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  1. Analysis of heart rate control to assess thermal sensitivity responses in Brazilian toads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E.S. Natali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In anurans, changes in ambient temperature influence body temperature and, therefore, energy consumption. These changes ultimately affect energy supply and, consequently, heart rate (HR. Typically, anurans living in different thermal environments have different thermal sensitivities, and these cannot be distinguished by changes in HR. We hypothesized that Rhinella jimi (a toad from a xeric environment that lives in a wide range of temperatures would have a lower thermal sensitivity regarding cardiac control than R. icterica (originally from a tropical forest environment with a more restricted range of ambient temperatures. Thermal sensitivity was assessed by comparing animals housed at 15° and 25°C. Cardiac control was estimated by heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate complexity (HRC. Differences in HRV between the two temperatures were not significant (P=0.214 for R. icterica and P=0.328 for R. jimi, whereas HRC differences were. All specimens but one R. jimi had a lower HRC at 15°C (all P<0.01. These results indicate that R. jimi has a lower thermal sensitivity and that cardiac control is not completely dependent on the thermal environment because HRC was not consistently different between temperatures in all R. jimi specimens. This result indicates a lack of evolutive trade-offs among temperatures given that heart rate control at 25°C is potentially not a constraint to heart rate control at 15°C.

  2. Analysis of heart rate control to assess thermal sensitivity responses in Brazilian toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, J E S; Santos, B T; Rodrigues, V H; Chauí-Berlinck, J G

    2015-01-01

    In anurans, changes in ambient temperature influence body temperature and, therefore, energy consumption. These changes ultimately affect energy supply and, consequently, heart rate (HR). Typically, anurans living in different thermal environments have different thermal sensitivities, and these cannot be distinguished by changes in HR. We hypothesized that Rhinella jimi (a toad from a xeric environment that lives in a wide range of temperatures) would have a lower thermal sensitivity regarding cardiac control than R. icterica (originally from a tropical forest environment with a more restricted range of ambient temperatures). Thermal sensitivity was assessed by comparing animals housed at 15° and 25°C. Cardiac control was estimated by heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate complexity (HRC). Differences in HRV between the two temperatures were not significant (P=0.214 for R. icterica and P=0.328 for R. jimi), whereas HRC differences were. All specimens but one R. jimi had a lower HRC at 15°C (all P<0.01). These results indicate that R. jimi has a lower thermal sensitivity and that cardiac control is not completely dependent on the thermal environment because HRC was not consistently different between temperatures in all R. jimi specimens. This result indicates a lack of evolutive trade-offs among temperatures given that heart rate control at 25°C is potentially not a constraint to heart rate control at 15°C.

  3. Measurement-based control of a mechanical oscillator at its thermal decoherence rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, D J; Sudhir, V; Piro, N; Schilling, R; Ghadimi, A; Kippenberg, T J

    2015-08-20

    In real-time quantum feedback protocols, the record of a continuous measurement is used to stabilize a desired quantum state. Recent years have seen successful applications of these protocols in a variety of well-isolated micro-systems, including microwave photons and superconducting qubits. However, stabilizing the quantum state of a tangibly massive object, such as a mechanical oscillator, remains very challenging: the main obstacle is environmental decoherence, which places stringent requirements on the timescale in which the state must be measured. Here we describe a position sensor that is capable of resolving the zero-point motion of a solid-state, 4.3-megahertz nanomechanical oscillator in the timescale of its thermal decoherence, a basic requirement for real-time (Markovian) quantum feedback control tasks, such as ground-state preparation. The sensor is based on evanescent optomechanical coupling to a high-Q microcavity, and achieves an imprecision four orders of magnitude below that at the standard quantum limit for a weak continuous position measurement--a 100-fold improvement over previous reports--while maintaining an imprecision-back-action product that is within a factor of five of the Heisenberg uncertainty limit. As a demonstration of its utility, we use the measurement as an error signal with which to feedback cool the oscillator. Using radiation pressure as an actuator, the oscillator is cold damped with high efficiency: from a cryogenic-bath temperature of 4.4 kelvin to an effective value of 1.1 ± 0.1 millikelvin, corresponding to a mean phonon number of 5.3 ± 0.6 (that is, a ground-state probability of 16 per cent). Our results set a new benchmark for the performance of a linear position sensor, and signal the emergence of mechanical oscillators as practical subjects for measurement-based quantum control.

  4. Efficacy and satisfaction rate comparing endometrial ablation by rollerball electrocoagulation to uterine balloon thermal ablation in a randomised controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zon-Rabelink, I.A.A. van; Vleugels, M.P.; Merkus, J.M.W.M.; Graaf, R.M. de

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two methods of endometrial ablation, hysteroscopic rollerball electrocoagulation (RBE) and non-hysteroscopic uterine balloon thermal ablation (Thermachoice trade mark ), regarding efficacy for reducing dysfunctional uterine bleeding and patients satisfaction rate. METHODS: A ra

  5. Spacecraft Design Thermal Control Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Robert N.

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the functions of the thermal control subsystem engineers in the design of spacecraft. The goal of the thermal control subsystem that will be used in a spacecraft is to maintain the temperature of all spacecraft components, subsystems, and all the flight systems within specified limits for all flight modes from launch to the end of the mission. For most thermal control subsystems the mass, power and control and sensing systems must be kept below 10% of the total flight system resources. This means that the thermal control engineer is involved in all other flight systems designs. The two concepts of thermal control, passive and active are reviewed and the use of thermal modeling tools are explained. The testing of the thermal control is also reviewed.

  6. Thermal Control Using Electrochromism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Hari; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    1999-01-01

    The applicability of a charge balanced electrochromic device to modulate the frequencies in the thermal infrared region is examined in this study. The device consisted of a transparent conductor, WO3, anode, PMMA/LiClO4 electrolyte, V2O5 cathode and transparent conductor. The supporting structure in the device is SnO2 coated glass and the edges are sealed with epoxy to reduce moisture absorption. The performance evaluation comprised of cyclic voltammetric measurements and determination of transmittance at various wavelengths. The device was subjected to anodic and cathodic polarization by sweeping the potential at a rate of 10 mV/sec from -0.8V to 1.8V. The current versus voltage profile indicated no reaction between -0.5 and +0.5 V. The device is colored green at 1.8 V with a transmittance of 5% at a wavelength, lambda = 900 nm and colorless at -0.8 V with a transmittance of 74% at lambda = 500 nm. The optical modulation is limited to 400-1500 nm and there is no activity in the thermal infrared. The switching time is a function of temperature and time for coloring reaction was slower than the bleaching reaction. The device yielded reproducible values for transmittance when cycled between colored and bleached states by application of 1.8V and -0.8V, respectively.

  7. Chemical preparation and thermal behavior of neodymium cyclotriphosphate pentahydrate NdP{sub 3}O{sub 9}.5H{sub 2}O: A study by Controlled Rate Thermal Analysis (CRTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahdi, Kais [Laboratoire d' Application de la Chimie aux Ressources et Substances Naturelles et a l' Environnement, Faculte des Sciences de Bizerte, Departement de Chimie, 7021 Zarzouna, Bizerte (Tunisia)], E-mail: k_nahdi@yahoo.fr; Ferid, Mokhtar; Ayadi, Malika Trabelsi [Unite de Materiaux de Terres Rares, Centre National de Recherches en Sciences des Materiaux, BP 95, Hammam-Lif, 2050 (Tunisia)

    2009-04-10

    A new neodymium cyclotriphosphate pentahydrate powder, NdP{sub 3}O{sub 9}.5H{sub 2}O, has been prepared using a classical chemistry method and characterized by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy techniques. The IR spectrum shows the characteristic bands of cyclotriphosphates as the triplet in the range 1055-1007-917 cm{sup -1}. The thermal behavior of the titled compound was also carried out using conventional thermal analysis techniques (TG and DSC) under air atmosphere and Controlled transformation Rate Thermal Analysis (CRTA) technique under constant water vapour pressure of 5 hPa. It was shown that thermal treatment in air, with linear heating rate of 10 K min{sup -1}, favourites the structure breakdown as soon as the release of water molecules starts. In this case an amorphous compound is obtained, which then crystallizes at 1073 K and gives the polyphosphate Nd(PO{sub 3}){sub 3}. However, by CRTA technique at P{sub H{sub 2}}{sub O}=5hPa, the water molecules are eliminated with a lower rate which permits to save the initial structure up to an advanced dehydration step. The breakdown of the initial structure is immediately followed by the crystallization of the anhydrous polyphosphate Nd(PO{sub 3}){sub 3} phase in the temperature range 455 K < T < 793 K.

  8. Optimal control in thermal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel

    2017-01-01

    This book is the first major work covering applications in thermal engineering and offering a comprehensive introduction to optimal control theory, which has applications in mechanical engineering, particularly aircraft and missile trajectory optimization. The book is organized in three parts: The first part includes a brief presentation of function optimization and variational calculus, while the second part presents a summary of the optimal control theory. Lastly, the third part describes several applications of optimal control theory in solving various thermal engineering problems. These applications are grouped in four sections: heat transfer and thermal energy storage, solar thermal engineering, heat engines and lubrication.Clearly presented and easy-to-use, it is a valuable resource for thermal engineers and thermal-system designers as well as postgraduate students.

  9. Possibilities of Thermal Systems Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata WAGNEROVÁ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes different approaches to thermal system control. Not only PID control but also sliding mode controls were used. In addition the different modifications of sliding mode control were used, such as extension with integral element or continuous substitution of sign function. Considering the thermal system allows applying cooling element, the control algorithm using cooling and heating parts was tested too. All designed algorithms were verified with help of computer simulation and also directly on laboratory stand. All used control algorithms ensured required temperature but with different control quality.

  10. Contamination Control for Thermal Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rachel B.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). This course will cover the basics of Contamination Control, including contamination control related failures, the effects of contamination on Flight Hardware, what contamination requirements translate to, design methodology, and implementing contamination control into Integration, Testing and Launch.

  11. Thermal dilepton rates from quenched lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, H -T; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F; Laermann, E; Mukherjee, S; Müller, M; Soeldner, W

    2013-01-01

    We present new lattice results on the continuum extrapolation of the vector current correlation function. Lattice calculations have been carried out in the deconfined phase at a temperature of 1.1 Tc, extending our previous results at 1.45 Tc, utilizing quenched non-perturbatively clover-improved Wilson fermions and light quark masses. A systematic analysis on multiple lattice spacings allows to perform the continuum limit of the correlation function and to extract spectral properties in the continuum limit. Our current analysis suggests the results for the electrical conductivity are proportional to the temperature and the thermal dilepton rates in the quark gluon plasma are comparable for both temperatures. Preliminary results of the continuum extrapolated correlation function at finite momenta, which relates to thermal photon rates, are also presented.

  12. Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-F) will evaluate, for the first time in a space environment, the performance of a feedback-controlled variable conductance heat pipe and a heat pipe thermal diode. In addition, the temperature control aspects of a phase-change material (PCM) will be demonstrated. The methanol/stainless steel feedback-controlled heat pipe uses helium control gas that is stored in a wicked reservoir. This reservoir is electrically heated through a solid state controller that senses the temperature of the heat source directly. The ammonia/stainless steel diode heat pipe uses excess liquid to block heat transfer in the reverse direction. The PCM is octadecane. Design tradeoffs, fabrication problems, and performance during qualification and flight acceptance tests are discussed.

  13. Liquid-circulating garment controls thermal balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetz, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data and mathematical model of human thermoregulatory system have been used to investigate use of liquid-circulatory garment (LCG) to control thermal balance. Model proved useful as accurate simulator of such variables as sweat rate, skin temperature, core temperature, and radiative, evaporative, and LCG heat loss.

  14. Advanced thermal control for spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert; Parker, Kelsey

    2015-09-01

    In optical systems just like any other space borne system, thermal control plays an important role. In fact, most advanced designs are plagued with volume constraints that further complicate the thermal control challenges for even the most experienced systems engineers. Peregrine will present advances in satellite thermal control based upon passive heat transfer technologies to dissipate large thermal loads. This will address the use of 700 W/m K and higher conducting products that are five times better than aluminum on a specific basis providing enabling thermal control while maintaining structural support.

  15. Heat transfer and thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosbie, A. L.

    Radiation heat transfer is considered along with conduction heat transfer, heat pipes, and thermal control. Attention is given to the radiative properties of a painted layer containing nonspherical pigment, bidirectional reflectance measurements of specular and diffuse surfaces with a simple spectrometer, the radiative equilibrium in a general plane-parallel environment, and the application of finite-element techniques to the interaction of conduction and radiation in participating medium, a finite-element approach to combined conductive and radiative heat transfer in a planar medium. Heat transfer in irradiated shallow layers of water, an analytical and experimental investigation of temperature distribution in laser heated gases, numerical methods for the analysis of laser annealing of doped semiconductor wafers, and approximate solutions of transient heat conduction in a finite slab are also examined. Consideration is also given to performance testing of a hydrogen heat pipe, heat pipe performance with gravity assist and liquid overfill, vapor chambers for an atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a prototype heat pipe radiator for the German Direct Broadcasting TV Satellite, free convection in enclosures exposed to compressive heating, and a thermal analysis of a multipurpose furnace for material processing in space.

  16. Control Optimization of Solar Thermally Driven Chillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Dalibard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many installed solar thermally driven cooling systems suffer from high auxiliary electric energy consumption which makes them not more efficient than conventional compression cooling systems. A main reason for this is the use of non-efficient controls with constant set points that do not allow a chiller power modulation at partial-load and therefore lead to unnecessary high power consumption of the parasitics. The aims of this paper are to present a method to control efficiently solar thermally driven chillers, to demonstrate experimentally its applicability and to quantify the benefits. It has been shown that the cooling capacity of a diffusion absorption chiller can be modulated very effectively by adjusting both the temperature and the flow rate of the cooling water. With the developed approach and the use of optimization algorithms, both the temperature and the flow rate can be controlled simultaneously in a way that the cooling load is matched and the electricity consumption is minimized. Depending on the weather and operating conditions, electricity savings between 20% and 60% can be achieved compared to other tested control approaches. The highest savings are obtained when the chiller is operated at partial load. The presented method is not restricted to solar cooling systems and can also be applied to other conventional heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC systems.

  17. Thermal control structure and garment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klett, James W [Knoxville, TN; Cameron, Christopher Stan [Sanford, NC

    2012-03-13

    A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

  18. Pilot point temperature regulation for thermal lesion control during ultrasound thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H L; Chen, Y Y; Yen, J Y; Lin, W L

    2004-03-01

    The fundamental goal of ultrasound thermal therapy is to provide proper thermal lesion formations for effective tumour treatment. The quality of the therapy depends mostly on its positional precision. To date, most ultrasound thermal therapy treatments have focused on the formation of power or temperature patterns. The non-linear and time-delay effects of thermal dose formation prohibit direct control of the thermal dose distribution. In the paper, the control of thermal lesions by regulation of the temperature of a pilot point is proposed. This scheme utilises the high correlation between temperature elevation and thermal dose at the forward boundary of thermal lesions. To verify the feasibility, a 2D ultrasound phased array system was used to generate thermal lesions of various sizes, and the temperature elevation required to generate a thermal dose threshold was investigated. Results showed that the required temperature elevation was found to be a reasonably constant value of 52.5 degrees C under differing conditions when the focal area was small. When the focal area under consideration was large, the required temperature elevation became a monotonic function of blood perfusion rate, ranging from 49.2 to 52.5 degrees C. When the reference temperature of the pilot point was set at a conservative value (52.5 degrees C), the thermal lesions were controlled precisely under a wide range of blood perfusion and power pattern changes, tested by using a more realistic model that takes into account thermal-induced attenuation and blood perfusion changes. This changed the complex thermal dose control problem into a simple temperature regulation problem, which makes implementation of thermal lesion control easier, giving the scheme a high potential for application to current ultrasound thermal therapy systems.

  19. Predictive Thermal Control Technology for Stable Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    Predictive Thermal Control (PTC) project is a multiyear effort to develop, demonstrate, mature towards TRL6, and assess the utility of model based Predictive Thermal Control technology to enable a thermally stable telescope. PTC demonstrates technology maturation by model validation and characterization testing of traceable components in a relevant environment. PTC's efforts are conducted in consultation with the Cosmic Origins Office and NASA Program Analysis Groups. To mature Thermally Stable Telescope technology, PTC has three objectives: • Validate models that predict thermal optical performance of real mirrors and structure based on their designs and constituent material properties, i.e. coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) distribution, thermal conductivity, thermal mass, etc. • Derive thermal system stability specifications from wavefront stability requirements. • Demonstrate utility of Predictive Thermal Control for achieving thermal stability. To achieve these objectives, PTC has five quantifiable milestones: 1. Develop a high-fidelity model of the AMTD-2 1.5 meter ULE® mirror, including 3D CTE distribution and reflective optical coating, that predicts its optical performance response to steady-state and dynamic thermal gradients under bang/bang and proportional thermal control. 2. Derive specifications for thermal control system as a function of wavefront stability. 3. Design and build a predictive Thermal Control System for a 1.5 meter ULE® mirror using new and existing commercial-off-the-shelf components that sense temperature changes at the 1mK level and actively controls the mirrors thermal environment at the 20mK level. 4. Validate the model by testing a 1.5-m class ULE® mirror in a relevant thermal vacuum environment in the MSFC X-ray and Cryogenic Facility (XRCF) test facility. 5. Use validated model to perform trade studies to optimize thermo-optical performance as a function of mirror design, material selection, mass, etc. PTC advances

  20. Thermal Imaging Control of Furnaces and Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David M. Rue; Serguei Zelepouga; Ishwar K. Puri

    2003-02-28

    The object if this project is to demonstrate and bring to commercial readiness a near-infrared thermal imaging control system for high temperature furnaces and combustors. The thermal imaging control system, including hardware, signal processing, and control software, is designed to be rugged, self-calibrating, easy to install, and relatively transparent to the furnace operator.

  1. Transient thermal camouflage and heat signature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Zhi; Su, Yishu; Xu, Weikai; Yang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials have been proposed to manipulate heat flux as a new way to cloak or camouflage objects in the infrared world. To date, however, thermal metamaterials only operate in the steady-state and exhibit detectable, transient heat signatures. In this letter, the theoretical basis for a thermal camouflaging technique with controlled transient diffusion is presented. This technique renders an object invisible in real time. More importantly, the thermal camouflaging device instantaneously generates a pre-designed heat signature and behaves as a perfect thermal illusion device. A metamaterial coating with homogeneous and isotropic thermal conductivity, density, and volumetric heat capacity was fabricated and very good camouflaging performance was achieved.

  2. Heat transfer, thermal control, and heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olstad, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    This volume provides information on recent progress in spacecraft thermal control and the supporting disciplines of conduction, thermal radiation, and heat pipe theory and application. Four problem areas are considered: conduction heat transfer, radiation heat transfer, thermal control, and heat pipes. The topics covered include finite-element methodology for transient conduction/forced-convection thermal analysis; effects of surface finish on thermal contact resistance between different materials; mathematical models for wide-band nongray gas radiation in spherical and cylindrical geometries; thermal design, analysis and testing of the Shuttle remote manipulator arm; porous heat pipe; and transient behavior of liquid trap heat-pipe thermal diodes. Also discussed is the thermal design concept for a high-resolution UV spectrometer.

  3. Effects of carbon content and solidification rate on thermal conductivity of grey cast iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The thermal conductivity or diffusivity of pearlitic grey irons with various carbon contents is investigated by the laser flash method. The materials are cast in controlled thermal environments and produced in three dissimilar cooling rates. The cooling rate together with the carbon content largely influence the thermal conductivity of grey iron. Linear relationships exist between the thermal conductivity and the carbon content, the carbon equivalent and the fraction of former primary solidified austenite transformed into pearlite. The work shows that optimal thermal transport properties are obtained at medium cooling rates. Equations describing the thermal conductivity of pearlite,solidified as pre-eutectic austenite, and the eutectic of grey iron are derived. The thermal conductivity of pearlitic grey iron is modeled at both room temperature and elevated temperature with good accuracy.

  4. Effects of Carbon Content and Solidification Rate on the Thermal Conductivity of Grey Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Holmgren; Attila Diószegi; Ingvar L.Svensson

    2008-01-01

    The thermal conductivity/diffusivity of pearlitic grey irons with various carbon contents was investi- gated by the laser flash method. The materials were cast in controlled thermal environments producing three dissimilar cooling rates. The cooling rates together with the carbon content largely influence the thermal conductivity of grey iron. Linear relationships exist between the thermal conductivity and the carbon content, the carbon equivalent, and the fraction of the former primary solidified austenite transformed into pearlite. The results show that the optimal thermal transport properties are obtained at medium cooling rates. Equa- tions are given for the thermal conductivity of pearlite, solidified as pre-eutectic austenite, and the eutectic of grey iron. The thermal conductivity of pearlitic grey iron is modelled at both room temperature and elevated temperatures with good accuracy.

  5. Effects of carbon content and solidification rate on thermal conductivity of grey cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Holmgren

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity or diffusivity of pearlitic grey irons with various carbon contents is investigated by the laser flash method. The materials are cast in controlled thermal environments and produced in three dissimilar cooling rates. The cooling rate together with the carbon content largely influence the thermal conductivity of grey iron. Linear relationships exist between the thermal conductivity and the carbon content, the carbon equivalent and the fraction of former primary solidified austenite transformed into pearlite. The work shows that optimal thermal transport properties are obtained at medium cooling rates. Equations describing the thermal conductivity of pearlite,solidified as pre-eutectic austenite, and the eutectic of grey iron are derived. The thermal conductivity of pearlitic grey iron is modeled at both room temperature and elevated temperature with good accuracy.

  6. Thermal Management Controller for Heat Source Temperature Control and Thermal Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGFU Yi; WU Jing-yi; WANG Ru-zhu; LI Sheng

    2009-01-01

    In many heat recovery processes, temperature control of heat source is often required to ensure safety and high efficiency of the heat source equipment. In addition, the management of recovered heat is important for the proper use of waste heat. To this aim, the concept of thermal management controller (TMC), which can vary heat transfer rate via the volume variation of non-condensable gas, was presented. Theoretical model and experimental prototype were established. Investigation shows that the prototype is effective in temperature control. With water as the working fluid, the vapor temperature variation is only 1.3 ℃ when the heating power varies from 2.5 to 10.0 kW. In variable working conditions, this TMC can automatically adjust thermal allocation to the heat consumer.

  7. Thermal processing of foods: control and automation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandeep, K. P

    2011-01-01

    .... In addition to validating new control systems, some food companies have started the more difficult task of validating legacy control systems that have been operating for a number of years on retorts or aseptic systems.Thermal Processing...

  8. Embedded Thermal Control for Spacecraft Subsystems Miniaturization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of spacecraft size, weight and power (SWaP) resources is an explicit technical priority at Goddard Space Flight Center. Embedded Thermal Control Subsystems are a promising technology with many cross cutting NSAA, DoD and commercial applications: 1.) CubeSatSmallSat spacecraft architecture, 2.) high performance computing, 3.) On-board spacecraft electronics, 4.) Power electronics and RF arrays. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem technology development efforts focus on component, board and enclosure level devices that will ultimately include intelligent capabilities. The presentation will discuss electric, capillary and hybrid based hardware research and development efforts at Goddard Space Flight Center. The Embedded Thermal Control Subsystem development program consists of interrelated sub-initiatives, e.g., chip component level thermal control devices, self-sensing thermal management, advanced manufactured structures. This presentation includes technical status and progress on each of these investigations. Future sub-initiatives, technical milestones and program goals will be presented.

  9. Lattice constraints on the thermal photon rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiglieri, J.; Kaczmarek, O.; Laine, M.; Meyer, F.

    2016-07-01

    We estimate the photon production rate from an SU(3) plasma at temperatures of about 1.1 Tc and 1.3 Tc . Lattice results for the vector current correlator at spatial momenta k ˜(2 -6 )T are extrapolated to the continuum limit and analyzed with the help of a polynomial interpolation for the corresponding spectral function, which vanishes at zero frequency and matches to high-precision perturbative results at large invariant masses. For small invariant masses the interpolation is compared with the next-to-leading-order (NLO) weak-coupling result, hydrodynamics, and a holographic model. At vanishing invariant mass we extract the photon rate which for k ≳3 T is found to be close to the NLO weak-coupling prediction. For k ≲2 T uncertainties remain large but the photon rate is likely to fall below the NLO prediction, in accordance with the onset of a strongly interacting behavior characteristic of the hydrodynamic regime.

  10. Lattice constraints on the thermal photon rate

    CERN Document Server

    Ghiglieri, J; Laine, M; Meyer, F

    2016-01-01

    We estimate the photon production rate from an SU(3) plasma at temperatures of about 1.1Tc and 1.3Tc. Lattice results for the vector current correlator at spatial momenta k ~ (2-6)T are extrapolated to the continuum limit and analyzed with the help of a polynomial interpolation for the corresponding spectral function, which vanishes at zero frequency and matches to high-precision perturbative results at large invariant masses. For small invariant masses the interpolation is compared with the NLO weak-coupling result, hydrodynamics, and a holographic model. At vanishing invariant mass we extract the photon rate which for k \\gsim 3T is found to be close to the NLO weak-coupling prediction. For k \\lsim 2T uncertainties remain large but the photon rate is likely to fall below the NLO prediction, in accordance with the onset of a strongly interacting behaviour characteristic of the hydrodynamic regime.

  11. Sliding Mode Thermal Control System for Space Station Furnace Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson Mark E.; Shtessel, Yuri B.

    1998-01-01

    The decoupled control of the nonlinear, multiinput-multioutput, and highly coupled space station furnace facility (SSFF) thermal control system is addressed. Sliding mode control theory, a subset of variable-structure control theory, is employed to increase the performance, robustness, and reliability of the SSFF's currently designed control system. This paper presents the nonlinear thermal control system description and develops the sliding mode controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to operate in their local sliding modes, resulting in control system invariance to plant uncertainties and external and interaction disturbances. The desired decoupled flow-rate tracking is achieved by optimization of the local linear sliding mode equations. The controllers are implemented digitally and extensive simulation results are presented to show the flow-rate tracking robustness and invariance to plant uncertainties, nonlinearities, external disturbances, and variations of the system pressure supplied to the controlled subsystems.

  12. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  13. Control strategies in a thermal oil - Molten salt heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Lidia; Bonilla, Javier; Rodríguez-García, Margarita M.; Palenzuela, Patricia; de la Calle, Alberto; Valenzuela, Loreto

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a preliminary control scheme for a molten salt - thermal oil heat exchanger. This controller regulates the molten salt mass flow rate to reach and maintain the desired thermal oil temperature at the outlet of the heat exchanger. The controller architecture has been tested using an object-oriented heat exchanger model that has been validated with data from a molten salt testing facility located at CIEMAT-PSA. Different simulations are presented with three different goals: i) to analyze the controller response in the presence of disturbances, ii) to demonstrate the benefits of designing a setpoint generator and iii) to show the controller potential against electricity price variations.

  14. Rates of fluvio-thermal erosion on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Puente, J.; Costard, Francois M.; Posado-Cano, R.

    1993-01-01

    In order to get some ideas about the order of magnitude of fluvio-thermal recession rate, a mathematical thermal model for Martian outflow channels is proposed. This model corresponds to a system undergoing a permanent thermal regime where the surface temperature is constant and equal to the phase change temperature (due to the immediate removal of melted materials). This is an ablation model. For its application, estimations of the heat transfer coefficient h and thermal flux q are necessary. Determination of these coefficients needs the calculation of dimensionless numbers (Reynolds, Prandtl, and Nusselt), and the consideration of turbulent regime of the flow.

  15. Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2016-05-03

    Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage apparatus controller includes processing circuitry configured to access first information which is indicative of surpluses and deficiencies of electrical energy upon an electrical power system at a plurality of moments in time, access second information which is indicative of temperature of a thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time, and use the first and second information to control an amount of electrical energy which is utilized by a heating element to heat the thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time.

  16. Environmental Control Unit with Integral Thermal Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-12

    integrated PCM Heat Exchanger (PHX) to provide thermal energy storage. By storing thermal energy during the hottest part of the day and rejecting this stored...Environmental Control Unit (ECU) that uses an integrated PCM Heat Exchanger (PHX) to provide thermal energy storage. To aid in the development of the PHX... Thermal Storage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911QX-14-C-0014 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael C. Ellis Ryan McDevitt 5d

  17. Variable emissivity laser thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Joseph R.

    1994-01-01

    A laser thermal control system for a metal vapor laser maintains the wall mperature of the laser at a desired level by changing the effective emissivity of the water cooling jacket. This capability increases the overall efficiency of the laser.

  18. Integration and software for thermal test of heat rate sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Shrider, K. R.

    1982-04-01

    A minicomputer controlled radiant test facility is described which was developed and calibrated in an effort to verify analytical thermal models of instrumentation islands installed aboard the space shuttle external tank to measure thermal flight parameters during ascent. Software was provided for the facility as well as for development tests on the SRB actuator tail stock. Additional testing was conducted with the test facility to determine the temperature and heat flux rate and loads required to effect a change of color in the ET tank external paint. This requirement resulted from the review of photographs taken of the ET at separation from the orbiter which showed that 75% of the external tank paint coating had not changed color from its original white color. The paint on the remaining 25% of the tank was either brown or black, indicating that it had degraded due to heating or that the spray on form insulation had receded in these areas. The operational capability of the facility as well as the various tests which were conducted and their results are discussed.

  19. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  20. Control of Thermal Meat Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffis, Carl L.; Osaili, Tareq M.

    The recent growth of the market for ready-to-eat (RTE) meat and poultry products has led to serious concern over foodborne illnesses due to the presence of pathogens, particularly Salmonella spp, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in meat and poultry products. Emphasis has been placed on thermal processing since heat treatment is still considered the primary means of eliminating foodborne pathogens from raw meat and poultry products (Juneja, Eblen, & Ransom, 2001). Inadequate time/temperature exposure during cooking is a contributing factor in food poisoning outbreaks. Optimal heat treatment is required not only to destroy pathogenic microorganisms in meat and poultry products but also to maintain desirable food quality and product yield.

  1. JPL Advanced Thermal Control Technology Roadmap - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birur, Gaj

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of thermal control technology at JPL and NASA.It shows the active spacecraft that are in vairous positions in the solar syatem, and beyond the solar system and the future missions that are under development. It then describes the challenges that the past missions posed with the thermal control systems. The various solutions that were implemented duirng the decades prior to 1990 are outlined. A review of hte thermal challenges of the future misions is also included. The exploration plan for Mars is then reviewed. The thermal challenges of the Mars Rovers are then outlined. Also the challenges of systems that would be able to be used in to explore Venus, and Titan are described. The future space telescope missions will also need thermal control technological advances. Included is a review of the thermal requirements for manned missions to the Moon. Both Active and passive technologies that have been used and will be used are reviewed. Those that are described are Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loops (MPFL), Loop Heat Pipes, an M3 Passive Cooler, Heat Siwtch for Space and Mars surface applications, phase change material (PCM) technology, a Gas Gap Actuateor using ZrNiH(x), the Planck Sorption Cooler (PCS), vapor compression -- Hybrid two phase loops, advanced pumps for two phase cooling loops, and heat pumps that are lightweight and energy efficient.

  2. Proportional and Integral Thermal Control System for Large Scale Heating Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Van Tran

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) Flight Loads Laboratory is a unique national laboratory that supports thermal, mechanical, thermal/mechanical, and structural dynamics research and testing. A Proportional Integral thermal control system was designed and implemented to support thermal tests. A thermal control algorithm supporting a quartz lamp heater was developed based on the Proportional Integral control concept and a linearized heating process. The thermal control equations were derived and expressed in terms of power levels, integral gain, proportional gain, and differences between thermal setpoints and skin temperatures. Besides the derived equations, user's predefined thermal test information generated in the form of thermal maps was used to implement the thermal control system capabilities. Graphite heater closed-loop thermal control and graphite heater open-loop power level were added later to fulfill the demand for higher temperature tests. Verification and validation tests were performed to ensure that the thermal control system requirements were achieved. This thermal control system has successfully supported many milestone thermal and thermal/mechanical tests for almost a decade with temperatures ranging from 50 F to 3000 F and temperature rise rates from -10 F/s to 70 F/s for a variety of test articles having unique thermal profiles and test setups.

  3. Rate of thermal transitions in kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liashko, S. Y.; Uzdin, V. M.; Jónsson, H.

    2016-08-01

    The rate of thermal transitions in a kagome spin ice element is calculated using harmonic transition state theory for magnetic systems. Each element consists of six prolate magnetic islands. Minimum energy paths on the multidimensional energy surface are found to estimate activation energy. Vibrational frequencies are also calculated to estimate the rate of the various transitions. An overall transition rate between equivalent ground states is calculated by using the stationary state approximation including all possible transition paths. The resulting transition rate is in a good agreement with experimentally measured lifetime.

  4. Controlling automobile thermal comfort using optimized fuzzy controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzaneh, Yadollah; Tootoonchi, Ali A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran)

    2008-10-15

    Providing thermal comfort and saving energy are two main goals of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. A controller with temperature feedback cannot best achieve the thermal comfort. This is because thermal comfort is influenced by many variables such as, temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, environment radiation, activity level and cloths insulation. In this study Fanger's predicted mean value (PMV) index is used as controller feedback. It is simplified without introducing significant error. Thermal models of the cabin and HVAC system are developed. Evaporator cooling capacity is selected as a criterion for energy consumption. Two fuzzy controllers one with temperature as its feedback and the other PMV index as its feedback are designed. Results show that the PMV feedback controller better controls the thermal comfort and energy consumption than the system with temperature feedback. Next, the parameters of the fuzzy controller are optimized by genetic algorithm. Results indicate that thermal comfort level is further increased while energy consumption is decreased. Finally, robustness analysis is performed which shows the robustness of optimized controller to variables variations. (author)

  5. Friction at seismic slip rates: testing thermal weakening models experimentally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S. B.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Recent experiments systematically explore rock friction under crustal earthquake conditions (fast slip rate 1desing an efficient and accurate wavenumber approximation for a solution of the temperature evolution on the fault. Finally, we propose a compact and paractical model based on a small number of memory variables for the implementation of thermal weakening friction in seismic fault simulations.

  6. Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, J. L.; Fogal, G. L.; Scollon, T. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents the development background and the present status of the Atmospheric Cloud Physics Laboratory (ACPL) thermal control capability. The ACPL, a Spacelab payload, is currently in the initial flight hardware development phase for a first flight scheduled in June 1981. The ACPL is intended as a facility for conducting a wide variety of cloud microphysics experimentation under zero gravity conditions. The cloud chambers, which are key elements of the ACPL, have stringent thermal requirements. Thus the expansion chamber inner walls must be uniform to within + or - 0.1 C during both steady-state and transient operation over a temperature range of +30 to -25 C. Design progression of the expansion chamber, from early in-house NASA-MSFC concepts (including test results of a prototype chamber) to a thermal control concept currently under development, is discussed.

  7. Controllability analysis of thermally coupled distillation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, S.; Jimenez, A.

    1999-10-01

    A comparison of the controllability properties of three thermally coupled distillation sequences (Petlyuk, sequence with side rectifier, and sequence with side stripper) using singular value decomposition is developed. Those properties are also compared to the energy consumption required for separating ternary mixtures. The parameters obtained via singular value decomposition show that sequences with a side rectifier or a side stripper have better control properties than the Petlyuk system, although the Petlyuk scheme has lower energy requirements than the systems with side columns.

  8. Evaluation of Instrumentation and Dynamic Thermal Ratings for Overhead Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, A. [New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States)

    2013-01-31

    In 2010, a project was initiated through a partnership between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the New York Power Authority (NYPA) to evaluate EPRI's rating technology and instrumentation that can be used to monitor the thermal states of transmission lines and provide the required real-time data for real-time rating calculations. The project included the installation and maintenance of various instruments at three 230 kV line sites in northern New York. The instruments were monitored, and data collection and rating calculations were performed for about a three year period.

  9. Thermal control of the GRASP detector section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, P. B.

    1988-12-01

    The necessity of keeping GRASP telescope (Gamma Ray Astronomy with Spectroscopy and Positioning) detectors at working temperatures within an adequate range (85 + or - 15 K for the germanium and 283 + or - 20 K for CsI) is discussed. Thermal control based in cryogenic liquid tanks is not considered the most suitable solution because of mass and lifetime considerations. Instead of this conventional solution, a concept using a combination of passive and active cooling systems was chosen. It combines the features of a corrugated radiator panel, thermal shields, MLI blankets, and an extra cooling system based on the Stirling cycle engine.

  10. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  11. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  12. Black hole thermalization rate from brane anti-brane model

    CERN Document Server

    Lifschytz, G

    2004-01-01

    We develop the quasi-particle picture for Schwarzchild and far from extremal black holes. We show that the thermalization equations of the black hole is recovered from the model of branes and anti-branes. This can also be viewed as a field theory explanation of the relationship between area and entropy for these black holes. As a by product the annihilation rate of branes and anti-branes is computed.

  13. Black hole thermalization rate from brane anti-brane model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lifschytz, Gilad E-mail: giladl@research.haifa.ac.il

    2004-08-01

    We develop the quasi-particle picture for Schwarzchild and far from extremal black holes. We show that the thermalization equations of the black hole is recovered from the model of branes and anti-branes. This can also be viewed as a field theory explanation of the relationship between area and entropy for these black holes. As a by product the annihilation rate of branes and anti-branes is computed. (author)

  14. Growth and development rates have different thermal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Jack; Hirst, Andrew G; Woodward, Guy

    2011-11-01

    Growth and development rates are fundamental to all living organisms. In a warming world, it is important to determine how these rates will respond to increasing temperatures. It is often assumed that the thermal responses of physiological rates are coupled to metabolic rate and thus have the same temperature dependence. However, the existence of the temperature-size rule suggests that intraspecific growth and development are decoupled. Decoupling of these rates would have important consequences for individual species and ecosystems, yet this has not been tested systematically across a range of species. We conducted an analysis on growth and development rate data compiled from the literature for a well-studied group, marine pelagic copepods, and use an information-theoretic approach to test which equations best describe these rates. Growth and development rates were best characterized by models with significantly different parameters: development has stronger temperature dependence than does growth across all life stages. As such, it is incorrect to assume that these rates have the same temperature dependence. We used the best-fit models for these rates to predict changes in organism mass in response to temperature. These predictions follow a concave relationship, which complicates attempts to model the impacts of increasing global temperatures on species body size.

  15. Thermal analysis and control of electronic equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, A. D.; Bar-Cohen, A.

    The application of thermal control techniques to the cooling of electronic components is examined from theoretical and practical points of view. The electronic-thermal-control (ETC) problem and the physical and conceptual restraints on its solution are characterized, with a focus on the goal of system reliability. The fundamentals of heat transfer and fluid mechanics are discussed, including steady-state and transient conduction, convection, radiation, phase-change processes, contact resistance, heat exchangers, air handling, and dimensional analysis. Mathematical models and empirical correlations are explored for such ETC techniques as direct air cooling, extended surfaces, cold plates, immersion cooling, heat pipes, and thermoelectric coolers. Specific ETC applications to inertial equipment, transistors, vacuum tubes, microwave equipment, microelectronics, and printed-circuit boards are considered.

  16. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  17. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Stanley V.; Savoie, Margarita T.; Hundal, Rolv

    1993-06-01

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation.

  18. An Iris Mechanism Driven Temperature Control of Solar Thermal Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Langenbergh, Lode; Ophoff, Cédric; Ozalp, Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    In spite of their attraction for clean production of fuels and commodities; solar thermal reactors are challenged by the transient nature of solar energy. Control of reactor temperature during transient periods is the key factor to maintain solar reactor performance. Currently, there are few techniques that are being used to accommodate the fluctuations of incoming solar radiation. One of the commonly practiced methods is to adjust the mass flow rate of the feedstock which is very simple to i...

  19. Orbital Thermal Control of the Mercury Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Kenneth C.

    1960-01-01

    The approach to orbital thermal control of the Project Mercury capsule environment is relatively unsophisticated compared with that for many unmanned satellites. This is made possible by the relatively short orbital flight of about 4 1/2 hours and by the presence of the astronaut who is able to monitor the capsule systems and compensate for undesirable thermal conditions. The general external features of the Mercury configuration as it appears in the orbital phase of flight are shown. The conical afterbody is a double-wall structure. The inner wall serves as a pressure vessel for the manned compartment, and the outer wall, of shingle type construction, acts as a radiating shield during reentry. Surface treatment of the shingles calls for a stably oxidized surface to minimize reentry temperatures. The shingles are supported by insulated stringers attached to the inner skin. Areas between stringers are insulated by blankets of Thermoflex insulation. This insulation is especially effective at high altitude due to the reduction of its thermal conductivity with decreasing pressure. As a result of the design of the afterbody for the severe reentry conditions, the heat balance on the manned compartment indicates the necessity for moderate internal cooling to compensate for the heat generation due to human and electrical sources. This cooling is achieved by the controlled vaporization of water in the cabin and astronaut-suit heat exchangers.

  20. Thermal Performance of ATLAS Laser Thermal Control System Demonstration Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung; Robinson, Franklin; Patel, Deepak; Ottenstein, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The second Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite mission currently planned by National Aeronautics and Space Administration will measure global ice topography and canopy height using the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System {ATLAS). The ATLAS comprises two lasers; but only one will be used at a time. Each laser will generate between 125 watts and 250 watts of heat, and each laser has its own optimal operating temperature that must be maintained within plus or minus 1 degree Centigrade accuracy by the Laser Thermal Control System (LTCS) consisting of a constant conductance heat pipe (CCHP), a loop heat pipe (LHP) and a radiator. The heat generated by the laser is acquired by the CCHP and transferred to the LHP, which delivers the heat to the radiator for ultimate rejection. The radiator can be exposed to temperatures between minus 71 degrees Centigrade and minus 93 degrees Centigrade. The two lasers can have different operating temperatures varying between plus 15 degrees Centigrade and plus 30 degrees Centigrade, and their operating temperatures are not known while the LTCS is being designed and built. Major challenges of the LTCS include: 1) A single thermal control system must maintain the ATLAS at 15 degrees Centigrade with 250 watts heat load and minus 71 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature, and maintain the ATLAS at plus 30 degrees Centigrade with 125 watts heat load and minus 93 degrees Centigrade radiator sink temperature. Furthermore, the LTCS must be qualification tested to maintain the ATLAS between plus 10 degrees Centigrade and plus 35 degrees Centigrade. 2) The LTCS must be shut down to ensure that the ATLAS can be maintained above its lowest desirable temperature of minus 2 degrees Centigrade during the survival mode. No software control algorithm for LTCS can be activated during survival and only thermostats can be used. 3) The radiator must be kept above minus 65 degrees Centigrade to prevent ammonia from freezing using no more

  1. Rate Constant Calculation for Thermal Reactions Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    DaCosta, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Providing an overview of the latest computational approaches to estimate rate constants for thermal reactions, this book addresses the theories behind various first-principle and approximation methods that have emerged in the last twenty years with validation examples. It presents in-depth applications of those theories to a wide range of basic and applied research areas. When doing modeling and simulation of chemical reactions (as in many other cases), one often has to compromise between higher-accuracy/higher-precision approaches (which are usually time-consuming) and approximate/lower-preci

  2. Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation : Successful and Failed Strict Rate Control Against a Background of Lenient Rate Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenveld, Hessel F.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Hillege, Hans L.; Alings, Marco; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to investigate differences in outcome between patients treated with successful strict, failed strict, and lenient rate control. Background The RACE II (Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation) study showed no difference in outcome between lenient and stric

  3. Porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, H.; King, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a highly adherent, low solar absorptance, porcelain enamel thermal control coating applied to 6061 and 1100 aluminum for space vehicle use. The coating consists of a low index of refraction, transparent host frit and a high volume fraction of titania as rutile, crystallized in-situ, as the scattering medium. Solar absorptance is 0.21 at a coating thickness of 0.013 cm. Hemispherical emittance is 0.88. The change in solar absorptance is 0.03, as measured in-situ, after an exposure of 1000 equivalent sun hours in vacuum.

  4. Preliminary control system design and analysis for the Space Station Furnace Facility thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. E.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) thermal control system (TCS) preliminary control system design and analysis. The SSFF provides the necessary core systems to operate various materials processing furnaces. The TCS is defined as one of the core systems, and its function is to collect excess heat from furnaces and to provide precise cold temperature control of components and of certain furnace zones. Physical interconnection of parallel thermal control subsystems through a common pump implies the description of the TCS by coupled nonlinear differential equations in pressure and flow. This report formulates the system equations and develops the controllers that cause the interconnected subsystems to satisfy flow rate tracking requirements. Extensive digital simulation results are presented to show the flow rate tracking performance.

  5. Thermal Stress and Residual Stress Control of Thermally Sprayed 80Ni20Cr Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Setoguchi, Katsuya; Hiraki, Kunihiro

    1999-01-01

    In order to find an effective method to control the residual coating stress after thermal spraying, an analysis and experiment were carried out on a cylindrical member of 80Ni20Cr/SUS304. Temperature measurements during the processes of thermal spraying, heating and cold thermal shock were carried out. Using these measured results, thermal stress analyses were perfomed by the finite element method(FEM) and a proposed simplified method for estimating the coating stress. Thermal stress of the c...

  6. Sliding Mode Control of a Thermal Mixing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Hanz; Figueroa, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we consider the robust control of a thermal mixer using multivariable Sliding Mode Control (SMC). The mixer consists of a mixing chamber, hot and cold fluid valves, and an exit valve. The commanded positions of the three valves are the available control inputs, while the controlled variables are total mass flow rate, chamber pressure and the density of the mixture inside the chamber. Unsteady thermodynamics and linear valve models are used in deriving a 5th order nonlinear system with three inputs and three outputs, An SMC controller is designed to achieve robust output tracking in the presence of unknown energy losses between the chamber and the environment. The usefulness of the technique is illustrated with a simulation.

  7. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Koshi Takenaka

    2012-01-01

    Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K−1. Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining pra...

  8. Controlled rejuvenation of amorphous metals with thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeda, Masato; Saida, Junji; Li, Ju; Ogata, Shigenobu

    2015-05-26

    Rejuvenation is the configurational excitation of amorphous materials and is one of the more promising approaches for improving the deformability of amorphous metals that usually exhibit macroscopic brittle fracture modes. Here, we propose a method to control the level of rejuvenation through systematic thermal processing and clarify the crucial feasibility conditions by means of molecular dynamics simulations of annealing and quenching. We also experimentally demonstrate rejuvenation level control in Zr(55)Al(10)Ni(5)Cu(30) bulk metallic glass. Our local heat-treatment recipe (rising temperature above 1.1T(g), followed by a temperature quench rate exceeding the previous) opens avenue to modifying the glass properties after it has been cast and processed into near component shape, where a higher local cooling rate may be afforded by for example transient laser heating, adding spatial control and great flexibility to the processing.

  9. Estimating river discharge rates through remotely sensed thermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Najm, M.; Alameddine, I.; Ibrahim, E.; Nasr, R.

    2016-12-01

    An empirical relationship is developed for estimating river discharge rates from remotely sensed thermal plumes that generate due to the temperature gradient at the interface between rivers and large water bodies. The method first determines the plumes' near field area, length scale, and length scale deviation angle from river channel centerline from Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite images. It also makes use of mean river and ocean temperatures and tidal levels collected from NOAA. A multiple linear regression model is then used to predict measured daily discharge rates with the determined predictors. The approach is tested and validated with discharge rates collected from four USGS gauged rivers in Oregon and California. Results from 116 Landsat 7 ETM+ satellites images of the four rivers show that the standard error of the discharge estimates were within a factor of 1.5-2.0 of observed values, with mean estimate accuracy of 10%. Goodness of fit (R2) ranged from 0.51 for the Rogue River up to 0.64 for the Coquille and Siuslaw rivers. The method offers an opportunity to monitor changes in flow discharge in ungauged basins, where tidal flow is not dominating and where a temperature difference of 2 oC exists between the river and the receiving water body.

  10. Rapid control and feedback rates enhance neuroprosthetic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M.; Orsborn, Amy L.; Moorman, Helene G.; Gowda, Suraj; Dangi, Siddharth; Carmena, Jose M.

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) create novel sensorimotor pathways for action. Much as the sensorimotor apparatus shapes natural motor control, the BMI pathway characteristics may also influence neuroprosthetic control. Here, we explore the influence of control and feedback rates, where control rate indicates how often motor commands are sent from the brain to the prosthetic, and feedback rate indicates how often visual feedback of the prosthetic is provided to the subject. We developed a new BMI that allows arbitrarily fast control and feedback rates, and used it to dissociate the effects of each rate in two monkeys. Increasing the control rate significantly improved control even when feedback rate was unchanged. Increasing the feedback rate further facilitated control. We also show that our high-rate BMI significantly outperformed state-of-the-art methods due to higher control and feedback rates, combined with a different point process mathematical encoding model. Our BMI paradigm can dissect the contribution of different elements in the sensorimotor pathway, providing a unique tool for studying neuroprosthetic control mechanisms.

  11. Strain-controlled thermal conductivity in ferroic twinned films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suzhi; Ding, Xiangdong; Ren, Jie; Moya, Xavier; Li, Ju; Sun, Jun; Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2014-09-01

    Large reversible changes of thermal conductivity are induced by mechanical stress, and the corresponding device is a key element for phononics applications. We show that the thermal conductivity κ of ferroic twinned thin films can be reversibly controlled by strain. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations reveal that thermal conductivity decreases linearly with the number of twin boundaries perpendicular to the direction of heat flow. Our demonstration of large and reversible changes in thermal conductivity driven by strain may inspire the design of controllable thermal switches for thermal logic gates and all-solid-state cooling devices.

  12. Adaptive rate control on wireless transcoder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To guarantee the real-time transmission of a video stream,based on the stochastic optimal control method,a frame layer adaptive rate control algorithm for the wireless transcoder is proposed,which is capable of dynamically determining the transcoder's objective bit rate,according to the bandwidth variation of the wireless channel and the bufier occupancy. Then the transient performance,steady performance,and computational complexity of the algorithm are analyzed.Finally,the experiment results demonstrate that the algorithm can improve the synthetic performance of rate control through the compromise between the end-to-end delay and the playout quality.

  13. Rate Control for MPEG-4 Bit Stream

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王振洲; 李桂苓

    2003-01-01

    For a very long time video processing dealt exclusively with fixed-rate sequences of rectangular shaped images. However, interest has been recently moving toward a more flexible concept in which the subject of the processing and encoding operations is a set of visual elements organized in both time and space in a flexible and arbitrarily complex way. The moving picture experts group (MPEG-4) standard supports this concept and its verification model (VM) encoder has adopted scalable rate control (SRC) as the rate control scheme, which is based on the spatial domain and compatible with constant bit rate (CBR) and variable bit rate (VBR). In this paper,a new rate control algorithm based on the DCT domain instead of the pixel domain is presented. More-over, macroblock level rate control scheme to compute the quantization step for each macroblock has been adopted. The experimental results show that the new algorithm can achieve a much better result than the original one in both peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the coding bits, and that the new algorithm is more flexible than test model 5 (TM5) rate control algorithm.

  14. Universal Parametrization of Thermal Photon Rates in Hadronic Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Heffernan, Matthew; Rapp, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) radiation off strongly interacting matter created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions (HICs) encodes information on the high-temperature phases of nuclear matter. Microscopic calculations of thermal EM emission rates are usually rather involved and not readily accessible to broad applications in models of the fireball evolution which are required to compare to experimental data. An accurate and universal parametrization of the microscopic calculations is thus key to honing the theory behind the EM spectra. Here we provide such a parametrization for photon emission rates from hadronic matter, including the contributions from in-medium rho mesons (which incorporate effects from anti-/baryons), as well as Bremsstrahlung from pi-pi scattering. Individual parametrizations for each contribution are numerically determined through nested fitting functions for photon energies from 0.2 to 5 GeV in chemically equilibrated matter of temperatures 100-180 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0-400 MeV. S...

  15. Macroeconomic control of interest rate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜鸣; 叶元煦; 何绍元

    2002-01-01

    The macroeconomic control of interest rate is studied using the elastic theory and correlation analysisand the concrete influence of interest rate on the consumption, savings and investment in China are investiga-ted. It is pointed out that although the interest rate mechanisms in China has gone through several adjustmentsand reforms, the results are not yet fully up to expectations. The interest rate does not adjust the national eco-nomic structure, and direct the trend of funds, nor regulate the general social supply and demand and balancethe price and currency in circulation, to achieve a rational distribution of social resources. The interest rate pol-icy of Central Bank does not have much actual influence on the economic departments, and this influence wascontinuously weakened in recent years. Countermeasures are suggested for improving the macro control of inter-est rate.

  16. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Hu, Rong-Zu; Ren, Ying-Hui; Xu, Si-Yu; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Ren, Xiao-Ning

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f(alpha)=(1-alpha)(2), and the kinetic equations are dalpha/dt = 10(19.24)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T) and dalpha/dt = 10(20.32)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T). The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  17. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jianhua [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Zhao Fengqi, E-mail: yiren@nwu.edu.cn [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Wang Bozhou; Liu Qian; Zhou Cheng; Hu Rongzu [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Ren Yinghui [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Xu Siyu [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China); Xu, Kang-Zhen [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an 710069 (China); Ren Xiaoning [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f({alpha}) = (1 - {alpha}){sup 2}, and the kinetic equations are d{alpha}/dt=10{sup 19.24}(1-{alpha}){sup 2}e{sup -2.32x10{sup 4/T}} and d{alpha}/dt=10{sup 20.32}(1-{alpha}){sup 2}e{sup -2.43x10{sup 4/T}}. The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  18. Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coating includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX, and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer, or a diameter of less than 5 microns. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate, and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of die invention, a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  19. Feedback control of optical beam spatial profiles using thermal lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhanwei; Arain, Muzammil A; Williams, Luke; Mueller, Guido; Tanner, David B; Reitze, David H

    2013-01-01

    A method for active control of the spatial profile of a laser beam using adaptive thermal lensing is described. A segmented electrical heater was used to generate thermal gradients across a transmissive optical element, resulting in a controllable thermal lens. The segmented heater also allows the generation of cylindrical lenses, and provides the capability to steer the beam in both horizontal and vertical planes. Using this device as an actuator, a feedback control loop was developed to stabilize the beam size and position.

  20. Power Admission Control with Predictive Thermal Management in Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Jianguo; Costanzo, Giuseppe Tommaso; Zhu, Guchuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a control scheme for thermal management in smart buildings based on predictive power admission control. This approach combines model predictive control with budget-schedulability analysis in order to reduce peak power consumption as well as ensure thermal comfort. First...

  1. The Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is submitted to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of processing the space environment stable, multifunctional thermal control material system...

  2. A prototype electrohydrodynamic driven thermal control system (EHD-TCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2001-02-01

    Goddard Space Flight Center has designed and fabricated a novel, prototype thermal control system operated solely by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) forces. The EHD-TCS consists of an EHD pumping section, transport tubing, a thermal-hydraulic test section, and a condenser section. The prototype loop has been fabricated to characterize the operations of the EHD-TCS and to investigate specific applications of EHD techniques to flow management and heat transfer enhancement. This paper discusses operational issues regarding an EHD conduction pump in the EHD-TCS. In the preliminary testing presented herein, the EHD-TCS loop operated as a single-phase thermal control system. The EHD conduction pump performance is characterized in the following terms: (i) mass flow rate versus applied voltage and applied current and (ii) pressure head developed by the pump as a function of applied voltage and current. Other relevant performance issues such as determination of steady state and operational power requirements are presented. The conduction pump operated reliably with no operational failures for up to 120 hours. Operational differences between static loop and EHD-TCS performance are noted. Hypotheses regarding possible explanations are discussed. The remaining engineering and technical challenges in this development program are outlined. .

  3. A way to estimate the heavy quark thermalization rate from the lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Caron-Huot, Simon; Moore, Guy D

    2009-01-01

    The thermalization rate of a heavy quark is related to its momentum diffusion coefficient. Starting from a Kubo relation and using the framework of the heavy quark effective theory, we argue that in the large-mass limit the momentum diffusion coefficient can be defined through a certain Euclidean correlation function, involving color-electric fields along a Polyakov loop. Furthermore, carrying out a perturbative computation, we show that the spectral function corresponding to this correlator is relatively flat at small frequencies. Therefore, unlike in the case of several other transport coefficients, for which the narrowness of the transport peak makes analytic continuation from Euclidean lattice data susceptible to severe systematic uncertainties, it appears that the determination of the heavy quark thermalization rate could be relatively well under control.

  4. Rate process analysis of thermal damage in cartilage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Sergio H; Nelson, J Stuart; Wong, Brian J F [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2003-01-07

    Cartilage laser thermoforming (CLT) is a new surgical procedure that allows in situ treatment of deformities in the head and neck with less morbidity than traditional approaches. While some animal and human studies have shown promising results, the clinical feasibility of CLT depends on preservation of chondrocyte viability, which has not been extensively studied. The present paper characterizes cellular damage due to heat in rabbit nasal cartilage. Damage was modelled as a first order rate process for which two experimentally derived coefficients, A=1.2x10{sup 70} s{sup -1} and E{sub a}=4.5x10{sup 5} J mole{sup -1}, were determined by quantifying the decrease in concentration of healthy chondrocytes in tissue samples as a function of exposure time to constant-temperature water baths. After immersion, chondrocytes were enzymatically isolated from the matrix and stained with a two-component fluorescent dye. The dye binds nuclear DNA differentially depending upon chondrocyte viability. A flow cytometer was used to detect differential cell fluorescence to determine the percentage of live and dead cells in each sample. As a result, a damage kinetic model was obtained that can be used to predict the onset, extent and severity of cellular injury to thermal exposure.

  5. Rate-cost tradeoffs in control

    KAUST Repository

    Kostina, Victoria

    2017-02-13

    Consider a distributed control problem with a communication channel connecting the observer of a linear stochastic system to the controller. The goal of the controller is minimize a quadratic cost function. The most basic special case of that cost function is the mean-square deviation of the system state from the desired state. We study the fundamental tradeoff between the communication rate r bits/sec and the limsup of the expected cost b, and show a lower bound on the rate necessary to attain b. The bound applies as long as the system noise has a probability density function. If target cost b is not too large, that bound can be closely approached by a simple lattice quantization scheme that only quantizes the innovation, that is, the difference between the controller\\'s belief about the current state and the true state.

  6. Characteristic thermal constant and dimensionless heating rate. The links to optimum heating rate in GC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg; Klee

    2000-09-01

    An initial step in the quest of deriving a generalized approach to optimization of a temperature program in gas chromatography is presented. Central to this is the introduction of a dimensionless heating rate, r. As a first step to defining r, a characteristic thermal constant, thetachar, defined as thetachar = -dT/dk at k = 1, where T and k are, respectively, column temperature and solute retention factor, is introduced and evaluated for our own experimental data and for thermodynamic data from the literature. It was determined that, for silicone stationary phases with a phase ratio of 250, thetachar ranged from about 23 degrees C for low molecular weight hydrocarbons such as dimethylpropane to about 45 degrees C for high molecular weight pesticides such as mirex. It was also found that, for a particular solute and a stationary phase type, a 2 orders of magnitude increase in the film thickness caused only about a 2-fold increase in the characteristic thermal constant. Using thetachar as a fundamental temperature unit in GC and void time as a fundamental time unit, a dimensionless heating rate is introduced and its potential utility for the evaluation of the separation-speed tradeoffs in a temperature-programmed GC is demonstrated.

  7. Methane Lunar Surface Thermal Control Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, David W.; Sutherlin, Steven G.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.; Jurns, John M.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is considering propulsion system concepts for future missions including human return to the lunar surface. Studies have identified cryogenic methane (LCH4) and oxygen (LO2) as a desirable propellant combination for the lunar surface ascent propulsion system, and they point to a surface stay requirement of 180 days. To meet this requirement, a test article was prepared with state-of-the-art insulation and tested in simulated lunar mission environments at NASA GRC. The primary goals were to validate design and models of the key thermal control technologies to store unvented methane for long durations, with a low-density high-performing Multi-layer Insulation (MLI) system to protect the propellant tanks from the environmental heat of low Earth orbit (LEO), Earth to Moon transit, lunar surface, and with the LCH4 initially densified. The data and accompanying analysis shows this storage design would have fallen well short of the unvented 180 day storage requirement, due to the MLI density being much higher than intended, its substructure collapse, and blanket separation during depressurization. Despite the performance issue, insight into analytical models and MLI construction was gained. Such modeling is important for the effective design of flight vehicle concepts, such as in-space cryogenic depots or in-space cryogenic propulsion stages.

  8. Heart rate variability in sleeping preterm neonates exposed to cool and warm thermal conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Stéphan-Blanchard

    Full Text Available Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the main cause of postneonatal infant death. Thermal stress is a major risk factor and makes infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Although it has been suggested that thermal stress could lead to SIDS by disrupting autonomic functions, clinical and physiopathological data on this hypothesis are scarce. We evaluated the influence of ambient temperature on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in thirty-four preterm neonates (mean ± SD gestational age: 31.4±1.5 weeks, postmenstrual age: 36.2±0.9 weeks. Heart rate variability was assessed as a function of the sleep stage at three different ambient temperatures (thermoneutrality and warm and cool thermal conditions. An elevated ambient temperature was associated with a higher basal heart rate and lower short- and long-term variability in all sleep stages, together with higher sympathetic activity and lower parasympathetic activity. Our study results showed that modification of the ambient temperature led to significant changes in autonomic nervous system control in sleeping preterm neonates. The latter changes are very similar to those observed in infants at risk of SIDS. Our findings may provide greater insight into the thermally-induced disease mechanisms related to SIDS and may help improve prevention strategies.

  9. Heart rate variability in sleeping preterm neonates exposed to cool and warm thermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stéphan-Blanchard, Erwan; Chardon, Karen; Léké, André; Delanaud, Stéphane; Bach, Véronique; Telliez, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the main cause of postneonatal infant death. Thermal stress is a major risk factor and makes infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Although it has been suggested that thermal stress could lead to SIDS by disrupting autonomic functions, clinical and physiopathological data on this hypothesis are scarce. We evaluated the influence of ambient temperature on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in thirty-four preterm neonates (mean ± SD gestational age: 31.4±1.5 weeks, postmenstrual age: 36.2±0.9 weeks). Heart rate variability was assessed as a function of the sleep stage at three different ambient temperatures (thermoneutrality and warm and cool thermal conditions). An elevated ambient temperature was associated with a higher basal heart rate and lower short- and long-term variability in all sleep stages, together with higher sympathetic activity and lower parasympathetic activity. Our study results showed that modification of the ambient temperature led to significant changes in autonomic nervous system control in sleeping preterm neonates. The latter changes are very similar to those observed in infants at risk of SIDS. Our findings may provide greater insight into the thermally-induced disease mechanisms related to SIDS and may help improve prevention strategies.

  10. Discovery of Spin-Rate-Dependent Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alan; Drube, Line

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. Using WISE/NEOWISE data and our new asteroid thermal-inertia estimator we show that the thermal inertia of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) appears to increase with spin period. Similar behavior is found in the case of thermophysically-modeled thermal inertia values of near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. On the basis of a picture of depth-dependent thermal inertia our results suggest that, in general, thermal inertia values representative of solid rock are reached some tens of centimeters to meters below the surface in the case of MBAs (the median diameter in our dataset = 24 km). In the case of the much smaller (km-sized) NEOs a thinner porous surface layer is indicated, with large pieces of solid rock possibly existing just a meter or less below the surface. These conclusions are consistent with our understanding from in-situ measurements of the surfaces of the Moon, and a few asteroids, and suggest a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids. Our results have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles ("kinetic impactors") in planetary defense.

  11. Thermal stabilization of a microring modulator using feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaraju, Kishore; Chan, Johnnie; Chen, Long; Lipson, Michal; Bergman, Keren

    2012-12-17

    We describe and demonstrate the use of a feedback control system to thermally stabilize a silicon microring modulator subjected to a thermally volatile environment. Furthermore, we establish power monitoring as an effective and appropriate mechanism to infer the temperature drift of a microring modulator. Our demonstration shows that a high-performance silicon microring-based device, normally inoperable in thermally volatile environments, can maintain error-free performance when a feedback control system is implemented.

  12. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  13. Heart rate control via vagus nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, Hendrik P.; Storm, Corstiaan J.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Verdouw, Pieter D.; Aa, van der Hans E.; Kemp, van der Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: There is ample and well-established evidence that direct electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve can change heart rate in animals and humans. Since tachyarrhythmias cannot always be controlled through medication, we sought, in this pilot study, to elucidate whether a clinical implantab

  14. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Koshi

    2012-02-01

    Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over -30 ppm K(-1). Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade.

  15. Choosing Actuators for Automatic Control Systems of Thermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorbunov, A. I., E-mail: gor@tornado.nsk.ru [JSC “Tornado Modular Systems” (Russian Federation); Serdyukov, O. V. [Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Automation and Electrometry (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Two types of actuators for automatic control systems of thermal power plants are analyzed: (i) pulse-controlled actuator and (ii) analog-controlled actuator with positioning function. The actuators are compared in terms of control circuit, control accuracy, reliability, and cost.

  16. Thermal control system for Space Station Freedom photovoltaic power module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacha, Thomas H.; Howard, Laura

    1994-01-01

    The electric power for Space Station Freedom (SSF) is generated by the solar arrays of the photovoltaic power modules (PVM's) and conditioned, controlled, and distributed by a power management and distribution system. The PVM's are located outboard of the alpha gimbals of SSF. A single-phase thermal control system is being developed to provide thermal control of PVM electrical equipment and energy storage batteries. This system uses ammonia as the coolant and a direct-flow deployable radiator. The description and development status of the PVM thermal control system is presented.

  17. Thermal conductance and basal metabolic rate are part of a coordinated system for heat transfer regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naya, Daniel E; Spangenberg, Lucía; Naya, Hugo; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2013-09-22

    Thermal conductance measures the ease with which heat leaves or enters an organism's body. Although the analysis of this physiological variable in relation to climatic and ecological factors can be traced to studies by Scholander and colleagues, only small advances have occurred ever since. Here, we analyse the relationship between minimal thermal conductance estimated during summer (Cmin) and several ecological, climatic and geographical factors for 127 rodent species, in order to identify the exogenous factors that have potentially affected the evolution of thermal conductance. In addition, we evaluate whether there is compensation between Cmin and basal metabolic rate (BMR)-in such a way that a scale-invariant ratio between both variables is equal to one-as could be expected from the Scholander-Irving model of heat transfer. Our major findings are (i) annual mean temperature is the best single predictor of mass-independent Cmin. (ii) After controlling for the effect of body mass, there is a strong positive correlation between log10 (Cmin) and log10 (BMR). Further, the slope of this correlation is close to one, indicating an almost perfect compensation between both physiological variables. (iii) Structural equation modelling indicated that Cmin values are adjusted to BMR values and not the other way around. Thus, our results strongly suggest that BMR and thermal conductance integrate a coordinated system for heat regulation in endothermic animals and that summer conductance values are adjusted (in an evolutionary sense) to track changes in BMRs.

  18. Thermal control system for SSF sensor/electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akau, R. L.; Lee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal control system was designed for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) sensor/electronics box (SSTACK). Multi-layer insulation and heaters are used to maintain the temperatures of the critical components within their operating and survival temperature limits. Detailed and simplified SSTACK thermal models were developed and temperatures were calculated for worst-case orbital conditions. A comparison between the two models showed very good agreement. Temperature predictions were also compared to measured temperatures from a thermal-vacuum test.

  19. Embedded Thermal Control for Subsystems for Next Generation Spacecraft Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. NASA, the Defense Department and commercial interests are actively engaged in developing miniaturized spacecraft systems and scientific instruments to leverage smaller cheaper spacecraft form factors such as CubeSats. This paper outlines research and development efforts among Goddard Space Flight Center personnel and its several partners to develop innovative embedded thermal control subsystems. Embedded thermal control subsystems is a cross cutting enabling technology integrating advanced manufacturing techniques to develop multifunctional intelligent structures to reduce Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) consumption of both the thermal control subsystem and overall spacecraft. Embedded thermal control subsystems permit heat acquisition and rejection at higher temperatures than state of the art systems by employing both advanced heat transfer equipment (integrated heat exchangers) and high heat transfer phenomena. The Goddard Space Flight Center Thermal Engineering Branch has active investigations seeking to characterize advanced thermal control systems for near term spacecraft missions. The embedded thermal control subsystem development effort consists of fundamental research as well as development of breadboard and prototype hardware and spaceflight validation efforts. This paper will outline relevant fundamental investigations of micro-scale heat transfer and electrically driven liquid film boiling. The hardware development efforts focus upon silicon based high heat flux applications (electronic chips, power electronics etc.) and multifunctional structures. Flight validation efforts include variable gravity campaigns and a proposed CubeSat based flight demonstration of a breadboard embedded thermal control system. The CubeSat investigation is technology demonstration will characterize in long-term low earth orbit a breadboard embedded thermal subsystem and its individual components to develop

  20. AN EOQ MODEL WITH CONTROLLABLE SELLING RATE

    OpenAIRE

    HORNG-JINH CHANG; PO-YU CHEN

    2008-01-01

    According to the marketing principle, a decision maker may control demand rate through selling price and the unit facility cost of promoting transaction. In fact, the upper bound of willing-to-pay price and the transaction cost probably depend upon the subjective judgment of individual consumer in purchasing merchandise. This study therefore attempts to construct a bivariate distribution function to simultaneously incorporate the willing-to-pay price and the transaction cost into the classica...

  1. Minimum scale controlled topology optimization and experimental test of a micro thermal actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heo, S.; Yoon, Gil Ho; Kim, Y.Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal topology design, fabrication and test of a micro thermal actuator. Because the minimum scale was controlled during the design optimization process, the production yield rate of the actuator was improved considerably; alternatively, the optimization design...... without scale control resulted in a very low yield rate. Using the minimum scale controlling topology design method developed earlier by the authors, micro thermal actuators were designed and fabricated through a MEMS process. Moreover, both their performance and production yield were experimentally...

  2. Power Control and Monitoring Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the MAP Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The specific heater control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland are described. The testing was conducted in the 10m wide x 18.3m high Space Environment Simulator (SES) Thermal Vacuum Facility. The MAP thermal testing required accurate quantification of spacecraft and fixture power levels while minimizing heater electrical emissions. The special requirements of the MAP test necessitated construction of five (5) new heater racks.

  3. Courtship Song Does Not Increase the Rate of Adaptation to a Thermally Stressful Environment in a Drosophila melanogaster Laboratory Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Larry G.; Holland, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Courtship song in D. melanogaster contributes substantially to male mating success through female selection. We used experimental evolution to test whether this display trait is maintained through adaptive female selection because it indicates heritable male quality for thermal stress tolerance. We used non-displaying, outbred populations of D. melanogaster (nub1) mutants and measured their rate of adaptation to a new, thermally stressful environment, relative to wild-type control populations that retained courtship song. This design retains sexually selected conflict in both treatments. Thermal stress should select across genomes for newly beneficial alleles, increasing the available genetic and phenotypic variation and, therefore, the magnitude of female benefit derived from courtship song. Following introduction to the thermally stressful environment, net reproductive rate decreased 50% over four generations, and then increased 19% over the following 16 generations. There were no differences between the treatments. Possible explanations for these results are discussed. PMID:25365209

  4. Courtship song does not increase the rate of adaptation to a thermally stressful environment in a Drosophila melanogaster laboratory population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry G Cabral

    Full Text Available Courtship song in D. melanogaster contributes substantially to male mating success through female selection. We used experimental evolution to test whether this display trait is maintained through adaptive female selection because it indicates heritable male quality for thermal stress tolerance. We used non-displaying, outbred populations of D. melanogaster (nub1 mutants and measured their rate of adaptation to a new, thermally stressful environment, relative to wild-type control populations that retained courtship song. This design retains sexually selected conflict in both treatments. Thermal stress should select across genomes for newly beneficial alleles, increasing the available genetic and phenotypic variation and, therefore, the magnitude of female benefit derived from courtship song. Following introduction to the thermally stressful environment, net reproductive rate decreased 50% over four generations, and then increased 19% over the following 16 generations. There were no differences between the treatments. Possible explanations for these results are discussed.

  5. High spin rate magnetic controller for nanosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavinskis, A.; Kvell, U.; Kulu, E.; Sünter, I.; Kuuste, H.; Lätt, S.; Voormansik, K.; Noorma, M.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a study of a high rate closed-loop spin controller that uses only electromagnetic coils as actuators. The controller is able to perform spin rate control and simultaneously align the spin axis with the Earth's inertial reference frame. It is implemented, optimised and simulated for a 1-unit CubeSat ESTCube-1 to fulfil its mission requirements: spin the satellite up to 360 deg s-1 around the z-axis and align its spin axis with the Earth's polar axis with a pointing error of less than 3°. The attitude of the satellite is determined using a magnetic field vector, a Sun vector and angular velocity. It is estimated using an Unscented Kalman Filter and controlled using three electromagnetic coils. The algorithm is tested in a simulation environment that includes models of space environment and environmental disturbances, sensor and actuator emulation, attitude estimation, and a model to simulate the time delay caused by on-board calculations. In addition to the normal operation mode, analyses of reduced satellite functionality are performed: significant errors of attitude estimation due to non-operational Sun sensors; and limited actuator functionality due to two non-operational coils. A hardware-in-the-loop test is also performed to verify on-board software.

  6. Degree of Rate Control: How Much the Energies of Intermediates and Transition States Control Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegelmann, Carsten; Andreasen, Anders; Campbell, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    For many decades, the concept of a “rate-determining step” has been of central importance in understanding chemical kinetics in multistep reaction mechanisms and using that understanding to advantage. Yet a rigorous method for identifying the rate-determining step in a reaction mechanism was only...... model for any reaction mechanism. Thus, it is very important to identify these rate-controlling transition states and rate-controlling intermediates for both applied and basic research. Here, we present a method for doing that....

  7. Brownian Ratchets: Transport Controlled by Thermal Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, J.; Czernik, T.; Łuczka, J.

    1998-02-01

    We analyze directed transport of overdamped Brownian particles in a 1D spatially periodic potential that are subjected to both zero-mean thermal equilibrium Nyquist noise and zero-mean exponentially correlated dichotomous fluctuations. We show that particles can reverse the direction of average motion upon a variation of noise parameters if two fundamental symmetries, namely, the reflection symmetry of the spatial periodic structure, and the statistical symmetry of dichotomous fluctuations, are broken. There is a critical thermal noise intensity Dc, or equivalently a critical temperature Tc, at which the mean velocity of particles is zero. Below Tc and above Tc particles move in opposite directions. At fixed temperature, there is a region of noise parameters in which particles of different linear size are transported in opposite directions.

  8. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: Implementation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin `Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature ( t eq) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t eq from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t eq. The results showed that the t eq values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode.

  9. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: implementation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin 'Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature (t(eq)) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t(eq) from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t(eq). The results showed that the t(eq) values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode.

  10. Development and Experimental Evaluation of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Castle, Charles H.; Burke, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide uniform cooling for a fuel cell stack, a cooling plate concept was evaluated. This concept utilized thin cooling plates to extract heat from the interior of a fuel cell stack and move this heat to a cooling manifold where it can be transferred to an external cooling fluid. The advantages of this cooling approach include a reduced number of ancillary components and the ability to directly utilize an external cooling fluid loop for cooling the fuel cell stack. A number of different types of cooling plates and manifolds were developed. The cooling plates consisted of two main types; a plate based on thermopyrolytic graphite (TPG) and a planar (or flat plate) heat pipe. The plates, along with solid metal control samples, were tested for both thermal and electrical conductivity. To transfer heat from the cooling plates to the cooling fluid, a number of manifold designs utilizing various materials were devised, constructed, and tested. A key aspect of the manifold was that it had to be electrically nonconductive so it would not short out the fuel cell stack during operation. Different manifold and cooling plate configurations were tested in a vacuum chamber to minimize convective heat losses. Cooling plates were placed in the grooves within the manifolds and heated with surface-mounted electric pad heaters. The plate temperature and its thermal distribution were recorded for all tested combinations of manifold cooling flow rates and heater power loads. This testing simulated the performance of the cooling plates and manifold within an operational fuel cell stack. Different types of control valves and control schemes were tested and evaluated based on their ability to maintain a constant temperature of the cooling plates. The control valves regulated the cooling fluid flow through the manifold, thereby controlling the heat flow to the cooling fluid. Through this work, a cooling plate and manifold system was developed that could maintain the cooling plates

  11. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2015-01-01

    loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal......Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  12. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon;

    2014-01-01

    The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally...... pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...... impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal profiles of power devices can be accurately mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal...

  13. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    impedance and silicon area of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) is mathematically established. By this new modeling approach, all factors that have impacts to the loss and thermal profiles of power devices can be accurately mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal......The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally...... pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...

  14. Thermal Vacuum Control Systems Options for Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, John

    2008-01-01

    This presentation suggests several Thermal Vacuum System (TVAC) control design approach methods for TVAC facilities. Over the past several years many aerospace companies have or are currently upgrading their TVAC testing facilities whether it be by upgrading old equipment or purchasing new. In doing so they are updating vacuum pumping and thermal capabilities of their chambers as well as their control systems. Although control systems are sometimes are considered second to the vacuum or thermal system upgrade process, they should not be taken lightly and must be planned and implemented with the equipment it is to control. Also, emphasis should be placed on how the operators will use the system as well as the requirements of "their" customers. Presented will be various successful methods of TVAC control systems from Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based to personal computer (PC) based control.

  15. Chalcopyrite leaching: The rate controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Kawashima, N.; Kaplun, K.; Absolon, V. J.; Gerson, A. R.

    2010-05-01

    The processes that determine the rate of chalcopyrite leaching are central to understanding how chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2) behaves under the environmentally adverse conditions of acid rock drainage. To this end the effect of the acid anion on chalcopyrite leach rates using a variety of acidic media (H 2SO 4, HClO 4, HCl and H 2SO 4 with 0.25 M NaCl) under carefully controlled solution conditions (pH 1 and 2, Eh 750 mV (SHE) and 75 °C) has been examined. These conditions have been chosen to enable sufficient leach rates for accurate experimental determination and to compare to the previous mechanistic analysis carried out by Harmer et al. (2006). Extensive surface analysis of leach residues demonstrated that variations in the surface speciation could not be responsible for the observed variations in leach rate. The rate of Cu release, however, was found to be first order with respect to Fe 3+ activity and inversely proportional with respect to H + activity to the power of 0.7: {1}/{S}{dC}/{dt}=(2.0±0.2){a}/{aH0.7} where S is the relative surface area, C is concentration of Cu in the solution (M), t is the time (h), 2.0 is the rate constant (M 0.7 h -1) and a and a are Fe 3+ and H + activities, respectively (M). The rate model was further validated against additional leaches carried out in H 2SO 4 media with the initial addition of Fe 3+ (8 mM as Fe 2(SO 4) 3) at 75 °C under various pH and Eh regimes. The only condition under which this rate model was found not to hold was at simultaneously low a and high a, that is at pH 1 and a<5×10-5M, where the concentration of dissolved O 2 may be leach rate determining.

  16. Spacecraft Thermal Control System Not Requiring Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal management of spacecraft would be enhanced by dynamic control over surface emissivity in the mid-infrared. In this SBIR program, Triton Systems proposes...

  17. CubeSat Form Factor Thermal Control Louvers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal control of small spacecraft, including CubeSats, is a challenge for the next era of NASA spaceflight. Science objectives and components will still require...

  18. INTEGRAL RADIATORS FOR NEXT GENERATION THERMAL CONTROL SYSTEMS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of spacecraft thermal control systems is to maintain internal and external temperature within acceptable boundaries while minimizing impact on vehicle...

  19. Automatic Thermal Control System with Temperature Difference or Derivation Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darina Matiskova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Automatic thermal control systems seem to be non-linear systems with thermal inertias and time delay. A controller is also non-linear because its information and power signals are limited. The application of methods that are available to on-linear systems together with computer simulation and mathematical modelling creates a possibility to acquire important information about the researched system. This paper provides a new look at the heated system model and also designs the structure of the thermal system with temperature derivation feedback. The designed system was simulated by using a special software in Turbo Pascal. Time responses of this system are compared to responses of a conventional thermal system. The thermal system with temperature derivation feedback provides better transients, better quality of regulation and better dynamical properties.

  20. Control of Several Emissions during Olive Pomace Thermal Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Miranda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomass plays an important role as an energy source, being an interesting alternative to fossil fuels due to its environment-friendly and sustainable characteristics. However, due to the exposure of customers to emissions during biomass heating, evolved pollutants should be taken into account and controlled. Changing raw materials or mixing them with another less pollutant biomass could be a suitable step to reduce pollution. This work studied the thermal behaviour of olive pomace, pyrenean oak and their blends under combustion using thermogravimetric analysis. It was possible to monitor the emissions released during the process by coupling mass spectrometry analysis. The experiments were carried out under non-isothermal conditions at the temperature range 25–750 °C and a heating rate of 20 °C·min−1. The following species were analysed: aromatic compounds (benzene and toluene, sulphur emissions (sulphur dioxide, 1,4-dioxin, hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. The results indicated that pollutants were mainly evolved in two different stages, which are related to the thermal degradation steps. Thus, depending on the pollutant and raw material composition, different emission profiles were observed. Furthermore, intensity of the emission profiles was related, in some cases, to the composition of the precursor.

  1. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  2. Mirror with thermally controlled radius of curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.

    2010-06-22

    A radius of curvature controlled mirror for controlling precisely the focal point of a laser beam or other light beam. The radius of curvature controlled mirror provides nearly spherical distortion of the mirror in response to differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces of the mirror. The radius of curvature controlled mirror compensates for changes in other optical components due to heating or other physical changes. The radius of curvature controlled mirror includes an arrangement for adjusting the temperature of the front surface and separately adjusting the temperature of the rear surface to control the radius of curvature. The temperature adjustment arrangements can include cooling channels within the mirror body or convection of a gas upon the surface of the mirror. A control system controls the differential expansion between the front and rear surfaces to achieve the desired radius of curvature.

  3. Electromechanically Actuated Valve for Controlling Flow Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A proposed valve for controlling the rate of flow of a fluid would include an electric-motor-driven ball-screw mechanism for adjusting the seating element of the valve to any position between fully closed and fully open. The motor would be of a type that can be electronically controlled to rotate to a specified angular position and to rotate at a specified rate, and the ball screw would enable accurate linear positioning of the seating element as a function of angular position of the motor. Hence, the proposed valve would enable fine electronic control of the rate of flow and the rate of change of flow. The uniqueness of this valve lies in a high degree of integration of the actuation mechanism with the flow-control components into a single, relatively compact unit. A notable feature of this integration is that in addition to being a major part of the actuation mechanism, the ball screw would also be a flow-control component: the ball screw would be hollow so as to contain part of the main flow passage, and one end of the ball screw would be the main seating valve element. The relationships among the components of the valve are best understood by reference to the figure, which presents meridional cross sections of the valve in the fully closed and fully open positions. The motor would be supported by a bracket bolted to the valve body. By means of gears or pulleys and a timing belt, motor drive would be transmitted to a sleeve that would rotate on bearings in the valve body. A ball nut inside the sleeve would be made to rotate with the sleeve by use of a key. The ball screw would pass through and engage the ball nut. A key would prevent rotation of the ball screw in the valve body while allowing the ball screw to translate axially when driven by the ball nut. The outer surface of the ball screw would be threaded only in a mid-length region: the end regions of the outer surface of the ball screw would be polished so that they could act as dynamic sealing surfaces

  4. Binary collision rates of relativistic thermal plasmas. I Theoretical framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermer, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Binary collision rates for arbitrary scattering cross sections are derived in the case of a beam of particles interacting with a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) plasma, or in the case of two MB plasmas interacting at generally different temperatures. The expressions are valid for all beam energies and plasma temperatures, from the nonrelativistic to the extreme relativistic limits. The calculated quantities include the reaction rate, the energy exchange rate, and the average rate of change of the squared transverse momentum component of a monoenergetic particle beam as a result of scatterings with particles of a MB plasma. Results are specialized to elastic scattering processes, two-temperature reaction rates, or the cold plasma limit, reproducing previous work.

  5. Channel adaptive rate control for energy optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BLANCH Carolina; POLLIN Sofie; LAFRUIT Gauthier; EBERLE Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Low energy consumption is one of the main challenges for wireless video transmission on battery limited devices. The energy invested at the lower layers of the protocol stack involved in data communication, such as link and physical layer, represent an important part of the total energy consumption. This communication energy highly depends on the channel conditions and on the transmission data rate. Traditionally, video coding is unaware of varying channel conditions. In this paper, we propose a cross-layer approach in which the rate control mechanism of the video codec becomes channel-aware and steers the instantaneous output rate according to the channel conditions to reduce the communication energy. Our results show that energy savings of up to30% can be obtained with a reduction of barely 0.1 dB on the average video quality. The impact of feedback delays is shown to be small. In addition, this adaptive mechanism has low complexity, which makes it suitable for real-time applications.

  6. CFD Analysis of Thermal Control System Using NX Thermal and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, C. R.; Harris, M. F. (Editor); McConnell, S. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) is a key part of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) for the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of this subsystem is to provide thermal control, mainly cooling, to the other APH subsystems. One of these subsystems, the Environmental Control Subsystem (ECS), controls the temperature and humidity of the growth chamber (GC) air to optimize the growth of plants in the habitat. The TCS provides thermal control to the ECS with three cold plates, which use Thermoelectric Coolers (TECs) to heat or cool water as needed to control the air temperature in the ECS system. In order to optimize the TCS design, pressure drop and heat transfer analyses were needed. The analysis for this system was performed in Siemens NX Thermal/Flow software (Version 8.5). NX Thermal/Flow has the ability to perform 1D or 3D flow solutions. The 1D flow solver can be used to represent simple geometries, such as pipes and tubes. The 1D flow method also has the ability to simulate either fluid only or fluid and wall regions. The 3D flow solver is similar to other Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) software. TCS performance was analyzed using both the 1D and 3D solvers. Each method produced different results, which will be evaluated and discussed.

  7. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhengtao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the proposed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance. The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  8. A novel intelligent adaptive control of laser-based ground thermal test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhengtao; Yu Gang; Li Shaoxia; He Xiuli; Chen Ru; Zheng Caiyun; Ning Weijian

    2016-01-01

    Laser heating technology is a type of potential and attractive space heat flux simulation technology, which is characterized by high heating rate, controlled spatial intensity distribution and rapid response. However, the controlled plant is nonlinear, time-varying and uncertainty when implementing the laser-based heat flux simulation. In this paper, a novel intelligent adaptive controller based on proportion–integration–differentiation (PID) type fuzzy logic is proposed to improve the performance of laser-based ground thermal test. The temperature range of thermal cycles is more than 200 K in many instances. In order to improve the adaptability of controller, output scaling factors are real time adjusted while the thermal test is underway. The initial values of scaling factors are optimized using a stochastic hybrid particle swarm optimization (H-PSO) algorithm. A validating system has been established in the laboratory. The performance of the pro-posed controller is evaluated through extensive experiments under different operating conditions (reference and load disturbance). The results show that the proposed adaptive controller performs remarkably better compared to the conventional PID (PID) controller and the conventional PID type fuzzy (F-PID) controller considering performance indicators of overshoot, settling time and steady state error for laser-based ground thermal test. It is a reliable tool for effective temperature control of laser-based ground thermal test.

  9. Controlling Thermal Expansion: A Metal-Organic Frameworks Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Salvador R G; Bueno-Perez, Rocio; Hamad, Said; Dubbeldam, David; Ruiz-Salvador, A Rabdel; Calero, Sofia

    2016-11-22

    Controlling thermal expansion is an important, not yet resolved, and challenging problem in materials research. A conceptual design is introduced here, for the first time, for the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as platforms for controlling thermal expansion devices that can operate in the negative, zero, and positive expansion regimes. A detailed computer simulation study, based on molecular dynamics, is presented to support the targeted application. MOF-5 has been selected as model material, along with three molecules of similar size and known differences in terms of the nature of host-guest interactions. It has been shown that adsorbate molecules can control, in a colligative way, the thermal expansion of the solid, so that changing the adsorbate molecules induces the solid to display positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion. We analyze in depth the distortion mechanisms, beyond the ligand metal junction, to cover the ligand distortions, and the energetic and entropic effect on the thermo-structural behavior. We provide an unprecedented atomistic insight on the effect of adsorbates on the thermal expansion of MOFs as a basic tool toward controlling the thermal expansion.

  10. An investigation on the assessed thermal sensation and human body exergy consumption rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya

    2010-01-01

    -environment research has been explored in the present work. The relationship of subjectively assessed thermal sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to the calculated human-body exergy consumption has been analysed. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate was related...

  11. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve as a Variable Thermal Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartenstine, John; Anderson, William G.; Walker, Kara; Dussinger, Pete

    2012-01-01

    Future lunar landers and rovers will require variable thermal links that allow for heat rejection during the lunar daytime and passively prevent heat rejection during the lunar night. During the lunar day, the thermal management system must reject the waste heat from the electronics and batteries to maintain them below the maximum acceptable temperature. During the lunar night, the heat rejection system must either be shut down or significant amounts of guard heat must be added to keep the electronics and batteries above the minimum acceptable temperature. Since guard heater power is unfavorable because it adds to system size and complexity, a variable thermal link is preferred to limit heat removal from the electronics and batteries during the long lunar night. Conventional loop heat pipes (LHPs) can provide the required variable thermal conductance, but they still consume electrical power to shut down the heat transfer. This innovation adds a thermal control valve (TCV) and a bypass line to a conventional LHP that proportionally allows vapor to flow back into the compensation chamber of the LHP. The addition of this valve can achieve completely passive thermal control of the LHP, eliminating the need for guard heaters and complex controls.

  12. Evaluating Degradation on Thermal Control Materials for GPM/DPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizawa, Junichiro; Hyakusoku, Yasutoshi; Shimamura, Hiroyuki; Kimoto, Yugo; Kojima, Masahiro

    Thermal control materials such as white paints and germanium-coated polyimide film were evaluated with respect to their space environmental tolerance for materials selection of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar of the Global Precipitation Measurement satellite (GPM/DPR). Though peeling off and cracking occurred in one paint material during the thermal shock test, other paints showed good tolerance against thermal shock, atomic oxygen, and ultraviolet ray irradiation. Germanium coating on polyimide film was also verified as high atomic oxygen tolerant barrier. Comparing different thickness germanium coatings, it seems that a 1000 angstrom Germanium film has fewer defects and risk of AO undercutting than a 525 angstrom Germanium film.

  13. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  14. Thermal-stress effects on enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity of linear bipolar circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.; SCHWANK,JAMES R.; WITCZAK,STEVEN C.; RIEWE,LEONARD CHARLES; WINOKUR,PETER S.; HASH,GERALD L.; PEASE,R.L.; FLEETWOOD,D.M.

    2000-02-17

    Thermal-stress effects are shown to have a significant impact on the enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity of linear bipolar circuits. Implications of these results on hardness assurance testing and mechanisms are discussed.

  15. Design and evaluation of automatic control for human/liquid cooling garment thermal interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Karen Lujean

    An automatic control system was designed and developed to control the thermal comfort of an astronaut wearing a liquid cooling garment (LCG). Experimental trials were run with test subjects performing arm cranking exercise in an environmental chamber. The thermal control algorithm incorporates the use of carbon dioxide production as a measure of metabolic rate to initiate the control response and mean body temperature, as a function of ear canal and skin temperatures, to provide feedback of the human thermal state to the controller. Nine test subjects each completed three, ninety-minute tests in three different environmental temperatures. Subjective comfort levels were obtained from the subjects throughout each test. Evaluation of subjective comfort level and quantitative energy storage indicates good performance of the controller in maintaining thermal neutrality for the subject over a wide range of environmental and transient metabolic states. The Wissler human thermoregulation model was utilized in the control design process and was used to further analyze the experimental results following testing. Subsequent application of the model allowed evaluation of additional protocols for which the LCG thermal controller may be used in the future.

  16. Experimental study of the surface thermal signature of gravity currents: application to the assessment of lava flow effusion rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garel, F.; Kaminski, E.; Tait, S.; Limare, A.

    2011-12-01

    During an effusive volcanic eruption, the crisis management is mainly based on the prediction of lava flows advance and its velocity. As the spreading of lava flows is mainly controlled by its rheology and the eruptive mass flux, the key question is how to evaluate them during the eruption (rather than afterwards.) A relationship between the heat flux lost by the lava at its surface and the eruption rate is likely to exist, based on the first-order argument that higher eruption rates should correspond to larger power radiated by a lava flow. The semi-empirical formula developed by Harris and co-workers (e.g. Harris et al., Bull. Volc. 2007) is currently used to estimate lava flow rate from satellite surveys yielding the surface temperatures and area of the lava flow field. However, this approach is derived from a static thermal budget of the lava flow and does not explicitly model the time-evolution of the surface thermal signal. Here we propose laboratory experiments and theoretical studies of the cooling of a viscous axisymmetric gravity current fed at constant flux rate. We first consider the isoviscous case, for which the spreading is well-know. The experiments using silicon oil and the theoretical model both reveal the establishment of a steady surface thermal structure after a transient time. The steady state is a balance between surface cooling and heat advection in the flow. The radiated heat flux in the steady regime, a few days for a basaltic lava flow, depends mainly on the effusion rate rather than on the viscosity. In this regime, one thermal survey of the radiated power could provide a consistent estimate of the flow rate if the external cooling conditions (wind) are reasonably well constrained. We continue to investigate the relationship between the thermal radiated heat flux and the effusion rate by using in the experiments fluids with temperature-dependent viscosity (glucose syrup) or undergoing solidification while cooling (PEG wax). We observe a

  17. Polarity controlled reaction path and kinetics of thermal cis-to-trans isomerization of 4-aminoazobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neeraj Kumar; Fuyuki, Masanori; Wada, Akihide

    2014-02-20

    Spectral and kinetic behavior of thermal cis-to-trans isomerization of 4-aminoazobenzene (AAB) is examined in various solvents of different polarities. In contrast to azobenzene (AB), it is found the rate of thermal isomerization of AAB is highly dependent on solvent polarity. Accelerated rates are observed in polar solvents as compared to nonpolar solvents. Moreover, a decrease in the barrier height with an increase in medium polarity is observed. Our observations suggest that inversion is the preferred pathway in cis-to-trans thermal isomerization in a nonpolar medium; however, in a polar medium, the isomerization path deviates from the inversion route and rotational behavior is incorporated. Differences in the kinetics and in mechanisms of isomerization in different media are rationalized in terms of modulation in barrier height by polarity of the medium and solute-solvent interaction. It is found that kinetics as well as the mechanism of thermal isomerization in AAB is controlled by the polarity of the medium.

  18. Subjective thermal sensation and human body exergy consumption rate: analysis and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Dovjak, M.; Kolarik, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    The exergy approach to design and operation of climate conditioning systems is relatively well established, while its exploitation in connection to human perception of the indoor environment is relatively rare. As a building should provide healthy and comfortable environment for its occupants......, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. There is a need to verify the human-body exergy model with the Thermal-Sensation (TS) response of subjects exposed to different combinations of indoor climate parameters (temperature, humidity, etc.). First results...... available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation showed that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to slightly cool side of thermal sensation. By applying...

  19. Subjective thermal sensation and human body exergy consumption rate: analysis and correlation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Dovjak, M.; Kolarik, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    The exergy approach to design and operation of climate conditioning systems is relatively well established, while its exploitation in connection to human perception of the indoor environment is relatively rare. As a building should provide healthy and comfortable environment for its occupants......, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. There is a need to verify the human-body exergy model with the Thermal-Sensation (TS) response of subjects exposed to different combinations of indoor climate parameters (temperature, humidity, etc.). First results...... available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation showed that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to slightly cool side of thermal sensation. By applying...

  20. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    profiles of the power devices can accurately be mapped, enabling more design freedom to optimize the efficiency and thermal loading of the power converter. The proposed model can be further improved by experimental tests, and it is well agreed by both circuit and Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation......Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  1. Correlation of thermal mathematical models for thermal control of space vehicles by means of genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Eva; Garmendia, Iñaki

    2015-03-01

    The design of the thermal control system of space vehicles, needed to maintain the equipment components into their admissible range of temperatures, is usually developed by means of thermal mathematical models. These thermal mathematical models need to be correlated with the equipment real behavior registered during the thermal test campaign, in order to adapt them to the real state of the vehicle "as built". The correlation of this type of mathematical models is a very complex task, usually based on manual procedures, which requires a big effort in time and cost. For this reason, the development of methodologies able to perform this correlation automatically, would be a key aspect in the improvement of the space vehicles thermal control design and validation. The implementation, study and validation of a genetic algorithm able to perform this type of correlation in an automatized way are presented in this paper. The study and validation of the algorithm have been performed based on a simplified model of a real space instrument. The algorithm is able to correlate thermal mathematical models in steady state and transient analyses, and it is also able to perform the simultaneous correlation of several cases, as for example hot and cold cases.

  2. A new monitor for routine thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate monitoring in k0 INAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster-Ammerlaan, M J J; Bacchi, M A; Bode, P; De Nadai Fernandes, E A

    2008-12-01

    The Zr-Au set for monitoring the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate and the epithermal spectrum parameter alpha is not always practicable for routine application of INAA in well-thermalized facilities. An alternative set consisting of Cr, Au and Mo provides values for the thermal neutron fluence rate, f and alpha that are not significantly different from those found via the Zr-Au method and the Cd-covered Zr-method. The IRMM standard SMELS-II was analyzed using the (Au-Cr-Mo) monitor and a good agreement was obtained.

  3. Vacuum rated flow controllers for inert gas ion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pless, L. C.

    1987-01-01

    Electrical propulsion systems which use a gas as a propellant require a gas flowmeter/controller which is capable of operating in a vacuum environment. The presently available instruments in the required flow ranges are designed and calibrated for use at ambient pressure. These instruments operate by heating a small diameter tube through which the gas is flowing and then sensing the change in temperature along the length of the tube. This temperature change is a function of the flow rate and the gas heat capacity. When installed in a vacuum, the change in the external thermal characteristics cause the tube to overheat and the temperature sensors are then operating outside their calibrated range. In addition, the variation in heat capacity with temperature limit the accuracy obtainable. These problems and the work in progress to solve them are discussed.

  4. Degree of Rate Control: How Much the Energies of Intermediates and Transition States Control Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegelmann, Carsten; Andreasen, Anders; Campbell, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    electronic or steric control on the relative energies of the key species. Since these key species are the ones whose relative energies most strongly influence the net reaction rate, they also identify the species whose energetics must be most accurately measured or calculated to achieve an accurate kinetic...

  5. Rate equations modeling for hydrogen inventory studies during a real tokamak material thermal cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnin, X., E-mail: xavier.bonnin@iter.org [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Hodille, E. [IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ning, N. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Sang, C. [School of Physics and Optoelectronics Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Grisolia, Ch. [IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Prediction and control of tritium inventory in plasma-facing components (PFCs) is a critical nuclear safety issue for ITER and future fusion devices. This goal can be achieved through rate equations models as presented here. We calibrate our models with thermal desorption spectrometry results to obtain a validated set of material parameters relevant to hydrogen inventory processes in bulk tungsten. The best fits are obtained with two intrinsic trap types, deep and shallow, and an extrinsic trap created by plasma irradiation and plastic deformation of the tungsten matrix associated with blister formation. We then consider a realistic cycle of plasma discharges consisting of 400 s of plasma exposure followed by a resting period of 1000 s, repeating for several hours. This cycle is then closed by a long “overnight” period, thus providing an estimate of the amount of tritium retained in the PFCs after a full day of standard operation.

  6. Controllable thermal rectification realized in binary phase change composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-03-09

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management.

  7. Environmental controls on the thermal structure of alpine glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water entrapped in glacier accumulation zones represents a significant latent heat contribution to the development of thermal structure. It also provides a direct link between glacier environments and thermal regimes. We apply a two-dimensional mechanically-coupled model of heat flow to synthetic glacier geometries in order to explore the environmental controls on flowband thermal structure. We use this model to test the sensitivity of thermal structure to physical and environmental variables and to explore glacier thermal response to environmental changes. In different conditions consistent with a warming climate, mean glacier temperature and the volume of temperate ice may either increase or decrease, depending on the competing effects of elevated meltwater production, reduced accumulation zone extent and thinning firn. For two model reference states that exhibit commonly-observed thermal structures, the fraction of temperate ice is shown to decline with warming air temperatures. Mass balance and aquifer sensitivities play an important role in determining how the englacial thermal regimes of alpine glaciers will adjust in the future.

  8. Automation and control of the MMT thermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. D.; Porter, Dallan; Goble, William

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the software automation and control framework for the MMT thermal system. Thermal-related effects on observing and telescope behavior have been considered during the entire software development process. Regression analysis of telescope and observatory subsystem data is used to characterize and model these thermal-related effects. The regression models help predict expected changes in focus and overall astronomical seeing that result from temperature variations within the telescope structure, within the primary mirror glass, and between the primary mirror glass and adjacent air (i.e., mirror seeing). This discussion is followed by a description of ongoing upgrades to the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system and the associated software controls. The improvements of the MMT thermal system have two objectives: 1) to provide air conditioning capabilities for the MMT facilities, and 2) to modernize and enhance the primary mirror (M1) ventilation system. The HVAC upgrade necessitates changes to the automation and control of the M1 ventilation system. The revised control system must factor in the additional requirements of the HVAC system, while still optimizing performance of the M1 ventilation system and the M1's optical behavior. An industry-standard HVAC communication and networking protocol, BACnet (Building Automation and Control network), has been adopted. Integration of the BACnet protocol into the existing software framework at the MMT is discussed. Performance of the existing automated system is evaluated and a preliminary upgraded automated control system is presented. Finally, user interfaces to the new HVAC system are discussed.

  9. Dynamical Screening Effect on $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ Resonant Scattering and Thermal Nuclear Scattering Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Xiaojun; Müller, Berndt

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamical screening effect in the QED plasma on the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ scattering at the $^8$Be resonance. Dynamical screening leads to an imaginary part of the potential which results in a thermal width for the resonance and dominates over the previously considered static screening effect. As a result, both the resonance energy and width increase with the plasma temperature. Furthermore, dynamical screening can have a huge impact on the $\\alpha$-$\\alpha$ thermal nuclear scattering rate. For example, when the temperature is around $10$ keV, the rate is suppressed by a factor of about $900$. We expect similar thermal suppressions of nuclear reaction rates to occur in nuclear reactions dominated by an above threshold resonance with a thermal energy. Dynamical screening effects on nuclear reactions can be relevant to cosmology and astrophysics.

  10. Thermal control system. [removing waste heat from industrial process spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, D. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    The temperature of an exothermic process plant carried aboard an Earth orbiting spacecraft is regulated using a number of curved radiator panels accurately positioned in a circular arrangement to form an open receptacle. A module containing the process is insertable into the receptacle. Heat exchangers having broad exterior surfaces extending axially above the circumference of the module fit within arcuate spacings between adjacent radiator panels. Banks of variable conductance heat pipes partially embedded within and thermally coupled to the radiator panels extend across the spacings and are thermally coupled to broad exterior surfaces of the heat exchangers by flanges. Temperature sensors monitor the temperature of process fluid flowing from the module through the heat exchanges. Thermal conduction between the heat exchangers and the radiator panels is regulated by heating a control fluid within the heat pipes to vary the effective thermal length of the heat pipes in inverse proportion to changes in the temperature of the process fluid.

  11. Joint excitation and reactive power control in thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragosavac Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordinated voltage and reactive power controller, designed for the thermal power plant, is presented in the paper. A brief explanation of the need for such device is given and justification for commissioning of such equipment is outlined. After short description of the theoretical background of the proposed control design, the achieved features of the commissioned equipment are fully given. Achieved performances are illustrated by recorded reactive power and bus voltage responses after commissioning of the described equipment into the largest thermal power plant in Serbia. As it can be seen in presented records, all design targets are met.

  12. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  13. Integration and software for thermal test of heat rate sensors. [space shuttle external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Shrider, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    A minicomputer controlled radiant test facility is described which was developed and calibrated in an effort to verify analytical thermal models of instrumentation islands installed aboard the space shuttle external tank to measure thermal flight parameters during ascent. Software was provided for the facility as well as for development tests on the SRB actuator tail stock. Additional testing was conducted with the test facility to determine the temperature and heat flux rate and loads required to effect a change of color in the ET tank external paint. This requirement resulted from the review of photographs taken of the ET at separation from the orbiter which showed that 75% of the external tank paint coating had not changed color from its original white color. The paint on the remaining 25% of the tank was either brown or black, indicating that it had degraded due to heating or that the spray on form insulation had receded in these areas. The operational capability of the facility as well as the various tests which were conducted and their results are discussed.

  14. Lunar Dust Contamination Effects on Lunar Base Thermal Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John R.; Ewert, Michael K.

    2000-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted to develop a thermal control system that can operate under the extreme thermal environments found on the lunar surface. While these proposed heat rejection systems use different methods to reject heat, each system contains a similar component, a thermal radiator system. These studies have always considered pristine thermal control system components and have overlooked the possible deleterious effects of lunar dust contamination. Since lunar dust has a high emissivity and absorptivity (greater than 0.9) and is opaque, dust accumulation on a surface should radically alter its optical properties and therefore alter its thermal response compared to ideal conditions. In addition, the non-specular nature of the dust particles will alter the performance of systems that employ specular surfaces to enhance heat rejection. To date, few studies have examined the effect of dust deposition on the normal control system components. These studies only focused on a single heat rejection or photovoltaic system. These studies did show that lunar dust accumulations alter the optical properties of any lunar base hardware, which in turn affects component temperatures, and heat rejection. Therefore, a new study was conducted to determine the effect of lunar dust contamination on heat rejection systems. For this study, a previously developed dust deposition model was incorporated into the Thermal Synthesizer System (TSS) model. This modeling scheme incorporates the original method of predicting dust accumulation due to vehicle landings by assuming that the thin dust layer can be treated as a semitransparent surface slightly above and in thermal contact with the pristine surface. The results of this study showed that even small amounts of dust deposits can radically alter the performance of the heat rejection systems. Furthermore. this study indicates that heat rejection systems be either located far from any landing sites or be protected from dust

  15. Different Approaches to Control of TISO Thermal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava KRÁLOVÁ

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is aimed on problematic of multivariable control. Multivariable system can be controlled by multivariable controller or we can use decentralized control. Control of thermal system with two inputs and one output is shown in the paper. The goal of paper is to find what sort of results we can get by classical approaches and by more sophisticated strategies. Two discrete-time PID controllers are selected as a representative of classical approach and split-range with discrete-time PID controller is selected as a representative of more sophisticated strategy. Control strategies are compared in the view of control quality and costs, information and knowledge required by control design and application.

  16. Mapping Thermal Habitat of Ectotherms Based on Behavioral Thermoregulation in a Controlled Thermal Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, T.; Skidmore, A.; Liu, Y.

    2012-07-01

    Thermal environment is especially important to ectotherm because a lot of physiological functions rely on the body temperature such as thermoregulation. The so-called behavioural thermoregulation function made use of the heterogeneity of the thermal properties within an individual's habitat to sustain the animal's physiological processes. This function links the spatial utilization and distribution of individual ectotherm with the thermal properties of habitat (thermal habitat). In this study we modelled the relationship between the two by a spatial explicit model that simulates the movements of a lizard in a controlled environment. The model incorporates a lizard's transient body temperatures with a cellular automaton algorithm as a way to link the physiology knowledge of the animal with the spatial utilization of its microhabitat. On a larger spatial scale, 'thermal roughness' of the habitat was defined and used to predict the habitat occupancy of the target species. The results showed the habitat occupancy can be modelled by the cellular automaton based algorithm at a smaller scale, and can be modelled by the thermal roughness index at a larger scale.

  17. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-10-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the indications; the optimal ventricular rate-control target, including detailed results of the Rate Control Efficacy in Permanent Atrial Fibrillation: a Comparison Between Lenient versus Strict Rate Control II (RACE II) study; and the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options to control the ventricular rate during AF in the setting of HF.

  18. Space station freedom resource nodes internal thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhoff, Paul; Dellinger, Brent; Taggert, Shawn; Cornwell, John

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the design and operation of the internal thermal control system (ITCS) developed for Space Station Freedom by the NASA-Johnson Space Center and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace to provide cooling for the resource nodes, airlock, and pressurized logistics modules. The ITCS collects, transports and rejects waste heat from these modules by a dual-loop, single-phase water cooling system. ITCS performance, cooling, and flow rate requirements are presented. An ITCS fluid schematic is shown and an overview of the current baseline system design and its operation is presented. Assembly sequence of the ITCS is explained as its configuration develops from Man Tended Capability (MTC), for which node 2 alone is cooled, to Permanently Manned Capability (PMC) where the airlock, a pressurized logistics module, and node 1 are cooled, in addition to node 2. A SINDA/FLUINT math model of the ITCS is described, and results of analyses for an MTC and a PMC case are shown and discussed.

  19. Thermal modeling and temperature control of a PEM fuel cell system for forklift applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2014-01-01

    . A combination of high temperature and reduced humidity increases the degradation rate. Stack thermal management and control are, thus, crucial issues in PEM fuel cell systems especially in automotive applications such as forklifts. In this paper we present a control–oriented dynamic model of a liquid–cooled PEM...... designers in choosing the required coolant mass flow rate and radiator size to minimize the stack temperature gradients....

  20. Identification of controlled-complexity thermal therapy models derived from magnetic resonance thermometry images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Niu

    Full Text Available Medical imaging provides information valuable in diagnosis, planning, and control of therapies. In this paper, we develop a method that uses a specific type of imaging--the magnetic resonance thermometry--to identify accurate and computationally efficient site and patient-specific computer models for thermal therapies, such as focused ultrasound surgery, hyperthermia, and thermally triggered targeted drug delivery. The developed method uses a sequence of acquired MR thermometry images to identify a treatment model describing the deposition and dissipation of thermal energy in tissues. The proper orthogonal decomposition of thermal images is first used to identify a set of empirical eigenfunctions, which captures spatial correlations in the thermal response of tissues. Using the reduced subset of eigenfunction as a functional basis, low-dimensional thermal response and the ultrasound specific absorption rate models are then identified. Once identified, the treatment models can be used to plan, optimize, and control the treatment. The developed approach is validated experimentally using the results of MR thermal imaging of a tissue phantom during focused ultrasound sonication. The validation demonstrates that our approach produces accurate low-dimensional treatment models and provides a convenient tool for balancing the accuracy of model predictions and the computational complexity of the treatment models.

  1. Effect of Oxidizer Particle Size on Burning Rate and Thermal Decomposition of Composite Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1982-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorarte(AP- polystyrene(PS propellant and burning rate of PS/AP propellant have been carried out as a function of oxidizer particle size. Thermal decomposition of AP and AP/PS propellant as function of AP particle size shows a maximum rate around 100 micro particle size which has been explained on the basis of Mample's theory. No such maximum is observed in the case of PS/AP propellant burning rate.

  2. Evaluation of thermal effects and strain-rate sensitivity in frozen soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Zhi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variation is one important factor that affects the dynamic mechanical properties of frozen soil under impact loading. Thermal damage is a collective phenomenon that can be caused by temperature variation. This paper investigates the effects of thermal damage on strain course. A split Hopkinson pressure bar was employed to investigate the dynamic mechanical characteristics of frozen soil at different temperatures and different strain rates. The stress-strain curves were obtained under impact loading. The compressive strength of frozen soil showed a negative temperature sensitivity and positive strain-rate trend. Specifically, the strength of frozen soil increased with decreasing temperatures and increasing strain rates.

  3. Thermal quantitative sensory testing: a study of 101 control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Jessica; Lee, Geoffrey; Joester, Jenna; Lynch, Mary; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Wrigley, Paul J; Ng, Karl

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative sensory testing is useful for the diagnosis, confirmation and monitoring of small fibre neuropathies. Normative data have been reported but differences in methodology, lack of age-specific values and graphical presentation of data make much of these data difficult to apply in a clinical setting. We have collected normative age-specific thermal threshold data for use in a clinical setting and clarified other factors influencing reference values, including the individual machine or operator. Thermal threshold studies were performed on 101 healthy volunteers (21-70 years old) using one of two Medoc Thermal Sensory Analyser II machines (Medoc, Ramat Yishai, Israel) with a number of operators. A further study was performed on 10 healthy volunteers using both machines and one operator at least 3 weeks apart. Thermal threshold detection increases with age and is different for different body regions. There is no significant difference seen in results between machines of the same make and model; however, different operators may influence results. Normative data for thermal thresholds should be applied using only age- and region-specific values and all operators should be trained and strictly adhere to standard protocols. To our knowledge, this is the largest published collection of normal controls for thermal threshold testing presented with regression data which can easily be used in the clinical setting. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental controls on the thermal structure of alpine glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Water entrapped in glacier accumulation zones represents a significant latent heat contribution to the development of thermal structure. It also provides a direct link between glacier environments and thermal regimes. We apply a two-dimensional mechanically-coupled model of heat flow to synthetic glacier geometries in order to explore the environmental controls on flowband thermal structure. We use this model to test the sensitivity of thermal structure to physical and environmental variables and to explore glacier response to potential environmental changes. In different conditions consistent with a warming climate, mean glacier temperature and the volume of temperate ice may either increase or decrease, depending on the competing effects of elevated meltwater production, reduced accumulation zone extent, and thinning firn. For two model reference states that exhibit commonly-observed thermal structures, the volume of temperate ice is shown to decline with warming air temperatures. Mass balance sensitivity plays an important role in determining how the englacial thermal regimes of alpine glaciers will adjust in the future.

  5. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya

    2011-01-01

    . Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy...... consumption rates increase as the operative temperature increases above 24 ◦C or decreases below 22 ◦C. With the data available so far, a second-order polynomial relationship between thermal sensation and the exergy consumption rate was established....... occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal...

  6. An Evaluation of Thermal Imaging Based Respiration Rate Monitoring in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah AL-Khalidi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: An important indicator of an individual’s health is respiration rate. It is the average number of times air is inhaled and exhaled per minute. Existing respiration monitoring methods require an instrument to be attached to the patient’s body during the recording. This is a discomfort to the patient and the instrument can be dislodged from its position. Approach: In this study a novel noncontact, thermal imaging based respiration rate measurement method is developed and evaluated. Facial thermal videos of 16 children (age: Median = 6.5 years, minimum = 6 months, maximum = 17 years were processed in the study. The recordings were carried out while the children rested comfortably on a bed. The children’s respiration rates were also simultaneously measured using a number of conventional contact based methods. Results: This allowed comparisons with the thermal imaging method to be carried out. The image capture rate was 50 frames per second and the duration of a thermal video recording was 2 min per child. The thermal images were filtered and segmented to identify the nasal region. An algorithm was developed to automatically track the identified nasal area. This region was partitioned into eight equal concentric segments. The pixel values within each segment were averaged to produce a single thermal feature for that segment of the image. A respiration signal was obtained by plotting each segment��€™s feature against time. Conclusion: Respiration rate values were automatically calculated by determining the number of oscillations in the respiration signals per minute. A close correlation (coefficient = 0.994 was observed between the respiration rates measured using the thermal imaging method and those obtained using the most effective conventional contact based respiration method.

  7. Effects of freezing rates and cryoprotectant on thermal expansion of articular cartilage during freezing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y; Sun, H J; Lv, Y; Zou, J C; Lin, B L; Hua, T C

    2013-01-01

    The intact articular cartilage has not yet been successfully preserved at low temperature most likely due to the volume expansion from water to ice during freezing. The objective of this current study focuses on examining thermal expansion behavior of articular cartilage (AC) during freezing from 0 degree C to -100 degree C. Thermo Mechanical Analysis (TMA) was used to investigate the effects of different concentrations of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) (0%, 10%, 30% and 60% v/v) and different freezing rates (1 C/min, 3 C/min and 5 C/min). The results showed that: (1) the inhomogeneous thermal expansion (or contraction) presents due to inhomogeneous water distributions in articular cartilage during freezing, which also may be the most likely reason that the matrix has been damaged in cryopreserved intact articular cartilage; (2) at the phase transition temperature range, the maximum thermal strain change value for 5C/min is approximately 1.45 times than that for 1 C/min, but the maximum thermal expansion coefficient of the later is about six times than that of the former; (3) the thermal expansion coefficient decreases with increasing cooling rate at the unfrozen temperature region, but some opposite results are obtained at the frozen temperature region; (4) the higher the DMSO concentration is, at the phase change temperature region, the smaller the thermal strain change as well as the maximum thermal expansion coefficient are, but DMSO concentration exhibits little effect on the thermal expansion coefficient at both unfrozen and frozen region. Once the DMSO concentration increasing enough, e.g. 60% v/v, the thermal strain decreases linearly and smoothly without any abrupt change due to little or no ice crystal forms (i.e. vitrification) in frozen articular cartilage. This study may improve our understanding of the thermal expansion (or contraction) behavior of cryopreserved articular cartilage and it may be useful for the future study on cryopreservation of intact

  8. Thermally Controlled Comb Generation and Soliton Modelocking in Microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Luke, Kevin; Ji, Xingchen; Miller, Steven A; Klenner, Alexander; Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    We report the first demonstration of thermally controlled soliton modelocked frequency comb generation in microresonators. By controlling the electric current through heaters integrated with silicon nitride microresonators, we demonstrate a systematic and repeatable pathway to single- and multi-soliton modelocked states without adjusting the pump laser wavelength. Such an approach could greatly simplify the generation of modelocked frequency combs and facilitate applications such as chip-based dual-comb spectroscopy.

  9. Thermal Analysis On The Kinetics Of Magnesium-Aluminum Layered Double Hydroxides In Different Heating Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Y.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal decomposition of magnesium-aluminum layered double hydroxides (LDHs was investigated by thermogravimetry analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC methods in argon environment. The influence of heating rates (including 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20K/min on the thermal behavior of LDHs was revealed. By the methods of Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, the thermal kinetic parameters of activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the exothermic processes under non-isothermal conditions were calculated using the analysis of corresponding DSC curves.

  10. Performance maps for the control of thermal energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finck, Christian; Li, Rongling; Zeiler, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Predictive control in building energy systems requires the integration of the building, building system, and component dynamics. The prediction accuracy of these dynamics is crucial for practical applications. This paper introduces performance maps for the control of water tanks, phase change mat...... material tanks, and thermochemical material tanks. The results show that these performance maps can fully account for the dynamics of thermal energy storage tanks.......Predictive control in building energy systems requires the integration of the building, building system, and component dynamics. The prediction accuracy of these dynamics is crucial for practical applications. This paper introduces performance maps for the control of water tanks, phase change...

  11. Solar Thermal Upper Stage Liquid Hydrogen Pressure Control Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. D.; Otto, J. M.; Cody, J. C.; Hastings, L. J.; Bryant, C. B.; Gautney, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    High-energy cryogenic propellant is an essential element in future space exploration programs. Therefore, NASA and its industrial partners are committed to an advanced development/technology program that will broaden the experience base for the entire cryogenic fluid management community. Furthermore, the high cost of microgravity experiments has motivated NASA to establish government/aerospace industry teams to aggressively explore combinations of ground testing and analytical modeling to the greatest extent possible, thereby benefitting both industry and government entities. One such team consisting of ManTech SRS, Inc., Edwards Air Force Base, and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was formed to pursue a technology project designed to demonstrate technology readiness for an SRS liquid hydrogen (LH2) in-space propellant management concept. The subject testing was cooperatively performed June 21-30, 2000, through a partially reimbursable Space Act Agreement between SRS, MSFC, and the Air Force Research Laboratory. The joint statement of work used to guide the technical activity is presented in appendix A. The key elements of the SRS concept consisted of an LH2 storage and supply system that used all of the vented H2 for solar engine thrusting, accommodated pressure control without a thermodynamic vent system (TVS), and minimized or eliminated the need for a capillary liquid acquisition device (LAD). The strategy was to balance the LH2 storage tank pressure control requirements with the engine thrusting requirements to selectively provide either liquid or vapor H2 at a controlled rate to a solar thermal engine in the low-gravity environment of space operations. The overall test objective was to verify that the proposed concept could enable simultaneous control of LH2 tank pressure and feed system flow to the thruster without necessitating a TVS and a capillary LAD. The primary program objectives were designed to demonstrate technology readiness of the SRS concept

  12. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  13. Using geophysical techniques to control in situ thermal remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, S.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Wilt, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Goldman, R.; Kayes, D.; Kenneally, K.; Udell, K. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Hunter, R. [Infraseismic, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States)

    1994-01-22

    Monitoring the thermal and hydrologic processes that occur during thermal environmental remediation programs in near real-time provides essential information for controlling the process. Geophysical techniques played a crucial role in process control as well as for characterization during the recent Dynamic Underground Stripping Project demonstration in which several thousand gallons of gasoline were removed from heterogeneous soils both above and below the water table. Dynamic Underground Stripping combines steam injection and electrical heating for thermal enhancement with ground water pumping and vacuum extraction for contaminant removal. These processes produce rapid changes in the subsurface properties including changes in temperature fluid saturation, pressure and chemistry. Subsurface imaging methods are used to map the heated zones and control the thermal process. Temperature measurements made in wells throughout the field reveal details of the complex heating phenomena. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) provides near real-time detailed images of the heated zones between boreholes both during electrical heating and steam injection. Borehole induction logs show close correlation with lithostratigraphy and, by identifying the more permeable gravel zones, can be used to predict steam movement. They are also useful in understanding the physical changes in the field and in interpreting the ERT images. Tiltmeters provide additional information regarding the shape of the steamed zones in plan view. They were used to track the growth of the steam front from individual injectors.

  14. Control of Thermal Conductance of Peltier Device Using Heat Disturbance Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimitsu, Hidetaka; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Presently in the industry, temperature control and heat flow control are conducted for many thermal devices, including the Peltier device, which facilitates heat transfer on the basis of the Peltier effect. Generally, temperature control compensates for the heat flowing from the external environment, while the heat actively flows into the system during heat flow control. Thus, temperature control and heat flow control differ from each other. However, there have been no detailed discussions on a thermal control process in which the thermal conductance of control ranges between 0 and ∞. This paper focuses on the thermal conductance of control and the construction of a thermal conductance control system for a Peltier device using a heat disturbance observer. When using the thermal conductance controller, the thermal conductance of control is altered, and the system becomes thermally compliant with the external environment. This paper also shows the experimental results that confirm the validity of the proposed control system.

  15. Strong converse rates for classical communication over thermal and additive noise bosonic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Bardhan, Bhaskar; Wilde, Mark M.

    2014-02-01

    We prove that several known upper bounds on the classical capacity of thermal and additive noise bosonic channels are actually strong converse rates. Our results strengthen the interpretation of these upper bounds, in the sense that we now know that the probability of correctly decoding a classical message rapidly converges to 0 in the limit of many channel uses if the communication rate exceeds these upper bounds. In order for these theorems to hold, we need to impose a maximum photon number constraint on the states input to the channel (the strong converse property need not hold if there is only a mean photon number constraint). Our first theorem demonstrates that Koenig and Smith's upper bound on the classical capacity of the thermal bosonic channel is a strong converse rate, and we prove this result by utilizing the structural decomposition of a thermal channel into a pure-loss channel followed by an amplifier channel. Our second theorem demonstrates that Giovannetti et al.'s upper bound on the classical capacity of a thermal bosonic channel corresponds to a strong converse rate, and we prove this result by relating the success probability to the rate, the effective dimension of the output space, and the purity of the channel as measured by the Rényi collision entropy. Finally, we use similar techniques to prove that similar previously known upper bounds on the classical capacity of an additive noise bosonic channel correspond to strong converse rates.

  16. Negative thermal expansion in functional materials: controllable thermal expansion by chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Lei; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-06-07

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) is an intriguing physical property of solids, which is a consequence of a complex interplay among the lattice, phonons, and electrons. Interestingly, a large number of NTE materials have been found in various types of functional materials. In the last two decades good progress has been achieved to discover new phenomena and mechanisms of NTE. In the present review article, NTE is reviewed in functional materials of ferroelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, superconductors, temperature-induced electron configuration change and so on. Zero thermal expansion (ZTE) of functional materials is emphasized due to the importance for practical applications. The NTE functional materials present a general physical picture to reveal a strong coupling role between physical properties and NTE. There is a general nature of NTE for both ferroelectrics and magnetics, in which NTE is determined by either ferroelectric order or magnetic one. In NTE functional materials, a multi-way to control thermal expansion can be established through the coupling roles of ferroelectricity-NTE, magnetism-NTE, change of electron configuration-NTE, open-framework-NTE, and so on. Chemical modification has been proved to be an effective method to control thermal expansion. Finally, challenges and questions are discussed for the development of NTE materials. There remains a challenge to discover a "perfect" NTE material for each specific application for chemists. The future studies on NTE functional materials will definitely promote the development of NTE materials.

  17. Rate control algorithm based on frame complexity estimation for MVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tao; An, Ping; Shen, Liquan; Zhang, Zhaoyang

    2010-07-01

    Rate control has not been well studied for multi-view video coding (MVC). In this paper, we propose an efficient rate control algorithm for MVC by improving the quadratic rate-distortion (R-D) model, which reasonably allocate bit-rate among views based on correlation analysis. The proposed algorithm consists of four levels for rate bits control more accurately, of which the frame layer allocates bits according to frame complexity and temporal activity. Extensive experiments show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently implement bit allocation and rate control according to coding parameters.

  18. Thermal Storage Power Balancing with Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The method described in this paper balances power production and consumption with a large number of thermal loads. Linear controllers are used for the loads to track a temperature set point, while Model Predictive Control (MPC) and model estimation of the load behavior are used for coordination....... The total power consumption of all loads is controlled indirectly through a real-time price. The MPC incorporates forecasts of the power production and disturbances that influence the loads, e.g. time-varying weather forecasts, in order to react ahead of time. A simulation scenario demonstrates...

  19. Capital Controls and the Real Exchange Rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijnbergen, S.J.G.

    1990-01-01

    Capital import taxes lower (raise) world (home) interest rates. This shifts home expenditure from the present to the future and foreign expenditure from the future to today. With identical home and foreign expenditure patterns, the change in the composition of world expenditure has no effects on

  20. Controlling thermal chaos in the mantle by positive feedback from radiative thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dubuffet

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of mantle materials has two components, the lattice component klat from phonons and the radiative component krad due to photons. These two contributions of variable thermal conductivity have a nonlinear dependence in the temperature, thus endowing the temperature equation in mantle convection with a strongly nonlinear character. The temperature derivatives of these two mechanisms have different signs, with ∂klat /∂T negative and dkrad /dT positive. This offers the possibility for the radiative conductivity to control the chaotic boundary layer instabilities developed in the deep mantle. We have parameterized the weight factor between krad and klat with a dimensionless parameter f , where f = 1 corresponds to the reference conductivity model. We have carried out two-dimensional, time-dependent calculations for variable thermal conductivity but constant viscosity in an aspect-ratio 6 box for surface Rayleigh numbers between 106 and 5 × 106. The averaged Péclet numbers of these flows lie between 200 and 2000. Along the boundary in f separating the chaotic and steady-state solutions, the number decreases and the Nusselt number increases with internal heating, illustrating the feedback between internal heating and radiative thermal conductivity. For purely basal heating situation, the time-dependent chaotic flows become stabilized for values of f of between 1.5 and 2. The bottom thermal boundary layer thickens and the surface heat flow increases with larger amounts of radiative conductivity. For magnitudes of internal heating characteristic of a chondritic mantle, much larger values of f , exceeding 10, are required to quench the bottom boundary layer instabilities. By isolating the individual conductive mechanisms, we have ascertained that the lattice conductivity is partly responsible for inducing boundary layer instabilities, while the radiative conductivity and purely depth-dependent conductivity exert a stabilizing

  1. Effect of warming rate on the critical thermal maxima of crabs, shrimp and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, Catarina; Leal, Inês; Mendonça, Vanessa; Flores, Augusto A V

    2015-01-01

    The threat of global warming has prompted numerous recent studies on the thermal tolerance of marine species. A widely used method to determine the upper thermal limit has been the Critical Thermal Maximum (CTMax), a dynamic method, meaning that temperature is increased gradually until a critical point is reached. This method presents several advantages over static methods, however, there is one main issue that hinders interpretation and comparison of CTMax results: the rate at which the temperature is increased. This rate varies widely among published protocols. The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of warming rate on CTMax values, using different animal groups. The influence of the thermal niche occupied by each species (intertidal vs subtidal) and habitat (intertidal vs subtidal) was also investigated. CTMax were estimated at three different rates: 1°Cmin(-1), 1°C30min(-1) and 1°Ch(-1), in two species of crab, Eurypanopeus abbreviatus and Menippe nodifrons, shrimp Palaemon northropi and Hippolyte obliquimanus and fish Bathygobius soporator and Parablennius marmoreus. While there were significant differences in the effect of warming rates for some species, for other species warming rate produced no significant differences (H. obliquimanus and B. soporator). While in some species slower warming rates lead to lower CTMax values (P. northropi and P. marmoreus) in other species the opposite occurred (E. abbreviatus and M. nodifrons). Biological group has a significant effect with crabs' CTMax increasing at slower warming rates, which did not happen for shrimp and fish. Subtidal species presented lower CTMax, at all warming rates tested. This study highlights the importance of estimating CTMax values at realistic rates that species encounter in their environment and thus have an ecological value.

  2. Removing the thermal component from heart rate provides an accurate VO2 estimation in forest work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubeau, Denise; Lebel, Luc; Kolus, Ahmet

    2016-05-01

    Heart rate (HR) was monitored continuously in 41 forest workers performing brushcutting or tree planting work. 10-min seated rest periods were imposed during the workday to estimate the HR thermal component (ΔHRT) per Vogt et al. (1970, 1973). VO2 was measured using a portable gas analyzer during a morning submaximal step-test conducted at the work site, during a work bout over the course of the day (range: 9-74 min), and during an ensuing 10-min rest pause taken at the worksite. The VO2 estimated, from measured HR and from corrected HR (thermal component removed), were compared to VO2 measured during work and rest. Varied levels of HR thermal component (ΔHRTavg range: 0-38 bpm) originating from a wide range of ambient thermal conditions, thermal clothing insulation worn, and physical load exerted during work were observed. Using raw HR significantly overestimated measured work VO2 by 30% on average (range: 1%-64%). 74% of VO2 prediction error variance was explained by the HR thermal component. VO2 estimated from corrected HR, was not statistically different from measured VO2. Work VO2 can be estimated accurately in the presence of thermal stress using Vogt et al.'s method, which can be implemented easily by the practitioner with inexpensive instruments.

  3. Thermal decay analysis of fiber Bragg gratings at different temperature annealing rates using demarcation energy approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Dinusha Serandi; Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2017-03-01

    In this study the thermal degradation of gratings inscribed in three types of fiber namely, PS 1250/1500, SM 1500 and zero water peak single mode fiber is demonstrated. A comparative investigation is carried out on the aging characteristics of the gratings at three different temperature ramping rates of 3 °C/min, 6 °C/min and 9 °C/min. During the thermal annealing treatment, a significant enhancement in the grating reflectivity is observed for PS 1250/1500 fiber from ∼1.2 eV until 1.4 eV which indicates a thermal induced reversible effect. Higher temperature ramping rates lead to a higher regeneration temperature. In addition, the investigation also reflects that regardless of the temperature ramping rate the thermal decay behavior of a specific fiber can be successfully characterized when represented in a demarcation energy domain. Moreover, this technique can be accommodated when predicting the thermal decay characteristics of a specific fiber.

  4. Tank Pressure Control Experiment/thermal Phenomena (TPCE/TP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M. M.; Knoll, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment/Thermal Phenomena (TPCE/TP)' is a reflight of the tank pressure control experiment (TPCE), flown on STS-43 in a standard Get-Away Special (GAS) container in August 1991. The TPCE obtained extensive video and digital data of the jet induced mixing process in a partially filled tank in low gravity environments. It also provided limited data on the thermal processes involved. The primary objective of the reflight of TPCE is to investigate experimentally the phenomena of liquid superheating and pool nucleate boiling at very low heat fluxes in a long duration low gravity environment. The findings of this experiment will be of direct relevance to space based subcritical cryogenic fluid system design and operation. Experiment hardware and results from the first TPCE are described in outline and graphic form.

  5. Experimental research on thermoelectric cooler for imager camera thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bing-ting; Kang, Ao-feng; Fu, Xin; Jiang, Shi-chen; Dong, Yao-hai

    2013-09-01

    Conventional passive thermal design failed to satisfy CCD's temperature requirement on a geostationary earth orbit satellite Imager camera because of the high power and low working temperature, leading to utilization of thermoelectric cooler (TEC) for heat dissipation. TEC was used in conjunction with the external radiator in the CCDs' thermal design. In order to maintain the CCDs at low working temperature, experimental research on the performance of thermoelectric cooler was necessary and the results could be the guide for the application of TEC in different conditions. The experimental system to evaluate the performance of TEC was designed and built, consisting of TEC, heat pipe, TEC mounting plate, radiator and heater. A series of TEC performance tests were conducted for domestic and oversea TECs in thermal vacuum environment. The effects of TEC's mounting, input power and heat load on the temperature difference of TEC's cold and hot face were explored. Results demonstrated that the temperature difference of TEC's cold and hot face was slightly increased when TEC's operating voltage reached 80% of rating voltage, which caused the temperature rise of TEC's hot face. It recommended TEC to operate at low voltage. Based on experiment results, thermal analysis indicated that the temperature difference of TEC's cold and hot face could satisfy the temperature requirement and still had surplus.

  6. Thermally Controlling the Polymeric Cytoskeleton in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Leduc, Philip

    2006-03-01

    Cell structure is controlled to a large degree by the cytoskeleton, which is an intracellular polymer network. This cytoskeleton is critical as it strongly influences many cellular functions such as motility, organelle transport, mechanotransduction and mitosis. In our studies, we controlled the thermal environment of living cells and after applying an increase in temperature of only 5 ^oC, we observed a change in the polymer network as the actin filaments depolymerized. Interestingly, when we then lowered the temperature, the actin repolymerized indicating a reversible phase that is controlled by the thermal environment. We characterized the presence of F-actin and G-actin for these phases through analyzing the intensity from immunofluorescent studies for these proteins. The F-actin concentration decreased when increasing the temperature from the initial state and then increased when decreasing the temperature. Although the cell is known to be affected by heat shock responses, this is not a function of just the polymers as they do not exhibit these polymerization characteristics when we probed them as single filaments in vitro. These studies suggest that the cell has distinct phases or patterns while maintaining a reversible equilibrium due to the thermal environment for these networked polymers.

  7. A MODIFIED THERMAL VISCOPLASTIC CONSTITUTIVE LAW INVOLVING THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE RISE RATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Chenguang; Duan Zhuping

    2000-01-01

    At high temperature rise rate, the mechanical properties of 10 # steel were determined ex perimentally in a very wide range of temperature and strain rates. A new constitutive relationship was put for ward, which can fit with the experimental results and describe various phenomena observed in our experim ents. Meanwhile, some interesting characteristics about the temperature rise rate, strain and strain rate hard ening and thermal softening are also shown in this paper. Finally, the reliability of the constitutive law and the correctness of the constitutive parameters were verified by comparing the calculation results with the ex perimental data.

  8. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  9. Binder extraction from green multilayer ceramics using a weight loss rate-controlled thermogravimetric analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Jason; Speyer, Robert F.; Murali, Lakshman

    1997-06-01

    A weight loss rate-controlled organic extraction furnace was built and demonstrated using a multilayer green ceramic. Multirate weight loss schedules as well as automated atmosphere control and detection were demonstrated. The low thermal mass furnace showed good tracking with 300 °C heating and cooling rates. This furnace, coupled with appropriate PID control constants, facilitated feedback control which could extract organics rapidly without self-ignition to uncontrolled combustion. Controlled organic burnout was demonstrated at weight loss rates up to 0.5%/min in air. Damage-free multilayers were observed using a burnout rate requiring 150 min for extraction, rather than the days commonly associated with this task when using conventional furnaces.

  10. Alternatives for thermal legionella control; Alternatieven thermische legionellabestrijding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Lieshout, M.

    2008-03-15

    One supplier considers his system a breakthrough in legionella control. Another claims decisively that his system provides the only affordable and effective solution. It is clear that manufacturers have their own way of finding alternatives in those cases where thermal control for complex existing installations prove not to be effective. (mk) [Dutch] De ene leverancier noemt zijn systeem een doorbraak in de legionellabestrijding. Een ander beweert met grote stelligheid dat zijn systeem de enige betaalbare en effectieve oplossing is. Duidelijk is dat fabrikanten op hun eigen manier een oplossing zoeken naar alternatieven, daar waar het thermisch beheer voor complexe bestaande installaties niet effectief blijk te zijn.

  11. THERMAL PROCESSING OF AGARICUS BISPORUS AND ITS CONTROL VARIABLES

    OpenAIRE

    Salas de la Torre, N.; Bazán, D.; Osorio, A.; Cornejo, O.; Reyna, L.; García Pantigozo, M.; Carhuaneho, H.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work to estab1ish the controlled use of heat as a function of the pH in order to destroy all the microorganisms that are this bacterias anaerobic forced thermopiles and essentially mesófilas. The bacteria more resistant esporulada to 1he heat is Clostridium botulinum and it is considered lndicative microorganísm of the sterellization. Another parameter of very important control is the quality of the matter it prevails that it can resist the operations of thermal prc...

  12. Cryopreservation: Vitrification and Controlled Rate Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Charles J

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation is the application of low temperatures to preserve the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. Conventional cooling protocols allow ice to form and solute concentrations to rise during the cryopreservation process. The damage caused by the rise in solute concentration can be mitigated by the use of compounds known as cryoprotectants. Such compounds protect cells from the consequences of slow cooling injury, allowing them to be cooled at cooling rates which avoid the lethal effects of intracellular ice. An alternative to conventional cooling is vitrification. Vitrification methods incorporate cryoprotectants at sufficiently high concentrations to prevent ice crystallization so that the system forms an amorphous glass thus avoiding the damaging effects caused by conventional slow cooling. However, vitrification too can impose damaging consequences on cells as the cryoprotectant concentrations required to vitrify cells at lower cooling rates are potentially, and often, harmful. While these concentrations can be lowered to nontoxic levels, if the cells are ultra-rapidly cooled, the resulting metastable system can lead to damage through devitrification and growth of ice during subsequent storage and rewarming if not appropriately handled.The commercial and clinical application of stem cells requires robust and reproducible cryopreservation protocols and appropriate long-term, low-temperature storage conditions to provide reliable master and working cell banks. Though current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) compliant methods for the derivation and banking of clinical grade pluripotent stem cells exist and stem cell lines suitable for clinical applications are available, current cryopreservation protocols, whether for vitrification or conventional slow freezing, remain suboptimal. Apart from the resultant loss of valuable product that suboptimal cryopreservation engenders, there is a danger that such processes will impose a selective

  13. Long Duration Life Test of Propylene Glycol Water Based Thermal Fluid Within Thermal Control Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hung; Hill, Charles; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of thermal properties and resistance to microbial growth concluded that 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture was desirable for use as a fluid within a vehicle s thermal control loop. However, previous testing with a commercial mixture of PG and water containing phosphate corrosion inhibitors resulted in corrosion of aluminum within the test system and instability of the test fluid. This paper describes a follow-on long duration testing and analysis of 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture with inorganic corrosion inhibitors used in place of phosphates. The test evaluates the long-term fluid stability and resistance to microbial and chemical changes

  14. Dynamic Thermal Model And Control Of A Pem Fuel Cell System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2013-01-01

    A lumped parameter dynamic model is developed for predicting the stack performance, temperatures of the exit reactant gases and coolant liquid outlet in a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. The air compressor, humidifier and cooling heat exchanger models are integrated to study...... the fuel cell system. A PID temperature control is implemented to study the effect of stack temperature on settling times of other variables such as stack voltage, air flow rate, oxygen excess ratio and net power of the stack. The model allows an assessment of the effect of operating parameters (stack...... power output, cooling water flow rate, air flow rate, and environmental temperature) and parameter interactions on the system thermal performance. The model represents a useful tool to determine the operating temperatures of the various components of the thermal system, and thus to fully assess...

  15. Determination of the strain rate dependent thermal softening behavior of thermoplastic materials for crash simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmann, Christian; Klein, Jan; Schöngart, Maximilian

    2016-03-01

    Thermoplastic materials are increasingly used as a light weight replacement for metal, especially in automotive applications. Typical examples are frontends and bumpers. The loads on these structures are very often impulsive, for example in a crash situation. A high rate of loading causes a high strain rate in the material which has a major impact on the mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials. The stiffness as well as the rigidity of polymers increases to higher strain rates. The increase of the mechanical properties is superimposed at higher rates of loading by another effect which works reducing on stiffness and rigidity, the increase of temperature caused by plastic deformation. The mechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials is influenced by temperature opposing to strain rate. The stiffness and rigidity are decreased to higher values of temperature. The effect of thermal softening on thermoplastic materials is investigated at IKV. For this purpose high-speed tensile tests are performed on a blend, consisting of Polybutylenterephthalate (PBT) and Polycarbonate (PC). In preliminary investigations the effects of strain rate on the thermomechanical behavior of thermoplastic materials was studied by different authors. Tensile impact as well as split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests were conducted in combination with high-speed temperature measurement, though, the authors struggled especially with temperature measurement. This paper presents an approach which uses high-speed strain measurement to transpire the link between strain, strain rate and thermal softening as well as the interdependency between strain hardening and thermal softening. The results show a superimposition of strain hardening and thermal softening, which is consistent to preliminary investigations. The advantage of the presented research is that the results can be used to calibrate damage and material models to perform mechanical simulations using Finite Element Analysis.

  16. Analysis of Silverized Teflon Thermal Control Material Flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, H. Gary

    1995-01-01

    Silver backed teflon (Ag/FEP) material used for thermal control on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) has been examined in detail. Optical, mechanical, and chemical properties were characterized for specimens exposed to a variety of space environmental conditions. Recession rates were determined for this material. Samples were obtained from virtually every LDEF location except the Earth-end. Atomic oxygen exposed regions changed from specular to diffusely reflective.

  17. Service Power Rate and Electricity-Saving in Conventional Thermal Power Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Since reforming and opening to the outside world, the power construction in China has been expanding by leaps and bounds. As of the end of 2005, the nationwide generation installed capacity made a breakthrough of 500 GW, of which thermal power units represented three-fourths.Relevant predictions indicate that the installed capacity will reach 680-730 GW in 2010 and it will exceed 1000 GW in 2020 as expected. The present situation of service power rate of thermal power units and how to make it approach and come up to world level are questions to be discussed in this paper.

  18. Cooling Rate Study of Nickel-Rich Material During Thermal Treatment and Quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Fransua; Murguia, Silvia Briseno (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    To investigate quench cracking that results from water quenching after heat treatment of binary and Ni-rich material, cooling rates of specimens were measured during quenching and hardness post-thermal treatment. For specific applications binary Ni-Ti is customarily thermally treated and quenched to attain desired mechanical properties and hardness. However, one problem emerging from this method is thermal cracking, either during the heat treatment process or during the specimen's application. This can result in material and equipment failure as well as financial losses. The objective of the study is to investigate the internal cooling rate of 60-NiTi during quenching and determine possible factors causing thermal cracking. Cubic (1 in.3) samples of both material were heat treated in air at 1000 deg C for 2 hrs and quenched in room temperature water using two methods: (1) dropped in the water and (2) agitated in the water. Hardness of the two fore-mentioned methods was measured post heat treatment. Results indicate that the quenching method had an effect on cooling rate during quenching but hardness was observed to be essentially the same through the thickness of the samples.

  19. The effects of low dose rate irradiation and thermal aging on reactor structural alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, T. R.; Trybus, C. L.; Cole, J. I.

    As part of the EBR-II reactor materials surveillance program, test samples of fifteen different alloys were placed into EBR-II in 1965. The surveillance (SURV) program was intended to determine property changes in reactor structural materials caused by irradiation and thermal aging. In this work, the effect of low dose rate (approximately 2 × 10 -8 dpa/s) irradiation at 380-410°C and long term thermal aging at 371°C on the properties of 20% cold worked 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel, Inconel X750, 304/308 stainless weld material, and 17-4 PH steel are evaluated. Doses of up to 6.8 dpa and thermal aging to 2994 days did not significantly affect the density of these alloys. The strength of 304 SS, X750, 17-4 PH, and 304/308 weld material increased with irradiation. In contrast, the strength of 420 stainless steel decreased with irradiation. Irradiation decreased the impact energy in both Inconel X750 and 17-4 PH steel. Thermal aging decreased the impact energy in 17-4 PH steel and increased the impact energy in Inconel X750. Tensile property comparisons of 304 SURV samples with 304 samples irradiated in EBR-II at a higher dose rate show that the higher dose rate samples had greater increases in strength and greater losses in ductility.

  20. Effect of heating rate on the thermoluminescence and thermal properties of natural ulexite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaksu, M; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Yüksel, M

    2014-10-31

    Boron-rich compounds are of interest in the nuclear industry because they exhibit a high neutron absorption cross section. The manufacture of these materials involves the application of thermal and chemical treatments. This paper focuses on the study of the effect of the heating rate (HR) in two thermal techniques, differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermoluminescence (TL), performed on natural ulexite from Bigadiç-Balıkesir (Turkey). The TL measurements were performed at six different heating rates in the range of 25-240°Cmin(-1). The UV-blue TL emission of natural ulexite shifted toward higher temperatures with increasing heating rate, whereas the intensity decreased. The kinetic parameters of the ulexite (Ea=0.65(9) eV and s=1.22×10(12)s(-1)) were calculated using the variable heating rate method. DTA measurements performed in the range of 0.5-10°Cmin(-1) displayed similar behavior to that of the TL response, despite the differences in technique and HR values. The DTA results indicated that natural ulexite exhibits two endothermic peaks originating from different processes: (i) a phase transition between the pentahydrated ulexite phase and a triple-hydrated phase and (ii) dehydration, dehydroxylation and alkali and earth-alkali self-diffusion processes in the ulexite lattice. The main endothermic peak shifted from 160°C to 250°C as the heating rate was increased.

  1. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  2. Recommended Thermal Rate Coefficients for the C + H3 + Reaction and Some Astrochemical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissapragada, S.; Buzard, C. F.; Miller, K. A.; O'Connor, A. P.; de Ruette, N.; Urbain, X.; Savin, D. W.

    2016-11-01

    We incorporate our experimentally derived thermal rate coefficients for C + {{{H}}}3+ forming CH+ and CH2 + into a commonly used astrochemical model. We find that the Arrhenius-Kooij equation typically used in chemical models does not accurately fit our data and instead we use a more versatile fitting formula. At a temperature of 10 K and a density of 104 cm-3, we find no significant differences in the predicted chemical abundances, but at higher temperatures of 50, 100, and 300 K we find up to factor of 2 changes. In addition, we find that the relatively small error on our thermal rate coefficients, ˜15%, significantly reduces the uncertainties on the predicted abundances compared to those obtained using the currently implemented Langevin rate coefficient with its estimated factor of 2 uncertainty.

  3. Recommended Thermal Rate Coefficients for the C + H$_3^+$ Reaction and Some Astrochemical Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Vissapragada, S; Miller, K A; O'Connor, A P; de Ruette, N; Urbain, X; Savin, D W

    2016-01-01

    We have incorporated our experimentally derived thermal rate coefficients for C + H$_3^+$ forming CH$^+$ and CH$_2^+$ into a commonly used astrochemical model. We find that the Arrhenius-Kooij equation typically used in chemical models does not accurately fit our data and use instead a more versatile fitting formula. At a temperature of 10 K and a density of 10$^4$ cm$^{-3}$, we find no significant differences in the predicted chemical abundances, but at higher temperatures of 50, 100, and 300 K we find up to factor of 2 changes. Additionally, we find that the relatively small error on our thermal rate coefficients, $\\sim15\\%$, significantly reduces the uncertainties on the predicted abundances compared to those obtained using the currently implemented Langevin rate coefficient with its estimated factor of 2 uncertainty.

  4. Optical Property Evaluation of Next Generation Thermal Control Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Deshpande, Mukund S.; Pierson, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Next generation white thermal control coatings were developed via the Small Business Innovative Research program utilizing lithium silicate chemistry as a binder. Doping of the binder with additives yielded a powder that was plasma spray capable and that could be applied to light weight polymers and carbon-carbon composite surfaces. The plasma sprayed coating had acceptable beginning-of-life and end-of-live optical properties, as indicated by a successful 1.5 year exposure to the space environment in low Earth orbit. Recent studies also showed the coating to be durable to simulated space environments consisting of 1 keV and 10 keV electrons, 4.5 MeV electrons, and thermal cycling. Large scale deposition was demonstrated on a polymer matrix composite radiator panel, leading to the selection of the coating for use on the Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.

  5. MODELING THE RATE-CONTROLLED SORPTION OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, D.B.; Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption of chromium VI on the iron-oxide- and hydroxide-coated surface of alluvial material was numerically simulated with rate-controlled reactions. Reaction kinetics and diffusional processes, in the form of film, pore, and particle diffusion, were simulated and compared with experimental results. The use of empirically calculated rate coefficients for diffusion through the reacting surface was found to simulate experimental data; pore or particle diffusion is believed to be a possible rate-controlling mechanism. The use of rate equations to predict conservative transport and rate- and local-equilibrium-controlled reactions was shown to be feasible.

  6. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  7. A Laboratory to Demonstrate the Effect of Thermal History on Semicrystalline Polymers Using Rapid Scanning Rate Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrinarayanan, Prashanth; Kessler, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of the effect of thermal history on the thermal properties of semicrystalline polymers is essential for materials scientists and engineers. In this article, we describe a materials science laboratory to demonstrate the effect of parameters such as heating rate and isothermal annealing conditions on the thermal behavior of…

  8. [The present status and development of thermal control system of spacesuits for extravehicular activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C Y; Sun, J B; Yuan, X G

    1999-04-01

    With the extension of extravehicular activity (EVA) duration, the need for more effective thermal control of EVA spacesuits is required. The specific schemes investigated in heat sink system for EVA are discussed, including radiator, ice storage, metal hydride heat pump, phase-change storage/radiator and sublimator. The importance and requirements of automatic thermal control for EVA are also discussed. Existed automatic thermal control for EVA are reviewed. Prospects of further developments of thermal control of spacesuits for EVA are proposed.

  9. Efficient rate control scheme for low bit rate H.264/AVC video coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-cheng; ZHANG Yong-jun; LIU Tao; GU Wan-yi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an efficient rate control scheme for H.264/AVC video coding in low bit rate environment. In the proposed scheme, an improved rate-distortion (RD) model by both analytical and empirical approaches is developed. It involves an enhanced mean absolute difference estimating method and a more rate-robust distortion model. Based on this RD model, an efficient macroblock-layer rate control scheme for H.264/AVC video coding is proposed. Experimental results show that this model encodes video sequences with higher peak signal-to-noise ratio gains and generates bit stream closer to the target rate.

  10. Optimal False Discovery Rate Control for Dependent Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jichun; Cai, T. Tony; Maris, John; Li, Hongzhe

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of optimal false discovery rate control when the test statistics are dependent. An optimal joint oracle procedure, which minimizes the false non-discovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate is developed. A data-driven marginal plug-in procedure is then proposed to approximate the optimal joint procedure for multivariate normal data. It is shown that the marginal procedure is asymptotically optimal for multivariate normal data with a short-range dependent covariance structure. Numerical results show that the marginal procedure controls false discovery rate and leads to a smaller false non-discovery rate than several commonly used p-value based false discovery rate controlling methods. The procedure is illustrated by an application to a genome-wide association study of neuroblastoma and it identifies a few more genetic variants that are potentially associated with neuroblastoma than several p-value-based false discovery rate controlling procedures. PMID:23378870

  11. [Research progress of thermal control system for extravehicular activity space suit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z Q; Shen, L P; Yuan, X G

    1999-08-01

    New research progress of thermal control system for oversea Extravehicular Activity (EVA) space suit is presented. Characteristics of several thermal control systems are analyzed in detail. Some research tendencies and problems are discussed, which are worthwhile to be specially noted. Finally, author's opinion about thermal control system in the future is put forward.

  12. Software for Automated Generation of Reduced Thermal Models for Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal analysis is increasingly used in thermal engineering of spacecrafts in every stage, including design, test, and ground-operation simulation. Current...

  13. A Numerical Proof of Concept for Thermal Flow Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dragan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper computational fluid dynamics is used to provide a proof of concept for controlled flow separation using thermal wall interactions with the velocity boundary layer. A 3D case study is presented, using a transition modeling Shear Stress Transport turbulence model. The highly loaded single slot flap airfoil was chosen to be representative for a light aircraft and the flow conditions were modeled after a typical landing speed. In the baseline case, adiabatic walls were considered while in the separation control case, the top surface of the flaps was heated to 500 K. This heating lead to flow separation on the flaps and a significant alteration of the flow pattern across all the elements of the wing. The findings indicate that this control method has potential, with implications in both aeronautical as well as sports and civil engineering applications.

  14. Studies on black anodic coatings for spacecraft thermal control applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uma Rani, R.; Subba Rao, Y.; Sharma, A.K. [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Thermal Systems Group

    2011-10-15

    An inorganic black colouring process using nickel sulphate and sodium sulphide was investigated on anodized aluminium alloy 6061 to provide a flat absorber black coating for spacecraft thermal control applications. Influence of colouring process parameters (concentration, pH) on the physico-optical properties of black anodic film was investigated. The nature of black anodic film was evaluated by the measurement of film thickness, micro hardness and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy studies confirmed the presence of nickel and sulphur in the black anodic coating. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of the coating. The environmental tests, namely, humidity, corrosion resistance, thermal cycling and thermo vacuum performance tests were used to evaluate the space worthiness of the coating. Optical properties of the film were measured before and after each environmental test to ascertain its stability in harsh space environment. The black anodic films provide higher thermal emittance ({proportional_to} 0.90) and solar absorptance ({proportional_to} 0.96) and their high stability during the environmental tests indicated their suitability for space and allied applications. (orig.)

  15. Applying stochastic methods to building thermal design and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scartezzini, J.L.; Bottazzi, F.; Nygard-Ferguson, M. (Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (CH))

    1990-01-01

    The object of this project is to develop numerical tools based on stochastic methods, issued from the theory of probability. Two objectives have been identified: I. The development of stochastic simulation techniques for thermal design and analysis of passive solar systems and buildings; II. The development of strategies for predictive controllers which can account for the stochastic behaviour of the weather and the occupants of buildings. The advantage of the stochastic approach is to treat the weather evolution and occupants behaviour by their probabilities. Previously to this work, an important effort was made towards the development of a stochastic approach to numerical simulations of passive solar systems. A smaller project has also treated the application of stochastic methods to predictive building thermal control. Encouraging results were obtained. They gave however rise to questions studied within the framework of this project: Design and analysis (hybrid dynamic simulation, Markovian stochastic simulation), predictive control. Two different institutions of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne collaborate in this project: The 'Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB)' in the Physics Department and the 'Chair of Operations Research' in the Mathematics Department. This document is a synthesis report of the work carried out within the project 'Application des methodes stochastiques: dimensionnement et regulation (Phase I)'. A detailed description of the results is available in French. (author) 20 figs., 10 refs.

  16. Thermal Control of a Dual Mode Parametric Sapphire Transducer

    CERN Document Server

    Belfi, Jacopo; De Michele, Andrea; Gabbriellini, Gianluca; Mango, Francesco; Passaquieti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method to control the thermal stability of a sapphire dielectric transducer made with two dielectric disks separated by a thin gap and resonating in the whispering gallery (WG) modes of the electromagnetic field. The simultaneous measurement of the frequencies of both a WGH mode and a WGE mode allows one to discriminate the frequency shifts due to gap variations from those due to temperature instability. A simple model, valid in quasi equilibrium conditions, describes the frequency shift of the two modes in terms of four tuning parameters. A procedure for the direct measurement of them is presented.

  17. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-12-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  18. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the indicati

  19. Ventricular rate control of atrial fibrillation in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Michiel; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been a major shift in the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) in the setting of hear failure (HF), from rhythm to ventricular rate control in most patients with both conditions. In this article, the authors focus on ventricular rate control and discuss the

  20. Determination of the optimal exchange rate via control of the domestic interest rate in Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Virtue Ekhosuehi; Sunday Ogbonmwan

    2014-01-01

    We consider an economic scenario where the government seeks to achieve a favourable balance-of-payments over a fixed planning horizon through exchange rate policy and control of the domestic interest rate. We view the dynamics of such an economy as a bounded optimal control problem where the exchange rate is the state variable and the domestic interest rate is the control variable. The idea of balance-of-payments is used as a theoretical underpinning to specify the objective function. By assu...

  1. Thermal Fission Rate Calculated Numerically by Particles Multi-passing over Saddle Point

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ling; BAO Jing-Dong

    2004-01-01

    Langevin simulation of the particles multi-passing over the saddle point is proposed to calculate thermal fission rate. Due to finite friction and the corresponding thermal fluctuation, a backstreaming exists in the process of the particle descent from the saddle to the scission. This leads to that the diffusion behind the saddle point has influence upon the stationary flow across the saddle point. A dynamical correction factor, as a ratio of the flows of multi- and firstoverpassing the saddle point, is evaluated analytically. The results show that the fission rate calculated by the particles multi-passing over the saddle point is lower than the one calculated by the particle firstly passing over the saddle point,and the former approaches the results at the scission point.

  2. Drift Mode Growth Rate and Associated Ion Thermal Transport in Reversed Magnetic Shear Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ai-Ke; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    Drift mode linear growth rate and quasi-linear ion thermal transport in the reversed magnetic shear plasma are investigated by using the two-fluid theory, previously developed by Weiland and the Chalmers group [J. Nucl.Fusion, 29 (1989) 1810; ibid. 30 (1990) 983]. The theory is here extended to include both the radial electrical field shear (dEr/dr) and the electron fluid velocity (Ve) in the sheared coordinate system. Here, Ve describes the coupling between the safety factor q and the Er × B velocity V E. Their influences on the growth rate and associated ion thermal transport are obtained numerically. In addition, the ion heat pinch in the reversed shear plasma is observed. Qualitatively, the present conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  3. Effects of window size and thermal mass on building comfort using an intelligent ventilation controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Roche, P. [Universidad del Zulia, Maracaibo (Venezuela). Facultad de Arquitectura y Diseno; Milne, M. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Architecture

    2004-10-01

    A prototype microcomputer-controlled thermostat was developed that can manage airflow according to cooling the needs in a building and the resources in the environment. This intelligent control system measures both indoor and outdoor temperature and uses decision rules to control a whole-house fan, in addition to the furnace and air conditioner. No such residential thermostat is currently commercially available. This paper presents the controller strategy that optimizes cooling with outdoor air. This paper also quantifies the effects of modifying the amount of thermal mass and the window area on indoor comfort when using this controller. These test confirm that smaller windows and more mass performed better than larger windows and less mass, and that higher volumes of controlled ventilation outperformed fixed ventilation rates. (Author)

  4. ESTIMATION OF THE CRITICAL RATE OF TEMPERATURE INCREASE OF THERMAL EXPLOSION OF NITROCELLULOSE USING NON-ISOTHERMAL DSC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rorng-zu Hu; Peng-jiang Guo; Sheng-li Gao; Hai Zhang; Zhi-ming Xia; Bin-ke Ning; Yan Fang; Qi-zhen Shi; Rong Liu

    2003-01-01

    A method of estimating the critical rate of temperature increase of thermal explosion for the first order autocatalytic decomposition reaction system using non-isothermal DSC is presented. Information is obtained on the increasing rate of temperature in nitrocellulose containing 13.54% of nitrogen when the first order autocatalytic decomposition converts into thermal explosion.

  5. Regulation of Star Formation Rates in Multiphase Galactic Disks: a Thermal/Dynamical Equilibrium Model

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, Eve C; Leroy, Adam K

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for regulation of galactic star formation rates Sigma_SFR in disk galaxies, in which ISM heating by stellar UV plays a key role. By requiring simultaneous thermal and (vertical) dynamical equilibrium in the diffuse gas, and star formation at a rate proportional to the mass of the self-gravitating component, we obtain a prediction for Sigma_SFR as a function of the total gaseous surface density Sigma and the density of stars + dark matter, rho_sd. The physical basis of this relationship is that thermal pressure in the diffuse ISM, which is proportional to the UV heating rate and therefore to Sigma_SFR, must adjust to match the midplane pressure set by the vertical gravitational field. Our model applies to regions where Sigma < 100 Msun/pc^2. In low-Sigma_SFR (outer-galaxy) regions where diffuse gas dominates, the theory predicts Sigma_SFR \\propto Sigma (rho_sd)^1/2. The decrease of thermal equilibrium pressure when Sigma_SFR is low implies, consistent with observations, that star formatio...

  6. Influence of Vegetable Oil on the Thermal Aging Rate of Kraft Paper and its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lijun; DENG Bangfei; LIAO Ruijin; SUN Caixin; ZHU Mengzhao

    2012-01-01

    With the development of new insulation materials,vegetable oil—the best substitute for mineral oil—has gradually been widely used in the liquid insulation of transformers.To investigate the influence of vegetable oil on the thermal aging rate of oil paper,Kraft paper impregnated with mineral oil and vegetable oil have been underwent thermally accelerated aging at three different temperatures.The degree of polymerization(DP) of Kraft paper was measured to indicate the aging degree of insulation paper.The aging rate of Kraft paper in mineral oil and vegetable oil was compared quantitatively,and results showed that vegetable oil retarded paper's degradation rate and extended its useful lifetime.The reasons contributing to such phenomena were analyzed using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy(XPS) and molecular simulation software.Kraft paper in vegetable oil had larger activation energy.Due to the larger interaction force between water and natural ester molecules,water molecules were easily bonded with natural ester,weakening the hydrolysis process of cellulose.Cellulose was chemically modified by natural ester during the thermal aging process,and the reactive-OH(hydroxyl) groups on the cellulose became esterified with fatty acid esters.Water molecules were firmly bounded to the ester groups on glucose produced by esterification.The long-chain fatty acid esterified to cellulose was parallel with cellulose chains and acted as a "water barrier" to further weaken the hydrolysis process.

  7. Dissociation rates from single-molecule pulling experiments under large thermal fluctuations or large applied force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkenar, Masoud; Gray, Thomas H; Zaccone, Alessio

    2017-04-01

    Theories that are used to extract energy-landscape information from single-molecule pulling experiments in biophysics are all invariably based on Kramers' theory of the thermally activated escape rate from a potential well. As is well known, this theory recovers the Arrhenius dependence of the rate on the barrier energy and crucially relies on the assumption that the barrier energy is much larger than k_{B}T (limit of comparatively low thermal fluctuations). As was shown already in Dudko et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 108101 (2006)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.96.108101], this approach leads to the unphysical prediction of dissociation time increasing with decreasing binding energy when the latter is lowered to values comparable to k_{B}T (limit of large thermal fluctuations). We propose a theoretical framework (fully supported by numerical simulations) which amends Kramers' theory in this limit and use it to extract the dissociation rate from single-molecule experiments where now predictions are physically meaningful and in agreement with simulations over the whole range of applied forces (binding energies). These results are expected to be relevant for a large number of experimental settings in single-molecule biophysics.

  8. Teaching Thermal Hydraulics & Numerical Methods: An Introductory Control Volume Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. S. Lucas

    2004-10-01

    A graduate level course for Thermal Hydraulics (T/H) was taught through Idaho State University in the spring of 2004. A numerical approach was taken for the content of this course since the students were employed at the Idaho National Laboratory and had been users of T/H codes. The majority of the students had expressed an interest in learning about the Courant Limit, mass error, semi-implicit and implicit numerical integration schemes in the context of a computer code. Since no introductory text was found the author developed notes taught from his own research and courses taught for Westinghouse on the subject. The course started with a primer on control volume methods and the construction of a Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) (T/H) code. The primer was valuable for giving the students the basics behind such codes and their evolution to more complex codes for Thermal Hydraulics and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The course covered additional material including the Finite Element Method and non-equilibrium (T/H). The control volume primer and the construction of a three-equation (mass, momentum and energy) HEM code are the subject of this paper . The Fortran version of the code covered in this paper is elementary compared to its descendants. The steam tables used are less accurate than the available commercial version written in C Coupled to a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The Fortran version and input files can be downloaded at www.microfusionlab.com.

  9. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very

  10. Adaptive and Robust Control for Thermal Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    descriptions were developed to describe the smart cooling system components. Henry et al. (2001) developed a simulation model of powertrain cooling...proposed control strategies have been verified by simulation and validated by experimental testing. In Section 2, the cooling system model is presented to...of energy transferred to the system is controlled by the main valve mounted on the heat exchanger. The mass flow rate of condensate is proportional

  11. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  12. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions......This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total quantities the order fill rate would be the preferred service level...

  13. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total quantities the order fill rate would be the preferred service level...... measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions...

  14. Blackness coefficients, effective diffusion parameters, and control rod worths for thermal reactors - methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretscher, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Simple diffusion theory cannot be used to evaluate control rod worths in thermal neutron reactors because of the strongly absorbing character of the control material. However, reliable control rod worths can be obtained within the framework of diffusion theory if the control material is characterized by a set of mesh-dependent effective diffusion parameters. For thin slab absorbers the effective diffusion parameters can be expressed as functions of a suitably-defined pair of blackness coefficients. Methods for calculating these blackness coefficients in the P/sub 1/, P/sub 3/, and P/sub 5/ approximations, with and without scattering, are presented. For control elements whose geometry does not permit a thin slab treatment, other methods are needed for determining the effective diffusion parameters. One such method, based on reaction rate ratios, is discussed.

  15. Active thermal figure control for the TOPS II primary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Roger; Kang, Tae; Cuerden, Brian; Guyon, Olivier; Stahl, Phil

    2007-09-01

    TOPS (Telescope to Observe Planetary Systems) is the first coronagraphic telescope concept designed specifically to take advantage of Guyon's method of Phase Induced Amplitude Apodization PIAA).1 The TOPS primary mirror may incorporates active figure control to help achieve the desired wavefront control to approximately 1 angstrom RMS accurate across the spectral bandwidth. Direct correction of the primary figure avoids the need for a separate small deformable mirror. Because of Fresnel propagation, correction at a separate surface can introduce serious chromatic errors unless it is precisely conjugated to the primary. Active primary control also reduces complexity and mass and increases system throughput, and will likely enable a full system test to the 10-10 level in the 1 g environment before launch. We plan to use thermal actuators with no mechanical disturbance, using radiative heating or cooling fingers distributed inside the cells of a honeycomb mirror. The glass would have very small but finite coefficient of expansion of ~ 5x10 -8/C. Low order modes would be controlled by front-to-back gradients and high order modes by local rib expansion and contraction. Finite element models indicate that for a mirror with n cells up to n Zernike modes can be corrected to better than 90% fidelity, with still higher accuracy for the lower modes. An initial demonstration has been made with a borosilicate honeycomb mirror. Interferometric measurements show a single cell influence function with 300 nm stroke and ~5 minute time constant.

  16. Internal Thermal Control System Hose Heat Transfer Fluid Thermal Expansion Evaluation Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, P. O.; Hawk, H. D.

    2001-01-01

    During assembly of the International Space Station, the Internal Thermal Control Systems in adjacent modules are connected by jumper hoses referred to as integrated hose assemblies (IHAs). A test of an IHA has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center to determine whether the pressure in an IHA filled with heat transfer fluid would exceed the maximum design pressure when subjected to elevated temperatures (up to 60 C (140 F)) that may be experienced during storage or transportation. The results of the test show that the pressure in the IHA remains below 227 kPa (33 psia) (well below the 689 kPa (100 psia) maximum design pressure) even at a temperature of 71 C (160 F), with no indication of leakage or damage to the hose. Therefore, based on the results of this test, the IHA can safely be filled with coolant prior to launch. The test and results are documented in this Technical Memorandum.

  17. Thermally activated reaction–diffusion-controlled chemical bulk reactions of gases and solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Möller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical kinetics of the reaction of thin films with reactive gases is investigated. The removal of thin films using thermally activated solid–gas to gas reactions is a method to in-situ control deposition inventory in vacuum and plasma vessels. Significant scatter of experimental deposit removal rates at apparently similar conditions was observed in the past, highlighting the need for understanding the underlying processes. A model based on the presence of reactive gas in the films bulk and chemical kinetics is presented. The model describes the diffusion of reactive gas into the film and its chemical interaction with film constituents in the bulk using a stationary reaction–diffusion equation. This yields the reactive gas concentration and reaction rates. Diffusion and reaction rate limitations are depicted in parameter studies. Comparison with literature data on tokamak co-deposit removal results in good agreement of removal rates as a function of pressure, film thickness and temperature.

  18. Thixoforming of Steel: New Tools Conception to Analyse Thermal Exchanges and Strain Rate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezard, P.; Bigot, R.; Becker, E.; Mathieu, S.; Pierret, J. C.; Rassili, A.

    2007-04-01

    Through different papers, authors shown that the influence of thermal exchanges was a first order parameter on the semi-solid steel behaviour, and certainly for every semi-solid metallic materials. These thermal exchanges hide other parameters effect like, for example, the strain rate influence. This paper tries to determine the influence of these two parameters by using a new extrusion device on a hydraulic press. This new tools conception annihilated the influence of the decrease of the punch speed before stopping and permitted to have a constant speed during the experiment. This work also deals with the homogeneous flow during thixoforming of steel and shows the importance to couple initial temperature of the slug with punch speed. This paper presents different conditions which permitted to have a homogeneous flow by keeping a low load.

  19. The order and volume fill rates in inventory control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorstenson, Anders; Larsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    level measure. The main result shows how the order and volume fill rates are related in magnitude. Earlier results derived for a single-item, single-stage, continuous review inventory system with backordering and constant lead times controlled by a base-stock policy are extended in different directions......This paper differentiates between an order (line) fill rate and a volume fill rate and specifies their performance for different inventory control systems. When the focus is on filling complete customer orders rather than total demanded quantity the order fill rate would be the preferred service...... extensions consider more general inventory control review policies with backordering, as well as some relations between service measures. A particularly important result in the paper concerns an alternative service measure, the customer order fill rate, and shows how this measure always exceeds the other two...

  20. Energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in dissipative Hamiltonian systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Mao-Lin; Zhu Wei-Qiu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in dissipative Hamiltonian systems is investigated by using the stochastic averaging method for quasi Hamiltonian systems. The boundary value problem of mean first-passage time (MFPT) of averaged system is formulated and the energy diffusion controlled reaction rate is obtained as the inverse of MFPT. The energy diffusion controlled reaction rate in the classical Kramers bistable potential and in a two-dimensional bistable potential with a heat bath are obtained by using the proposed approach respectively. The obtained results are then compared with those from Monte Carlo simulation of original systems and from the classical Kramers theory. It is shown that the reaction rate obtained by using the proposed approach agrees well with that from Monte Carlo simulation and is more accurate than the classical Kramers rate.

  1. A comparison between computer-controlled and set work rate exercise based on target heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Wanda M.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Webster, Laurie; Hayes, Judith C.; Mazzocca, Augustus D.; Harris, Bernard A., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two methods are compared for observing the heart rate (HR), metabolic equivalents, and time in target HR zone (defined as the target HR + or - 5 bpm) during 20 min of exercise at a prescribed intensity of the maximum working capacity. In one method, called set-work rate exercise, the information from a graded exercise test is used to select a target HR and to calculate a corresponding constant work rate that should induce the desired HR. In the other method, the work rate is controlled by a computer algorithm to achieve and maintain a prescribed target HR. It is shown that computer-controlled exercise is an effective alternative to the traditional set work rate exercise, particularly when tight control of cardiovascular responses is necessary.

  2. Discrete LQ Rate Control for MPEG2 Video Streaming System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaofei Zhou; Kenneth Ong

    2008-01-01

    ...) to transmissions of MPEG2 streams in IP networks. We give out the detail deduction for disturbed-DLQ-regulator problem and the corresponding methods to implement the results into media streaming rate control...

  3. Identification of strain-rate and thermal sensitive material model with an inverse method

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Peroni, M

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a numerical inverse method to extract material strength parameters from the experimental data obtained via mechanical tests at different strain-rates and temperatures. It will be shown that this procedure is particularly useful to analyse experimental results when the stress-strain fields in the specimen cannot be correctly described via analytical models. This commonly happens in specimens with no regular shape, in specimens with a regular shape when some instability phenomena occur (for example the necking phenomena in tensile tests that create a strongly heterogeneous stress-strain fields) or in dynamic tests (where the strain-rate field is not constant due to wave propagation phenomena). Furthermore the developed procedure is useful to take into account thermal phenomena generally affecting high strain-rate tests due to the adiabatic overheating related to the conversion of plastic work. The method presented requires strong effort both from experimental and numerical point of view, an...

  4. Preliminary design of the Space Station internal thermal control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, Mark T.; Patterson, David W.; Turner, Larry D.

    1987-01-01

    The baseline preliminary design configuration of the Internal Thermal Control system (ITCS) of the U.S. Space Station pressurized elements (i.e., the Habitation and U.S. Laboratory modules, pressurized logistics carrier, and resources nodes) is defined. The ITCS is composed of both active and passive components. The subsystems which comprise the ITCS are identified and their functional descriptions are provided. The significant trades and analyses, which were performed during Phase B (i.e., the preliminary design phase) that resulted in the design described herein, are discussed. The ITCS interfaces with the station's central Heat Rejection and Transport System (HRTS), other systems, and externally attached pressurized payloads are described. Requirements on the ITCS with regard to redundancy and experiment support are also addressed.

  5. Airways in Apartment Buildings as a Method of Thermal Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suslova Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, the majority of modern apartment buildings are rather high. Altitude of such structures attains 50 meters. It is clear that for such high structures every extra meter of elevation costs a lot. For this reason, architects are trying to avoid adding attics above the last floor of the buildings. However, attic is not only an architectural element. It is an important part of the thermal control process of the entire building, especially of the apartments located on the last floor. In this article, construction of airways under the roof is suggested and discussed in detail. Airway acts as an attic, but has a significantly lower construction cost due to the lower height. Application of this technology allows providing comfortable microclimate on the living quarters in an economical way.

  6. Self-regulating heater application to Shuttle/Centaur hydrazine fuel line thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkrich, David B.

    1987-01-01

    The Shuttle/Centaur high energy upper stage vehicle thermal environments were more severe than previous Centaur vehicle thermal environments, creating need for a new hydrazine fuel line thermal control technique. Constant power heaters did not satisfy power dissipation requirements, because the power required to maintain fuel line thermal control during cold conditions exceeded the maximum power allowable during hot conditions. Therefore, a Raychem Thermolimit self-regulating heater was selected for this application, and was attached to the hydrazine fuel line with Kapton and aluminum foil tapes. Fuel line/heater thermal modeling and subsequent thermal vacuum chamber testing simulated heater thermal performance during all worst-case Shuttle/Centaur thermal environmental conditions. Fuel line temperatures were maintained between the 4C to 71C limits during all analytical and test cases. Finally, the thermal model predictions were correlated with the test data, thereby ensuring that the model would provide satisfactory predictions for future missions and/or vehicles.

  7. Unsteady-state human-body exergy consumption rate and its relation to subjective assessment of dynamic thermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiker, Marcel; Kolarik, Jakub; Dovjak, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    Few examples studied applicability of exergy analysis on human thermal comfort. These examples relate the human-body exergy consumption rate with subjectively obtained thermal sensation votes and had been based on steady-state calculation methods. However, humans are rarely exposed to steady......-state thermal environments. Therefore, the first objective of the current paper was to compare a recently introduced unsteady-state model with previously used steady-state model using data obtained under both constant and transient temperature conditions. The second objective was to explore a relationship...... between the human-body exergy consumption rate and subjective assessment of thermal environment represented by thermal sensation as well as to extend the investigation towards thermal acceptability votes. Comparison of steady-state and unsteady-state model showed that results from both models were...

  8. Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J.K.E.

    1981-07-10

    A system and method are provided for controlling the storing and release of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

  9. Effects of an Integrated Separator/Electrode Assembly on Enhanced Thermal Stability and Rate Capability of Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Seokhyeon; Jeon, Hyunkyu; Lee, Hoogil; Ryou, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Yong Min

    2017-05-31

    To improve the rate capability and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), we developed an integrated separator/electrode by gluing polyethylene (PE) separators and electrodes using a polymeric adhesive (poly(vinylidene fluoride), PVdF). To fabricate thin and uniform polymer coating layers on the substrate, we applied the polymer solution using a spray-coating technique. PVdF was chosen because of its superior mechanical properties and stable electrochemical properties within the voltage range of commercial LIBs. The integrated separator/electrode showed superior thermal stability compared to that of the control PE separators. Although PVdF coating layers partially blocked the porous structures of the PE separators, resulting in reduced ionic conductivity (control PE = 0.666 mS cm(-1), PVdF-coated PE = 0.617 mS cm(-1)), improved interfacial properties between the separators and the electrodes were obtained due to the intimate contact, and the rate capabilities of the LIBs based on integrated separators/electrodes showed 176.6% improvement at the 7 C rate (LIBs based on PVdF-coated and control PE maintained 48.4 and 27.4% of the initial discharge capacity, respectively).

  10. Effect of high heating rate on thermal decomposition behaviour of titanium hydride (TiH2) powder in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Rasooli; M A Boutorabi; M Divandari; A Azarniya

    2013-04-01

    DTA and TGA curves of titanium hydride powder were determined in air at different heating rates. Also the thermal decomposition behaviour of the aforementioned powder at high heating rates was taken into consideration. A great breakthrough of the practical interest in the research was the depiction of the H2-time curves of TiH2 powder at various temperatures in air. In accordance with the results, an increase in heating rate to higher degrees does not change the process of releasing hydrogen from titanium hydride powder, while switching it from internal diffusion to chemical reaction. At temperatures lower than 600 °C, following the diffusion of hydrogen and oxygen atoms in titanium lattice, thin layers TiH phase and oxides form on the powder surface, controlling the process. On the contrary, from 700 °C later on, the process is controlled by oxidation of titanium hydride powder. In fact, the powder oxidation starts around 650 °C and may escalate following an increase in the heating rate too.

  11. Identification of strain-rate and thermal sensitive material model with an inverse method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peroni M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a numerical inverse method to extract material strength parameters from the experimental data obtained via mechanical tests at different strainrates and temperatures. It will be shown that this procedure is particularly useful to analyse experimental results when the stress-strain fields in the specimen cannot be correctly described via analytical models. This commonly happens in specimens with no regular shape, in specimens with a regular shape when some instability phenomena occur (for example the necking phenomena in tensile tests that create a strongly heterogeneous stress-strain fields or in dynamic tests (where the strain-rate field is not constant due to wave propagation phenomena. Furthermore the developed procedure is useful to take into account thermal phenomena generally affecting high strain-rate tests due to the adiabatic overheating related to the conversion of plastic work. The method presented requires strong effort both from experimental and numerical point of view, anyway it allows to precisely identify the parameters of different material models. This could provide great advantages when high reliability of the material behaviour is necessary. Applicability of this method is particularly indicated for special applications in the field of aerospace engineering, ballistic, crashworthiness studies or particle accelerator technologies, where materials could be submitted to strong plastic deformations at high-strain rate in a wide range of temperature. Thermal softening effect has been investigated in a temperature range between 20°C and 1000°C.

  12. Rate control is more cost-effective than rhythm control for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation - results from the RAte Control versus Electrical cardioversion (RACE) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, VE; Vermeulen, KM; TenVergert, EM; Van Veldhuisen, JGP; Bosker, HA; Kamp, O; Kingma, JH; Tijssen, JGP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    2004-01-01

    Aims To evaluate costs between a rate and rhythm control strategy in persistent atrial. fibrillation. Methods and results In a prospective substudy of RACE (Rate control versus electrical cardioversion for persistent atrial. fibrillation) in 428 of the total 522 patients (206 rate control and 222 rh

  13. Rate control is more cost-effective than rhythm control for patients with persistent atrial fibrillation - results from the RAte Control versus Electrical cardioversion (RACE) study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagens, VE; Vermeulen, KM; TenVergert, EM; Van Veldhuisen, JGP; Bosker, HA; Kamp, O; Kingma, JH; Tijssen, JGP; Crijns, HJGM; Van Gelder, IC

    Aims To evaluate costs between a rate and rhythm control strategy in persistent atrial. fibrillation. Methods and results In a prospective substudy of RACE (Rate control versus electrical cardioversion for persistent atrial. fibrillation) in 428 of the total 522 patients (206 rate control and 222

  14. Control performances of a piezoactuator direct drive valve system at high temperatures with thermal insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yung-Min; Han, Chulhee; Kim, Wan Ho; Seong, Ho Yong; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-09-01

    This technical note presents control performances of a piezoactuator direct drive valve (PDDV) operated at high temperature environment. After briefly discussing operating principle and mechanical dimensions of the proposed PDDV, an appropriate size of the PDDV is manufactured. As a first step, the temperature effect on the valve performance is experimentally investigated by measuring the spool displacement at various temperatures. Subsequently, the PDDV is thermally insulated using aerogel and installed in a large-size heat chamber in which the pneumatic-hydraulic cylinders and sensors are equipped. A proportional-integral-derivative feedback controller is then designed and implemented to control the spool displacement of the valve system. In this work, the spool displacement is chosen as a control variable since it is directly related to the flow rate of the valve system. Three different sinusoidal displacements with different frequencies of 1, 10 and 50 Hz are used as reference spool displacement and tracking controls are undertaken up to 150 °C. It is shown that the proposed PDDV with the thermal insulation can provide favorable control responses without significant tracking errors at high temperatures.

  15. Optimization of the thermal substitution rate. Pt. 2; Optimierung der thermischen Substitutionsrate. T. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Tahir; Lowes, Tom [Cinar Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    By means of MI-CFD modeling, improvements to AFR thermal substitution rates (TSR) can be easily validated. Case study II shows, how natural gas can be replaced by alternative fuels. The first part of the article in issue 5/2012 dealt with the basics and case study I. It was shown, how MI-CFD modelling can be used to understand the thermo-fluid dynamics of a calciner. In Part II a second case study and suggestions for the utilization of AFR are presented. (orig.)

  16. Exercise, Insulin Absorption Rates, and Artificial Pancreas Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Spencer; Hinshaw, Ling; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by an inability of a person to endogenously produce the hormone insulin. Because of this, insulin must be injected - usually subcutaneously. The size of the injected dose and the rate at which the dose reaches the circulatory system have a profound effect on the ability to control glucose excursions, and therefore control of diabetes. However, insulin absorption rates via subcutaneous injection are variable and depend on a number of factors including tissue perfusion, physical activity (vasodilation, increased capillary throughput), and other tissue geometric and physical properties. Exercise may also have a sizeable effect on the rate of insulin absorption, which can potentially lead to dangerous glucose levels. Insulin-dosing algorithms, as implemented in an artificial pancreas controller, should account accurately for absorption rate variability and exercise effects on insulin absorption. The aforementioned factors affecting insulin absorption will be discussed within the context of both fluid mechanics and data driven modeling approaches.

  17. Programmable Control of the Pulse Repetition Rate in the Multiwave Strontium Vapor Laser System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soldatov Anatoly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was the development of laser systems for ablation of biological tissues with a programmable control over the lasing pulse repetition rate in a wide range. A two-stage laser system consisting of a master oscillator and a power amplifier based on strontium vapor laser has been developed. The operation of the laser system in a single-pulse mode operation, multipulse mode operation, and with a pulse repetition rate up to 20 kHz has been technically implemented. The possibility of a bone tissue ablation with no visible thermal damage is shown.

  18. Intelligent Data Rate Control in Cognitive Mobile Heterogeneous Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Jeich; Nien, Hsiao-Chen; Cheng, Jen-Chia

    An adaptive rate controller (ARC) based on an adaptive neural fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is designed to autonomously adjust the data rate of a mobile heterogeneous network to adapt to the changing traffic load and the user speed for multimedia call services. The effect of user speed on the handoff rate is considered. Through simulations, it has been demonstrated that the ANFIS-ARC is able to maintain new call blocking probability and handoff failure probability of the mobile heterogeneous network below a prescribed low level over different user speeds and new call origination rates while optimizing the average throughput. It has also been shown that the mobile cognitive wireless network with the proposed CS-ANFIS-ARC protocol can support more traffic load than neural fuzzy call-admission and rate controller (NFCRC) protocol.

  19. Flight Control System Design with Rate Saturating Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R. A.; Snell, S. A.

    1997-01-01

    Actuator rate saturation is an important factor adversely affecting the stability and performance of aircraft flight control systems. It has been identified as a catalyst in pilot-induced oscillations, some of which have been catastrophic. A simple design technique is described that utilizes software rate limiters to improve the performance of control systems operating in the presence of actuator rate saturation. As described, the technique requires control effectors to be ganged such that any effector is driven by only a single compensated error signal. Using an analysis of the steady-state behavior of the system, requirements are placed upon the type of the loop transmissions and compensators in the proposed technique. Application of the technique to the design of a multi-input/multi-output, lateral-directional control system for a simple model of a high-performance fighter is demonstrated as are the stability and performance improvements that can accrue with the technique.

  20. Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

    2005-09-30

    Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very

  1. Thermoelectric control of shape memory alloy microactuators: a thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Chaillet, Nicolas; Lexcellent, Christian; Bourjault, Alain

    1999-06-01

    Microtechnologies and microsystems engineering use new active materials. These materials are interesting to realize microactuators and microsensors. In this category of materials, Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are good candidates for microactuation. SMA wires, or thin plates, can be used as active material in microfingers. These microstructures are able to provide very important forces, but have low dynamic response, especially for cooling, in confined environment. The control of the SMA phase transformations, and then the mechanical power generation, is made by the temperature. The Joule effect is an easy and efficiency way to heat the SMA wires, but cooling is not so easy. The dynamic response of the actuator depends on cooling capabilities. The thermal convection and conduction are the traditional ways to cool the SMA, but have limitations for microsystems. We are looking for a reversible way of heating and cooling SMA microactuators, based on the thermoelectric effects. Using Peltier effect, a positive or a negative electrical courant is able to pump or produce heat, in the SMA actuator. A physical model based on thermal exchanges between a Nickel/Titanium (NiTi) SMA, and Bismuth/Telluride (Te3Bi2) thermoelectric material has been developed. For simulation, we use a numerical resolution of our model, with finite elements, which takes into account the Peltier effect, the Joule effect, the convection, the conduction and the phase transformation of the SMA. We have also developed the corresponding experimental system, with two thermoelectric junctions, where the SMA actuator is one of the element of each junction. In this paper, the physical model and its numerical resolution are given, the experimental system used to validate the model is described, and experimental results are shown.

  2. International Space Station power module thermal control system hydraulic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, V. [Boeing North American, Inc., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

    1997-12-31

    The International Space Station (ISS) uses four photovoltaic power modules (PVMs) to provide electric power for the US On-Orbit Segment. The PVMs consist of photovoltaic arrays (PVAs), orbit replaceable units (ORUs), photovoltaic radiators (PVRs), and a thermal control system (TCS). The PVM TCS function is to maintain selected PVM components within their specified operating ranges. The TCS consists of the pump flow control subassembly (PFCS), piping system, including serpentine tubing for individual component heat exchangers, headers/manifolds, fluid disconnect couplings (FQDCs), and radiator (PVR). This paper describes the major design requirements for the TCS and the results of the system hydraulic performance predictions in regard to these requirements and system component sizing. The system performance assessments were conducted using the PVM TCS fluid network hydraulic model developed for predicting system/component pressure losses and flow distribution. Hardy-Cross method of iteration was used to model the fluid network configuration. Assessments of the system hydraulic performance were conducted based on an evaluation of uncertainties associated with the manufacturing and design tolerances. Based on results of the analysis, it was concluded that all design requirements regarding system performance could be met. The hydraulic performance range, enveloping possible system operating parameter variations was determined.

  3. Sub-thermal to super-thermal light statistics from a disordered lattice via deterministic control of excitation symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Kondakci, H E; Abouraddy, A F; Christodoulides, D N; Saleh, B E A

    2016-01-01

    Monochromatic coherent light traversing a disordered photonic medium evolves into a random field whose statistics are dictated by the disorder level. Here we demonstrate experimentally that light statistics can be deterministically tuned in certain disordered lattices, even when the disorder level is held fixed, by controllably breaking the excitation symmetry of the lattice modes. We exploit a lattice endowed with disorder-immune chiral symmetry in which the eigenmodes come in skew-symmetric pairs. If a single lattice site is excited, a "photonic thermalization gap" emerges: the realm of sub-thermal light statistics is inaccessible regardless of the disorder level. However, by exciting two sites with a variable relative phase, as in a traditional two-path interferometer, the chiral symmetry is judiciously broken and interferometric control over the light statistics is exercised, spanning sub-thermal and super-thermal regimes. These results may help develop novel incoherent lighting sources from coherent lase...

  4. Physiological Responses, Growth Rate and Blood Metabolites Under Feed Restriction and Thermal Exposure in Kids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Hooda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to study the cumulative effect of thermal stress and feed restriction in kids. Twelve kids of Alpine x Beetle cross were divided into two groups. Group 1 served as control and group 2 was put on restricted feeding and exposed at 40, 42 and 44oC. Body weights of both groups were similar before thermal exposure and feed restriction. Body weight of group 1 increased significantly and were higher than group 2 throughout the experiment. Body weight gain, average daily gain and feed conversion efficiency were comparable in both groups after removal of thermal stress and switching over to ad libitum feeding (42-63 days. Body weights of group 2 remained lower than group 1, the losses in body weights of group 2 could not be compensated and there was approximately 25% loss in body weight at the end of experiment. Physiological responses of group 2 were significantly lower before exposure to high temperature but increased significantly after exposure at temperature 40, 42 and 44oC and the increase was in commensurate with the increase in exposure temperature. Blood glucose, total protein, albumin and serum enzymes decreased significantly on exposure at higher temperature and differences were higher in feed restricted group. T3, T4 and cortisol concentration were similar in both groups before feed restriction and thermal stress. T3, T4 concentration decreased while cortisol concentration increased significantly after exposure to high temperature. Variations in plasma enzymes, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, SGOT and SGPT were not significant before feed restriction and thermal stress. The activities of acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase decreased whereas that of SGOT and SGPT increased significantly on exposure at temperature 40oC and subsequent changes at temperature 42 and 44oC were not significant. The study indicated that animals of group 2 experienced more stress as observed by significant alteration in body

  5. Study on Thermal Degradation Characteristics and Regression Rate Measurement of Paraffin-Based Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songqi Hu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paraffin fuel has been found to have a regression rate that is higher than conventional HTPB (hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene fuel and, thus, presents itself as an ideal energy source for a hybrid rocket engine. The energy characteristics of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel have been calculated by the method of minimum free energy. The thermal degradation characteristics were measured for paraffin, pretreated paraffin, HTPB and paraffin-based fuel in different working conditions by the using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA. The regression rates of paraffin-based fuel and HTPB fuel were tested by a rectangular solid-gas hybrid engine. The research findings showed that: the specific impulse of paraffin-based fuel is almost the same as that of HTPB fuel; the decomposition temperature of pretreated paraffin is higher than that of the unprocessed paraffin, but lower than that of HTPB; with the increase of paraffin, the initial reaction exothermic peak of paraffin-based fuel is reached in advance, and the initial reaction heat release also increases; the regression rate of paraffin-based fuel is higher than the common HTPB fuel under the same conditions; with the increase of oxidizer mass flow rate, the regression rate of solid fuel increases accordingly for the same fuel formulation.

  6. Load rate dependence of the mechanical properties of thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zotov, Nikolay; Eggeler, Gunther [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Bartsch, Marion [Institut fuer Werkstoff-Forschung, DLR Koeln, 51147 Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC), composed of yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic top coat (TC) and intermetallic NiCoCrAlY bond coat (BC) are commonly used as protective coatings of Ni-based high temperature gas engine components. Nanoindentation techniques are increasingly applied for determining the TBC mechanical properties on a nanometre scale. However, little is known about the load-rate dependence of the mechanical properties, which is important for better understanding of cyclic thermal fatigue experiments. Nanoindentations with different load rates omega were performed on polished cross-sections of TBC, deposited by EB-PVD on IN625 substrates (S), using a XP Nanoindenter (MTS) equipped with Berkovich diamond tip. The Young's modulus (E) of the TC is independent of omega, while E for the BC and the S decreases with omega. The hardness (H) of the TC and the BC increases, while H for the S decreases with omega. From the dependence of H on omega, creep power-law exponents c = 0.24(11) and c = 0.023(6) for the TC and the BC were determined. For all TBC components, a decrease with omega of the power-law exponents n and m, describing the loading and unloading nanoindentation curves, is observed.

  7. Mass discharge rate retrieval combining weather radar and thermal camera observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulpiani, Gianfranco; Ripepe, Maurizio; Valade, Sebastien

    2016-08-01

    The mass discharge rate is a key parameter for initializing volcanic ash dispersal models. Commonly used empirical approaches derive the discharge rate by the plume height as estimated by remote sensors. A novel approach based on the combination of weather radar observations and thermal camera imagery is presented here. It is based on radar ash concentration estimation and the retrieval of the vertical exit velocities of the explosive cloud using thermal camera measurements. The applied radar retrieval methodology is taken from a revision of previously presented work. Based on the analysis of four eruption events of the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy) that occurred in December 2015, the proposed methodology is tested using observations collected by three radar systems (at C and X band) operated by the Italian Department of Civil Protection. The total erupted mass was estimated to be about 9·109 kg and 2.4·109 kg for the first and second events, respectively, while it was about 1.2·109 kg for both the last two episodes. The comparison with empirical approaches based on radar-retrieved plume height shows a reasonably good agreement. Additionally, the comparative analysis of the polarimetric radar measurements provides interesting information on the vertical structure of the ash plume, including the size of the eruption column and the height of the gas thrust region.

  8. Emerging role of ivabradine for rate control in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Sarah L; Francis, Kerry E; Lowe, Denise K; Cahoon, William D

    2016-12-01

    Control of ventricular rate is recommended for patients with paroxysmal, persistent, or permanent atrial fibrillation (AF). Existing rate-control options, including beta-blockers, nondihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, and digoxin, are limited by adverse hemodynamic effects and their ability to attain target heart rate (HR). Ivabradine, a novel HR-controlling agent, decreases HR through deceleration of conduction through If ('funny') channels, and is approved for HR reduction in heart failure patients with ejection fraction less than 35% and elevated HR, despite optimal pharmacological treatment. Because If channels were thought to be expressed solely in sinoatrial (SA) nodal tissue, ivabradine was not investigated in heart failure patients with concomitant AF. Subsequent identification of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 4 (HCN4), the primary gene responsible for If current expression throughout the myocardium, stimulated interest in the potential role of ivabradine for ventricular rate control in AF. Preclinical studies of ivabradine in animal models with induced AF demonstrated a reduction in HR, with no significant worsening of QT interval or mean arterial pressure. Preliminary human data suggest that ivabradine provides HR reduction without associated hemodynamic complications in patients with AF. Questions remain regarding efficacy, safety, optimal dosing, and length of therapy in these patients. Prospective, randomized studies are needed to determine if ivabradine has a role as a rate-control treatment in patients with AF.

  9. Thermal Disk Winds in X-Ray Binaries: Realistic Heating and Cooling Rates Give Rise to Slow, but Massive, Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, N.; Proga, D.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    A number of X-ray binaries exhibit clear evidence for the presence of disk winds in the high/soft state. A promising driving mechanism for these outflows is mass loss driven by the thermal expansion of X-ray heated material in the outer disk atmosphere. Higginbottom & Proga recently demonstrated that the properties of thermally driven winds depend critically on the shape of the thermal equilibrium curve, since this determines the thermal stability of the irradiated material. For a given spectral energy distribution, the thermal equilibrium curve depends on an exact balance between the various heating and cooling mechanisms at work. Most previous work on thermally driven disk winds relied on an analytical approximation to these rates. Here, we use the photoionization code cloudy to generate realistic heating and cooling rates which we then use in a 2.5D hydrodynamic model computed in ZEUS to simulate thermal winds in a typical black hole X-ray binary. We find that these heating and cooling rates produce a significantly more complex thermal equilibrium curve, with dramatically different stability properties. The resulting flow, calculated in the optically thin limit, is qualitatively different from flows calculated using approximate analytical rates. Specifically, our thermal disk wind is much denser and slower, with a mass-loss rate that is a factor of two higher and characteristic velocities that are a factor of three lower. The low velocity of the flow—{v}\\max ≃ 200 km s‑1—may be difficult to reconcile with observations. However, the high mass-loss rate—15 × the accretion rate—is promising, since it has the potential to destabilize the disk. Thermally driven disk winds may therefore provide a mechanism for state changes.

  10. A Multi-Environment Thermal Control System With Freeze-Tolerant Radiator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future space exploration missions require advanced thermal control systems (TCS) to dissipate heat from spacecraft, rovers, or habitats to external environments. We...

  11. Advanced Durable Flexible Ultra Low Outgassing Thermal Control Coatings for NASA Science Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I program proposes to synthesize novel nanoengineered ultra low out gassing elastomers and formulate high temperature capable flexible thermal control...

  12. Rectified Continuous Flow Loop for Thermal Control of Large Deployable Structures and Distributed Loads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future instruments and platforms for NASA's Earth Science Enterprises will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications...

  13. Development of process data capturing, analysis and controlling for thermal spray techniques - SprayTracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelber, C.; Marke, S.; Trommler, U.; Rupprecht, C.; Weis, S.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal spraying processes are becoming increasingly important in high-technology areas, such as automotive engineering and medical technology. The method offers the advantage of a local layer application with different materials and high deposition rates. Challenges in the application of thermal spraying result from the complex interaction of different influencing variables, which can be attributed to the properties of different materials, operating equipment supply, electrical parameters, flow mechanics, plasma physics and automation. In addition, spraying systems are subject to constant wear. Due to the process specification and the high demands on the produced coatings, innovative quality assurance tools are necessary. A central aspect, which has not yet been considered, is the data management in relation to the present measured variables, in particular the spraying system, the handling system, working safety devices and additional measuring sensors. Both the recording of all process-characterizing variables, their linking and evaluation as well as the use of the data for the active process control presuppose a novel, innovative control system (hardware and software) that was to be developed within the scope of the research project. In addition, new measurement methods and sensors are to be developed and qualified in order to improve the process reliability of thermal spraying.

  14. Assessment of the Use of Nanofluids in Spacecraft Active Thermal Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Erickson, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    The addition of metallic nanoparticles to a base heat transfer fluid can dramatically increase its thermal conductivity. These nanofluids have been shown to have advantages in some heat transport systems. Their enhanced properties can allow lower system volumetric flow rates and can reduce the required pumping power. Nanofluids have been suggested for use as working fluids for spacecraft Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCSs). However, there are no studies showing the end-to-end effect of nanofluids on the design and performance of spacecraft ATCSs. In the present work, a parametric study is performed to assess the use of nanofluids in a spacecraft ATCSs. The design parameters of the current Orion capsule and the tabulated thermophysical properties of nanofluids are used to assess the possible benefits of nanofluids and how their incorporation affects the overall design of a spacecraft ATCS. The study shows that the unique system and component-level design parameters of spacecraft ATCSs render them best suited for pure working fluids. The addition of nanoparticles to typical spacecraft thermal control working fluids actually results in an increase in the system mass and required pumping power.

  15. Impact of Cooling Rate-Induced Recrystallization on High G Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling in Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas R.; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stability and thermo-mechanical fatigue performance of solder joints with low silver content Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%) (SAC105) alloy based on different cooling rates are investigated in high G level shock environment and thermal cycling conditions. The cooling rate-controlled samples ranging from 1°C/min to 75°C/min cooling rate, not only show differences in microstructure, where a fine poly-granular microstructure develops in the case of fast cooling versus normal cooling, but also show various shock performances based on the microstructure changes. The fast cooling rate improves the high G shock performance by over 90% compared to the normal cooled SAC105 alloy air-cooling environment commonly used after assembly reflow. The microstructure effect on thermal cycling performance is also discussed, which is analyzed based on the Sn grain orientation, interconnect stability, and solder joint bulk microstructure.

  16. ROBUST REPETITIVE CONTROL FOR IMPROVING RATE SMOOTHNESS OF TEST TURNTABLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYu; ZENGMing; SUBao-ku

    2005-01-01

    A robust repetitive control scheme is used to improve the rate smoothness of a brushless DC motor (BLDCM) driven test turntable. The method synthesizes variable structure control (VSC) laws and repetitive control (RC) laws in a complementary manner. The VSC strategy can stabilize the system and suppress uncertainties, such as the aperiodic disturbance and noises, while RC strategy can eliminate the periodic rate fluctuation in a steady state. The convergence of the repetitive learning process is also guaranteed by VSC. A general nonlinear system model is discussed. The model can be considered as an extension of BLDCMs. The stability and asymptotic position tracking performance are validated by using Lyapunov functions. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed approach for improving the rate smoothness.

  17. COMPUTATIONAL FLOW RATE FEEDBACK AND CONTROL METHOD IN HYDRAULIC ELEVATORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Bing; Ma Jien; Lin Jianjie

    2005-01-01

    The computational flow rate feedback and control method, which can be used in proportional valve controlled hydraulic elevators, is discussed and analyzed. In a hydraulic elevator with this method, microprocessor receives pressure information from the pressure transducers and computes the flow rate through the proportional valve based on pressure-flow conversion real time algorithm. This hydraulic elevator is of lower cost and energy consumption than the conventional closed loop control hydraulic elevator whose flow rate is measured by a flow meter. Experiments are carried out on a test rig which could simulate the load of hydraulic elevator. According to the experiment results, the means to modify the pressure-flow conversion algorithm are pointed out.

  18. Selection of sampling rate for digital control of aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, P.; Powell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The considerations in selecting the sample rates for digital control of aircrafts are identified and evaluated using the optimal discrete method. A high performance aircraft model which includes a bending mode and wind gusts was studied. The following factors which influence the selection of the sampling rates were identified: (1) the time and roughness response to control inputs; (2) the response to external disturbances; and (3) the sensitivity to variations of parameters. It was found that the time response to a control input and the response to external disturbances limit the selection of the sampling rate. The optimal discrete regulator, the steady state Kalman filter, and the mean response to external disturbances are calculated.

  19. Model classification rate control algorithm for video coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A model classification rate control method for video coding is proposed. The macro-blocks are classified according to their prediction errors, and different parameters are used in the rate-quantization and distortion-quantization model.The different model parameters are calculated from the previous frame of the same type in the process of coding. These models are used to estimate the relations among rate, distortion and quantization of the current frame. Further steps,such as R-D optimization based quantization adjustment and smoothing of quantization of adjacent macroblocks, are used to improve the quality. The results of the experiments prove that the technique is effective and can be realized easily. The method presented in the paper can be a good way for MPEG and H. 264 rate control.

  20. An Improvement of MPEG-4 Rate Control Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhaohua; LI Hua; LIU Jixing

    2005-01-01

    Frame skipping in low bit video coding could significantly reduce the visual quality of reconstructed video. At the same time, if the complexity of the video sequence remains high for a long period, then driving up the long term average bit rate, the only resort of MPEG-4 Q2 rate control algorithm results in using a high quantization scale, which shows a poor visual quality of the reconstructed video. This paper analyzes the main causes of frame skipping in current MPEG-4 frame rate control scheme, and presents a new rate control algorithm based on the quadratic R-D model over a CBR channel. Key features of the present work are: 1) the bits allocated to each P-frame or B-frame are in proportion to its distance from the end of this GOP, i.e. more bits are allocated to the frames that are nearer to their reference Ⅰ-frame; 2) the target buffer level is changeable in the GOP, at the end of each GOP(five P-frames or B-frames), the target buffer level is linearly reduced from 1/2 to 1/4 of buffer size, to other frames, the target buffer level is set to 1/2 of buffer size; 3) a selective and judicious use of the reduced resolution mode, in addition to a modulation of the quantization scale parameter, is to control the average long term bit rate. Experimental results with different video sequences of varied complexity, encoded at low bit rates show better efficacy of the proposed algorithm than MPEG-4 Q2 rate control scheme, and the experimental results also show that the improved algorithm has significantly reduced the number of frame skipping, increased the overall PSNR, and improved the perceptual quality.

  1. A new monitor for routine thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate monitoring in k{sub 0} INAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koster-Ammerlaan, M.J.J. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.j.j.koster-ammerlaan@tudelft.nl; Bacchi, M.A. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo 13400-970, Piracicaba (Brazil); Bode, P. [Delft University of Technology, Reactor Institute Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands); Nadai Fernandes, E.A. de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de Sao Paulo 13400-970, Piracicaba (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    The Zr-Au set for monitoring the thermal and epithermal neutron fluence rate and the epithermal spectrum parameter {alpha} is not always practicable for routine application of INAA in well-thermalized facilities. An alternative set consisting of Cr, Au and Mo provides values for the thermal neutron fluence rate, f and {alpha} that are not significantly different from those found via the Zr-Au method and the Cd-covered Zr-method. The IRMM standard SMELS-II was analyzed using the (Au-Cr-Mo) monitor and a good agreement was obtained.

  2. Thermal mathematical modelling philosophy for modular and integrated networks used in the Hermes thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Pierluigi; Martino, Renato; Ruvolo, Giuseppe

    1991-12-01

    The management of thermal modeling activities, so as to build up an overall Hermes Thermal Mathematical Model (HTMM), is described. This overall thermal model is developed using ESATAN (ESA Thermal Analysis Network) software. This computer code allows the hierarchical linking of the various 'stand alone' submodels of different compartments of the Spaceplane. In the Hermes program these submodels are built and run independently, and to permit a successful integration some key points must be considered: requirements for submodel/compartment development; interface definition between submodels; boundary conditions for each submodel; consistent thermal parameters database; network change facilities; logic implementation to simulate the mission phases to be analyzed; linking of submodels; requirements for post processing; and result interpretation. These aspects are discussed, underlining the major problems encountered and the solutions adopted.

  3. Automatic Generation Control Using PI Controller with Bacterial Foraging for both Thermal and Hydro Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Hooda,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The load-frequency control (LFC is used to restore the balance between load and generation in each control area by means of speed control. In power system, the main goal of load frequency control (LFC or automatic generation control (AGC is to maintain the frequency of each area and tie- line power flow within specified tolerance by adjusting the MW outputs of LFC generators so as to accommodate fluctuating load demands. In this paper, attempt is made to make a scheme for automatic generation control within a restructured environment considering effects of contracts between DISCOs and GENCOs to make power system network in normal state where, GENCO used are hydro plants as well as thermal plants. The bacterial foraging optimization technique is being developed, which is applied to AGC in an interconnected four area system.The performance of the system is obtained by MATLAB Simulink tool. The results are shown in frequency and power response for four area AGC system. In this paper we have shown practical work by using thermal and hydro both system at Genco’s side.As reheated system transfer function is being used.

  4. A controlled rate freeze/thaw system for cryopreservation of biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Harrison, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    A system which allows programmable temperature-time control for a 5 cc sample volume of an arbitrary biological material was constructed. Steady state and dynamic temperature control was obtained by supplying heat to the sample volume through resistive elements constructed as an integral part of the sample container. For cooling purposes, this container was totally immersed into a cold heat sink. Sample volume thermodynamic property data were obtained by measurements of heater power and heat flux through the container walls. Using a mixture of dry ice and alcohol at -79 C, sample volume was controlled from +40 C to -60 C at rates from steady state to + or - 65 C/min. Steady state temperature precision was better than 0.2 C while the dynamic capability depends on the temperature rate of change as well as the thermal mass of the sample and the container.

  5. Should thermostatted ring polymer molecular dynamics be used to calculate thermal reaction rates?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hele, Timothy J. H., E-mail: tjhh2@cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Suleimanov, Yury V. [Computation-based Science and Technology Research Center, Cyprus Institute, 20 Kavafi St., Nicosia 2121 (Cyprus); Department of Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    We apply Thermostatted Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics (TRPMD), a recently proposed approximate quantum dynamics method, to the computation of thermal reaction rates. Its short-time transition-state theory limit is identical to rigorous quantum transition-state theory, and we find that its long-time limit is independent of the location of the dividing surface. TRPMD rate theory is then applied to one-dimensional model systems, the atom-diatom bimolecular reactions H + H{sub 2}, D + MuH, and F + H{sub 2}, and the prototypical polyatomic reaction H + CH{sub 4}. Above the crossover temperature, the TRPMD rate is virtually invariant to the strength of the friction applied to the internal ring-polymer normal modes, and beneath the crossover temperature the TRPMD rate generally decreases with increasing friction, in agreement with the predictions of Kramers theory. We therefore find that TRPMD is approximately equal to, or less accurate than, ring polymer molecular dynamics for symmetric reactions, and for certain asymmetric systems and friction parameters closer to the quantum result, providing a basis for further assessment of the accuracy of this method.

  6. Radiative energy balance of Venus: An approach to parameterize thermal cooling and solar heating rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haus, R.; Kappel, D.; Arnold, G.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal cooling rates QC and solar heating rates QH in the atmosphere of Venus at altitudes between 0 and 100 km are investigated using the radiative transfer and radiative balance simulation techniques described by Haus et al. (2015b, 2016). QC strongly responds to temperature profile and cloud parameter changes, while QH is less sensitive to these parameters. The latter mainly depends on solar insolation conditions and the unknown UV absorber distribution. A parameterization approach is developed that permits a fast and reliable calculation of temperature change rates Q for different atmospheric model parameters and that can be applied in General Circulation Models to investigate atmospheric dynamics. A separation of temperature, cloud parameter, and unknown UV absorber influences is performed. The temperature response parameterization relies on a specific altitude and latitude-dependent cloud model. It is based on an algorithm that characterizes Q responses to a broad range of temperature perturbations at each level of the atmosphere using the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) as basis temperature model. The cloud response parameterization considers different temperature conditions and a range of individual cloud mode factors that additionally change cloud optical depths as determined by the initial latitude-dependent model. A QH response parameterization for abundance changes of the unknown UV absorber is also included. Deviations between accurate calculation and parameterization results are in the order of a few tenths of K/day at altitudes below 90 km. The parameterization approach is used to investigate atmospheric radiative equilibrium (RE) conditions. Polar mesospheric RE temperatures above the cloud top are up to 70 K lower and equatorial temperatures up to 10 K higher than observed values. This radiative forcing field is balanced by dynamical processes that maintain the observed thermal structure.

  7. Influence of natural thermal gradients on whole animal rates of protein synthesis in marine gammarid amphipods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P S Rastrick

    Full Text Available Although temperature is known to have an important effect on protein synthesis rates and growth in aquatic ectotherms held in the laboratory, little is known about the effects of thermal gradients on natural populations in the field. To address this issue we determined whole-animal fractional rates of protein synthesis (ks in four dominant species of gammarid amphipods with different distributions along the coasts of Western Europe from arctic to temperate latitudes. Up to three populations of each species were collected in the summer and ks measured within 48 h. Summer ks values were relatively high in the temperate species, Gammarus locusta, from Portugal (48°N and Wales (53°N and were maintained across latitudes by the conservation of translational efficiency. In sharp contrast, summer ks remained remarkably low in the boreal/temperate species G. duebeni from Wales, Scotland (58°N and Tromsø (70°N, probably as a temporary energy saving strategy to ensure survival in rapidly fluctuating environments of the high intertidal. Values for ks increased in acclimated G. duebeni from Scotland and Tromsø showing a lack of compensation with latitude. In the subarctic/boreal species, G. oceanicus, summer ks remained unchanged in Scotland and Tromsø but fell significantly in Svalbard (79°N at 5°C, despite a slight increase in RNA content. At 79°N, mean ks was 4.5 times higher in the circumpolar species G. setosus than in G. oceanicus due to a doubling in RNA content. The relationship between whole-animal protein synthesis rates and natural thermal gradients is complex, varies between species and appears to be associated with local temperatures and their variability, as well as changes in other environmental factors.

  8. Embedded microstructures for daylighting and seasonal thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostro, André; Geiger, Mario; Jolissaint, Nicolas; Gonzalez Lazo, Marina A.; Scartezzini, Jean-Louis; Leterrier, Yves; Schüler, Andreas M.

    2012-10-01

    A novel concept for an advanced fenestration system was studied and samples were produced to demonstrate the feasibility. The resulting novel glazing will combine the functions of daylighting, glare protection, and seasonal thermal control. Coated microstructures provide redirection of the incident solar radiation, thus simultaneously reducing glare and projecting daylight deep into the room in the same manner as an anidolic mirror-based system. The solar gains are reduced for chosen angles corresponding to aestival elevations of the sun, thereby minimizing heating loads in winter and cooling loads in summer. A ray-tracing program developed especially for the study of laminar structures was used for the optimization of structures with the above mentioned goals. The chosen solution is based on reflective surfaces embedded in a polymer film that can be combined with a standard doubled glazed window. The fabrication of such structures required several steps. The fabrication of a metallic mould with a relative high aspect ratio and mirror polished surfaces is followed by the production of an intermediate Polydimethylsiloxane moulds that was subsequently used to replicate the structure with a UV curable polymer. Selected facets of these samples were then coated with a thin film of highly reflective material in a physical vapour deposition process. Finally, the structures were filled with the same polymer to integrated the mirrors.

  9. Rate Control Protocol for Fast Flows: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Gaganpreet Singh,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s world, congestion control is a main objective to maximize fairness, utilization and throughput of the Internet. Every protocol has its own features to handle the congestion. The most widely used protocol over the Internet is Transfer Control Protocol. It aims at reliable and in order delivery of bytes to the higher layer and it also protect the network from congestive control. Other congestion control protocols are XCP and RCP. These new protocols are advancement over TCP. We study new congestion control protocol like Rate Control Protocol that make flows complete frequently as compared to TCP and other version of TCP and XCP. In this paper we have presented a comparison between TCP, XCP and RCP, which shows that RCP is a superior choice to use over the Internet to make flows complete quickly

  10. Reaction weakening and emplacement of crystalline thrusts: Diffusion control on reaction rate and strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Kieran

    2007-08-01

    In the southern Appalachians, the Blue Ridge-Piedmont crystalline thrust sheet was emplaced onto low-grade Late Precambrian and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the footwall along a basal detachment consisting of phyllosilicate-rich mylonites (phyllonites). The phyllonites developed first by mechanical breakdown of feldspar followed by chemical breakdown to white mica in the presence of a pore fluid. Diffusion of solute in the pore fluid is the rate limiting step in controlling reaction rate and also the strain rate. Assuming solute diffusion follows the Stokes-Einstein equation, the shear strain rate is given by ⅆγ/ⅆt=2ωkT/5ηrx for shear stress ≥20 MPa, where n is a constant, ω is a geometric factor, k is Boltzmann's constant, T is absolute temperature, η is water viscosity, r is the atomic radius of the diffusing species, and x is the diffusion distance. A bulk diffusion coefficient in the range of ˜10 -10 to 10 -12 m 2/s over distances of 10-100 m results in strain rates of 10 -14 to 10 -13 s -1 in the temperature range 200-400 °C. It is concluded that greenschist grade crystalline thrust sheets develop on pre-existing basement faults that become weak during reaction softening and localize into high strain phyllonite zones in which pore fluid diffusion controls reaction rate and strain rate.

  11. Analyzing Control Challenges for Thermal Energy Storage in Foodstuffs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Larsen, Lars F. S.; Skovrup, Morten Juel

    2012-01-01

    We consider two important challenges that arise when thermal energy is to be stored in foodstuffs. We have previously introduced economic optimizing MPC schemes that both reduce operating costs and offer flexible power consumption in a future Smart Grid. The goal is to utilize the thermal capacity...

  12. Accurate quantum thermal rate constants for the three-dimensional H+H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jun; Light, J. C.

    1989-07-01

    The rate constants for the three-dimensional H+H2 reaction on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) surface are calculated using Pack-Parker hyperspherical (APH) coordinates and a C2v symmetry adapted direct product discrete variable representation (DVR). The C2v symmetry decomposition and the parity decoupling on the basis are performed for the internal coordinate χ. The symmetry decomposition results in a block diagonal representation of the flux and Hamiltonian operators. The multisurface flux is introduced to represent the multichannel reactive flux. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the J=0 internal Hamiltonian are obtained by sequential diagonalization and truncation. The individual symmetry blocks of the flux operator are propagated by the corresponding blocks of the Hamiltonian, and the J=0 rate constant k0(T) is obtained as a sum of the rate constants calculated for each block. k0(T) is compared with the exact k0(T) obtained from thermal averaging of the J=0 reaction probabilities; the errors are within 5%-20% up to T=1500 K. The sequential diagonalization-truncation method reduces the size of the Hamiltonian greatly, but the resulting Hamiltonian matrix still describes the time evolution very accurately. For the J≠0 rate constant calculations, the truncated internal Hamiltonian eigenvector basis is used to construct reduced (JKJ) blocks of the Hamiltonian. The individual (JKJ) blocks are diagonalized neglecting Coriolis coupling and treating the off-diagonal KJ±2 couplings by second order perturbation theory. The full wave function is parity decoupled. The rate constant is obtained as a sum over J of (2J+1)kJ(T). The time evolution of the flux for J≠0 is again very accurately described to give a well converged rate constant.

  13. Gas Control and Thermal Modeling Methods for Pressed Pellet and Fast Rise Thin-Film Thermal Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    heat paper.3,4 Similar pyrotechnically heated mixtures of ~22/78 wt % Zr /BaCrO4 heat powder plus additional BaCrO4 powder should be effective in...fractions – Control – Full Run – Showing H2 – No Zr /BaCrO4 ..............................6 Fig. 2 Pressed pellet thermal battery operating gas atmosphere...fractions – Control – Full Run – Not Showing H2 – No Zr /BaCrO4 .......................6 Fig. 3 Pressed pellet thermal battery operating gas

  14. A Simple Adaptive Rate Control for H.264/AVC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Myoung-Jin; Kim; Min-Cheol; Hong

    2010-01-01

    <正>The purpose of this paper is to improve allocation of the number of bits without skipping the frame by accurately estimating the target bits in H.264/AVC rate control.In our scheme,we propose an enhancement method of the target frame rate based H.264/AVC bit allocation.The enhancement uses a frame complexity estimation to improve the existing mean absolute difference(MAD)complexity measurement Bit allocation to each frame is not just computed by target frame rate but also adjusted by a combined frame complexity measure.Using the statistical characteristic,we obtain change of occurrence bit about QP to apply the bit amount by QP from the video characteristic and applied in the estimated bit amount of the current frame. Simulation results show that the proposed rate control scheme could not only achieves time saving of more than 99%over existing rate control algorithm,but also increase the average PSNR of reconstructed video for around 0.02~0.78 dB in all the sequences.

  15. Controlling the Type I Error Rate in Stepwise Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, John T.

    Three procedures used to control Type I error rate in stepwise regression analysis are forward selection, backward elimination, and true stepwise. In the forward selection method, a model of the dependent variable is formed by choosing the single best predictor; then the second predictor which makes the strongest contribution to the prediction of…

  16. Social Capital, Social Control, and Changes in Victimization Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawdon, James; Ryan, John

    2009-01-01

    A neighborhood-level model of crime that connects the central dimensions of social capital with specific forms of social control is developed. The proposed model is tested using a structural equation model that predicts changes in empirical Bayes log odds of neighborhood victimization rates between 2000 and 2001 in 41 neighborhoods in South…

  17. Rate control for streaming media transmission over WLAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoliang ZHU; Xu DU

    2008-01-01

    In order to solve the problems of link layer retransmission and packet fragment strategies for IEEE 802.11,this paper proposes a variable packet TCPfriendly rate control(VPTFRC)scheme for streaming media transmission over wireless local area network (WLAN)by researching on the policy of packet size adjustment in transport layer based on the minimum retransmit-delay constraint.Unlike other proposals,this process considers the impact of wireless packet error ratio(PER)on the packet size adjustment and the performance of rate control.Simulation results demonstrate that our proposed process can simultaneously achieve higher throughput,better fairness,shorter transmission delay and less jitter than TFRC.Among them,the ratio of delay,iitter and packet loss rate can reach a maximum improvement ratio of 58%,42%and 85%respectively.

  18. Steady thermal stress and strain rates in a rotating circular cylinder under steady state temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress and strain rates in a thick walled rotating cylinder under steady state temperature has been derived by using Seth’s transition theory. For elastic-plastic stage, it is seen that with the increase of temperature, the cylinder having smaller radii ratios requires lesser angular velocity to become fully plastic as compared to cylinder having higher radii ratios The circumferential stress becomes larger and larger with the increase in temperature. With increase in thickness ratio stresses must be decrease. For the creep stage, it is seen that circumferential stresses for incompressible materials maximum at the internal surface as compared to compressible material, which increase with the increase in temperature and measure n.

  19. Influence of process parameters on thermal-rate treatment of ZA42 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成栋; 田学雷; 赵梅; 耿浩然

    2002-01-01

    Sand casting process and directional solidification technique combining thermal-rate treatment(TRT) were used. The influence of process parameters on TRT was investigated according to the values of impact toughness. At the same time, the mechanism of TRT was discussed. The results showed that TRT can improve the impact toughness of this alloy, while the hardness is basically constant. The time of heat preservation should not be more than 5min. Different forms of cooling intensification additive have different effects among which the zinc ingot solidified in graphite mold is the best one that can improve impact toughness of samples by more than 80%. With increasing the cooling temperature, the value of α(Al) crystal lattice constant increases. The element Sb has negative effect on TRT.

  20. Thermal dilepton rates and electrical conductivity of the QGP from the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Heng-Tong; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Meyer, Florian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of the thermal dilepton rate and the electrical conductivity of the gluon plasma at temperatures of 1.1, 1.3, and 1.5 Tc in quenched QCD. Making use of nonperturbatively clover-improved Wilson valence quarks allows for a clean extrapolation of the vector meson correlation function to the continuum limit. We found that the vector correlation function divided by T3 is almost temperature independent in the current temperature window. The spectral functions are obtained by χ2 fitting of phenomenologically inspired Ansätze for the spectral function to the continuum extrapolated correlator data, where the correlations between the data points have been included. Systematic uncertainties arising from varying the Ansätze motivated from strong coupling theory as well as perturbation theory are discussed and estimated. We found that the electrical conductivity of the hot medium, related to the slope of the vector spectral function at zero frequency and momentum, is 0.2 Ce m≲σ /T ≲0.7 Ce m for T =1.1 Tc and 0.2 Ce m≲σ /T ≲0.4 Ce m for the higher temperatures. The dilepton rates and soft photon rates, resulting from the obtained spectral functions, show no significant temperature dependence, either.

  1. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve for Passive Variable Thermal Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Lunar Landers and Rovers will require variable thermal links that can reject heat during daytime, and passively shut-off during lunar night. During the long...

  2. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve for Passive Variable Thermal Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can provide variable thermal conductance needed to maintain electronics and batteries on Lunar/Martian rovers/landers within desired...

  3. Software for Automated Generation of Reduced Thermal Models for Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal analysis is increasingly used in the engineering of spacecrafts at every stage, including design, test, and ground-operation simulation. Currently used...

  4. Atrial fibrillation management: evaluating rate vs rhythm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan; Jolly, Umjeet; Sidhu, Kiran; Yee, Raymond; Leong-Sit, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasing global issue leading to increased hospitalizations, adverse health related events and mortality. This review focuses on the management of atrial fibrillation, in particular in the past decade, comparing two major strategies, rate or rhythm control. We evaluate the evidence for each strategy, pharmacological options and the increasing utilization of invasive techniques, in particular catheter ablation and use of implantable cardiac pacing devices. Pharmacological comparative trials evaluating both strategies have shown rate control being non-inferior to rhythm control for clinical outcomes of mortality and other cardiovascular events (including stroke). Catheter ablation techniques, involving radiofrequency ablation and recently cryoablation, have shown promising results in particular with paroxysmal AF. However, persistent AF provides ongoing challenges and will be a particular focus of continued research.

  5. 0-π phase-controllable thermal Josephson junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Timossi, Giuliano; Virtanen, Pauli; Solinas, Paolo; Giazotto, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Two superconductors coupled by a weak link support an equilibrium Josephson electrical current that depends on the phase difference ϕ between the superconducting condensates. Yet, when a temperature gradient is imposed across the junction, the Josephson effect manifests itself through a coherent component of the heat current that flows opposite to the thermal gradient for |ϕ| fundamental step towards the realization of caloritronic logic components such as thermal transistors, switches and memory devices. These elements, combined with heat interferometers and diodes, would complete the thermal conversion of the most important phase-coherent electronic devices and benefit cryogenic microcircuits requiring energy management, such as quantum computing architectures and radiation sensors.

  6. Preliminary results on the non-thermal effects of 200-350 GHz radiation on the growth rate of S. cerevisiae cells in microcolonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiloucas, S; Chahal, M S; Bowen, J W

    2002-11-07

    We report preliminary results from studies of biological effects induced by non-thermal levels of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation. Exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells grown on dry media were exposed to electromagnetic fields in the 200-350 GHz frequency range at low power density to observe possible non-thermal effects on the microcolony growth. Exposure to the electromagnetic field was conducted over 2.5 h. The data from exposure and control experiments were grouped into either large-, medium- or small-sized microcolonies to assist in the accurate assessment of growth. The three groups showed significant differences in growth between exposed and control microcolonies. A statistically significant enhanced growth rate was observed at 341 GHz. Growth rate was assessed every 30 min via time-lapse photography. Possible interaction mechanisms are discussed, taking into account Frohlich's hypothesis.

  7. Thermal-sprayed, thin-film pyrite cathodes for thermal batteries -- Discharge-rate and temperature studies in single cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.; DAI,JINXIANG; XIAO,T. DANNY; REISNER,DAVID

    2000-05-25

    Using an optimized thermal-spray process, coherent, dense deposits of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) with good adhesion were formed on 304 stainless steel substrates (current collectors). After leaching with CS{sub 2} to remove residual free sulfur, these served as cathodes in Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells. The cells were tested over a temperature range of 450 C to 550 C under baseline loads of 125 and 250 mA/cm{sup 2}, to simulate conditions found in a thermal battery. Cells built with such cathodes outperformed standard cells made with pressed-powder parts. They showed lower interracial resistance and polarization throughout discharge, with higher capacities per mass of pyrite. Post-treatment of the cathodes with Li{sub 2}O coatings at levels of >7% by weight of the pyrite was found to eliminate the voltage transient normally observed for these materials. Results equivalent to those of standard lithiated catholytes were obtained in this manner. The use of plasma-sprayed cathodes allows the use of much thinner cells for thermal batteries since only enough material needs to be deposited as the capacity requirements of a given application demand.

  8. Controllable magnetic thermal rectification in a SMM dimmer with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai-Hua; Liu, Juan; Luo, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Using the quantum master equation, we studied the thermally driven magnonic spin current in a single-molecule magnet (SMM) dimer with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Due to the asymmetric DMI, one can observe the thermal rectifying effect in the case of the spatial symmetry coupling with the thermal reservoirs. The properties of the thermal rectification can be controlled by tuning the angle and intensity of the magnetic field. Specially, when the DM vector and magnetic field point at the specific angles, the thermal rectifying effect disappears. And this phenomenon does not depend on the intensities of DMI and magnetic field, the temperature bias and the magnetic anisotropies of the SMM.

  9. Integral Radiators for Next Generation Thermal Control Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Integral radiators integrate the primary structural system and the thermal rejection system into a dual function subsystem allowing for reduced weight. The design of...

  10. Electrochemical-Driven Fluid Pump for Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With the increasing power demands and longer life spans of space vehicles, their thermal management becomes ever more critical. Accompanying this is an unprecedented...

  11. Electrochemical-Driven Fluid Pump for Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — With the increasing power demands and longer life spans of space vehicles, their thermal management becomes ever more critical. Accompanying this is an unprecedented...

  12. Role of feedback in voluntary control of heart rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, S B; Levenson, R W; Hinrichsen, J J; Gryll, S L

    1975-06-01

    The relative effectiveness of biofeedback techniques on the voluntary control of heart rate was examined by randomly assigning 32 Ss to one of four feedback conditions in a bi-directional heart-rate control task: (1) no feedback, (2) binary feedback--S was signaled when an interbeat interval had changed in the correct direction, (3) "real-time," proportional feedback--S was provided information about the relative duration of successive interbeat intervals, and (4) numerical, proportional feedback--each interbeat interval was represented as a numeral indicating its relationship to pre-trial mean by direction and magnitude. Significant over-all heart-rate changes were evidenced for both increase and decrease directions, but no differences were found between the feedback conditions. While these data suggest that feedback may be a relatively insignificant factor in voluntary heart-rate control, it was recommended that further investigation examine the role of feedback within the context of other training, mediating and motivational variables.

  13. Joint rate control and scheduling for wireless uplink video streaming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian-wei; LI Zhu; CHIANG Mung; KATSAGGELOS Aggelos K.

    2006-01-01

    We solve the problem of uplink video streaming in CDMA cellular networks by jointly designing the rate control and scheduling algorithms. In the pricing-based distributed rate control algorithm, the base station announces a price for the per unit average rate it can support, and the mobile devices choose their desired average transmission rates by balancing their video quality and cost of transmission. Each mobile device then determines the specific video frames to transmit by a video summarization process. In the time-division-multiplexing (TDM) scheduling algorithm, the base station collects the information on frames to be transmitted from all devices within the current time window, sorts them in increasing order of deadlines, and schedules the transmissions in a TDM fashion. This joint algorithm takes advantage of the multi-user content diversity, and maximizes the network total utility (i.e., minimize the network total distortion), while satisfying the delivery deadline constraints. Simulations showed that the proposed algorithm significantly outperforms the constant rate provision algorithm.

  14. Controls on Helheim Glacier calving rates from 2001-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, L. A.; Foga, S. C.; Hamilton, G. S.; Straneo, F.; Sutherland, D.; van der Veen, C. J.; Oltmanns, M.; Schild, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Iceberg calving is an efficient mechanism for ice mass loss. While the physical controls on calving are not well understood, recent field and remote sensing observations from Helheim Glacier, southeast Greenland, suggest calving is dependent on both glacier and fjord conditions. This presentation investigates the sensitivity of calving rates to ice velocity, ocean temperature and mélange composition using a combination of in situ and satellite observations. Ocean properties in Sermilik Fjord for 2009-2014 are reconstructed using mooring data, and an object-based image analysis (OBIA) that inventories icebergs, sea-ice and small icebergs quantifies mélange composition several times a season. Ice velocity from InSAR and optical imagery is used to calculate calving rates and investigate the role of longitudinal gradients on calving. Ice velocity appears to be the dominant control on calving rates at Helheim Glacier. However, calving rates exhibit a complex pattern of seasonal and interannual variability, which does not simply mimic ice velocity patterns. We explore the relative roles of ocean properties, glacier geometry, and mélange composition on calving rates from 2001-2014 in order to improve physically-based glacier models.

  15. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  16. Miniaturized two-stack Blumlein pulser with a variable repetition-rate for non-thermal irreversible-electroporation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Sun-Hong; Kwon, Ohjoon; Sattorov, Matlabjon; Baek, In-Keun; Kim, Seontae; Jeong, Jin-Young; Hong, Dongpyo; Park, Seunghyuk; Park, Gun-Sik

    2017-01-01

    Non-thermal irreversible electroporation (NTIRE) to avoid thermal damage to cells during intense DC ns pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is a recent modality for medical applications. This mechanism, related to bioelectrical dynamics of the cell, is linked to the effect of a DC electric field and a threshold effect with an electrically stimulated membrane for the charge distribution in the cell. To create the NTIRE condition, the pulse width of the nsPEF should be shorter than the charging time constant of the membrane related to the cell radius, membrane capacitance, cytoplasm resistivity, and medium resistivity. It is necessary to design and fabricate a very intense nanosecond DC electric field pulser that is capable of producing voltages up to the level of 100 kV/cm with an artificial pulse width (˜ns) with controllable repetition rates. Many devices to generate intense DC nsPEF using various pulse-forming line technologies have been introduced thus far. However, the previous Blumlein pulse-generating devices are clearly inefficient due to the energy loss between the input voltage and the output voltage. An improved two-stage stacked Blumlein pulse-forming line can overcome this limitation and decrease the energy loss from a DC power supply. A metal oxide silicon field-effect transistor switch with a fast rise and fall time would enable a high repetition rate (max. 100 kHz) and good endurance against very high voltages (DC ˜ 30 kV). The load is designed to match the sample for exposure to cell suspensions consisting of a 200 Ω resistor matched with a Blumlein circuit and two electrodes without the characteristic RC time effect of the circuit (capacitance =0.174 pF).

  17. Rapid estimation of glucosinolate thermal degradation rate constants in leaves of Chinese kale and broccoli (Brassica oleracea) in two seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Kristin; Verkerk, Ruud; Bonnema, Guusje; Dekker, Matthijs

    2012-08-15

    Kinetic modeling was used as a tool to quantitatively estimate glucosinolate thermal degradation rate constants. Literature shows that thermal degradation rates differ in different vegetables. Well-characterized plant material, leaves of broccoli and Chinese kale plants grown in two seasons, was used in the study. It was shown that a first-order reaction is appropriate to model glucosinolate degradation independent from the season. No difference in degradation rate constants of structurally identical glucosinolates was found between broccoli and Chinese kale leaves when grown in the same season. However, glucosinolate degradation rate constants were highly affected by the season (20-80% increase in spring compared to autumn). These results suggest that differences in glucosinolate degradation rate constants can be due to variation in environmental as well as genetic factors. Furthermore, a methodology to estimate rate constants rapidly is provided to enable the analysis of high sample numbers for future studies.

  18. Optically controlled thermal management on the nanometer length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garwe, F [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Bauerschaefer, U [GmBU, Erich-Neuss-Weg 5, D-06120 Halle/S (Germany); Csaki, A [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Steinbrueck, A [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Ritter, K [Technical University Ilmenau, D-98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Bochmann, A [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Bergmann, J [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Weise, A [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Human Genetics and Anthropology, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Akimov, D [Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Physical Chemistry, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Maubach, G [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Koenig, K [Fraunhofer Institut St Ingbert, D-07702 St Ingbert (Germany); Huettmann, G [Medical Laser Center Luebeck, D-23552 Luebeck (Germany); Paa, W [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Popp, J [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Fritzsche, W [Institute of Photonic Technology (IPHT) Jena, PO Box 100239, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2008-02-06

    The manipulation of polymers and biological molecules or the control of chemical reactions on a nanometer scale by means of laser pulses shows great promise for applications in modern nanotechnology, biotechnology, molecular medicine or chemistry. A controllable, parallel, highly efficient and very local heat conversion of the incident laser light into metal nanoparticles without ablation or fragmentation provides the means for a tool like a 'nanoreactor', a 'nanowelder', a 'nanocrystallizer' or a 'nanodesorber'. In this paper we explain theoretically and show experimentally the interaction of laser radiation with gold nanoparticles on a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) layer (one-photon excitation) by means of different laser pulse lengths, wavelengths and pulse repetition rates. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing the possibility of highly local (in a 40 nm range) regulated heat insertion into the nanoparticle and its surroundings without ablation of the gold nanoparticles. In an earlier paper we showed that near-infrared femtosecond irradiation can cut labeled DNA sequences in metaphase chromosomes below the diffraction-limited spot size. Now, we use gold as well as silver-enhanced gold nanoparticles on DNA (also within chromosomes) as energy coupling objects for femtosecond laser irradiation with single-and two-photon excitation. We show the results of highly localized destruction effects on DNA that occur only nearby the nanoparticles.

  19. Control over emissivity of zero-static-power thermal emitters based on phase changing material GST

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Kaikai; Lyu, Yanbiao; Ding, Jichao; Lu, Yue; Cheng, Zhiyuan; Qiu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the emissivity of a thermal emitter has attracted growing interest with a view towards a new generation of thermal emission devices. So far, all demonstrations have involved sustained external electric or thermal consumption to maintain a desired emissivity. Here control over the emissivity of a thermal emitter consisting of a phase changing material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) film on top of a metal film is demonstrated. This thermal emitter shows broad wavelength-selective spectral emissivity in the mid-infrared. The peak emissivity approaches the ideal blackbody maximum and a maximum extinction ratio of above 10dB is attainable by switching GST between the crystalline and amorphous phases. By controlling the intermediate phases, the emissivity can be continuously tuned. This switchable, tunable, wavelength-selective and thermally stable thermal emitter will pave the way towards the ultimate control of thermal emissivity in the field of fundamental science as well as for energy-harvesting and thermal contro...

  20. Speech rate in Parkinson's disease: A controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, F; Meilán, J J G; Carro, J; Gómez Íñiguez, C; Millian-Morell, L; Pujante Valverde, I M; López-Alburquerque, T; López, D E

    2016-09-01

    Speech disturbances will affect most patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) over the course of the disease. The origin and severity of these symptoms are of clinical and diagnostic interest. To evaluate the clinical pattern of speech impairment in PD patients and identify significant differences in speech rate and articulation compared to control subjects. Speech rate and articulation in a reading task were measured using an automatic analytical method. A total of 39 PD patients in the 'on' state and 45 age-and sex-matched asymptomatic controls participated in the study. None of the patients experienced dyskinesias or motor fluctuations during the test. The patients with PD displayed a significant reduction in speech and articulation rates; there were no significant correlations between the studied speech parameters and patient characteristics such as L-dopa dose, duration of the disorder, age, and UPDRS III scores and Hoehn & Yahr scales. Patients with PD show a characteristic pattern of declining speech rate. These results suggest that in PD, disfluencies are the result of the movement disorder affecting the physiology of speech production systems. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal loading as a causal factor in exceeding the 0.1 PPM laboratory fume hood control level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessin, Saul J; Johnston, James D

    2002-07-01

    Tracer gas testing per ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods was used to investigate the role of thermal loading in exceeding laboratory fume hood control levels. Three types of typical laboratory burners (blast, Meeker, and economy) were used to provide a thermal challenge. Heat outputs of between 0 and 61,610 Btu/hr were based on fuel heat capacity (for liquid propane gas) and fuel gas flow rates. Breathing zone concentrations were measured with a MIRAN 1B2 infrared gas analyzer. Also, for each test, the difference between the room and duct temperatures (delta temperature) was measured. Results indicated a linear relationship between heat loads and tracer gas breathing zone concentrations for both Btu/hr and delta temperature. Control levels of 0.1 ppm were exceeded at less than 12,000 Btu/hr. Also, control levels were exceeded at a lower heat load when the tracer gas generation rate was increased. These results indicate that thermal loads in laboratory fume hoods increase the risk of exceeding laboratory fume hood control levels. Some compensatory measures relative to hood configuration and flow rates are recommended for laboratory operations involving heat sources.

  2. High process yield rates of thermoplastic nanofluidic devices using a hybrid thermal assembly technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uba, Franklin I; Hu, Bo; Weerakoon-Ratnayake, Kumuditha; Oliver-Calixte, Nyote; Soper, Steven A

    2015-02-21

    Over the past decade, thermoplastics have been used as alternative substrates to glass and Si for microfluidic devices because of the diverse and robust fabrication protocols available for thermoplastics that can generate high production rates of the desired structures at low cost and with high replication fidelity, the extensive array of physiochemical properties they possess, and the simple surface activation strategies that can be employed to tune their surface chemistry appropriate for the intended application. While the advantages of polymer microfluidics are currently being realized, the evolution of thermoplastic-based nanofluidic devices is fraught with challenges. One challenge is assembly of the device, which consists of sealing a cover plate to the patterned fluidic substrate. Typically, channel collapse or substrate dissolution occurs during assembly making the device inoperable resulting in low process yield rates. In this work, we report a low temperature hybrid assembly approach for the generation of functional thermoplastic nanofluidic devices with high process yield rates (>90%) and with a short total assembly time (16 min). The approach involves thermally sealing a high T(g) (glass transition temperature) substrate containing the nanofluidic structures to a cover plate possessing a lower T(g). Nanofluidic devices with critical feature sizes ranging between 25-250 nm were fabricated in a thermoplastic substrate (T(g) = 104 °C) and sealed with a cover plate (T(g) = 75 °C) at a temperature significantly below the T(g) of the substrate. Results obtained from sealing tests revealed that the integrity of the nanochannels remained intact after assembly and devices were useful for fluorescence imaging at high signal-to-noise ratios. The functionality of the assembled devices was demonstrated by studying the stretching and translocation dynamics of dsDNA in the enclosed thermoplastic nanofluidic channels.

  3. Temperature control of thermal radiation from composite bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weiliang; Polimeridis, Athanasios G.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate that recent advances in nanoscale thermal transport and temperature manipulation can be brought to bear on the problem of tailoring thermal radiation from wavelength-scale composite bodies. We show that such objects—complicated arrangements of phase-change chalcogenide (Ge2Sb2Te5 ) glasses and metals or semiconductors—can be designed to exhibit strong resonances and large temperature gradients, which in turn lead to large and highly directional emission at midinfrared wavelengths. We find that partial directivity depends sensitively on a complicated interplay between shape, material dispersion, and temperature localization within the objects, requiring simultaneous design of the electromagnetic scattering and thermal properties of these structures. Our calculations exploit a recently developed fluctuating-volume current formulation of electromagnetic fluctuations that rigorously captures radiation phenomena in structures with strong temperature and dielectric inhomogeneities, such as those studied here.

  4. Time-Based Dithering Algorithm and Frame Rate Control Technique for STN LCD Controller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEIJianming; ZOUXuechen

    2004-01-01

    Time-based dithering algorithm and Frame rate control (FRC) technique applied to the STN liquid crystal display controller are presented. The dithering unit performs time-based dithering algorithm on pixel data to advantageously increase smoothness of an image displayed. The frame rate control unit is responsive to the dithering unit and performs frame rate controlling to generate more gray-shades, which may reduce flicker and visual artifacts. Results show that the gray shades displayed on images can be up to 256 for monochrome STN LCD panels or 2563 colors for color STN LCD panels respectively by using timebased dithering algorithm and frame rate control technique if each encoded pixel data is 8 bits. The images displayed on the STN liquid crystal display can get desirable grayshades and very little flicker and visual artifacts.

  5. Wind Turbine Contingency Control Through Generator De-Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan; Goebel, Kai; Balas, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing turbine up-time and reducing maintenance costs are key technology drivers for wind turbine operators. Components within wind turbines are subject to considerable stresses due to unpredictable environmental conditions resulting from rapidly changing local dynamics. In that context, systems health management has the aim to assess the state-of-health of components within a wind turbine, to estimate remaining life, and to aid in autonomous decision-making to minimize damage to the turbine. Advanced contingency control is one way to enable autonomous decision-making by providing the mechanism to enable safe and efficient turbine operation. The work reported herein explores the integration of condition monitoring of wind turbines with contingency control to balance the trade-offs between maintaining system health and energy capture. The contingency control involves de-rating the generator operating point to achieve reduced loads on the wind turbine. Results are demonstrated using a high fidelity simulator of a utility-scale wind turbine.

  6. Synchronous temperature rate control for refrigeration with reduced energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alberto Regio; Keres, Stephen L.; Kuehl, Steven J.; Litch, Andrew D.; Richmond, Peter J.; Wu, Guolian

    2015-09-22

    Methods of operation for refrigerator appliance configurations with a controller, a condenser, at least one evaporator, a compressor, and two refrigeration compartments. The configuration may be equipped with a variable-speed or variable-capacity compressor, variable speed evaporator or compartment fans, a damper, and/or a dual-temperature evaporator with a valve system to control flow of refrigerant through one or more pressure reduction devices. The methods may include synchronizing alternating cycles of cooling each compartment to a temperature approximately equal to the compartment set point temperature by operation of the compressor, fans, damper and/or valve system. The methods may also include controlling the cooling rate in one or both compartments. Refrigeration compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its lower threshold temperature. Freezer compartment cooling may begin at an interval before or after when the freezer compartment reaches its upper threshold temperature.

  7. Robust, Decoupled, Flight Control Design with Rate Saturating Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, S. A.; Hess, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Techniques for the design of control systems for manually controlled, high-performance aircraft must provide the following: (1) multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) solutions, (2) acceptable handling qualities including no tendencies for pilot-induced oscillations, (3) a tractable approach for compensator design, (4) performance and stability robustness in the presence of significant plant uncertainty, and (5) performance and stability robustness in the presence actuator saturation (particularly rate saturation). A design technique built upon Quantitative Feedback Theory is offered as a candidate methodology which can provide flight control systems meeting these requirements, and do so over a considerable part of the flight envelope. An example utilizing a simplified model of a supermaneuverable fighter aircraft demonstrates the proposed design methodology.

  8. Reversible control of electrochemical properties using thermally-responsive polymer electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jesse C; Pepin, Mark; Huber, Dale L; Bunker, Bruce C; Roberts, Mark E

    2012-02-14

    A thermally responsive copolymer is designed to modulate the properties of an electrolyte solution. The copolymer is prepared using pNIPAM, which governs the thermal properties, and acrylic acid, which provides the electrolyte ions. As the polymer undergoes a thermally activated phase transition, the local environment around the acid groups is reversibly switched, decreasing ion concentration and conductivity. The responsive electrolyte is used to control the activity of redox electrodes with temperature.

  9. Channel Based Adaptive Rate Control Technique for MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bharathiraja

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In Mobile Ad hoc Networks (MANET, most of the existing works does not consider energy efficiency during selecting the appropriate route. Hence in MANET selecting the appropriate route and also maintaining energy efficiency is very important. Hence in order to overcome these issues, in this study we propose Channel Based Adaptive Rate Control technique for MANET. Here the most appropriate links is selected to transmit the node with efficient power consumption. The node broadcasts the information of its outgoing and incoming links in NSET instead of waiting for the feedback informattion from receiver. The number of packets transmitted in a channel access time is maximized by implementing the benefit ratio in rate selection algorithm. This study also introduces node cooperation, in node cooperation the node determines the feasibility of new rate setting determined by rate selection algorithm and it carries out new setting if it is feasible by following help, ack, reject and accept method. By simulation results we show that the proposed approach is power efficient and also increases the trasmission rate.

  10. Factors Controlling Sediment Denitrification Rates in Grassland and Forest Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sediment denitrification is an important nitrate (NO3- removal process from agricultural streams. The direct and indirect factors that control denitrification rates in tributary sediments can vary depending on the types of agricultural activities and vegetation. Our research investigated (1 tributary sediment denitrification rates in a grassland stream affected by pasture ecosystems and a forest stream affected by N fertilization; and (2 the environmental factors that determine denitrification rates in tributary sediments. The denitrification enzyme activity (DEA in grassland stream sediments is positively correlated with precipitation likely due to the increased nutrient exchange rates between stream water and sediments, and was higher than in forest stream sediments, leading to a decrease in NO3- concentration ([NO3-] in stream sediments. The DEA in riparian sediments was regulated by carbon concentrations and did not contribute to NO3- removal from the riparian sediment in grassland and forest streams. Thus, environmental factors affected by different types of agricultural activities and vegetation might regulate denitrification rates and [NO3-] in agricultural stream ecosystems.

  11. AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF HEART RATE AFTER EXERCISE IN TRAINED WRESTLERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, San Martín E.; Von Oetinger, A.; Cañas, Jamett R.; Ramírez, Campillo R.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish differences in vagal reactivation, through heart rate recovery and heart rate variability post exercise, in Brazilian jiu-jitsu wrestlers (BJJW). A total of 18 male athletes were evaluated, ten highly trained (HT) and eight moderately trained (MT), who performed a maximum incremental test. At the end of the exercise, the R-R intervals were recorded during the first minute of recovery. We calculated heart rate recovery (HRR60s), and performed linear and non-linear (standard deviation of instantaneous beat-to-beat R-R interval variability – SD1) analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), using the tachogram of the first minute of recovery divided into four segments of 15 s each (0-15 s, 15-30 s, 30-45 s, 45-60 s). Between HT and MT individuals, there were statistically significant differences in HRR60s (p <0.05) and in the non linear analysis of HRV from SD130-45s (p <0.05) and SD145-60s (p <0.05). The results of this research suggest that heart rate kinetics during the first minute after exercise are related to training level and can be used as an index for autonomic cardiovascular control in BJJW. PMID:24744476

  12. Modelling heat and moisture transfer in buildings. Applications to indoor thermal and moisture control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiaoshu

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this thesis is to firstly develop a mathematical model for predicting heat and moisture transfer in buildings exposed to outdoor climatic conditions presented as temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation and wind velocity. Secondly, the heat and moisture transfer model is used to theoretically study the possibilities of controlling indoor thermal and moisture levels into an allowable range by means of heating indoor air and ventilating outdoor air. Starting from an extensive literature, it is indicated that less attention has been devoted to the topic that is similar to this thesis work. The reviewed literature has been classified into different categories in a consistent and systematic way. In modelling heat and moisture transfer in a building, the building structure is split into two components: building indoor air and building envelopes, most of which are porous media. The heat and moisture transfer equations are based on the fundamental thermodynamic relations. Darcy's law, Fick's law and Fourier's law are used in describing the transfer equations. The resultant nonlinear system of partial differential equations is discretised by using the finite element method or the finite difference method. The time marching scheme, Crank-Nicolson scheme, is adopted to advance the solution in time. The final solution provides transient distributions of thermal, moisture content and gaseous pressure for the envelopes as well as the transient thermal and moisture content for indoor air. The model program, named as HMTB, is validated with the real test houses. HMTB has a highly flexibility: It has been used to simulate the multiphase drying process of a porous medium. It has been adopted to predict transient thermal and moisture contents for buildings, transient indoor moisture generation rates and condensation potential on the wall surfaces. In studying the applications of indoor thermal and moisture control, HMTB has been applied to

  13. Thermal decay rate of a metastable state with two degrees of freedom: Dynamical modelling versus approximate analytical formula

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I I GONTCHAR; M V CHUSHNYAKOVA

    2017-06-01

    Accuracy of the Kramers approximate formula for the thermal decay rate of the metastable state is studied for the two-dimensional potential pocket. This is done by comparing with the quasistationary rate resulting from the dynamical modelling. It is shown that the Kramers rate is in agreement with the quasistationary rate within the statistical errors provided the absorptive border is far enough from the potential ridge restricting the metastable state. As the absorptive border (or its part) gets closer to the ridge, the Kramers formula underestimates the quasistationary rate. The difference reaches approximately the factor of 2 when the absorptive border coincides with the ridge.

  14. Thermal decay rate of a metastable state with two degrees of freedom: dynamical modeling versus approximate analytical formula

    CERN Document Server

    Gontchar, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Accuracy of the Kramers approximate formula for the thermal decay rate of the metastable state is studied for the two-dimensional potential pocket. This is done by the comparison with the quasistationary rate resulting from the dynamical modeling. It is shown that the Kramers rate is in agreement with the quasistationary rate within the statistical errors provided the absorptive border is far enough from the potential ridge restricting the metastable state. As the absorptive border (or its part) gets closer to the ridge the Kramers formula underestimate the quasistationary rate. The difference reaches approximately the factor of 2 when the absorptive border coincides with the ridge.

  15. CFD validation of the thermal comfort in a room using draft rates

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Air temperature and velocity are the two main factors affecting the thermal comfort indoors. These two values can be easily obtained using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations together with the turbulence kinetic energy value. This paper evaluates methods of calculating thermal comfort indices using CFD. Simulated results are compared against experimental data measured in a purpose build full-scale model room. The results show that CFD data can reliably predict thermal comfort values...

  16. Two-Dimension Sorting and Selection Algorithm featuring Thermal Balancing Control for Modular Multilevel Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangwongwanich, Ariya; Máthé, Lászlo; Teodorescu, Remus

    2016-01-01

    With the aim to solve the unbalanced thermal behavior in the modular multilevel converter, introduced by mismatch in the submodule parameters, a thermal balancing control strategy is proposed here. The proposed solution ensures a balanced junction temperature for the power devices, while...

  17. Thermal decomposition rate of MgCO3 as an inorganic astrobiological matrix in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisceglia, E.; Longo, G. Micca; Longo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Carbonate minerals, likely of hydrothermal origins and included into orthopyroxenite, have been extensively studied in the ALH84001 meteorite. In this meteorite, nanocrystals comparable with those produced by magnetotactic bacteria have been found into a carbonate matrix. This leads naturally to a discussion of the role of such carbonates in panspermia theories. In this context, the present work sets the basis of a criterion to evaluate whether a carbonate matrix in a meteor entering a planetary atmosphere would be able to reach the surface. As a preliminary step, the composition of carbonate minerals in the ALH84001 meteorite is reviewed; in view of the predominance of Mg in these carbonates, pure magnesite (MgCO3) is proposed as a mineral model. This mineral is much more sensitive to high temperatures reached during an entry process, compared with silicates, due to facile decomposition into MgO and gaseous carbon dioxide (CO2). A most important quantity for further studies is therefore the decomposition rate expressed as CO2 evaporation rate J (molecules/m2 s). An analytical expression for J(T) is given using the Langmuir law, based on CO2 pressure in equilibrium with MgCO3 and MgO at the surface temperature T. Results suggest that carbonate minerals rich in magnesium may offer much better thermal protection to embedded biological matter than silicates and significantly better than limestone, which was considered in previous studies, in view of the heat absorbed by their decomposition even at moderate temperatures. This first study can be extended in the future to account for more complex compositions, including Fe and Ca.

  18. Method of Producing Controlled Thermal Expansion Coat for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Miller, Robert A. (Inventor); Aikin, Beverly J. M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    An improved thermal barrier coating and method for producing and applying such is disclosed herein. The thermal barrier coatings includes a high temperature substrate, a first bond coat layer applied to the substrate of MCrAlX and a second bond coat layer of MCrAlX with particles of a particulate dispersed throughout the MCrAlX and the preferred particulate is Al2O3. The particles of the particulate dispersed throughout the second bond coat layer preferably have a diameter of less then the height of the peaks of the second bond coat layer or a diameter of less than 5 micron. The method of producing the second bond coat layer may either include the steps of mechanical alloying of particles throughout the second bond coat layer, attrition milling the particles of the particulate throughout the second bond coat layer, or using electrophoresis to disperse the particles throughout the second bond coat layer. In the preferred embodiment of the invention the first bond coat layer is applied to the substrate. and then the second bond coat layer is thermally sprayed onto the first bond coat layer. Further, in a preferred embodiment of the invention a ceramic insulating layer covers the second bond coat layer.

  19. CREDIT CONTROL INSTRUMENTS IN A DUAL BANKING SYSTEM: LEVERAGE CONTROL RATE (LCR – A PROPOSAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubair HASAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Islam banishes interest. This raises two questions contextual to Central Banking. First, can Islamic banks create credit like the conventional? We shall argue that Islamic banks cannot avoid credit creation; an imperative for staying in the market where they operate in competition with their conventional rivals. Evidently, the interest rate policy would not be applicable to them as a control measure. This leads us to the second question: What could possibly replace the interest rate for Islamic banks? In reply, the paper suggests what it calls a leverage control rate (LCR as an addition to Central Banks’ credit control arsenal. The proposed rate is derived from the sharing of profit ratio in Islamic banking. It is contended that the new measure has an edge over the old fashioned interest rate instrument which it can in fact replace with advantage. It can possibly be a common measure in a dual system.

  20. Thermal response simulation for tuning PID controllers in a 1016 mm guarded hot plate apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William C; Zarr, Robert R

    2011-07-01

    A mathematical model has been developed and used to simulate the controlled thermal performance of a large guarded hot-plate apparatus. This highly specialized apparatus comprises three interdependent components whose temperatures are closely controlled in order to measure the thermal conductivity of insulation materials. The simulation model was used to investigate control strategies and derive controller gain parameters that are directly transferable to the actual instrument. The simulations take orders-of-magnitude less time to carry out when compared to traditional tuning methods based on operating the actual apparatus. The control system consists primarily of a PC-based PID control algorithm that regulates the output voltage of programmable power amplifiers. Feedback parameters in the form of controller gains are required for the three heating circuits. An objective is to determine an improved set of gains that meet temperature control criteria for testing insulation materials of interest. The analytical model is based on aggregated thermal capacity representations of the primary components and includes the same control algorithm as used in the actual hot-plate apparatus. The model, accounting for both thermal characteristics and temperature control, was validated by comparisons with test data. The tuning methodology used with the simulation model is described and results are presented. The resulting control algorithm and gain parameters have been used in the actual apparatus without modification during several years of testing materials over wide ranges of thermal conductivity, thickness, and insulation resistance values.

  1. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Arvind [Department of Design, Production and Management, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Sodha, M.S. [Department of Education and Physics, Lucknow University, Lucknow 226007 (India); Anwar, S.I. [Indian Institute of Sugar-cane Research, Lucknow, U.P. (India)

    2009-12-15

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank, respectively, in the terms of design and climatic parameters. Further, an analysis has also been extended for hot water withdrawal at constant collection temperature. Numerical computations have been carried out for the design and climatic parameters of the system used by Huang et al. [Huang BJ, Lin TH, Hung WC, Sun FS. Performance evaluation of solar photovoltaic/thermal systems. Sol Energy 2001; 70(5): 443-8]. It is observed that the daily overall thermal efficiency of IPVTS system increases with increase constant flow rate and decrease with increase of constant collection temperature. The exergy analysis of IPVTS system has also been carried out. It is further to be noted that the overall exergy and thermal efficiency of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar system (IPVTS) is maximum at the hot water withdrawal flow rate of 0.006 kg/s. The hourly net electrical power available from the system has also been evaluated. (author)

  2. A novel dynamic frame rate control algorithm for H.264 low-bit-rate video coding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Jing; Fang Xiangzhong

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to improve human visual perceptual quality as well as coding efficiency of H.264 video at low bit rate conditions by adaptively adjusting the number of skipped frames. The encoding frames ale selected according to the motion activity of each frame and the motion accumulation of successive frames. The motion activity analysis is based on the statistics of motion vectors and with consideration of the characteristics of H. 264 coding standard. A prediction model of motion accumulation is proposed to reduce complex computation of motion estimation. The dynamic encoding frame rate control algorithm is applied to both the frame level and the GOB (Group of Macroblocks) level. Simulation is done to compare the performance of JM76 with the proposed frame level scheme and GOB level scheme.

  3. Controlling thermal and electrical properties of graphene by strain-engineering its flexural phonons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Hiram; Nicholl, Ryan; Bolotin, Kirill

    2014-03-01

    We explore the effects of flexural phonons on the thermal and electrical properties of graphene. To control the amplitude of flexural phonons, we developed a technique to engineer uniform mechanical strain between 0 and 1% in suspended graphene. We determine the level of strain, thermal conductivity and carrier mobility of graphene through a combination of mechanical resonance and electrical transport measurements. Depending on strain, we find significant changes in the thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, and carrier mobility of suspended graphene. These changes are consistent with the expected contribution of flexural phonons.

  4. Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array for Picosat Propulsion and Thermal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeenko, Alina; Cardiff, Eric; Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Film-Evaporation MEMS Tunable Array (FEMTA) concept for propulsion and thermal control of picosats exploits microscale surface tension effect in conjunction with temperature- dependent vapor pressure to realize compact, tunable and low-power thermal valving system. The FEMTA is intended to be a self-contained propulsion unit requiring only a low-voltage DC power source to operate. The microfabricated thermal valving and very-high-integration level enables fast high-capacity cooling and high-resolution, low-power micropropulsion for picosats that is superior to existing smallsat micropropulsion and thermal management alternatives.

  5. Coupled Chemical and Thermal Processes During Contact Metamorphism: Constraining Rates and Duration with Time-Dependent 3-D Heat and Mass Transport Modeling of Fluid-Rock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrow, B. L.; Henry, D.; Gable, C. W.; Heydari, E.; Travis, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrothermal, metamorphic and metasomatic rocks develop through a complex set of coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical processes that contain non-linear feedbacks. The integrated outcome results in a mineral assemblage with a specific texture that records the rates, magnitude and duration of the controlling processes. However, it is often difficult to extract this coupled information from the rock record due to the competing and time-integrated nature of the final product. A particularly problematic case arises when advective metasomatism accompanies thermal energy transport. Advective transport of reactive components by thermally driven flowing fluids can dramatically alter the original bulk rock chemistry. In some instances, these chemical transformations are slow but in others, these alterations can occur over short time scales (yrs). To facilitate investigations of coupled, complex systems and to constrain the rates, duration and relative importance of governing processes during a thermal event, high-resolution 3-D time dependent computational modeling is used. An example of the integrated effects of thermal and chemical transport is found in subsurface Louisiana. Here, an 11m alkali igneous dike intruded Late Jurassic sandy limestones transforming these into new mineral assemblages rich in alkali, alkaline earth elements and F; hydrogrossular, diopside, pectolite (pct), apophyllite, fluorite, and feldspars. Increased temperatures (Ts) and significant mass transport of components from the dike into the host rocks are required. A series of coupled heat and mass transport calculations constrain the rates and duration of the thermal pulse and provide insights into the time-scale of mass transport within this system. For example, calculations incorporating silica transport indicate that at the pct zone (1.5m), thermal conditions remained above 150oC for 2.8 yrs assuming anisotropic permeability (K) and 4.2 yrs (layered K) reaching Tmax at 0.36 (aniso) or 0.53 yr

  6. An Analysis of an Automatic Coolant Bypass in the International Space Station Node 2 Internal Active Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Stephen E.; Holt, James M.; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A challenging part of International Space Station (ISS) thermal control design is the ability to incorporate design changes into an integrated system without negatively impacting performance. The challenge presents itself in that the typical ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) consists of an integrated hardware/software system that provides active coolant resources to a variety of users. Software algorithms control the IATCS to specific temperatures, flow rates, and pressure differentials in order to meet the user-defined requirements. What may seem to be small design changes imposed on the system may in fact result in system instability or the temporary inability to meet user requirements. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the solution process and analyses used to implement one such design change that required the incorporation of an automatic coolant bypass in the ISS Node 2 element.

  7. Operation and Thermal Modeling of the ISIS H– Source from 50 to 2 Hz Repetition Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, H; Lettry, J

    2013-01-01

    CERN’s Linac4 accelerator H− ion source, currently under construction, will operate at a 2 Hz repetition rate, with pulse length of 0.5 ms and a beam current of 80 mA. Its reliability must exceed 99 % with a mandatory 3 month uninterrupted operation period. A Penning ion source is successfully operated at ISIS; at 50 Hz repetition rate it reliably provides 55 mA H− pulses of 0.25 ms duration over 1 month. The discharge plasma ignition is very sensitive to the temperatures of the discharge region, especially of its cathode. The investigation by modeling and measurement of operation parameters suitable for arc ignition and H− production at 2 Hz is of paramount importance and must be understood prior to the implementation of discharge ion sources in the Linac4 accelerator. In its original configuration, the ISIS H− source delivers beam only if the repetition rate is above 12.5 Hz, this paper describes the implementation of a temperature control of the discharge region aiming at lower repetition rate op...

  8. Quality control for thermal building simulations; Keurmerk thermische gebouwsimulaties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijsman, A.J.Th.M.; Plokker, W. [TNO Bouw, Delft (Netherlands)

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of the IEA (International Energy Agency) Annex 21 (Calculation of Energy and Environmental Performance of Buildings a set of tools has been developed to reduce the - in practice often very broad - differences produced in computerised thermal calculations for buildings and installations. This was followed by the launch of a project aimed at putting the assimilated knowledge and newly developed tools into practice in the Netherlands. The tools (MIS or Model Information System for the documentation of the models and the programmes, BESTEST to test building simulation programmes, and PAM, a Performance Assessment Method with guidelines for the user to translate practical data of the building into input data for the programme) were partly adapted to the Dutch situation and then transferred to four interested Dutch distributors of the computer software used for the thermal calculations. A procedure was also developed for issuing a mark of approval, based on these tools. 2 refs.

  9. Lossless Compression and Rate Control for the Galileo NIMS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, R.; Mehlman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) is a sophisticated multi-spectral instrument that was developed to study the spatial/compositional aspects of the atmosphere of Jupiter and the surfaces of it's satellites. Since its original development, the communication capability of the Galileo spacecraft has been severly reduced as the result of a failure of ground controllers to open the main antenna. The data rate which will be available for all instruments at the first Jupiter encounter in 1995 has been reduced by several orders of magnitude (even after recent numerous improvements to data link efficiency.).

  10. Adaptation to local thermal regimes by crustose coralline algae does not affect rates of recruitment in coral larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siboni, Nachshon; Abrego, David; Evenhuis, Christian; Logan, Murray; Motti, Cherie A.

    2015-12-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are well known for their ability to induce settlement in coral larvae. While their wide distribution spans reefs that differ substantially in temperature regimes, the extent of local adaptation to these regimes and the impact they have on CCA inductive ability are unknown. CCA Porolithon onkodes from Heron (southern) and Lizard (northern) islands on Australia's Great Barrier Reef (separated by 1181 km) were experimentally exposed to acute or prolonged thermal stress events and their thermal tolerance and recruitment capacity determined. A sudden onset bleaching model was developed to determine the health status of CCA based on the rate of change in the CCA live surface area (LSA). The interaction between location and temperature was significant ( F (2,119) = 6.74, p = 0.0017), indicating that thermally driven local adaptation had occurred. The southern population remained healthy after prolonged exposure to 28 °C and exhibited growth compared to the northern population ( p = 0.022), with its optimum temperature determined to be slightly below 28 °C. As expected, at the higher temperatures (30 and 32 °C) the Lizard Island population performed better that those from Heron Island, with an optimum temperature of 30 °C. Lizard Island CCA displayed the lowest bleaching rates at 30 °C, while levels consistently increased with temperature in their southern counterparts. The ability of those CCA deemed thermally tolerant (based on LSA) to induce Acropora millepora larval settlement was then assessed. While spatial differences influenced the health and bleaching levels of P. onkodes during prolonged and acute thermal exposure, thermally tolerant fragments, regardless of location, induced similar rates of coral larval settlement. This confirmed that recent thermal history does not influence the ability of CCA to induce settlement of A. millepora larvae.

  11. HRCT: hop-by-hop rate control technique for congestion control in wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Rekha; Cidambaram, Gomathy

    2011-12-01

    In Wireless Sensor Networks, congestion occurs when the traffic rate is high. This happens when the an event is detected in a network. Congestion causes packet loss thus degrading the performance of the network. Hence it necessitates to develop an effective congestion control technique. This paper focuses on congestion due to concurrent transmission. We have proposed an efficient protocol to detect and control congestion in a MAC. The occurrence of congestion is detected by calculating a new metrics called congestion scale. When the congestion scale exceeds the threshold value it intimates, that, congestion has occurred. Congestion notification signal is send to all the nodes. On receiving the notification signal all nodes adjust their transmission rate to control congestion. We have implemented Hop-by-Hop Rate Control Technique(HRCT) to control congestion and to guarantee both high throughput and minimum delay. This technique is implemented successfully in NS-2 simulator. Finally, simulation results have demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm.

  12. Near-field radiative thermal control with graphene covered on different materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ao; Zheng, Zhiheng; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-09-01

    Based on the structure of double-layer parallel plates, this paper demonstrates that thermal radiation in near field is greatly enhanced due to near-field effects, exceeding Planck‧s blackbody radiation law. To study the effect of graphene on thermal radiation in near field, the authors add graphene layer into the structure and analyze the ability of graphene to control near-field thermal radiation with different materials. The result indicates that the graphene layer effectively suppresses the near-field thermal radiation between metal plates or polar-dielectric plates, having good ability of thermal insulation. But for doped-silicon plates, depending on the specific models, graphene has different control abilities, suppressing or enhancing, and the control abilities mainly depend on the material graphene is attached to. The authors also summarize some common rules about the different abilities of graphene to control the near-field thermal radiation. In consideration of the thickness of 0.34 nm of monolayer graphene, this paper points out that graphene plays a very important role in controlling the near-field thermal radiation.

  13. Structurally Efficient Three-dimensional Metamaterials with Controllable Thermal Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Pasini, Damiano

    2016-10-10

    The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of architected materials, as opposed to that of conventional solids, can be tuned to zero by intentionally altering the geometry of their structural layout. Existing material architectures, however, achieve CTE tunability only with a sacrifice in structural efficiency, i.e. a drop in both their stiffness to mass ratio and strength to mass ratio. In this work, we elucidate how to resolve the trade-off between CTE tunability and structural efficiency and present a lightweight bi-material architecture that not only is stiffer and stronger than other 3D architected materials, but also has a highly tunable CTE. Via a combination of physical experiments on 3D fabricated prototypes and numeric simulations, we demonstrate how two distinct mechanisms of thermal expansion appearing in a tetrahedron, can be exploited in an Octet lattice to generate a large range of CTE values, including negative, zero, or positive, with no loss in structural efficiency. The novelty and simplicity of the proposed design as well as the ease in fabrication, make this bi-material architecture well-suited for a wide range of applications, including satellite antennas, space optical systems, precision instruments, thermal actuators, and MEMS.

  14. Structurally Efficient Three-dimensional Metamaterials with Controllable Thermal Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Pasini, Damiano

    2016-10-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of architected materials, as opposed to that of conventional solids, can be tuned to zero by intentionally altering the geometry of their structural layout. Existing material architectures, however, achieve CTE tunability only with a sacrifice in structural efficiency, i.e. a drop in both their stiffness to mass ratio and strength to mass ratio. In this work, we elucidate how to resolve the trade-off between CTE tunability and structural efficiency and present a lightweight bi-material architecture that not only is stiffer and stronger than other 3D architected materials, but also has a highly tunable CTE. Via a combination of physical experiments on 3D fabricated prototypes and numeric simulations, we demonstrate how two distinct mechanisms of thermal expansion appearing in a tetrahedron, can be exploited in an Octet lattice to generate a large range of CTE values, including negative, zero, or positive, with no loss in structural efficiency. The novelty and simplicity of the proposed design as well as the ease in fabrication, make this bi-material architecture well-suited for a wide range of applications, including satellite antennas, space optical systems, precision instruments, thermal actuators, and MEMS.

  15. Structurally Efficient Three-dimensional Metamaterials with Controllable Thermal Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Pasini, Damiano

    2016-01-01

    The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of architected materials, as opposed to that of conventional solids, can be tuned to zero by intentionally altering the geometry of their structural layout. Existing material architectures, however, achieve CTE tunability only with a sacrifice in structural efficiency, i.e. a drop in both their stiffness to mass ratio and strength to mass ratio. In this work, we elucidate how to resolve the trade-off between CTE tunability and structural efficiency and present a lightweight bi-material architecture that not only is stiffer and stronger than other 3D architected materials, but also has a highly tunable CTE. Via a combination of physical experiments on 3D fabricated prototypes and numeric simulations, we demonstrate how two distinct mechanisms of thermal expansion appearing in a tetrahedron, can be exploited in an Octet lattice to generate a large range of CTE values, including negative, zero, or positive, with no loss in structural efficiency. The novelty and simplicity of the proposed design as well as the ease in fabrication, make this bi-material architecture well-suited for a wide range of applications, including satellite antennas, space optical systems, precision instruments, thermal actuators, and MEMS. PMID:27721437

  16. Effective thermal conductivity of condensed polymeric nanofluids (nanosolids) controlled by diffusion and interfacial scattering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Nisha; M S Jayalakshmy; J Philip

    2013-11-01

    Thermal properties of polymeric nanosolids, obtained by condensing the corresponding nanofluids, are investigated using photothermal techniques. The heat transport properties of two sets of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based nanosolids, TiO2/PVA and Cu/PVA, prepared by condensing the respective nanofluids, which are prepared by dispersing nanoparticles of TiO2 and metallic copper in liquid PVA, are reported. Two photothermal techniques, the photoacoustic and the photopyroelectric techniques, have been employed for measuring thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of these nanosolids. The experimental results indicate that thermal conduction in these polymer composites is controlled by heat diffusion through the embedded particles and interfacial scattering at matrix–particle boundaries. These two mechanisms are combined to arrive at an expression for their effective thermal conductivity. Analysis of the results reveals the possibility to tune the thermal conductivity of such nanosolids over a wide range using the right types of nanoparticles and right concentration.

  17. Size control by rate control in colloidal PbSe quantum dot synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čapek, Richard Karel; Yanover, Dianna; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2015-03-01

    A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses.A recently demonstrated approach to control the size of colloidal nanoparticles, ``size control by rate control'', which was validated on the examples of colloidal CdSe- and CdS-quantum dot (CQD) synthesis, appears to be a general strategy for designing technically applicable CQD-syntheses. The ``size control by rate control'' concept allows full-yield syntheses of ensembles of CQDs with different sizes by tuning the solute formation rate. In this work, we extended this strategy to dialkylphosphine enhanced hot-injection synthesis of PbSe-CQDs. Furthermore, we provide new insight into the reaction mechanism of dialkylphosphine enhancement in TOPSe based CQD-syntheses. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data about the reaction and growth kinetics, NMR-data and exemplary TEM images of PbSe-CQDs prepared by the procedure described in this publication. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00028a

  18. Control of serpentinisation rate by reaction-induced cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Brantut, Nicolas; Kaczmarek, Mary-Alix

    2017-10-01

    Serpentinisation of mantle rocks requires the generation and maintenance of transport pathways for water. The solid volume increase during serpentinisation can lead to stress build-up and trigger cracking, which ease fluid penetration into the rock. The quantitative effect of this reaction-induced cracking mechanism on reactive surface generation is poorly constrained, thus hampering our ability to predict serpentinisation rate in geological environments. Here we use a combined approach with numerical modelling and observations in natural samples to provide estimates of serpentinisation rate at mid-ocean ridges. We develop a micromechanical model to quantify the propagation of serpentinisation-induced cracks in olivine. The maximum crystallisation pressure deduced from thermodynamic calculations reaches several hundreds of megapascals but does not necessary lead to crack propagation if the olivine grain is subjected to high compressive stresses. The micromechanical model is then coupled to a simple geometrical model to predict reactive surface area formation during grain splitting, and thus bulk reaction rate. Our model reproduces quantitatively experimental kinetic data and the typical mesh texture formed during serpentinisation. We also compare the model results with olivine grain size distribution data obtained on natural serpentinised peridotites from the Marum ophiolite and the Papuan ultramafic belt (Papua New Guinea). The natural serpentinised peridotites show an increase of the number of olivine grains for a decrease of the mean grain size by one order of magnitude as reaction progresses from 5 to 40%. These results are in agreement with our model predictions, suggesting that reaction-induced cracking controls the serpentinisation rate. We use our model to estimate that, at mid-ocean ridges, serpentinisation occurs up to 12 km depth and reaction-induced cracking reduces the characteristic time of serpentinisation by one order of magnitude, down to values

  19. Robust Engineered Thermal Control Material Systems for Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and Prometheus Needs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — identified needs for the thermal control and ESD functions of the Prometheus Program's hardware for the heat rejection system for the planned nuclear system. These...

  20. Demonstration of a Plug and Play Approach to Satellite Thermal Control System Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Mainstream is proposing a methodology to reduce the development time and cost, and improve the reliability of future thermal control systems for the next decade of...

  1. A Module For Thermal Pest Control In Stored Raw Materials Used In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Module For Thermal Pest Control In Stored Raw Materials Used In Feed Mills / Food Manufacturing Industries. ... Journal Home > Vol 3, No 1 (2006) > ... The module is an engineering contraption, which uses steam to raise temperature ...

  2. Hybrid Heat Pipes for High Heat Flux Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Grooved aluminum/ammonia Constant Conductance Heat Pipes (CCHPs) are the standard for thermal control in zero-gravity. Unfortunately, they are limited in terms of...

  3. Interior and exterior ballistics coupled optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin-xin; Zhang, Nai-min; Zhang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    For solid launch vehicle performance promotion, a modeling method of interior and exterior ballistics associated optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal condition is proposed. Firstly, the interior and external ballistic models of the solid launch vehicle are established, and the attitude control model of the high wind area and the stage of the separation is presented, and the load calculation model of the drag reduction device is presented, and thermal condition calculation model of flight is presented. Secondly, the optimization model is established to optimize the range, which has internal and external ballistic design parameters as variables selected by sensitivity analysis, and has attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions as constraints. Finally, the method is applied to the optimal design of a three stage solid launch vehicle simulation with differential evolution algorithm. Simulation results are shown that range capability is improved by 10.8%, and both attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions are satisfied.

  4. Metabolic Heat Regenerated Temperature Swing Adsorption for CO2, Thermal and Humidity Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MTSA technology specifically addresses the thermal, CO2 and humidity control challenges faced by Portable Life Support Systems (PLSS) to be used in NASA's...

  5. Safe, Non-Corrosive Dielectric Fluid for Stagnating Radiator Thermal Control System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Paragon proposes to develop a single-loop, non-toxic, stagnating active pumped loop thermal control design for NASA's Orion or Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM)...

  6. Next Generation Advanced Binder Chemistries for High Performance, Environmentally DurableThermal Control Material Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative SBIR Phase II proposal will develop next generation products for Thermal Control Material Systems (TCMS) an adhesives based on the next generation...

  7. Effect of acetylene flow rate on morphology and structure of carbon nanotube thick films grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zhangyi; SUN Zhuo; GUO Pingsheng; CHEN Yiwei

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films were grown on nickel foil substrates by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with acetylene and hydrogen as the precursors. The morphology and structure of CNTs depending on the acetylene flow rate were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM),a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a Raman spectrometer,respectively.The effect of acetylene flow rate on the morphology and structure of CNT films was investigated.By increasing the acetylene flow rate from 10 to 90 sccm (standard cubic centimeter perminute),the yield and the diameter of CNTs increase.Also, the defects and amorphous phase in CNT films increase with increasing acetylene flow rate.

  8. Thermal Control Method for High-Current Wire Bundles by Injecting a Thermally Conductive Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, Juan; Rowles, Russell; Greer, Greg

    2011-01-01

    A procedure was developed to inject thermal filler material (a paste-like substance) inside the power wire bundle coming from solar arrays. This substance fills in voids between wires, which enhances the heat path and reduces wire temperature. This leads to a reduced amount of heat generated. This technique is especially helpful for current and future generation high-power spacecraft (1 kW or more), because the heat generated by the power wires is significant enough to cause unacceptable overheating to critical components that are in close contact with the bundle.

  9. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, Arvind; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank, resp

  10. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, A.; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank, resp

  11. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  12. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, A.; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank,

  13. Control and exploitation of thermal distortions in welded T-joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keinaenen, H.; Alhainen, J.; Karppi, R.; Verho, M. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    2009-07-01

    The main objective of the DISCO (Control and Exploitation of Thermal Distortions) project was the creation of an overall concept for the control of thermal distortions. The domain of the project was at this stage limited to structural steels and to the processes most important to the participating industry. The project explored the possibility to apply the inherent strain method for modelling thermal deformations by establishing an inherent strain database for major arc welding and thermal cutting situations. The project was executed in close co-operation with Osaka University, Japan, Lappeenranta University of Technology and four Finnish enterprises. The work focused on structural steels representing two strength levels, and GMAW, FCAW, SAW and restrictedly on tandem MAG welding processes. The computational practices were revealed for treating thermal distortions. Further actions included testing and modelling of welded T-joint with various plate thicknesses

  14. RATE-ADJUSTMENT ALGORITHM FOR AGGREGATE TCP CONGESTION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. TINNAKORNSRISUPHAP, ET AL

    2000-09-01

    The TCP congestion-control mechanism is an algorithm designed to probe the available bandwidth of the network path that TCP packets traverse. However, it is well-known that the TCP congestion-control mechanism does not perform well on networks with a large bandwidth-delay product due to the slow dynamics in adapting its congestion window, especially for short-lived flows. One promising solution to the problem is to aggregate and share the path information among TCP connections that traverse the same bottleneck path, i.e., Aggregate TCP. However, this paper shows via a queueing analysis of a generalized processor-sharing (GPS) queue with regularly-varying service time that a simple aggregation of local TCP connections together into a single aggregate TCP connection can result in a severe performance degradation. To prevent such a degradation, we introduce a rate-adjustment algorithm. Our simulation confirms that by utilizing our rate-adjustment algorithm on aggregate TCP, connections which would normally receive poor service achieve significant performance improvements without penalizing connections which already receive good service.

  15. Aerobic exercise during pregnancy influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of heart rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Linda E; Glaros, Alan; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Clapp, James F; Gustafson, Kathleen M

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies using ultrasound technology showed that fetal heart rate (HR) may be responsive to maternal aerobic exercise. Although it is recognized that cardiac autonomic control may be influenced by the intrauterine environment, little is known about how maternal exercise affects fetal heart development. This study tested the hypothesis that regular maternal exercise throughout gestation influences fetal cardiac autonomic control of HR and heart rate variability (HRV) when compared to fetuses of non-exercising women. Magnetocardiograms (MCGs) were recorded using a dedicated fetal biomagnetometer at 28, 32 and 36 weeks gestational age (GA) from 26 regularly exercising (>30 min of aerobic exercise, 3x per week) and 35 healthy, non-exercising pregnant women. Fetal MCG was isolated and normal R-peaks were marked to derive fetal HR and HRV in the time and frequency domains. We applied a mixed-effects model to investigate the effects of exercise, GA and fetal activity state. At 36 weeks GA, during the active fetal state, fetal HR was significantly lower in the exercise group (p=exercise group during the active fetal state at 36 weeks GA for both time and frequency domain measures. These results indicate that regular maternal exercise throughout gestation results in significantly lower fetal HR and increased HRV. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Rate Control Management of Atrial Fibrillation: May a Mathematical Model Suggest an Ideal Heart Rate?

    CERN Document Server

    Anselmino, Matteo; Camporeale, Carlo; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF), clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR) to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation. Methods. The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively. Results. Left ventricular pressure increased by 56.7%, from 33.92+-37.56 mmHg to 53.15+-47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27.4%, from 82.66+-14.04 mmHg to 105.29+-7.63 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45+-8.5 to 39.09+-8.08 mL), ejection fraction (from 61.1+-4.4 to 39.32+-5.42%) and stroke work (SW, from 0.88+-0.04 to 0.58+-0.09 J) decreased by 49.5, 35.6 and 34.2%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen co...

  17. Thermal control of electronic equipment by heat pipes; Controle thermique de composants electroniques par caloducs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groll, M.; Schneider, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme; Sartre, V.; Chaker Zaghdoudi, M.; Lallemand, M. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Centre de Thermique de Lyon, Upresa CNRS

    1998-05-01

    In the frame of the BRITE-EURAM european programme (KHIEPCOOL project), a literature survey on the main beat pipe and micro heat pipe technologies developed for thermal control of electronic equipment has been carried out. The conventional heat pipes are cylindrical, flat or bellow tubes, using wicks or axial grooves as capillary structures. In the field of micro heat pipes, the component interconnection substrate. The best performances were achieved with Plesch`s axially grooved flat miniature heat pipe, which is able to transfer a heat flux of about 60 W.cm{sup -2}. Theoretical models have shown that the performance of micro heat pipe arrays increase with increasing tube diameter, decreasing tube length and increasing heat pipe density. The heat pipe technologies are classified and compared according to their geometry and location in the system. A list of about 150 references, classified according to their subjects, is presented. (authors) 160 refs.

  18. Preliminary Design and Analysis of the ARES Atmospheric Flight Vehicle Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarre, J. F.; Dillman, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) is a proposed 2007 Mars Scout Mission that will be the first mission to deploy an atmospheric flight vehicle (AFV) on another planet. This paper will describe the preliminary design and analysis of the AFV thermal control system for its flight through the Martian atmosphere and also present other analyses broadening the scope of that design to include other phases of the ARES mission. Initial analyses are discussed and results of trade studies are presented which detail the design process for AFV thermal control. Finally, results of the most recent AFV thermal analysis are shown and the plans for future work are discussed.

  19. Dynamic Thermal Model and Temperature Control of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Stack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵庆龙; 卫东; 曹广益; 朱新坚

    2005-01-01

    A dynamic thermal transfer model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack is developed based on energy conservation in order to reach better temperature control of PEMFC stack. Considering its uncertain parameters and disturbance, we propose a robust adaptive controller based on backstepping algorithm of Lyaponov function. Numerical simulations indicate the validity of the proposed controller.

  20. Thermal control of power supplies with electronic packaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The analysis, design, and development work to reduce the weight and size of a standard modular power supply with a 350 watt output was summarized. By integrating low cost commercial heat pipes in the redesign of this power supply, weight was reduced by 30% from that of the previous design. The temperature was also appreciably reduced, increasing the environmental capability of the unit. A demonstration unit with a 100 watt output and a 15 volt regulator module, plus simulated output modules, was built and tested to evaluate the thermal performance of the redesigned power supply.

  1. PWM Flow Rate Control of ER Valve and its Application to ER Actuator Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masami; Minagawa, Shuji; Hagino, Katsuya

    The PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) control of ER valve consisting of two parallel electrodes has been investigated to continuously control the flow rate of an electrorheological (ER) suspension containing sulfonated polymer particles in silicone oil. PWM wave voltages are applied to the electrodes of the ER valve. It is possible to control continuously the flow rate by changing the duty ratio of the PWM wave from 1 to 0, where the duty ratio of 1 corresponds to the state to stop the flow. A miniature bellows actuator driven by a pair of PWM controlled ER valves has been developed, and the control characteristics of the actuator have been investigated. The duty ratios of both ER valves have been proposed to be changed alternately in proportion to the control voltage V to control the flow rate into and out of the bellows chamber, and also an overlap duty ratio Dov at V=0V has been introduced. The introduction of the overlap duty ratio Dov was found to be very important to smoothly control the actuator and to improve the control performance.

  2. Layerwise Analysis of Thermal Shape Control in Graded Piezoelectric Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2003-01-01

    A layerwise finite element formulation developed for piezoelectric materials is used to investigate the displacement and stress response of a functionally graded piezoelectric bimorph actuator. The formulation is based on the principles of linear thermopiezoelectricity and accounts for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric materials. The layerwise laminate theory is implemented into a linear beam element in order to provide a more accurate representation of the transverse and shear effects that are induced by increased inhomogeneities introduced through-the-thickness by using functionally graded materials. The accuracy of the formulation is verified with previously published experimental results for a piezoelectric bimorph actuator. Additional studies are conducted to analyze the impact of electric and thermal loads on the deflections and stresses in a bimorph actuator. Results of the study help demonstrate the capability of the layerwise theory to provide a more complete representation of shear effects that are no longer negligible even in thin piezoelectric beams. In addition, the effects of varying piezoelectric properties through-the-thickness of the beam are shown to provide additional benefits in minimizing the induced deformations and stresses.

  3. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this

  4. Spatial and temporal control of thermal waves by using DMDs for interference based crack detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Erik; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Active Thermography is a well-established non-destructive testing method and used to detect cracks, voids or material inhomogeneities. It is based on applying thermal energy to a samples' surface whereas inner defects alter the nonstationary heat flow. Conventional excitation of a sample is hereby done spatially, either planar (e.g. using a lamp) or local (e.g. using a focused laser) and temporally, either pulsed or periodical. In this work we combine a high power laser with a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) allowing us to merge all degrees of freedom to a spatially and temporally controlled heat source. This enables us to exploit the possibilities of coherent thermal wave shaping. Exciting periodically while controlling at the same time phase and amplitude of the illumination source induces - via absorption at the sample's surface - a defined thermal wave propagation through a sample. That means thermal waves can be controlled almost like acoustical or optical waves. However, in contrast to optical or acoustical waves, thermal waves are highly damped due to the diffusive character of the thermal heat flow and therefore limited in penetration depth in relation to the achievable resolution. Nevertheless, the coherence length of thermal waves can be chosen in the mmrange for modulation frequencies below 10 Hz which is perfectly met by DMD technology. This approach gives us the opportunity to transfer known technologies from wave shaping techniques to thermography methods. We will present experiments on spatial and temporal wave shaping, demonstrating interference based crack detection.

  5. Controlling protein crystal growth rate by means of temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SantamarIa-Holek, I; Gadomski, A [Institute of Mathematics and Physics, University of Technology and Life Sciences, PL-85796 Bydgoszcz (Poland); RubI, J M, E-mail: isholek.fc@gmail.com, E-mail: agad@utp.edu.pl, E-mail: mrubi@ub.edu [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    We have proposed a model to analyze the growth kinetics of lysozyme crystals/aggregates under non-isothermal conditions. The model was formulated through an analysis of the entropy production of the growth process which was obtained by taking into account the explicit dependence of the free energy on the temperature. We found that the growth process is coupled with temperature variations, resulting in a novel Soret-type effect. We identified the surface entropy of the crystal/aggregate as a decisive ingredient controlling the behavior of the average growth rate as a function of temperature. The behavior of the Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature is also analyzed. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good in the range of temperatures considered.

  6. Controlling protein crystal growth rate by means of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanamaría-Holek, I; Gadomski, A; Rubí, J M

    2011-06-15

    We have proposed a model to analyze the growth kinetics of lysozyme crystals/aggregates under non-isothermal conditions. The model was formulated through an analysis of the entropy production of the growth process which was obtained by taking into account the explicit dependence of the free energy on the temperature. We found that the growth process is coupled with temperature variations, resulting in a novel Soret-type effect. We identified the surface entropy of the crystal/aggregate as a decisive ingredient controlling the behavior of the average growth rate as a function of temperature. The behavior of the Gibbs free energy as a function of temperature is also analyzed. The agreement between theory and experiments is very good in the range of temperatures considered.

  7. Improving active space telescope wavefront control using predictive thermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersh-Range, Jessica; Perrin, Marshall D.

    2015-01-01

    Active control algorithms for space telescopes are less mature than those for large ground telescopes due to differences in the wavefront control problems. Active wavefront control for space telescopes at L2, such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), requires weighing control costs against the benefits of correcting wavefront perturbations that are a predictable byproduct of the observing schedule, which is known and determined in advance. To improve the control algorithms for these telescopes, we have developed a model that calculates the temperature and wavefront evolution during a hypothetical mission, assuming the dominant wavefront perturbations are due to changes in the spacecraft attitude with respect to the sun. Using this model, we show that the wavefront can be controlled passively by introducing scheduling constraints that limit the allowable attitudes for an observation based on the observation duration and the mean telescope temperature. We also describe the implementation of a predictive controller designed to prevent the wavefront error (WFE) from exceeding a desired threshold. This controller outperforms simpler algorithms even with substantial model error, achieving a lower WFE without requiring significantly more corrections. Consequently, predictive wavefront control based on known spacecraft attitude plans is a promising approach for JWST and other future active space observatories.

  8. Brownian transport controlled by dichotomic and thermal fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, J.; Kostur, M.; Łuczka, J.

    1998-09-01

    We study transport of Brownian particles in spatially periodic structures, driven by both thermal equilibrium fluctuations and dichotomic noise of zero mean values. Introducing specific scaling, we show that the dimensionless Newton-Langevin type equation governing the motion of Brownian particles is very well approximated by the overdamped dynamics; inertial effects can be neglected because for generic systems dimensionless mass is many orders less than a dimensionless friction coefficient. An exact probability current, proportional to the mean drift velocity of particles, is obtained for a piecewise linear spatially periodic potential. We analyze in detail properties of the macroscopic averaged motion of particles. In dependence on statistics of both sources of fluctuations, the directed transport of particles exhibits such distinctive non-monotonic behavior as: bell-shaped dependence (there exists optimal statistics of fluctuations maximizing velocity) and reversal in the direction of macroscopic motion (there exists critical statistics at which the drift velocity is zero).

  9. Vehicle Thermal Control with a Variable Area Inlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    empirically derived Nusselt number. Proportional, Proportional-Derivative (PD), and Proportional-Integral-Derivative ( PID ) controllers were built and...tested. The PD and PID controllers did not appear to need any gain scheduling for the varying speed and temperature conditions. Lastly, a general design process was detailed. (AN)

  10. Dynamic multimedia stream adaptation and rate control for heterogeneous networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SZWABE Andrzej; SCHORR Andreas; HAUCK Franz J.; KASSLER Andreas J.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic adaptation of multimedia content is seen as an important feature of next generation networks and pervasive systems enabling terminals and applications to adapt to changes in e.g. context, access network, and available Quality-of-Service(QoS) due to mobility of users, devices or sessions. We present the architecture of a multimedia stream adaptation service which enables communication between terminals having heterogeneous hardware and software capabilities and served by heterogeneous networks. The service runs on special content adaptation nodes which can be placed at any location within the network. The flexible structure of our architecture allows using a variety of different adaptation engines. A generic transcoding engine is used to change the codec of streams. An MPEG-21 Digital Item Adaptation (DIA) based transformation engine allows adjusting the data rate of scalable media streams. An intelligent decision-taking engine implements adaptive flow control which takes into account current network QoS parameters and congestion information. Measurements demonstrate the quality gains achieved through adaptive congestion control mechanisms under conditions typical for a heterogeneous network.

  11. Nonlinear Control of Heart Rate Variability in Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, George; Allan, Walter; Sobel, Daniel; Allan, Kenneth D.

    1996-03-01

    Nonlinear analyses of infant heart rhythms reveal a marked rise in the complexity of the electrocardiogram with maturation. We find that normal mature infants (gestation >= 35 weeks) have complex and distinctly nonlinear heart rhythms (consistent with recent reports for healthy adults) but that such nonlinearity is lacking in preterm infants (gestation parasympathetic-sympathetic interaction and function are presumed to be less well developed. Our study further shows that infants with clinical brain death and those treated with atropine exhibit a similar lack of nonlinear feedback control. These three lines of evidence support the hypothesis championed by Goldberger et al. [Goldberger, A. L., Rigney, D. R. & West, B. J. (1990) Sci. Am. 262, 43-49] that autonomic nervous system control underlies the nonlinearity and possible chaos of normal heart rhythms. This report demonstrates the acquisition of nonlinear heart rate dynamics and possible chaos in developing human infants and its loss in brain death and with the administration of atropine. It parallels earlier work documenting changes in the variability of heart rhythms in each of these cases and suggests that nonlinearity may provide additional power in characterizing physiological states.

  12. Controllable rectification of the axial expansion in the thermally driven artificial muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Donghua; Zhang, Xingyi; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Jun; Zhou, You-He

    2015-09-01

    At present, the concept of artificial muscle twisted by polymers or fibers has become a hot issue in the field of intelligent material research according to its distinguishing advantages, e.g., high energy density, large-stroke, non-hysteresis, and inexpensive. The axial thermal expansion coefficient is an important parameter which can affect its demanding applications. In this letter, a device with high accuracy capacitive sensor is constructed to measure the axial thermal expansion coefficient of the twisted carbon fibers and yarns of Kevlar, and a theoretical model based on the thermal elasticity and the geometrical features of the twisted structure are also presented to predict the axial expansion coefficient. It is found that the calculated results take good agreements with the experimental data. According to the present experiment and analyses, a method to control the axial thermal expansion coefficient of artificial muscle is proposed. Moreover, the mechanism of this kind of thermally driven artificial muscle is discussed.

  13. Design and Control of Thermally Coupled Reactive Distillation Sequence for Biodiesel Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lumin; Sun Lanyi; Xie Xu; Tian Yanan; Shang Jianlong; Tian Yuanyu

    2016-01-01

    Decreasing petroleum reserves and growing alternative fuels requirements have promoted the study of biodiesel production. In this work, two thermally coupled reactive distillation designs for biodiesel production were investigated, and the sensitivity analysis was conducted to obtain the appropriate design values. The thermodynamic analysis and economics evaluation were performed to estimate the superiority of the thermally coupled designs over the base case. The proposed biodiesel production processes were simulated using the simulator Aspen Plus, and calculation results show that the exergy loss and economic cost in the two thermally coupled designs can be greatly reduced. It is found that the thermally coupled side-stripper reactive distillation design provides more economic beneifts than the side-rectiifer one. The dynamic performance of the thermally coupled side-stripper design was investigated and the results showed that the proposed control structure could effectively handle large feed disturbances.

  14. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  15. The International Space Station 2B Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) Leak: An Operational History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vareha, Anthony N.

    2014-01-01

    As early as 2004, the Photovoltaic Thermal Control System (PVTCS) for the International Space Station's 2B electrical power channel began slowly leaking ammonia overboard. Initially, the operations strategy was "feed the leak," a strategy successfully put into action via Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) during the STS-134 Space Shuttle mission. This recharge was to have allowed for continued power channel operation into 2014 or 2015, at which point another EVA would have been required. In mid-2012, the leak rate increased from 1.5lbm/year to approximately 5lbm/year. As a result, an EVA was planned and executed within a 5 week timeframe to drastically alter the architecture of the PVTCS via connection to an adjacent dormant thermal control system. This EVA, US EVA 20, was successfully executed on November 1, 2012 and left the 2B PVTCS in a configuration where the system was now being adequately cooled via a different radiator than what the system was designed to utilize. Data monitoring over the next several months showed that the isolated radiator had not been leaking, and the system itself continued to leak steadily until May 9th, 2013. It was on this day that the ISS crew noticed the visible presence of ammonia crystals escaping from the 2B channel's truss segment, signifying a rapid acceleration of the leak from 5lbm/year to 5lbm/day. Within 48 hours of the crew noticing the leak, US EVA 21 was in progress to replace the coolant pump - the only remaining replaceable leak source. This was successful, and telemetry monitoring has shown that indeed the coolant pump was the leak source and was thus isolated from the running 2B PVTCS. This paper will explore the management of the 2B PVTCS leak from the operations perspective.

  16. Degradation of thermal control materials under a simulated radiative space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. K.; Sridhara, N.

    2012-11-01

    A spacecraft with a passive thermal control system utilizes various thermal control materials to maintain temperatures within safe operating limits. Materials used for spacecraft applications are exposed to harsh space environments such as ultraviolet (UV) and particle (electron, proton) irradiation and atomic oxygen (AO), undergo physical damage and thermal degradation, which must be considered for spacecraft thermal design optimization and cost effectiveness. This paper describes the effect of synergistic radiation on some of the important thermal control materials to verify the assumptions of beginning-of-life (BOL) and end-of-life (EOL) properties. Studies on the degradation in the optical properties (solar absorptance and infrared emittance) of some important thermal control materials exposed to simulated radiative geostationary space environment are discussed. The current studies are purely related to the influence of radiation on the degradation of the materials; other environmental aspects (e.g., thermal cycling) are not discussed. The thermal control materials investigated herein include different kind of second-surface mirrors, white anodizing, white paints, black paints, multilayer insulation materials, varnish coated aluminized polyimide, germanium coated polyimide, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and poly tetra fluoro ethylene (PTFE). For this purpose, a test in the constant vacuum was performed reproducing a three year radiative space environment exposure, including ultraviolet and charged particle effects on North/South panels of a geostationary three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Reflectance spectra were measured in situ in the solar range (250-2500 nm) and the corresponding solar absorptance values were calculated. The test methodology and the degradations of the materials are discussed. The most important degradations among the low solar absorptance materials were found in the white paints whereas the rigid optical solar reflectors remained quite

  17. Autonomic neural control of heart rate during dynamic exercise: revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniel W; Raven, Peter B

    2014-06-15

    The accepted model of autonomic control of heart rate (HR) during dynamic exercise indicates that the initial increase is entirely attributable to the withdrawal of parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS) activity and that subsequent increases in HR are entirely attributable to increases in cardiac sympathetic activity. In the present review, we sought to re-evaluate the model of autonomic neural control of HR in humans during progressive increases in dynamic exercise workload. We analysed data from both new and previously published studies involving baroreflex stimulation and pharmacological blockade of the autonomic nervous system. Results indicate that the PSNS remains functionally active throughout exercise and that increases in HR from rest to maximal exercise result from an increasing workload-related transition from a 4 : 1 vagal-sympathetic balance to a 4 : 1 sympatho-vagal balance. Furthermore, the beat-to-beat autonomic reflex control of HR was found to be dependent on the ability of the PSNS to modulate the HR as it was progressively restrained by increasing workload-related sympathetic nerve activity. (i) increases in exercise workload-related HR are not caused by a total withdrawal of the PSNS followed by an increase in sympathetic tone; (ii) reciprocal antagonism is key to the transition from vagal to sympathetic dominance, and (iii) resetting of the arterial baroreflex causes immediate exercise-onset reflexive increases in HR, which are parasympathetically mediated, followed by slower increases in sympathetic tone as workloads are increased. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  18. A Morphing Radiator for High-Turndown Thermal Control of Crewed Space Exploration Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognata, Thomas J.; Hardtl, Darren; Sheth, Rubik; Dinsmore, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft designed for missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO) face a difficult thermal control challenge, particularly in the case of crewed vehicles where the thermal control system (TCS) must maintain a relatively constant internal environment temperature despite a vastly varying external thermal environment and despite heat rejection needs that are contrary to the potential of the environment. A thermal control system is in other words required to reject a higher heat load to warm environments and a lower heat load to cold environments, necessitating a quite high turndown ratio. A modern thermal control system is capable of a turndown ratio of on the order of 12:1, but for crew safety and environment compatibility these are massive multi-loop fluid systems. This paper discusses the analysis of a unique radiator design which employs the behavior of shape memory alloys (SMA) to vary the turndown of, and thus enable, a single-loop vehicle thermal control system for space exploration vehicles. This design, a morphing radiator, varies its shape in response to facesheet temperature to control view of space and primary surface emissivity. Because temperature dependence is inherent to SMA behavior, the design requires no accommodation for control, instrumentation, nor power supply in order to operate. Thermal and radiation modeling of the morphing radiator predict a turndown ranging from 11.9:1 to 35:1 independent of TCS configuration. Stress and deformation analyses predict the desired morphing behavior of the concept. A system level mass analysis shows that by enabling a single loop architecture this design could reduce the TCS mass by between 139 kg and 225 kg. The concept is demonstrated in proof-of-concept benchtop tests.

  19. Thermal Fluid-Dynamic Study for the thermal control of the new ALICE Central Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pelizzari, Andrea

    The Inner Tracking System Detector of the ALICE Experiment at CERN laboratory will be replaced in 2020 with a new Detector. It will have to provide, among others, higher spatial resolution, higher tracking precision and faster data read-out. These goals will be attained thanks to new pixel sensors chips and new electronic components, which will have a high impact in terms of dissipated heat. Therefore, one of the critical aspects for the success of the Upgrade project is the design of the Detector cooling system. This thesis work has been developed at CERN in Geneva in close contact with the group responsible for the Mechanics and Cooling of the Detector. The aim of the thermal fluid dynamic study devised is to deliver to the group a reliable and accurate description of the air flow inside the New Inner Tracking System Detector. After a first part of problem definition and design study, a Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis has been developed with the ANSYS Fluent software. The CFD model built in this ...

  20. Fuzzy Approximate Model for Distributed Thermal Solar Collectors Control

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2014-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of controlling concentrated solar collectors where the objective consists of making the outlet temperature of the collector tracking a desired reference. The performance of the novel approximate model based on fuzzy theory, which has been introduced by the authors in [1], is evaluated comparing to other methods in the literature. The proposed approximation is a low order state representation derived from the physical distributed model. It reproduces the temperature transfer dynamics through the collectors accurately and allows the simplification of the control design. Simulation results show interesting performance of the proposed controller.

  1. Compositional variability across Mercury's surface revealed by MESSENGER measurements of variations in thermal neutron count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Lawrence, D. J.; Goldsten, J. O.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Measurements by MESSENGER's Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) have revealed variations in the flux of thermal neutrons across Mercury's northern hemisphere. These variations are interpreted to originate from spatial variations in surface elemental composition. In particular, the measurements are sensitive to the near-surface abundances of elements that absorb thermal neutrons, including major rock-forming elements such as Fe and Ti, minor elements such as Mn and Cl, and rare-earth elements such as Gd and Sm. We have constructed a map of thermal neutron variability across the surface and compared it with known variations in elemental composition and with the distribution of geologic units. Development of the map included the derivation of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section across the surface, a quantity whose value and variability provides useful constraints on the formation and geochemical evolution of Mercury's crust. Finally, by combining the thermal neutron measurements with previously reported elemental measurements from the GRNS and MESSENGER's X-Ray Spectrometer, we have derived constraints on the abundances of neutron-absorbing elements, including previously unreported limits for some minor and rare-earth elements.

  2. Rate control management of atrial fibrillation: may a mathematical model suggest an ideal heart rate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Anselmino

    Full Text Available Despite the routine prescription of rate control therapy for atrial fibrillation (AF, clinical evidence demonstrating a heart rate target is lacking. Aim of the present study was to run a mathematical model simulating AF episodes with a different heart rate (HR to predict hemodynamic parameters for each situation.The lumped model, representing the pumping heart together with systemic and pulmonary circuits, was run to simulate AF with HR of 50, 70, 90, 110 and 130 bpm, respectively.Left ventricular pressure increased by 57%, from 33.92±37.56 mmHg to 53.15±47.56 mmHg, and mean systemic arterial pressure increased by 27%, from 82.66±14.04 mmHg to 105.3±7.6 mmHg, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. Stroke volume (from 77.45±8.50 to 39.09±8.08 mL, ejection fraction (from 61.10±4.40 to 39.32±5.42% and stroke work (SW, from 0.88±0.04 to 0.58±0.09 J decreased by 50, 36 and 34%, at the 50 and 130 bpm simulations, respectively. In addition, oxygen consumption indexes (rate pressure product - RPP, tension time index per minute - TTI/min, and pressure volume area per minute - PVA/min increased from the 50 to the 130 bpm simulation, respectively, by 186% (from 5598±1939 to 15995±3219 mmHg/min, 56% (from 2094±265 to 3257±301 mmHg s/min and 102% (from 57.99±17.90 to 117.4±26.0 J/min. In fact, left ventricular efficiency (SW/PVA decreased from 80.91±2.91% at 50 bpm to 66.43±3.72% at the 130 bpm HR simulation.Awaiting compulsory direct clinical evidences, the present mathematical model suggests that lower HRs during permanent AF relates to improved hemodynamic parameters, cardiac efficiency, and lower oxygen consumption.

  3. Load frequency control of three area interconnected hydro-thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijest.v4i1.4S ... To over come this Artificial Neural Network (ANN) controller, which is an advance ... δ and δ 3 = Power angles of end voltages V1 , V2 and V3 of equivalent machine of the three areas ..... Learning algorithms causes the adjustment of the weights so that the controlled system gives.

  4. Thermal Characteristics of Air-Water Spray Impingement Cooling of Hot Metallic Surface under Controlled Parametric Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh Kumar Nayak; Purna Chandra Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results on the thermal characteristics of air-water spray impingement cooling of hot metallic surface are presented and discussed in this paper.The controlling input parameters investigated were the combined air and water pressures,plate thickness,water flow rate,nozzle height from the target surface and initial temperature of the hot surface.The effects of these input parameters on the important thermal characteristics such as heat transfer rate,heat transfer coefficient and wetting front movement were measured and examined.Hot flat plate samples of mild steel with dimension 120 mm in length,120 mm breadth and thickness of 4 mm,6 mm,and 8 mm respectively were tested.The air assisted water spray was found to be an effective cooling media and method to achieve very high heat transfer rate from the surface.Higher heat transfer rate and heat transfer coefficients were obtained for the lesser i.e,4 mm thick plates.Increase in the nozzle height reduced the heat transfer efficiency of spray cooling.At an inlet water pressure of 4 bar and air pressure of 3 bar,maximum cooling rates 670℃/s and average cooling rate of 305.23℃/s were achieved for a temperature of 850℃ of the steel plate.

  5. Active control and parameter updating techniques for nonlinear thermal network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexandris, M. V.; Milman, M. H.

    The present article reports on active control and parameter updating techniques for thermal models based on the network approach. Emphasis is placed on applications where radiation plays a dominant role. Examples of such applications are the thermal design and modeling of spacecrafts and space-based science instruments. Active thermal control of a system aims to approximate a desired temperature distribution or to minimize a suitably defined temperature-dependent functional. Similarly, parameter updating aims to update the values of certain parameters of the thermal model so that the output approximates a distribution obtained through direct measurements. Both problems are formulated as nonlinear, least-square optimization problems. The proposed strategies for their solution are explained in detail and their efficiency is demonstrated through numerical tests. Finally, certain theoretical results pertaining to the characterization of solutions of the problems of interest are also presented.

  6. Indirect thermal control for improved reliability of Modular Multilevel Converter by utilizing circulating current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowlatabadi, Mohammadkazem Bakhshizadeh; Ma, Ke; Loh, Poh Chiang;

    2015-01-01

    Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC) has recently become a popular multilevel topology for high-power applications, where the reliability performance is a crucial design consideration. In this paper the impacts of the circulating current in the MMC to the loss and thermal loading of power...... loading of the power devices, and by proper controlling the amount of circulating current, the temperature fluctuation or thermal cycling in the power device can be relieved, and thereby contributing to improved reliability performance according to many lifetime models/testing results for power devices....... semiconductor devices are comprehensively investigated. Also a novel control strategy by utilizing the circulating current is proposed to enhance the reliability performance of MMC in order to limit the amplitude of thermal cycles. It is concluded that the circulating current may change the losses and thermal...

  7. Instrumentation and control systems for monitoring and data acquisition for thermal recovery process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aparicio, J.; Hernandez, E.; Perozo, H. [PDVSA Intevep, S.A. (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    Thermal recovery methods are often applied to enhance oil recovery in heavy oil reservoirs, one of its challenges is to control the displacement of the thermal front. Methods are thus implemented to obtain data on the temperatures in the wells at any given time and to monitor other variables so that the behaviour of the thermal front can be predicted. The aim of this paper is to present a new control and instrumentation scheme to measure all of the variables. A software was created using Labview a graphs-based programming language software and PostgreSQL, a database management system. Using this software, sensors can be added or removed at any time; trends can be immediately visualized; and quality of the information is ensured since there is no human intervention in the data collection or processing. This paper presented a software which improves monitoring of all of the variables affecting the behaviour of the thermal front.

  8. Analysis and Design of Phase Change Thermal Control for Light Emitting Diode (LED) Spacesuit Helmet Lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bue, Grant C.; Nguyen, Hiep X.; Keller, John R.

    2010-01-01

    LED Helmet Extravehicular Activity Helmet Interchangeable Portable (LEHIP) lights for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) have been built and tested and are currently being used on the International Space Station. A design is presented of the passive thermal control system consisting of a chamber filled with aluminum foam and wax. A thermal math model of LEHIP was built and correlated by test to show that the thermal design maintains electronic components within hot and cold limits for a 7 hour spacewalk in the most extreme EVA average environments, and do not pose a hazard to the crew or to components of the EMU.

  9. Thermal tuning of hollow waveguides fabricated by controlled thin-film buckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, E; Ponnampalam, N; McMullin, J N; Decorby, R G

    2009-09-28

    We describe the thermal tuning of air-core Bragg waveguides, fabricated by controlled formation of delamination buckles within a multilayer stack of chalcogenide glass and polymer. The upper cladding mirror is a flexible membrane comprising high thermal expansion materials, enabling large tuning of the air-core dimensions for small changes in temperature. Measurements on the temperature dependence of feature heights showed good agreement with theoretical predictions. We applied this mechanism to the thermal tuning of modal cutoff conditions in waveguides with a tapered core profile. Due to the omnidirectional nature of the cladding mirrors, these tapers can be viewed as waveguide-coupled, tunable Fabry-Perot filters.

  10. Performance Assessment of Low-Temperature Thermal Storage with Electromagnetic Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Wei Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents electromagnetic-controlled thermal storage (ECTS that can be directly implemented in strategies of low-temperature waste heat recovery for energy-consuming equipment. A magnetic nanofluid (MNF prepared from fine iron ferrite ferromagnetic particles is recommended as a latent heat medium (LHM. During electromagnetic induction, local flow fluctuations are generated and thermal convection in the MNF can be enhanced. The achieved results demonstrated that ECTS has a wide operational range and an optimum storage efficiency of 84.46%. Thus, a self-perturbation mode used to enhance thermal energy transportation can be designed for numerous waste heat management applications.

  11. Development of porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Lent, W. E.; Buettner, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    A white porcelain enamel coating was developed for application to high temperature metallic alloy substrates on spacecraft. The coating consists of an optically opacifying zirconia pigment, a lithia-zirconia-silica frit, and an inorganic pigment dispersant. The coating is fired at 1000 to 1150 C to form the enamel. The coating has a solar absorptance of 0.22 and a total normal emittance of 0.82 for a 0.017 cm thick coating. The coating exhibits excellent adhesion, cleanability, and integrity and is thermal shock resistant to 900 C. Capability to coat large panels has been demonstrated by successful coating of 30 cm x 30 cm Hastelloy X alloy panels. Preliminary development of low temperature enamels for application to aluminum and titanium alloy substrates was initiated. It was determined that both leaded and leadless frits were feasible when applied with appropriate mill fluxes. Indications were that opacification could be achieved at firing temperatures below 540 C for extended periods of time.

  12. Multiphase Flow Technology Impacts on Thermal Control Systems for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, John; Sankovic, John; Lekan, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The Two-Phase Flow Facility (TPHIFFy) Project focused on bridging the critical knowledge gap by developing and demonstrating critical multiphase fluid products for advanced life support, thermal management and power conversion systems that are required to enable the Vision for Space Exploration. Safety and reliability of future systems will be enhanced by addressing critical microgravity fluid physics issues associated with flow boiling, condensation, phase separation, and system stability. The project included concept development, normal gravity testing, and reduced gravity aircraft flight campaigns, in preparation for the development of a space flight experiment implementation. Data will be utilized to develop predictive models that could be used for system design and operation. A single fluid, two-phase closed thermodynamic loop test bed was designed, assembled and tested. The major components in this test bed include: a boiler, a condenser, a phase separator and a circulating pump. The test loop was instrumented with flow meters, thermocouples, pressure transducers and both high speed and normal speed video cameras. A low boiling point surrogate fluid, FC-72, was selected based on scaling analyses using preliminary designs for operational systems. Preliminary results are presented which include flow regime transitions and some observations regarding system stability.

  13. Thermal dependence of clearance and metabolic rates in slow- and fast-growing spats of manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, David; Ibarrola, Irrintzi; Navarro, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    Thermal dependence of clearance rate (CR: l h(-1)), standard (SMR: J h(-1)) and routine metabolic rates (RMR: J h(-1)), were analyzed in fast (F)- and slow (S)-growing juveniles of the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Physiological rates were measured at the maintenance temperature (17 °C), and compared with measurements performed at 10 and 24 °C after 16 h and 14 days to analyze acute and acclimated responses, respectively. Metabolic rates (both RMR and SMR) differed significantly between F and S seeds, irrespective of temperature. Mass-specific CRs were not different for F and S seeds but were significantly higher in F clams for rates standardized according to allometric size-scaling rules. Acute thermal dependency of CR was equal for F and S clams: mean Q 10 were ≈3 and 2 in temperature ranges of 10-17 and 17-24 °C, respectively. CR did not change after 2 weeks of acclimation to temperatures. Acute thermal effects on SMR were similar in both groups (Q 10 ≈ 1 and 1.6 in temperature ranges of 10-17 and 17-24 °C, respectively). Large differences between groups were found in the acute thermal dependence of RMR: Q 10 in F clams (≈1.2 and 1.9 at temperature ranges of 10-17 and 17-24 °C, respectively) were similar to those found for SMR (Q 10 = 1.0 and 1.7). In contrast, RMR of S clams exhibited maximum thermal dependence (Q 10 = 3.1) at 10-17 °C and become depressed at higher temperatures (Q 10 = 0.9 at 17-24 °C). A recovery of RMR in S clams was recorded upon acclimation to 24 °C. Contrasting metabolic patterns between fast and slow growers are interpreted as a consequence of differential thermal sensitivity of the fraction of metabolism associated to food processing and assimilation.

  14. Millisecond dynamics of thermal expansion of mechanically controllable break junction electrodes studied in the tunneling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnychenko, O. Yu.; Toonen, A. J.; Shklyarevskii, O. I.; van Kempen, H.

    2001-10-01

    The thermal expansion dynamics of W, Pt-Ir, and Au mechanically controllable break junction electrodes was studied in the millisecond range. By measuring a transient tunnel current as a function of time, we found that, at low temperatures, the electrode elongation Δs˜t1/2 due to the large values of thermal diffusivity of metals. The magnitude of Δs varies in direct proportion to the power P dissipated in the electrodes.

  15. Upper atomosphere and Thermal control of the Super Low Altitude Test Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Super Low Altitude Test Satellite (SLATS) is an engineering test satellite currently under development in JAXA in an attempt to open a new frontier of space utilization on extremely low earth orbits. The altitude of SLATS orbit is around200km altitude. In this altitude, rarefied aerodynamics and high-density atomic oxygen effect on the thermal design of SLATS. The thermal control of SLATS was introduced in this paper. And, the equilibrium temperature on the bumper of SLATS was estimated w...

  16. Computer control of a scanning electron microscope for digital image processing of thermal-wave images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Percy; Jones, Robert E.; Kramarchuk, Ihor; Williams, Wallace D.; Pouch, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Using a recently developed technology called thermal-wave microscopy, NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a computer controlled submicron thermal-wave microscope for the purpose of investigating III-V compound semiconductor devices and materials. This paper describes the system's design and configuration and discusses the hardware and software capabilities. Knowledge of the Concurrent 3200 series computers is needed for a complete understanding of the material presented. However, concepts and procedures are of general interest.

  17. Collagen thermal denaturation study for thermal angioplasty based on modified kinetic model: relation between the artery mechanical properties and collagen denaturation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, N.; Hayashi, T.; Kunio, M.; Arai, T.

    2010-02-01

    We have been developing the novel short-term heating angioplasty in which sufficient artery lumen-dilatation was attained with thermal softening of collagen fiber in artery wall. In the present study, we investigated on the relation between the mechanical properties of heated artery and thermal denaturation fractures of arterial collagen in ex vivo. We employed Lumry-Eyring model to estimate temperature- and time-dependent thermal denaturation fractures of arterial collagen fiber during heating. We made a kinetic model of arterial collagen thermal denaturation by adjustment of K and k in this model, those were the equilibrium constant of reversible denaturation and the rate constant of irreversible denaturation. Meanwhile we demonstrated that the change of reduced scattering coefficient of whole artery wall during heating reflected the reversible denaturation of the collagen in artery wall. Based on this phenomenon, the K was determined experimentally by backscattered light intensity measurement (at 633nm) of extracted porcine carotid artery during temperature elevation and descending (25°C-->80°C-->25°C). We employed the value of according to our earlier report in which the time-and temperature- dependent irreversible denaturation amount of the artery collagen fiber that was assessed by the artery birefringence. Then, the time- and temperature- dependent reversible (irreversible) denaturation fraction defined as the reversible ((irreversible) denatured collagen amount) / (total collagen amount) was calculated by the model. Thermo-mechanical analysis of artery wall was performed to compare the arterial mechanical behaviors (softening, shrinkage) during heating with the calculated denaturation fraction with the model. In any artery temperature condition in 70-80°, the irreversible denaturation fraction at which the artery thermal shrinkage started was estimated to be around 20%. On the other hand, the calculated irreversible denaturation fraction remained below

  18. Model Predictive Control of Hybrid Thermal Energy Systems in Transport Refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shafiei, Seyed Ehsan; Alleyne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    A predictive control scheme is designed to control a transport refrigeration system, such as a delivery truck, that includes a vapor compression cycle configured in parallel with a thermal energy storage (TES) unit. A novel approach to TES utilization is introduced and is based on the current...

  19. Thermal Rate Coefficients for the Astrochemical Process C + CH$^+$ $\\to$ C$_2^+$ + H by Ring Polymer Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rampino, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Thermal rate coefficients for the astrochemical reaction C + CH$^+$ $\\to$ C$_2^+$ + H were computed in the temperature range 20-300 K by using novel rate theory based on ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) on a recently published bond-order based potential energy surface and compared with previous Langevin capture model (LCM) and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. Results show that there is a significant discrepancy between the RPMD rate coefficients and the previous theoretical results which can lead to overestimation of the rate coefficients for the title reaction by several orders of magnitude at very low temperatures. We argue that this can be attributed to a very challenging energy profile along the reaction coordinate for the title reaction, not taken into account in extenso by either the LCM or QCT approximation. In the absence of any rigorous quantum mechanical or experimental results, the computed RPMD rate coefficients represent state-of-the-art estimates to be included in astrochemic...

  20. An alternative empirical model for the relationship between the bond valence and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidey, Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    The relationship between the bond valence s and the thermal expansion rate of chemical bonds (dr/dT) has been closely approximated by using the alternative three-parameter empirical model (dr/dT) = (u + vs)(-1/w), where u, v and w are the refinable parameters. Unlike the s-(dr/dT) model developed by Brown et al. [(1997), Acta Cryst. B53, 750-761], this alternative model can be optimized for particular s-(dr/dT) datasets in the least-squares refinement procedure. For routine calculations of the thermal expansion rates of chemical bonds, the alternative model with the parameters u = -63.9, v = 2581.0 and w = 0.647 can be recommended.

  1. The effects of laser repetition rate on femtosecond laser ablation of dry bone: a thermal and LIBS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ruby K; Smith, Zachary J; Lee, Changwon; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the effect of varying laser repetition rate on thermal energy accumulation and dissipation as well as femtosecond Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (fsLIBS) signals, which may help create the framework for clinical translation of femtosecond lasers for surgical procedures. We study the effect of repetition rates on ablation widths, sample temperature, and LIBS signal of bone. SEM images were acquired to quantify the morphology of the ablated volume and fsLIBS was performed to characterize changes in signal intensity and background. We also report for the first time experimentally measured temperature distributions of bone irradiated with femtosecond lasers at repetition rates below and above carbonization conditions. While high repetition rates would allow for faster cutting, heat accumulation exceeds heat dissipation and results in carbonization of the sample. At repetition rates where carbonization occurs, the sample temperature increases to a level that is well above the threshold for irreversible cellular damage. These results highlight the importance of the need for careful selection of the repetition rate for a femtosecond laser surgery procedure to minimize the extent of thermal damage to surrounding tissues and prevent misclassification of tissue by fsLIBS analysis.

  2. Transfer of control system interface solutions from other domains to the thermal power industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligård, L-O; Andersson, J; Osvalder, A-L

    2012-01-01

    In a thermal power plant the operators' roles are to control and monitor the process to achieve efficient and safe production. To achieve this, the human-machine interfaces have a central part. The interfaces need to be updated and upgraded together with the technical functionality to maintain optimal operation. One way of achieving relevant updates is to study other domains and see how they have solved similar issues in their design solutions. The purpose of this paper is to present how interface design solution ideas can be transferred from domains with operator control to thermal power plants. In the study 15 domains were compared using a model for categorisation of human-machine systems. The result from the domain comparison showed that nuclear power, refinery and ship engine control were most similar to thermal power control. From the findings a basic interface structure and three specific display solutions were proposed for thermal power control: process parameter overview, plant overview, and feed water view. The systematic comparison of the properties of a human-machine system allowed interface designers to find suitable objects, structures and navigation logics in a range of domains that could be transferred to the thermal power domain.

  3. Controlling thermal emission with refractory epsilon-near-zero metamaterials via topological transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; Molesky, S.; Petrov, A. Yu; Störmer, M.; Krekeler, T.; Lang, S.; Ritter, M.; Jacob, Z.; Eich, M.

    2016-01-01

    Control of thermal radiation at high temperatures is vital for waste heat recovery and for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion. Previously, structural resonances utilizing gratings, thin film resonances, metasurfaces and photonic crystals were used to spectrally control thermal emission, often requiring lithographic structuring of the surface and causing significant angle dependence. In contrast, here, we demonstrate a refractory W-HfO2 metamaterial, which controls thermal emission through an engineered dielectric response function. The epsilon-near-zero frequency of a metamaterial and the connected optical topological transition (OTT) are adjusted to selectively enhance and suppress the thermal emission in the near-infrared spectrum, crucial for improved TPV efficiency. The near-omnidirectional and spectrally selective emitter is obtained as the emission changes due to material properties and not due to resonances or interference effects, marking a paradigm shift in thermal engineering approaches. We experimentally demonstrate the OTT in a thermally stable metamaterial at high temperatures of 1,000 °C. PMID:27263653

  4. Parental arc magma compositions dominantly controlled by mantle-wedge thermal structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stephen J.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Katz, Richard F.; Dungan, Michael A.; Escrig, Stéphane

    2016-10-01

    The processes that lead to the fourfold variation in arc-averaged compositions of mafic arc lavas remain controversial. Control by the mantle-wedge thermal structure is supported by chemical correlations with the thickness of the underlying arc crust, which affects the thermal state of the wedge. Control by down-going slab temperature is supported by correlations with the slab thermal parameter. The Chilean Southern Volcanic Zone provides a test of these hypotheses. Here we use chemical data to demonstrate that the Southern Volcanic Zone and global arc averages define the same chemical trends, both among elements and between elements and crustal thickness. But in contrast to the global arc system, the Southern Volcanic Zone is built on crust of variable thickness with a constant slab thermal parameter. This natural experiment, along with a set of numerical simulations, shows that global arc compositional variability is dominated by different extents of melting that are controlled by the thermal structure of the mantle wedge. Slab temperatures play a subordinate role. Variations in the subducting slab's fluid flux and sediment compositions, as well as mantle-wedge heterogeneities, produce second-order effects that are manifested as distinctive trace element and isotopic signatures; these can be more clearly elucidated once the importance of wedge thermal structure is recognized.

  5. Controlling thermal emission with refractory epsilon-near-zero metamaterials via topological transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; Molesky, S.; Petrov, A. Yu; Störmer, M.; Krekeler, T.; Lang, S.; Ritter, M.; Jacob, Z.; Eich, M.

    2016-06-01

    Control of thermal radiation at high temperatures is vital for waste heat recovery and for high-efficiency thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion. Previously, structural resonances utilizing gratings, thin film resonances, metasurfaces and photonic crystals were used to spectrally control thermal emission, often requiring lithographic structuring of the surface and causing significant angle dependence. In contrast, here, we demonstrate a refractory W-HfO2 metamaterial, which controls thermal emission through an engineered dielectric response function. The epsilon-near-zero frequency of a metamaterial and the connected optical topological transition (OTT) are adjusted to selectively enhance and suppress the thermal emission in the near-infrared spectrum, crucial for improved TPV efficiency. The near-omnidirectional and spectrally selective emitter is obtained as the emission changes due to material properties and not due to resonances or interference effects, marking a paradigm shift in thermal engineering approaches. We experimentally demonstrate the OTT in a thermally stable metamaterial at high temperatures of 1,000 °C.

  6. An innovative matrix controlling drug delivery produced by thermal treatment of DC tablets containing polycarbophil and ethylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglioli, Gabriele; Baldassari, Sara; Cirrincione, Paola; Russo, Eleonora; Parodi, Brunella; Gatti, Paolo; Drava, Giuliana

    2013-12-15

    An innovative matrix, produced by thermal treatment on direct compression (DC) tablets containing polycarbophil (POL) and ethylcellulose (EC), identified as matrix forming polymers, and able to control the release of diltiazem hydrochloride, was developed. At pH 7.2, 72 ± 1.2% (w/w) of drug loaded was released in 25 h, mostly at constant rate. This swellable and unerodible matrix controls drug release by an anomalous transport mechanism. The modifications induced by the thermal treatment are irreversible and can be used to control and characterize the matrix. A 3-component constrained mixture design allowed the investigation of the experimental domain in which the matrix forms and the computation of a mathematical model that can be used to optimize the formulation properties. The release rate can be modulated (0.032-0.064% drug released/min) through the choice of suitable treatment conditions and tablet composition. The maximum amount of diltiazem hydrochloride released by zero-order kinetics, at the lowest release rate, occurs for POL:EC ratio in the range of 1:1-2:3 with 20-30% of diluent. The tablets are able to load up to 50% (w/w) of diltiazem hydrochloride without losing their properties. A stability study performed on a selected formulation containing DTZ showed stability for at least 2.7 years at RT conditions.

  7. Thermal Battery Operating Gas Atmosphere Control and Heat Transfer Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Thermo Fisher Scientific (maximum operating temperature 1100 °C). The SS tube was enclosed in a protective quartz tube to insure proper operation...201S Analytical Balance or a Mettler Toledo AT 20 Microbalance. The BaCrO4 used was certified grade from Fisher Scientific. Global measured leak rates...CHAGNON 107 BEAVER CT COCKEYSVILLE MD 21030 2 ASB ATTN J SWEENEY ATTN S SHOEFFERT BOURGES CEDEX ALLEE SAINTE HELENE 18021

  8. Elementary stage rate coefficients of heterogeneous catalytic recombination of dissociated air on thermal protective surfaces from ab initio approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, A. A.; Kroupnov, A. A.; Kovalev, V. L.

    2015-08-01

    Elementary stage rate coefficients of the full system of kinetic equations describing heterogeneous catalytic recombination of the dissociated air on the surfaces of thermal protective ceramic coatings of β-cristobalite and α-Al2O3 are determined using the quantum-mechanical calculations within the framework of cluster models and literature data. Both the impact and associative recombination processes of adsorbed oxygen and nitrogen atoms are taken into account.

  9. Energy budgets, growth rates, and thermal constraints: toward an integrative approach to the study of life-history variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiarowski, P H

    2001-04-01

    Variation in thermal constraints on activity has been hypothesized to be an important ecological source of geographic variation in growth rates of juvenile eastern fence lizards Sceloporus undulatus. However, most of the evidence to support this hypothesis is either inferential or indirect. In this study, I quantitatively compared thermal constraints on activity and their relationship to growth rates of free-ranging juvenile fence lizards from two extremes of the range of variation in growth rate (Nebraska and New Jersey) used in a reciprocal transplant experiment. I also examined energy allocation made to growth and storage by yearling lizards. Reduced growth rates in New Jersey of normally fast-growing hatchlings from Nebraska were associated with a more stringent thermal constraint on activity corresponding to a 2-3-h shorter predicted daily activity period in New Jersey compared to Nebraska. The thermal constraint on activity was particularly strong (24% less time available in New Jersey compared to Nebraska) during the period when hatchling lizards emerge (August-October). An 8% reduction in total activity time available over the course of a single year was associated with a 7% reduction in the total amount of energy accumulated by lizards in New Jersey. Differences in the total amount of energy available for allocation were also accompanied by differences in how energy was allocated. Lizards from New Jersey had an allocatable energy pool of approximately 40.34 kJ (88% to growth, 12% to storage, and 0% to reproduction). Lizards from Nebraska had an allocatable pool of 43.44 kJ (22% to growth, 18% to storage, and 60% to reproduction). This study joins others in advocating and illustrating an integrative approach to determining the causes and consequences of life-history variation by combining experimental, comparative, and phylogenetic methods in a single system.

  10. Estimation of Critical Rate of Temperature Rise for Thermal Explosion of First Order Autocatalytic Decomposition Reaction Systems by Using Non-isothermal DSC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Peng-jiang; LU Gui-e; JIANG Ji-you; HU Rong-zu; ZHANG Hai; XIA Zhi-ming; SONG Ji-rong; GAO Sheng-li; NING Bin-ke; SHI Qi-zhen; LIU Rong

    2004-01-01

    A method of estimating the critical rate of temperature rise for the thermal explosion of first order autocatalytic decomposition reaction systems by using non-isothermal DSC is presented. The information was obtained on the increasing rate of temperature for the first order autocatalytic decomposition of nitrocellulose containing 13.86% nitrogen converting into the thermal explosion.

  11. Probability ratings in claustrophobic patients and normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, L G; Csatlos, P

    2000-11-01

    Forty-nine DSM-IV diagnosed claustrophobics and 49 sex- and age-matched community controls, without any current or past psychiatric disorder, were asked to estimate the probability that three types if events would occur if they were in the described situations. The events were claustrophobic, generally negative, and positive in nature. The results showed that claustrophobics significantly overestimated the probability of events they specifically feared, i.e. the claustrophobic events, while there was no difference between the groups regarding generally negative events and positive events. This finding remained when the higher scores for claustrophobics on the Claustrophobia scale and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index were covaried out. The conclusion that can be drawn is that claustrophobics' probability ratings are characterized by distortions that are specifically connected to anxiety-arousing events and not negative events in general. The hypothesis is proposed that this may be explained by an exaggerated use of simplified rules-of-thumb for probability estimations that build on availability in memory, simulation, and representativity.

  12. Thermal control of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters for complete implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yun; Okuyama, Takeshi; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Kamiyama, Takamichi; Nishi, Kotaro; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an approach for the thermal control of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys. An artificial anal sphincter has been proposed by the authors to resolve problems of severe fecal incontinence in patients. The basic design of the artificial sphincter consists of two all-round shape memory alloy plates as the main functional parts, and heaters that are attached to the SMA plates for generating the thermal cycles required for the phase transformation accompanied shape changes of the plates. The SMA artificial sphincter could be fitted around intestines, performing an occlusion function at body temperature and a release function upon heating. Thermal compatibility of such prostheses is most important and is critical for practical use. Since a temperature rise of approximately 20 °C from body temperature is needed to activate a complete transformation of SMA plates, an earlier model of ours allowed only a short period of heating, resulting in incomplete evacuation. In this work, a thermal control approach using a temperature-responsive reed switch has been incorporated into the device to prevent the SMA plates from overheating. Then, with thermal insulation the artificial anal sphincter is expected to allow a long enough opening period for fecal continence; without any thermal impact to the surrounding tissues that would be in contact with the artificial sphincter. Thermal control was confirmed in both in vitro and in vivo experiments, suggesting the effectiveness of the present approach. The modified SMA artificial anal sphincter has been implanted into animal models for chronic experiments of up to 4 weeks, and has exhibited good performance by maintaining occlusion and release functions. At autopsy, no anomaly due to thermal impact was found on the surfaces of intestines that had been in contact with the artificial anal sphincter.

  13. Release and control of hydrogen sulfide during sludge thermal drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Huanxin; Dai, Zhixin; Ji, Zhongqiang; Gao, Caixia; Liu, Chongxuan

    2015-04-15

    The release of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) during sludge drying is a major environmental problem because of its toxicity to human health. A series of experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms and factors controlling the H2S release. Results of this study show that: 1) the biomass and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sludge were the major factors controlling the amount of H2S release, 2) the sludge drying temperature had an important effect on both the extent and the timing of H2S release from the sludge, and 3) decreasing sludge pH increased the H2S release. Based on the findings from this study, a new system that integrates sludge drying and H2S gas treatment was developed to reduce the amount of H2S released from sludge treatments.

  14. Local thermal control of the human cutaneous circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, John M.; Kellogg, Dean L.

    2010-01-01

    The level of skin blood flow is subject to both reflex thermoregulatory control and influences from the direct effects of warming and cooling the skin. The effects of local changes in temperature are capable of maximally vasoconstricting or vasodilating the skin. They are brought about by a combination of mechanisms involving endothelial, adrenergic, and sensory systems. Local warming initiates a transient vasodilation through an axon reflex, succeeded by a plateau phase due largely to nitric...

  15. Self-deflagration rates of 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB). [burning tate, thermal stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Zurn, D. E.; Atwood, A. I.; Eisel, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal stability and resistance to impact was investigated for the ingredient TABA. Particular attention was given to determining the use of TABA as a possible alternative ingredient or substitute for HMX in explosives and high energy propellants. The burn rate of TABA was investigated as a function of pressure. It was concluded that the self deflagration rate of TABA is an order of magnitude lower than HMX over the range 2000-15000 psi; TABA will not sustain self deflagration at low pressures (less than or equal to 1500 psi) in the sample configuration and apparatus used.

  16. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  17. Development of digital flow control system for multi-channel variable-rate sprayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precision modulation of nozzle flow rates is a critical step for variable-rate spray applications in orchards and ornamental nurseries. An automatic flow rate control system activated with microprocessors and pulse width modulation (PWM) controlled solenoid valves was developed to control flow rates...

  18. A controlled evaluation of thermal biofeedback and thermal biofeedback combined with cognitive therapy in the treatment of vascular headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, E B; Appelbaum, K A; Radnitz, C L; Morrill, B; Michultka, D; Kirsch, C; Guarnieri, P; Hillhouse, J; Evans, D D; Jaccard, J

    1990-04-01

    One-hundred-sixteen patients suffering from vascular headache (migraine or combined migraine and tension) were, after 4 weeks of pretreatment baseline headache monitoring, randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) thermal biofeedback with adjunctive relaxation training (TBF); (b) TBF plus cognitive therapy; (c) pseudomediation as an ostensible attention-placebo control; or (d) headache monitoring. The first three groups received 16 individual sessions over 8 weeks, while the fourth group continued to monitor headaches. All groups then monitored headaches for a 4-week posttreatment baseline. Analyses revealed that all treated groups improved significantly more than the headache monitoring group with no significant differences among the three treated groups. On a measure of clinically significant improvement, the two TBF groups had slightly higher (51%) degree of improvement than the meditation group (37.5%). It is argued that the attention-placebo control became an active relaxation condition.

  19. Active thermal control for the 1.8-m primary mirror of the solar telescope CLST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyi; Gu, Naiting; Li, Cheng; Cheng, Yuntao; Yao, Benxi; Wang, Zhiyong; Rao, Changhui

    2016-07-01

    The 1.8-m primary mirror of solar telescope is heated by the solar radiation and introduce harmful mirror seeing degrading the imaging quality. For the Chinese Large Solar Telescope (CLST), the thermal requirement based on the quantitative evaluation on mirror seeing effect shows that the temperature rise on mirror surface should be within 1 kelvin. To meet the requirement, an active thermal control system design for the CLST primary mirror is proposed, and realized on the subscale prototype of the CLST. The experimental results show that the temperature on the mirror surface is well controlled. The average and maximum thermal controlled error are less than 0.3 and 0.7 kelvins respectively, which completely meets the requirements.

  20. A dynamic solar-electric power/thermal control system for spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B. K.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a solar-electric power and active thermal control system for spacecraft with solar energy to electricity conversion efficiency of more than 20%. Briefly, the solar heat energy is absorbed by flat plate collectors yielding above 70% of the energy incident for conversion by an organic condensing cycle. The cycle operates between 132 and 6.67 deg C. The working fluid is F-114 which flows through a solar collector to absorb heat, then through a regenerator and into the radiator where it is condensed to a liquid. The cold liquid flows through two paths, one providing regenerator cooling, the other providing spacecraft thermal control. The system total weight is about 170kg/kW of electrical energy produced. The dynamic system replaces batteries by a thermal capacitor for eclipse period energy storage, thereby eliminating many battery charging and control problems as well as improving efficiency and weight characteristics of the system.

  1. Relationship analysis between transient thermal control mode and image quality for an aerial camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiyi; Xu, Yongsen; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Yulei; Shen, Honghai; Ding, Yalin

    2017-02-01

    Thermal control and temperature uniformity are important factors for aerial cameras. This paper describes the problems with existing systems and introduces modifications. The modifications have improved the temperature uniformity from 12.8°C to 4.5°C, and they enable images to be obtained at atmospheric and low pressures (35.4 KPa). First, thermal optical analysis of the camera is performed by using the finite element analysis method. This modeled the effect of temperature level and temperature gradient on imaging. Based on the results of the analysis, the corresponding improvements to the thermal control measures are implemented to improve the temperature uniformity. The relationship between the temperature control mode and temperature uniformity is analyzed. The improved temperature field corresponding to the thermal optical analysis is studied. Taking into account that the convection will be affected by the low pressure, the paper analyzes the thermal control effect, and imaging results are obtained in low pressure. The experimental results corroborate the analyses.

  2. Model Based Predictive Control of Thermal Comfort for Integrated Building System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Tz.; Jonkov, T.; Yonchev, E.; Tsankov, D.

    2011-12-01

    This article deals with the indoor thermal control problem in HVAC (heating, ventilation and air conditioning) systems. Important outdoor and indoor variables in these systems are: air temperature, global and diffuse radiations, wind speed and direction, temperature, relative humidity, mean radiant temperature, and so on. The aim of this article is to obtain the thermal comfort optimisation by model based predictive control algorithms (MBPC) of an integrated building system. The control law is given by a quadratic programming problem and the obtained control action is applied to the process. The derived models and model based predictive control algorithms are investigated based on real—live data. All researches are derived in MATLAB environment. The further research will focus on synthesis of robust energy saving control algorithms.

  3. Simplified Building Thermal Model Used for Optimal Control of Radiant Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MPC has the ability to optimize the system operation parameters for energy conservation. Recently, it has been used in HVAC systems for saving energy, but there are very few applications in radiant cooling systems. To implement MPC in buildings with radiant terminals, the predictions of cooling load and thermal environment are indispensable. In this paper, a simplified thermal model is proposed for predicting cooling load and thermal environment in buildings with radiant floor. In this thermal model, the black-box model is introduced to derive the incident solar radiation, while the genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the parameters of the thermal model. In order to further validate this simplified thermal model, simulated results from TRNSYS are compared with those from this model and the deviation is evaluated based on coefficient of variation of root mean square (CV. The results show that the simplified model can predict the operative temperature with a CV lower than 1% and predict cooling loads with a CV lower than 10%. For the purpose of supervisory control in HVAC systems, this simplified RC thermal model has an acceptable accuracy and can be used for further MPC in buildings with radiation terminals.

  4. The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

    2013-01-01

    Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

  5. Thermal distortion and birefringence in repetition-rate plasma electrode Pockels cell for high average power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingxiang Cao; Xiongjun Zhang; Wanguo Zheng; Shaobo He; Zhan Sui

    2007-01-01

    We numerically study thermally induced birefringence and distortion in plasma electrode Pockels cell based on KD*P as the electro-optic material. This device can repetitively operate under the heat capacity mode.Simulation results indicate that the excellent switching performances and low wave-front distortion are achieved within several tens seconds working time at average power in excess of 1 kW.

  6. Thermally assisted electric field control of magnetism in flexible multiferroic heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiwei; Zhan, Qingfeng; Dai, Guohong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Wang, Baomin; Liu, Gang; Zuo, Zhenghu; Rong, Xin; Yang, Huali; Zhu, Xiaojian; Xie, Yali; Chen, Bin; Li, Run-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Thermal and electrical control of magnetic anisotropy were investigated in flexible Fe81Ga19 (FeGa)/Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) multiferroic heterostructures. Due to the large anisotropic thermal deformation of PVDF (α1 = -13 × 10-6 K-1 and α2 = -145 × 10-6 K-1), the in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) of FeGa can be reoriented 90° by changing the temperature across 295 K where the films are magnetically isotropic. Thus, the magnetization of FeGa can be reversed by the thermal cycling between 280 and 320 K under a constant magnetic field lower than coercivity. Moreover, under the assistance of thermal deformation with slightly heating the samples to the critical temperature, the electric field of +/- 267 kV cm-1 can well align the UMA along the two orthogonal directions. The new route of combining thermal and electrical control of magnetic properties realized in PVDF-based flexible multiferroic materials shows good prospects in application of flexible thermal spintronic devices and flexible microwave magnetic materials.

  7. The use of heat pipes in thermal control system for electronics: current situation and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairnasov S. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, the widespread application of cooling systems based on heat pipes makes significant contribution to the solution of the thermal control of electronic equipment. The use of heat pipes as heat transfer devices and heat exchanging equipment allows creating an efficient new-generation heat sinks. Nowadays, heat pipes are widely used in the following areas: electronic equipment, special application computer equipment (from small computers to large data centres, high power electronics. The article provides an analysis of the current state and prospects of heat pipes application in thermal control systems for ground-based electronic equipment.

  8. Automatic control of human thermal comfort with a liquid-cooled garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetz, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    Water cooling in a liquid-cooled garment is used to maintain the thermal comfort of crewmembers during extravehicular activity. The feasibility of a simple control that will operate automatically to maintain the thermal comfort is established. Data on three test subjects are included to support the conclusion that heat balance can be maintained well within allowable medical limits. The controller concept was also successfully demonstrated for ground-based applications and shows potential for any tasks involving the use of liquid-cooled garments.

  9. Mussel-Inspired Polydopamine Coating for Enhanced Thermal Stability and Rate Performance of Graphite Anodes in Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Hyo; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Lee, Junmin; Jeong, You Kyeong; Choi, Jang Wook; Lee, Hochun

    2016-06-08

    Despite two decades of commercial history, it remains very difficult to simultaneously achieve both high rate capability and thermal stability in the graphite anodes of Li-ion batteries because the stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer, which is essential for thermal stability, impedes facile Li(+) ion transport at the interface. Here, we resolve this longstanding challenge using a mussel-inspired polydopamine (PD) coating via a simple immersion process. The nanometer-thick PD coating layer allows the formation of an SEI layer on the coating surface without perturbing the intrinsic properties of the SEI layer of the graphite anodes. PD-coated graphite exhibits far better performances in cycling test at 60 °C and storage test at 90 °C than bare graphite. The PD-coated graphite also displays superior rate capability during both lithiation and delithiation. As evidenced by surface free energy analysis, the enhanced performance of the PD-coated graphite can be ascribed to the Lewis basicity of the PD, which scavenges harmful hydrofluoric acid and forms an intermediate triple-body complex among a Li(+) ion, solvent molecules, and the PD's basic site. The usefulness of the proposed PD coating can be expanded to various electrodes in rechargeable batteries that suffer from poor thermal stability and interfacial kinetics.

  10. System Level Analysis of a Water PCM HX Integrated into Orion's Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Moses; Hansen, Scott; Seth, Rubik; Ungar, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development an Orion system level analysis was performed using Thermal Desktop for a water PCM HX integrated into Orion's thermal control system in a 100km Lunar orbit. The study verified of the thermal model by using a wax PCM and analyzed 1) placing the PCM on the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) versus the External Thermal Control System (ETCS) 2) use of 30/70 PGW verses 50/50 PGW and 3) increasing the radiator area in order to reduce PCM freeze times. The analysis showed that for the assumed operating and boundary conditions utilizing a water PCM HX on Orion is not a viable option for any case. Additionally, it was found that the radiator area would have to be increased by at least 40% in order to support a viable water-based PCM HX.

  11. Robust thermal control for CMOS-based lab-on-chip systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Quijada, Jose; Ma, Tianchi; Hall, Gordon H.; Reynolds, Matt; Sloan, David; Caverhill-Godkewitsch, Saul; Glerum, D. Moira; Sameoto, Dan; Elliott, Duncan G.; Backhouse, Christopher J.

    2015-07-01

    The need for precise temperature control at small scales has provided a formidable challenge to the lab-on-chip community. It requires, at once, good thermal conductivity for high speed operation, good thermal isolation for low power consumption and the ability to have small (mm-scale) thermally independent regions on the same substrate. Most importantly, and, in addition to these conflicting requirements, there is a need to accurately measure the temperature of the active region without the need for device-to-device calibrations. We have developed and tested a design that enables thermal control of lab-on-chip devices atop silicon substrates in a way that could be integrated with the standard methods of mass-manufacture used in the electronics industry (i.e. CMOS). This is a significant step towards a single-chip lab-on-chip solution, one in which the microfluidics, high voltage electronics, optoelectronics, instrumentation electronics, and the world-chip interface are all integrated on a single substrate with multiple, independent, thermally-controlled regions based on active heating and passive cooling.

  12. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Tasks for ANAV NPPs in Support of Plant Operation and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Reventós

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks aimed at supporting plant operation and control of nuclear power plants are an important issue for the Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs (ANAV. ANAV is the consortium that runs the Ascó power plants (2 units and the Vandellòs-II power plant. The reactors are Westinghouse-design, 3-loop PWRs with an approximate electrical power of 1000 MW. The Technical University of Catalonia (UPC thermal-hydraulic analysis team has jointly worked together with ANAV engineers at different levels in the analysis and improvement of these reactors. This article is an illustration of the usefulness of computational analysis for operational support. The contents presented were operational between 1985 and 2001 and subsequently changed slightly following various organizational adjustments. The paper has two different parts. In the first part, it describes the specific aspects of thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks related to operation and control and, in the second part, it briefly presents the results of three examples of analyses that were performed. All the presented examples are related to actual situations in which the scenarios were studied by analysts using thermal-hydraulic codes and prepared nodalizations. The paper also includes a qualitative evaluation of the benefits obtained by ANAV through thermal-hydraulic analyses aimed at supporting operation and plant control.

  13. Effect of Personal Control over Thermal Environment in a Laboratorium Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulve, M. te; Boerstra, A. C.; Toftum, Jørn;

    was that human responses to a thermal indoor environment depend on the availability of control opportunities. This was tested in a field lab where subjects had a personal desk fan with a stepless controller at their workplace. Two conditions were tested: one (the first) with individual control and one without......, but with identical indoor climate exposure as recorded during the first session. During both experimental conditions, 23 subjects were exposed for 120 min to an operative temperature of 28 °C and they were provided with a personal desk fan. During the first exposure subjects were allowed to adjust air velocity (and...... therefore local thermal environment) at any moment. For each subject the adjustments were recorded. In the second experiment, subjects were exposed to identical indoor environment conditions as recorded during the first experiment, but without individual control of the desk fan (control knob was hidden...

  14. Flutter and thermal buckling control for composite laminated panels in supersonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Ming; Song, Zhi-Guang

    2013-10-01

    Aerothermoelastic analysis for composite laminated panels in supersonic flow is carried out. The flutter and thermal buckling control for the panels are also investigated. In the modeling for the equation of motion, the influences of in-plane thermal load on the transverse bending deflection are taken into account, and the unsteady aerodynamic pressure in supersonic flow is evaluated by the linear piston theory. The governing equation of the structural system is developed applying the Hamilton's principle. In order to study the influences of aerodynamic pressure on the vibration mode shape of the panel, both the assumed mode method (AMM) and the finite element method (FEM) are used to derive the equation of motion. The proportional feedback control method and the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) are used to design the controller. The aeroelastic stability of the structural system is analyzed using the frequency-domain method. The effects of ply angle of the laminated panel on the critical flutter aerodynamic pressure and the critical buckling temperature change are researched. The flutter and thermal buckling control effects using the proportional feedback control and the LQR are compared. An effective method which can suppress the flutter and thermal buckling simultaneously is proposed.

  15. An automatic energy-saving and thermal monitoring/controlling system for a pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ching-Chien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of low temperatures and oxygen in cold water, fish will die when cold currents arrive. This will cause tremendous loss of money. In order reduce the cooling of the pond, an automatic thermal detecting and cold-roofing system using a wind-proofing device, heaters, and thermal detectors is proposed. To reduce heat loss due to thermal convection above the pond surface, a motor-driven wind-proofing device automatically controlled by a PLC controller is adopted. Here, the wind-proofing device, thermal detectors, and heating system are connected to the PLC controller. The PLC will also be connected to the PC interface. The temperature thresholds used to trigger the heater and the wind proofing device can be set at the PC interface. Two options for manipulating the heating and the automatic heating can be selected. The related wind-proofing area and the number of heaters will be determined according to the current temperature. Moreover, the PLC can be wirelessly connected to the server PC in the control room. The pond keeper can monitor everything online and control the pond water's temperature. With this, the problem of fish dying in a cold wave can be solved. Consequently, to reduce the electrical exhaust when heating up the pond water, green energy, solar energy and wind energy, is used.

  16. The development of the cell cryopreservation protocol with controlled rate thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurina, Tatyana M; Pakhomov, Alexandr V; Polyakova, Anna L; Legach, Evgeniy I; Bozhok, Galyna A

    2016-06-01

    Thawing in the water bath is often considered as a standard procedure. The thermal history of samples thawed in this way is poorly controlled, but cryopreservation and banking of cell-based products require standardization, automation and safety of all the technological stages including thawing. The programmable freezers allow implementation of the controlled cooling as well as the controlled thawing. As the cell damage occurs during the phase transformation that takes place in the cryoprotectant medium in the process of freezing-thawing, the choice of warming rates within the temperature intervals of transformations is very important. The goal of the study was to investigate the influence of warming rates within the intervals of the phase transformations in the DMSO-based cryoprotectant medium on the cell recovery and to develop a cryopreservation protocol with controlled cooling and warming rates. The temperature intervals of phase transformations such as melting of the eutectic mixture of the cryoprotectant solution (MEMCS), melting of the eutectic salt solution (MESS), melting of the main ice mass (MMIM), recrystallization before MEMCS, recrystallization before MESS and recrystallization before MMIM were determined by thermo-mechanical analysis. The biological experiments were performed on the rat testicular interstitial cells (TIC). The highest levels of the cell recovery and metabolic activity after cryopreservation were obtained using the protocol with the high (20 °C/min) warming rate in the temperature intervals of crystallization of the eutectics as well as recrystallizations and the low (1 °C/min) warming rate in the temperature intervals of melting of the eutectics as well as MMIM. The total cell recovery was 65.3 ± 2.1 %, the recovery of the 3-beta-HSD-positive (Leydig) cells was 82.9 ± 1.8 %, the MTT staining was 32.5 ± 0.9 % versus 42.1 ± 1.7 %; 57.4 ± 2.1 % and 24.0 ± 1.1 % respectively, when compared to the thawing in

  17. A new approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transfer rates with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R.; Rosner, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A rational approach to the correlation of boundary layer mass transport rates, applicable to many commonly encountered laminar flow conditions with thermal diffusion and/or variable properties, is outlined. The correlation scheme builds upon already available constant property blowing/suction solutions by introducing appropriate correction factors to account for the additional ('pseudo' blowing and source) effects identified with variable properties and thermal diffusion. Applications of the scheme to the particular laminar boundary layer mass transfer problems considered herein (alkali and transition metal compound vapor transport) indicates satisfactory accuracy up to effective blowing factors equivalent to about one third of the 'blow off' value. As a useful by-product of the variable property correlation, we extend the heat-mass transfer analogy, for a wide range of Lewis numbers, to include variable property effects.

  18. Non-adiabatic effects within a single thermally-averaged potential energy surface: Thermal expansion and reaction rates of small molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J L; Clemente-Gallardo, J; Echenique, P; Mazo, J J; Polo, V; Rubio, A; Zueco, D

    2012-01-01

    At non-zero temperature and when a system has low-lying excited electronic states, the ground-state Born--Oppenheimer approximation breaks down and the low-lying electronic states are involved in any chemical process. In this work, we use a temperature-dependent effective potential for the nuclei which can accomodate the influence of an arbitrary number of electronic states in a simple way, while at the same time producing the correct Boltzmann equibrium distribution for the electronic part. With the help of this effective potential, we show that thermally-activated low-lying electronic states can have a significant effect in molecular properties for which electronic excitations are oftentimes ignored. We study the thermal expansion of the Manganese dimer, Mn$_2$, where we find that the average bond length experiences a change larger than the present experimental accuracy upon the inclusion of the excited states into the picture. We also show that, when these states are taken into account, reaction rate const...

  19. Experimental Research of Electronic Devices Thermal Control Using Metallic Phase Change Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Gang Pan; Jun-Biao Wang; Xian-Jie Zhang; Xiao-Bao Cao

    2014-01-01

    A Phase-change thermal control unit ( PTCU) filled with metallic phase change material ( PCM) Bismuth alloy for electric devices thermal protection was developed and investigated experimentally. The PTCU filled with PCM was designed and manufactured. Resistance heating components ( RCHs) produced 1 W, 3 W, 5 W, 7W, and 10 W for simulating heat generation of electronic devices. At various heating power levels, the performance of PTCU were tested during heating period and one duty cycle period. The experimental results show that the PTCU delays RCH reaching the maximum operating temperature. Also, a numerical model was developed to enable interpretation of experimental results and to perform parametric studies. The results confirmed that the PTCU is suitable for electric devices thermal control.

  20. Size Control of Nanoscale Silicon Particles Formed in Thermally Annealed A- Si: H Films and Its Photoluminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Qing

    2005-01-01

    A method to control the size of nanoscale silicon grown in thermally annealed hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si : H) films is reported. Using the characterizing techniques of micro-Raman scattering,X-ray diffraction and computer simulation, it is found that the sizes of the formed silicon particles change with the temperature rising rate in thermally annealing the a-Si : H films. When the a-Si: H films have been annealed with high rising rate( ~ 100 C/s), the sizes of nanoscale silicon particles are in the range of 1.6~ 15nm. On the other hand, if the a-Si: H films have been annealed with low temperature rising rate(~1 C/s),the sizes of nanoscale silicon particles are in the range of 23~46 nm. Based on the theory of crystal nucleation and growth, the effect of temperature rising rate on the sizes of the formed silicon particles is discussed. Under high power laser irradiation, in situ nanocrystallization and subsequent nc-Si clusters are small enough for visible light emission, authors have not detected any visible photoluminescence(PL) from these nc-Si clusters before surface passivation. After electrochemical oxidization in hydrofluoric acid, however, intense red PL has been detected. Cyclic hydrofluoric oxidization and air exposure can cause subsequent blue shift in the red emission. The importance of surface passivation and quantum confinement in the visible emissions has been discussed.

  1. Recycling potential of air pollution control residue from sewage sludge thermal treatment as artificial lightweight aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialowiec, Andrzej; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Gusiatin, Zygmunt M; Thornton, Arthur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Zielinska, Magdalena

    2014-03-01

    Thermal treatment of sewage sludge produces fly ash, also known as the air pollution control residue (APCR), which may be recycled as a component of artificial lightweight aggregates (ALWA). Properties of APCR are typical: high content of Ca, Mg, P2O5, as well as potential to induce alkaline reactions. These properties indicate that ALWA prepared with a high content of APCR may remove heavy metals, phosphorus, and ammonium nitrogen from wastewater with high efficiency. The aim of this preliminary study was to determine the optimal composition of ALWA for potential use as a filter media in wastewater treatment systems. Five kinds of ALWA were produced, with different proportions of ash (shown as percentages in subscripts) in mixture with bentonite: ALWA0 (reference), ALWA12.5, ALWA25, ALWA50, and ALWA100. The following parameters of ALWA were determined: density, bulk density, compressive strength, hydraulic conductivity, and removal efficiency of ions Zn(2+), NH4 (+), and PO4 (3-). Tests showed that ALWA had good mechanical and hydraulic properties, and might be used in wastewater filtering systems. Phosphates and zinc ions were removed with high efficiency (80-96%) by ALWA25-100 in static (batch) conditions. The efficiency of ammonium nitrogen removal was low, <18%. Artificial wastewater treatment performance in dynamic conditions (through-flow), showed increasing removal efficiency of Zn(2+), PO4 (3-) with a decrease in flow rate.

  2. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  3. Adaptive threshold control for auto-rate fallback algorithm in IEEE 802.11 multi-rate WLANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qilin; Lu, Yang; Zhu, Xiaolin; Ge, Fangzhen

    2012-03-01

    The IEEE 802.11 standard supports multiple rates for data transmission in the physical layer. Nowadays, to improve network performance, a rate adaptation scheme called auto-rate fallback (ARF) is widely adopted in practice. However, ARF scheme suffers performance degradation in multiple contending nodes environments. In this article, we propose a novel rate adaptation scheme called ARF with adaptive threshold control. In multiple contending nodes environment, the proposed scheme can effectively mitigate the frame collision effect on rate adaptation decision by adaptively adjusting rate-up and rate-down threshold according to the current collision level. Simulation results show that the proposed scheme can achieve significantly higher throughput than the other existing rate adaptation schemes. Furthermore, the simulation results also demonstrate that the proposed scheme can effectively respond to the varying channel condition.

  4. Experimental and modeling study of thermal rate coefficients and cross sections for electron attachment to C(60).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, Albert A; Friedman, Jeffrey F; Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Schaffer, Linda C; Troe, Jürgen

    2010-05-21

    Thermal electron attachment to C(60) has been studied by relative rate measurements in a flowing afterglow Langmuir probe apparatus. The rate coefficients of the attachment k(1) are shown to be close to 10(-6) cm(3) s(-1) with a small negative temperature coefficient. These results supersede measurements from the 1990s which led to much smaller values of k(1) with a large positive temperature coefficient suggesting an activation barrier. Theoretical modeling of k(1) in terms of generalized Vogt-Wannier capture theory shows that k(1) now looks more consistent with measurements of absolute attachment cross sections sigma(at) than before. The comparison of capture theory and experimental rate or cross section data leads to empirical correction factors, accounting for "intramolecular vibrational relaxation" or "electron-phonon coupling," which reduce k(1) below the capture results and which, on a partial wave-selected level, decrease with increasing electron energy.

  5. Effect of cooling rates on dendrite spacings of directionally solidified DZ125 alloy under high thermal gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Weiguo; LIU Lin; ZHAO Xinbao; HUANG Taiwen; YU Zhuhuan; QU Min; FU Hengzhi

    2009-01-01

    The dendrite morphologies and spacings of directionally solidified DZ125 superalloy were investigated under high thermal gradient about 500 K/cm. The results reveal that, with increasing cooling rate, both the spacings of primary and secondary dendrite arms decrease, and the dendrite morphologies transit from coarse to superfine dendrite. The secondary dendrite arms trend to be refined and be well developed, and the tertiary dendrite will occur. The predictions of the Kurz/Fisher model and the Hunt/Lu model accord basically with the experimental data for primary dendrite arm spacing. The regression equation of the primary dendrite arm spacings λ_1 and the cooling rate V_c is λ_1=0.013V_c~(-0.32). The regression equation of the secondary dendrite arm spacing λ_2 and the cooling rate V_c is λ_2=0.00258V_c~(-0.31), which gives good agreement with the Feurer/Wunderlin model.

  6. Optimizing Compliance and Thermal Conductivity of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings via Controlled Powders and Processing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yang; Srinivasan, Vasudevan; Nakamura, Toshio; Sampath, Sanjay; Bertrand, Pierre; Bertrand, Ghislaine

    2012-09-01

    The properties and performance of plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are strongly dependent on the microstructural defects, which are affected by starting powder morphology and processing conditions. Of particular interest is the use of hollow powders which not only allow for efficient melting of zirconia ceramics but also produce lower conductivity and more compliant coatings. Typical industrial hollow spray powders have an assortment of densities resulting in masking potential advantages of the hollow morphology. In this study, we have conducted process mapping strategies using a novel uniform shell thickness hollow powder to control the defect microstructure and properties. Correlations among coating properties, microstructure, and processing reveal feasibility to produce highly compliant and low conductivity TBC through a combination of optimized feedstock and processing conditions. The results are presented through the framework of process maps establishing correlations among process, microstructure, and properties and providing opportunities for optimization of TBCs.

  7. Convergence rates of symplectic pontryagin approximations in optimal control theory

    OpenAIRE

    Sandberg, Mattias; Szepessy, Anders

    2006-01-01

     Many inverse problems for differential equations can be formulated as optimal control problems. It is well known that inverse problems often need to be regularized to obtain good approximations. This work presents a systematic method to regularize and to establish error estimates for approximations to some control problems in high dimension, based on symplectic approximation of the Hamiltonian system for the control problem. In particular the work derives error estimates and constructs regul...

  8. A Hybrid Power Control Concept for PV Inverters with Reduced Thermal Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    on a single-phase PV inverter under yearly operation is presented with analyses of the thermal loading, lifetime, and annual energy yield. It has revealed the trade-off factors to select the power limit and also verified the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed control concept....

  9. Optimization of thermal fly-height control slider geometry for Tbit/in^2 recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic storage advances including thermal fly-height control (TFC) technology were able to reduce the clearance between the read/write elements of the slider and the disk surface to increase the recording density of hard disk drives without compromising the stability of the head–disk interface (HD

  10. Three-DOF dynamic model with lubricant contact for thermal fly-height control nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vakis, Antonis I.; Hadjicostis, Christoforos N.; Polycarpou, Andreas A.

    2012-01-01

    A three-degree-of-freedom dynamic contact model with friction and lubricant contact is introduced for thermal fly-height control of a near-contact flying slider. The proposed model addresses the issue of contact with a molecularly thin lubricant layer and includes a third degree-of-freedom, roll. Ne

  11. A predictive model for smart control of a domestic heat pump and thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; Gebhardt, I.; de Wit, J.B.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a predictive model of a thermal storage which is charged by a heat pump and used for domestic hot water supply. The model is used for smart grid control purposes and requires measurement signals of flow and temperature at the inlet and outlet of

  12. A cell for the controllable thermal treatment and electrochemical characterisation of single crystal alloy electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondarenko, Alexander S.; Stephens, Ifan E.L.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2012-01-01

    A new electrochemical cell is described which provides the opportunity to perform electrochemical experiments and apply a controllable thermal treatment without exposing the sample to the laboratory atmosphere. We report typical model experiments with Pt(111) single crystal electrodes which can...

  13. A predictive model for smart control of a domestic heat pump and thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van R.P.; Gebhardt, I.; Wit, de J.B.; Smit, G.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a predictive model of a thermal storage which is charged by a heat pump and used for domestic hot water supply. The model is used for smart grid control purposes and requires measurement signals of flow and temperature at the inlet and outlet of t

  14. Thermal effects on the dynamics and motor control of ballistic prey capture in toads: maintaining high performance at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deban, Stephen M; Lappin, A Kristopher

    2011-04-15

    Temperature has a strong influence on biological rates, including the contractile rate properties of muscle and thereby the velocity, acceleration and power of muscle-powered movements. We hypothesized that the dynamics of movements powered by elastic recoil have a lower thermal dependence than muscle-powered movements. We examined the prey capture behavior of toads (Bufo terrestris) using high speed imaging and electromyography to compare the effects of body temperature (11-35°C) on the kinematics, dynamics and motor control of two types of movement: (1) ballistic mouth opening and tongue projection, which are powered by elastic recoil, and (2) non-ballistic prey transport, including tongue retraction and mouth closing, which are powered directly by muscle contraction. Over 11-25°C, temperature coefficients of ballistic mouth opening and tongue projection dynamics (Q(10) of 0.99-1.25) were not significantly different from 1.00 and were consistently lower than those of prey transport movements (Q(10) of 1.77-2.26), supporting our main hypothesis. The depressor mandibulae muscle, which is responsible for ballistic mouth opening and tongue projection via the recovery of elastic strain energy stored by the muscle prior to the onset of the movement, was activated earlier and for a longer duration at lower temperatures (Q(10) of 2.29-2.41), consistent with a slowing of its contractile rates. Muscle recruitment was unaffected by temperature, as revealed by the lack of thermal dependence in the intensity of activity of both the jaw depressor and jaw levator muscles (Q(10) of 0.754-1.12). Over the 20-35°C range, lower thermal dependence was found for the dynamics of non-elastic movements and the motor control of both elastic and non-elastic movements, in accord with a plateau of high performance found in other systems.

  15. Controlling the Pore Size of Mesoporous Carbon Thin Films through Thermal and Solvent Annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengping; Liu, Guoliang

    2017-02-02

    Herein an approach to controlling the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films from metal-free polyacrylonitrile-containing block copolymers is described. A high-molecular-weight poly(acrylonitrile-block-methyl methacrylate) (PAN-b-PMMA) is synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The authors systematically investigate the self-assembly behavior of PAN-b-PMMA thin films during thermal and solvent annealing, as well as the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films after pyrolysis. The as-spin-coated PAN-b-PMMA is microphase-separated into uniformly spaced globular nanostructures, and these globular nanostructures evolve into various morphologies after thermal or solvent annealing. Surprisingly, through thermal annealing and subsequent pyrolysis of PAN-b-PMMA into mesoporous carbon thin films, the pore size and center-to-center spacing increase significantly with thermal annealing temperature, different from most block copolymers. In addition, the choice of solvent in solvent annealing strongly influences the block copolymer nanostructure and the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films. The discoveries herein provide a simple strategy to control the pore size of mesoporous carbon thin films by tuning thermal or solvent annealing conditions, instead of synthesizing a series of block copolymers of various molecular weights and compositions.

  16. Implementation of Active Thermal Control (ATC) for the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylov, Rebecca; Kwack, Eug; French, Richard; Dawson, Douglas; Hoffman, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Earth Observing Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is scheduled to launch in November 2014 into a 685 kilometer near-polar, sun-synchronous orbit. SMAP will provide comprehensive global mapping measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state in order to enhance understanding of the processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles. The primary objectives of SMAP are to improve worldwide weather and flood forecasting, enhance climate prediction, and refine drought and agriculture monitoring during its three year mission. The SMAP instrument architecture incorporates an L-band radar and an L-band radiometer which share a common feed horn and parabolic mesh reflector. The instrument rotates about the nadir axis at approximately 15 revolutions per minute, thereby providing a conically scanning wide swath antenna beam that is capable of achieving global coverage within three days. In order to make the necessary precise surface emission measurements from space, the electronics and hardware associated with the radiometer must meet tight short-term (instantaneous and orbital) and long-term (monthly and mission) thermal stabilities. Maintaining these tight thermal stabilities is quite challenging because the sensitive electronics are located on a fast spinning platform that can either be in full sunlight or total eclipse, thus exposing them to a highly transient environment. A passive design approach was first adopted early in the design cycle as a low-cost solution. With careful thermal design efforts to cocoon and protect all sensitive components, all stability requirements were met passively. Active thermal control (ATC) was later added after the instrument Preliminary Design Review (PDR) to mitigate the threat of undetected gain glitches, not for thermal-stability reasons. Gain glitches are common problems with radiometers during missions, and one simple way to avoid gain glitches is to use the in-flight set point programmability that ATC

  17. Syneresis rate of cow's, ewe's, and goat's curd. Effect of thermal treatment and ultrafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M M; Espinoza, N A

    1999-03-01

    The influences of ultrafiltration (UF), the intensity of heat treatment (70 degrees C for 5 or 30 min) applied to milk prior to UF processing, and species on the syneresis rate of curd from cow's, ewe's, and goat's milk were analyzed. The influence of the species was significant (P syneresis rate. The syneresis rate depended significantly on the intensity of the heat treatment applied before UF and the degree of concentration; these two parameters showed significant (P syneresis rate depending on the species studied. These results could indicate a possible difference in the structure of the curd formed. The differences in the curd structure could be due to the different relative composition of the retentates of the different species as well as the possible effect of the UF process on the physicochemical composition of milk.

  18. Influence of deep breathing exercise on spontaneous respiratory rate and heart rate variability: a randomised controlled trial in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharion, Elizabeth; Samuel, Prasanna; Rajalakshmi, R; Gnanasenthil, G; Subramanian, Rajam Krishna

    2012-01-01

    Studies show that yogic type of breathing exercises reduces the spontaneous respiratory rate. However, there are no conclusive studies on the effects of breathing exercise on heart rate variability. We investigated the effects of non-yogic breathing exercise on respiratory rate and heart rate variability. Healthy subjects (21-33 years, both genders) were randomized into the intervention group (n=18), which performed daily deep breathing exercise at 6 breaths/min (0.1 Hz) for one month, and a control group (n=18) which did not perform any breathing exercise. Baseline respiratory rate and short-term heart rate variability indices were assessed in both groups. Reassessment was done after one month and the change in the parameters from baseline was computed for each group. Comparison of the absolute changes [median (inter-quartile ranges)] of the parameters between the intervention and control group showed a significant difference in the spontaneous respiratory rate [intervention group -2.50 (-4.00, -1.00), control group 0.00 (-1.00, 1.00), cycles/min, Pchanges produced by simple deep slow breathing exercise in the respiratory rate and cardiac autonomic modulation of the intervention group were significant, when compared to the changes in the control group. Thus practice of deep slow breathing exercise improves heart rate variability in healthy subjects, without altering their cardiac autonomic balance. These findings have implications in the use of deep breathing exercises to improve cardiac autonomic control in subjects known to have reduced heart rate variability.

  19. Life support and internal thermal control system design for the Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R.; Mitchell, K.; Reuter, J.; Carrasquillo, R.; Beverly, B.

    1991-01-01

    A Review of the Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) as well as the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) design, including recent changes resulting from an activity to restructure the program, is provided. The development state of the original Space Station Freedom ECLSS through the restructured configuration is considered and the selection of regenerative subsystems for oxygen and water reclamation is addressed. A survey of the present ground development and verification program is given.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Controlling Thermal Cracks in Mass Concrete Foundation by Circulating Water

    OpenAIRE

    Wenchao Liu; Wanlin Cao; Huiqing Yan; Tianxiang Ye; Wang Jia

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes an engineering experience of solving the problem of thermal cracking in mass concrete by using a large project, Zhongguancun No.1 (Beijing, China), as an example. A new method is presented for controlling temperature cracks in the mass concrete of a foundation. The method involves controlled cycles of water circulating between the surface of mass concrete foundation and the atmospheric environment. The temperature gradient between the surface and the core of the mass con...

  1. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parra, Amanda [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Russell, Marion [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, Wen-Yee [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick’s Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

  2. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp.

  3. Basal metabolic rate in carnivores is associated with diet after controlling for phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Agusti; Williams, Joseph B

    2005-01-01

    Studies of basal metabolic rate (BMR), the minimum metabolic rate of postabsorptive, inactive endotherms while in their rest phase and thermal neutral zone, have contributed significantly to our understanding of animal energetics. Besides body mass, the main determinant of BMR, researchers have invoked diet and phylogenetic history as important factors that influence BMR, although their relative importance has been controversial. For 58 species within the Carnivora, we tested the hypothesis that BMR is correlated with home range size, a proxy for level of activity, and diet, using conventional least squares regression (CLSR) and regression based on phylogenetic independent contrasts (PIC). Results showed that BMR of Carnivora was positively correlated with home range size after controlling for body mass, regardless of the statistical method employed. We also found that diet and mass-adjusted home range size were correlated. When we simultaneously tested the effect of diet and mass-adjusted home range on mass-adjusted BMR, home range size was insignificant because of its colinearity with diet. Then we eliminated home range size from our model, and diet proved to be significant with both CLSR and PIC. We concluded that species that eat meat have larger home ranges and higher BMR than species that eat vegetable matter. To advance our understanding of the potential mechanisms that might explain our results, we propose the "muscle performance hypothesis," which suggests that selection for different muscle fiber types can account for the differences in BMR observed between meat eaters and vegetarian species within the Carnivora.

  4. Temperature control for thermal treatment of aluminum alloy in a large-scale vertical quench furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈玲; 贺建军; 喻寿益; 桂卫华

    2016-01-01

    The temperature control of the large-scale vertical quench furnace is very difficult due to its huge volume and complex thermal exchanges. To meet the technical requirement of the quenching process, a temperature control system which integrates temperature calibration and temperature uniformity control is developed for the thermal treatment of aluminum alloy workpieces in the large-scale vertical quench furnace. To obtain the aluminum alloy workpiece temperature, an air heat transfer model is newly established to describe the temperature gradient distribution so that the immeasurable workpiece temperature can be calibrated from the available thermocouple temperature. To satisfy the uniformity control of the furnace temperature, a second order partial differential equation (PDE) is derived to describe the thermal dynamics inside the vertical quench furnace. Based on the PDE, a decoupling matrix is constructed to solve the coupling issue and decouple the heating process into multiple independent heating subsystems. Then, using the expert control rule to find a compromise of temperature rising time and overshoot during the quenching process. The developed temperature control system has been successfully applied to a 31 m large-scale vertical quench furnace, and the industrial running results show the significant improvement of the temperature uniformity, lower overshoot and shortened processing time.

  5. Design and Analysis of a High Force, Low Voltage and High Flow Rate Electro-Thermal Micropump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghader Yosefi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and simulation of an improved electro-thermal micromachined pump for drug delivery applications. Thermal actuators, which are a type of Micro Electro Mechanical system (MEMS device, are highly useful because of their ability to deliver with great force and displacement. Thus, our structure is based on a thermal actuator that exploits the Joule heating effect and has been improved using the springy length properties of MEMS chevron beams. The Joule heating effect results in a difference in temperature and therefore displacement in the beams (actuators. Simulation results show that a maximum force of 4.4 mN and a maximum flow rate of 16 μL/min can be obtained by applying an AC voltage as low as 8 V at different frequencies ranging from 1 to 32 Hz. The maximum temperature was a problem at the chevron beams and the center shaft. Thus, to locally increase the temperature of the chevron beams alone and not that of the pumping diaphragm: (1 The air gaps 2 μm underneath and above the device layer were optimized for heat transfer. (2 Release holes and providing fins were created at the center shaft and actuator, respectively, to decrease the temperature by approximately 10 °C. (3 We inserted and used a polymer tube to serve as an insulator and eliminate leakage problems in the fluidic channel.

  6. A novel practical control approach for rate independent hysteretic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Frank J; Zheng, Qing; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2012-05-01

    A disturbance rejection based control approach, active disturbance rejection control (ADRC), is proposed for hysteretic systems with unknown characteristics. It is an appealing alternative to hysteresis compensation because it does not require a detailed model of hysteresis, by treating the nonlinear hysteresis as a common disturbance and actively rejecting it. The stability characteristic of the ADRC is analyzed. It is shown that, in the face of the inherent dynamic uncertainties, the estimation and closed-loop tracking errors of ADRC are bounded, with their bounds monotonously decreasing with the observer and controller bandwidths, respectively. Simulation results on a typical hysteretic system further demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  7. Hydrologic connectivity responses to thermally-controlled changes in hydraulic gradients on Arctic hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushlow, C. R.; Godsey, S.

    2012-12-01

    storm events, both inside the water track and on the surrounding hillslopes. While water table elevations rose in all locations during storm events, water level dropped more quickly (and in many cases dried up entirely) on the surrounding hillslope as the hydraulic gradient directed water flow into the water tracks. Together these observations suggest that 1) prior to and during snowmelt, downvalley flow gradients are steeper than cross-valley flow gradients, 2) cross-valley flow gradients increase as thaw depth increases and the rate of this transition may be enhanced by the presence of flowing water, and 3) the rate of connection and disconnection between the water track and surrounding hillslope during and after a given storm event is determined by the surface topography and the thermal regime controlling active layer thaw.

  8. A study of the active thermal control for the high energy detector on the HXMT%A study of the active thermal control for the high energy detector on the HXMT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翼飞; 康士秀; 宋黎明; 李延国; 吴伯冰; 张永杰; 董永伟; 孙建超; 赵冬华; 邢闻; 柴军营

    2011-01-01

    A thermal control system (TCS) based on the resistance heating method is designed for the High Energy Detector (HED) on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope (HXMT). The ground-based experiments of the active thermal control for the HED with the TCS are per

  9. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Tasks for ANAV NPPs in Support of Plant Operation and Control

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks aimed at supporting plant operation and control of nuclear power plants are an important issue for the Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs (ANAV). ANAV is the consortium that runs the Ascó power plants (2 units) and the Vandellòs-II power plant. The reactors are Westinghouse-design, 3-loop PWRs with an approximate electrical power of 1000 MW. The Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) thermal-hydraulic analysis team has jointly worked togeth...

  10. Magnetogasdynamic Control of Burning Rate of Condensed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Borovskoy

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents the results of modelling combustion products of solid propellant flow. The product of combustion is the ionized gas occurring in a channel with current conducting walls, when a part of the channel is in the external homogeneous magnetic field, oriented in such a way that the ponderomotive force, occuring in the flow region, is opposite to the flow. This results in gas deceleration and increase of static pressure. For the condenensed systems, whose mass burning rate is in direct proportion to the environment pressure, the static pressure increase causes increase of mass burning rate. The basic parameters have been determined by numerical simulation. The nature of their influence on the process of combustion in a cylindrical channel has also been determined. The study revealed that a ten-fold increase of burning rate is possible at moderate values of the parameter of magnetogasdynamic interaction.

  11. 1/f scaling in heart rate requires antagonistic autonomic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzik, Zbigniew R.; Hayano, Junichiro; Sakata, Seiichiro; Kwak, Shin; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    We present systematic evidence for the origins of 1/f -type temporal scaling in human heart rate. The heart rate is regulated by the activity of two branches of the autonomic nervous system: the parasympathetic (PNS) and the sympathetic (SNS) nervous systems. We examine alterations in the scaling property when the balance between PNS and SNS activity is modified, and find that the relative PNS suppression by congestive heart failure results in a substantial increase in the Hurst exponent H towards random-walk scaling 1/f2 and a similar breakdown is observed with relative SNS suppression by primary autonomic failure. These results suggest that 1/f scaling in heart rate requires the intricate balance between the antagonistic activity of PNS and SNS.

  12. Control of atomic transition rates via laser light shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Jauregui, R

    2015-01-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, requires waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be natura...

  13. Enhancement of the efficiency of the automatic control system to control the thermal load of steam boilers fired with fuels of several types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismatkhodzhaev, S. K.; Kuzishchin, V. F.

    2017-05-01

    An automatic control system to control the thermal load (ACS) in a drum-type boiler under random fluctuations in the blast-furnace and coke-oven gas consumption rates and to control action on the natural gas consumption is considered. The system provides for use of a compensator by the basic disturbance, the blast-furnace gas consumption rate. To enhance the performance of the system, it is proposed to use more accurate mathematical second-order delay models of the channels of the object under control in combination with calculation by frequency methods of the controller parameters as well as determination of the structure and parameters of the compensator considering the statistical characteristics of the disturbances and using simulation. The statistical characteristics of the random blast-furnace gas consumption signal based on experimental data are provided. The random signal is presented in the form of the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components. The models of the correlation functions and spectral densities are developed. The article presents the results of calculating the optimal settings of the control loop with the controlled variable in the form of the "heat" signal with the restricted frequency variation index using three variants of the control performance criteria, viz., the linear and quadratic integral indices under step disturbance and the control error variance under random disturbance by the blastfurnace gas consumption rate. It is recommended to select a compensator designed in the form of series connection of two parts, one of which corresponds to the operator inverse to the transfer function of the PI controller, i.e., in the form of a really differentiating element. This facilitates the realization of the second part of the compensator by the invariance condition similar to transmitting the compensating signal to the object input. The results of simulation under random disturbance by the blast-furnace gas consumption are reported

  14. System Level Analysis of a Water PCM HX Integrated Into Orion's Thermal Control System Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Moses; Hansen, Scott; Ungar, Eugene; Sheth, Rubik

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development an Orion system level analysis was performed using Thermal Desktop for a water PCM HX integrated into Orion's thermal control system and in a 100km Lunar orbit. The study analyzed 1) placing the PCM on the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) versus the External Thermal Control System (ETCS) 2) use of 30/70 PGW verses 50/50 PGW and 3) increasing the radiator area in order to reduce PCM freeze times. The analysis showed that for the assumed operating and boundary conditions utilizing a water PCM HX on Orion is not a viable option. Additionally, it was found that the radiator area would have to be increased over 20% in order to have a viable water-based PCM HX.

  15. Noradrenaline: Central inhibitory control of blood pressure and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de

    Noradrenaline injected bilaterally into the brainstem in the area of the nucleus tractus solitarii decreased systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate of anesthetized rats. The effect of noradrenaline was prevented by a preceding injection of the α-adrenergic blocking agent phentolamine, at

  16. Volitional Control of Heart Rate During Exercise Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFevers, Victoria A.

    Thirty five volunteer college women were divided into three groups to determine if heart rate could be conditioned instrumentally and lowered during exercise stress on the treadmill. The three groups were a) experimental group I, 15 subjects who received instrumental conditioning with visual feedback; b) instrumental group II, 9 subjects who…

  17. Noradrenaline: Central inhibitory control of blood pressure and heart rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Wybren de

    1974-01-01

    Noradrenaline injected bilaterally into the brainstem in the area of the nucleus tractus solitarii decreased systemic arterial blood pressure and heart rate of anesthetized rats. The effect of noradrenaline was prevented by a preceding injection of the α-adrenergic blocking agent phentolamine, at th

  18. Thermal effects on the performance, motor control and muscle dynamics of ballistic feeding in the salamander Eurycea guttolineata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Christopher V; Larghi, Nicholas P; Deban, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Temperature strongly affects muscle contractile rate properties and thus may influence whole-organism performance. Movements powered by elastic recoil, however, are known to be more thermally robust than muscle-powered movements. We examined the whole-organism performance, motor control and muscle contractile physiology underlying feeding in the salamander Eurycea guttolineata. We compared elastically powered tongue projection with the associated muscle-powered retraction to determine the thermal robustness of each of these functional levels. We found that tongue-projection distance in E. guttolineata was unaffected by temperature across the entire 4-26°C range, tongue-projection dynamics were significantly affected by temperature across only the 4-11°C interval, and tongue retraction was affected to a higher degree across the entire temperature range. The significant effect of temperature on projection dynamics across the 4-11°C interval corresponds to a significant decline in projector muscle burst intensity and peak contractile force of the projector muscle across the same interval. Across the remaining temperature range, however, projection dynamics were unaffected by temperature, with muscle contractile physiology showing typical thermal effects and motor patterns showing increased activity durations and latencies. These results reveal that elastically powered tongue-projection performance in E. guttolineata is maintained to a higher degree than muscle-powered tongue retraction performance across a wide temperature range. These results further indicate that thermal robustness of the elastically powered movement is dependent on motor control and muscle physiology that results in comparable energy being stored in elastic tissues across a range of temperatures.

  19. Modeling and temperature regulation of a thermally coupled reactor system via internal model control strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.Y.; Coronella, C.J.; Bhadkamkar, A.S.; Seader, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1993-12-01

    A two-stage, thermally coupled fluidized-bed reactor system has been developed for energy-efficient conversion of tar-sand bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Modeling and temperature control of a system are addressed in this study. A process model and transfer function are determined by a transient response technique and the reactor temperature are controlled by PI controllers with tuning settings determined by an internal model control (IMC) strategy. Using the IMC tuning method, sufficiently good control performance was experimentally observed without lengthy on-line tuning. It is shown that IMC strategy provides a means to directly use process knowledge to make a control decision. Although this control method allows for fine tuning by adjusting a single tuning parameter, it is not easy to determine the optimal value of this tuning parameter, which must be specified by the user. A novel method is presented to evaluate that parameter, which must be specified by the user. A novel method is presented to evaluate that parameter in this study. It was selected based on the magnitude of elements on the off-diagonal of the relative gain array to account for the effect of thermal coupling on control performance. It is shown that this method provides stable and fast control of reactor temperatures. By successfully decoupling the system, a simple method of extending the IMC tuning technique to multiinput/multioutput systems is obtained.

  20. Control of thermal balance by a liquid circulating garment based on a mathematical representation of the human thermoregulatory system. Ph.D. Thesis - California Univ., Berkeley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetz, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    Test data and a mathematical model of the human thermoregulatory system were used to investigate control of thermal balance by means of a liquid circulating garment (LCG). The test data were derived from five series of experiments in which environmental and metabolic conditions were varied parametrically as a function of several independent variables, including LCG flowrate, LCG inlet temperature, net environmental heat exchange, surrounding gas ventilation rate, ambient pressure, metabolic rate, and subjective/obligatory cooling control. The resultant data were used to relate skin temperature to LCG water temperature and flowrate, to assess a thermal comfort band, to demonstrate the relationship between metabolic rate and LCG heat dissipation, and so forth. The usefulness of the mathematical model as a tool for data interpretation and for generation of trends and relationships among the various physiological parameters was also investigated and verified.