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Sample records for control sulfur effects

  1. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-11-15

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

  2. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-08-15

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim data report summarizes results as of August, 1999, on the status of the test programs being conducted on three technologies: lean-NO{sub x} catalysts, diesel particulate filters and diesel oxidation catalysts.

  3. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  4. Diesel Emission Control- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program- Phase II Summary Report: NOx Adsorber Catalysts; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    2000-01-01

    The investigations performed in this project demonstrated the ability to develop a NO(sub x) regeneration strategy including both an improved lean/rich modulation cycle and rich engine calibration, which resulted in a high NO(sub x) conversion efficiency over a range of operating temperatures. A high-temperature cycle was developed to desulfurize the NO(sub x) absorber catalyst. The effectiveness of the desulfurization process was demonstrated on catalysts aged using two different sulfur level fuels. The major findings of this project are as follows: (1) The improved lean/rich engine calibration achieved as a part of this test project resulted in NO(sub x) conversion efficiencies exceeding 90% over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (2) The desulfurization procedure developed showed that six catalysts, which had been exposed to fuel sulfur levels of 3-, 16-, and 30-ppm for as long as 250 hours, could be recovered to greater than 85% NO(sub x) conversion efficiency over a catalyst inlet operating temperature window of 300 C-450 C, after a single desulfurization event. This performance level was achieved while staying within the 4% fuel economy penalty target defined for the regeneration calibration. (3) The desulfurization procedure developed has the potential to meet in-service engine operating conditions and provide acceptable driveability conditions. (4) Although aging with 78-ppm sulfur fuel reduced NO(sub x) conversion efficiency more than aging with 3-ppm sulfur fuel as a result of sulfur contamination, the desulfurization events restored the conversion efficiency to nearly the same level of performance. However, repeatedly exposing the catalyst to the desulfurization procedure developed in this program caused a continued decline in the catalyst's desulfurized performance. Additional work will be

  5. Can acyclic conformational control be achieved via a sulfur-fluorine gauche effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiehoff, C; Holland, M C; Daniliuc, C; Houk, K N; Gilmour, R

    2015-06-01

    The gauche conformation of the 1,2-difluoroethane motif is known to involve stabilising hyperconjugative interactions between donor (bonding, σ C-H ) and acceptor (antibonding, σ *C-F) orbitals. This model rationalises the generic conformational preference of F-C β -C α -X systems ( φ FCCX ≈ 60°), where X is an electron deficient substituent containing a Period 2 atom. Little is known about the corresponding Period 3 systems, such as sulfur and phosphorus, where multiple oxidation states are possible. Conformational analyses of β-fluorosulfides, -sulfoxides and -sulfones are disclosed here, thus extending the scope of the fluorine gauche effect to the 3rd Period (F-C-C-S(O) n ; φ FCCS ≈ 60°). Synergy between experiment and computation has revealed that the gauche effect is only pronounced in structures bearing an electropositive vicinal sulfur atom (S + -O - , SO 2 ).

  6. Effect of sulfur dioxide on proteins of the vegetable organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckendorfer, P; Beran, F

    1931-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of sulfur dioxide on red clover in a controlled environment. An increase in the concentration of sulfur dioxide caused a significant decrease in the digestible protein. However, after the sulfur dioxide was discontinued, there was a decrease in the indigestible protein. The leaves showed an increase in spotting with an increase in sulfur dioxide concentration. Chemical analysis of the soil revealed a higher sulfur content in these experiments.

  7. Effects of sulfur dioxide on vegetation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, G S

    1939-11-11

    A discussion is presented on the effects of sulfur dioxide on vegetation as observed at Trail, British Columbia. The investigation was carried out over a period of eight years, 1929 to 1937. The concentration of sulfur dioxide at the United States border was carefully determined throughout the crop season at a point 16 miles from the source of sulfur dioxide. Maximum and average concentrations in part per million are given. The sulfur content of vegetation was determined and was found to diminish as the distance from the smelter increased. It was determined that the sulfur content may rise to four times the normal amount without injurious effect. This is particularly so with prolonged low concentration. The effect on the soil was determined by measuring soluble sulfate, pH and exchangeable bases. The soil near the plant was affected, but this fell off rapidly with increase in distance so that eight miles from the smelter the soil was substantially normal. No effect on water supplies was found. An appreciable retardation in growth, as determined by annular rings, was noted for trees exposed to the sulfur dioxide. This effect was lost following installation of sulfur dioxide control at Trail. Conifers were found more susceptible during periods of active growth than when dormant. Also, transplanted conifers were more severly affected than native trees. Seedlings were less resistant that older trees.

  8. Ocular Effects of Sulfur Mustard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To review current knowledge about ocular effects of sulfur mustard (SM and the associated histopathologic findings and clinical manifestationsMethods: Literature review of medical articles (human and animal studies was accomplished using PubMed, Scopus and ISI databases. A total of 274 relevant articles in English were retrieved and reviewed thoroughly.Results: Eyes are the most sensitive organs to local toxic effects of mustard gas. Ocular injuries are mediated through different toxic mechanisms including: biochemical damages, biomolecular and gene expression modification, induction of immunologic and inflammatory reactions, disturbing ultrastructural architecture of the cornea, and long-lasting corneal denervation. The resulting ocular injuries can roughly be categorized into acute or chronic complications. Most of the patients recover from acute injuries, but a minority of victims will suffer from chronic ocular complications. Mustard gas keratopathy (MGK is a devastating late complication of SM intoxication that proceeds from limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD.Conclusion: SM induces several different damaging changes in case of ocular exposure; hence leading to a broad spectrum of ocular manifestations in terms of severity, timing and form. Unfortunately, no effective strategy has been introduced yet to inhibit or restore these damaging changes.

  9. Effect of different sulfur levels from various sources on brassica napus growth and soil sulfur fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, R.; Khan, K.S.; Islam, M.; Yousaf, M.; Shabbir, G.

    2012-01-01

    A two year field study was conducted at two different locations in northern rain fed Punjab, Pakistan to assess the effect of different rates of sulfur application from various sources on soil sulfur fractions and growth of Brassica napus. The treatments included three sulfur sources i. e., single super phosphate, ammonium sulfate and gypsum each applied at five different rates (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 kg S ha/sup -1/ ). Sulfur application had a significant positive effect on the growth and yield parameters of Brassica napus. Among the sulfur sources ammonium sulfate resulted in maximum increase in plant growth and yield parameters, followed by single super phosphate. Sulfur content and uptake by crop plants was significantly higher with ammonium sulfate application as compared to other two sulfur sources. Sulfur application also exerted a significant positive effect on different S fractions in the soils. On an average, 18.0% of the applied sulfur got incorporated into CaCl/sub 2/ extractable sulfur fraction, while 15.6% and 35.5% entered into adsorbed and organic sulfur fractions in the soils, respectively. The value cost ratio increased significantly by sulfur application up to 30 kg ha/sup -1/. Among sulfur sources, ammonium sulfate performed best giving the highest net return. (author)

  10. 40 CFR 52.724 - Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur dioxide. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Illinois> § 52.724 Control strategy: Sulfur... Energy Incorporated. This disapproval does not in and of itself result in the growth restrictions of...

  11. Isotope effects of sulfur in chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczuk, A.

    1999-01-01

    Sulfur is an important component of organic matter because it forms compounds with many elements. Due to high chemical activity of sulfur, it takes part in biological and geological processes in which isotope effects are occurring. It has been shown during last years research of isotope effects that we have take into account not only mass difference but also many other physical properties of nuclides e.g. even or odd number of neutrons in nuclei, shape and distribution of charge, turn of nuclear spin etc. The factor remains that new theoretical ideas have been formed on the base of data, being obtained in fractionation processes of heavy element isotope, particularly uranium. Now it is being well known that effects unconnected with vibration energy have also caused an effect on fractionation of considerably lighter elements like iron and magnesium. The important question is, if these effects would come to light during the separation of sulfur isotopes. Sulfur have three even isotopes M = (32, 34, 36) and one odd M 33). This problem is still open. (author)

  12. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL; SEMIANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO(sub X) selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO(sub 3) formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO(sub X) control than at removing SO(sub 3) formed in the furnace. The SO(sub 3) removal results were presented in the

  13. Effects of sulfur oxides on eicosanoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.C.; Miller, P.D.; Amdur, M.O.

    1989-01-01

    Ultrafine metal oxides and SO2 react during coal combustion or smelting operations to form primary emissions coated with an acidic SOx layer. Ongoing work in this laboratory has examined the effects of sulfur oxides on pulmonary functions of guinea pigs. We have previously reported that 20 micrograms/m3 acidic sulfur oxide as a surface layer on ultrafine ZnO particles decreases lung volumes, decreases carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, and causes lung inflammation in guinea pigs after 4 daily 3-h exposures. It also produces bronchial hypersensitivity following a single 1-h exposure. The importance of this surface layer is demonstrated by our observation that 200 micrograms/m3 of sulfuric acid droplets of equivalent size are needed to produce the same degree of hypersensitivity. This study characterized the concentration-dependent effects of in vivo exposures to sulfur oxides on arachidonic acid metabolism in the guinea pig lung, and investigated the time course and the relation between eicosanoid composition and pulmonary functions. We focused specifically on four cyclooxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, that is, prostaglandins (PG) E1, F2 alpha, 6-keto prostaglandin F1 alpha, and thromboxane (Tx) B2, and two groups of sulfidopeptide leukotrienes (C4, D4, E4, and F4). Guinea pigs were exposed to ultrafine ZnO aerosol (count median diameter = 0.05 microns, sigma g = 1.80) with a layer of acidic sulfur oxide on the surface of the particles. Lung lavage was collected after exposures, and the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites were determined using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Concentration-dependent promotion of PGF2 alpha and concentration-dependent suppression of LtB4 were observed. The increased PGF2 alpha was associated with depressed vital capacity and diffusing capacity of the lungs measured in guinea pigs exposed to the same atmosphere described in a previous study

  14. Effect of sulfur dioxide partial pressure on the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hayato; Imai, Yoshiyuki; Kasahara, Seiji; Kubo, Shinji; Onuki, Kaoru

    2007-01-01

    Effect of sulfur dioxide partial pressure on the reaction of iodine, sulfur dioxide and water, which is a unit reaction in the IS process for thermochemical hydrogen production, was studied experimentally at 323 K under iodine saturation. Quasi-equilibrium state was observed in the presence of sulfur dioxide gas at constant pressure. The composition of the poly-hydriodic acid solution formed was discussed assuming an ideal desulfurization by the reverse reaction of the Bunsen reaction. The value of HI/(HI+H 2 O) of the desulfurized solution was large at high sulfur dioxide pressure and reached the maximum of 15.7 ± 0.3 mol%. (author)

  15. Sodium lauryl sulfate - a biocide for controlling acidity development in bulk commercially formed solid elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyne, J. B. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1996-04-01

    Acidification of bulk elemental sulfur caused by Thiobacillus species which consume elemental sulfur by converting it into oxidized sulfur forms, was studied. Contributory factors, such as length of time in transit or in storage, warm temperatures, the presence of air and moisture, particle size and form of sulfur, and the presence of sources of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients, were reviewed. Laboratory experiments with adding sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), a known biocide, to sulfur inoculated with Thiobacillus, proved to be an efficient method for controlling acidity development. At the concentration required for effectiveness SLS did not interfere with purity specifications, had negligible effect on moisture, and appeared to be compatible with current dust suppression application practices. 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  16. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  17. Effects of sulfur bath on hip osteoarthritis: a randomized, controlled, single-blind, follow-up trial: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Csaba; Bozsik, Ágnes; Pecze, Mariann; Borbély, Ildikó; Fogarasi, Andrea; Kovács, Lajos; Tefner, Ildikó Katalin; Bender, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    The effects of balneotherapy were evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. This randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded study enrolled outpatients with hip osteoarthritis according to ACR criteria. In addition to home exercise therapy, one patient group received balneotherapy for 3 weeks on 15 occasions. The mineral water used in this study is one of the mineral waters with the highest sulfide ion content (13.2 mg/L) in Hungary. The control group received exercise therapy alone. The WOMAC Likert 3.1 index and the EQ-5D quality of life self-administered questionnaire were completed three times during the study: prior to first treatment, at the end of the 3-week treatment course, and 12 weeks later. The main endpoint was achievement of Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) at 12 weeks, defined as ≥7.9 points in a normalized WOMAC function score. The intention to treat analysis included 20 controls and 21 balneotherapy patients. At 12 weeks, 17 (81 %) balneotherapy group patients had Minimal Clinically Important Improvement and 6 (30 %) of controls ( p = 0.001). Comparing the results of the two groups at the end of treatment, there was a significant difference in the WOMAC stiffness score only, whereas after 12 weeks, the WOMAC pain, stiffness, function, and total scores also showed a significant difference in favor of the balneotherapy group. The difference between the two groups was significant after 12 weeks in point of EQVAS score, too. The results of our study suggest that the combination of balneotherapy and exercise therapy achieves more sustained improvement of joint function and decreases in pain than exercise therapy alone.

  18. Research on Frequency Control of Grid Connected Sodium-Sulfur Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fenglin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium sulfur battery is the only energy storage battery with large capacity and high energy density. It has a great application prospect in the peak load shifting of power grid, due to the lack of domestic research on it, it is urgent to evaluate the effect of grid-connection of sodium sulfur battery scientifically. According to the experimental data of the sodium sulfur battery project, the battery model is built. Compared with the real discharge curve, the error of the model simulation curve is small, so the battery model is effective. The AC / DC power grid model is built, and the rectifier and inverter control circuits are designed to simulate the scenario that the wind turbine and the battery are supplied to the passive load. The simulation results show that the grid-connected model of the sodium sulfur battery under the two control strategies can stabilize the larger frequency fluctuation.

  19. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot gas desulfurization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H 2 S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct. The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP), a leading process for producing an elemental sulfur byproduct in hot-gas desulfurization systems, incurs a coal gas use penalty, because coal gas is required to reduce the SO 2 in regeneration off-gas to elemental sulfur. Alternative regeneration schemes, which avoid coal gas use and produce elemental sulfur, will be evaluated. These include (i) regeneration of sulfided sorbent using SO 2 ; (ii) partial oxidation of sulfided sorbent in an O 2 starved environment; and (iii) regeneration of sulfided sorbent using steam to produce H 2 S followed by direct oxidation of H 2 S to elemental sulfur. Known regenerable sorbents will be modified to improve the feasibility of the above alternative regeneration approaches. Performance characteristics of the modified sorbents and processes will be obtained through lab- and bench-scale testing. Technical and economic evaluation of the most promising processes concept(s) will be carried out

  20. Effects of elemental sulfur and sulfur-containing waste on nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... grown twice on the same soils to determine initial and residual effects of applied S. Results showed that applications of ... Key words: Calcareous soil, plant growth, plant nutrition, sulfur application. ...... Colombia. Can. J. Soil ...

  1. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Department of Environmental Quality Engineering.). Gardner State Hospital, Gardner. Grafton State Hospital... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy: Sulfur oxides. 52... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (CONTINUED) Massachusetts § 52.1126 Control...

  2. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Guoxiu [School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ahn, Jae-Pyeung [Advanced Analysis Center, Research Planning & Coordination Division, KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Jun, E-mail: ahj@gnu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  3. Effect of sulfur on the SCC and corrosion fatigue performance of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, E.; Nolan, T.; Lucente, A.; Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Morris, R.; Mullen, J.; Newsome, G.

    2015-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue experiments were conducted on model heats of 304/304L stainless steel with systematically controlled sulfur content to isolate the influence of sulfur on crack growth behavior. The results of the SCC experiments conducted in 338 C. degrees deaerated water on 20% cold worked model heats with 0.006 and 0.012 wt% sulfur showed an order of magnitude or more reduction in the crack growth rate relative to a model heat with <0.001 wt% sulfur. Corrosion fatigue crack growth rates revealed a reduction in the crack growth rates of the elevated sulfur heats relative to model predicted steady state crack growth rates with increasing rise time for nominal loading conditions of a stress ratio of 0.7 and a stress intensity factor range of 6.6 MPa√m. At the longest rise time of 5.330 sec, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate of the 0.006 wt% sulfur model heat was only 13% of model predictions and the crack growth of the 0.012 wt% sulfur heat completely stalled. Experiments conducted in anion faulted aerated water on stainless steel heats with moderate to high sulfur and variable carbon and boron contents showed that any detrimental effect of sulfur in this environment was secondary to the effect of sensitization in promoting SCC growth. (authors)

  4. Environment-Friendly Control of Pear Scab and Rust Using Lime Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hoon Cha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pear scab and rust are the major diseases causing severe epidemics in organic cultivation of pear trees. Incidences of pear scab and rust were compared in organically managed plots and conventionally managed plots to obtain optimum application schedule of environment-friendly control agents in organically managed plots. Organically cultural practice with 10 time-applications of lime sulfur and Bordeaux mixture showed higher than 40% of control efficacies of pear scab and rust compared to conventionally cultural practice. Organically cultural practice with 8 time-applications of lime sulfur considering weather condition showed higher than 30% of control efficacies of pear scab compared to conventionally cultural practice. The results suggest that proper application of environment-friendly control agents such as lime sulfur considering weather condition will enable effective control of the major diseases for organic cultivation of pear.

  5. Control Room Habitability for Accidental Sulfuric Acid Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sungmin; Lee, Heedo; Song, Dongsoo

    2006-01-01

    The 10 CFR 50 Appendix A Criterion 19, 'Control Room', requires that a control room be provided from which actions can be taken to operate the nuclear power unit safely under normal conditions and to maintain it in a safe condition under accident conditions. For compliance with the requirement, the control room of a nuclear power plant should be appropriately protected from hazardous chemicals that may be discharged as a result of equipment failures, operator errors, or events and conditions outside the control of the nuclear power plant. We have excluded sulfuric acid from a target of estimation for control room habitability merely because its boiling point is too high; qualitative analysis in this paper shows that we can exclude sulfuric acid from the target of habitability estimation

  6. Effect of sulfur removal on scale adhesion to PWA 1480

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smialek, J.L.; Tubbs, B.K.

    1995-01-01

    A commercial superalloy, PWA 1480, was annealed in hydrogen at 1,000 C to 1,300 C in order to remove a 10 ppmw sulfur impurity. This treatment was very successful above 1,200 C, resulting in residual sulfur contents below 0.1 ppmw. The degree of scale adhesion in subsequent 1,100 C cyclic oxidation tests was inversely related to residual sulfur content. Control of adhesion by desulfurization in the absence of reactive elements supports an adhesion mechanism based on oxide-metal bonding weakened by sulfur segregation. Attempts at sulfur purging and improving adhesion by repeated oxidation/polishing were not successful, in contrast to previous studies on NiCrAl

  7. Effects of sulfur dioxide on conifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govi, G.; Tagliani, F.; Cimino, A.

    1974-01-01

    Trials on the resistance of several conifer and oak species to the effects of sulfur dioxide at different concentrations and moisture levels were conducted. 72 combinations were experimented. The damages began to appear under the following conditions: Abies alba: 0.3 ppm, 25/sup 0/C, 70% ur after 24 hours; Picea excelsa: 0.3 ppm, 15/sup 0/C, 70-95% ur after 24 hours; Cedrus deodara: 0.3 ppm, 15/sup 0/C, 95% ur after 48 hours; Pinus pinea: 0.3 ppm, 15/sup 0/C, 70-95% after 72 hours; Pinus strobus 0.3 ppm, 25/sup 0/C, 70-95%, after 48 hours; Pinus pinaster: similar to the former; Pinus nigra: 2 ppm, 25/sup 0/C, 70-95%, ur after 5 days; Cupressus arizonica and C. semperivirens: 2 ppm, 25%/sup 0/C, 90% ur after 72 hours; Quercus robur: 5 ppm, 25/sup 0/C, 90% ur, after 10 days. 6 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  8. 40 CFR 52.1881 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides (sulfur dioxide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....0 pounds of sulfur dioxide per million BTU actual heat input for the coal-fired boiler and 0.4... BTU actual heat input for coal-fired boiler C exiting through stack 5. (3) 2.24 pounds of sulfur dioxide per million BTU acutal heat input for coal-fired boiler D exiting through stack 6. (E) In lieu of...

  9. EFFECT OF SOLE AND ASSOCIATIVE ACTIONS OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR AND INOCULATION SULFUR OXIDIZING BACTERIA ON GROWTH AND NUTRIENTS CONTENTS OF PEPPER PLANTS AND THE USED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ibrahim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of elemental sulfur (E.S rate (2.5 g/kg soil and sulfur oxidizing bacteria on pepper plant and some chemical properties of two representative soil samples varying in their texture and CaCO3 content. Pepper was grown in Shobrakheet clay loam and Nobaria sandy loam soils for 50 days. Each soil was treated with elemental sulfur (2.5 g kg-1 soil and inoculated with two sulfur oxidizing bacteria (S.O.B. No.8 and S.O.B. ATCC 8158. Elemental sulfur with or without sulfur oxidizing bacteria increased shoot dry weights of pepper plants as compared with control. The highest effect was observed with E.S + ATCC 8158 treatment which resulted in increasing the pepper shoot dry weights from 1.36 to 2.08 g pot-1 with the clay loam soil and from 0.77 to 1.37 g pot-1 with the sandy loam soil. The same treatment resulted in the highest plant content of S, N, P, K and micronutrients.

  10. Factors controlling sulfur gas exchange in Sphagnum-dominated wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demello, William Zamboni; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Atmosphere-peatland exchange of reduced sulfur gases was determined seasonally in fen in NH, and in an artificially-acidified fen at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in Canada. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) dominated gas fluxes at rates as high as 400 nmol/m(sup -2)hr(sup -1). DMS fluxes measured using enclosures were much higher than those calculated using a stagnant-film model, suggesting that Sphagnum regulated efflux. Temperature controlled diel and seasonal variability in DMS emissions. Use of differing enclosure techniques indicated that vegetated peatlands consume atmospheric carbonyl sulfide. Sulfate amendments caused DMS and methane thiol concentrations in near-surface pore waters to increase rapidly, but fluxes of these gases to the atmosphere were not affected. However, emission data from sites experiencing large differences in rates of sulfate deposition from the atmosphere suggested that chronic elevated sulfate inputs enhance DMS emissions from northern wetlands.

  11. 78 FR 5303 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Missouri; Control of Sulfur Emissions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... stringency of the SIP. Missouri's revision adds 10 CSR 10- 5.570 Control of Sulfur Emissions from Stationary... approving the State's request to add 10 CSR 10-5.570 Control of Sulfur Emissions from Stationary Boilers to... Management and Budget under Executive Order 12866 (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993); Does not impose an...

  12. Effects of sulfur on lead partitioning during sludge incineration based on experiments and thermodynamic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jing-yong, E-mail: www053991@126.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Huang, Shu-jie; Sun, Shui-yu; Ning, Xun-an; He, Rui-zhe [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li, Xiao-ming [Guangdong Testing Institute of Product Quality Supervision, Guangzhou 510330 (China); Chen, Tao [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Luo, Guang-qian [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Xie, Wu-ming; Wang, Yu-jie; Zhuo, Zhong-xu; Fu, Jie-wen [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic equilibrium calculation was carried out. • Effects of three types of sulfurs on Pb distribution were investigated. • The mechanism for three types of sulfurs acting on Pb partitioning were proposed. • Lead partitioning and species in bottom ash and fly ash were identified. - Abstract: Experiments in a tubular furnace reactor and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were conducted to investigate the impact of sulfur compounds on the migration of lead (Pb) during sludge incineration. Representative samples of typical sludge with and without the addition of sulfur compounds were combusted at 850 °C, and the partitioning of Pb in the solid phase (bottom ash) and gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) was quantified. The results indicate that three types of sulfur compounds (S, Na{sub 2}S and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) added to the sludge could facilitate the volatilization of Pb in the gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) into metal sulfates displacing its sulfides and some of its oxides. The effect of promoting Pb volatilization by adding Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S was superior to that of the addition of S. In bottom ash, different metallic sulfides were found in the forms of lead sulfide, aluminosilicate minerals, and polymetallic-sulfides, which were minimally volatilized. The chemical equilibrium calculations indicated that sulfur stabilizes Pb in the form of PbSO{sub 4}(s) at low temperatures (<1000 K). The equilibrium calculation prediction also suggested that SiO{sub 2}, CaO, TiO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing materials function as condensed phase solids in the temperature range of 800–1100 K as sorbents to stabilize Pb. However, in the presence of sulfur or chlorine or the co-existence of sulfur and chlorine, these sorbents were inactive. The effect of sulfur on Pb partitioning in the sludge incineration process mainly depended on the gas phase reaction, the surface reaction, the volatilization of products, and the

  13. Dosimetric characteristics of biological effect of sulfur-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental materials related to evaluation of dosimetric characteristics of sulfur-35 are presented. Hemogenic organs are subjected to greatest influence especially in the first hours after radionuclide entry into the organism. Comparison is made of absorbed doses in blood with observed blastomogen effect of hemogenic organs. It is noted, that quantitative evaluation of relative biological efficiency of low energy beta-emitters should be performed with account of dosimetric peculiarities of the nuclides mentioned above. 10 refs.; 3 tabs

  14. Microbial Desulfurization of a Crude Oil Middle-Distillate Fraction: Analysis of the Extent of Sulfur Removal and the Effect of Removal on Remaining Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, M. J.; Lee, M. K.; Prince, R. C.; Garrett, K. K.; George, G. N.; Pickering, I. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 was evaluated for its ability to desulfurize a 232 to 343°C middle-distillate (diesel range) fraction of Oregon basin (OB) crude oil. OB oil was provided as the sole source of sulfur in batch cultures, and the extent of desulfurization and the chemical fate of the residual sulfur in the oil after treatment were determined. Gas chromatography (GC), flame ionization detection, and GC sulfur chemiluminesce detection analysis were used to qualitatively evaluate the effect of Rhodococcus sp. strain ECRD-1 treatment on the hydrocarbon and sulfur content of the oil, respectively. Total sulfur was determined by combustion of samples and measurement of released sulfur dioxide by infrared absorption. Up to 30% of the total sulfur in the middle distillate cut was removed, and compounds across the entire boiling range of the oil were affected. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption-edge spectroscopy was used to examine the chemical state of the sulfur remaining in the treated OB oil. Approximately equal amounts of thiophenic and sulfidic sulfur compounds were removed by ECRD-1 treatment, and over 50% of the sulfur remaining after treatment was in an oxidized form. The presence of partially oxidized sulfur compounds indicates that these compounds were en route to desulfurization. Overall, more than two-thirds of the sulfur had been removed or oxidized by the microbial treatment. PMID:9872778

  15. The effective synthesis of Insoluble sulfur using electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Daejin; Yu, Kookhyun [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Vulcanization is process that formed crosslinking by Insoluble sulfur between linear structure of rubber polymer. Recently, Synthesis of Insoluble sulfur is used Thermal polymerization using about 250 {approx} 300 .deg. C and extraction process is used carbon disulfide(CS2) for separation between soluble sulfur and insoluble sulfur. But this process isn't environmental, economical and safety. This research was focus on developing of insoluble sulfur synthesis process using electron beam. This new process is using under the 140 .deg. C. Because of that, explosion risk is decrease, environmental and economical factor is increased. The sulfur can be melt by increase temperature or made solution using carbon disulfide. And electron beam is irradiated melting sulfur or sulfur solution. After irradiation, The high purity insoluble sulfur can be obtained by separation with carbon disulfide.

  16. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that a few ppmw sulfur impurity may segregate to the interface of thermally grown alumina scales and the underlying substrate, resulting in bond degradation and premature spallation. This has been shown for NiAl and NiCrAl-based alloys, bare single crystal superalloys, or coated superalloys. The role of reactive elements (especially Y) has been to getter the sulfur in the bulk and preclude interfacial segregation. Pt additions are also very beneficial, however a similar thermodynamic explanation does not apply. The purpose of the present discussion is to highlight some observations of these effects on Rene'142, Rene'N5, PWA1480, and PWA1484. For PWA1480, we have mapped cyclic oxidation and spallation in terms of potential sulfur interfacial layers and found that a cumulative amount of about one monolayer is sufficient to degrade long term adhesion. Depending on substrate thickness, optimum performance occurs if sulfur is reduced below about 0.2-0.5 ppmw. This is accomplished in the laboratory by hydrogen annealing or commercially by melt-fluxing. Excellent 1150 C cyclic oxidation is thus demonstrated for desulfurized Rene'142, Rene'N5, and PWA1484. Alternatively, a series of N5 alloys provided by GE-AE have shown that as little as 15 ppmw of Y dopant was effective in providing remarkable scale adhesion. In support of a Y-S gettering mechanism, hydrogen annealing was unable to desulfurize these alloys from their initial level of 5 ppmw S. This impurity and critical doping level corresponds closely to YS or Y2S3 stoichiometry. In many cases, Y-doped alloys or alloys with marginal sulfur levels exhibit an oxidative sensitivity to the ambient humidity called Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS). After substantial scale growth, coupled with damage from repeated cycling, cold samples may spall after a period of time, breathing on them, or immersing them in water. While stress corrosion arguments may apply, we propose that the underlying

  17. Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2011-03-15

    Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

  18. Effects of Sulfurization Temperature on Properties of CZTS Films by Vacuum Evaporation and Sulfurization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper zinc tin sulfur (CZTS thin films have been extensively studied in recent years for their advantages of low cost, high absorption coefficient (≥104 cm−1, appropriate band gap (~1.5 eV, and nontoxicity. CZTS thin films are promising materials of solar cells like copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS. In this work, CZTS thin films were prepared on glass substrates by vacuum evaporation and sulfurization method. Sn/Cu/ZnS (CZT precursors were deposited by thermal evaporation and then sulfurized in N2 + H2S atmosphere at temperatures of 360–560°C to produce polycrystalline CZTS thin films. It is found that there are some impurity phases in the thin films with the sulfurization temperature less than 500°C, and the crystallite size of CZTS is quite small. With the further increase of the sulfurization temperature, the obtained thin films exhibit preferred (112 orientation with larger crystallite size and higher density. When the sulfurization temperature is 500°C, the band gap energy, resistivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of the CZTS thin films are 1.49 eV, 9.37 Ω · cm, 1.714×1017 cm−3, and 3.89 cm2/(V · s, respectively. Therefore, the prepared CZTS thin films are suitable for absorbers of solar cells.

  19. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, P. L.; Rommereim, R. L.; Burton, F. G.; Buschbom, R. L.; Sasser, L . B.

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with 0. 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development. These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats and rabbits since fetal effects were observed only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for "no observable effects levels" in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  20. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in

  1. Advanced sulfur control concepts for hot-gas desulfurization technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Ortiz, A.; Harrison, D.P.; Groves, F.R.; White, J.D.; Zhang, S.; Huang, W.N.; Zeng, Y.

    1998-01-01

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500C to 700C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in a

  2. Effects of sulfur on lead partitioning during sludge incineration based on experiments and thermodynamic calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-yong; Huang, Shu-jie; Sun, Shui-yu; Ning, Xun-an; He, Rui-zhe; Li, Xiao-ming; Chen, Tao; Luo, Guang-qian; Xie, Wu-ming; Wang, Yu-Jie; Zhuo, Zhong-xu; Fu, Jie-wen

    2015-04-01

    Experiments in a tubular furnace reactor and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were conducted to investigate the impact of sulfur compounds on the migration of lead (Pb) during sludge incineration. Representative samples of typical sludge with and without the addition of sulfur compounds were combusted at 850 °C, and the partitioning of Pb in the solid phase (bottom ash) and gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) was quantified. The results indicate that three types of sulfur compounds (S, Na2S and Na2SO4) added to the sludge could facilitate the volatilization of Pb in the gas phase (fly ash and flue gas) into metal sulfates displacing its sulfides and some of its oxides. The effect of promoting Pb volatilization by adding Na2SO4 and Na2S was superior to that of the addition of S. In bottom ash, different metallic sulfides were found in the forms of lead sulfide, aluminosilicate minerals, and polymetallic-sulfides, which were minimally volatilized. The chemical equilibrium calculations indicated that sulfur stabilizes Pb in the form of PbSO4(s) at low temperatures (incineration process mainly depended on the gas phase reaction, the surface reaction, the volatilization of products, and the concentration of Si, Ca and Al-containing compounds in the sludge. These findings provide useful information for understanding the partitioning behavior of Pb, facilitating the development of strategies to control the volatilization of Pb during sludge incineration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on bark epiphytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, P D

    1967-01-01

    The destructive effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on epiphytic bryophytes is seen to be due to chlorophyll degradation and the impairment of cell structure and function through plasmolysis. Morphological changes noted by Pearson and Skye (1965) in lichens were not seen, although stunting and infertility are evident in epiphyte remnants in polluted areas. The investigation of the ion exchange and buffer capacities of sycamore bark indicates a loss of both in approximate proportion to the degree of pollution. Smoke and aerosol particles are not considered to be of particular importance at the present time although they may well have been important in the past.

  4. Sulfur impregnated in tunable porous N-doped carbon as sulfur cathode: effect of pore size distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Sha; Zhao, Zhenxia; Xu, Hui; Deng, Yuanfu; Li, Zhong; Chen, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •Effects of pore size were investigated on electrochemistry for S cathode. •Activation energy of sulfur desorption from the PDA-C was estimated. •Strong interaction was formed between sulfur and porous N-doped carbon. •PDA-C@S showed good cycling performance of 608 mA h g −1 at 2 C over 300 cycles. •PDA-C@S showed good rate stability and high rate capacity. -- Abstract: A novel porous N-doped carbon microsphere (polymer-dopamine derived carbon, PDA-C) with high specific surface area was synthesized as sulfur host for high performance of lithium-sulfur batteries. We used KOH to adjust the pore size and surface area of the PDA-C materials, and then impregnated sulfur into the PDA-C samples by vapor-melting diffusion method. Effects of pore size of the PDA-C samples on the electrochemical performance of the PDA-C@sulfur cathodes were systematically investigated. Raman spectra indicated an enhanced trend of the degree of graphitization of the PDA-C samples with increasing calcination temperature. The surface area of the PDA-C samples increases with amount of the KOH in the pore-creating process. The graphitized porous N-doped carbon provides the high electronic conductive network. Meanwhile, the PDA-C with high surface area and uniform micropores ensures a high interaction toward sulfur as well as the high dispersion of nanoscale sulfur layer on it. The microporous PDA-C@S cathode material exhibits the excellent high rate discharge capability (636 mA h g −1 at 2.0 C) and good low/high-rate cycling stability (893 mA h g −1 (0.5 C) and 608 mA h g −1 (2.0 C) over 100 and 300 cycles). Cyclic voltammogram curves and electrochemical impedance plots show that both the impedance and polarization of the cells increase with decreasing pore size

  5. Effects on the forest of sulfur dioxide from a sulfur fire near Edson, Alberta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, D

    1975-01-01

    Sulfur was burnt in a sanitary landfill during August 9 and 10, 1974. Resulting sulfur dioxide impinged on the surrounding mixed forest for 29 h. About 4 ha of forest displayed visible injury symptoms of varying intensity soon after. However, only .4 ha remained permanently injured the next season. Here, white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and scattered individuals of balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera L.), alder (Alnus tenuifolia Nutt.), and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) were killed. This report describes the extent of injury, relative sensitivities of affected plant species, and recovery in the spring in 1975.

  6. Effect of gamma irradiation on sulfur-cured chlorobutyl rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Cardoso, Elisabeth E.L.; Ono, Lilian S.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2011-01-01

    Chlorobutyl rubber (CIIR) is similarly manufactured to butyl rubber (IIR). The insertion of chlorine atom in isoprene group represents an improvement in its properties, such as: high vulcanizing speed, low permanent stress and compatibility with other types of rubber. The presence of reactive chlorine in butyl chlorate allows a variety of vulcanizing techniques, being the cure via sulfur, the most conventional. In these compounds carbon-halogen bonds are weaker than carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen bonds, and the main effect of radiation is to break the carbon-halogen bond to give an organic free radical. Irradiations of certain alkyl chlorides can bring about isomerism in which the location of the halogen atom is changed, the carbon skeleton of molecule remaining unaltered. Irradiation of n-butyl chlorides gives high yields of tertiary carbon. The major effect of high energy photon, such as gamma rays, in organic polymers is the generation of free radicals, along changes in mechanical properties. This work aims to the study of irradiation effect on mechanical properties of a sulfur cured chlorobutyl rubber compound, gamma irradiated within 25, 50, 100, 150 e 200 kGy doses range. The techniques used in their characterization were: strength - stress analysis and elasticity modulus. Results obtained were investigated, demonstrated and discussed. (author)

  7. Effect of gamma irradiation on sulfur-cured chlorobutyl rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Cardoso, Elisabeth E.L.; Ono, Lilian S.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: srscagliusi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Chlorobutyl rubber (CIIR) is similarly manufactured to butyl rubber (IIR). The insertion of chlorine atom in isoprene group represents an improvement in its properties, such as: high vulcanizing speed, low permanent stress and compatibility with other types of rubber. The presence of reactive chlorine in butyl chlorate allows a variety of vulcanizing techniques, being the cure via sulfur, the most conventional. In these compounds carbon-halogen bonds are weaker than carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen bonds, and the main effect of radiation is to break the carbon-halogen bond to give an organic free radical. Irradiations of certain alkyl chlorides can bring about isomerism in which the location of the halogen atom is changed, the carbon skeleton of molecule remaining unaltered. Irradiation of n-butyl chlorides gives high yields of tertiary carbon. The major effect of high energy photon, such as gamma rays, in organic polymers is the generation of free radicals, along changes in mechanical properties. This work aims to the study of irradiation effect on mechanical properties of a sulfur cured chlorobutyl rubber compound, gamma irradiated within 25, 50, 100, 150 e 200 kGy doses range. The techniques used in their characterization were: strength - stress analysis and elasticity modulus. Results obtained were investigated, demonstrated and discussed. (author)

  8. Sulfur dioxide emissions and market effects under the Clean Air Act Acid Rain Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, C.E.; Gilroy, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) established a national program to control sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions from electricity generation. CAAA90's market-based approach includes trading and banking of SO 2 -emissions allowances. The paper presents an analysis of data describing electric utility SO 2 emissions in 1995, the first year of the program's Phase I, and market effects over the 1990-95 period. Fuel switching and flue-gas desulfurization were the dominant means used in 1995 by targeted generators to reduce emissions to 51% of 1990 levels. Flue-gas desulfurization costs, emissions allowance prices, low-sulfur coal prices, and average sulfur contents of coals shipped to electric utilities declined over the 1990-95 period. Projections indicate that 13-15 million allowances will have been banked during the programs' Phase I, which ends in 1999, a quantity expected to last through the first decade of the program's stricter Phase II controls. In 1995, both allowance prices and SO 2 emissions were below pre-CAAA90 expectations. The reduction of SO 2 emissions beyond pre-CAAA90 expectations, combined with lower-than-expected allowance prices and declining compliance costs, can be viewed as a success for market-based environmental controls. 21 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Effect of sulfur analogue of lysine on bacterial protein biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko; Soda, Kenji.

    1976-01-01

    S-(beta-Aminoethyl)-L-cysteine, a sulfur analogue of lysine inhibited strongly growth of Escherichia coli A-19, and weakly that of Corynebacterium sp. isolated from soil, but did not inhibit growth of Aerobacter aerogenes. In Corynebacterium sp. the inhibitory effect was markedly enhanced in the presence of L-threonine. The inhibition of growth by S-(beta-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine was rapidly reversed by the addition of L-lysine. S-(beta-Aminoethyl)-L-cysteine inhibited protein synthesis and the activity of lysyl-tRNA synthetase from E. coli and A. aerogenes. All the other lysine analogues tested inhibited the activity of enzyme, but S-(beta-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine derivatives, S-(beta-N-acetyl-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine and S-(beta-aminoethyl)-alpha-N-acetyl-L-cysteine were not effective. (auth.)

  10. EFFECT OF SOIL SULFUR FERTILIZER AND SOME FOLIAR FERTILIZERS ON GROWTH AND YIELD OF BROCCOLI IN SALINE SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Husain JASIM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Factorial experiment was conducted in the open fields of Agricultural College, Al-Qasim Green University during the agricultural seasons of 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 to study the effect of adding two levels of agricultural sulfur (control and add 100 kg.ha-1 and four levels of nutrient spray (without spray, high-potash fertilizer, high-phosphorus fertilizer and humic acid on growth and yield of broccoli under drip irrigation and polyethylene soil mulching in saline soil (9.6 dS.m-1. Randomized complete block design with three replicates was used. The results showed that agricultural sulfur led to increase number of leaves, leaf area, leaves chlorophyll content, diameter and weight of flower head compared to control. Spraying foliar fertilizer and its interaction with sulfur fertilizer also led to increase all of parameters above (except leaves chlorophyll content significantly compared to control treatment.

  11. Effects of Curcuminoids-Piperine Combination on Systemic Oxidative Stress, Clinical Symptoms and Quality of Life in Subjects with Chronic Pulmonary Complications Due to Sulfur Mustard: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Hajhashemi, Ali; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in the development of chronic pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard (SM). Curcuminoids are polyphenols with documented safety and antioxidant activity. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of short-term supplementation with curcuminoids (co-administered with piperine to enhance the bioavailability of curcuminoids) in alleviating systemic oxidative stress and clinical symptoms, and improvement of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in subjects suffering from chronic pulmonary complications due to SM exposure who are receiving standard respiratory treatments. Eighty-nine subjects were recruited to this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial, being randomly allocated to either curcuminoids (1500 mg/day) + piperine (15 mg/day) combination (n = 45) or placebo (n = 44) for a period of 4 weeks. High-resolution computed tomography suggested the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans in all subjects. Efficacy measures were changes in serum levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and malonedialdehyde (MDA). The severity and frequency of respiratory symptoms and HRQoL were also assessed using St. George respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and COPD Assessment Test (CAT) indices. Serum levels of GSH were increased whilst those of MDA decreased by the end of trial in both groups. Likewise, there were significant improvements in the total as well as subscale (symptoms, activity and impact) SGRQ and CAT scores in both groups. However, comparison of magnitude of changes revealed a greater effect of curcuminoids-piperine combination compared to placebo in elevating GSH, reducing MDA and improving CAT and SGRQ (total and subscale) scores (p stress, clinical symptoms and HRQoL, these phytochemicals may be used as safe adjuvants in patients suffering from chronic SM-induced pulmonary complications who are receiving standard treatments.

  12. Sulfur in human nutrition - effects beyond protein synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gertjan Schaafsma

    2008-01-01

    That sulfur is essential to humans is based on the requirement of S-animo acids for normal growth and maintenance of nitrogen balance and not on the optimization of metabolic proccesses involving the synthesis of non-protein sulphur containing compounds. This paper reviews the significance of sulfur

  13. The benefits of combining elemental sulfur with a DMI fungicide to control Monilinia fructicola isolates resistant to propiconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holb, Imre J; Schnabel, Guido

    2008-02-01

    Management of demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicide resistance in Monilinia fructicola (G. Winter) Honey is a priority in peach orchards of the southeastern United States, but DMI fungicides are still an important component of antiresistance strategies in view of the few effective alternatives. The goal of this study was to investigate potential benefits of a sulfur/propiconazole mixture for the control of propiconazole-resistant isolates. The mixture provided the best control for propiconazole-resistant isolates, regardless of protective or curative application timings, or the presence or absence of fruit injury. Propiconazole-resistant isolates developed disease on detached fruit after protective or curative applications of propiconazole or its mixture with sulfur, but protective applications of the mixture significantly reduced (P = 0.05) disease symptoms compared with the individual compounds. Additive to slightly synergistic effects were observed for the mixture in protective treatments of peaches inoculated with propiconazole-resistant isolates. The results suggest that the addition of elemental sulfur to a DMI fungicide is likely to be a relatively inexpensive means to improve brown rot control in peach production areas where reduced sensitivity to DMI fungicides is suspected but has not led to noticeable control failure.

  14. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.S., E-mail: yinwenfeng2010@163.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Yin, W.F. [College of Mechatronic Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China); Sang, D.H. [Sheng Li Construction Group International Engineering Department, Shandong, Dongying, 257000 (China); Jiang, Z.Y. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Petroleum University, Sichuan, Chengdu, 610500 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion of a carbon-manganese steel and a stainless steel in sulfur and/or naphthenic acid media was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The corrosion rate of the carbon-manganese steel increased with the increase of the acid value and sulfur content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical values of the concentration of sulfur and acid for corrosion rate of the stainless steel were ascertained respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The stainless steel is superior to the carbon-manganese steel in corrosion resistance because of the presence of stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases. - Abstract: The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 Degree-Sign C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr{sub 5}S{sub 8} phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  15. Synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion in crude oil distillation unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B. S.; Yin, W. F.; Sang, D. H.; Jiang, Z. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion at high temperature in crude oil distillation unit was studied using Q235 carbon-manganese steel and 316 stainless steel. The corrosion of Q235 and 316 in corrosion media containing sulfur and/or naphthenic acid at 280 °C was investigated by weight loss, scanning electron microscope (SEM), EDS and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis. The results showed that in corrosion media containing only sulfur, the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316 first increased and then decreased with the increase of sulfur content. In corrosion media containing naphthenic acid and sulfur, with the variations of acid value or sulfur content, the synergy effect of naphthenic acid corrosion and sulfur corrosion has a great influence on the corrosion rate of Q235 and 316. It was indicated that the sulfur accelerated naphthenic acid corrosion below a certain sulfur content but prevented naphthenic acid corrosion above that. The corrosion products on two steels after exposure to corrosion media were investigated. The stable Cr5S8 phases detected in the corrosion products film of 316 were considered as the reason why 316 has greater corrosion resistance to that of Q235.

  16. Effects of mix ratio, moisture content and aeration rate on sulfur odor emissions during pig manure composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Bing; Li, Shuyan; Michel, Frederick; Li, Guoxue; Luo, Yuan; Zhang, Difang; Li, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Sulfur compounds in swine manure can cause odor emissions during composting if conditions are not conducive to their rapid oxidation and degradation. In this study, the effects of controllable composting process variables on sulfur odor emissions were investigated. These included pig manure to corn stalk mix ratio (0.7:1, 1.5:1 and 2.2:1dw basis), initial moisture content (60%, 65%, 70% and 75%) and aeration rate (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0m(3)m(-3)h(-1)). The compounds measured were carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan, ethyl mercaptan, diethyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide (Me2S) and dimethyl disulfide (Me2SS). The results showed that total sulfur losses ranged from 3.9% to 18.3% after 26days of composting. Me2S and Me2SS were the primary (>59.61%) sulfur compounds released during this period. After turning, emission rates of both Me2S and Me2SS increased. Emissions of the other six sulfur compounds were low and inconsistent during composting. Within the compost, feedstock mix ratio significantly influenced the concentration of Me2SS, while aeration rate significantly affected Me2S concentration (pMoisture content did not have a significant effect on the concentrations of either of these two compounds. Concentrations of sulfur odor compounds were the lowest at the highest aeration rate. Therefore, high aeration rates during the thermophilic phase, especially after turning, are recommended to minimize sulfur odors produced during swine manure composting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 40 CFR 80.500 - What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Information § 80.500 What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program? 80.500 Section 80.500 Protection of Environment...

  18. 40 CFR 52.125 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to existing fuel burning equipment producing electrical energy will provide for the attainment and...: Sulfur oxides. 52.125 Section 52.125 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... since the control strategy does not analyze the impact of smelter fugitive emissions on ambient air...

  19. Delayed biological effects of incorporated sulfur-35 in combination with IOS-4876

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusanova, O.V.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative evaluation of some delayed effects of sulfur-35 single administration to mongree white rats males is carried out; modifying effect of IOS-4876 preparation on biological efficiency of incorporated sulfur-35 is also evaluated. Different radionuclide doses demonstrated identical tumor effect exceeding by 2.2-3 times the level of spontaneous tumors. Sulfur-35 incorporated in quantities of 185 and 925 kBq/g causes proved increase in rats death level during the first two years of observation. IOS-4876 preparation leads to certain decrease in the level of delayed biological effects due to internal irradiation. 11 refs

  20. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1997-12-31

    Based on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, a two dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the engine on the formation and growth of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols in the near field plume. The conversion of fuel sulfur to sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid in the engine is predicted to significantly increase the number density and surface area density of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols and the chemical activation of exhaust soot particulates. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of exhaust SO{sub x} emissions to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions. (author) 18 refs.; Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters

  1. Effect of aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions on near field plume aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R C; Miake-Lye, R C; Anderson, M R; Kolb, C E [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

    1998-12-31

    Based on estimated exit plane sulfur speciation, a two dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model with coupled gas phase oxidation kinetics and aerosol nucleation and growth dynamics is used to evaluate the effect of fuel sulfur oxidation in the engine on the formation and growth of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols in the near field plume. The conversion of fuel sulfur to sulfur trioxide and sulfuric acid in the engine is predicted to significantly increase the number density and surface area density of volatile H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O aerosols and the chemical activation of exhaust soot particulates. This analysis indicates the need for experimental measurements of exhaust SO{sub x} emissions to fully assess the atmospheric impact of aircraft emissions. (author) 18 refs.; Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters

  2. Effect of Prussian blue on organic sulfur of coal in aqueous medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-01-15

    This study is an attempt to desulfurize organic sulfur from coal samples with ferric hexacyanoferrate (II), Fe{sub 4} (Fe(CN){sub 6}), as the desulfurization agent. Effect of temperature, particle size and concentration of ferrocyanide ion on desulfurization from the coal samples has been investigated. The temperature and stirring time are the most important parameters for the level of desulfurization of organic sulfur. Removal of organic sulfur content increased continuously with increasing temperature from 298 to 368 K. The organic sulfur removal rate sharply increases from 10 min to 30 min stirring time. After 30 min, it reaches a value of plateau. Particle size between -100 mesh and -200 mesh slightly affects the amount of organic sulfur removal. Gradual increase in the concentration of ferric hexacyanoferrate (II) raised the magnitude of desulfurization, but at higher concentration, the variation is not significant.

  3. Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/stabilized-zirconia Anodes – Effect on Long-Term Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Hagen, Anke; Hjelm, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur impurities in carbon containing fuels for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), e.g. natural gas and biogas, can lead to significant losses in performance due to the sulfur sensitivity of Ni/YSZ SOFC anodes. Full cells having Ni/YSZ and Ni/ScYSZ anodes have been characterized during long-term gal...... to focus on the long-term effect over a few hundred of hours. This work describes and correlates the observed evolution of anode performance, over hundreds of hours, with sulfur poisoning with the different operating conditions.......Sulfur impurities in carbon containing fuels for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), e.g. natural gas and biogas, can lead to significant losses in performance due to the sulfur sensitivity of Ni/YSZ SOFC anodes. Full cells having Ni/YSZ and Ni/ScYSZ anodes have been characterized during long...

  4. Deposition of elemental sulfur in city gate Pressure Control Valves (PCVs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinto, Thiago C. do; Veiga, Leandro S. da; Silva, Marcos J.M. da; Lemos, Marcelo C. de; Goncalves, Luciane T. [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Deposition of elemental sulfur has been observed in city gate pressure control valves (PCV s), a phenomenon that causes operational problems in these facilities. This article discusses the problems caused by this deposition, especially in pilots of pressure control valves. While passing through PCV s, the flow of natural gas is subjected to a sharp drop in temperature due to the reduction of pressure (Joule-Thompson). When this happens, the elemental sulfur that is in balance with the flow of natural gas is deposited inside the PCV s and the obstacles ahead. Since PCV s are self-operated and use natural gas as the working fluid, the elemental sulfur is also deposited in the pilots as well. Elemental sulfur in powder form has very small particles - around 20 {mu}m - that prevent the perfect operation of the small moving parts of pilots. Because of this, the affected pilot cannot operate the PCV satisfactorily to regulate the pressure of the natural gas supplied to the customer. There are two possible consequences of this situation: when the customer increases consumption, the pressure will decline to less than below the limit established under the supply contract, which can lead to fines; and the pressure can rise above the limit tolerated by pipes, which can lead to dangerous ruptures. (author)

  5. Effects of mineral matter on products and sulfur distributions in hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Li, B.; Zhang, B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Inst. of Coal Chemistry

    1999-05-01

    The effects of the mineral matter on the product yield and sulfur distribution in hydropyrolysis and pyrolysis of Chinese Hongmiao lignite were investigated using a fixed-bed reactor. The volatile sulfur-containing gases (H{sub 2}S, COS, CH{sub 3}SH) were also analyzed as a function of pyrolysis temperature. Coal samples were treated with HCl/HF or HCl/HF and CrCl{sub 2} solution to eliminate minerals and pyrite respectively. In hydropyrolysis, demineralized Hongmiao lignite showed lower yields of tar and water than the raw coal. Demineralization cannot only minimize the fixation effect of basic mineral matter on sulfur-containing gases, but also increase the sulfur distribution of the tar. Further, from the evolution profiles of sulfur-containing gases, it is possible to elucidate the contribution of minerals, pyrite and organic sulfur to the sulfur evolution. Pyrite may not be the only source of COS formation. 32 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Effect of simulated sulfuric acid rain on yield, growth and foliar injury of several crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J J; Neely, G E; Perrigan, S C; Grothaus, L C

    1981-01-01

    This study was designed to reveal patterns of response of major United States crops to sulfuric acid rain. Potted plants were grown in field chambers and exposed to simulated sulfuric acid rain (pH 3.0, 3.5 or 4.0) or to a control rain (pH 5.6). At harvest, the weights of the marketable portion, total aboveground portion and roots were determined for 28 crops. Of these, marketable yield production was inhibited for 5 crops (radish, beet, carrot, mustard greens, broccoli), stimulated for 6 crops (tomato, green pepper, strawberry, alfalfa, orchardgrass, timothy), and ambiguously affected for 1 crop (potato). In addition, stem and leaf production of sweet corn was stimulated. Visible injury of tomatoes might have decreased their marketabiity. No statistically significant effects on yield were observed for the other 15 crops. The results suggest that the likelihood of yield being affected by acid depends on the part of the plant utilized, as well as on species. Effects on the aboveground portion of crops and on roots are also presented. Plants were regularly examined for foliar injury associated with acid rain. Of the 35 cultivars examined, the foliage of 31 was injured at pH 3.0, 28 at pH 3.5, and 5 at pH 4.0. Foliar injury was not generally related to effects on yield. However, foliar injury of Swiss chard, mustard greens and spinach was severe enough to adversely affect marketability.

  7. Effects of rhizobium inoculation, sulfur and phosphorus applications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... Key words: Chickpea, phosphorus, sulfur, yield, nutrient uptake. ... Fertilizer P was applied in bands 3 cm below rows sown to chick pea. Chick pea ... water. Plant grains and shoot were dried for 48 h at 70°C and were ground.

  8. Effect of cathode component on the energy density of lithium-sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yun Seok; Kim, Seok; Choi, Soo Seok; Han, Ji Sung; Kim, Jan Dee; Jeon, Sang Eun; Jung, Bok Hwan

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the carbon black types and the sulfur particle size on the discharge capacity or the utilization of sulfur was investigated for the cathode having high loading of sulfur. The DBP (dibutyl phthalate) absorption number of the used carbon black has a strong effect on the utilization while the specific surface area is not so critical to it. It was also found that the sulfur particle size is a factor having an effect on the utilization. We have improved the cathode component and achieved the utilization of about 50%. By using that cathode, the volumetric energy density of about 330 Wh/l was obtained for the full size Li-S battery (3.8 mm thickness, 35 mm width and 62 mm height)

  9. Use of the Moessbauer effect for determining pyritic sulfur content in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerw, B; Sikora, T

    1986-10-01

    This paper discusses investigations into resonance absorption of gamma radiation. Standard equipment for measuring the Moessbauer effect in black coal consisting of a measuring head, the SM-4T spectrometer, a multichannel analyzer, the Standard electronic unit and a printer is evaluated. The MSP measuring system developed jointly by the EMAG Mine Automation Company and the Nuclear Research Institute in Swierk is described. The MSP equipment is used for measuring content of pyritic sulfur in coal. Its accuracy is satisfactory. Results of measuring pyritic and total sulfur content by means of quantitative chemical analysis and by the MSP resonance absorption method (Moessbauer effect) are compared. The mean standard deviation for pyritic sulfur is 0.14% and for total sulfur content 0.21%. 11 refs.

  10. Study on thermal effects & sulfurized additives, in lubricating greases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ami Atul

    understand the effects of the addition of sulphur from a sulfurized olefin to MoS2 through mechanical processing has been conducted. This mechanically processed additive mixed is tested through regular ASTM D2266 test. The hypothesis was to make more shear able MoS 2 layers available by using the sulphur from the olefin to form the basic FeS layer that reduces the continuous wear rate. The results have been studied using SEM and EDX imaging.

  11. Technical effects of adding 1 % lidocaine to technetium sulfur colloid for sentinel lymphatic mapping in early breast cancer: analysis of data from a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciero, Cletus A; Henry, Leonard R; Howard, Robin S; Peoples, George E; Bilchik, Anton J; Avital, Itzhak; Buckenmaier Iii, Chester C; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2013-08-01

    A practice standard in sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping in breast cancer is intradermal injection of technetium-99m sulfur colloid (Tc-99m), resulting in significant patient discomfort and pain. A previous randomized controlled trial showed that adding lidocaine to Tc-99m significantly reduced radioisotope injection-related pain. We tested whether 1 % lidocaine admixed with Tc-99m affects feasibility of SLN mapping. Between January 2006 and April 2009, 140 patients with early breast cancer were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1) to receive standard topical 4 % lidocaine cream and intradermal Tc-99m (control) or to one of three other study groups: topical placebo cream and injection of Tc-99m containing sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), 1 % lidocaine, or both. All SLN data were collected prospectively. Study groups were comparable for clinicopathological parameters. As previously reported, the addition of 1 % lidocaine to the radioisotope solution significantly improved patient comfort. Overall SLN identification rate in the trial was 93 %. Technical aspects of SLN biopsy were similar for all groups, including time from injection to operation, first SLN (SLN 1) gamma probe counts, ex vivo counts for SLN 1 and SLN 2, and axillary bed counts. SLN identification rates were comparable statistically: control (96 %), lidocaine (90 %), sodium bicarbonate (97 %), and sodium bicarbonate-lidocaine (90 %). The control group had a significantly higher SLN 2/SLN 1 ex vivo count ratio, and the number of SLNs detected was significantly reduced in the lidocaine versus no-lidocaine groups (p cancer is associated with fewer SLNs detected, but it does not appear to compromise SLN identification.

  12. Chloride-Reinforced Carbon Nanofiber Host as Effective Polysulfide Traps in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lei; Zhuang, Houlong L; Zhang, Kaihang; Cooper, Valentino R; Li, Qi; Lu, Yingying

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is one of the most promising alternatives for the current state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries due to its high theoretical energy density and low production cost from the use of sulfur. However, the commercialization of Li-S batteries has been so far limited to the cyclability and the retention of active sulfur materials. Using co-electrospinning and physical vapor deposition procedures, we created a class of chloride-carbon nanofiber composites, and studied their effectiveness on polysulfides sequestration. By trapping sulfur reduction products in the modified cathode through both chemical and physical confinements, these chloride-coated cathodes are shown to remarkably suppress the polysulfide dissolution and shuttling between lithium and sulfur electrodes. From adsorption experiments and theoretical calculations, it is shown that not only the sulfide-adsorption effect but also the diffusivity in the vicinity of these chlorides materials plays an important role on the reversibility of sulfur-based cathode upon repeated cycles. Balancing the adsorption and diffusion effects of these nonconductive materials could lead to the enhanced cycling performance of an Li-S cell. Electrochemical analyses over hundreds of cycles indicate that cells containing indium chloride-modified carbon nanofiber outperform cells with other halogenated salts, delivering an average specific capacity of above 1200 mAh g -1 at 0.2 C.

  13. Manipulating ship fuel sulfur content and modeling the effects on air quality and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Laakso, Anton; Schmidt, Anja; Kokkola, Harri; Kuokkanen, Tuomas; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Lehtinen, Kari E. J.; Laakso, Lauri; Korhonen, Hannele

    2013-04-01

    order to assess the health effects of different emission scenarios we diagnose PM2.5 concentrations from each simulation. Then, we use PM2.5 concentrations and C-R functions to calculate the changes in mortality related to lung cancer and cardiopulmonary diseases. Our preliminary analysis suggests that mortality in geo-ships would be lower than in std-ships. Strict sulfur content limits also in the open oceans (future-ships) would decrease the mortality even more. Idea of deliberately increasing fuel sulfur content in order to produce a cooling effect can be classified as one form of solar radiation management (SRM). There are several scientific, ethical and political problems associated with SRM technologies and a number of them would be applicable to the idea we present here. For example, there would be a conflict between the existing international treaties and the proposed increase in ship fuel sulfur content. However, our study is increasing the knowledge of air quality and climate trade-offs related to ship emission controls. If the cooling effect of ship traffic is considered too precious to lose, there might be ways to preserve it, while still notably increasing the continental air quality.

  14. Effect of commercial activated carbons in sulfur cathodes on the electrochemical properties of lithium/sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Icpyo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52828 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Won; Nam, Tae-Hyun; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon [Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52828 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ho-Suk [Department of Material and Energy Engineering, Gyeongwoon University, 730, Gangdong-ro, Sandong-myeon, Gumi, Gyeongbuk, 39160 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Jun, E-mail: ahj@gnu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52828 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Engineering and Convergence Technology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 52828 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The sulfur/activated carbon composite is fabricated using commercial activated carbons. • The sulfur/activated carbon composite with coal shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacities of 1240 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C and 567 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C. - Abstract: We prepared sulfur/active carbon composites via a simple solution-based process using the following commercial activated carbon-based materials: coal, coconut shells, and sawdust. Although elemental sulfur was not detected in any of the sulfur/activated carbon composites based on Thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy results confirmed its presence in the activated carbon. These results indicate that sulfur was successfully impregnated in the activated carbon and that all of the activated carbons acted as sulfur reservoirs. The sulfur/activated carbon composite cathode using coal exhibited the highest discharge capacity and best rate capability. The first discharge capacity at 1 C (1.672 A g{sup −1}) was 1240 mAh g{sup −1}, and a large reversible capacity of 567 mAh g{sup −1} was observed at 10 C (16.72 A g{sup −1}).

  15. Interspecific differences in the effects of sulfur dioxide on angiosperm sexual reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBay, D.T.

    1981-01-01

    The major objective of this study was to test the potential direct effects of SO 2 on sexual reproduction in several plant species with different reproductive structures and processes. In marked contrast to the sensitivity to SO 2 reported by other investigators for pollen germination and pollen tube growth in vitro, and recorded for Lepidium virginicum in this study, 4 of 5 species tested were tolerant with respect to fruit and seed set after exposure to 0.6 ppm SO 2 for 8 hours during flowering. Seed set in the one sensitive species, Geranium carolinianum, was reduced 40% from the control after exposure to SO 2 , but only when relative humidity (RH) was at or above 90%. The effect of SO 2 on Lepidium pollen germination in vitro was greater than the effect of SO 2 on sexual reproduction in vivo. Sulfur dioxide reduced pollen germination in vitro 94% from the control. The same concentration of SO 2 , at 90% Rh, reduced pollen germination in vivo 50% from the control, but had no effect on seed set. Predictions of effects of SO 2 on reproduction in vivo based on effects of SO 2 on pollen germination and pollen tube growth in vitro are not valid

  16. Prevention of formation of acid drainage from high-sulfur coal refuse by inhibition of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. 1. Preliminary experiments in controlled shaken flasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Changes of pH and sulfate concentration in high-sulfur coal refuse slurries are used as measurements of microbial pyrite oxidation in the laboratory. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), alkylbenzene sulfonate (ABS), benzoic acid (BZ) and combinations of SLS plus BZ and ABS plus BZ effectively inhibited formation of sulfate and acid when added in concentrations greater than 50 mg/l to inoculated 20 or 30% coal refuse slurries. Here 25 mg/l concentrations of SLS, ABS and ABS plus BZ stimulated acid production. Formic, hexanoic, oxalic, propionic, and pyruvic acids at 0.1% concentrations were also effective inhibitors. Four different lignin sulfonates were only slightly effective inhibitors at 0.1% concentrations. It was concluded that acid formation resulting from microbial oxidation in high-sulfur coal refuse can be inhibited. 22 references.

  17. Effects of acid rain and sulfur dioxide on marble dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, Susan I.

    1994-01-01

    Acid precipitation and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide (SO2) accelerate damage to carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. This study identified and quantified environmental damage to a sample of Vermont marble during storms and their preceding dry periods. Results from field experiments indicated the deposition of SO2 gas to the stone surface during dry periods and a twofold increase in marble dissolution during coincident episodes of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. The study is widely applicable to the analysis of carbonate-stone damage at locations affected by acid rain and air pollution.

  18. The effectiveness of sulfidic materials as a source of sulfur fertilizer for the production of rice in two sulfur deficient soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul Hasnat M. Shamim

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of sulfidic materials (SM and gypsum (G application at the rates of 0, 40, 80, 120, and 160 kg S ha-1on the growth, yield, and mineral nutrition of rice (Oryza sativa L.; BR 16: Shahi balam cultivated in two sulfur deficient soilsof Sirajgonj (Typic Haplaquept and Gazipur (Typic Paleustult were evaluated in a greenhouse study. The best growth, yieldperformance, and nutrition of rice were recorded by the SM160 treatment in both the Sirajgonj (e.g. grain: 9.8 g/plant andGazipur (8.6 soils, followed by the SM120 (8.5, 7.5 > SM80 (7.3, 7.3 > G160 (7.1, 6.9 treatments. The application of SMincreased the average grain yield by 82% (increased over control: IOC for Sirajgonj soil and 78% for Gazipur soil, irrespectiveof application rates. In the case of gypsum, these increments were 40 and 37% for Sirajgonj and Gazipur soils, respectively. Theapplication of gypsum at the highest rate of G160 was not as effective as even the dose of SM80 in both of the soils. However,almost similar and significant (p<0.05 effects were observed for the grain weight, percent filled grains, and harvest index ofrice grown in both the soils. The applied SM increased the average organic matter and available sulfur contents in the soilsby 20 to 46%, and 140 to 228% IOC, respectively, while these increments were 6 to 20% and 88 to 187% for gypsum treatments,indicating that the SM was potential and effective than gypsum not only as a source of sulfur fertilizer but also to enrich thefertility and productivity status of the soils. Moreover, the SM treatment was found to be maintained the high nutrient statusin both the soils till the final harvest at maturity of rice, reflecting a good indication for its long term use. The use of SM didnot show any adverse effect on the plant and soil.

  19. Sulfur poisoning of a Ni(111) crystal with small angle boundaries (SAB) and its effect on CO adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, G A; Lih-Ren Chao, J; Freeman, G B

    1981-01-01

    The sulfur poisoning of a Ni(111) crystal with small angle boundaries (SAB) and its effect on CO adsorption were studied using the techniques of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The sulfur poisoned Ni(111)-SAB surface was prepared by heating the crystal to 850/sup 0/C for 20 min. The bulk sulfur impurity was diffused to the surface. The sulfur Auger peak intensities taken at and between boundary lines, show that sulfur distribution is uniform on the Ni(111)-SAB surface. No LEED pattern due to sulfur presence was observed. Sulfur atoms do not form an ordered structure in the Ni(111)-SAB surface. The Auger spectra showed that the boundary lines at the sulfur-free crystal surface provide favorable sites for the adsorbed CO to dissociate at temperatures as low as 25/sup 0/C. After sulfur is diffused to the surface, it blocks the active sites as well as the boundary sites. The boundary line enhanced dissociation of CO is no longer seen. Sulfur and nickel Auger intensities were taken during the CO adsorption. From the change of the intensities, sulfur only interacts with nickel and physically inhibits the CO adsorption and, thereby, further CO dissociation.

  20. Morphology control of ordered mesoporous carbons for high capacity lithium sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Joerg David

    2011-06-07

    The focus of this thesis concerns the morphology control of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials. Ordered mesoporous carbons with diverse morphologies, that are thin films, fibers - embedded in anodic alumina membranes and free-standing - or spherical nanoparticles, have been successfully prepared by soft-templating procedures. The mechanisms of structure formation and processing were investigated with in-situ SAXS measurements and their application in high capacity lithium-sulfur batteries was successfully tested in cooperation with Guang He and Linda Nazar from the University of Waterloo in Canada. The Li-S batteries receive increasing attention due to their high theoretical energy density which is 3 to 5 times higher than from lithium-ion batteries. For this type of battery the specific pore volume is crucial for the content of the active component (sulfur) in the cathode and therefore correlates with the capacity and gravimetric energy density of the battery. At first, mesoporous thin films with 2D-hexagonal structure were obtained through organic-organic self-assembly of a preformed oligomeric resol precursor and the triblock copolymer template Pluronic P123. The formation of a condensed-wall material through thermopolymerization of the precursor oligomers resulted in mesostructured phenolic resin films. Subsequent decomposition of the surfactant and partial carbonization were achieved through thermal treatment in inert atmosphere. The films were crack-free with tunable homogenous thicknesses, and showed either 2D-hexagonal or lamellar mesostructure. An additional, yet unknown 3D-mesostructure was also found. In the second part, cubic and circular hexagonal mesoporous carbon phases in the confined environment of tubular anodic alumina membrane (AAM) pores were obtained by self-assembly of the mentioned resol precursor and the triblock copolymer templates Pluronic F127 or P123, respectively. Casting and solvent-evaporation were also followed by

  1. Effects of low sulfur dioxide concentrations on bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of Aglianico red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriele, Morena; Gerardi, Chiara; Lucejko, Jeannette J; Longo, Vincenzo; Pucci, Laura; Domenici, Valentina

    2018-04-15

    This study analyzed the effect of low sulfur dioxide concentrations on the chromatic properties, phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of Aglianico red wines with respect to wines produced from conventional winemaking. We determined the phytochemical composition by spectrophotometric methods and HPLC-DAD analysis and the in vitro antioxidant activity of different wine samples by the ORAC assay. The main important classes of fluorophore molecules in red wine were identified by Front-Face fluorescence spectroscopy, and the emission intensity trend was investigated at various sulfur dioxide concentrations. Lastly, we tested the effects of both conventional and low sulfite wines on ex vivo human erythrocytes under oxidative stimulus by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay and the hemolysis test. The addition of sulfur dioxide, which has well-known side effects, increased the content of certain bioactive components but did not raise the erythrocyte antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of sulfur fertilization on the sanitary state of plants of the family Brassicaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz P. Kurowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out in the years 2006-2008 in Bałcyny (N=53°35'49"; E=19°51'20". The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sulfur fertilization on the sanitary state of spring oilseed rape, winter oilseed rape, white mustard and Chinese mustard as well as on the species composition of fungi colonizing their seeds. Sulfur fertilization had a beneficial effect on the health of Brassicaceae plants infested by Alternaria blight, grey mould, Sclerotinia stem rot, Phoma stem canker and Verticillium wilt, but it had a varying effect on the occurrence of powdery mildew. Alternaria alternata and Penicillium spp. were isolated most frequently from Brassicaceae seeds. In general, more fungi (including pathogenic to Brassicaceae were isolated from the seeds of plants grown in non-sulfur fertilized plots. Pathogens occurred primarily on the seed surface, and their number decreased after surface disinfection of seeds.

  3. Pretreatment of Sugar Beet Pulp with Dilute Sulfurous Acid is Effective for Multipurpose Usage of Carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharina, M; Emelyanov, V; Mokshina, N; Ibragimova, N; Gorshkova, T

    2016-05-01

    Sulfurous acid was used for pretreatment of sugar beet pulp (SBP) in order to achieve high efficiency of both extraction of carbohydrates and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the remaining solids. The main advantage of sulfurous acid usage as pretreatment agent is the possibility of its regeneration. Application of sulfurous acid as hydrolyzing agent in relatively low concentrations (0.6-1.0 %) during a short period of time (10-20 min) and low solid to liquid ratio (1:3, 1:6) allowed effective extraction of carbohydrates from SBP and provided positive effect on subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest obtained concentration of reducing substances (RS) in hydrolysates was 8.5 %; up to 33.6 % of all carbohydrates present in SBP could be extracted. The major obtained monosaccharides were arabinose and glucose (9.4 and 7.3 g/l, respectively). Pretreatment of SBP with sulfurous acid increased 4.6 times the yield of glucose during subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of remaining solids with cellulase cocktail, as compared to the untreated SBP. Total yield of glucose during SBP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis amounted to 89.4 % of the theoretical yield. The approach can be applied directly to the wet SBP. Hydrolysis of sugar beet pulp with sulfurous acid is recommended for obtaining of individual monosaccharides, as well as nutritional media.

  4. Effect of plasma voltage on sulfurization of α-MoO{sub 3} nanostructured thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Prabhat, E-mail: prabhat89k@gmail.com; Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K.; Reddy, G. B. [Thin Film Laboratory, Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this report, the effect of plasma voltage on plasma assisted sulfurization (PAS) of vertically aligned molybdenum trioxide (α- MoO{sub 3}) nanoflakes (NFs) on glass substrates has been studied systematically. MoO{sub 3} NFs were deposited using plasma assisted sublimation process. These nanoflakes were subjected to H{sub 2}S/Ar plasma at two different plasma voltages 600 and 1000 volts; to study the effect of plasma ionization on degree of sulfurization of MoO{sub 3} into MoS{sub 2}. XRD and Raman analysis show that film sulfurized at 1000 volts have relatively higher degree of conversion into MoS{sub 2}, as more intense peaks of MoS{sub 2} and MoO{sub 2} are obtained than that sulfurized at 600 volts. HRTEM of sulfurized film shows that outer surface of nanoflake has been converted into MoS{sub 2} (4-5 monolayers). Meanwhile, MoO{sub 3} was reduced into MoO{sub 2} as confirmed by XRD and Raman results. All the observed results are well in consonance with each other.

  5. Control of Copper Resistance and Inorganic Sulfur Metabolism by Paralogous Regulators in Staphylococcus aureus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Nicholas; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Ma, Zhen; Adams, Keith W.; Cowart, Darin M.; Scott, Robert A.; Skaar, Eric P.; Giedroc, David P.

    2011-01-01

    All strains of Staphylococcus aureus encode a putative copper-sensitive operon repressor (CsoR) and one other CsoR-like protein of unknown function. We show here that NWMN_1991 encodes a bona fide Cu(I)-inducible CsoR of a genetically unlinked copA-copZ copper resistance operon in S. aureus strain Newman. In contrast, an unannotated open reading frame found between NWMN_0027 and NWMN_0026 (denoted NWMN_0026.5) encodes a CsoR-like regulator that represses expression of adjacent genes by binding specifically to a pair of canonical operator sites positioned in the NWMN_0027–0026.5 intergenic region. Inspection of these regulated genes suggests a role in assimilation of inorganic sulfur from thiosulfate and vectorial sulfur transfer, and we designate NWMN_0026.5 as CstR (CsoR-like sulfur transferase repressor). Expression analysis demonstrates that CsoR and CstR control their respective regulons in response to distinct stimuli with no overlap in vivo. Unlike CsoR, CstR does not form a stable complex with Cu(I); operator binding is instead inhibited by oxidation of the intersubunit cysteine pair to a mixture of disulfide and trisulfide linkages by a likely metabolite of thiosulfate assimilation, sulfite. CsoR is unreactive toward sulfite under the same conditions. We conclude that CsoR and CstR are paralogs in S. aureus that function in the same cytoplasm to control distinct physiological processes. PMID:21339296

  6. Control of copper resistance and inorganic sulfur metabolism by paralogous regulators in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossoehme, Nicholas; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Ma, Zhen; Adams, Keith W; Cowart, Darin M; Scott, Robert A; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2011-04-15

    All strains of Staphylococcus aureus encode a putative copper-sensitive operon repressor (CsoR) and one other CsoR-like protein of unknown function. We show here that NWMN_1991 encodes a bona fide Cu(I)-inducible CsoR of a genetically unlinked copA-copZ copper resistance operon in S. aureus strain Newman. In contrast, an unannotated open reading frame found between NWMN_0027 and NWMN_0026 (denoted NWMN_0026.5) encodes a CsoR-like regulator that represses expression of adjacent genes by binding specifically to a pair of canonical operator sites positioned in the NWMN_0027-0026.5 intergenic region. Inspection of these regulated genes suggests a role in assimilation of inorganic sulfur from thiosulfate and vectorial sulfur transfer, and we designate NWMN_0026.5 as CstR (CsoR-like sulfur transferase repressor). Expression analysis demonstrates that CsoR and CstR control their respective regulons in response to distinct stimuli with no overlap in vivo. Unlike CsoR, CstR does not form a stable complex with Cu(I); operator binding is instead inhibited by oxidation of the intersubunit cysteine pair to a mixture of disulfide and trisulfide linkages by a likely metabolite of thiosulfate assimilation, sulfite. CsoR is unreactive toward sulfite under the same conditions. We conclude that CsoR and CstR are paralogs in S. aureus that function in the same cytoplasm to control distinct physiological processes.

  7. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits - Part 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, P L; Rommereim, R L; Burton, F G; Buschbom, R L; Sasser, L B

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with o. 0.5, 1 .0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats • and rabbits since fetal effects were obs~rved only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for •no observable effects levers· in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  8. Functional Differentiation of Three Pores for Effective Sulfur Confinement in Li-S Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Yang, Minghui; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Li, Chao; Gu, Da-Ming

    2018-03-01

    Shuttle effect of the dissolved intermediates is regarded as the primary cause that leads to fast capacity degradation of Li-S battery. Herein, a microporous carbon-coated sulfur composite with novel rambutan shape (R-S@MPC) is synthesized from microporous carbon-coated rambutan-like zinc sulfide (R-ZnS@MPC), via an in situ oxidation process. The R-ZnS is employed as both template and sulfur precursor. The carbon frame of R-S@MPC composite possesses three kinds of pores that are distinctly separated from each other in space and are endowed with the exclusive functions. The central macropore serves as buffer pool to accommodate the dissolved lithium polysulfides (LPSs) and volumetric variation during cycling. The marginal straight-through mesoporous, connected with the central macropore, takes the responsibility of sulfur storage. The micropores, evenly distributed in the outer carbon shell of the as-synthesized R-S@MPC, enable the blockage of LPSs. These pores are expected to perform their respective single function, and collaborate synergistically to suppress the sulfur loss. Therefore, it delivers an outstanding cycling stability, decay rate of 0.013% cycle -1 after 500 cycles at 1 C, when the sulfur loading is kept at 4 mg cm -2 . © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Volcanic sulfur degassing and the role of sulfides in controlling volcanic metal emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, M.; Liu, E.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanoes emit prodigious quantities of sulfur and metals, their behaviour inextricably linked through pre-eruptive sulfide systematics and through degassing and speciation in the volcanic plume. Fundamental differences exist in the metal output of ocean island versus arc volcanoes, with volcanoes in Hawaii and Iceland outgassing large fluxes of gaseous and particulate chalcophiles; and arc volcanoes' plumes, in contrast, enriched in Zn, Cu, Tl and Pb. Metals and metalloids partition into a magmatic vapor phase from silicate melt at crustal pressures. Their abundance in magmatic vapor is influenced strongly by sulfide saturation and by the composition of the magmatic vapor phase, particularly with respect to chloride. These factors are highly dependent on tectonic setting. Metal outgassing is controlled by magma water content and redox: deep saturation in vapor and minimal sulfide in arc basalts yields metal-rich vapor; shallow degassing and resorption of sulfides feeds the metal content of volcanic gas in ocean islands. We present a detailed study of the sulfide systematics of the products of the 2014-2015 Holuhraun basaltic fissure eruption (Bárðarbunga volcanic system, Iceland) to illustrate the interplay between late water and sulfur outgassing; sulfide saturation and breakdown; and metal partitioning into a vapor phase. Sulfide globules, representing quenched droplets of an immiscible sulfide liquid, are preserved within erupted tephra. Sulfide globules in rapidly quenched tephra are preserved within both matrix glass and as inclusions in crystals. The stereologically-corrected 3D size distribution of sulfide globules ranges from importance in supplying sulfur and metals to the atmosphere during eruption.

  10. Understanding the effects of sulfur on mercury capture from coal-fired utility flue gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, E.A.; Morita, K.; Jia, C.Q. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Coal combustion continues to be a major source of energy throughout the world and is the leading contributor to anthropogenic mercury emissions. Effective control of these emissions requires a good understanding of how other flue gas constituents such as sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}) may interfere in the removal process. Most of the current literature suggests that SO{sub 2} hinders elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation by scavenging oxidizing species such as chlorine (Cl2) and reduces the overall efficiency of mercury capture, while there is evidence to suggest that SO{sub 2} with oxygen (O{sub 2}) enhances Hg{sup 0} oxidation by promoting Cl2 formation below 100{sup o}C. However, studies in which SO{sub 2} was shown to have a positive correlation with Hg{sup 0} oxidation in full-scale utilities indicate that these interactions may be heavily dependent on operating conditions, particularly chlorine content of the coal and temperature. While bench-scale studies explicitly targeting SO{sub 3} are scarce, the general consensus among full-scale coal-fired utilities is that its presence in flue gas has a strong negative correlation with mercury capture efficiency. The exact reason behind this observed correlation is not completely clear, however. While SO{sub 3} is an inevitable product of SO{sub 2} oxidation by O{sub 2}, a reaction that hinders Hg{sup 0} oxidation, it readily reacts with water vapor, forms sulfuric acid (H{sub 2 }SO{sub 4}) at the surface of carbon, and physically blocks active sites of carbon. On the other hand, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} on carbon surfaces may increase mercury capacity either through the creation of oxidation sites on the carbon surface or through a direct reaction of mercury with the acid. However, neither of these beneficial impacts is expected to be of practical significance for an activated carbon injection system in a real coal-fired utility flue gas.

  11. Sulfur poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian, R J; Harrison, K B

    1975-01-01

    A case of sulfur poisoning is described in which 12 of 20 cattle died following the feeding of sulfur. Respiratory distress and abdominal pain were the prominent signs. Examination of one animal revealed vasculitis and necrosis of the rumen and abomasal wall. The possible toxic effects of sulfur are discussed.

  12. Effect of sulfur loading on the desulfation chemistry of a commercial lean NOx trap catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heui; Yezerets, Aleksey; Li, Junhui; Currier, Neal; Chen, Haiying; Hess, Howard ..; Engelhard, Mark H.; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF

    2012-12-15

    We investigate the effects of initial sulfur loadings on the desulfation chemistry and the subsequent final activity of a commercial LNT catalyst. Identical total amounts of SO2 are applied to the samples, albeit with the frequency of desulfation varied. The results indicate that performance is better with less frequent desulfations. The greater the amount of sulfur deposited before desulfation, the more amount of SO2 evolution before H2S is observed during desulfation, which can be explained by two sequential reactions; initial conversion of sulfate to SO2, followed by the reduction of SO2 to H2S. After completing all sulfation/desulfation steps, the sample with only a single desulfation results in a fairly uniform sulfur distribution along the z-axis inside of the monolith. We expect that the results obtained in this study will provide useful information for optimizing regeneration strategies in vehicles that utilize the LNT technology.

  13. Carbonized cellulose paper as an effective interlayer in lithium-sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Shiqi; Ren, Guofeng; Hoque, Md Nadim Ferdous; Dong, Zhihua; Warzywoda, Juliusz; Fan, Zhaoyang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A facile and economical method to fabricate interlayer for high-performance lithium-sulfur battery was demonstrated. • The performance of lithium-sulfur batteries without and with interlayer was compared. • The mechanism for the function of interlayer was explained. - Abstract: One of the several challenging problems hampering lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery development is the so-called shuttling effect of the highly soluble intermediates (Li_2S_8–Li_2S_6). Using an interlayer inserted between the sulfur cathode and the separator to capture and trap these soluble intermediates has been found effective in diminishing this effect. Previously, most reported interlayer membranes were synthesized in a complex and expensive process, and might not be suitable for practical cheap batteries. Herein, a facile method is reported to pyrolyze the commonly used cellulose filter paper into highly flexible and conductive carbon fiber paper. When used as an interlayer, such a carbon paper can improve the cell capacity by several folds through trapping the soluble polysulfides. The enhanced electronic conductivity of the cathode, due to the interlayer, also significantly improves the cell rate performance. In addition, it was demonstrated that such an interlayer can also effectively mitigate the self-discharge problem of the Li-S batteries. This study indicates that the cost-effective pyrolyzed cellulose paper has potential as interlayer for practical Li-S batteries.

  14. Carbonized cellulose paper as an effective interlayer in lithium-sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shiqi; Ren, Guofeng; Hoque, Md Nadim Ferdous [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Dong, Zhihua [Hangzhou Dianzi University, No. 1158, 2nd Street, Xiasha Higher Education District, Hangzhou City, Zhejiang Province (China); Warzywoda, Juliusz [Materials Characterization Center, Whitacre College of Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Fan, Zhaoyang, E-mail: zhaoyang.fan@ttu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • A facile and economical method to fabricate interlayer for high-performance lithium-sulfur battery was demonstrated. • The performance of lithium-sulfur batteries without and with interlayer was compared. • The mechanism for the function of interlayer was explained. - Abstract: One of the several challenging problems hampering lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery development is the so-called shuttling effect of the highly soluble intermediates (Li{sub 2}S{sub 8}–Li{sub 2}S{sub 6}). Using an interlayer inserted between the sulfur cathode and the separator to capture and trap these soluble intermediates has been found effective in diminishing this effect. Previously, most reported interlayer membranes were synthesized in a complex and expensive process, and might not be suitable for practical cheap batteries. Herein, a facile method is reported to pyrolyze the commonly used cellulose filter paper into highly flexible and conductive carbon fiber paper. When used as an interlayer, such a carbon paper can improve the cell capacity by several folds through trapping the soluble polysulfides. The enhanced electronic conductivity of the cathode, due to the interlayer, also significantly improves the cell rate performance. In addition, it was demonstrated that such an interlayer can also effectively mitigate the self-discharge problem of the Li-S batteries. This study indicates that the cost-effective pyrolyzed cellulose paper has potential as interlayer for practical Li-S batteries.

  15. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  16. Experimental studies on the injurious effect of sulfur dioxide upon the rice cultivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshima, T; Takahashi, T

    1952-01-01

    From experimental studies on the injurious effect of sulfur dioxide upon the cultivation of rice it was ascertained that SO2 strongly affects the pollen and the ovary. The pollen and the matured grain showed a decrease in fertility when the plant is fumigated at the flowering and boot stage.

  17. Mineralogical controls on surface colonization by sulfur-metabolizing microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. A.; Bennett, P.

    2012-12-01

    When characterizing microbial diversity and the microbial ecosystem of the shallow subsurface the mineral matrix is generally assumed to be homogenous and unreactive. We report here experimental evidence that microorganisms colonize rock surfaces according to the rock's chemistry and the organism's metabolic requirements and tolerances. We investigated this phenomenon using laboratory biofilm reactors with both a pure culture of sulfur-oxidizing Thiothrix unzii and a mixed environmental sulfur-metabolizing community from Lower Kane, Cave, WY, USA. Reactors contained rock and mineral chips (calcite, albite, microcline, quartz, chert, Madison Limestone (ML), Madison Dolostone (MD), and basalt) amended with one of the two inoculants. Biomass of attached microorganisms on each mineral surface was quantified. The 16S rRNA of attached microbial communities were compared using Roche FLX and Titanium 454 next generation pyrosequencing. A primary controlling factor on taxonomy of attached microorganisms in both pure and mixed culture experiments was mineral buffering capacity. In mixed culture experiments acid-buffering carbonates were preferentially colonized by neutrophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms (~18% to ~27% of microorganisms), while acidophilic sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms colonized non-buffering quartz exclusively (~46% of microorganisms). The nutrient content of the rock was a controlling factor on biomass accumulation, with neutrophilic organisms selecting between carbonate surfaces of equivalent buffer capacities according to the availability of phosphate. Dry biomass on ML was 17.8 ± 2.3 mg/cm2 and MD was 20.6 ± 6.8 mg/cm2; while nutrient poor calcite accumulated 2.4 ± 0.3 mg/cm2. Biomass accumulation was minimal on non-buffering nutrient-limited surfaces. These factors are countered by the competitive exclusion of some populations. A pure culture of T. unzii preferentially colonizes carbonates while a very closely related Thiothrix spp is excluded

  18. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  19. Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Richardson; Katherine Dombrowski; Douglas Orr

    2006-12-31

    This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operation at the different host sites. Full-scale sorbent injection for mercury control was evaluated at three sites: Georgia Power's Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of the Southern Company] and Reliant Energy's Shawville Unit 3. Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 has an existing small-SCA cold-side ESP followed by a Chiyoda CT-121 wet scrubber. Yates Unit 2 is also equipped with a small-SCA ESP and a dual flue gas conditioning system. Unit 2 has no SO2 control system. Shawville Unit 3 is equipped with two small-SCA cold-side ESPs operated in series. All ESP systems tested in this program had SCAs less than 250 ft2/1000 acfm. Short-term parametric tests were conducted on Yates

  20. Co-Inoculation Effects of Thiobacillus thiooxidans Bacteria and Mycorrhiza (Glomus spp. on Maize Nutrition at Different Levels of Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholami

    2016-02-01

    was performed on all experimental data and means were compared using the least Significant Differences (LSD test with SAS software. The significance level was p>0.05 unless stated otherwise. Results and Discussion: Results showed sulfur application increased significantly the amount of S, P, N, Fe, Zn, shoot dry weight and leaf chlorophyll of maize. With increasing Sulfur, sulfur concentration in plant shoot increased with linear trend. The highest S concentration was obtained with 200 mg.kg-1 S and the lowest amount was obtained from control plots. Applications of 50, 100, 150 and 200 mg.kg-1 S increased P content about 0.45, 3.91, 4.74 and 5.56 %, respectively. The highest N contentwas obtained with 100 mg.kg-1 S. The thiobacillus significantly increased P, Fe, Zn anddecreased root colonization and soil pH compared to control. Thiobacillus bacteria increased shoot P only with application of 100 mg.kg-1 S. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased the amount of N, P, S, Fe, Zn, shoot dry weight and root colonization. Inoculation with G.intra and G.mosseae increased shoot P content about 4.18 and 3.34% in comparison with the control plots. Single or combination of sulfur and thiobacillus had a negative impact on the root colonization. Based on the results it seems that sulfur, thiobacillus and mycorrhiza in alkaline soils improved crops nutrition and growth. S application and thiobacillus interaction on S concentration of maize shoot were significant. In condition of 0 or 50 mg.kg-1 S application, inoculation of thiobacillus is recommended. Also, the effects of mycorrhiza on P shoot was significant with no application of S.

  1. Coordination Polymer Modified Separator for Mitigating Polysulfide Shuttle Effect in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Yi

    2017-11-19

    The development of the new cathode and anode materials of Lithium-Ion Batteries (LIBs) with high energy density and outstanding electrochemical performance is of substantial technological importance due to the ever-increasing demand for economic and efficient energy storage system. Because of the abundance of element sulfur and high theoretical energy density, Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) batteries have become one of the most promising candidates for the next-generation energy storage system. However, the shuttling effect of electrolyte-soluble polysulfides severely impedes the cell performance and commercialization of Li-S batteries, and significant progress have been made to mitigate this shuttle effect in the past two decades. Coordination polymers (CPs) or Metal-organic Frameworks (MOFs) have been attracted much attention by virtue of their controllable porosity, nanometer cavity sizes and high surface areas, which supposed to be an available material in suppressing polysulfide migration. In this thesis, we investigate different mechanisms of mitigating polysulfide diffusion by applying a layer of MOFs (including Y-FTZB, ZIF-7, ZIF-8, and HKUST-1) on a separator. We also fabricate a new free-standing 2D coordination polymer Zn2(Benzimidazolate)2(OH)2 with rich hydroxyl (OH-) groups by using a simple, scalable and low cost method at air/water surface. Our results suggest that the chemical stability, the cluster morphology and the surface function groups of MOFs shows a greater impact on minimizing the shuttling effect in Li-S batteries, other than the internal cavity size in MOFs. Meanwhile, the new design of 2D coordination polymer efficiently mitigate the shuttling effect in Li-S battery resulting in a largely promotion of the battery capacity to 1407 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and excellent cycling performance (capacity retention of 98% after 200 cycles at 0.25C). Such excellent cell performance is mainly owing to the fancying physical and chemical structure controllability

  2. Synergistic interaction and controllable active sites of nitrogen and sulfur co-doping into mesoporous carbon sphere for high performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Taeseob; Kim, Myeongjin; Park, Dabin; Kim, Jooheon

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped mesoporous carbon sphere (NSMCS) was prepared as a metal-free catalyst by an economical and facile pyrolysis process. The mesoporous carbon spheres were derived from sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as the carbon source and the nitrogen and sulfur dopants were derived from urea and p-benzenedithiol, respectively. The doping level and chemical states of nitrogen and sulfur in the prepared NSMCS can be easily adjusted by controlling the pyrolysis temperature. The NSMCS pyrolyzed at 900 °C (NSMCS-900) exhibited higher oxygen reduction reaction activity than the mesoporous carbon sphere doped solely with nitrogen or sulfur, due to the synergistic effect of co-doping. Among all the NSMCS samples, NSMCS-900 exhibited excellent ORR catalytic activity owing to the presence of a highly active site, consisting of pyridinic N, graphitic N, and thiophene S. Remarkably, the NSMCS-900 catalyst was comparable with commercial Pt/C, in terms of the onset and the half-wave potentials and showed better durability than Pt/C for ORR in an alkaline electrolyte. The approach demonstrated in this work could be used to prepare promising metal-free electrocatalysts for application in energy conversion and storage.

  3. The effect of sulfuric acid on pore initiation in anodic alumina formed in oxalic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Hafezi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a tracer study on pore initiation in anodic alumina in oxalic acid was performed. Effects of some experimental parameters such as applied electrical potential, electrolyte composition and heat pretreatment were evaluated. Electrochemical and morphological experiments were performed using potentiostatic anodizing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques, respectively. Effect of electrolyte composition on current density was discussed. In various electrical potentials, electrolyte composition had different effects on current density. Addition of sulfuric acid into oxalic acid increased porosity. Also, distribution of pore size and pore diameter were influenced by presence of sulfuric acid. Effect of electrolyte composition on the morphology of aluminum surface layer depended on the electric potential. Current density and porosity of aluminum surface layer was decreased by heat pretreatment.

  4. Effects of stress hormones on the production of volatile sulfur compounds by periodontopathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Morini Calil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the effects of stress hormones on the etiologic agents of halitosis. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effects of adrenaline (ADR, noradrenaline (NA and cortisol (CORT on bacteria that produce volatile sulfur compounds (VSC, the major gases responsible for bad breath. Cultures of Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn, Porphyromonas endodontalis (Pe, Prevotella intermedia (Pi and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg were exposed to 50 µM ADR, NA and CORT or equivalent volumes of sterile water as controls for 12 and 24 h. Growth was evaluated based on absorbance at 660 nm. Portable gas chromatography was used to measure VSC concentrations. Kruskal-Wallis and the Dunn post-hoc test were used to compare the groups. For Fn, ADR, NA and CORT significantly reduced bacterial growth after 12 h and 24 h (p 0.05. In the Pi cultures, ADR, NA and CORT increased H2S (p < 0.05. Catecholamines and cortisol can interfere with growth and H2S production of sub-gingival species in vitro. This process appears to be complex and supports the association between stress and the production of VSC.

  5. Development of alternative sulfur dioxide control strategies for a metropolitan area and its environs, utilizing a modified climatological dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. J. Skipka; D. B. Smith

    1977-01-01

    Alternative control strategies were developed for achieving compliance with ambient air quality standards in Portland, Maine, and its environs, using a modified climatological dispersion model (CDM) and manipulating the sulfur content of the fuel oil consumed in four concentric zones. Strategies were evaluated for their impact on ambient air quality, economics, and...

  6. Effect of Sulfur in Steel on Transient Evolution of Inclusions During Calcium Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhang, Ying; Duan, Haojian; Ren, Ying; Yang, Wen

    2018-04-01

    In the current study, the effect of S content in the molten steel on inclusions during calcium treatment was studied using an induction furnace. The calcium in steel decreased from 48 to 2 ppm, and the sulfur in steel changed a little with time. When sulfur content in steel was as low as 25 ppm during calcium treatment, inclusions shifted from CaO-Al2O3-CaS to Al2O3-CaO with about 35 pct CaO. When the sulfur increased over 90 ppm, more CaS-CaO formed just after the addition of calcium, and then the CaS content decreased from over 45 pct to lower than 15 pct and inclusions were mostly Al2O3-CaO-CaS and Al2O3-CaO with a high Al2O3 content. Thermodynamic calculation predicted the variation of the composition of inclusions, indicating good agreement with the measurement, while a certain deviation existed, especially for heats with 90 and 180 ppm sulfur. A reaction model was proposed for the formation of CaO and CaS, which considered the reaction between calcium vapor bubbles in the zone and the dissolved oxygen and sulfur in the molten steel, as described by a Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm with a reaction occurring on the remaining vacant sites. The variation of transient CaS inclusions was discussed based on the thermodynamic calculation and the morphology evolution of typical inclusions containing CaS.

  7. Identification of control parameters for the sulfur gas storability with bag sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air samples containing sulfur compounds are often collected and stored in sample bags prior to analyses. The storage stability of six gaseous sulfur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, DMS, CS2, DMDS and SO2) was compared between two different bag materials (polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and polyester aluminum (PEA))...

  8. Chemical Immobilization Effect on Lithium Polysulfides for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caixia; Xi, Zhucong; Guo, Dexiang; Chen, Xiangju; Yin, Longwei

    2018-01-01

    Despite great progress in lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs), great obstacles still exist to achieve high loading content of sulfur and avoid the loss of active materials due to the dissolution of the intermediate polysulfide products in the electrolyte. Relationships between the intrinsic properties of nanostructured hosts and electrochemical performance of LSBs, especially, the chemical interaction effects on immobilizing polysulfides for LSB cathodes, are discussed in this Review. Moreover, the principle of rational microstructure design for LSB cathode materials with strong chemical interaction adsorbent effects on polysulfides, such as metallic compounds, metal particles, organic polymers, and heteroatom-doped carbon, is mainly described. According to the chemical immobilizing mechanism of polysulfide on LSB cathodes, three kinds of chemical immobilizing effects, including the strong chemical affinity between polar host and polar polysulfides, the chemical bonding effect between sulfur and the special function groups/atoms, and the catalytic effect on electrochemical reaction kinetics, are thoroughly reviewed. To improve the electrochemical performance and long cycling life-cycle stability of LSBs, possible solutions and strategies with respect to the rational design of the microstructure of LSB cathodes are comprehensively analyzed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of Anion Mobility on Electrochemical Behaviors of Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kee Sung; Chen, Junzheng; Cao, Ruiguo; Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Murugesan, Vijayakumar; Shi, Lili; Pan, Huilin; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Persson, Kristin A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2017-10-27

    The electrolyte is a crucial component of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, as it controls polysulfide dissolution, charge shuttling processes, and solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation. Experimentally, the overall performance of Li-S batteries varies with choice of solvent system and Li-salt used in the electrolyte, and a lack of predictive understanding about the effects of individual electrolyte components inhibits the rational design of electrolytes for Li-S batteries. Here we analyze the role of the counter anions of common Li salts (such as TfO-, FSI-, TFSI-, and TDI-) when dissolved in DOL/DME (1:1 vol.) for use in Li-S batteries. The evolution of ion-ion and ion-solvent interactions due to vari-ous anions was analyzed using 17O NMR and pulsed-field gradient (PFG) NMR and then correlated with electrochemi-cal performance in Li-S cells. These data reveal that the for-mation of the passivation layer on the anode and the loss of active materials from the cathode (evidenced by polysulfide dissolution) are related to anion mobility and affinity with lithium polysulfide, respectively. For future electrolyte de-sign, anions with lower mobility and weaker interactions with lithium polysulfides may be superior candidates for increasing the long-term stability of Li-S batteries.

  10. Effect of Water Stress and Sulfur Fertilizer on Grain Yield, Chlorophyll and Nutrient Status of Black Cumin (Nigella Sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of water stress and different amounts of sulfur fertilizer on grain yield, nutrient status and chlorophyll content in black cumin (Nigella sativa L. a field experiment as split plot design with three replications was conducted at Ghaen city in 2009. Treatments included three levels of irrigation after 50, 100 and 150 mm evaporation from Class A pan as main plot and four levels of sulfur fertilizer including 0, 75, 150 and 225 kg/ha from bentonite-sulfur source as sub-plot. Statistical analysis of the results showed that water stress has significant effect on grain yield and essential oil of black cumin. At the level of 150 mm evaporation from Class A pan, the grain yield decreased by 22.8% and essential oil by 27.6%. Application of 225 kg/ha sulfur fertilizer increased grain yield up to 7.2%. Water stress and sulfur fertilizer treatments had only significant effect on chlorophyll a content. However, water stress decreased chlorophyll a content, but sulfur fertilizer application up to 225 kg/ha increased the content of chlorophyll a. In this study, water stress decreased potassium content in black cumin leaves, but increased the sodium and calcium accumulation. Although application of sulfur fertilizer affected significantly the potassium and magnesium contents in shoots, but did not have significant effect on sodium and calcium contents.

  11. Electrochemical evaluation of sulfur poisoning in a methane-fuelled solid oxide fuel cell: Effect of current density and sulfur concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Anke; Johnson, Gregory B.; Hjalmarsson, Per

    2014-01-01

    , the effect of sulfur was less pronounced on mass transfer/fuel reforming processes but quite significant on the charge transfer/TPB processes. Overall, sulfur related performance loss was more severe at the highest current density (1 A cm−2), due to the deactivation of catalytic fuel reforming reactions......A Ni/ScYSZ based SOFC was tested at 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0 (OCV) A cm−2 in methane fuel containing 0–100 ppm H2S. Analysis of cell voltage loss during short-term H2S poisoning showed that SOFC performance loss was generally larger at higher current loads. Separating the effect of H2S on catalytic...... reforming and electrochemical activity by evaluating the relevant area specific resistances and charge transfer processes based on impedance spectroscopy revealed that the poisoning of electrochemical activity was not dependent on current density. Two major anode processes were significantly affected...

  12. Effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid on host-parasite interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. S. Shriner

    1976-01-01

    Wind-blown rain, rain splash, and films of free moisture play important roles in the epidemiology of many plant diseases. The effects of simulated rain acidified with sulfuric acid were studied on several host-parasite systems. Plants were exposed, in greenhouse or field, to simulated rain of pH 3.2 ? 0.1 or pH 6.0 ? 0.2. Simulated "rain" of pH 3.2 resulted...

  13. Evaluation of sulfur dioxide-generating pads and modified atmosphere packaging for control of postharvest diseases in blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postharvest diseases are a limiting factor of storage and shelf life of blueberries. Gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important postharvest diseases in blueberries grown in California. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sulfur dioxide (SO2)-generating pads (designated ...

  14. Effectiveness of purified sulfur intake per os to reduce a reaction in radiotherapy of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, O.V.; Saliev, V.P.; Klemparskaya, N.N.; Dobronravova, N.N.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical basis of this work is the development of autosensitization in exposure to ionizing radiation and well-known desensitizing action of sulfuric agents. To reduce clinical manifestations of a side reaction to combined radiotherapy 34 women with diagnosis of cervical cancer were given 0.5-1 g of purified sulfur mixed with 0.25 g of glucose in the morning every 2-3 hours before irradiation, per os; 24 patients received placebo, in 21 patients no protective means were used. All 79 patients were given unified adjuvant therapy and diet No.15. A significant decrease in the reaction to therapeutic irradiation was noted in the study group. No side effects were observed

  15. Impact of sulfur on density of Tetranychus pacificus (Acari: Tetranychidae) and Galendromus occidentalis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) in a central California vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur is the oldest and most widely used fungicide in the vineyards of California, where it is used for control of powdery mildew (Uncinula necator [Schw.] Burr). For decades, sulfur use has been associated with outbreaks of Tetranychus pacificus McGregor (Acari: Tetranychidae) on cultivated grapes in the San Joaquin Valley. I undertook large-scale field studies to test this association, to evaluate the impact of sulfur on Galendromus occidentalis (Nesbit) (Acari: Phytoseiidae), a major predator of T. pacificus, and to determine if timing of sulfur applications with respect to grape bloom has an impact on T. pacificus density. The studies took place in a 32 ha vineyard in Fresno County, and all fungicide applications were made with commercial-scale equipment. In 1998 a 'high sulfur' treatment, a combination of wettable sulfur and sulfur dust, was compared to 'low sulfur,' in which demethylation inhibitor (DMI) fungicides partially substituted for sulfur. In 1999 treatments were 'sulfur,' 'DMI,' 'sulfur pre-bloom' (here sulfur was applied prior to grape bloom, in late May, and then DMIs were applied until mid-season) and 'sulfur post-bloom' (the reverse of 'sulfur pre-bloom'). In each year, the T. pacificus population increase came after the end of fungicide applications, and results clearly show a relationship between sulfur use and T. pacificus density. In 1998, mean T. pacificus density was 2.7 times higher and mean G. occidentalis density 2.5 times higher in 'high sulfur' compared to 'low sulfur.' In 1999, the highest T. pacificus counts were in the 'sulfur' and 'sulfur pre-bloom' treatments, 4.8 times higher than 'sulfur post-bloom' and 2 times higher than 'DMIs.' Density of G. occidentalis was 2.3 times as high in 'sulfur' or 'sulfur pre-bloom' than 'DMIs.' The predator/prey ratio was not significantly different among treatments in 1998, but in 1999 it was highest in the 'sulfur pre-bloom' treatment. In 1999, density of Homeopronematus anconai (Baker) (Acari

  16. Effects of sulfur and aromatic contents in gasoline on motorcycle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yung-Chen; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, An-Lin; Jeng, Fu-Tien

    By investigating the effect of sulfur and aromatic contents in gasoline on the criteria pollutant emissions [CO, total hydrocarbons (THCs), and NO x] and on air toxics in the exhaust from a non-catalyst four-stroke motorcycle engine, inferences can be made concerning the effect of fuel composition on motorcycle emissions. The fuels were blended with different contents of sulfur (40 and 150 ppmw) and aromatics (20 and 30 vol%). The data indicate that the sulfur content does not correlate with the emissions of the criteria pollutants from the catalyst free engine. Instead, lowering aromatic content in gasoline reduced the THC emission by over 30%, especially in the cruising test. The NO x emission, however, showed an inverse correlation with the aromatic content in gasoline. While a reduction of aromatic content in gasoline may decrease emissions of benzene and toluene, it will increase the emission of aldehyde. Since the percentage changes of emission factor of THC and air toxics in the motorcycle were larger than those in passenger cars, the benefit of emission reduction due to fuel composition changes in motorcycles may have significant impacts in health risk analysis.

  17. Effect of Water Stress and Sulfur Fertilizer on Grain Yield, Chlorophyll and Nutrient Status of Black Cumin (Nigella Sativa L.)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Heidari; A. R. Rezapor

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the effects of water stress and different amounts of sulfur fertilizer on grain yield, nutrient status and chlorophyll content in black cumin (Nigella sativa L.) a field experiment as split plot design with three replications was conducted at Ghaen city in 2009. Treatments included three levels of irrigation after 50, 100 and 150 mm evaporation from Class A pan as main plot and four levels of sulfur fertilizer including 0, 75, 150 and 225 kg/ha from bentonite-sulfur source a...

  18. Evaluation of the Effect of Sulfur Application and Thiobacillus on Some Soil Chemical Characteristics and Yield of Canola in Wheat-Canola Rotation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Besharati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: After soybean and palm oil, canola is third important oil seed in the world which belongs to the genus Brassicaceae, that its seeds contain about 40% oil. The per capita consumption of oil in Iran is about 14 kg, so approximately 900 thousand tons of oil will be required for each year. However, only less than 10% of this oil is produced in the country. In recent years, special attention has been paid to canola cultivation in order to increase oil production, so during recent years an apparent increase in canola cultivated lands is significant. In most of these canola cultivated lands, the soil is calcareous therefore; some available nutrients such as phosphorus, iron and zinc are less than the amounts required by plants. Increasing qualitative and quantitative yield of canola in calcareous soils is a priority to canola cultivation improvement. Sulfur plays an important role in oil content of oily seed crops. On the other hands sulfur oxidation in calcareous soils can improve some nutrients availability. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of sulfur on yield, oil content and nutrients uptake and also its impact on soil chemical properties with 8 treatments, in 3 replications. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in Ekbatan research station in Hamedan province for 2 years as completely randomized block design with 8 treatments and 3 repetitions. The treatments were: T1: Control (Without sulfur and Thiobacillus, T2: Application of 150 kg sulfur per ha, T3: T2+ Thiobacillus inoculums (2% of applied sulfur, T4: Application of 300 kg sulfur per ha, T5: T4+ Thiobacillus inoculums (2% of applied sulfur, T6: Application of 600 kg sulfur per ha, T7: T6+ Thiobacillus inoculums (2% of applied sulfur T8: Fertilizing based on soil test without sulfur and Thiobacillus. Thiobacillus inoculant containing about 107 cells of Thiobacillus bacteria which belonged to neutrophile Thiobacilli were prepared at soil biology

  19. Effect of antimony oxide on magnesium vanadates for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, K.T.; Chi, Z.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Tunghai University, ROC Taichung (Taiwan)

    2001-05-17

    The effect of antimony oxide addition to MgV{sub 2}O{sub 6} and Mg{sub 3}V{sub 2}O{sub 8} was studied in the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur. Significant improvements in sulfur selectivity and yield were observed for the uncalcined mechanical mixtures of magnesium vanadates with {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Calcination of the mechanical mixtures resulted in the much stronger synergy in catalytic activity and sulfur selectivity. For the uncalcined samples, XRD, TPR and XPS studies indicated that antimony reduction behaviors in the mechanical mixtures differed very much from those in {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} alone, suggested that their selectivity improvements might be due to the interactions (probably oxygen transfer) between {alpha}-Sb{sub 2}O{sub 4} and magnesium vanadates. For the calcined samples, XRD results indicated that their better catalytic performances in H{sub 2}S oxidation were primarily attributed to the formation of VSbO{sub 4} compound from antimony oxide and magnesium vanadates.

  20. Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Larry L.

    2008-06-09

    This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt

  1. Amelioration of Adverse Effects of Salt Stress on Maize (Zea Mays L.) Cultivars by Exogenous Application of Sulfur at Seedling Stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riffat, A.; Ahmad, M. S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur is an important plant nutrient involved in seed germination and seedling establishment. It also plays an important role in response of plants to tolerate abiotic stresses such as salinity. A study was conducted to assess the role of sulfur on salinity tolerance of maize (Zea mays L.) at seed germination stage. Six varieties (Sadaf, MMRI, Pearl Basic, Agaitti 2003, Saiwal 2002 and Pak Afgoi 2003) and two hybrids (Yusafwala Hybrid and Hybrid 1898) of maize were used to assess the modulation of salt stress by exogenously applied sulfur. Three NaCl (25, 50 and 75 mM) and five potassium sulfate (20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mM) levels were applied to plants as sand amendment at sowing time along with a control. The experiment was laid down in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replicates. The data for various germination attributes were recorded. The results revealed that sulfur application significantly modulated all germination parameters i-e. germination percentage germination index, coefficient of velocity of emergence, mean emergence time, vigour index, germination energy, germination speed, mean daily germination and germination value and thus reduced the toxic effect of salinity. It was found that sulfur at 60 and 80 mM had more pronounced effect in enhancing seed germination. Application of sulfur at 60 to 80 mM improved all germination parameters and reduced time needed for 50 percent seed to germinate. The phylogenetic tree constructed by NTSysPC clearly clustered all genotypes the two distinct clusters. The tolerant cluster mainly contained 4 varieties (Sadaf, MMRI, Pearl Basic and Agati 2003) while the sensitive cluster included two varieties (Sahiwal 2002, Pak Afgoi 2003) and two hybrids (Hybrid 1898 and Yusaf wala hybrid). Based on the distance matrixes generated by software, Agati 2003 proved to be the most tolerant genotype. In comparison, a maize variety (Pak Afgoi-2003) and a Hybrid-1898 showed the least improvement by exogenously applied

  2. Some information needs for air quality modeling. [Environmental effects of sulfur compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, F B

    1975-09-01

    The following topics were considered at the workshop: perturbation of the natural sulfur cycle by human activity; ecosystem responses to a given environmental dose of sulfur compounds; movement of sulfur compounds within the atmosphere; air quality models; contribution of biogenic sulfur compounds to atmospheric burden of sulfur; production of acid rain from sulfur dioxide; meteorological processes; and rates of oxidation of SO/sub 2/ via direct photo-oxidation, oxidation resulting from photo-induced free radical chemistry, and catalytic oxidation in cloud droplets and on dry particles. (HLW)

  3. Effects of sulfur in flooded paddy soils: Implications for iron chemistry and arsenic mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2013-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (amplified by erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Iron and sulfur both interact strongly with arsenic in paddy soils: iron oxides are strong adsorbents for arsenic in oxic conditions, and sulfur (in the form of sulfide) is a strong adsorbent under anoxic conditions. In the process of reductive dissolution of iron oxides, arsenic, which had been adsorbed to the iron oxides, is released. Therefore, higher levels of reduced iron (ferrous iron) will likely correlate with higher levels of mobilized arsenic. However, the mobilized arsenic may then co-precipitate with or adsorb to iron sulfides, which form under sulfate-reducing conditions and with the aid of certain microbes already present in the soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how these processes correlate and which has the greatest influence on arsenic mobilization and potential plant availability. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of sulfur (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, and gypsum) on the iron and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. The two types of rice straw were designed to introduce the same amount of organic sulfur (7.7 μg/g of soil), but different levels of available carbon, since carbon stimulates microbial activity in the soil. In comparison, two different levels of gypsum (calcium sulfate) were used, 7.7 and 34.65 μg/g of soil, to test the effect of directly available inorganic sulfate without carbon addition. The soil was flooded with a buffer solution at pH 7.07 in airtight serum vials and kept as a slurry on a shaker at 25 °C. We measured pH, alkalinity, ferrous iron, ferric iron, sulfide, sulfate, total iron, sulfur, and arsenic in the

  4. Effect of nitrate on sulfur transformations in sulfidogenic sludge of a marine aquaculture biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwermer, Carsten Ulrich; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Stief, Peter

    2010-01-01

    to 35mmol L-1 day-1), indicating that the main source of sulfide in the sludge was not SO42- reduction, but desulfuration during the decomposition of organic matter. Although NO3- inhibited SO42- reduction, but not desulfuration, the primary NO3- mitigation effect was the onset of NO3--mediated sulfide...... oxidation (up to 75 mmolL-1 day-1), partially to elemental sulfur (S0). Above NO3- concentrations of 0.6mM in the bulk water, the net sulfide production and oxidation zones were moved deeper into flocs and sludge cores, which effectively prevented sulfide from entering the water column. However, the sulfide...

  5. EFFECTS OF ALKALINE SANDY LOAM ON SULFURIC SOIL ACIDITY AND SULFIDIC SOIL OXIDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Michael

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available  In poor soils, addition of alkaline sandy loam containing an adequate proportion of sand, silt and clay would add value by improving the texture, structure and organic matter (OM for general use of the soils. In acid sulfate soils (ASS, addition of alkaline sandy would improve the texture and leach out salts as well as add a sufficient proportion of OM for vegetation establishment. In this study, addition of alkaline sandy loam into sulfuric soil effectively increased the pH, lowered the redox and reduced the sulfate content, the magnitude of the effects dependent on moisture content. Addition of alkaline sandy loam in combination with OM was highly effective than the effects of the lone alkaline sandy loam. When alkaline sandy was added alone or in combination with OM into sulfidic soil, the effects on pH and the redox were similar as in the sulfuric soil but the effect on sulfate content was variable. The effects under aerobic conditions were higher than under anaerobic conditions. The findings of this study have important implications for the general management of ASS where lime availability is a concern and its application is limited.International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-3, June-August 2015Page: 42-54

  6. Control and treatment of sulfur oxides emissions; Prevention et traitement des emissions d`oxydes de soufre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The conference on the control and treatment of sulfur oxides emissions has held in Le Havre the 4. and 5. december, 1997. The aim of this conference was to promote the information on the different treatment technologies and to contribute on the one hand to the supporting and revival of the environmental protection and on the other hand to the desulfurization programs. It has allowed to recall too the technical and financial support of the Ademe to the manufacturers. (O.M.)

  7. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide. A tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia; Gauss, Jürgen; Codella, Claudio; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Cernicharo, José; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2017-09-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challenging due to the high sensitivity and high spectral resolution required. So far, the Zeeman effect has been detected unambiguously in star forming regions for very few non-masing species, such as OH and CN. Aims: We decided to investigate the suitability of sulfur monoxide (SO), which is one of the most abundant species in star forming regions, for probing the intensity of magnetic fields via the Zeeman effect. Methods: We investigated the Zeeman effect for several rotational transitions of SO in the (sub-)mm spectral regions by using a frequency-modulated, computer-controlled spectrometer, and by applying a magnetic field parallel to the radiation propagation (I.e., perpendicular to the oscillating magnetic field of the radiation). To support the experimental determination of the g factors of SO, a systematic quantum-chemical investigation of these parameters for both SO and O2 has been carried out. Results: An effective experimental-computational strategy for providing accurate g factors as well as for identifying the rotational transitions showing the strongest Zeeman effect has been presented. Revised g factors have been obtained from a large number of SO rotational transitions between 86 and 389 GHz. In particular, the rotational transitions showing the largest Zeeman shifts are: N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 1 (86.1 GHz), N,J = 4, 3 ← 3, 2 (159.0 GHz), N,J = 1, 1 ← 0, 1 (286.3 GHz), N,J = 2, 2 ← 1, 2 (309.5 GHz), and N,J = 2, 1 ← 1, 0 (329.4 GHz). Our investigation supports SO as a good candidate for probing magnetic fields in high-density star forming regions. The complete list of measured Zeeman components is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  8. Effect of gamma irradiation and sulfur dioxide treatment on storability of some grape varieties (Vitis Vinifera L.) in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Bachir, M.

    1997-12-01

    The feasibility of using gamma irradiation and sulfur dioxide to control post-harvest diseases and to extend shelf life of table grapes in cold storage (1-2 C deg) was studied using two local varieties of grapes (Baladi and Helwani). The experiment was conducted for two years (1995 and 1996). In the first year, the clusters of both varieties were subjected to one of the following treatments: Irradiation with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy of gamma rays, sulfur dioxide (3 g Na 2 S 2 O 5 / 5 Kg clusters) or combination of both 1.0 KGy of gamma irradiation and sulfur dioxide. In the second year, two additional doses were applied: 0.1 and 0.25 KGy for Helwani and 2.0 and 2.5 KGy for Baladi. Clusters of both var. were treated with combined treatments (1.5 KGy and sulfur dioxide for Baladi) and (0.5 KGy and sulfur dioxide for Helwani). Treated and untreated clusters were kept in cold storage (temperature, 1 to 2 C deg). Weight loss, spoilage and total loss were evaluated every two and four weeks of storage for Baladi and Helwani, respectively. With the exception of Helwani var. produced in the first year and treated with sulfur dioxide, the results indicated that separate application of sulfur dioxide and gamma radiation reduced the rotting induced by (B. cinerea) and improved the storability of both varieties. Gamma irradiation in combination with sulfur dioxide preserved the two varieties of table grapes. (author)

  9. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  10. Effects of mineral matters on evolution of sulfur-containing gases in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Li, B.; Zhang, B. [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Conversion

    1998-07-01

    The evolution of sulfur-containing gases were investigated using two Chinese coals with their de-ash and de-pyrite forms in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis. Mineral matter can not only return H{sub 2}S produced in pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis, but also catalyse hydrodesulfurization and reduce COS formation. Secondary reactions markedly influence COS formation. Mineral matter can reduce CH{sub 3}SH formation, and pyrite shows positive effects on CH{sub 3}SH formation. 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Effect of Nickel Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Electrochemical Performance of Lithium-Sulfur Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao; Yao, Shanshan; Hou, Jinli; Jing, Maoxiang; Qian, Xinye; Shen, Xiangqian; Xiang, Jun; Xi, Xiaoming

    2017-04-01

    Conventional lithium-sulfur batteries suffer from severe capacity fade, which is induced by low electron conductivity and high dissolution of intermediated polysulfides. Recent studies have shown the metal (Pt, Au, Ni) as electrocatalyst of lithium polysulfides and improved the performance for lithium sulfur batteries. In this work, we present the nickel coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Ni-MWNTs) as additive materials for elemental sulfur positive electrodes for lithium-sulfur rechargeable batteries. Compared with MWNTs, the obtained Ni-MWNTs/sulfur composite cathode demonstrate a reversible specific capacity approaching 545 mAh after 200 cycles at a rate of 0.5C as well as improved cycling stability and excellent rate capacity. The improved electrochemical performance can be attributed to the fact the MWNTs shows a vital role on polysulfides adsorption and nickel has a catalytic effect on the redox reactions during charge–discharge process. Meanwhile, the Ni-MWNTs is a good electric conductor for sulfur cathode.

  12. Effect of Dietary Processed Sulfur Supplementation on Texture Quality, Color and Mineral Status of Dry-cured Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Han; Ju, Min-Gu; Yeon, Su-Jung; Hong, Go-Eun; Park, WooJoon; Lee, Chi-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the chemical composition, mineral status, oxidative stability, and texture attributes of dry-cured ham from pigs fed processed sulfur (S, 1 g/kg feed), and from those fed a basal diet (CON), during the period from weaning to slaughter (174 d). Total collagen content and soluble collagen of the S group was significantly higher than that of the control group (pham (pham from the control group, that from the S group exhibited lower springiness and gumminess; these results suggest that feeding processed sulfur to pigs can improve the quality of the texture and enhance the oxidative stability of dry-cured ham.

  13. Experimental evaluation of sorbents for sulfur control in a coal-fueled gas turbine slagging combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, L.H.; Wen, C.S.; LeCren, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a slagging combustor that has been used to evaluate three calcium-based sorbents for sulfur capture efficiency in order to assess their applicability for use in a oil-fueled gas turbine. Testing is competed in a bench-scale combustor with one-tenth the heat input needed for the full-scale gas turbine. The bench-scale rig is a two-stage combustor featuring a fuel-rich primary zone an a fuel-lean secondary zone. The combustor is operated at 6.5 bars with inlet air preheated to 600 K. Gas temperatures of 1840 K are generated in the primary zone and 1280 K in the secondary zone. Sorbents are either fed into the secondary zone or mixed with the coal-water mixture and fed into the primary zone. Dry powered sorbents are fed into the secondary zone by an auger into one of six secondary air inlet ports. The three sorbents tested in the secondary zone include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and hydrated lime. Sorbents have been tested while burning coal-water mixtures with coal sulfur loadings of 0.56 to 3.13 weight percent sulfur. Sorbents are injected into the secondary zone at varying flow rates such that the calcium/sulfur ratio varies from 0.5 to 10.0

  14. The effect of the sulfur concentration on the phase transformation from the mixed CuO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} system to Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} during the sulfurization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lijian; Jin, Xin; Yuan, Chenchen; Jiang, Guoshun; Liu, Weifeng, E-mail: liuwf@ustc.edu.cn; Zhu, Changfei, E-mail: cfzhu@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} thin films were creatively fabricated by sulfurizing metal oxide precursor. • The phase transformation mechanism during the sulfurization process was studied. • The reason why the excess S restrained the formation of Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} was discussed. • The effect of temperature on film morphology and bandgap was studied. - Abstract: The ternary semiconductor Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}, as a promising light-absorber material for thin film solar cells, was creatively synthesized by sulfurizing the mixed metal oxides precursor film deposited by spin-coating chemical solution method. Two kinds of sulfurization techniques were introduced to study the effect of the sulfur concentration on the phase formation for the pure Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}. It was found that Cu-poor S-rich phases such as Cu{sub 3}Bi{sub 3}S{sub 7} and Cu{sub 4}Bi{sub 4}S{sub 9} were easily generated at high S concentration and then can transform to Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} phase by a simple desulphurization process, which means the sulfur concentration had a significant influence on the formation of Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} during the sulfurization process. The probable transformation mechanism from the mixed metal oxides to the pure Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} phase during the sulfurization process was studied in detail through the XRD analysis and thermodynamic calculation. In addition, the electrical properties were characterized by Hall measurement and the effects of sulfurization temperature on the phase transformation, morphology and optical band gap of the absorber layer were also studied in detail.

  15. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology to Control Nitrogen Oxide Emissions From High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers: A DOE Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Energy Technology Center

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round 2. The project is described in the report ''Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) Technology for the Control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO(sub x)) Emissions from High-Sulfur, Coal-Fired Boilers'' (Southern Company Services 1990). In June 1990, Southern Company Services (Southern) entered into a cooperative agreement to conduct the study. Southern was a cofunder and served as the host at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist. Other participants and cofunders were EPRI (formerly the Electric Power Research Institute) and Ontario Hydro. DOE provided 40 percent of the total project cost of$23 million. The long-term operation phase of the demonstration was started in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. This independent evaluation is based primarily on information from Southern's Final Report (Southern Company Services 1996). The SCR process consists of injecting ammonia (NH(sub 3)) into boiler flue gas and passing the 3 flue gas through a catalyst bed where the NO(sub x) and NH(sub 3) react to form nitrogen and water vapor. The objectives of the demonstration project were to investigate: Performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and manufacturing methods at typical U.S. high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions; Catalyst resistance to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals but not present, or present at much lower concentrations, in fuels from other countries; and Effects on the balance-of-plant equipment

  16. Significance of the Capacity Recovery Effect in Pouch Lithium-Sulfur Battery Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knap, Vaclav; Zhang, Teng; Stroe, Daniel Loan

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) batteries are an emerging energy storage technology, which is technically-attractive due to its high theoretical limits; practically, it is expected that Li-S batteries will result into lighter energy storage devices with higher capacities than traditional Lithium-ion...... batteries. One of the actual disadvantages for this technology is the highly pronounced rate capacity effect, which reduces the available capacity to be discharged when high currents are used. This drawback might be addressed by the use of the capacity recovery effect, which by introducing relaxation...... periods between consecutive pulse discharges of the battery, increases the available discharge capacity of the cell. The capacity recovery effect of the Li-S cell is studied in this paper using the pulse discharge technique, considering its dependence on the applied current, discharge step length...

  17. Effects of sulfur nutrition on phytotoxicity and growth responses of bean plants to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adedipe, N O; Hofstra, G; Ormrod, D P

    1972-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Blue Lake plants were grown in sand culture at three temperatures, and fed with nutrient solution containing 1.3 or 32 mg/liter sulfur (S). Plants were fumigated twice with ozone at 50 parts per hundred million (pphm) for 2 h. Intensity of phytotoxicity was markedly lower in plants grown at the high S rate. Ozone reduced chlorophyll content of plants grown in low S at 25/20 and 30/25/sup 0/. With the high S treatment, however, ozone had no significant effect on chlorophyll content particularly at the lower temperatures. Irrespective of S nutrition, ozone had no effect on total soluble carbohydrate content. Ozone effects on plant growth depended on plant part, growth temperature, and S nutrition.

  18. Ecological effects of nitrogen and sulfur air pollution in the US: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaver, Tara L.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Barber, Mary C.; Baron, Jill S.; Cosby, Bernard J.; Deerhake, Marion E.; Dennis, Robin L.; Dubois, Jean-Jacque B.; Goodale, Christine L.; Herlihy, Alan T.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Liu, Lingli; Lynch, Jason A.; Novak, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Four decades after the passage of the US Clean Air Act, air-quality standards are set to protect ecosystems from damage caused by gas-phase nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) compounds, but not from the deposition of these air pollutants to land and water. Here, we synthesize recent scientific literature on the ecological effects of N and S air pollution in the US. Deposition of N and S is the main driver of ecosystem acidification and contributes to nutrient enrichment in many natural systems. Although surface-water acidification has decreased in the US since 1990, it remains a problem in many regions. Perturbations to ecosystems caused by the nutrient effects of N deposition continue to emerge, although gas-phase concentrations are generally not high enough to cause phytotoxicity. In all, there is overwhelming evidence of a broad range of damaging effects to ecosystems in the US under current air quality conditions.

  19. Effects of Electrospun Carbon Nanofibers’ Interlayers on High-Performance Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianji Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two different interlayers were introduced in lithium–sulfur batteries to improve the cycling stability with sulfur loading as high as 80% of total mass of cathode. Melamine was recommended as a nitrogen-rich (N-rich amine component to synthesize a modified polyacrylic acid (MPAA. The electrospun MPAA was carbonized into N-rich carbon nanofibers, which were used as cathode interlayers, while carbon nanofibers from PAA without melamine was used as an anode interlayer. At the rate of 0.1 C, the initial discharge capacity with two interlayers was 983 mAh g−1, and faded down to 651 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles with the coulombic efficiency of 95.4%. At the rate of 1 C, the discharge capacity was kept to 380 mAh g−1 after 600 cycles with a coulombic efficiency of 98.8%. It apparently demonstrated that the cathode interlayer is extremely effective at shutting down the migration of polysulfide ions. The anode interlayer induced the lithium ions to form uniform lithium metal deposits confined on the fiber surface and in the bulk to strengthen the cycling stability of the lithium metal anode.

  20. Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors: Impact of sulfur passivation on gate stack quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Dian; Wang, Wei; Gong, Xiao, E-mail: elegong@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: elegong@nus.edu.sg, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng [Institute of Material Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Tok, Eng-Soon [Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117551 (Singapore)

    2016-01-14

    The effect of room temperature sulfur passivation of the surface of Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} prior to high-k dielectric (HfO{sub 2}) deposition is investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to examine the chemical bonding at the interface of HfO{sub 2} and Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}. Sulfur passivation is found to be effective in suppressing the formation of both Ge oxides and Sn oxides. A comparison of XPS results for sulfur-passivated and non-passivated Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} samples shows that sulfur passivation of the GeSn surface could also suppress the surface segregation of Sn atoms. In addition, sulfur passivation reduces the interface trap density D{sub it} at the high-k dielectric/Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} interface from the valence band edge to the midgap of Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17}, as compared with a non-passivated control. The impact of the improved D{sub it} is demonstrated in Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (p-MOSFETs). Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} p-MOSFETs with sulfur passivation show improved subthreshold swing S, intrinsic transconductance G{sub m,int}, and effective hole mobility μ{sub eff} as compared with the non-passivated control. At a high inversion carrier density N{sub inv} of 1 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2}, sulfur passivation increases μ{sub eff} by 25% in Ge{sub 0.83}Sn{sub 0.17} p-MOSFETs.

  1. Combined effect of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide gases on mold fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochurova, A.I.; Karpova, T.N.

    1974-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide at 0.08% killed Penicillium expansum, Stemphylium macrosporium, and Botrytis cinerea within 24 hours. At 0.2%, it killed P. citrinum, Alternaria tenuis, and Fusarium moniliforme. Sulfur dioxide (at 0.04%) and Sulfur dioxide-carbon dioxide mixtures (at 0.02 and 5% respectively) completely suppressed the growth of P. citrinum, P. expansum, P. rubrum, A. tenuis, S. macrosporium, B. cinerea, and F. moniliforme in laboratory experiments. 1 table.

  2. A three-dimensional cathode matrix with bi-confinement effect of polysulfide for lithium-sulfur battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ren-Sheng; Wang, Bo; Ruan, Ting-Ting; Wang, Lei; Luo, Hao; Wang, Fei; Gao, Tian-Tian; Wang, Dian-Long

    2018-01-01

    Soluble polysulfide shuttling is still the main cause of restricting the development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. Here, we propose a novel three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide@sulfur/nitrogen-doped porous carbon polyhedron/carbon nanotubes (rGO@S/NCP/CNTs) composite with bi-confinement effect of polysulfide as an effective cathode material. In rGO@S/NCP/CNTs, NCP provides physical confinement for sulfur and soluble polysulfide by its abundant micropores and mesopores, while oxygen functional groups of rGO provide strong chemical confinement to soluble polysulfide. Additionally, CNTs with one-dimensional conductivity enable facile transport of electrons. Therefore, the resulting rGO@S/NCP/CNTs composite shows an obvious enhancement in cycling performance for Li-S battery, and reversible capacities up to 738 mAh g-1 and 660 mAh g-1 over 100 and 200 cycles are remained at 0.2 C rate.

  3. An effective 2-band eg model of sulfur hydride H3S for high-Tc superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Kazutaka; Teranishi, Shingo; Miyao, Satoaki; Matsushita, Goh; Kusakabe, Koichi

    To understand high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity in sulfur hydride H3S, we propose an effective 2-band model having the eg symmetry as the minimal model for H3S. Two eg orbitals centered on a sulfur S atom are chosen for the smallest representation of relevant bands with the van-Hove singularity around the Fermi levels except for the Γ-centered small hole pockets by the sulfur 3 p orbitals. By using the maximally localized Wannier functions, we derive the minimal effective model preserving the body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal symmetry of the H3S phase having the highest Tc ( 203 K under pressures) among the other polymorphs of H3S.

  4. Ozone and/or sulfur dioxide effects on tissue permeability of petunia leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkiey, T.; Ormrod, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements were made of potassium (K ) and total electrolyte leakage from leaf discs of 42-day old petunia plants exposed to 40 pphm ozone (O3) and/or 80 pphm sulfur dioxide (SO2). In an O3-sensitive cultivar White Cascade, K leakage was not affected by O3 or O3 and SO2 after 4 h exposure, but greatly increased by 4 h day exposure for 4 days to O3, SO2, or O3 and SO2. There was an indication of decreased K leakage from plants exposed for 4 h to SO2. Total electrolyte leakage was greater from leaf discs of White Cascade and White Magic, an intermediate sensitivity cultivar, than for Capri, the least O3-sensitive cultivar, when exposed to O3 for 4 h, while SO2 had little effect on total electrolyte leakage. There was also little effect on total K content of the leaves. 21 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  5. Effect of sulfur removal on Al2O3 scale adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.

    1991-03-01

    If the role of reactive element dopants in producing A12O3 scale adhesion on NiCrAl alloys is to getter sulfur and prevent interfacial segregation, then eliminating sulfur from undoped alloys should also produce adherence. Four experiments successfully produced scale adhesion by sulfur removal alone. (1) Repeated oxidation and polishing of a pure NiCrAl alloy lowered the sulfur content from 10 to 2 parts per million by weight (ppmw), presumably by removing the segregated interfacial layer after each cycle. Total scale spallation changed to total retention after 13 such cycles, with no changes in the scale or interfacial morphology. (2) Thinner samples became adherent after fewer oxidation polishing cycles because of a more limited supply of sulfur. (3) Spalling in subsequent cyclic oxidation tests of samples from experiment (1) was a direct function of the initial sulfur content. (4) Desulfurization to 0.1 ppmw levels was accomplished by annealing melt-spun foil in 1 arm H2. These foils produced oxidation weight change curves for 500 1-hour cycles at 1100 °C similar to those for Y- or Zr-doped NiCrAl. The transition between adherent and nonadherent behavior was modeled in terms of sulfur flux, sulfur content, and sulfur segregation.

  6. The addition zirconium effect on the solubility and activity of sulfur in liquid iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burylev, B.P.; Mojsov, L.P.

    1994-01-01

    Critical analysis of reference data on thermodynamic properties of zirconium sulfides is conducted for evaluation of zirconium desulfonation ability in liquid steel. Sulfur solubility dependence on zirconium concentration in liquid iron is presented. Curves of sulfur solubility in liquid iron in the presence of other elements, including titanium, manganese, vanadium and chromium are presented for comparison. It is shown that equilibrium concentration of sulfur is much lower than standard sulfur concentrations in steel, therefore zirconium appears to be the best desulfonator among the metals considered

  7. Sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide surface passivation effects on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, Z. H.; Lee, K. B.; Qian, H.; Jiang, S.; Houston, P. A.; Guiney, I.; Wallis, D. J.; Humphreys, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we have compared SiN x passivation, hydrogen peroxide, and sulfuric acid treatment on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs surface after full device fabrication on Si substrate. Both the chemical treatments resulted in the suppression of device pinch-off gate leakage current below 1 μA/mm, which is much lower than that for SiN x passivation. The greatest suppression over the range of devices is observed with the sulfuric acid treatment. The device on/off current ratio is improved (from 10 4 –10 5 to 10 7 ) and a reduction in the device sub-threshold (S.S.) slope (from ∼215 to 90 mV/decade) is achieved. The sulfuric acid is believed to work by oxidizing the surface which has a strong passivating effect on the gate leakage current. The interface trap charge density (D it ) is reduced (from 4.86 to 0.90 × 10 12  cm −2 eV −1 ), calculated from the change in the device S.S. The gate surface leakage current mechanism is explained by combined Mott hopping conduction and Poole Frenkel models for both untreated and sulfuric acid treated devices. Combining the sulfuric acid treatment underneath the gate with the SiN x passivation after full device fabrication results in the reduction of D it and improves the surface related current collapse

  8. Effects of reactive element additions and sulfur removal on the oxidation behavior of FECRAL alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasik, M.C.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H.; Smialek, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of this study have shown that desulfurization of FeCrAl alloys by hydrogen annealing can result in improvements in cyclic oxidation comparable to that achieved by doping with reactive elements. Moreover, specimens of substantial thicknesses can be effectively desulfurized because of the high diffusivity of sulfur in bcc iron alloys. The results have also shown that there is less stress generation during the cyclic oxidation of Y-doped FeCrAl compared to Ti-doped or desulfurized FeCrAl. This indicates that the growth mechanism, as well as the strength of the oxide/alloy interface, influences the ultimate oxidation morphology and stress state which will certainly affect the length of time the alumina remains protective

  9. Effects of sulfur and nitrogen on nutrients uptake of corn using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... Sulfur uptake efficiency increases, and the deficiency symptom disappears, upon application of N fertilizer in the form of urea in S deficient soil (Murphy, 1999). Sulfur is considered one of the major essential plant nutrients and an amendment used for reclaiming alkaline and calcareous soils (Marschner ...

  10. Effect of sulfur and iron fertilizers on yield, yield components and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-13

    Jun 13, 2011 ... per plant. Interaction between water stress and combination of iron and sulfur fertilizers had significant .... Results of analysis of variance (ANOVA) of water stress (W), sulfur (B) and iron (C), and their interaction with gain yield, yield components and ... the soil structure and it increased the usefulness of other.

  11. Simulated effects of sulfur deposition on nutrient cycling in class I wilderness areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katherine J. Elliott; James M. Vose; Jennifer D. Knoepp; Dale W. Johnson; William T. Swank; William Jackson

    2008-01-01

    As a consequence of human land use, population growth, and industrialization, wilderness and other natural areas can be threatened by air pollution, climate change, and exotic diseases or pests. Air pollution in the form of acidic deposition is comprised of sulfuric and nitric acids and ammonium derived from emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia....

  12. 75 FR 7426 - Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline Sulfur Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... 2060-AI23; 2060-AQ12 Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicle and Light-Duty Truck Emission Standards and Gasoline.... The rulemaking also required oil refiners to limit the sulfur content of the gasoline they produce. Sulfur in gasoline has a detrimental impact on catalyst performance and the sulfur requirements have...

  13. Effective sulfur and energy recovery from hydrogen sulfide through incorporating an air-cathode fuel cell into chelated-iron process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Cui, Yu-Zhi

    2013-12-15

    The chelated-iron process is among the most promising techniques for the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) removal due to its double advantage of waste minimization and resource recovery. However, this technology has encountered the problem of chelate degradation which made it difficult to ensure reliable and economical operation. This work aims to develop a novel fuel-cell-assisted chelated-iron process which employs an air-cathode fuel cell for the catalyst regeneration. By using such a process, sulfur and electricity were effectively recovered from H2S and the problem of chelate degradation was well controlled. Experiment on a synthetic sulfide solution showed the fuel-cell-assisted chelated-iron process could maintain high sulfur recovery efficiencies generally above 90.0%. The EDTA was preferable to NTA as the chelating agent for electricity generation, given the Coulombic efficiencies (CEs) of 17.8 ± 0.5% to 75.1 ± 0.5% for the EDTA-chelated process versus 9.6 ± 0.8% to 51.1 ± 2.7% for the NTA-chelated process in the pH range of 4.0-10.0. The Fe (III)/S(2-) ratio exhibited notable influence on the electricity generation, with the CEs improved by more than 25% as the Fe (III)/S(2-) molar ratio increased from 2.5:1 to 3.5:1. Application of this novel process in treating a H2S-containing biogas stream achieved 99% of H2S removal efficiency, 78% of sulfur recovery efficiency, and 78.6% of energy recovery efficiency, suggesting the fuel-cell-assisted chelated-iron process was effective to remove the H2S from gas streams with favorable sulfur and energy recovery efficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanqing; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán; Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous “excess sulfur” problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the “petrologic estimate”), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of

  15. Sulfur cycle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Microbes, especially bacteria, play an important role in oxidative and reductive cycle of sulfur. The oxidative part of the cycle is mediated by photosynthetic bacteria in the presence of light energy and chemosynthetic forms in the absence of light...

  16. Sulfur Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in of the vapors can cause chronic respiratory disease, repeated respiratory infections, or death. Extensive eye exposure can cause permanent blindness. Exposure to sulfur mustard may increase a person’s risk for lung and respiratory cancer. ...

  17. Comparative analysis of the effect of pretreating aspen wood with aqueous and aqueous-organic solutions of sulfuric and nitric acid on its reactivity during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dotsenko, Gleb; Osipov, D. O.; Zorov, I. N.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of aspen wood pretreatment methods with the use of both aqueous solutions of sulfuric and nitric acids and aqueous-organic solutions (ethanol, butanol) of sulfuric acid (organosolv) on the limiting degree of conversion of this type of raw material into simple sugars during enzymatic...

  18. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pH<10, possibly due to the dissolution of ettringite (at alkaline pH) or calcium (Ca)-antimonate. Treated APC residues, stored anoxically in the laboratory, simulating the conditions at the NOAH Langøya landfill, gave rise to decreasing concentrations of Sb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Deposition and cycling of sulfur controls mercury accumulation in Isle Royale fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul E. Drevnick; Donald E. Canfield; Patrick R. Gorski (and others) [Miami University, Oxford, OH (United States). Department of Zoology

    2007-11-01

    Mercury contamination of fish is a global problem. Consumption of contaminated fish is the primary route of methylmercury exposure in humans and is detrimental to health. Newly mandated reductions in anthropogenic mercury emissions aim to reduce atmospheric mercury deposition and thus mercury concentrations in fish. However, factors other than mercury deposition are important for mercury bioaccumulation in fish. In the lakes of Isle Royale, U.S.A., reduced rates of sulfate deposition since the Clean Air Act of 1970 have caused mercury concentrations in fish to decline to levels that are safe for human consumption, even without a discernible decrease in mercury deposition. Therefore, reductions in anthropogenic sulfur emissions may provide a synergistic solution to the mercury problem in sulfate-limited freshwaters. 71 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. To control and to be controlled – understanding the Arabidopsis SLIM1 function in sulfur deficiency through comprehensive investigation of the EIL protein family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eWawrzyńska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available SSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL family of transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is the regulator of many sulfur-deficiency responsive genes. Among the five other proteins of the family, three regulate ethylene responses and two have unassigned functions. Contrary to the well-defined ethylene signaling, the pathway leading from sensing sulfate status to the activation of its acquisition via SLIM1 is completely unknown. SLIM1 binds to the 20 nt-long specific UPE-box sequence; however, it also recognizes the shorter TEIL sequence, unique for the whole EIL family. SLIM1 takes part in the upregulation and downregulation of various sulfur metabolism genes, but also it controls the degradation of glucosinolates under sulfur deficient conditions. Besides facilitating the increased flux through the sulfate assimilation pathway, SLIM1 induces microRNA395, specifically targeting ATP sulfurylases and a low-affinity sulfate transporter, SULTR2;1, thus affecting sulfate translocation to the shoot. Here, we briefly review the identification, structural characteristics and molecular function of SLIM1 from the perspective of the whole EIL protein family.

  1. The effect of water-containing electrolyte on lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Haasch, Richard T.; Perdue, Brian R.; Apblett, Christopher A.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2017-11-01

    Dissolved polysulfides, formed during Li-S battery operation, freely migrate and react with both the Li anode and the sulfur cathode. These soluble polysulfides shuttle between the anode and cathode - the so-called shuttle effect - resulting in an infinite recharge process and poor Columbic efficiency. In this study, water present as an additive in the Li-S battery electrolyte is found to reduce the shuttle effect in Li-S batteries. Batteries where water content was below 50 ppm exhibited a substantial shuttle effect and low charge capacity. Alternatively, addition of 250 ppm water led to stable charge/discharge behavior with high Coulombic efficiency. XPS results show that H2O addition results in the formation of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film with more LiOH on Li anode which protects the Li anode from the polysulfides. Batteries cycled without water result in a SEI film with more Li2CO3 likely formed by direct contact between the Li metal and the solvent. Intermediate quantities of H2O in the electrolyte result in high cycle efficiency for the first few cycles which then rapidly decays. This suggests that H2O is consumed during battery cycling, likely by interaction with freshly exposed Li metal formed during Li deposition.

  2. Effects on water, soil and vegetation of an increasing atmospheric supply of sulfur: a survey on ecological bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malmer, N; Nilsson, F M.I.

    1974-01-01

    In this paper a critical survey is given of the research work carried out on the ecological effects of the increasing rate of sulfur deposition, especially with reference to Swedish conditions. It also contains information about soil types and soil conditions of importance for the understanding of the problems. In several lakes and rivers this increased supply of sulfur (mainly as SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/) has brought about a considerable decrease in pH. In most lakes and rivers of the oligotrophic type the concentration of bicarbonate ion (the main buffer of pH changes) was already low, and it has now been reduced to the extent that a further increase in the deposition of sulfate will immediately result in marked and much more widespread acidification. The increase in the supply of sulfur which has already occurred will influence the conditions of the soil in several ways. A distinct decrease in forest productivity is to be expected. Due to the short time that has passed since the supply of sulfur started to increase it is, however, doubtful whether such a decrease is yet measurable with the measurement methods commonly used in forest taxation. 88 references.

  3. Demonstration of SCR technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired utility boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, W.S. [W.S. Hinton and Associates, Cantonment, FL (United States); Maxwell, J.D.; Healy, E.C.; Hardman, R.R. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States); Baldwin, A.L. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the completed Innovative Clean Coal Technology project which demonstrated SCR technology for reduction of flue gas NO{sub x} emissions from a utility boiler burning US high-sulfur coal. The project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, managed and co-funded by Southern Company Services, Inc. on behalf of the Southern Company, and also co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and Ontario Hydro. The project was located at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit 5 (a 75 MW tangentially-fired boiler burning US coals that had a sulfur content ranging from 2.5--2.9%), near Pensacola, Florida. The test program was conducted for approximately two years to evaluate catalyst deactivation and other SCR operational effects. The SCR test facility had nine reactors: three 2.5 MW (5,000 scfm), and operated on low-dust flue gas. The reactors operated in parallel with commercially available SCR catalysts obtained from suppliers throughout the world. Long-term performance testing began in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. A brief test facility description and the results of the project are presented in this paper.

  4. Effective bioleaching of chromium in tannery sludge with an enriched sulfur-oxidizing bacterial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jing; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Sun, Zhao-Yong; Kida, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a sulfur-oxidizing community was enriched from activated sludge generated in tannery wastewater treatment plants. Bioleaching of tannery sludge containing 0.9-1.2% chromium was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the enriched community, the effect of chromium binding forms on bioleaching efficiency, and the dominant microbes contributing to chromium bioleaching. Sludge samples inoculated with the enriched community presented 79.9-96.8% of chromium leaching efficiencies, much higher than those without the enriched community. High bioleaching efficiencies of over 95% were achieved for chromium in reducible fraction, while 60.9-97.9% were observed for chromium in oxidizable and residual fractions. Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, the predominant bacteria in the enriched community, played an important role in bioleaching, whereas some indigenous heterotrophic species in sludge might have had a supporting role. The results indicated that A. thiooxidans-dominant enriched microbial community had high chromium bioleaching efficiency, and chromium binding forms affected the bioleaching performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Absence of respiratory inflammatory reaction of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kiyoung; Smith, Jodi L; Last, Jerold A

    2005-01-01

    Elemental sulfur, a natural substance, is used as a fungicide. Elemental sulfur is the most heavily used agricultural chemical in California. In 2003, annual sulfur usage in California was about 34% of the total weight of pesticide active ingredient used in production agriculture. Even though sulfur is mostly used in dust form, the respiratory health effects of elemental sulfur are not well documented. The purpose of this paper is to address the possible respiratory effect of elemental sulfur using the California Pesticide Illness Database and laboratory experiments with mice. We analyzed the California Pesticide Illness Database between 1991 and 2001. Among 127 reports of definite, probable, and possible illness involving sulfur, 21 cases (16%) were identified as respiratory related. A mouse model was used to examine whether there was an inflammatory or fibrotic response to elemental sulfur. Dust solutions were injected intratracheally into ovalbumin sensitized mice and lung damage was evaluated. Lung inflammatory response was analyzed via total lavage cell counts and differentials, and airway collagen content was analyzed histologically and biochemically. No significant differences from controls were seen in animals exposed to sulfur particles. The findings suggest that acute exposure of elemental sulfur itself may not cause an inflammatory reaction. However, further studies are needed to understand the possible health effects of chronic sulfur exposure and environmental weathering of sulfur dust.

  6. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Leimkühler, Silke; Missirlis, Fanis

    2018-01-01

    Iron sulfur (Fe-S) clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco) are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i) mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii) increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide dismutase, which

  7. Iron Sulfur and Molybdenum Cofactor Enzymes Regulate the Drosophila Life Cycle by Controlling Cell Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonimir Marelja

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron sulfur (Fe-S clusters and the molybdenum cofactor (Moco are present at enzyme sites, where the active metal facilitates electron transfer. Such enzyme systems are soluble in the mitochondrial matrix, cytosol and nucleus, or embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane, but virtually absent from the cell secretory pathway. They are of ancient evolutionary origin supporting respiration, DNA replication, transcription, translation, the biosynthesis of steroids, heme, catabolism of purines, hydroxylation of xenobiotics, and cellular sulfur metabolism. Here, Fe-S cluster and Moco biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster is reviewed and the multiple biochemical and physiological functions of known Fe-S and Moco enzymes are described. We show that RNA interference of Mocs3 disrupts Moco biosynthesis and the circadian clock. Fe-S-dependent mitochondrial respiration is discussed in the context of germ line and somatic development, stem cell differentiation and aging. The subcellular compartmentalization of the Fe-S and Moco assembly machinery components and their connections to iron sensing mechanisms and intermediary metabolism are emphasized. A biochemically active Fe-S core complex of heterologously expressed fly Nfs1, Isd11, IscU, and human frataxin is presented. Based on the recent demonstration that copper displaces the Fe-S cluster of yeast and human ferredoxin, an explanation for why high dietary copper leads to cytoplasmic iron deficiency in flies is proposed. Another proposal that exosomes contribute to the transport of xanthine dehydrogenase from peripheral tissues to the eye pigment cells is put forward, where the Vps16a subunit of the HOPS complex may have a specialized role in concentrating this enzyme within pigment granules. Finally, we formulate a hypothesis that (i mitochondrial superoxide mobilizes iron from the Fe-S clusters in aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase; (ii increased iron transiently displaces manganese on superoxide

  8. Sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide surface passivation effects on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Z. H., E-mail: zaffar.zaidi@sheffield.ac.uk; Lee, K. B.; Qian, H.; Jiang, S.; Houston, P. A. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Guiney, I.; Wallis, D. J.; Humphreys, C. J. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, The University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-28

    In this work, we have compared SiN{sub x} passivation, hydrogen peroxide, and sulfuric acid treatment on AlGaN/GaN HEMTs surface after full device fabrication on Si substrate. Both the chemical treatments resulted in the suppression of device pinch-off gate leakage current below 1 μA/mm, which is much lower than that for SiN{sub x} passivation. The greatest suppression over the range of devices is observed with the sulfuric acid treatment. The device on/off current ratio is improved (from 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7}) and a reduction in the device sub-threshold (S.S.) slope (from ∼215 to 90 mV/decade) is achieved. The sulfuric acid is believed to work by oxidizing the surface which has a strong passivating effect on the gate leakage current. The interface trap charge density (D{sub it}) is reduced (from 4.86 to 0.90 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1}), calculated from the change in the device S.S. The gate surface leakage current mechanism is explained by combined Mott hopping conduction and Poole Frenkel models for both untreated and sulfuric acid treated devices. Combining the sulfuric acid treatment underneath the gate with the SiN{sub x} passivation after full device fabrication results in the reduction of D{sub it} and improves the surface related current collapse.

  9. Investigation on the Effect of Sulfur and Titanium on the Microstructure of Lamellar Graphite Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Stefanescu, Doru Michael; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to identify the inclusions in lamellar graphite cast iron in an effort to explain the nucleation of the phases of interest. Four samples of approximately the same carbon equivalent but different levels of sulfur and titanium were studied. The Ti/S ratios were from 0...... of complex Al, Ca, Mg oxide. An increased titanium level of 0.35 pct produced superfine interdendritic graphite (~10 μm) at low (0.012 wt pct) as well as at high-S contents. Ti also caused increased segregation in the microstructure of the analyzed irons and larger eutectic grains (cells). TiC did not appear...... to be a nucleation site for the primary austenite as it was found mostly at the periphery of the secondary arms of the austenite, in the last region to solidify. The effect of titanium in refining the graphite and increasing the austenite fraction can be explained through the widening of the liquidus...

  10. Sulfur Poisoning of SOFC Anodes: Effect of Overpotential on Long-Term Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Hagen, Anke; Hjelm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    characterized during long-term galvanostatic operation in internal reforming gas mixture (CH4/H2O/H2:30/60/10), with 2 ppm H2S exposure to the anode for 500 hours at 850◦C, at different current densities. This work focus on the long-term effect of H2S exposure over a few hundreds of hours; and describes...... and correlates the observed evolution of anode performance, over hundreds of hours, with sulfur exposure at low cell overpotential (low current density) and at high overpotential (high current density) with and without H2S exposure. For tests at low overpotential with H2S exposure only a reversible loss...... in performance was observed and post-mortem SEM analysis showed an intact Ni/YSZ anode microstructure. For tests at high cell overpotential the H2S exposure caused both a reversible loss in performance and an irreversible long-term degradation. Post-mortem SEM analysis of the Ni/YSZ anode from this tests showed...

  11. Effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Nao; Tanabe, Kazunari; Takeshita, Toru; Yoneda, Masahiro; Iwamoto, Tomoyuki; Oshiro, Sueko; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Hirofuji, Takao

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the effects of oil drops containing Lactobacillus salivarius WB21 on periodontal health and oral microbiota producing volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs). For this study, 42 subjects were randomly assigned to receive oil samples containing L. salivarius WB21 or a placebo for two weeks. Oral assessment and saliva collection were performed on days 1 and 15. Bacterial analysis was performed using the real-time polymerase chain reaction and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In both the experimental and placebo groups, the average probing depth, number of periodontal pockets, and the percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) decreased while stimulated salivary flow increased on day 15. BOP was reduced in the experimental group compared with the placebo group (P = 0.010). In the experimental group, total bacterial numbers decreased, and the number of L. salivarius increased. The number of Prevotella intermedia, which is correlated with hydrogen sulfide concentration in mouth air, increased in the placebo group and did not change in the experimental group. T-RFLP analysis found that the peak area proportions representing Porphyromonas gingivalis, P. intermedia, Tannerella forsythensis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum decreased in the experimental group, although there was no significant change in the bacterial composition. Thus we observed oil drops containing L. salivarius WB21 improved BOP and inhibited the reproduction of total and VSC-producing periodontopathic bacteria compared with the placebo group, but also showed the limit of its efficacy in controlling VSCs producing and periodontal pathogens.

  12. Sulfur Tolerant Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Coal Syngas Application: Experimental Study on Diverse Impurity Effects and Fundamental Modeling of Electrode Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Mingyang

    With demand over green energy economy, fuel cells have been developed as a promising energy conversion technology with higher efficiency and less emission. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can utilize various fuels in addition to hydrogen including coal derived sygas, and thus are favored for future power generation due to dependence on coal in electrical industry. However impurities such as sulfur and phosphorous present in coal syngas in parts per million (p.p.m.) levels can severely poison SOFC anode typically made of Ni/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (Ni-YSZ) and limit SOFC applicability in economically derivable fuels. The focus of the research is to develop strategy for application of high performance SOFC in coal syngas with tolerance against trace impurities such as H2S and PH3. To realize the research goal, the experimental study on sulfur tolerant anode materials and examination of various fuel impurity effects on SOFC anode are combined with electrochemical modeling of SOFC cathode kinetics in order to benefit design of direct-coal-syngas SOFC. Tolerant strategy for SOFC anode against sulfur is studied by using alternative materials which can both mitigate sulfur poisoning and function as active anode components. The Ni-YSZ anode was modified by incorporation of lanthanum doped ceria (LDC) nano-coatings via impregnation. Cell test in coal syngas containing 20 ppm H2S indicated the impregnated LDC coatings inhibited on-set of sulfur poisoning by over 10hrs. Cell analysis via X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemistry revealed LDC coatings reacted with H2S via chemisorptions, resulting in less sulfur blocking triple--phase-boundary and minimized performance loss. Meanwhile the effects of PH3 impurity on SOFC anode is examined by using Ni-YSZ anode supported SOFC. Degradation of cell is found to be irreversible due to adsorption of PH3 on TPB and further reaction with Ni to form secondary phases with low melting point. The

  13. Sulfuric acid nucleation: power dependencies, variation with relative humidity, and effect of bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Zollner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nucleation of particles composed of sulfuric acid, water, and nitrogen base molecules was studied using a continuous flow reactor. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with an ultrafine condensation particle counter, while vapors of sulfuric acid and nitrogen bases were detected by chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Variation of particle numbers with sulfuric acid concentration yielded a power dependency on sulfuric acid of 5 ± 1 for relative humidities of 14–68% at 296 K; similar experiments with varying water content yielded power dependencies on H2O of ~7. The critical cluster contains about 5 H2SO4 molecules and a new treatment of the power dependency for H2O suggests about 12 H2O molecules for these conditions. Addition of 2-to-45 pptv of ammonia or methyl amine resulted in up to millions of times more particles than in the absence of these compounds. Particle detection capabilities, sulfuric acid and nitrogen base detection, wall losses, and the extent of particle growth are discussed. Results are compared to previous laboratory nucleation studies and they are also discussed in terms of atmospheric nucleation scenarios.

  14. A long term field study of the effect of fungicides penconazole and sulfur on yeasts in the vineyard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Bueso, Gustavo; Arroyo, Teresa; Valero, Eva

    2014-10-17

    This research deals with how two fungicide treatments against powdery mildew, penconazole as a systematic fungicide and sulfur as an inorganic broad-spectrum fungicide, affect the diversity and density of wine yeasts associated with grape berry surfaces and subsequent spontaneous fermentations. Unlike other studies in this area, this work aims to evaluate this effect on the population dynamics in the environment, the conditions of which are not reproducible in the laboratory. A long term (three year) sampling plan was thus devised. A minimum inhibitory concentration assay was also carried out in the laboratory in order to prove the influence of these antifungals on yeast populations. While both antifungal treatments (penconazole and sulfur) were similarly effective against powdery mildew, each had a very different effect on yeast populations. Penconazole showed the most negative effect on biodiversity in the vineyard and was the fungicide to which the isolated yeasts showed the greatest sensitivity. This study therefore evidences the suitability of treatment with sulfur, in both conventional and organic viticulture, to preserve the yeast population associated with grape berries, in particular the Saccharomyces cerevisiae species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of sulfur and nitrogen supply on the susceptibility of Pisum sativum to SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, H; Jaeger, H J; Steubing, L

    1974-01-01

    The susceptibility of Pisum to SO/sub 2/ injury was examined in relation to the sulfur and nitrogen nutrition. The injury was measured by comparing the dry matter yield to control and treated plants. SO/sub 2/ effects on metabolism were established by determining the content of organic and inorganic sulfur and, indirectly, by measuring total nitrogen, amino acid nitrogen, and protein nitrogen. The plants grown in nutrient solutions deficient in sulfur or nitrogen showed a decreased sensitivity to SO/sub 2/ pollution compared to the control. The higher content of amino acid nitrogen and organic sulfur of the plants grown in a nitrogen-deficient solution suggests that an increased synthesis of sulfur containing amino acids occurs. The slighter injury of the plants deficient in sulfur may be explained by the delayed sulfur supply.

  16. Quantitative trait loci controlling sulfur containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine, in soybean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, D R; Pantalone, V R; Sams, C E; Saxton, A M; West, D R; Orf, J H; Killam, A S

    2006-02-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is the single largest source of protein in animal feed. However, a major limitation of soy proteins is their deficiency in sulfur-containing amino acids, methionine (Met) and cysteine (Cys). The objective of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with Met and Cys concentration in soybean seed. To achieve this objective, 101 F(6)-derived recombinant inbred lines (RIL) from a population developed from a cross of N87-984-16 x TN93-99 were used. Ground soybean seed samples were analyzed for Met and Cys concentration using a near infrared spectroscopy instrument. Data were analyzed using SAS software and QTL Cartographer. RIL differed (Pseed dry weight) for Cys and 4.4-8.8 (g kg(-1) seed dry weight) for Met. Heritability estimates on an entry mean basis were 0.14 and 0.57 for Cys and Met, respectively. A total of 94 polymorphic simple sequence repeat molecular genetic markers were screened in the RIL. Single factor ANOVA was used to identify candidate QTL, which were confirmed by composite interval mapping using QTL Cartographer. Four QTL linked to molecular markers Satt235, Satt252, Satt427 and Satt436 distributed on three molecular linkage groups (MLG) D1a, F and G were associated with Cys and three QTL linked to molecular markers Satt252, Satt564 and Satt590 distributed on MLG F, G and M were associated with Met concentration in soybean seed. QTL associated with Met and Cys in soybean seed will provide important information to breeders targeting improvements in the nutritional quality of soybean.

  17. Effects of Alclad Layer and Anodizing Time on Sulfuric Acid Anodizing and Film Properties of 2E12 Aluminum Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN Gao-hong; HU Yuan-sen; YU Mei; LIU Jian-hua; LI Guo-ai

    2017-01-01

    Alclad and unclad 2E12 aerospace aluminum alloy were treated by sulfuric acid anodic oxidation. The effects of alclad layer and anodizing time on the anodization behaviour and corrosion resistance of anodic oxide layer on 2E12 aluminum alloy were studied. Surface and cross-section morphology of anodic oxide films were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties of anodic oxide films were analyzed by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance ...

  18. Effect of Sulfur Application on Spinach Phytoremedaiton Process of Cadmium in Contaminated Calcareous Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kasraian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, cadmium (Cd concentration has increased in croplands through sewage sludge and phosphorous fertilizers application. On the other hand, some special methods, like phytoremedation, were introduced in order to decrease soil contamination hazard. Calcium carbonate plays an important role in Cd solubility in highly calcareous soils. Sulfurs oxidation, by dissolving Cd carbonate fraction, may improve phytoremediation efficiency. An experiment was conducted to study the effects of S application (equivalent to 0, 2, 4 and 6 Mg S ha-1 on Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid  (DTPA extractable Cd and also on Cd uptake and extraction by spinach (Spinacea oleracea L. in calcareous soils which were contaminated by 40mg Cd kg-1. To ensure biological S oxidation, all S-treated samples were inoculated by Thiobacillus spp. and incubated for 50 days. The soil pH, EC and soluble sulfate were affected by S application and it clearly showed that S oxidation process was occurred in Cd treated soils. The most significant change for pH and sulfate were observed at 4 Mg S ha-1 and for electrical conductivity (EC of soil it occurred at 6Mg S ha-1. Application of S had no effect on DTPA extractable Cd in soils whereas; its concentration increased 73.55% in average in plant tissue. Plant dry matter decreased significantly (about 63 percent following Cd application. Although the highest rate of S oxidation was observed at 4 and 6 Mg S ha-1 tٰٰٰhe maximum Cd extraction (2.5µg Cd pot-1 was observed at 2 Mg S ha-1 . This may be due to adverse effect of Cd toxicity and increase of soluble salt resulted by S oxidation in higher level of S application.

  19. Acute effects of total suspended particles and sulfur dioxides on preterm delivery: a community-based cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X.P.; Ding, H.; Wang, X.B. [Harvard University, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Health

    1995-11-01

    The acute effects of air pollution on preterm delivery were examined in a prospective cohort in Beijing, China. From early pregnancy until delivery in 1988, we followed all registered pregnant women who lived in four residential areas of Beijing. Information for both mothers and infants was collected. Daily air pollution and meteorological data were obtained independently. The sample for analysis included 25 370 resident women who gave first live births in 1988. Multiple linear regression and logistic regression were used to estimate the effects of air pollution on gestational age and preterm delivery (i.e. {lt} 37 wk), with adjustment for outdoor temperature and humidity, day of the week, season, maternal age, gender of child, and residential area. Very high concentrations of ambient sulfur dioxide (mean = 102 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), (maximum = 630 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) and total suspended particulates (mean = 375 {mu}g/m{sup 3}), (maximum =1 003 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) were observed in these areas. There was a significant dose-dependent association between gestational age and sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulate concentrations. The estimated reduced duration of gestation was 0.075 wk (12.6 h) and 0.042 wk (7.1 h) for each 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} increase in sulfur dioxide and total suspended particulates 7-d lagged moving average, respectively. We concluded that high levels of total suspended particulates and sulfur dioxide, or of a more complex pollution mixture associated with these pollutants, appear to contribute to excess risk of preterm delivery in this population. Further work needs to be carried out, with more detailed information on personal exposure and effect modifiers.

  20. In-situ sulfuration synthesis of sandwiched spherical tin sulfide/sulfur-doped graphene composite with ultra-low sulfur content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Yang, Yaqing; Wang, Zhixuan; Huang, Shoushuang; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Shanshan; Chen, Zhiwen; Jiang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    SnS is widely studied as anode materials since of its superior structural stability and physicochemical property comparing with other Sn-based composites. Nevertheless, the inconvenience of phase morphology control and excessive consumption of sulfur sources during synthesis hinder the scalable application of SnS nanocomposites. Herein, we report a facile in-situ sulfuration strategy to synthesize sandwiched spherical SnS/sulfur-doped graphene (SnS/S-SG) composite. An ultra-low sulfur content with approximately stoichiometric ratio of Sn:S can effectively promote the sulfuration reaction of SnO2 to SnS and simultaneous sulfur-doping of graphene. The as-prepared SnS/S-SG composite shows a three-dimensional interconnected spherical structure as a whole, in which SnS nanoparticles are sandwiched between the multilayers of graphene sheets forming a hollow sphere. The sandwiched sphere structure and high S doping amount can improve the binding force between SnS and graphene, as well as the structural stability and electrical conductivity of the composite. Thus, a high reversibility of conversion reaction, promising specific capacity (772 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at 0.1 C) and excellent rate performance (705 and 411 mAh g-1 at 1 C and 10 C, respectively) are exhibited in the SnS/S-SG electrode, which are much higher than that of the SnS/spherical graphene synthesized by traditional post-sulfuration method.

  1. Diurnal Variation and Spatial Distribution Effects on Sulfur Speciation in Aerosol Samples as Assessed by X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwatt Pongpiachan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on providing new results relating to the impacts of Diurnal variation, Vertical distribution, and Emission source on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of aerosol samples. All aerosol samples used in the diurnal variation experiment were preserved using anoxic preservation stainless cylinders (APSCs and pressure-controlled glove boxes (PCGBs, which were specially designed to prevent oxidation of the sulfur states in PM10. Further investigation of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra revealed that PM10 samples were dominated by S(VI, even when preserved in anoxic conditions. The “Emission source effect” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 was examined by comparing sulfur K-edge XANES spectra collected from various emission sources in southern Thailand, while “Vertical distribution effects” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 were made with samples collected from three different altitudes from rooftops of the highest buildings in three major cities in Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that neither “Emission source” nor “Vertical distribution” appreciably contribute to the characteristic fingerprint of sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum in PM10.

  2. Effects of vine water status on dimethyl sulfur potential, ammonium, and amino acid contents in Grenache Noir grapes (Vitis vinifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Royer Dupré, N; Schneider, R; Payan, J C; Salançon, E; Razungles, A

    2014-04-02

    We studied the effect of vine water status on the dimethyl sulfur potential (DMSP), ammonium, and amino acid contents of the berry during the maturation of Grenache Noir grapes. Water deficit increased the accumulation of amino acids in berries and favored yeast assimilable amino nitrogen. Similarly, ammonium content was higher in berries from vines subjected to moderate water deficit. DMSP content followed the same trend as yeast assimilable amino acid content, with higher concentrations observed in the berries of vines subjected to water deficit. The high DMSP and yeast assimilable nitrogen contents of musts from vines subjected to water deficit resulted in a better preservation of DMSP during winemaking. The wines produced from these musts had a higher DMSP level and would therefore probably have a higher aroma shelf life, because the DMSP determines the rate of release of dimethyl sulfur during wine storage, and this compound enhances fruity notes.

  3. Effects of Different Level and Source of Sulfur Supplement in Close-up diets of Dairy Cows on Blood Metabolites, Colostrums Composition and Liver Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Manidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 24 maltiparous Holstein dairy cows were allocated in a completely randomized design to study the effects of different level and source of sulfur supplement in close-up diets on blood metabolites, colostrums composition and liver performance. The mean body weight of the cows was 687.9 kg and the mean days until expected calving date was 21.8 d. The first treatment (T1 has contained 0.21% sulfur (DM basis, the second treatment (T2 has contained 0.41% sulfur which supplied entirely through magnesium sulfate and the third treatment (T3 has contained 0.41% sulfur which supplied through a combination of magnesium sulfate and an organic source of sulfur (Mepran. The DMI for pre-calving (P < 0.001 was affected by treatments and T2 showed the lowest DMI among treatments. Colostrums yield, protein, DM and ash significantly decreased in inorganic sulfur supplemented treatment (P < 0.05. Among the blood metabolites, calcium, copper and glucose were decreased in T2 compared with two other treatments (P < 0.05. However, BHBA, NEFA and urea were increased in T2 (P < 0.05. Urine pH was affected with different treatments (P < 0.0001. The both liver enzymes (i.e. AST and CPK were increased supplementing inorganic sulfur showing that inorganic sulfur has potential to decrease liver performance in dairy cows. The results of the present study indicate that although magnesium sulfate (inorganic source has negative effect on dairy cow health and performance, a combination of magnesium sulfate and organic source of sulfur could have positive effects on dry matter intake, blood metabolites and liver health in dairy cows.

  4. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for Control of Atmospheric Pollution, as it applies to those areas listed in paragraph (a) of this... of the Puerto Rico Regulation for Control of Atmospheric Pollution would permit the use of stack... of Article 6 of the Puerto Rico Regulation for Control of Atmospheric Pollution is disapproved to the...

  5. Effect of Digestible Protein and Sulfur Amino Acids in Starter Diet on Performance and Small Intestinal (Jejunum Morphology of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avisa Akhavan khaleghi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Protein is an essential constituent of all tissues of animal body and has major effect on growth performance of the bird. A better understanding of the nutritional requirements of amino acids allows a more precise nutrition, offering the possibility for the formulator to optimize the requirement of at least minimum levels of crude protein by essential amino acids requirements, generating better result and lower costs for the producer. Methionine + Cystine (total sulfur amino acid = TSSA perform a number of functions in enzyme reactions and protein synthesis. Methionine is an essential amino acid for poultry and has an important role as a precursor of Cystine. Methionine is usually the first limiting amino acid in most of the practical diets for broiler chicken. The efficiency of utilization of dietary nutrients partly depends on the development of the gastro intestinal tract. Material and methods A 2×3 factorial arrangement in a CRD experiment was conducted to study the effect of digestible protein (DP and sulfur amino acids (DSAA during the starter period on performance and small intestinal (jejunum villous morphology. A total number of 300 day-old Ross 308 male broiler chicks were randomly distributed to 30 groups with 10 chicks each. Treatments consisted of two dietary levels of DP (19.5 and 21.5% and three dietary levels of DSAA (0.94, 1.02 and 1.1% that were fed for 10 days. For Each group and treatment, Feed Intake (FI, Weight Gain (WG and Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR were calculated and all the data were statistically analyzed by the SAS software. Results and Discussions The effects of different levels of protein and digestible sulfur amino acids on the mean feed intake, feed conversion ratio and daily weight gain are shown in the Table 3. Increase in the percentage of digestible sulfur amino acids, increased the levels of feed intake and feed conversion ratio in the starter period but, had no effect on the WG. Adding the DSAA

  6. Efficacy of omeprazole on cough, pulmonary function and quality of life of patients with sulfur mustard lung injury: A placebo-control, cross-over clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is prevalent and related to more severe disease in patients with respiratory problems. We evaluated the effects of antireflux therapy in warfare victims of exposure to Mustard gas with chronic cough. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted on 45 cases of sulfur mustard injury with chronic cough (≥8 weeks and GERD. Patients were randomized into two groups, receiving either 20 mg twice daily omeprazole-placebo (OP or matching placebo (placebo-omeprazole [PO] for 4 months, followed by a 1-month washout period and the alternative treatment for 4 months. Assessments included GERD and cough, quality of life, and pulmonary function using spirometry. Leicester Cough Questionnaire and SF-36 were used for measuring quality of life. Results: Patients in the OP group experienced a more decrease than those in the PO group in severity of Leicester cough scores during the first 4-month of trial. After crossing the groups, the OP group experienced an increase (P = 0.036 and the PO group experienced a nonsignificant decrease (P = 0.104 in the severity of scores. The OP group also experienced improvement in GERD symptoms and quality of life at the end of the trial, but changes in the PO group was not significant. There was no significant change in respiratory function indices in any groups. Conclusion: Long-term treatment with high-dose omeprazole improved GERD as well as cough, and quality of life, but not changed respiratory function indices in sulfur mustard injured cases with respiratory symptoms.

  7. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide on mercury oxidation and reduction under homogeneous conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongxin Zhao; Michael D. Mann; Edwin S. Olson; John H. Pavlish; Grant E. Dunham [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-05-15

    This paper is particularly related to elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation and divalent mercury (Hg{sup 2+} reduction under simulated flue gas conditions in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). As a powerful oxidant and chlorinating reagent, Cl{sub 2} has the potential for Hg oxidation. However, the detailed mechanism for the interactions, especially among chlorine (Cl)-containing species, SO{sub 2}, NO, as well as H{sub 2}O, remains ambiguous. Research described in this paper therefore focused on the impacts of SO{sub 2} and NO on Hg{sup 0} oxidation and Hg{sup 2+} reduction with the intent of unraveling unrecognized interactions among Cl species, SO{sub 2}, and NO most importantly in the presence of H{sub 2}O. The experimental results demonstrated that SO{sub 2} and NO had pronounced inhibitory effects on Hg{sup 0} oxidation at high temperatures when H{sub 2}O was also present in the gas blend. Such a demonstration was further confirmed by the reduction of Hg{sup 2+} back into its elemental form. Data revealed that SO{sub 2} and NO were capable of promoting homogeneous reduction of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg{sup 0} with H{sub 2}O being present. However, the above inhibition or promotion disappeared under homogeneous conditions when H{sub 2}O was removed from the gas blend. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Effects of temperature on the heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on calcium carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Wu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous oxidation of sulfur dioxide by ozone on CaCO3 was studied as a function of temperature (230 to 298 K at ambient pressure. Oxidation reactions were followed in real time using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS to obtain kinetic and mechanistic data. From the analysis of the spectral features, the formation of sulfate was identified on the surface in the presence of O3 and SO2 at different temperatures from 230 to 298 K. The results showed that the heterogeneous oxidation and the rate of sulfate formation were sensitive to temperature. An interesting stage-transition region was observed at temperatures ranging from 230 to 257 K, but it became ambiguous gradually above 257 K. The reactive uptake coefficients at different temperatures from 230 to 298 K were acquired for the first time, which can be used directly in atmospheric chemistry modeling studies to predict the formation of secondary sulfate aerosol in the troposphere. Furthermore, the rate of sulfate formation had a turning point at about 250 K. The sulfate concentration at 250 K was about twice as large as that at 298 K. The rate of sulfate formation increased with decreasing temperature at temperatures above 250 K, while there is a contrary temperature effect at temperatures below 250 K. The activation energy for heterogeneous oxidation at temperatures from 245 K to 230 K was determined to be 14.63 ± 0.20 kJ mol−1. A mechanism for the temperature dependence was proposed and the atmospheric implications were discussed.

  9. Effects of aerobic-anaerobic transient conditions on sulfur and metal cycles in sewer biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between sulfur and metals were studied in aerobic and anaerobic biofilms grown on domestic waste water at 15°C. The dominant metals in the waste water were iron, zinc and copper, which were present in average concentrations of 0.5mg/l, 0.6mg/l and 0.1m/l, respectively. Copper and zinc

  10. Effects of sulfur and nitrogen on nutrients uptake of corn using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N) fertilizer using acidified water (pH 6.5) to determine nutrients uptake and growth of maize plants grown in calcareous sandy soil. Four levels of elemental sulfur (0, 1, 5 and 10 t ha-1), two levels of N (0 and 0.34 t N ha-1) were tested at Al ...

  11. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rondo, L.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosolnucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detectionof gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased inthe presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was setup at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection ofH2SO4in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time inthe CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF(Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutralsulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presenceof dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS...

  12. Lime sulfur toxicity to broad mite, to its host plants and to natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venzon, Madelaine; Oliveira, Rafael M; Perez, André L; Rodríguez-Cruz, Fredy A; Martins Filho, Sebastião

    2013-06-01

    An acaricidal effect of lime sulfur has not been demonstrated for Polyphagotarsonemus latus. However, lime sulfur can cause toxicity to natural enemies and to host plants. In this study, the toxicity of different concentrations of lime sulfur to P. latus, to the predatory mite Amblyseius herbicolus and to the predatory insect Chrysoperla externa was evaluated. Additionally, the phytotoxicity of lime sulfur to two P. latus hosts, chili pepper and physic nut plants, was determined. Lime sulfur at a concentration of 9.5 mL L(-1) restrained P. latus population growth. However, this concentration was deleterious to natural enemies. The predatory mite A. herbicolus showed a negative value of instantaneous growth rate, and only 50% of the tested larvae of C. externa reached adulthood when exposed to 10 mL L(-1) . Physic nut had severe injury symptoms when sprayed with all tested lime sulfur concentrations. For chili pepper plants, no phytoxicity was observed at any tested concentration. Lime sulfur might be used for P. latus control on chili pepper but not on physic nut owing to phytotoxicity. Care should be taken when using lime sulfur in view of negative effects on natural enemies. Selective lime sulfur concentration integrated with other management tactics may provide an effective and sustainable P. latus control on chili pepper. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. The effect of coal sulfur on the behavior of alkali metals during co-firing biomass and coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tianhua Yang; Xingping Kai; Yang Sun; Yeguang He; Rundong Li [Shenyang Aerospace University, Liaoning (China). Liaoning Key Laboratory of Clean Energy and Institute of Clean Energy and Environmental Engineering

    2011-07-15

    Biomass contains high amounts of volatile alkali metals and chlorine, which can cause deposition, corrosion and agglomeration during combustion. Meanwhile coal contains a certain amount of sulfur that produces serious environmental pollution following combustion. To investigate the effects of sulfur on the migration of alkali metals during biomass and coal co-combustion, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were applied and experiments were performed in a laboratory scale reactor combining with a scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and other analytical approaches. The results indicate that inorganic sulfur FeS{sub 2} addition significantly enhanced the formation of potassium sulfate when the S/K molar ratio was less than 2. Meanwhile increasing FeS{sub 2} dosage reduced the formation of KCl(g) and KOH(g) and increased the release of HCl(g). In addition potassium sulfate can react with silica and aluminum to form potassium aluminosilicates and release HCl at the S/K molar ratio above 4. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A case study of the relative effects of power plant nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide emission reductions on atmospheric nitrogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Krish; Seigneur, Christian; Bronson, Rochelle; Chen, Shu-Yun; Karamchandani, Prakash; Walters, Justin T; Jansen, John J; Brandmeyer, Jo Ellen; Knipping, Eladio M

    2010-03-01

    The contrasting effects of point source nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) air emission reductions on regional atmospheric nitrogen deposition are analyzed for the case study of a coal-fired power plant in the southeastern United States. The effect of potential emission reductions at the plant on nitrogen deposition to Escambia Bay and its watershed on the Florida-Alabama border is simulated using the three-dimensional Eulerian Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. A method to quantify the relative and individual effects of NOx versus SO2 controls on nitrogen deposition using air quality modeling results obtained from the simultaneous application of NOx and SO2 emission controls is presented and discussed using the results from CMAQ simulations conducted with NOx-only and SO2-only emission reductions; the method applies only to cases in which ambient inorganic nitrate is present mostly in the gas phase; that is, in the form of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3). In such instances, the individual effects of NOx and SO2 controls on nitrogen deposition can be approximated by the effects of combined NOx + SO2 controls on the deposition of NOy, (the sum of oxidized nitrogen species) and reduced nitrogen species (NHx), respectively. The benefit of controls at the plant in terms of the decrease in nitrogen deposition to Escambia Bay and watershed is less than 6% of the overall benefit due to regional Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) controls.

  15. 40 CFR 52.2679 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... because they are inconsistent with section 123(a)(2) of the Clean Air Act which requires continuous control strategies. (1) Rule 13.2, submitted on October 12, 1979. [46 FR 26304, May 6, 1981] ...

  16. Lithium sulfur batteries and electrolytes and sulfur cathodes thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J.; Goncharenko, Nikolay; Nimon, Vitaliy; Petrov, Alexei; Nimon, Yevgeniy S.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.; Katz, Bruce D.; Loginova, Valentina

    2017-05-23

    Lithium sulfur battery cells that use water as an electrolyte solvent provide significant cost reductions. Electrolytes for the battery cells may include water solvent for maintaining electroactive sulfur species in solution during cell discharge and a sufficient amount of a cycle life-enhancing compound that facilitates charging at the cathode. The combination of these two components enhances one or more of the following cell attributes: energy density, power density and cycle life. For instance, in applications where cost per Watt-Hour (Wh) is paramount, such as grid storage and traction applications, the use of an aqueous electrolyte in combination with inexpensive sulfur as the cathode active material can be a key enabler for the utility and automotive industries, for example, providing a cost effective and compact solution for load leveling, electric vehicles and renewable energy storage. Sulfur cathodes, and methods of fabricating lithium sulfur cells, in particular for loading lithium sulfide into the cathode structures, provide further advantages.

  17. Effect of characteristic of sorbents on their sulfur capture capability at a fluidized bed condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leming Cheng; Bo Chen; Ni Liu; Zhongyang Luo; Kefa Cen [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Clean Energy and Environment Engineering Key Lab of Ministry of Education, Institute for Thermal Power Engineering

    2004-05-01

    This research was intent for finding relationships among physical and/or chemical properties of sorbents and their sulfur capture capability at a fluidized bed condition. Three limestones and two seashells were chosen as a SO{sub 2} sorbent. Characteristics of sorbents were evaluated based on atomic absorption spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope and mercury-penetration porosimeter analyses. Their sulfur capture capabilities were measured on a fluidized bed test system at 800, 850, 900 and 950{sup o}C. Conversion of the sobents was computed and analyzed depending on the sorbents' morphology and microstructure analysis. Results showed pore size and specific surface might have large influence on sorbents' desulfurization ability in the range of 800 950{sup o}C. 14 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Effects on crystal structure of CZTS thin films owing to deionized water and sulfurization treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadi, Samia Ahmed; Chelvanathan, Puvaneswaran; Islam, M. A.; Sopian, Kamruzzaman [Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Yusoff, Yulisa [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Nowshad [Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical, Electronic and Systems Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); College of Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-05-15

    To condense the cost and increase the production, using abundantly obtainable non-toxic elements, Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) seem to be a strong contender among the photovoltaic thin film technologies. Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} thin films were fabricated by RF magnetron sputtering system. CZTS were sputtered on Molybdenum (Mo) coated soda lime glass (SLG) using a single target sputtering technique. The sputtering parameters (base pressure, working pressure, Argon (Ar) flow rate, RF power and sputtering time) were kept same for all three types of films. For sulfurization, the temperature used was 500 °C. Finally, As-deposited film was immersed in DIW before undergoing identical sulfurization profile. As-deposited film (Sample A), sulfurized films (Sample B) and sulfurized plus DIW treated (Sample C) were compared in terms of their structural properties by means of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) measurement and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Sample B and C showed peak of (1 1 2) planes of CZTS which are characteristics of stannite structure. Post deposition treatment on CZTS films proved to be beneficial as evident from the observed enhancement in the crystallinity and grain growth. Significant difference on grain size and area roughness could be observed from the AFM measurement. The roughness of Sample A, B and C increased from 5.007 nm to 20.509 nm and 14.183 nm accordingly. From XRD data secondary phases of Cu{sub x}MoS{sub x} could be observed.

  19. Interactive effects of vertical mixing, solar radiation and microbial activity on oceanic dimethylated sulfur cycling

    OpenAIRE

    Galí Tàpias, Martí

    2012-01-01

    The production and subsequent emission of volatile compounds is one of the numerous ways by which microbial plankton participate in the cycling of elements and influence the Earth's climate. Dimethylsulfide (DMS), produced by enzymatic decomposition of the algal intracellular compound dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), is the more abundant organic volatile in the upper ocean. Its global emission amounts ca. 28 Tg S per year, and represents the main biogenic source of sulfur to the troposphere...

  20. Conduction-type control of SnSx films prepared by the sol–gel method for different sulfur contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chung-Cheng; Lin, Yow-Jon; Chuang, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Chia-Jyi; Yang, Yao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of S content on the electrical property of the SnS x film was examined. ► For S-rich films, the probability of having formed Sn vacancies (V Sn ) should be high. ► Transformation from V Sn to V Sn 2- is accompanied by lattice relaxation. ► Transformation from Sn 2+ to Sn 4+ is an offset to lattice relaxation. ► A link between the conduction type and defects was established. -- Abstract: The effect of S content on the electrical property of the sol–gel SnS x films was examined. The observed conduction-type changes are related to the different ratios between the concentrations of Sn 4+ and Sn 2+ . The experimental identification confirms that n-type conversion is due to an increase in the atomic concentration ratio of Sn 4+ /(Sn 4+ + Sn 2+ ) in the S-rich film. The probability of having formed Sn vacancies (V Sn ) should be high under S-rich growth conditions. Transformation from V Sn to V Sn 2- is accompanied by lattice relaxation. Therefore, transformation from Sn 2+ to Sn 4+ is an offset to lattice relaxation under S-rich growth conditions, increasing the electron density and producing n-type conversion. A suitable sulfur concentration is an important issue for tuning conduction type of SnS x

  1. Effect of sulfurization temperature on the property of Cu2ZnSnS4 thin film by eco-friendly nanoparticle ink method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Honglie; Yao, Hanyu; Shang, Huirong; Tang, ZhengXia; Li, Yufang

    2017-09-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films were fabricated by a low-cost nanoparticle ink method. The eco-friendly hydrophilic CZTS nanoparticles were mixed with low-cost n-propanol to form nanoparticle ink. To improve crystallinity and remove oxygen element, the CZTS thin films were sulfurized further. The effects of sulfurization temperature on the structure, morphologies, and photovoltaic performances of CZTS thin films were investigated. The results showed that the crystallinity of CZTS thin film was improved with increasing sulfurization temperature. The surface morphology studies demonstrated the formation of compact and homogenous CZTS thin film at a sulfurization temperature of 600 °C. By optimizing thickness of CZTS thin film, the CZTS thin-film solar cell with an optimal efficiency of 2.1% was obtained.

  2. Effect of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide on initial stage of coal liquefaction in tetralin; Sekitan ekika shoki katei ni okeru io to ryuka suiso no hatasu yakuwari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, M. [Government Industrial Research Institute, Kyushu, Saga (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    It is well known that the solubilization of coal can be accelerated by adding sulfur or hydrogen sulfide during direct liquefaction of difficult coals. From the studies of authors on the coal liquefaction under the conditions at rather low temperatures between 300 and 400{degree}C, liquefaction products with high quality can be obtained by suppressing the aromatization of naphthene rings, but it was a problem that the reaction rate is slow. For improving this point, results obtained by changing solvents have been reported. In this study, to accelerate the liquefaction reaction, Illinois No.6 coal was liquefied in tetralin at temperature range from 300 to 400{degree}C by adding a given amount of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide at the initial stage of liquefaction. The addition of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide provided an acceleration effect of liquefaction reaction at temperature range between 300 and 400{degree}C. The addition of sulfur or hydrogen sulfide at 400{degree}C increased the oil products. At 370 and 400{degree}C, the liquid yield by adding sulfur was slightly higher than that by adding hydrogen sulfide, unexpectedly. The effects of sulfur and hydrogen sulfide were reversed when increasing the hydrogen pressure. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Biologically produced sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are

  4. Chain-Branching Control of the Atomic Structure of Alkanethiol-Based Gold–Sulfur Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong

    2011-01-01

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111......): direct binding to the Au(111) surface without pitting, binding to adatoms above a regular surface with extensive pitting, and binding to adatoms with local surface vacancies and some pitting. Thermal motions are shown to produce some observed STM features, with a very tight energy balance controlling...

  5. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  6. Effect of sulfur dioxide on the development of an anaphylactic reaction in guinea pigs sensitized by an immunosorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khristova, L; Orlov, G

    1973-01-01

    The effect of sulfur dioxide on the development of experimentally- induced anaphylaxis in guinea pigs inhaling antigenic aerosol (egg albumin) was studied. The animals were sensitized in advance with a complex of protein and sefadex (immunosorbent). Animals exposed for 60 min to SO/sub 2/ showed more severe anaphylactic seizures immediately after aerosol provocation than did animals not exposed to SO/sub 2/. The use of the immunosorbent resulted in the formation of large amounts of antibodies and prolonged antibody response, indicating the suitability of this method for sensitization.

  7. Antibotulinal efficacy of sulfur dioxide in meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkin, R B; Christiansen, L N; Shaparis, A B

    1980-01-01

    The addition of sodium metabisulfite as a source of sulfur dioxide delayed botulinal outgrowth in perishable canned comminuted pork when it was temperature abused at 27 degree C. The degree of inhibition was directly related to the level of sulfur dioxide. Levels greater than 100 microgram of sulfur dioxide per g were necessary to achieve significant inhibition when a target level of 100 botulinal spores per g was used. Sodium nitrite partially reduced the efficacy of the sulfur dioxide. Sulfur dioxide offers a new option for the control of botulinal outgrowth in cured or noncured meat and poultry products. PMID:6996613

  8. Balancing surface adsorption and diffusion of lithium-polysulfides on nonconductive oxides for lithium?sulfur battery design

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Xinyong; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Chong; Wang, Haotian; Yao, Hongbin; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Cai, Qiuxia; Li, Weiyang; Zhou, Guangmin; Zu, Chenxi; Cui, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium?sulfur batteries have attracted attention due to their six-fold specific energy compared with conventional lithium-ion batteries. Dissolution of lithium polysulfides, volume expansion of sulfur and uncontrollable deposition of lithium sulfide are three of the main challenges for this technology. State-of-the-art sulfur cathodes based on metal-oxide nanostructures can suppress the shuttle-effect and enable controlled lithium sulfide deposition. However, a clear mechanistic understandin...

  9. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  10. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. Coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and European gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing al aspects of this project. 1 ref., 69 figs., 45 tabs.

  11. Effect of Iron Oxides (Ordinary and Nano and Municipal Solid Waste Compost (MSWC Coated Sulfur on Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Plant Iron Concentration and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mazaherinia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A greenhouse study was conducted to compare the effects of ordinary iron oxide (0.02-0.06 mm and nano iron oxide (25-250 nm and five levels of both iron oxides (0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 %w/w and two levels of sulfurous granular compost (MSW (0 and 2% w/w on plant height, spike length, grain weight per spike, total plant dry matter weight and thousands grain weight of wheat. The experimental factors were combined in factorial arrangement in a completely randomized design with 3 replications. Results showed that nano iron oxide was superior over ordinary iron oxide in all parameters studied. Fe concentration, spike length, plant height, grain weight per spike, total plant dry weight and thousands grain weight showed increasing trend per increase in both of iron oxides levels. Also, all parameters studied in sulfurous granular compost (MSW treatment were superior over granular compost without sulfurous (MSW. This increase in all parameters were significantly higher when urban solid waste compost coated with sulfur coupled with nano iron oxide compared to urban sulfurous granular compost (MSW along with ordinary iron oxide. Keywords: Sulfurous granular compost (MSW, Nano and ordinary iron oxides, Wheat

  12. Effect of layer thickness on device response of silicon heavily supersaturated with sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, David [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY 12180 (United States); Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, United States Military Academy, West Point NY 10996 (United States); Mathews, Jay [US Army ARDEC – Benét Laboratories, Watervliet NY 12189 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States); Sullivan, Joseph T.; Buonassisi, Tonio [School of Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States); Akey, Austin [School of Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA 02139 (United States); Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Aziz, Michael J. [Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Persans, Peter [Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY 12180 (United States); Warrender, Jeffrey M., E-mail: jwarrend@post.harvard.edu [US Army ARDEC – Benét Laboratories, Watervliet NY 12189 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We report on a simple experiment in which the thickness of a hyperdoped silicon layer, supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification, is systematically varied at constant average sulfur concentration, by varying the implantation energy, dose, and laser fluence. Contacts are deposited and the external quantum efficiency (EQE) is measured for visible wavelengths. We posit that the sulfur layer primarily absorbs light but contributes negligible photocurrent, and we seek to support this by analyzing the EQE data for the different layer thicknesses in two interlocking ways. In the first, we use the measured concentration depth profiles to obtain the approximate layer thicknesses, and, for each wavelength, fit the EQE vs. layer thickness curve to obtain the absorption coefficient of hyperdoped silicon for that wavelength. Comparison to literature values for the hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficients [S.H. Pan et al. Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)] shows good agreement. Next, we essentially run this process in reverse; we fit with Beer’s law the curves of EQE vs. hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficient for those wavelengths that are primarily absorbed in the hyperdoped silicon layer, and find that the layer thicknesses obtained from the fit are in good agreement with the original values obtained from the depth profiles. We conclude that the data support our interpretation of the hyperdoped silicon layer as providing negligible photocurrent at high S concentrations. This work validates the absorption data of Pan et al. [Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011)], and is consistent with reports of short mobility-lifetime products in hyperdoped layers. It suggests that for optoelectronic devices containing hyperdoped layers, the most important contribution to the above band gap photoresponse may be due to photons absorbed below the hyperdoped layer.

  13. Effect of layer thickness on device response of silicon heavily supersaturated with sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hutchinson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on a simple experiment in which the thickness of a hyperdoped silicon layer, supersaturated with sulfur by ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid solidification, is systematically varied at constant average sulfur concentration, by varying the implantation energy, dose, and laser fluence. Contacts are deposited and the external quantum efficiency (EQE is measured for visible wavelengths. We posit that the sulfur layer primarily absorbs light but contributes negligible photocurrent, and we seek to support this by analyzing the EQE data for the different layer thicknesses in two interlocking ways. In the first, we use the measured concentration depth profiles to obtain the approximate layer thicknesses, and, for each wavelength, fit the EQE vs. layer thickness curve to obtain the absorption coefficient of hyperdoped silicon for that wavelength. Comparison to literature values for the hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficients [S.H. Pan et al. Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011] shows good agreement. Next, we essentially run this process in reverse; we fit with Beer’s law the curves of EQE vs. hyperdoped silicon absorption coefficient for those wavelengths that are primarily absorbed in the hyperdoped silicon layer, and find that the layer thicknesses obtained from the fit are in good agreement with the original values obtained from the depth profiles. We conclude that the data support our interpretation of the hyperdoped silicon layer as providing negligible photocurrent at high S concentrations. This work validates the absorption data of Pan et al. [Applied Physics Letters 98, 121913 (2011], and is consistent with reports of short mobility-lifetime products in hyperdoped layers. It suggests that for optoelectronic devices containing hyperdoped layers, the most important contribution to the above band gap photoresponse may be due to photons absorbed below the hyperdoped layer.

  14. Effect of sulfur and Nano- carbon black on the mechanical properties of hard rubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hamza Al-Maamori

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the properties of hard rubber(Ebonite from natural rubber, added Nano-Carbon black, where measured the properties of tensile, density, hardness and the properties of the vulcanization of a group of samples with different amount of sulfur from 18-36 pphr and different of carbon black (18-26-30 pphr. The results showed that the best carbon black ratio is 30 pphr, where it gives a balance between tensile properties of hand and toughness and flexibility of on the other hand and reduce brittleness in hard rubber.

  15. Effect of iron and chromium on the graphitization behaviour of sulfur-containing carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyumentsev, V.A.; Belenkov, E.A.; Saunina, S.I.; Podkopaev, S.A.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1998-01-01

    Process of transition of carbonaceous material, containing structurally incorporated sulfur, into graphite and impact of iron and chromium additions are studied. It is established that carbonaceous material, containing more than 1.5 mass % S and also 1.5 mass % Cr 2 O 3 is heterogeneous after thermal treatment at 1300-1600 deg C. It consists of large and sufficiency complete areas of coherent scattering having graphite structure and ultra-dispersed matrix. The number of graphite crystals formed in the presence of dispersed iron within this temperature range, decreases by two times [ru

  16. Kinetic effects of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration: nitrile hydratase insights from bioinspired ruthenium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Davinder; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic investigations inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase were performed on a series of ruthenium(II) complexes to determine the effect of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration. The rate of benzonitrile hydration was quantified as a function of catalyst, nitrile, and water concentrations. Precatalysts L(n)RuPPh3 (n = 1-3; L(1) = 4,7-bis(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(2) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(3) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfenato-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane) were activated by substitution of triphenylphosphine with substrate in hot dimethylformamide solution. Rate measurements are consistent with a dynamic equilibrium between inactive aqua (L(n)Ru-OH2) and active nitrile (L(n)Ru-NCR) derivatives with K = 21 ± 1, 9 ± 0.9, and 23 ± 3 for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Subsequent hydration of the L(n)Ru-NCR intermediate yields the amide product with measured hydration rate constants (k's) of 0.37 ± 0.01, 0.82 ± 0.07, and 1.59 ± 0.12 M(-1) h(-1) for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Temperature dependent studies reveal that sulfur oxidation lowers the enthalpic barrier by 27 kJ/mol, but increases the entropic barrier by 65 J/(mol K). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/LanL2DZ (Ru); 6-31G(d) (all other atoms)) support a nitrile bound catalytic cycle with lowering of the reaction barrier as a consequence of sulfur oxidation through enhanced nitrile binding and attack of the water nucleophile through a highly organized transition state.

  17. Political economy of low sulfurization and air pollution control policy in Japan : SOx emission reduction by fuel conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Terao, Tadayoshi

    2013-01-01

    In the early stages of the development of Japan’s environmental policy, sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions, which seriously damage health, was the most important air pollution problem. In the second half of the 1960s and the first half of the 1970s, the measures against SOx emissions progressed quickly, and these emissions were reduced drastically. The most important factor of the reduction was the conversion to a low-sulfur fuel for large-scale fuel users, such as the electric power industry. Howe...

  18. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  19. Effects of Low Sulfur Fuel and a Catalyzed Particle Trap on the Composition and Toxicity of Diesel Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jacob D.; Harrod, Kevin S.; Seagrave, JeanClare; Seilkop, Steven K.; Mauderly, Joe L.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we compared a “baseline” condition of uncontrolled diesel engine exhaust (DEE) emissions generated with current (circa 2003) certification fuel to an emissions-reduction (ER) case with low sulfur fuel and a catalyzed particle trap. Lung toxicity assessments (resistance to respiratory viral infection, lung inflammation, and oxidative stress) were performed on mice (C57Bl/6) exposed by inhalation (6 hr/day for 7 days). The engine was operated identically (same engine load) in both cases, and the inhalation exposures were conducted at the same exhaust dilution rate. For baseline DEE, this dilution resulted in a particle mass (PM) concentration of approximately 200 μg/m3 PM, whereas the ER reduced the PM and almost every other measured constituent [except nitrogen oxides (NOx)] to near background levels in the exposure atmospheres. These measurements included PM, PM size distribution, PM composition (carbon, ions, elements), NOx, carbon monoxide, speciated/total volatile hydrocarbons, and several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds. After exposure concluded, one group of mice was immediately sacrificed and assessed for inflammation and oxidative stress in lung homogenate. Another group of mice were intratracheally instilled with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and RSV lung clearance and inflammation was assessed 4 days later. Baseline DEE produced statistically significant biological effects for all measured parameters. The use of low sulfur fuel and a catalyzed trap either completely or nearly eliminated the effects. PMID:15345344

  20. The Effect of Fuel Mass Fraction on the Combustion and Fluid Flow in a Sulfur Recovery Unit Thermal Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lang Yeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur recovery unit (SRU thermal reactors are negatively affected by high temperature operation. In this paper, the effect of the fuel mass fraction on the combustion and fluid flow in a SRU thermal reactor is investigated numerically. Practical operating conditions for a petrochemical corporation in Taiwan are used as the design conditions for the discussion. The simulation results show that the present design condition is a fuel-rich (or air-lean condition and gives acceptable sulfur recovery, hydrogen sulfide (H2S destruction, sulfur dioxide (SO2 emissions and thermal reactor temperature for an oxygen-normal operation. However, for an oxygen-rich operation, the local maximum temperature exceeds the suggested maximum service temperature, although the average temperature is acceptable. The high temperature region must be inspected very carefully during the annual maintenance period if there are oxygen-rich operations. If the fuel mass fraction to the zone ahead of the choke ring (zone 1 is 0.0625 or 0.125, the average temperature in the zone behind the choke ring (zone 2 is higher than the zone 1 average temperature, which can damage the downstream heat exchanger tubes. If the zone 1 fuel mass fraction is reduced to ensure a lower zone 1 temperature, the temperature in zone 2 and the heat exchanger section must be monitored closely and the zone 2 wall and heat exchanger tubes must be inspected very carefully during the annual maintenance period. To determine a suitable fuel mass fraction for operation, a detailed numerical simulation should be performed first to find the stoichiometric fuel mass fraction which produces the most complete combustion and the highest temperature. This stoichiometric fuel mass fraction should be avoided because the high temperature could damage the zone 1 corner or the choke ring. A higher fuel mass fraction (i.e., fuel-rich or air-lean condition is more suitable because it can avoid deteriorations of both zone 1

  1. Sulfur turnover and emissions during storage of cattle slurry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Andersen, Astrid J; Poulsen, Henrik Vestergaard

    2012-01-01

    Slurry acidification using sulfuric acid reduces ammonia emissions but also affects sulfur (S) cycling. Emission of sulfur is a source of malodor and reduces the sulfur fertilizer value of the slurry. We investigated the effect of sulfate and methionine amendments, alone or in combination...

  2. SULFUR POLYMER ENCAPSULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KALB, P.

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur polymer cement (SPC) is a thermoplastic polymer consisting of 95 wt% elemental sulfur and 5 wt% organic modifiers to enhance long-term durability. SPC was originally developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines as an alternative to hydraulic cement for construction applications. Previous attempts to use elemental sulfur as a construction material in the chemical industry failed due to premature degradation. These failures were caused by the internal stresses that result from changes in crystalline structure upon cooling of the material. By reacting elemental sulfur with organic polymers, the Bureau of Mines developed a product that successfully suppresses the solid phase transition and significantly improves the stability of the product. SPC, originally named modified sulfur cement, is produced from readily available, inexpensive waste sulfur derived from desulfurization of both flue gases and petroleum. The commercial production of SPC is licensed in the United States by Martin Resources (Odessa, Texas) and is marketed under the trade name Chement 2000. It is sold in granular form and is relatively inexpensive ((approx)$0.10 to 0.12/lb). Application of SPC for the treatment of radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes was initially developed and patented by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in the mid-1980s (Kalb and Colombo, 1985; Colombo et al., 1997). The process was subsequently investigated by the Commission of the European Communities (Van Dalen and Rijpkema, 1989), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Darnell, 1991), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Mattus and Mattus, 1994). SPC has been used primarily in microencapsulation applications but can also be used for macroencapsulation of waste. SPC microencapsulation has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for a wide variety of wastes, including incinerator hearth and fly ash; aqueous concentrates such as sulfates, borates, and chlorides; blowdown solutions; soils; and sludges. It is not

  3. Effects of sulfurization on the optical properties of Cu2ZnxFe1-xSnS4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannachi, A.; Oueslati, H.; Khemiri, N.; Kanzari, M.

    2017-10-01

    In order to prepare thin films of novel semiconductor materials that contain only earth abundant, low cost and nontoxic elements, Cu2ZnxFe1-xSnS4 ingots were successfully synthesized by direct fusion method. Crushed powders of these ingots were used as raw materials for the thermal evaporation. Cu2ZnxFe1-xSnS4 (with x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) thin films were deposited on non-heated glass substrates by vacuum evaporation method. The as deposited films were sulfurized for 30 min at sulfurization temperature Ts = 400 °C. The effects of the sulfurization on the structural and optical properties of CZFTS films were realized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. XRD patterns show that all sulfurized CZFTS films were polycrystalline in nature with a preferential orientation along the (112) plane. CFTS films exhibit a stannite structure while CZTS films had a kesterite structure. Optical measurements showed that CZFTS films sulfurized at 400 °C exhibited an optical transmittance between 60 and 80% and all materials had relatively high absorption coefficients in the range of 104-105 cm-1. The band gap energies of sulfurized CZFTS films decreased from 1.71 to 1.50 eV with the increase of the Zn content. The dispersion of the refractive index was discussed in terms of the single oscillator model proposed by Wemple and DiDomenico and the optical parameters such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, oscillator energy and dispersion energy were calculated. The electrical free carrier susceptibility and the carrier concentration on the effective mass ratio were evaluated according to the model of Spitzer and Fan. The hot probe analysis showed that all sulfurized CZFTS films are p-type conductivity.

  4. Simultaneous heterotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process for drinking water treatment: control of sulfate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin; Kilic, Adem; Demirel, Sevgi; Uyanik, Sinan; Cinar, Ozer

    2011-12-15

    A long-term performance of a packed-bed bioreactor containing sulfur and limestone was evaluated for the denitrification of drinking water. Autotrophic denitrification rate was limited by the slow dissolution rate of sulfur and limestone. Dissolution of limestone for alkalinity supplementation increased hardness due to release of Ca(2+). Sulfate production is the main disadvantage of the sulfur autotrophic denitrification process. The effluent sulfate concentration was reduced to values below drinking water guidelines by stimulating the simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification with methanol supplementation. Complete removal of 75 mg/L NO(3)-N with effluent sulfate concentration of around 225 mg/L was achieved when methanol was supplemented at methanol/NO(3)-N ratio of 1.67 (mg/mg), which was much lower than the theoretical value of 2.47 for heterotrophic denitrification. Batch studies showed that sulfur-based autotrophic NO(2)-N reduction rate was around three times lower than the reduction rate of NO(3)-N, which led to NO(2)-N accumulation at high loadings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemistry and preliminary environmental effects of mixtures of triisopropyl phosphite, Bis-(2-ethylexyl)-phosphonate, and sulfur. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Harvey, S.D.; McVeety, B.D.; Fellows, R.J.; Van Noris, P.

    1991-12-01

    The present studies were performed to evaluate the reaction chemistry and preliminary biotic impacts of BIS, TIP, and TIPS. Reaction chemistry studies were designed to simulate in-flight mixing characteristics. The binary mixture undergoes rapid and nearly complete reaction. The final products released to the environment are TIPS and excess elemental sulfur. There is an apparent species sensitivity difference in algae for the simulants BIS, TIP, and TIPS, with Chlorella being more sensitive than Selenastrum based on cell number studies. However, the extent of adverse effects was not excessive for either algal species. There was no apparent effect of TIP or TIPS on the electron transport systems of isolated chloroplasts at the concentration tested (10 ppm). In general, it is unlikely that environmental release of these products would have significant or lasting effects, based on the preliminary algal tests and electron transport studies.

  6. Effectiveness of Biodiesel from Various Tropical Oil Crops on Lubricity Improvement of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chollacoop, Nuwong; Topaiboul, Subongkoj; Goodwin, Vituruch (Bioenergy Group, National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC), Thailand Science Park, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand)). e-mail: nuwongc@mtec.or.th

    2008-10-15

    Ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) has been introduced worldwide with an aim to reduce emission. Since the desulfurization process for ULSD inadvertently reduces its lubricity, lubricity additive is needed. Biodiesel emerges as a potential candidate due to its excellent lubricity property and little sulfur content. In the present study, biodiesel from various energy crops available in Thailand was added at various amounts to ULSD to test the lubricity according to the CEC-F-06-A-96 standard (using High-Frequency Reciprocating Rig: HFRR [1]). It was found that when biodiesel from crude palm, jatropha, soybean, coconut, sunflower, rice, corn and sesame oils of less than 1% (by volume) is additized to ULSD, the lubricity is improved to meet the diesel standard. Further addition beyond 2% (by volume) does not improve lubricity remarkably, where the lubrication seems to saturate. Biodiesel improves lubricity property by film formation preventing mechanical contact between the rubbing surfaces, and the effectiveness varies among different feedstock oils. Biodiesel from crude palm oil, jatropha oil and coconut oil seemingly are superior lubricity additives in ULSD than that from soybean oil, sunflower oil, rice oil, corn oil and sesame oil. Keywords: biodiesel, bio-lubricants, palm oil, sunflower oil

  7. Effect of sulfur addition and heat treatment on electrical conductivity of barium vanadate glasses containing iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassaan, M.Y., E-mail: myhassaan@yahoo.com [Al-Azhar University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, 11884 Cairo (Egypt); Ebrahim, F.M.; Mostafa, A.G. [Al-Azhar University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, 11884 Cairo (Egypt); El-Desoky, M.M., E-mail: mmdesoky@gmail.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Suez (Egypt)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Selected glasses of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-BaO-5Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} system have been transformed into nanomaterials by annealing at temperature close to crystallization temperature (T{sub c}) for 1 h. {yields} Glass ceramic nanocrystals are important because of their physical properties which are not obtainable in other classes of materials. {yields} Crystal and grain sizes are the most significant structural parameters in electronic nanocrystalline glassy phases. {yields} These phases have very high electrical conductivity, hence glass-ceramic nanocrystals are expected to be used, for example, as a gas sensor. - Abstract: Six glass samples with a composition of 75V{sub 2}O{sub 5} + 10BaO + 15Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} mol%, with 0, 10, 15, 20, and 25 wt% of sulfur were prepared by using a quenching method. The samples were measured by XRD, DSC, TEM, Moessbauer spectrometry and D.C. conductivity. The prepared samples were heat treated at temperature close to their crystallization temperatures for 1 h, and then the previous measurements were repeated. The results showed that the treatment process caused the formation of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and FeVO{sub 4} nanocrystals with size of 17-25 nm dispersed in the glass matrix. The addition of sulfur reduced only the vanadium ions to V{sup 4+}, while it was found that iron ions were Fe{sup 3+} only. D.C. conduction enhanced due to the small polaron or electron hopping from V{sup 4+} to V{sup 5+} ions. The heat treated samples exhibit much higher conductivity and much lower activation energy than the as-prepared glasses. The heat treated samples showed decreased thermal stability with the addition of sulfur. This considerable enhancement of electrical conductivity after nanocrystallization referred to the formation of extensive and dense network of electronic conduction paths which are situated between V{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanocrystals and their surfaces.

  8. SELECTED YIELD COMPONENTS IN WHITE MUSTARD (SINAPIS ALBA VERSUS SULFUR FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena BARCZAK

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As shown by the research made based on the four-year field experiment, sulfur fertilization, in general, significantly differentiated the white mustard yield components. Of all the factors (sulfur application method, its form and dose, the greatest effect on the yield structure components was demonstrated for the sulfur dose. The use of 40 kg S·ha-1, regardless of the form applied and the sulfur application method, resulted in significant increases in most of the characters, as compared with the control. The application of sulfur into soil showed a significantly more favorable effect on the seed weigh and number per silique and on the weight of seeds of the entire plant than the foliar application of this nutrient. The white mustard seed yield size was most correlated with the number of siliques per plant, and successively less with the thousand seed weight.

  9. [An observation of the effect of sulfur dioxide on rat nasal mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z Q

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the effect of SO2 on rat nasal mucosa. The rats were forced to inhale SO2 and the effect on the nasal mucosa observed. The rats were divided into four groups. The first group inhaled 10ppm SO2; the second group 20ppm; the third group 40 ppm and the fourth group served as control. The observation lasted for 6 months. It was found that the nasal mucosa in the control group remained columnar ciliated. In the experimental groups, during the early stage (groups I, II) of exposure, there was no significant morphological change in epithelium. Then (groups I, II) the epithelium changed into cuboidal with complete disappearance of cilia, only some short and slender microvilli remained. While in the late stage (group III), the epithelium had transformed into squamous stratified and the amount of mucosal glands reduced.

  10. Degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack: Experiment investigation on the effect of high volume fly ash content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiawan, S. A.; Sunarmasto; Tyas, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Concrete is susceptible to a variety of chemical attacks. In the sulfuric acid environment, concrete is subjected to a combination of sulfuric and acid attack. This research is aimed to investigate the degradation of self-compacting concrete (SCC) due to sulfuric acid attack based on measurement of compressive strength loss and diameter change. Since the proportion of SCC contains higher cement than that of normal concrete, the vulnerability of this concrete to sulfuric acid attack could be reduced by partial replacement of cement with fly ash at high volume level. The effect of high volume fly ash at 50-70% cement replacement levels on the extent of degradation owing to sulfuric acid will be assessed in this study. It can be shown that an increase in the utilization of fly ash to partially replace cement tends to reduce the degradation as confirmed by less compressive strength loss and diameter change. The effect of fly ash to reduce the degradation of SCC is more pronounced at a later age.

  11. The effect of phosphorus and sulfur treatment on the surface properties of InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, R.; Chang, R. R.; Dubey, A.; Lile, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for InP surfaces treated by using red phosphorus as a source to create an excess overpressure of phosphorus during annealing and prior to silicon dioxide deposition. The surface has been probed by in situ photoluminescence, noncontacting remote gate C-V, and conventional high-frequency and quasi-static C-V methods. A study has also been made of the surface of sulfurized InP following heating in aqueous (NH4)2S(x). MISFETs fabricated using the benefits of these surface treatments show high transconductances and stabilities approaching those of thermal SiO2/Si with less than 5-percent variation in drain current over a 12-hr period.

  12. Effect of naphtha diluent on greenhouse gases and reduced sulfur compounds emissions from oil sands tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kathleen F; Poon, Ho Yin; Hashisho, Zaher; Ulrich, Ania C

    2017-11-15

    The long-term storage of oil sands tailings has resulted in the evolution of greenhouse gases (CH 4 and CO 2 ) as a result of residual organics biodegradation. Recent studies have identified black, sulfidic zones below the tailings-water interface, which may be producing toxic sulfur-containing gases. An anaerobic mesocosm study was conducted over an 11-week period to characterize the evolution of CH 4 , CO 2 and reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) (including H 2 S) in tailings as it relates to naphtha-containing diluent concentrations (0.2, 0.8, and 1.5% w/v) and microbial activity. Our results showed that RSCs were produced first at 0.12μmol°RSCs/mL MFT (1.5% w/v diluent treatment). RSCs contribution (from highest to lowest) was H 2 S and 2-methylthiophene>2.5-dimethylthiophene>3-methylthiophene>thiofuran>butyl mercaptan>carbonyl sulfide, where H 2 S and 2-methylthiophene contributed 81% of the gas produced. CH 4 and CO 2 production occurred after week 5 at 40.7μmolCH 4 /mL MFT and 5.9μmolCO 2 /mL MFT (1.5% w/v diluent treatment). The amount of H 2 S and CH 4 generated is correlated to the amount of diluent present and to microbial activity as shown by corresponding increases in sulfate-reducers' Dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB) gene and methanogens' methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of synthetic pesticides and sulfur used in conventional and organically grown strawberry and soybean on Neozygites floridana, a natural enemy of spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Thiago; Roggia, Samuel; Wekesa, Vitalis W; de Andrade Moral, Rafael; Gb Demétrio, Clarice; Delalibera, Italo; Klingen, Ingeborg

    2016-09-01

    The beneficial fungus Neozygites floridana kills the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae, which is a serious polyphagous plant pest worldwide. Outbreaks of spider mites in strawberry and soybean have been associated with pesticide applications. Pesticides may affect N. floridana and consequently the natural control of T. urticae. N. floridana is a fungus difficult to grow in artificial media, and for this reason, very few studies have been conducted with this fungus, especially regarding the impact of pesticides. The aim of this study was to conduct a laboratory experiment to evaluate the effect of pesticides used in strawberry and soybean crops on N. floridana. Among the pesticides used in strawberry, the fungicides sulfur and cyprodinil + fludioxonil completely inhibited both the sporulation and conidial germination of N. floridana. The fungicide fluazinam affected N. floridana drastically. The application of the fungicide tebuconazole and the insecticides fenpropathrin and abamectin resulted in a less pronounced negative effect on N. floridana. Except for epoxiconazole and cyproconazole, all tested fungicides used in soybean resulted in a complete inhibition of N. floridana. Among the three insecticides used in soybean, lambda-cyhalothrin and deltamethrin resulted in a significant inhibition of N. floridana. The insecticides/ acaricides abamectin and lambda-cyhalothrin at half concentrations and fenpropathrin and permethrin and the fungicide tebuconazole at the recommended concentrations resulted in the lowest impact on N. floridana. The fungicides with the active ingredients sulfur, cyprodinil + fludioxonil, azoxystrobin, azoxystrobin + cyproconazole, trifloxystrobin + tebuconazole and pyraclostrobin + epoxiconazole negatively affected N. floridana. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Effects of Rhizobium inoculation on Trifolium resupinatum antioxidant system under sulfur dioxide pollution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Bayat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plant growth stimulating rhizobacteria are beneficial bacteria that can cause resistance to various stresses in plants. One of these stresses is SO2 air pollution. SO2 is known as a strong damaging air pollutant that limits growth of plants. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effects of bacterial inoculation with native and standard Rhizobium on Persian clover root growth and antioxidants activity and capacity under air SO2 pollution. Materials and methods: In this study, 31 days plants (no-inoculated and inoculated with two strains of Rhizobium exposed to the different concentrations of SO2 (0 as a control, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 ppm for 5 consecutive days and 2 hours per day. Results: Results showed different concentrations of SO2 had a significant effect on Persian clover root weight and antioxidant system. Increasing SO2 stress decreased root fresh and dry weight and antioxidant capacities (IC50 and increased antioxidant activities (I% of Persian clover leaves significantly in comparison to the control plants (under 0 ppm and increased SOD, CAT and GPX activity. Inoculation of Persian clover plants with native and standard Rhizobium increased root weight and did not show a significant effect on antioxidants activity and capacity, but interaction between Rhizobium inoculation and SO2 treatment reduced significantly the stress effects of high concentration of SO2 on root growth and antioxidants activity and capacity. In fact, level of this change of root growth and antioxidant system under SO2 pollution stress in inoculated plants was lower than in the non-inoculated plants. Discussion and conclusion: As a result, an increase in SO2 concentration caused a decrease in root weight, increase in antioxidants activity and capacity of Persian clover. Inoculation with Rhizobium strains could alleviate the effect of SO2 pollution on antioxidant system by effects on root growth.

  15. Study on Effectiveness of Low Dose Theophylline as Add-on to Inhaled Corticosteroid for Patients with Sulfur Mustard Induced Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Theophylline may reverse steroid resistance and decrease inflammation in patients with chronic pulmonary disease and sulfur mustard (SM induced bronchiolitis. This study was designed to assess the effects of low-dose theophylline on improvement of pulmonary function tests (PFTs of SM exposed patients.Methods: In this comparative observational study, a group of SM-exposed victims during the Iraq-Iran war who were treated with oral slow releasing (SR theophylline, salmetrol, fluxitide, omeprazole and NAC (study group were compared to a group of age and gender matched SM-exposed patients who received same medications except oral SR theophylline (historical control group. PFTs were measured at the beginning of the study and after 8 weeks of the treatment.Results: In total, 33 subjects in the study group and 27 subjects in the control group were studied. Mean (SD age of all subjects was 51 (14.1 years. In the study group, on the 8th week post-treatment, PFTs decreased, though the differences of tests between before and after treatment were not significant. In the control group, all the tests decreased in the same period and these reductions were not also significant. However, the changes in PFTs were significantly different between the two groups. The results of most PFTs in the controls decreased in greater extents compared to theophylline treated patients. This shows that despite theophylline was unable to improve the patients; it was partially able to decelerate the reductions in PFTs.Conclusion: Theophylline may not improve PFTs of SM exposed patients but it may decelerate the progress of the underlying respiratory disease. Further studies in this setting with higher doses of theophylline and longer term of evaluation are needed to better understand the pathophysiological mechanism of SM induced bronchiolitis and the effectiveness of the treatment with theophylline.   How to cite this article: Panahi Y, Poursaleh Z, Amini-Harandi A

  16. Evaluation of Sulfur SC 80% and Penconazole EW 20% Effects on Grape Powdery Mildew Disease and Quantitative and Qualitative Traits of Grape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Karbalaei Khiavi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fungal diseases are a major problem in the cultivation of grapevine, Powdery mildew disease caused by plant pathogenic fungus, Erysiphenecator is one of the most important and destructive diseases of grape in many countries of the world including Iran. Due to extend viticulture area in Iran and the high prevalence of the grape powdery mildew in vineyards, application of sulfur based fungicides is mainly recommended for the disease control. This study was conducted aimed to investigate the effect of new formulations fungicide of sulfur SC 80% and penconazole EW 20% to control grape powdery mildew disease. Material and Methods: The experiments were conducted on Askari cultivar as susceptible in Ardabil, KhorasanRazavi and Kohgiluye and Boyer-Ahmad provinces and in vineyards, which in previous years had a history of infected and trees were similar in age and growth conditions. Experiments were carried out in a completely randomized block design with four replications. Treatments were composed of penconazole EW 20% 0.125 ml L-1, sulfur SC 80% 2, 2.5 and 3 ml L-1 and control. The spray was carried out three times, including when the young shoots were between15 and 35cm, before falling flowers and stage of sours. One week after the last spray sampling of leaves and clusters was carried out in four directions main canopy trees randomly in each plot. Efficacy of treatments was evaluated based on infection severity found in 60 leaves and 12 clusters in per plot. To determine the amount of sugar and tartaric acid in the grape fruit, sampling of the healthy and infected clusters were carried out and healthy and infected the samples were then separated into a plastic bag and crushed. Then, the juice wasprepared (fruit juice was obtained from 700 g fruit in each sample.To determine the amount of sugar, hand-held refractometer was used and the amount of sugar was determined in healthy and infected fruit. For the determination of tartaric acid in

  17. Acidophilic sulfur disproportionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardisty, Dalton S.; Olyphant, Greg A.; Bell, Jonathan B.; Johnson, Adam P.; Pratt, Lisa M.

    2013-07-01

    Bacterial disproportionation of elemental sulfur (S0) is a well-studied metabolism and is not previously reported to occur at pH values less than 4.5. In this study, a sediment core from an abandoned-coal-mine-waste deposit in Southwest Indiana revealed sulfur isotope fractionations between S0 and pyrite (Δ34Ses-py) of up to -35‰, inferred to indicate intense recycling of S0 via bacterial disproportionation and sulfide oxidation. Additionally, the chemistry of seasonally collected pore-water profiles were found to vary, with pore-water pH ranging from 2.2 to 3.8 and observed seasonal redox shifts expressed as abrupt transitions from Fe(III) to Fe(II) dominated conditions, often controlled by fluctuating water table depths. S0 is a common product during the oxidation of pyrite, a process known to generate acidic waters during weathering and production of acid mine drainage. The H2S product of S0 disproportionation, fractionated by up to -8.6‰, is rapidly oxidized to S0 near redox gradients via reaction with Fe(III) allowing for the accumulation of isotopically light S0 that can then become subject to further sulfur disproportionation. A mass-balance model for S0 incorporating pyrite oxidation, S0 disproportionation, and S0 oxidation readily explains the range of observed Δ34Ses-py and emphasizes the necessity of seasonally varying pyrite weathering and metabolic rates, as indicated by the pore water chemistry. The findings of this research suggest that S0 disproportionation is potentially a common microbial process at a pH < 4.5 and can create large sulfur isotope fractionations, even in the absence of sulfate reduction.

  18. The effect of solvent component on the discharge performance of Lithium-sulfur cell containing various organic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seok; Jung, Yongju; Lim, Hong S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of solvent component on the discharge performance of lithium-sulfur (Li/S) cell and the optimal composition of ternary electrolyte for the improved discharge performance of the cell have been investigated. The capacity value and capacity stability with cycle are dependent on the nature of solvent as well as the composition of mixed solvent. The change trend of discharge performance as a function of content of each solvent component is studied. Capacity value increases as the 1,3-dioxolane (DOX) content decreases. Average discharge voltage shows larger value when the 1,2-dimethoxy ethane (DME) content is small. Finally, we have obtained the optimal solvent composition by using a statistical method

  19. Effect of the sulfur and fluorine concentration on physical properties of CdS films grown by chemical bath deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Nieto-Zepeda

    Full Text Available Undoped and F-doped CdS thin films were grown on glass slides by chemical bath deposition using thiourea, cadmium acetate and ammonium fluoride as sulfur, cadmium, and fluorine sources, respectively. Undoped CdS films were deposited varying the concentration of thiourea. Once the optimal thiourea concentration was determined, based on the crystalline quality of the samples, this concentration was maintained and ammonium fluoride was added at different concentrations in order to explore the effect of the F nominal concentration on properties of CdS films. Undoped and F-doped CdS films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV–Vis, room temperature photoluminescence, and four probe resistivity measurements. Results showed highly transparent F-doped CdS films with strong PL and low resistivity were obtained. Keywords: CdS films, F-doped CdS films, Chemical bath deposition, Optical properties, Room temperature photoluminescence

  20. Scrap tire pyrolysis using a new type two-stage pyrolyzer: Effects of dolomite and olivine on producing a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Gyung-Goo; Oh, Seung-Jin; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Scrap tire pyrolysis was performed using a two-stage pyrolyzer consisting of an auger reactor and a fluidized bed reactor to produce a low-sulfur pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the effect of the residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor was investigated at ∼300 (auger reactor) and 500 °C (fluidized bed reactor). In addition, natural dolomite and olivine and calcined dolomite and olivine were used as the fluidized bed materials to examine their effects on reducing the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. In the experiments, the yields of the oil from the auger reactor were 1.4–3.7 wt%, and it was enriched with DL-limonene whose content in the oil was 40–50 wt%. The yields of the oil from the fluidized bed reactor were 42–46 wt%. The optimum residence time of the feed material in the auger reactor turned out to be 3.5 min. Calcined dolomite and olivine significantly decreased the sulfur content of pyrolysis oil. Metal oxides of the additives appeared to react with H_2S to form metal sulfides. The sulfur content of pyrolysis oil obtained with calcined olivine was 0.45 wt%. - Highlights: • Scrap tires were successfully pyrolyzed in a new type two-stage pyrolyzer. • The two-stage pyrolyzer is composed of an auger and fluidized bed reactors. • Calcination of olivine and dolomite led to a strong decrease in sulfur. • The lowest sulfur content of pyrolysis oil was 0.45 wt%. • Pyrolysis oil yields from the fluidized bed reactor were 43–46 wt%.

  1. Effects of processing on the transverse fatigue properties of low-sulfur AISI 4140 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sunniva R.; Michal, Gary M.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of inclusions due to steelmaking processes on the fatigue life of AISI 4140 have been investigated. The test matrix consisted of three commercially produced heats of AISI 4140 of comparable cleanliness: one was conventionally cast (CC), and two were inert gas-shielded/ bottom-poured (IGS). One of the IGS heats was calcium-treated to explore the effects of inclusion shape control (IGS/SC). All heats were hot-rolled and reduced over 95 pct to produce bar stock of 127 to 152 mm (5 to 6 in.) in diameter. Transverse axial specimens conforming to ASTM E466 were machined, quenched, and tempered to approximately 40 HRC, and they were fatigue tested in tension-tension cycling ( R = 0.1). Test results and statistical analyses of the stress-life data show that the IGS grade has several times the fatigue strength of the CC grade at 107 cycles. Lower-limit fatigue strengths calculated at a 99.9 pct probability were 518.5 MPa (75.2 ksi) for IGS vs 55.6 MPa (8.1 ksi) for the CC grade. The IGS/SC grade had the best performance at all stress and life levels. The results obtained indicate that fatigue performance can be improved by choosing a processing method that reduces the incidence of exogenous oxides and by controlling the shape of the sulfides.

  2. Effect of Sulfur and Chlorine on Fireside Corrosion Behavior of Inconel 740 H Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin-tao, Lu; Yan, Li; Zhen, Yang; Jin-yang, Huang; Ming, Zhu; Gu, Y.

    2018-03-01

    Fireside corrosion behavior of Inconel 740H superalloy was studied at 750 °C in simulated coal ash/flue gas environments by means of XRD, SEM and EDS. The results indicated that the corrosion behavior was strongly related to the SO2 levels and was significantly affected by NaCl additions. In presence of the atmospheres with 0.1 % SO2, the alloy exhibited the highest corrosion resistance due to formation of a stable and dense Cr2O3 film. In presence of the atmosphere with 1.5 % SO2, however, a non-coherent and porous Cr2O3 film was formed. The thickness of film and internal sulfides were substantially increased. The NaCl additions significantly accelerated the corrosion process. A non-protective outer oxide film was formed, composed by multiple layers with serious inner sulfide and spallation. The depths of internal oxidizing and sulfuration zones were significantly increased. The mechanism of ash corrosion formation was also discussed.

  3. Effect of zirconia morphology on sulfur-resistant methanation performance of MoO3/ZrO2 catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Weihan; Xu, Yan; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Baowei; Ma, Xinbin

    2018-05-01

    Two kinds of ZrO2 support with different morphologies were prepared by facile solvothermal method in different solvents. The obtained two supports showed monoclinic zirconia (m-ZrO2) and tetragonal zirconia (t-ZrO2) phase with similar crystalline size. Their supported Mo-based catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and the effect of zirconia morphology on the performance of sulfur-resistant methanation was examined. The results indicated that the MoO3/m-ZrO2 has higher CO conversion than the MoO3/t-ZrO2 catalyst. Characterizations by XRD, Raman, H2-TPR and IR confirmed that the m-ZrO2 is superior to t-ZrO2 for dispersing molybdenum species. In addition, the MoO3/m-ZrO2 catalyst has weaker interaction between support and active Mo speices than the MoO3/t-ZrO2 catalyst, which facilitates to forming active species of nanocrystalline MoS2 layers for sulfur-resistant methanation. The weaker interaction of molybdenum species with m-ZrO2 is related with the more covalent character of the Zrsbnd O bond and more oxygen defective structure of m-ZrO2. A larger number of Lewis acid centers appear on the surface of m-ZrO2, which verified the substantial vacancies on m-ZrO2 exposing coordinately unsaturated Zr3+ and Zr4+ cations. Meanwhile, the less Lewis acid of t-ZrO2 result in stronger interaction between support and molybdenum species and trigger crystalline phase MoO3 and Mosbnd Osbnd Zr linkages.

  4. EFFECT OF DIATOMEAOUS EARTH TREATMENT USING HYDROGEN CHLORIDE AND SULFURIC ACID ON KINETICS OF CADMIUM(II ADSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, treatment of diatomaceous earth, Sangiran, Central Java using hydrogen chloride (HCl and sulfuric acid (H2SO4 on kinetics of Cd(II adsorption in aqueous solution has been carried out. The work was conducted by mixing an amount of grounded diatomaceous earth (200 mesh in size with HCl or H2SO4 solution in various concentrations for two hours at temperature range of 100 - 150oC. The mixture was then filtered and washed with water until the filtrate pH is approximately 7 and then the residue was dried for four hours at a temperature of 70oC. The product was used as an adsorbent to adsorb Cd(II in aqueous solution with various concentrations. The Cd(II adsorbed was determined by analyzing the rest of Cd(II in the solution using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The effect of treatment was evaluated from kinetic parameter of adsorption rate constant calculated based on the simple kinetic model. Results showed  that before equilibrium condition reached, adsorpstion of Cd(II occurred through two steps, i.e. a step tends to follow a reaction of irreversible first order  (step I followed by reaction of reversible first order (step II. Treatment with acids, either hydrogen chloride or sulfuric acid, decreased adsorption rate constant for the step I from 15.2/min to a range of 6.4 - 9.4/min.  However, increasing concentration of acid (in a range of concentration investigated did not give significant and constant change of adsorption rate constant. For step II process,  adsorption involved physical interaction with the sufficient low adsorption energy (in a range of 311.3 - 1001 J/mol.     Keywords: adsorption, cdmium, diatomaceous earth, kinetics.

  5. Further studies on the effect of sulfur dioxide on lichens and bryophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, O L

    1970-01-01

    After comparing sixteen aspects of their biology it is clear that despite wide differences in botanical affinity bryophytes and lichens are outstandingly similar in their response to SO/sub 2/. This suggests that these lower plants can only colonize inhospitable habitats by adaptations which carry with them an inherent susceptibility to air pollution. Extensive laboratory and field work has emphasized the controlling influence of habitat on the survival of species. Among the strongest modifying influences are shelter, the pH and buffer capacity of the substratum and nutrient flushing. There is an apparent connection between survival and age of substratum. Water relations were found to have little effect. The extreme sensitivity of most epiphytes and the problems raised by resistant species are discussed. 34 references, 5 figures, 7 tables.

  6. Dew point of gases with low sulfuric acid content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieg, J.

    1981-07-01

    Discusses control of air pollution caused by sulfur compounds in solid fuels during combustion. Excessive amount of oxygen during combustion leads to formation of sulfur trioxide. Sulfur trioxide reacts with water vapor and forms sulfuric acid. Chemical reactions which lead to formation of sulfuric acid are described. Conditions for sulfuric acid condensation are analyzed. Several methods for determining dew point of flue gases with low sulfuric acid content are reviewed: methods based on determination of electric conductivity of condensed sulfuric acid (Francis, Cheney, Kiyoure), method based on determination of sulfuric acid concentration in the gaseous phase and in the liquid phase after cooling (Lee, Lisle and Sensenbaugh, Ross and Goksoyr). (26 refs.) (In Polish)

  7. Effect of sulfur levels on four tropical grasses in cerrado soils of mato grosso do sul, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlos Casagrande, J.; Correa De Souza, O.

    1982-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate responses of four tropical grasses, Melinis minutiflora cv. Cabelo de Negro Hyparrhenia rufa, Brachiaria decumbens australian type and Setaria anceps cv. kazungula to five levels of sulfur (0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 kg/ha) in two cerrado Oxisols and one Entisol. Cuttings were done at 50, 95 and 150 days after plant exposure. Besides dry matter production, visible symptoms of sulfur deficiency were observed. Greater responses were associated with sulfur rates up to 30 kg/ha. Molasses grass and brachiaria were the most responsive species.

  8. The Effect of Supplementation Urea and Sulfur in Mixed Cassava Waste Fermented and Soyabean Cake Waste on Digestibility of Protein and Blood Urea Male Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bata

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen local male sheep were divided into 3 groups I,II and III based on the body weight 18.55±1.27, 15.79±0.67 and 13.14±1.33 kg respectively. Two level urea (2 and 3% and three levels Sulfur (0.02 and 0.3% as treatment, so pattern factorial 2x3 with Randomized Block Design used this experiment. All of the treatment get a same basal feed namely land-grass and concentrate with dry matter ratio 70:30.  The total intake of  dry matter was 4 % of body weight. The concentrate consist of cassava waste fermented  and soyabean cake waste with dry matter  ratio 77.50 : 22.50. Supplementation of urea and sulfur shown not significant interaction, but supplementation urea had effect high significantly (P<0.01 on digestibility of protein and sulfur only had effect significant  (P<0.05 on blood urea. These result had indication that enriched urea in the diet could increase protein digestibility and sulfur level 0.2% could prevent NH3 absorption from rumen. (Animal Production 1(2: 75-81 (1999   Key Words: cassava waste, soyabean cake waste, fermentation, digestibility, urea blood.

  9. Effects of sulfur addition on pitting corrosion and machinability behavior of super duplex stainless steel containing rare earth metals: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Soon-Hyeok; Kim, Soon-Tae; Lee, In-Sung; Park, Yong-Soo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The mechanisms on the effects of rare earth metals (REM) and sulfur (S) additions on the initiation and propagation of pitting corrosion and machinabillity of a super duplex stainless steel (SDSS) were elucidated → It was found that, in consideration of the ratio of lifetime (the resistance to pitting corrosion) to cost (machining and raw material), a costly austenitic stainless steel with high Ni , medium Mo and low N can be replaced by the high S and REM added SDSS with 7 wt.% Ni-4 wt% Mo-0.3 wt.% N → The resistance to pitting corrosion of the tested super duplex stainless steel was affected by the type of inclusions, the preferential interface areas between inclusions and the substrate, and the PREN difference between the γ-phase and the α-phase for the initiation and propagation of the pitting corrosion. - Abstract: To elucidate the effects of sulfur addition on pitting corrosion and machinability behavior of alloys containing rare earth metals, a potentiostatic polarization test, a critical pitting temperature test, a SEM-EDS analysis of inclusions, and a tool life test were conducted. As sulfur content increased, the resistance to pitting corrosion decreased due to the formation of numerous manganese sulfides deteriorating the corrosion resistance and an increase in the preferential interface areas for the initiation of the pitting corrosion. With an increase in sulfur content, the tool life increased due to the lubricating films of manganese sulfides adhering to tool surface.

  10. Effect of sulfur dioxide on pulmonary macrophage endocytosis at rest and during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skornik, W.A.; Brain, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Inhaled SO2 may cause damage by injuring upper airways. To what extent can SO2 also alter pulmonary macrophage function in the parenchyma and what is the impact of exercise? We studied the effect of SO2 on pulmonary macrophage endocytosis in resting and in exercising animals by measuring the rates of macrophage endocytosis in situ for 1 h of a test particle of insoluble radioactive colloidal gold (198Au), 1, 24, or 48 h after inhalation exposure to SO2. Resting hamsters exposed for 4 h to 50 ppm SO2 had no significant reduction in macrophage endocytosis compared with air-breathing control hamsters. However, if hamsters were exposed to the same concentration of SO2 while continuously running (40 min at 0.9 km/h), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure even though the exposure time was only one-sixth as long. Twenty-four hours later, the percentage of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained significantly depressed. By 48 h, the rate had returned to control values. Exercise alone did not affect endocytosis. Hamsters exposed to 50 ppm SO2, with or without exercise, also showed significant reductions in the number of lavaged macrophages. This decrease was greatest and most persistent in the SO2 plus exercise group. These data indicate that even when animals are exposed to water-soluble gases, which are normally removed by the upper airways, exercise can potentiate damage to more peripheral components of the pulmonary defense system such as the macrophage

  11. Effects of sulfur dioxide on nitrogen fixation, carbon partitioning, and yield components in snapbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, S.M.; Campbell, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    The air pollutant SO 2 is known to affect plant biochemistry and physiology, although very little is known about its effects on N 2 -fixation in legumes. This study sought to determine if N 2 -fixation, C partitioning, and plant productivity of snapbean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were affected under short-term, low-level SO 2 exposures. Plants were exposed, 29 d after planting (7 d before anthesis), to 0, 18, and 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 for 4 h d -1 for 5 d in a fumigation chamber. On the last day of SO 2 treatment, plants were also exposed to 14 CO 2 to determine changes in C partitioning patterns. At these concentrations, there was no visible damage to plant tissue and no significant changes in dry weight or yield components. Only the 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 treatment reduced C 2 H 2 reduction rates, but recovery to near control rates occurred within 24 h after SO 2 removal. Leaves of plants treated with 18 μmol SO 2 m -3 exported more of their total assimilated 14 C than control plants, while those treated with 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 retained greater amounts. Retention of 14 C at the 36 μmol SO 2 m -3 level may account for the inhibition of C 2 H 2 -reduction because of less photosynthate arriving at the root nodules. These data suggest that SO 2 levels that do not cause visible injury may interfere with C metabolism and transport in snapbean

  12. Effect of sulfur-containing spices on the bioaccessibility of trace minerals from selected cereals and pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Meena; Platel, Kalpana

    2017-07-01

    Garlic and onion, which are rich in organo-sulfur compounds, are reported to enhance the bioaccessibility of Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn; however, there is a lack of similar information on the bioaccessibility of copper, manganese and chromium. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effect of exogenous garlic and onion on the bioaccessibility of these trace minerals from selected food grains. The effect of two levels of garlic (0.25 and 0.5 g/10 g grain -1 ) and onion (1.5 and 3 g/10 g grain -1 ) on the bioaccessibility of these trace minerals from two representative cereals and pulses was determined by employing an in vitro dialysability procedure. Both garlic and onion significantly improved the bioaccessibility of Cu, especially when added at the higher level, in most of the foods examined. The enhancing effect of garlic on Mn bioaccessibility was found in cooked sorghum and chickpea, whereas onion significantly improved Mn bioaccessibility in cooked rice and chickpea. The addition of both spices did not exert any enhancing effect on Cr bioaccessibility from the cereals and pulses. The bioaccessibility of Cu, as well as Mn to a lesser extent, from vegetarian diets can be significantly improved by incorporating garlic and onion in the diet. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Effects of Foliar Applications of Sulfur, Nitrogen and Phosphorus on Castor Bean (Ricinus cmmunis L. Seed Yield and its Components under Water Deficit Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mosavi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To determine the effects of foliar applications of some macroelements on castor seed yield and its components under drought stress conditions, an experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Center of East Azerbaijan province. A factorial experiment, based on randomized complete block design with three replications, was carried out during 2013 growing season. Treatment factors consisted of irrigations with two levels (no water deficit and water deficit during grain filling stage and of foliar applications of macroelements with four levels [control, wettable sulfur (0.2 percent, nitrogen (urea: 0.6 percent and phosphor (super phosphate triple: 0.4 percent. Traits studied were: plant height, number of inflorescence, number of lateral branches, number of leaves, leaf temperature, relative water content, number of seeds per plant, 1000-kernal weight and seed yield. All traits, except number of inflorescence, were affected significantly by drought stress. Water deficit reduced plant height, number of leaves, number of seeds per plant, 1000-kernal weight, seed yield, relative water content, while it increased leaf temperature. Number of lateral branches was affected significantly by interaction between factors. Maximum latral branches (1.86 were obtained under non-stress treatment with nitrogen foliar application. Moderate drought stress had significant effect on leaf temperature and relative water content. It seems that, these traits can be used in determination of water deficit effects on castor bean.

  14. Sulfur Removal by Adding Iron During the Digestion Process of High-sulfur Bauxite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhanwei, Liu; Hengwei, Yan; Wenhui, Ma; Keqiang, Xie; Dunyong, Li; Licong, Zheng; Pengfei, Li

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach to sulfur removal by adding iron during the digestion process. Iron can react with high-valence sulfur (S2O3 2-, SO3 2-, SO4 2-) to generate S2- at digestion temperature, and then S2- enter red mud in the form of Na3FeS3 to be removed. As iron dosage increases, high-valence sulfur concentration decreases, but the concentration of S2- increases; sulfur digestion rate decreases while sulfur content in red mud markedly increases; the alumina digestion rate, conversely, remains fairly stable. So sulfur can be removed completely by adding iron in digestion process, which provide a theoretical basis for the effective removal of sulfur in alumina production process.

  15. COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT NEEDS FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

    2008-05-30

    , the kinetic activity decreases. We recommend further testing to determine if these binary alloys will provide the increased reaction kinetic needed to meet the targets. We also plan to test the performance of these catalyst materials for both proton and sulfur dioxide reduction. The latter may provide another parameter by which we can control the reduction of sulfur dioxide upon transport to the cathode catalyst surface. A small scale electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2}) has been fabricated and successfully installed as an additional tool to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on electrolyzer and MEA performance. Currently this electrolyzer is limited to testing at temperatures up to 80 C and at atmospheric pressure. Selected electrochemical performance data from the single cell sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer were analyzed with the aid of an empirical equation which takes into account the overpotential of each of the components. By using the empirical equation, the performance data was broken down into its components and a comparison of the potential losses was made. The results indicated that for the testing conditions of 80 C and 30 wt% sulfuric acid, the major overpotential contribution ({approx}70 % of all losses) arise from the slow reaction rate of oxidation of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that in order to meet the target of hydrogen production at 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V and 50 wt% sulfuric acid, identification of a better catalyst for sulfur dioxide oxidation will provide the largest gain in electrolyzer performance.

  16. A primer on sulfur for the planetary geologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilig, E.

    1982-01-01

    Sulfur has been proposed as the dominant composition for the volcanic material on Io. Sulfur is a complex element which forms many intramolecular and intermolecular allotropes exhibiting a variety of physical properties. Cyclo-S8 sulfur is the most abundant and stable molecular form. The important molecular species within liquid sulfur change in concentration with temperature. Concentrations of the allotropes control the physical properties of the melt. Discontinuities in density, viscosity, and thermal properties reflect the polymerization process within liquid sulfur. Variations in the melting point are related to autodissociation of the liquid. Many solids forms of sulfur have been identified but only orthorhombic alpha and monoclinic beta sulfur, both composed of cyclo-S8 sulfur, are stable under terrestrial conditions. Physical properties of solid sulfur are dependent on the allotrope and, in some cases, the thermal history. Three natural terrestrial sulfur flows are described: (1) Siretoko-Iosan, Japan; (2) Volcan Azufre, Galapagos Islands; and (3) Mauna Loa, Hawaii. All of the flows are associated with fumarolic areas and are considered to have formed by the melting and mobilization of sulfur deposits. Surface textures of the flows indicate a behavior of molten sulfur similar to that of silicate lava. Channels, rivulets, and lobate edges were described for the flows. The solidification of man-made sulfur flows formed as part of the Frasch mining process by which sulfur is removed from the subsurface in a liquid state is described.

  17. Sulfur emission from Victorian brown coal under pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion and gasification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luguang; Bhattacharya, Sankar

    2013-02-05

    Sulfur emission from a Victorian brown coal was quantitatively determined through controlled experiments in a continuously fed drop-tube furnace under three different atmospheres: pyrolysis, oxy-fuel combustion, and carbon dioxide gasification conditions. The species measured were H(2)S, SO(2), COS, CS(2), and more importantly SO(3). The temperature (873-1273 K) and gas environment effects on the sulfur species emission were investigated. The effect of residence time on the emission of those species was also assessed under oxy-fuel condition. The emission of the sulfur species depended on the reaction environment. H(2)S, SO(2), and CS(2) are the major species during pyrolysis, oxy-fuel, and gasification. Up to 10% of coal sulfur was found to be converted to SO(3) under oxy-fuel combustion, whereas SO(3) was undetectable during pyrolysis and gasification. The trend of the experimental results was qualitatively matched by thermodynamic predictions. The residence time had little effect on the release of those species. The release of sulfur oxides, in particular both SO(2) and SO(3), is considerably high during oxy-fuel combustion even though the sulfur content in Morwell coal is only 0.80%. Therefore, for Morwell coal utilization during oxy-fuel combustion, additional sulfur removal, or polishing systems will be required in order to avoid corrosion in the boiler and in the CO(2) separation units of the CO(2) capture systems.

  18. Effect of Elemental Sulfur and Sulfide on the Corrosion Behavior of Cr-Mo Low Alloy Steel for Tubing and Tubular Components in Oil and Gas Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaksar, Ladan; Shirokoff, John

    2017-04-20

    The chemical degradation of alloy components in sulfur-containing environments is a major concern in oil and gas production. This paper discusses the effect of elemental sulfur and its simplest anion, sulfide, on the corrosion of Cr-Mo alloy steel at pH 2 and 5 during 10, 20 and 30 h immersion in two different solutions. 4130 Cr-Mo alloy steel is widely used as tubing and tubular components in sour services. According to the previous research in aqueous conditions, contact of solid sulfur with alloy steel can initiate catastrophic corrosion problems. The corrosion behavior was monitored by the potentiodynamic polarization technique during the experiments. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been applied to characterize the corrosion product layers after each experiment. The results show that under the same experimental conditions, the corrosion resistance of Cr-Mo alloy in the presence of elemental sulfur is significantly lower than its resistance in the presence of sulfide ions.

  19. The effect of sulfur on the inhibition of PCDD/F formation during co-combustion of coal and solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palladas, A. [Laboratory of Environmental and Energy Processes, Thermi-Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Research Institute; Samaras, P. [TEI of Western Macedonia, Kozani (Greece). Dept. of Environmental Technology; Sakellaropoulos, G. [Aristotle Univ. of Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2004-09-15

    Co-combustion of solid wastes with coal is a promising technique used to reduce landfilled wastes, utilizing waste the energy content. However, solid wastes often contain chlorine and other substances, which upon combustion may result in the production of extremely toxic compounds like polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans. Various compounds have been proposed for their inhibition ability of PCDD/F formation, including sulphuric and nitrogen containing substances. Sulfur compounds may form some kind of complexes with metal species, reducing thus their ability for catalysing the PCDD/F formation pathways. Sulfur inhibitory capacity has been attributed to reaction with copper catalytic sites, altering their form and presumably their ability to produce Cl{sub 2} through the Deacon process reaction. Another second postulated role of sulfur is to undergo homogeneous reactions, converting the primary chlorinating agent, Cl{sub 2}, into a form (HCl) less likely to undergo aromatic substitution reactions forming PCDD/F precursors. The objectives of this work were the measurement of PCDD/F emissions during co-combustion of different fuel mixtures, and the study of the effect of sulfur addition to the fuel on PCDD/F formation.

  20. Cumulative effect of sulfur and calcium on wheat growth and yield under saline-sodic soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arshadullah, M.; Hyder, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of three rates of gypsum on growth and ionic concentration of wheat variety (Saher) sown in saline-sodic soil (ECe=5.32 dS m , pH=8.52 and SAR=18.87) at Soil Salinity Research Institute (SSRI) Farm, Pindi Bhattian during rabi 2009-10. Treatments were arranged using randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The crop was harvested at maturity, data on tillering, plant height, spike length, number of grains spike , 1000-grain weight, straw and paddy yields were recorded. Potassium (K), Na, Ca, S and Mg concentrations in grain were estimated using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Tillering, grains spike , 1000-grain weight and paddy yield significantly (P = 0.05) enhanced by increasing the rate of gypsum (CaSO/sub 4/). The maximum 4 number of grains spike (60), 1000-grain weight (47 g) and grain yields (4.01 t ha ) were recorded with CaSO application at the rate 150 kg ha . Grain 4 yield was 43% more than control treatment. Positive correlations (r2+ + 0.96), (r=0.96) and (r=0.91) between Ca , K , S and negative correlation r+ (-0.99) between Na contents in grain and wheat grain yield, respectively. It indicates presence of significantly higher Ca , K contents in grain receiving CaSO/sub 4/ help plants to attain more Ca/sup 2+/ , K and S to avoid Na 4 uptake. (author)

  1. Sulfur deposition changes under sulfate geoengineering conditions: quasi-biennial oscillation effects on the transport and lifetime of stratospheric aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visioni, Daniele; Pitari, Giovanni; Tuccella, Paolo; Curci, Gabriele

    2018-02-01

    Sustained injection of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the tropical lower stratosphere has been proposed as a climate engineering technique for the coming decades. Among several possible environmental side effects, the increase in sulfur deposition deserves additional investigation. In this study we present results from a composition-climate coupled model (University of L'Aquila Composition-Chemistry Model, ULAQ-CCM) and a chemistry-transport model (Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Transport Model, GEOS-Chem), assuming a sustained lower-stratospheric equatorial injection of 8 Tg SO2 yr-1. Total S deposition is found to globally increase by 5.2 % when sulfate geoengineering is deployed, with a clear interhemispheric asymmetry (+3.8 and +10.3 % in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and the Southern Hemisphere (SH), due to +2.2 and +1.8 Tg S yr-1, respectively). The two models show good consistency, both globally and on a regional scale under background and geoengineering conditions, except for S-deposition changes over Africa and the Arctic. The consistency exists with regard to time-averaged values but also with regard to monthly and interannual deposition changes. The latter is driven essentially by the variability in stratospheric large-scale transport associated with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). Using an externally nudged QBO, it is shown how a zonal wind E shear favors aerosol confinement in the tropical pipe and a significant increase in their effective radius (+13 % with respect to W shear conditions). The net result is an increase in the downward cross-tropopause S flux over the tropics with dominant E shear conditions with respect to W shear periods (+0.61 Tg S yr-1, +42 %, mostly due to enhanced aerosol gravitational settling) and a decrease over the extratropics (-0.86 Tg S yr-1, -35 %, mostly due to decreased large-scale stratosphere-troposphere exchange of geoengineering sulfate). This translates into S-deposition changes that are significantly

  2. Graphene derived carbon confined sulfur cathodes for lithium-sulfur batteries: Electrochemical impedance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Aswathi; Varzi, Alberto; Passerini, Stefano; Shaijumon, Manikoth M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene-derived carbon (GDC) with distinctive porosity characteristics are prepared. • Effect of micro-/mesoporosity of GDC for improved Li-S battery performance is studied. • Impedance studies reveal insights into Li-S redox reactions and capacity fading phenomena. - Abstract: Sulfur nanocomposites are prepared by using graphene derived carbon (GDC), with controlled porosity characteristics, as confining matrix and are studied as efficient cathodes for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. To understand the effect of micro-/mesoporosity in porous carbon for the effective encapsulation of sulfur and polysulfides towards improved Li-S battery performance, two different GDC samples with controlled porosity characteristics, one with predominantly micropores (GDC-1) and a surface area of 1970 m 2 g −1 and the other with a surface area of 3239 m 2 g −1 , having more or less equal contribution of micro- and mesopores (GDC-2), are used to synthesize nanocomposite sulfur electrodes following melt diffusion process. Electrochemical studies are carried out by using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). EIS spectra collected at different depth of discharge (DOD) in the first cycle as well as upon cycling give valuable insights into the Li-S redox reactions and capacity fading phenomena in these electrodes. The impedance response of GDC-S electrodes suggests a detrimental effect of the mesopores, where insoluble reaction products can easily accumulate, resulting in the loss of active material leading to capacity fading of Li-S cells.

  3. Sulfur-Containing Agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devendar, Ponnam; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2017-10-09

    Modern agricultural chemistry has to support farmers by providing innovative agrochemicals. In this context, the introduction of sulfur atoms into an active ingredient is still an important tool in modulating the properties of new crop-protection compounds. More than 30% of today's agrochemicals contain at least one sulfur atom, mainly in fungicides, herbicides and insecticides. A number of recently developed sulfur-containing agrochemical candidates represent a novel class of chemical compounds with new modes of action, so we intend to highlight the emerging interest in commercially active sulfur-containing compounds. This chapter gives a comprehensive overview of selected leading sulfur-containing pesticidal chemical families namely: sulfonylureas, sulfonamides, sulfur-containing heterocyclics, thioureas, sulfides, sulfones, sulfoxides and sulfoximines. Also, the most suitable large-scale synthetic methods of the recently launched or provisionally approved sulfur-containing agrochemicals from respective chemical families have been highlighted.

  4. Effects of Alclad Layer and Anodizing Time on Sulfuric Acid Anodizing and Film Properties of 2E12 Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Gao-hong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alclad and unclad 2E12 aerospace aluminum alloy were treated by sulfuric acid anodic oxidation. The effects of alclad layer and anodizing time on the anodization behaviour and corrosion resistance of anodic oxide layer on 2E12 aluminum alloy were studied. Surface and cross-section morphology of anodic oxide films were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties of anodic oxide films were analyzed by potentiodynamic polarization curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results show that the protective anodic oxide layers are formed on alclad and unclad 2E12 aluminum alloy. The film thickness increases with anodizing time extending. The copper rich second phase particles lead to more cavity defects and even micro cracks on anodic oxide films of unclad 2E12 aluminum alloy. The anodic oxide films on alclad 2E12 aluminum alloy are thicker and have fewer cavity defects, resulting in better corrosion resistance. The films obtained after 30min and 45min anodic oxidation treatment exhibit lower corrosion current and higher impedance of the porous layer than other anodizing time.

  5. Effect of (OPC) oligomeric pronthocyanidine extracted of grape seed on chromosomal aberrations for Tc 99m sulfur colloid in laboratory animal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwan, I. F.; Ahmed, A.M.; Mohamad, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    The aims study to assess the protective material (OPC) oligomeric pronthocyanidine grape seed extract, to decrease the effect of Technetium 99 m radiation used in on the (Chromosomal Aberration) in the genes for bone marrow in laboratory animals. Been diagnosed by a composite (OPC) optical spectrometer (UV.vis) to determine the wavelength of the compound, for the purpose of examination and analysis by a high-purity HPLC to determine the components of grape seed extract. Has been handing laboratory animals, grape seed extract material (OPC) at a dose (150 mg/kg) for two weeks and then were injected to the solution of sulfur colloidal label with Tc 99 m doses of radiation to the following quantity (400 u ci, 250 u ci, 150 u ci / 0.1 m1). The treated animals by extract (OPC) showed decrease in the proportion of chromosomal changes resulting from the impact of injection differences dose compared to animals injected to the same radiation dose and non treated animal with (OPC). The result indicated there are significant differences (p>0.05) at the level of changes in chromosomal in genes of animals untreated compared with the group of animals treated with (OPC) and injected with the same radiation dose compared a control animal group. (Author)

  6. Effects of sulfur and phosphorus application on the growth, biomass yield and fuel properties of leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit. as bioenergy crop on sandy infertile soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songyos Chotchutima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of Sulfur (S and Phosphorus (P fertilizer on the growth, biomass production and wood quality of leucaena for use as a bioenergy crop at the Buriram Livestock Research and Testing Station, Pakham, Buriram province, Thailand during 2011–2013. The experiment was arranged in a split plot design with two rates of S fertilizer (0 and 187.5 kg/ha as a main plot and five rates of P (0, 93.75, 187.5, 375 and 750 kg/ha as a sub-plot, with four replications. The results showed that the plant height, stem diameter, total woody stem and biomass yield of leucaena were significantly increased by the application of S, while the leaf yield was not influenced by S addition. The total woody stem and biomass yield were also proportionately greatest with the maximum rate of P (750 kg/ha application. The addition of S did not result in any significant differences in fuel properties, while the maximum rate of P application also showed the best fuel properties among the several rates of P, especially with low Mg and ash contents compared with the control (0 kg/ha.

  7. Childhood physical abnormalities following paternal exposure to sulfur mustard gas in Iran: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khademolhosseini Seyyed M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mustard gas, a known chemical weapon, was used during the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988. We aimed to determine if exposure to mustard gas among men was significantly associated with abnormalities and disorders among progenies. Methods Using a case-control design, we identified all progenies of Sardasht men (exposed group, n = 498, who were born at least nine months after the exposure, compared to age-matched controls in Rabat, a nearby city (non-exposed group, n = 689. We conducted a thorough medical history, physical examination, and appropriate paraclinical studies to detect any physical abnormality and/or disorder. Given the presence of correlated data, we applied Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE multivariable models to determine associations. Results The overall frequency of detected physical abnormalities and disorders was significantly higher in the exposed group (19% vs. 11%, Odds Ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.37-2.72, P = 0.0002. This was consistent across sexes. Congenital anomalies (OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.58-7.93, P = 0.002 and asthma (OR, 3.12, 95% CI, 1.43-6.80, P = 0.004 were most commonly associated with exposure. No single abnormality was associated with paternal exposure to mustard gas. Conclusion Our study demonstrates a generational effect of exposure to mustard gas. The lasting effects of mustard gas exposure in parents effects fertility and may impact child health and development in the long-term.

  8. Functional group-dependent anchoring effect of titanium carbide-based MXenes for lithium-sulfur batteries: A computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuming; Zhao, Jingxiang, E-mail: xjz_hmily@163.com

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • We have studied the anchong effects of two-dimensional Ti{sub 2}CO{sub 2} monolayer for Li-S batteries. • Ti{sub 2}CO{sub 2} monolayer can strongly interact with Li{sub 2}S{sub n} species with moderate binding strength to effectively immobilize the soluble polysulfides. • The intactness of the Li{sub 2}S{sub n} species can be well saved. - Abstract: The large-scale practical application of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries cannot be relized unless the challenge of dissolving of soluble lithium polysulfides (Li{sub 2}S{sub n}) species in electrolytes can be solved. Herein, by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations, we systematically exploited the anchoring effects of various titanium carbide-based MXenes for Li-S batteries. Our results revealed that, due to the attraction between Li ions in Li{sub 2}S{sub n} species and O atoms in Ti{sub 2}CO{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}C{sub 2}O{sub 2} monolayer, the two Mxenes can strongly interact with Li{sub 2}S{sub n} species with remarkable but not too strong binding strength to effectively immobilize the soluble polysulfides. Especially, the intactness of the Li{sub 2}S{sub n} species can be well saved, although the Li−S bonds are weakened. Therefore, Ti{sub 2}CO{sub 2} and Ti{sub 3}C{sub 2}O{sub 2} monolayers are quite promising anchoring materials with good cycling performances for Li-S batteries.

  9. The diversity of the effects of sulfur mustard gas inhalation on respiratory system 10 years after a single, heavy exposure: analysis of 197 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, A; Rezaian, G R

    1997-09-01

    To find out the late pulmonary sequelae of sulfur mustard gas inhalation in 197 veterans, 10 years after their exposure. Cross-sectional clinical study. University hospital. One hundred ninety-seven veterans with a single, heavy exposure to sulfur mustard gas in 1986 and 86 nonexposed veterans as their control group. Pulmonary function tests, carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, bronchoscopy, and high-resolution CT of the chest were performed in all patients. Transbronchial lung biopsy was done in 24 suspected cases of pulmonary fibrosis. Asthma was diagnosed in 21 (10.65%), chronic bronchitis in 116 (58.88%), bronchiectasis in 17 (8.62%), airway narrowing due to searing or granulation tissue in 19 (9.64%), and pulmonary fibrosis in 24 (12.18%) cases. None of these were found among the control group except for a single case of chronic bronchitis. Although the respiratory symptoms of an acute sulfur mustard gas inhalation are usually transient and nonspecific, it can lead to the development of a series of chronic destructive pulmonary sequelae in such cases.

  10. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2011-10-15

    Since 2006, China has set goals of reducing energy intensity, emissions, and pollutants in multiple guidelines and in the Five Year Plans. Various strategies and measures have then been taken to improve the energy efficiency in all sectors and to reduce pollutants. Since controlling energy, CO{sub 2} emissions, and pollutants falls under the jurisdiction of different government agencies in China, many strategies are being implemented to fulfill only one of these objectives. Co-controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutant emissions. The targets could be met in a more cost effective manner if the integrated measures can be identified and prioritized. This report provides analysis and insights regarding how these targets could be met via co-control measures focusing on both CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emissions in the cement, iron &steel, and power sectors to 2030 in China. An integrated national energy and emission model was developed in order to establish a baseline scenario that was used to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and expected actions. In addition, CO{sub 2} mitigation scenarios and SO{sub 2} control scenarios were also established to evaluate the impact of each of the measures and the combined effects. In the power sector, although the end of pipe SO{sub 2} control technology such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has the largest reduction potential for SO{sub 2} emissions, other CO{sub 2} control options have important co-benefits in reducing SO{sub 2} emissions of 52.6 Mt of SO{sub 2} accumulatively. Coal efficiency improvements along with hydropower, renewable and nuclear capacity expansion will result in more than half of the SO{sub 2} emission reductions as the SO{sub 2} control technology through 2016. In comparison, the reduction from carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is much less and has negative SO{sub 2} reductions

  11. Effect of Sowing Date and Sulfur on Yield, Oil Content and Grain Nitrogen of Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. in Autumn Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Safara

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Nowadays oilseed crops are considered as the second most important sources of energy in the diet. In this regard, cultivation of oilseed crops such as safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L. is important due to quality of oil seed and medicinal properties. Different planting dates leads to adaptation of vegetative and reproductive growth of plant to temperature, day-length and various solar radiations and as a result affects plant’s development phase and yield. With delayed planting date , temperature and day length increases and development phase will accelerate. In this condition the crop yield will reduce due to crop growth and developmental period will shorten. Sulfur is an essential element for plant nutrition and its role is greater than Phosphorus. Using sulfur increases the heads per plant and grain yield. In order to investigate the effect of sulfur fertilizer under heat stress condition at the terminal growth stages and its role in reducing the negative effects of high temperature stress on safflower, this research was performed. Materials and Methods In order to study effect of planting date and sulfur manure on yield components, nitrogen and oil percent in safflower, a field experiment was carried out in a randomized complete blocks design with three replications in as split plot arrangement at Ramin Agriculture and Natural Resources University of Khuzestan during 2013-2014. The experimental treatments consisted of four planting dates of 30 November, 21 December, 22 January and 1st February were randomly placed in main plots and four levels of sulfur of 0, 200, 400 and 600 kg ha-1 performed randomly in subplots, Sulfur fertilizer was corporated to soil one week before each planting date. Harvest was performed from the mid-May to early-June, during physiological maturity. To measure the yield on maturity time after the removal of margins, Safflower plants were harvested from one m2 unit area. Nitrogen percent was determined

  12. Effects of acidifying pig diets on emissions of ammonia, methane and sulfur from slurry during storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jørgen; Nørgaard, Jan Værum; Poulsen, Hanne Damgaard

    2014-01-01

    and feces were collected separately from twenty-four pigs fed one of four diets (Control, +BA, +CaCl2, +BA+CaCl2) in metabolic cages, and mixed as slurry. During 103 days of storage, all acidifying diets consistently reduced pH in the slurry by 0.4 - 0.6 units. There was a strong relationship between slurry...

  13. Effect of sulfur supplements on cellulolytic rumen micro-organisms and microbial protein synthesis in cattle fed a high fibre diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSweeney, C S; Denman, S E

    2007-11-01

    To examine the effect of sulfur-containing compounds on the growth of anaerobic rumen fungi and the fibrolytic rumen bacteria Ruminococcus albus, Ruminococcus flavefaciens and Fibrobacter succinogenes in pure culture and within the cattle rumen. The effect of two reduced sulfur compounds, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) or 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonic acid as the sole S source on growth of pure fibroyltic fungal and bacterial cultures showed that these compounds were capable of sustaining growth. An in vivo trial was then conducted to determine the effect of sulfur supplements (MPA and sodium sulfate) on microbial population dynamics in cattle fed the roughage Dichanthium aristatum. Real-time PCR showed significant increases in fibrolytic bacterial and fungal populations when cattle were supplemented with these compounds. Sulfate supplementation leads to an increase in dry matter intake without a change in whole tract dry matter digestibility. Supplementation of low S-containing diets with either sodium sulfate or MPA stimulates microbial growth with an increase in rumen microbial protein supply to the animal. Through the use of real-time PCR monitoring, a better understanding of the effect of S supplementation on discrete microbial populations within the rumen is provided.

  14. Formation and Control of Sulfur Oxides in Sour Gas Oxy-Combustion: Prediction Using a Reactor Network Model

    KAUST Repository

    Bongartz, Dominik

    2015-11-19

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Sour natural gas currently requires expensive gas cleanup before it can be used in power generation because it contains large amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2) that entail a low heating value and highly corrosive combustion products. A potential alternative is to use the gas directly in a gas turbine process employing oxy-fuel combustion, which could eliminate the need for gas cleanup while also enabling the application of carbon capture and sequestration, possibly combined with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). However, the exact influence of an oxy-fuel environment on the combustion products of sour gas has not been quantified yet. In this work, we used a reactor network model for the combustor and the gas turbine together with our recently assembled and validated detailed chemical reaction mechanism for sour gas combustion to investigate the influence of some basic design parameters on the combustion products of natural gas and sour gas in CO2 or H2O diluted oxy-fuel combustion as well as in conventional air combustion. Our calculations show that oxy-fuel combustion produces up to 2 orders of magnitude less of the highly corrosive product sulfur trioxide (SO3) than air combustion, which clearly demonstrates its potential in handling sulfur containing fuels. Unlike in air combustion, in oxy-fuel combustion, SO3 is mainly formed in the flame zone of the combustor and is then consumed as the combustion products are cooled in the dilution zone of the combustor and the turbine. In oxy-fuel combustion, H2O dilution leads to a higher combustion efficiency than CO2 dilution. However, if the process is to be combined with EOR, CO2 dilution makes it easier to comply with the very low levels of oxygen (O2) required in the EOR stream. Our calculations also show that it might even be beneficial to operate slightly fuel-rich because this simultaneously decreases the O2 and SO3 concentration further. The flame zone

  15. Sulfur nanocrystals anchored graphene composite with highly improved electrochemical performance for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Zimin; Wang, Xiuli; Zhao, Xuyang; Tu, Jiangping; Su, Qingmei; Du, Gaohui

    2014-12-01

    Two kinds of graphene-sulfur composites with 50 wt% of sulfur are prepared using hydrothermal method and thermal mixing, respectively. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectra mapping show that sulfur nanocrystals with size of ∼5 nm dispersed on graphene sheets homogeneously for the sample prepared by hydrothermal method (NanoS@G). While for the thermal mixed graphene-sulfur composite (S-G mixture), sulfur shows larger and uneven size (50-200 nm). X-ray Photoelectron Spectra (XPS) reveals the strong chemical bonding between the sulfur nanocrystals and graphene. Comparing with the S-G mixture, the NanoS@G composite shows highly improved electrochemical performance as cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery. The NanoS@G composite delivers an initial capacity of 1400 mAh g-1 with the sulfur utilization of 83.7% at a current density of 335 mA g-1. The capacity keeps above 720 mAh g-1 over 100 cycles. The strong adherence of the sulfur nanocrystals on graphene immobilizes sulfur and polysulfides species and suppressed the "shuttle effect", resulting higher coulombic efficiency and better capacity retention. Electrochemical impedance also suggests that the strong bonding enabled rapid electronic/ionic transport and improved electrochemical kinetics, therefore good rate capability is obtained. These results demonstrate that the NanoS@G composite is a very promising candidate for high-performance Li-S batteries.

  16. Field testing the effectiveness of pumping to remove sulfur hexafluoride traced drilling air from a prototype borehole near superior, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, C.A.; Striffler, P.; Yang, I.C.; Ferarese, J.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to provide hydrologic, hydrochemical, and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear-waste repository. The USGS unsaturated-zone hydrochemistry study involves the collection of gas and water samples from the unsaturated zone for chemical and isotopic analyses. Results from these analyses will aid in the understanding of the movement of gas and water in the rock units at Yucca Mountain. A prototype borehole designated USW UZP5 was drilled by the US Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office (DOE, YMSCPO) in June 1990 in the Apache Leap Tuff of southcentral Arizona. The hole was dry drilled with air using sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) as a tracer. This drilling method simulated that which will be used to drill boreholes for the collection of gas and water samples at Yucca Mountain. The purpose of tracing the drilling air is to quantify its removal by pumping, prior to sampling of in situ gases. The objectives of our work in Arizona were to: (1) Determine the amount of time and the pumping rates required to remove the SF 6 -enriched drilling air without inducing additional atmospheric contamination; (2) collect core samples for uniaxial compression to determine the amount of SF 6 gas that penetrated the core during drilling; (3) test the effectiveness of the SF 6 injection and sampling system; (4) test the installation and effectiveness of the prototype packer system; and (5) test the effectiveness of several core sealing methods. 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Stability of sulfur slopes on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, G. D.; Carr, M. H.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical properties of elemental sulfur are such that the upper crust of Io cannot be primarily sulfur. For heat flows in the range 100-1000 ergs/sq cm sec sulfur becomes ductile within several hundred meters of the surface and would prevent the formation of calderas with depths greater than this. However, the one caldera for which precise depth data are available is 2 km deep, and this value may be typical. A study of the mechanical equilibrium of simple slopes shows that the depth to the zone of rapid ductile flow strongly controls the maximum heights for sulfur slopes. Sulfur scarps with heights greater than 1 km will fail for all heat flows greater than 180 ergs/sq cm sec and slope angles greater than 22.5 deg. The observed relief on Io is inconsistent with that anticipated for a predominantly sulfur crust. However, a silicate crust with several percent sulfur included satisfies both the mechanical constraints and the observed presence of sulfur on Io.

  18. Effect of Silica Sol on Boric-sulfuric Acid Anodic Oxidation of LY12CZ Aluminum Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Hui-cong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum alloy anodizing coatings were prepared for LY12CZ in the boric-sulfuric acid solution (45g/L sulfuric acid,8g/L boric acid with the addition of 10%,20%,30% (volume fractionsilica sol,with the gradient voltage of 15V. The current and voltage transients of the anodizing process were collected by data collection instrument. The surface morphologies,microstructure and chemical composition of the anodic coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The corrosion resistance was examined by neutral salt spray,electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS test and titrating test. The results show that the different concentration of silica sol addition can influence the forming and dissolution of anodizing coatings,improve the compactness smoothness and corrosion resistance during the anodizing process in the boric-sulfuric acid solution.

  19. Effects of growth retardants and fumigations with ozone and sulfur dioxide on growth and flowering of Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cathey, H.M.; Heggestad, H.E.

    1973-01-01

    Eight cultivars of poinsettia, Euphorbia pulcherrima Willd., were evaluated for sensitivity to ..cap alpha..-cyclopropyl-..cap alpha.. (4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidine methanol (ancymidol) and protection from ozone and sulfur dioxide injury afforded by applications of ancymidol and (2-chloroethyl) trimethyl ammonium chloride (chlormequat). Foliar sprays of ancymidol were at least 80 to 500 times and the soil drench 1000 times more active than chlormequat in retarding stem elongation. The diam of the bracts was reduced, but branching increased more on plants treated with ancymidol than on untreated plants. The cv. Annette Hegg (AH) was more sensitive to ozone fumigations than was Eckespoint C-1' (C-1). Sulfur dioxide also caused more injury to AH than to C-1. Ancymidol and chlormequat reduced visible injury induced by ozone and sulfur dioxide.

  20. Sulfur dioxide : Relevance of toxic and nutritional effects for Chinese cabbage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Liping; Stulen, Ineke; De Kok, Luit J.

    2006-01-01

    Shoots of Chinese cabbage formed a sink for atmospheric SO2 and there was a linear relation between the rate of uptake and the atmospheric SO2 level (0.03-1.4 mu l l(-1)). Chinese cabbage appeared to be rather susceptible to the toxic effects of SO2. Shoot biomass production was reduced upon

  1. Zeeman effect in sulfur monoxide: a tool to probe magnetic fields in star forming regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Lattanzi, Valerio; Coriani, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Context. Magnetic fields play a fundamental role in star formation processes and the best method to evaluate their intensity is to measure the Zeeman effect of atomic and molecular lines. However, a direct measurement of the Zeeman spectral pattern from interstellar molecular species is challengi...

  2. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  3. Effect of alloying elements on characteristics of iron passive state in sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejes Jola, O.; Mustafa-Zade, F.M.; Sukhotin, A.M.; Tchannikova, O.A.

    1981-01-01

    The curves of anodic polarization of iron binary alloys with Cr, Mo, W, Ni, Si, Co, Mn, Re, Ti, Al, Cu, Bi, Zn, In, V, Sb, Ta, Hf, Pb, Sn, Zr, Nb, Ce, B, P, S in 0.5 MH 2 SO 4 are studied. Passivation potentials, potentials of total passivation, transpassivity and current density are determined in the passivity region. All alloys had alpha-structure, the content of alloying elements was close to solubility in solid solution. Elements are classified according to the type of their effect on passive state of iron. Character of this effect does not have a direct connection with passivation ability the elements themselves, it is determined, probably, by a possibility to form stable passivating ruixed oxides of the ferrospinel type [ru

  4. Interaction effect on nitrogen and sulfur on growth and nutrient uptake by maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaggi, R.C.; Aulakh, M.S.; Dev, G.

    1977-01-01

    A pot culture experiment was conducted in the greenhouse on an arid brown loamy sand deficient in both available N and S with maize (Ganga-5) as the test corp. Three levels of N (0, 30, 60 ppm) as NH 4 Cl in factorial combination with three levels of S (0, 10, 20 ppm) as Na 2 35 SO 4 were replicated thrice. Application of N upto 60 ppm S significantly increased dry matter yield and uptake of N and S by maize (stem + levels) and their combined application showed sinergistic effect for both yield and uptake of these nutrients. Maximum yield of dry matter and uptake of the nutrients were obtained with the application of 60 ppm N and 20 ppm S. The radioassay data corroborated the beneficial effect of N on the efficiency of applied S. (author)

  5. Sulfur polymer cement concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, H.H.; McBee, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfur-based composite materials formulated using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) and mineral aggregates are described and compared with conventional portland cement based materials. Materials characteristics presented include mechanical strength, chemical resistance, impact resistance, moisture permeation, and linear shrinkage during placement and curing. Examples of preparation and placement of sulfur polymer cement concrete (SC) are described using commercial scale equipment. SC applications presented are focused into hostile chemical environments where severe portland cement concrete (PCC) failure has occurred

  6. Effects of sulfuric, nitric, and mixed acid rain on Chinese fir sapling growth in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Bo; Zhai, Lu; Meng, Miaojing; Lin, Jie; Zhuang, Jiayao; Wang, G Geoff; Zhang, Jinchi

    2018-05-23

    The influence of acid rain on plant growth includes direct effects on foliage as well as indirect soil-mediated effects that cause a reduction in root growth. In addition, the concentration of NO 3 - in acid rain increases along with the rapid growth of nitrogen deposition. In this study, we investigated the impact of simulated acid rain with different SO 4 2- /NO 3 - (S/N) ratios, which were 1:0, 5:1, 1:1, 1:5 and 0:1, on Chinese fir sapling growth from March 2015 to April 2016. Results showed that Chinese fir sapling height growth rate (HGR) and basal diameter growth rate (DGR) decreased as acid rain pH decreased, and also decreased as the percentage of NO 3 - increased in acid rain. Acid rain pH significantly decreased the Chlorophyll a (Chla) and Chlorophyll b (Chlb) content, and Chla and Chlb contents with acid rain S/N 1:5 were significantly lower than those with S/N 1:0 at pH 2.5. The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, maximal efficiency of Photosystem II photochemistry (Fv/Fm) and non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ), with most acid rain treatments were significantly lower than those with CK treatments. Root activities first increased and then decreased as acid rain pH decreased, when acid rain S/N ratios were 1:1, 1:5 and 0:1. Redundancy discriminant analysis (RDA) showed that the Chinese fir DGR and HGR had positive correlations with Chla, Chlb, Fv/Fm ratio, root activity, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities in roots under the stress of acid rain with different pH and S/N ratios. The structural equation modelling (SEM) results showed that acid rain NO 3 - concentration and pH had stronger direct effects on Chinese fir sapling HGR and DGR, and the direct effects of acid rain NO 3 - concentration and pH on HGR were lower than those on DGR. Our results suggest that the ratio of SO 4 2- to NO 3 - in acid rain is an important factor which could affect the sustainable development of monoculture Chinese fir plantations in southern China

  7. Performance of the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel with air, nitrogen, and sulfur hexafluoride media under closed loop automatic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishna, S.; Kilgore, W. Allen

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel was modified in 1994, to operate with any one of the three test gas media viz., air, cryogenic nitrogen gas, or sulfur hexafluoride gas. This document provides the initial test results with respect to the tunnel performance and tunnel control, as a part of the commissioning activities on the microcomputer based controller. The tunnel can provide precise and stable control of temperature to less than or equal to +/- 0.3 K in the range 80-320 K in cyro mode or 300-320 K in air/SF6 mode, pressure to +/- 0.01 psia in the range 15-88 psia and Mach number to +/- O.0015 in the range 0.150 to transonic Mach numbers up to 1.000. A new heat exchanger has been included in the tunnel circuit and is performing adequately. The tunnel airfoil testing benefits considerably by precise control of tunnel states and helps in generating high quality aerodynamic test data from the 0.3-m TCT.

  8. Effect of Pretreatment with Sulfuric Acid on Catalytic Hydrocracking of Fe/AC Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyu Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC was modified by H2SO4 and used as a support for catalyst. The Fe2S3/AC-T catalyst was prepared by deposition-precipitation method and used to catalyze hydrocracking of coal-related model compound, di(1-naphthylmethane (DNM. The properties of catalyst were studied by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The result showed that ferric sulfate and acidic centers had synergetic effect on hydrocracking of DNM when using Fe2S3/AC-T as catalyst, the optimal loading of Fe is 9 wt.%. Hydroconversion of the extraction residue from Guizhou bituminous coal was also studied using Fe2S3/AC-T as the catalyst. The reaction was conducted in cyclohexane under 0.8 Mpa of initial hydrogen pressure at 310°C. The reaction mixture was extracted with petroleum ether and analyzed by GC/MS. Amounts of organic compounds which fall into the categories of homologues of benzene and naphthalene were detected. It suggested that the catalyst could effectively catalyze the cleavage of C-C-bridged bonds.

  9. Effects of sulfur dioxide on net CO/sub 2/ assimilation in the lichen Evernia mesomorpha Nyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huebert, D B; L' Hirondelle, S J; Addison, P A

    1985-01-01

    Physiologically active thalli of the lichen Evernia mesomorpha Nyl. were very sensitive to short-term fumigations with low concentrations of gaseous sulfur dioxide. Net CO/sub 2/ assimilation rate (NAR) was significantly reduced after exposure to 0.085 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ (250 ..mu..g m/sup -3/) SO/sub 2/ for 1 h or more, and the reduction increased with increasing concentration. Duration of exposure had no significant effect on NAR, indicating the importance of rate of SO/sub 2/ uptake rather than the total amount absorbed. Respiration was significantly reduced after 4 h or more of exposure to 0.265 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ (639 ..mu..g m/sup -3/) SO/sub 2/ or higher. Recovery of NAR after fumigation was dependent on both SO/sub 2/ concentration and duration of fumigation, and on the time allowed for recovery. Virtually complete recovery occurred within 24 h after episodes with up to 0.355 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ (856 ..mu..g m/sup -3/) SO/sub 2/ for 1 h and 0.085 ..mu..l l/sup -1/ SO/sub 2/ for 4 h. Above these levels, recovery was incomplete or nonexistent after 24 h in clean air. The level of sensitivity found can be attributed to the environmental conditions during fumigation, which prevented thallus desiccation and inactivity. Based on this study, neither the concept of dose (concentration x time) nor that of threshold levels of SO/sub 2/ fumigations are supported. Peak exposures to SO/sub 2/ for short periods may be of primary importance in determining the survival of lichens in industrial areas.

  10. Effect of sulfur dioxide and sulfuric acid on the physiological-biochemical processes in the leaves of plants. [Acer negundo; Betula verrucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaevskii, V S; Suslova, V S

    1967-01-01

    In the vicinity of copper-smelting plants, the boxelder (Acer negundo) had an injury rate of 5-10% of a period of years, the European white birch (Betula verrucosa), 60-100%. During the 1st stages of the action of H2SO4 and SO2 on the boxelder, observations were made of an active rise in reducing substances, but in the birch there was intensification of oxidative processes. The discovery of a peak of intensification of oxidative activity after stopping peroxidase activity is explained by the activation of cytochrome oxidase and other oxidative systems. It is suggested that H2SO4 affects the oxidation-reduction conditions in the plants not only through the change in pH of the medium but also biochemically. H2SO4 and SO2 exert similar effects on plants in trials: there is very rapid inactivation of catalase and unique behavior of peroxidase. 8 references, 5 figures.

  11. Effect of pH buffering capacity and sources of dietary sulfur on rumen fermentation, sulfide production, methane production, sulfate reducing bacteria, and total Archaea in in vitro rumen cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Meng, Qingxiang; Yu, Zhongtang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of three types of dietary sulfur on in vitro fermentation characteristics, sulfide production, methane production, and microbial populations at two different buffer capacities were examined using in vitro rumen cultures. Addition of dry distilled grain with soluble (DDGS) generally decreased total gas production, degradation of dry matter and neutral detergent fiber, and concentration of total volatile fatty acids, while increasing ammonia concentration. High buffering capacity alleviated these adverse effects on fermentation. Increased sulfur content resulted in decreased methane emission, but total Archaea population was not changed significantly. The population of sulfate reducing bacteria was increased in a sulfur type-dependent manner. These results suggest that types of dietary sulfur and buffering capacity can affect rumen fermentation and sulfide production. Diet buffering capacity, and probably alkalinity, may be increased to alleviate some of the adverse effects associated with feeding DDGS at high levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation induced sulfur dioxide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewski, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The biggest source of air pollution is the combustion of fossil fuels, were pollutants such as particulate, sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen oxides (NO x ), and volatile organic compounds (VOC) are emitted. Among these pollutants, sulfur dioxide plays the main role in acidification of the environment. The mechanism of sulfur dioxide transformation in the environment is partly photochemical. This is not direct photooxidation, however, but oxidation through formed radicals. Heterogenic reactions play an important role in this transformation as well; therefore, observations from environmental chemistry can be used in air pollution control engineering. One of the most promising technologies for desulfurization of the flue gases (and simultaneous denitrification) is radiation technology with an electron accelerator application. Contrary to the nitrogen oxides (NO x ) removal processes, which is based on pure radiation induced reactions, sulfur dioxide removal depends on two pathways: a thermochemical reaction in the presence of ammonia/water vapor and a radiation set of radiochemical reactions. The mechanism of these reactions and the consequent technological parameters of the process are discussed in this paper. The industrial application of this radiation technology is being implemented in an industrial pilot plant operated by INCT at EPS Kaweczyn. A full-scale industrial plant is currently in operation in China, and two others are under development in Japan and Poland. (author)

  13. Growth-promoting effect on iron-sulfur proteins on axenic cultures of Entamoeba dispar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa S.A.M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A growth-promoting factor (GPF that promotes the growth of Entamoeba dispar under axenic culture conditions was found in fractions of mitochondria (Mt, hydrogenosomes (Hg and chloroplasts (Cp obtained from cells of six different protozoan, mammalian and plant species. We were able to extract the GPF from the Cp-rich leaf cells of a plant (spiderwort: Commelina communis L. in an acetone-soluble fraction as a complex of chlorophyll with low molecular weight proteins (molecular weight [MW] approximately 4,600. We also found that on treatment with 0.6 % complexes of 2-mercapthoethanol (2ME, complexes of chlorophyll-a with iron-sulphur (Fe-S proteins (e.g., ferredoxins [Fd] from spinach and Clostridium pasteurianum and noncomplex rubredoxin (Rd from C. pasteurianum have a growth-promoting effect on E. dispar. These findings suggest that E. dispar may lack a sufficient quantity of some essential components of Fe-S proteins, such as Fe-S center.

  14. Effects of Copper and Sulfur Additions on Corrosion Resistance and Machinability of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon Tae; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Hyung Joon

    1999-01-01

    Effects of Cu and S on corrosion resistance and machinability of austenitic stainless steel were investigated using immersion test, metallographic examination, Auger surface analysis and tool life test with single point turning tools. Corrosion resistance of the experimental Cu containing alloys in 18.4N H 2 SO 4 at 80 ∼ 120 .deg. C and 3N HCl at 40 .deg. C decreased as S content increased. However, one of the experimental alloys (Fe- 18%Cr- 21%Ni-3.2%Mo- 1.6%W- 0.2%N- 3.1%Cu- 0.091%S) showed general and pitting corrosion resistance equivalent to that of CW12MW in highly concentrated SO 4 2- environment. The alloy also showed pitting corrosion resistance superior to super stainless steel such as 654SMO in Cl - environment. The reasons why the increase in S content deteriorated the corrosion resistance were first, that the number and size of (Mn, Cr)S sulfides having corrosion resistance lower than that of matrix increased, leading to pitting corrosion and second, that rapid dissolution of the matrix around the pits was caused by adsorbed S. However, the alloy containing 3.1 %Cu and 0.091 % S maintained high general and pitting corrosion resistance due to heavily enriched noble Cu through selective dissolution of active Fe and Ni. The tool life for 3.1 % Cu + 0.091 % S added alloy was about four times that of 0.06%Cu + 0.005% S added alloy due to high shear strain rate generated by Cu addition giving easy cross slip of dislocation, lubrication of ductile (Mn, Cr)S sulfides adhering to tool crater surface and low cutting force resulting from thin continuous sulfides formed in chips during machining

  15. A Comparative Study of the Addition Effect of Diopside and Silica Sulfuric Acid Nanoparticles on Mechanical Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rezazadeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to study the effects of adding  diopside (CaMgSi2O6 as well as silica sulfuric acid nanoparticles to ceramic part of glass ionomer cement (GIC in order to improve its mechanical properties. To do this, firstly, diopside (DIO nanoparticles with chemical formula of CaMgSi2O6 were synthesized using sol-gel process and then, the structural and morphological properties of synthesized diopside nanoparticles were investigated. The results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM and particle size analyzing (PSA confirmed that synthesized diopside are nanoparticles and agglomerated. Besides, the result of X-ray diffraction (XRD analyses approved the purity of diopside nanoparticles compounds. Silica sulfuric acid (SSA nanoparticles are also prepared by chemical modification of silica nanoparticles by means of chlorosulfonic acid. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR technique was used to find about the presence of the (SO3H groups on the surface of silica sulfuric acid nanoparticles. Furthermore, various amounts (0.1, 3 and 5 wt.% of diopside and silica sulfuric acid nanoparticles were added to the ceramic part of GIC (Fuji II GIC commercial type to produce glass ionomer cement nanocomposites. The mechanical properties of the produced nanocomposites were measured using the compressive strength, three-point flexural strength and diametral tensile strength methods. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique confirmed the presence of the (SO3H groups on the surface of silica nanoparticles. The compressive strength, three-point flexural strength and diametral tensile strength were 42.5, 15.4 and 6 MPa, respectively, without addition. Although adding 1% silica solfonic acid improved nanocomposite mchanical properties by almost 122%, but maximum increase in nanocomposite mechanical properties was observed in the nanocomposites with 3% diposid, in which 160% increase was seen in the mechanical properties.

  16. Effects of dietary sulfur concentration and forage-to-concentrate ratio on ruminal fermentation, sulfur metabolism, and short-chain fatty acid absorption in beef heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, S; McKinnon, J J; Penner, G B; Hendrick, S

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary S concentration and forage-to-concentrate ratio (F:C) on ruminal fermentation, S metabolism, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption in beef heifers. Sixteen ruminally cannulated heifers (initial BW 628 ± 48 kg) were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement. The main factors included F:C (4% forage vs. 51% forage, DM basis) and the S concentration, which was modified using differing sources of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to achieve low- and high-S diets (LS = 0.30% vs. HS = 0.67% S on a DM basis). Elemental S was also added to increase the S content for the HS diets. Serum sulfate concentration from blood, sulfide (S(2-)), and SCFA concentrations from ruminal fluid, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentration from the ruminal gas cap, and urinary sulfate concentration were determined. Continuous rumen pH and SCFA (acetate, butyrate, and propionate) absorption were measured. There were no interactions between S concentration and F:C. The F:C did not affect DMI (P = 0.26) or ruminal S metabolite concentrations (P ≥ 0.19), but ruminal pH was lower (P ruminal pH (P ruminal H2S (P Ruminal H2S was positively correlated with serum sulfate (r = 0.89; P Ruminal acetate concentration was not affected (P = 0.26) by dietary S concentration. Heifers fed the HS diet had lower (P = 0.01) ruminal propionate concentration and tended to have lower (P = 0.06) butyrate concentration than heifers fed the LS diet. Ruminal acetate was greater (P = 0.01) and butyrate was less (P < 0.01) with the high F:C diet than the low F:C diet. Both HS (P = 0.06) and low F:C (P = 0.07) diets tended to reduce urine output. Feeding HS diets reduced SCFA absorption (P < 0.05). In summary, S metabolism in beef heifers was not influenced by the F:C, but HS reduced DMI, inhibited SCFA absorption, and increased urinary S excretion.

  17. Developing porous carbon with dihydrogen phosphate groups as sulfur host for high performance lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhui; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Junwei; Liang, Xiao; Baker, Andrew P.; Qu, Deyang; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Huayu; Zhang, Xinhe

    2018-02-01

    Carbon matrix (CM) derived from biomass is low cost and easily mass produced, showing great potential as sulfur host for lithium sulfur batteries. In this paper we report on a dihydrogen phosphate modified CM (PCM-650) prepared from luffa sponge (luffa acutangula) by phosphoric acid treatment. The phosphoric acid not only increases the surface area of the PCM-650, but also introduces dihydrogen phosphate onto PCM-650 (2.28 at% P). Sulfur impregnated (63.6 wt%) PCM-650/S, in comparison with samples with less dihydrogen phosphate LPCM-650/S, shows a significant performance improvement. XPS analysis is conducted for sulfur at different stages, including sulfur (undischarged), polysulfides (discharge to 2.1 V) and short chain sulfides (discharge to 1.7 V). The results consistently show chemical shifts for S2p in PCM-650, suggesting an enhanced adsorption effect. Furthermore, density functional theory (DFT) calculations is used to clarify the molecular binding: carbon/sulfur (0.86 eV), carbon/Li2S (0.3 eV), CH3-O-PO3H2/sulfur (1.24 eV), and CH3-O-PO3H2/Li2S (1.81 eV). It shows that dihydrogen phosphate group can significantly enhance the binding with sulfur and sulfide, consistent with XPS results. Consequently a CM functionalised with dihydrogen phosphate shows great potential as the sulfur host in a Li-S battery.

  18. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Influence of sulfurous oxide on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, J

    1872-01-01

    It has been determined that of the trees living in an atmosphere containing sulfurous oxide, the conifers suffer more injuries than ordinary foliaged trees. Experiments were conducted to find the causes of injuries and their relation in these two kinds of plants. Pine and alder were chosen as test plants. It was found that 1000 square centimeters of pine leaves had absorbed 1.6 c.c. of sulfurous oxide and the same surface area of alder leaves had accumulated 7.9 c.c. of sulfurous oxide. Experiments were also conducted to determine the effects of sulfurous oxide on transpiration in plants. Two similar twigs of a sycamore were arranged so that the water transpired could be weighed. Results indicate that the ratio between the total amount of water transpired by the leaves not acted on by the sulfurous oxide and those under its influence was 3.8:1. The author concludes that the amount of sulfurous oxide absorbed by pine leaves is smaller than that absorbed by trees with ordinary foliage for equal surfaces. Since its effect on transpiration is less in the case of pine, the cause of the greater injury to pine trees in nature must be due to the accumulation of sulfur. In trees annual leaves the damage to one year's foliage would have only an indirect influence on that of the following year.

  20. Effect of air pollution by copper, sulfuric acid and fertilizer factories on plants at Harjavalta, West Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laaksovirta, K; Silvola, J

    1975-01-01

    The most sensitive index of air pollution proved to be the sulfur content of needles of the Scots pine; the normal contents were reached at a distance of 20-30 km from the factories. The industrial site lies in a lichen desert (8.8 km/sup 2/), outside which is a transitional zone (52 km/sup 2/). The pine damage area coincides almost exactly with the lichen desert. The order of susceptibility of the dwarf shrubs studied proved to be: Calluna vulgaris (least tolerant), Empetrum nigrum, Vaccinium vitis-idaea and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi. The acidity of the soil had not changed very much. The acidity of the pine bark had decreased and the sulfur and phosphorus contents of the bark had risen between the factories and the limit of the lichen desert, because of fertilizer dust. 25 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  1. Natural variations of copper and sulfur stable isotopes in blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Vincent; Nogueira da Costa, Andre; Paky Bondanese, Victor; Jaouen, Klervia; Lamboux, Aline; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Vincent, Nicolas; Fourel, François; Télouk, Philippe; Gigou, Michelle; Lécuyer, Christophe; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Bréchot, Christian; Albarède, Francis; Hainaut, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The widespread hypoxic conditions of the tumor microenvironment can impair the metabolism of bioessential elements such as copper and sulfur, notably by changing their redox state and, as a consequence, their ability to bind specific molecules. Because competing redox state is known to drive isotopic fractionation, we have used here the stable isotope compositions of copper (65Cu/63Cu) and sulfur (34S/32S) in the blood of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a tool to explore the cancer-driven copper and sulfur imbalances. We report that copper is 63Cu-enriched by ∼0.4‰ and sulfur is 32S-enriched by ∼1.5‰ in the blood of patients compared with that of control subjects. As expected, HCC patients have more copper in red blood cells and serum compared with control subjects. However, the isotopic signature of this blood extra copper burden is not in favor of a dietary origin but rather suggests a reallocation in the body of copper bound to cysteine-rich proteins such as metallothioneins. The magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect is similar in red blood cells and serum of HCC patients, implying that sulfur fractionation is systemic. The 32S-enrichment of sulfur in the blood of HCC patients is compatible with the notion that sulfur partly originates from tumor-derived sulfides. The measurement of natural variations of stable isotope compositions, using techniques developed in the field of Earth sciences, can provide new means to detect and quantify cancer metabolic changes and provide insights into underlying mechanisms.

  2. Effect of sulfur dioxide inhalation on CYP2B1/2 and CYP2E1 in rat liver and lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guohua Qin; Ziqiang Meng [Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Environmental Medicine and Toxicology

    2006-07-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is a ubiquitous air pollutant, present in low concentrations in the urban air and in higher concentrations in the working environment. In this study, we investigated the effects of inhaled SO{sub 2} on the O-dealkylase of pentoxyresorufin (PROD) and p-nitrophenol hydroxylases (p-NP) activities and mRNA levels of CYP2B1/2 and CYP2E1 in the lung and liver of Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats were housed in exposure chambers and treated with 14.11 {+-}1.53, 28.36 {+-} 2.12, and 56.25 {+-} 4.28 mg /m{sup 3}SO{sub 2} for 6 h/day for 7 days, while control rats were exposed to filtered air in the same condition. The mRNAs of CYP2B1/2 and -2E1 were analyzed in livers and lungs by using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results showed that the PROD activities and mRNA of CYP2B1/2 were decreased in livers and lungs of rats exposed to SO{sub 2}. The p-NP activities and mRNA of CYP2E1 were decreased in lungs but not in livers of rats exposed to SO{sub 2}. Total liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 (CYP) contents were diminished in SO{sub 2} -exposed rats. These results lead to two conclusions: (1) SO{sub 2} exposure can suppress CYP2B1/2 and CYP2E1 in lungs and CYP2B1/2 in livers of rats, thus modifying the liver and lung toxication/detoxication potential, and (2) the total liver microsomal CYP contents were diminished, although the activity and mRNA expression of CYP2E1 in rat livers were not affected by SO{sub 2} exposure.

  3. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2002-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2002 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H(sub 2)S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf(sup SM) (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H(sub 2)S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H(sub 2)S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO(sub 2) at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H(sub 2)S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. In a previous reporting period tests were done to determine the effect of hydrocarbons such as n-hexane on catalyst performance with and without H(sub 2)S present. The experiments showed that hexane oxidation is suppressed when H(sub 2)S is present. Hexane represents the most reactive of the C1 to C6 series of alkanes. Since hexane exhibits low reactivity under H(sub 2)S oxidation conditions, and more importantly, does not change

  4. Volatile earliest Triassic sulfur cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schobben, Martin; Stebbins, Alan; Algeo, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    model experiment. Exposure of evaporite deposits having a high δ 34S may account for the source change, with a possible role for the Siberian Traps volcanism by magmatic remobilization of Cambrian rock salt. A high sulfur cycle turnover rate would have left the ocean system vulnerable to development......Marine biodiversity decreases and ecosystem destruction during the end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) have been linked to widespread marine euxinic conditions. Changes in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and marine dissolved sulfate concentrations during...... fractionation and point to a more universal control, i.e., contemporaneous seawater sulfate concentration.The MSR-trend transfer function yielded estimates of seawater sulfate of 0.6-2.8mM for the latest Permian to earliest Triassic, suggesting a balanced oceanic S-cycle with equal S inputs and outputs...

  5. Origin of electrolyte-dopant dependent sulfur poisoning of SOFC anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, ZhenHua; Björketun, Mårten E; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens B; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-05-14

    The mechanisms governing the sulfur poisoning of the triple phase boundary (TPB) of Ni-XSZ (X2O3 stabilized zirconia) anodes have been investigated using density functional theory. The calculated sulfur adsorption energies reveal a clear correlation between the size of the cation dopant X(3+) and the sulfur tolerance of the Ni-XSZ anode; the smaller the ionic radius, the higher the sulfur tolerance. The mechanistic study shows that the size of X(3+) strongly influences XSZ's surface energy, which in turn determines the adhesion of Ni to XSZ. The Ni-XSZ interaction has a direct impact on the Ni-S interaction and on the relative stability of reconstructed and pristine Ni(100) facets at the TPB. Together, these two effects control the sulfur adsorption on the Ni atoms at the TPB. The established relationships explain experimentally observed dopant-dependent anode performances and provide a blueprint for the future search for and preparation of highly sulfur tolerant anodes.

  6. Nitrogen-doped porous “green carbon” derived from shrimp shell: Combined effects of pore sizes and nitrogen doping on the performance of lithium sulfur battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Jiangying, E-mail: qujy@lnnu.edu.cn [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, 116029 (China); Carbon Research Laboratory, Center for Nano Materials and Science, School of Chemical Engineering, State Key Lab of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China); Lv, Siyuan; Peng, Xiyue; Tian, Shuo; Wang, Jia [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, 116029 (China); Gao, Feng, E-mail: fenggao2003@163.com [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, 116029 (China); Carbon Research Laboratory, Center for Nano Materials and Science, School of Chemical Engineering, State Key Lab of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2016-06-25

    Nitrogen-rich porous “green carbons” derived from abundant shrimp shell shows good performance for Li–S batteries. The strategy in this work is highlighted to selective removal of intrinsic CaCO{sub 3} in shrimp shell followed by KOH activation to tune the pore sizes of the obtained carbons. On the basis of the different porous structures, the discharge capacity of the obtained carbons as Li–S cathodes follows the order of micro-mesoporous carbon>mesoporous carbon>microporous carbon. The high capacity of the micro-mesoporous carbon is attributed to its positive characters such as the coexistence of micro-mesoporous structure, the large pore volume and the high specific surface area. Furthermore, well-dispersed nitrogen in the porous carbons is naturally doped and inherited from shrimp shell, and can help to enhance cycle stability when used as cathodes. As a result, all carbon cathodes exhibit the good cycle stability (>78%) due to their nitrogen doping induced chemical adsorption of sulfur on the surface areas of the porous carbons. Among them, mesoporous carbon cathode shows the best cycle stability with 90% retention within 100 cycles, which is mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of its both large pore size (5.12 nm) and high nitrogen content (6.67 wt %). - Highlights: • Nitrogen-rich porous “green carbons” derived from abundant shrimp shell shows good performance for Li–S batteries. • Intrinsic CaCO{sub 3} in shrimp shell as the natural template plays an important role on tailoring of the pore sizes of the porous carbons. • Nitrogen containing polysaccharide in shrimp shell benefits to produce nitrogen-rich carbons. • The effects of pore sizes on the electrochemical performance are investigated in detail. • The carbon-sulfur cathodes exhibit the good cycle stability because of nitrogen doping induced chemical adsorption of sulfur.

  7. Nitrogen-doped porous “green carbon” derived from shrimp shell: Combined effects of pore sizes and nitrogen doping on the performance of lithium sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Jiangying; Lv, Siyuan; Peng, Xiyue; Tian, Shuo; Wang, Jia; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-rich porous “green carbons” derived from abundant shrimp shell shows good performance for Li–S batteries. The strategy in this work is highlighted to selective removal of intrinsic CaCO_3 in shrimp shell followed by KOH activation to tune the pore sizes of the obtained carbons. On the basis of the different porous structures, the discharge capacity of the obtained carbons as Li–S cathodes follows the order of micro-mesoporous carbon>mesoporous carbon>microporous carbon. The high capacity of the micro-mesoporous carbon is attributed to its positive characters such as the coexistence of micro-mesoporous structure, the large pore volume and the high specific surface area. Furthermore, well-dispersed nitrogen in the porous carbons is naturally doped and inherited from shrimp shell, and can help to enhance cycle stability when used as cathodes. As a result, all carbon cathodes exhibit the good cycle stability (>78%) due to their nitrogen doping induced chemical adsorption of sulfur on the surface areas of the porous carbons. Among them, mesoporous carbon cathode shows the best cycle stability with 90% retention within 100 cycles, which is mainly attributed to the synergistic effects of its both large pore size (5.12 nm) and high nitrogen content (6.67 wt %). - Highlights: • Nitrogen-rich porous “green carbons” derived from abundant shrimp shell shows good performance for Li–S batteries. • Intrinsic CaCO_3 in shrimp shell as the natural template plays an important role on tailoring of the pore sizes of the porous carbons. • Nitrogen containing polysaccharide in shrimp shell benefits to produce nitrogen-rich carbons. • The effects of pore sizes on the electrochemical performance are investigated in detail. • The carbon-sulfur cathodes exhibit the good cycle stability because of nitrogen doping induced chemical adsorption of sulfur.

  8. Sulfur dioxide control in China: policy evolution during the 10th and 11th Five-year Plans and lessons for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreifels, Jeremy J.; Fu, Yale; Wilson, Elizabeth J.

    2012-01-01

    China's Central government established national goals to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions by 10% in both the 10th and 11th Five-year Plan periods, 2001–2005 and 2006–2010, respectively. But the early policies were unsuccessful at reducing emissions—emissions increased 28% during the 10th Five-year Plan. After adapting a number of policies and introducing new instruments during the 11th Five-year Plan, SO 2 emissions declined by 14%. We examine the evolution of these policies, their interplay with technical and institutional factors, and capture lessons from the 11th Five-year Plan to guide future pollution control programs. We find that several factors contributed to achievement of the 11th Five-year Plan SO 2 reduction goal: (1) instrument choice, (2) political accountability, (3) emission verification, (4) political support, (5) streamlined targets, and (6) political and financial incentives. The approach integrated multiple policy instruments—market-based, command-and-control, and administrative instruments specific to the Chinese context. The evolution of SO 2 reduction policies and programs has implications for further SO 2 reductions from power plants and other sources, as well as control of other atmospheric pollutants such as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in China. - Highlights: ► This paper assesses China's SO 2 reduction policies between 2000 and 2010. ► Government used a variety of policy instruments to achieve emission targets. ► Experience shows that accountability, incentives, and political support were key. ► The policy lessons can aid future policies for SO 2 , NO x , and CO 2 reductions.

  9. Insight into the loading temperature of sulfur on sulfur/carbon cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Huan; Yin, Ya-Xia; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A cost-effective chemical activation method to prepare porous carbon nanospheres. • Carbon nanospheres with bimodal microporous structure show high specific area and large micropore volume. • The S/C composite cathodes with in-situformed S−C bond exhibit high sulfur activity with a reversible capacity of 1000 mA h g −1 . • S−C bond enables well confinement on sulfur and polysulfides. - Abstract: Lithium–sulfur batteries are highly desired because of their characteristics such as high energy density. However, the applications of Li-S batteries are limited because they exist dissolution of polysulfides into electrolytes. This study reports the preparation of sulfur cathodes by using bimodal microporous (0.5 nm and 0.8 nm to 2.0 nm) carbon spheres with high specific area (1992 m 2 g −1 ) and large micropore volume (1.2 g cm −1 ), as well as the encapsulation of polysulfides via formation of carbon–sulfur bonds in a sealed vacuum glass tube at high temperature. Given that sulfur and polysulfides are well confined by the S−C bond, the shuttle effect is effectively suppressed. The prepared S/C cathodes with a sulfur loading of up to 75% demonstrate high sulfur activity with reversible capacity of 1000 mA h g −1 at the current density of 0.1 A g −1 and good cycling stability (667 mA h g −1 after 100 cycles).

  10. Effects of rehydration nutrients on H2S metabolism and formation of volatile sulfur compounds by the wine yeast VL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gal; Henschke, Paul A; Higgins, Vincent J; Ugliano, Maurizio; Curtin, Chris D

    2011-11-02

    In winemaking, nutrient supplementation is a common practice for optimising fermentation and producing quality wine. Nutritionally suboptimal grape juices are often enriched with nutrients in order to manipulate the production of yeast aroma compounds. Nutrients are also added to active dry yeast (ADY) rehydration media to enhance subsequent fermentation performance. In this study we demonstrate that nutrient supplementation at rehydration also has a significant effect on the formation of volatile sulfur compounds during wine fermentations. The concentration of the 'fruity' aroma compounds, the polyfunctional thiols 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol (3MH) and 3-mercaptohexyl acetate (3MHA), was increased while the concentration of the 'rotten egg' aroma compound, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), was decreased. Nutrient supplementation of the rehydration media also changed the kinetics of H2S production during fermentation by advancing onset of H2S production. Microarray analysis revealed that this was not due to expression changes within the sulfate assimilation pathway, which is known to be a major contributor to H2S production. To gain insight into possible mechanisms responsible for this effect, a component of the rehydration nutrient mix, the tri-peptide glutathione (GSH) was added at rehydration and studied for its subsequent effects on H2S formation. GSH was found to be taken up during rehydration and to act as a source for H2S during the following fermentation. These findings represent a potential approach for managing sulfur aroma production through the use of rehydration nutrients.

  11. The analysis of thermoplastic characteristics of special polymer sulfur composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Książek, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Specific chemical environments step out in the industry objects. Portland cement composites (concrete and mortar) were impregnated by using the special polymerized sulfur and technical soot as a filler (polymer sulfur composite). Sulfur and technical soot was applied as the industrial waste. Portland cement composites were made of the same aggregate, cement and water. The process of special polymer sulfur composite applied as the industrial waste is a thermal treatment process in the temperature of about 150-155°C. The result of such treatment is special polymer sulfur composite in a liquid state. This paper presents the plastic constants and coefficients of thermal expansion of special polymer sulfur composites, with isotropic porous matrix, reinforced by disoriented ellipsoidal inclusions with orthotropic symmetry of the thermoplastic properties. The investigations are based on the stochastic differential equations of solid mechanics. A model and algorithm for calculating the effective characteristics of special polymer sulfur composites are suggested. The effective thermoplastic characteristics of special polymer sulfur composites, with disoriented ellipsoidal inclusions, are calculated in two stages: First, the properties of materials with oriented inclusions are determined, and then effective constants of a composite with disoriented inclusions are determined on the basis of the Voigt or Rice scheme. A brief summary of new products related to special polymer sulfur composites is given as follows: Impregnation, repair, overlays and precast polymer concrete will be presented. Special polymer sulfur as polymer coating impregnation, which has received little attention in recent years, currently has some very interesting applications.

  12. Interactions between bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium, and sulfur-dependent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    In spite of its central importance in research efforts, the relationship between seawater compounds and bacterial luminescence has not previously been investigated in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effect of cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) and anions (Cl(-) , HCO(3) (-) , CO(3) (2-) , and NO(3) (-) ) on the induction of both inorganic (sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) and organic (L-cysteine and L-cystine) sulfur-dependent luminescence in Vibrio fischeri. We found that HCO(3) (-) (bicarbonate) and CO(3) (2-) (carbonate), in the form of various compounds, had a stimulatory effect on sulfur-dependent luminescence. The luminescence induced by bicarbonate was further promoted by the addition of magnesium. Potassium also increased sulfur-dependent luminescence when sulfate or thiosulfate was supplied as the sole sulfur source, but not when sulfite, L-cysteine, or L-cystine was supplied. The positive effect of potassium was accelerated by the addition of magnesium and/or calcium. Furthermore, the additional supply of magnesium improved the induction of sulfite- or L-cysteine-dependent luminescence, but not the l-cystine-dependent type. These results suggest that sulfur-dependent luminescence of V. fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions is mainly controlled by bicarbonate, carbonate, and potassium. In addition, our results indicate that an additional supply of magnesium is effective for increasing V. fischeri luminescence. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Self-assembled peptides for coating of active sulfur nanoparticles in lithium–sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jewel, Yead; Yoo, Kisoo; Liu, Jin; Dutta, Prashanta

    2016-01-01

    Development of lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery is hindered by poor cyclability due to the loss of sulfur, although Li–S battery can provide high energy density. Coating of sulfur nanoparticles can help maintain active sulfur in the cathode of Li–S battery, and hence increase the cyclability. Among myriad of coating materials, synthetic peptides are very attractive because of their spontaneous self-assembly as well as electrical conductive characteristics. In this study, we explored the use of various synthetic peptides as a coating material for sulfur nanoparticles. Atomistic simulations were carried out to identify optimal peptide structure and density for coating sulfur nanoparticles. Three different peptide models, poly-proline, poly(leucine–lysine) and poly-histidine, are selected for this study based on their peptide–peptide and peptide-sulfur interactions. Simulation results show that both poly-proline and poly(leucine–lysine) can form self-assembled coating on sulfur nanoparticles (2–20 nm) in pyrrolidinone, a commonly used solvent for cathode slurry. We also studied the structural integrity of these synthetic peptides in organic [dioxolane (DOL) and dimethoxyethane (DME)] electrolyte used in Li–S battery. Both peptides show stable structures in organic electrolyte (DOL/DME) used in Li–S battery. Furthermore, the dissolution of sulfur molecules in organic electrolyte is investigated in the absence and presence of these peptide coatings. It was found that only poly(leucine–lysine)-based peptide can most effectively suppress the sulfur loss in electrolyte, suggesting its potential applications in Li–S battery as a coating material.Graphical abstract

  14. Sulfur-binding in recent environments: II. Speciation of sulfur and iron and implications for the occurrence of organo-sulfur compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartgers, Walter A.; Lòpez, Jordi F.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Reiss, Christine; Maxwell, James R.; Grimalt, Joan O.

    1997-11-01

    Speciation of iron and sulfur species was determined for two recent sediments (La Trinitat and Lake Cisó) which were deposited in environments with a high biological productivity and sulfate-reducing activity. In sediments from calcite ponds of La Trinitat an excess of reactive iron species (iron monosulfides, iron hydroxides) results in a depletion of reactive sulfur which is accompanied by a virtual absence of organo-sulfur compounds, both in low (LMW) and high molecular-weight (HMW) fractions. Small amounts of phytanyl and highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) thiophenes in the extract demonstrate that these molecules exhibit a higher reactivity towards reduced sulfur species as compared to detrital iron. Euxinic sediments from Lake Cisó are characterised by an excess of reduced sulfur species which can rapidly trap reactive iron. High concentrations of H 2S results in the formation of organo-sulfur compounds which were encountered in both LMW and HMW fractions. The major part of the organic sulfur is bound to the carbohydrate portion of woody tissues, whose presence was revealed by a specific alkylthiophene distribution in the flash pyrolysate and by Li/EtNH 2 desulfurisation of the kerogen which resulted in the solubilisation of the sulfur-enriched hemicellulose fraction. Relatively high amounts of sulfurised C 25 HBI compounds in the sediment extract of Lake Cisó reflect the incorporation of sulfur into algal derived organic matter upon early diagenesis. The combined approach of the speciation of iron and sulfur species and the molecular analysis of sedimentary fractions demonstrates that abiotic sulfur binding to organic matter occurs at the earliest stages of diagenesis under specific depositional conditions (anoxic, stratified water column) in which an excess of reduced sulfur species relative to the amount of reactive iron is a controlling factor.

  15. Confine sulfur in mesoporous metal–organic framework @ reduced graphene oxide for lithium sulfur battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Weizhai; Zhang, Zhian; Qu, Yaohui; Zhou, Chengkun; Wang, Xiwen; Li, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Metal organic framework @ reduced graphene oxide was applied for sulfur cathode. • MIL-101(Cr)@rGO/S composites are synthesized by a facile two-step liquid method. • Cycling stability of MIL-101(Cr)@rGO/S sulfur cathode was improved. -- Abstract: Mesoporous metal organic framework @ reduced graphene oxide (MIL-101(Cr)@rGO) materials have been used as a host material to prepare the multi-composite sulfur cathode through a facile and effective two-step liquid phase method successfully, which is different from the simple MIL-101(Cr)/S mixed preparation method. The successful reduced graphene oxide coating in the MIL-101(Cr)@rGO improve the electronic conductivity of meso-MOFs effectively. The discharge capacity and capacity retention rate of MIL-101(Cr)@rGO/S composite sulfur cathode are as high as 650 mAh g −1 and 66.6% at the 50th cycle at the current density of 335 mA g −1 . While the discharge capacity and capacity retention rate of MIL-101(Cr)/S mixed sulfur cathode is 458 mAh g −1 and 37.3%. Test results indicate that the MIL-101(Cr)@rGO is a promising host material for the sulfur cathode in the lithium–sulfur battery applications

  16. Tropospheric chemistry of natural hydrocarbons, aldehydes, and peroxy radicals: Their connections to sulfuric acid production and climate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A.

    1993-05-01

    Recent work has shown that natural hydrocarbon emissions can significantly affect the levels of urban and regional tropospheric ozone. We report on the reactivities of these biogenic trace gases, particularly isoprene, focusing on their importance in the production of aldehydes and peroxy radicals, leading to increased levels of hydrogen over regional forests. Hydrogen peroxide can lead to the wet oxidation of sulfur dioxide to acidic sulfate in aerosols, fogs, and clouds. In turn, acidic sulfate can act to as a light scattering aerosol and a source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), potentially leading to global cooling. Aerosol sulfate and other dissolved organic and inorganic compounds can also play important roles as a greenhouse species in the lower troposphere

  17. Effect of octanols structure on their extraction ability as regards to rhenium(VII) in sulfuric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasikov, A.G.; Petrova, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    It is established that extraction ability of octanols as regards to rhenium(VII) and sulfuric acid depends on the structure of alcohol, but if in passage from octanol-1 to octanol-3 as regard to rhenium(VII) it rises, then for H 2 SO 4 it falls. Dependence of the distribution function of rhenium from the concentration of the acid has maximums at 4-7 mol l 1- that the most distinctly it becomes apparent for secondary alcohols. Decreasing the extraction ability of octyl alcohols with the growth of H 2 SO 4 concentration more than 7 mol l 1- is connected with the change of extractant composition and forms of rhenium(VII) being in the solution [ru

  18. Effects of rare-earths additions on the breakdown of protective oxide scales in the presence of sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Goodman, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Minor additions of rare-earths improve oxide scale adhesion in simple oxidation at high temperatures. The efficacy of such improvements and the role of such additions are not well understood in the presence of sulfur at 500-700 degrees C. Therefore, mixed gas corrosion tests were performed on model Fe-based alloys, with minor additions of rare-earths in an H 2 /H 2 S/H 2 O/Ar gas mixture at 700 degrees C up to 192 hours. The scale breakdown mechanisms were studied on preoxidized samples. The scales and the substrates were characterized by SEM/EDS, and scanning Auger microscopy (AES). The results are discussed

  19. On the effects of gravity and sulfur content on the weld shape in horizontal narrow gap GTAW of stainless steels

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2013-07-01

    A simplified 2D axisymmetric model and a comprehensive 3D weld pool model, accounting for the free surface deformation and the filler metal addition, have been developed to investigate the factors that lead to asymmetric bead shapes in horizontal GTA welding of stainless steels. Buoyancy-induced flow and the sagging of the pool free surface, under the action of gravity, are found to be responsible for the weld asymmetry and the decrease in the weld penetration at the bottom sidewall. The numerical results clearly emphasized the beneficial role of the Marangoni shear stress in limiting the asymmetry of horizontal GTA welds. An additional experimental investigation showed that the asymmetry in the weld shape can be reduced when placing the lowest sulfur content component at the bottom side. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Penetration of sulfur hexafluoride into cellular polypropylene films and its effect on the electric charging and electromechanical response of ferroelectrets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Xunlin; Wegener, Michael; Wirges, Werner; Zhang Xiaoqing; Hillenbrand, Joachim; Xia Zhongfu; Gerhard-Multhaupt, Reimund; Sessler, Gerhard M

    2005-01-01

    Cellular polypropylene (PP) films were treated with sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) gas in order to study the SF 6 penetration behaviour and optimize the electric charging conditions. There were differences in the penetration of SF 6 for different cellular PP materials, depending on the microscopic properties, which manifest themselves in the voided structure as well as in the mechanical stiffnesses of the cellular films. The penetration of SF 6 after long-term pressure treatment is confirmed in strongly inflated cellular PP films with a low mechanical stiffness of about 1 MPa. No SF 6 penetration occurs for slightly inflated cellular PP films with smaller void sizes and higher mechanical stiffnesses of around 5.8 MPa. The observed thickness variations, the higher charging fields during corona charging because of SF 6 penetration and the SF 6 environment, as well as the resulting electromechanical properties are discussed

  1. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R C; Anderson, M R; Miake-Lye, R C; Kolb, C E [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A A; Buriko, Y I [Scientific Research Center ` Ecolen` , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1998-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  2. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  3. Effect of sulfur content in wet or dry distillers grains fed at several inclusions on cattle growth performance, ruminal parameters, and hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarturi, J O; Erickson, G E; Klopfenstein, T J; Vasconcelos, J T; Griffin, W A; Rolfe, K M; Benton, J R; Bremer, V R

    2013-10-01

    Effects of S from wet or dry distillers grains with solubles (DGS) containing 0.82 or 1.16% S on animal growth performance, carcass characteristics, apparent total tract digestibility, and ruminal parameters were evaluated. In Exp. 1, crossbred beef steers (n = 120; 345 ± 34 kg BW) were individually fed ad libitum using Calan gates. Treatments were applied as a 2 × 2 × 3 + 1 factorial treatment arrangement with factors of DGS type (wet or dry), S content in DGS (0.82 or 1.16% DM basis), and DGS inclusion (20, 30, and 40%, DM basis), as well as a corn control diet (no DGS). In Exp. 2, ruminally cannulated crossbred beef steers (n = 6; 381 ± 31 kg BW) were assigned to 1 of 5 diets in a 5 × 6 unbalanced Latin Square design and fed ad libitum through five 14-d periods. A 2 × 2 + 1 factorial treatment arrangement was used with the factors of DGS type and S content in DGS (similar to Exp. 1). Inclusion of DGS was 40%, except for a MATCH diet containing wet 1.16% S DGS included at 31.4% (DM basis). Intake of DM decreased linearly (P content (P = 0.52). Feeding diets with wet 1.16% S DGS linearly decreased (P = 0.03) HCW. In Exp. 2, molar proportion of propionate declined (P = 0.01) 9% and A:P ratio tended (P = 0.13) to be greater when 1.16 compared with 0.82% S DGS was fed. Apparent total tract DMD was not affected (P > 0.16) and only subtle changes (P ruminal pH parameters were observed. Greater (P = 0.02) ruminal H2S concentration for steers fed wet compared with dry DGS was observed, while 1.16% S DGS tended (P = 0.12) to produce greater ruminal H2S than 0.82% S. Sulfur in wet DGS appears to be more prone to be converted to ruminal H2S, because feeding 1.16% S as wet DGS had a greater impact on ADG, DMI, and ruminal H2S compared with dry DGS.

  4. Investigations of solvents and various sulfur sources influence on the shape-controlled synthesis of CuInS2 nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruszynska, Marta; Borchert, Holger; Parisi, Jürgen; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    CuInS 2 (CIS) nanocrystals were successfully synthesized through a hot-injection technique employing a reaction of copper (I) acetate and indium (III) acetate with tert-dodecanethiol as a source of sulfur, and trioctylphosphine oxide and 1-dodecanethiol were used as ligands. The reaction medium was a mixture of two solvents: oleylamine and 1-octadecene. Varying the ratio between both solvents leads to the formation of wurtzite CuInS 2 particles with shapes ranging from triangular to rod-shaped with length up to 50 nm. Oleylamine turned out to influence the reaction condition in two opposite ways: by leading to monomer depletion before the injection of the sulfur precursor, and at the same time increasing the activity of the monomers remaining in solution. By changing the sulfur source from tert-dodecanethiol to sulfur dissolved in oleylamine, triangular particles with zinc blend structure and a smaller size (∼5 nm) were synthesized. The final materials were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and absorption spectroscopy (UV–Vis).

  5. Sulfur activation in Hiroshima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Pace, J.V. III.

    1987-01-01

    In 1979, we attempted to establish the validity of source terms for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs using experimental data on sulfur activation. Close agreement was observed between measured and calculated values for test firings of Nagasaki-type bombs. The calculated values were based on source terms developed by W.E. Preeg at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A discrepancy was found, however, when we compared calculated values for the two bombs because a 1956 report by R.R. Wilson stated that sulfur acitvation by fast neutrons in Hiroshima was approximately three times greater than in Nagasaki. Our calculations based on Preeg's source-term data predicted about equal sulfur activation in the two cities

  6. Comparative effects of sulfuric and nitric acid rain on litter decomposition and soil microbial community in subtropical plantation of Yangtze River Delta region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Wenrui; Wang, Ling; Xie, Dejin; Huo, Wentong; Wu, Yanwen; Zhang, Jinchi

    2017-12-01

    Acid rain is mainly caused by dissolution of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere, and has a significant negative effect on ecosystems. The relative composition of acid rain is changing gradually from sulfuric acid rain (SAR) to nitric acid rain (NAR) with the rapidly growing amount of nitrogen deposition. In this study, we investigated the impact of simulated SAR and NAR on litter decomposition and the soil microbial community over four seasons since March 2015. Results first showed that the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition and soil microbial were positive in the early period of the experiment, except for SAR on soil microbes. Second, soil pH with NAR decreased more rapidly with the amount of acid rain increased in summer than with SAR treatments. Only strongly acid rain (both SAR and NAR) was capable of depressing litter decomposition and its inhibitory effect was stronger on leaf than on fine root litter. Meanwhile, NAR had a higher inhibitory effect on litter decomposition than SAR. Third, in summer, autumn and winter, PLFAs were negatively impacted by the increased acidity level resulting from both SAR and NAR. However, higher acidity level of NAR (pH=2.5) had the strongest inhibitory impact on soil microbial activity, especially in summer. In addition, Gram-negative bacteria (cy19:0) and fungi (18:1ω9) were more sensitive to both SAR and NAR, and actinomycetes was more sensitive to SAR intensity. Finally, soil total carbon, total nitrogen and pH were the most important soil property factors affecting soil microbial activity, and high microbial indices (fungi/bacteria) with high soil pH. Our results suggest that the ratio of SO 4 2- to NO 3 - in acid rain is an important factor which could affect litter decomposition and soil microbial in subtropical forest of China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Sulfur isotope in nature. Determination of sulfur isotope ratios in coal and petroleum by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derda, M.

    1999-01-01

    Elementary sulfur or in chemical compounds is one of the elements widespread in the earth's crust and biosphere. Its participation in earth's crust amounts to 0.26 % by weight. Measurement of isotope composition of natural samples can deliver many information about origin, creation and transformation ranges of rocks and minerals. Sulfur isotope ratio contained in minerals is variable and for this reason investigation of isotope sulfur composition can deliver useful information about the geochemistry of each component. Therefore in the investigated sample it is necessary to determine not only the content of sulfur but also the isotope composition of each component. Differentiation of contents of sulfur-34 in natural sulfur compounds can reach up to 110 per mile. So large divergences can be explained by a kinetic effect or by bacterial reduction of sulphates. In this report a wide review of the results of investigations of isotope sulfur compositions in coal and petroleum are presented as well as the methods for the preparation of samples for mass spectrometry analysis are proposed. (author)

  8. Conductive framework of inverse opal structure for sulfur cathode in lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Huang, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Guobo; Wu, Hua; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-09-07

    As a promising cathode inheritor for lithium-ion batteries, the sulfur cathode exhibits very high theoretical volumetric capacity and energy density. In its practical applications, one has to solve the insulating properties of sulfur and the shuttle effect that deteriorates cycling stability. The state-of-the-art approaches are to confine sulfur in a conductive matrix. In this work, we utilize monodisperse polystyrene nanoparticles as sacrificial templates to build polypyrrole (PPy) framework of an inverse opal structure to accommodate (encapsulate) sulfur through a combined in situ polymerization and melting infiltration approach. In the design, the interconnected conductive PPy provides open channels for sulfur infiltration, improves electrical and ionic conductivity of the embedded sulfur, and reduces polysulfide dissolution in the electrolyte through physical and chemical adsorption. The flexibility of PPy and partial filling of the inverse opal structure endure possible expansion and deformation during long-term cycling. It is found that the long cycling stability of the cells using the prepared material as the cathode can be substantially improved. The result demonstrates the possibility of constructing a pure conductive polymer framework to accommodate insulate sulfur in ion battery applications.

  9. Antagonistic Activities of Purple Non-sulfur Bacterial Extracts Against Antibiotic Resistant Vibrio sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran, R.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solvent extracts of native purple non-sulfur bacterial (PNSB isolates from the effluents of brackish shrimp culture ponds, near Nagapattinam coast (South India were evaluated for antibacterial activity by the disc diffusion method. Best results were shown by the chloroform extracts against oxytetracycline resistant Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischerii. Among the purple non-sulfur bacterial isolates, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, showed maximum antagonistic activity. The findings suggest that the antagonistic extracts from Rba. sphaeroides could be used as an effective antibiotic in controlling Vibrio spp., in aquaculture systems.

  10. Sulfurized activated carbon for high energy density supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunxia; Candelaria, Stephanie L.; Li, Yanwei; Li, Zhimin; Tian, Jianjun; Zhang, Lili; Cao, Guozhong

    2014-04-01

    Sulfurized activated carbon (SAC), made by coating the pore surface with thiophenic sulfur functional groups from the pyrolysis of sulfur flakes, were characterized and tested for supercapacitor applications. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the sulfur content in the SAC was found to be 2.7 at%. Electrochemical properties from potentiostatic and galvanostatic measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the effect of sulfur on porous carbon electrodes. The SAC electrode exhibits better conductivity, and an obvious increase in specific capacitance that is almost 40% higher than plain activated carbons (ACs) electrode at a high current density of 1.4 A g-1. The proposed mechanism for improved conductivity and capacitive performance due to the sulfur functional groups on ACs will be discussed.

  11. Helium and Sulfur Hexafluoride in Musical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forinash, Kyle; Dixon, Cory L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inhaled helium on the human voice were investigated in a recent article in "The Physics Teacher." As mentioned in that article, demonstrations of the effect are a popular classroom activity. If the number of YouTube videos is any indication, the effects of sulfur hexafluoride on the human voice are equally popular.…

  12. Single and multiple ionization of sulfur atoms by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the cross sections for single, double, triple, and quadruple ionization of sulfur atoms by electron impact are presented for collision energies from threshold to 500 eV. The cross sections for single ionization of sulfur are measured relative to those of several elements whose absolute cross sections for single ionization are known. Cross sections for each multiple ionization process are then measured relative to those for single ionization. The configuration and operation of the apparatus for these measurements are described. The possible effects of excited sulfur reactants are examined, and the reported cross sections are felt to be characteristic of ground state sulfur atoms

  13. Effects of combined action of γ-irradiation and sulfur dioxide or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidin on bacteria and higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal'chenko, V.A.; Lotareva, O.V.; Spirin, D.A.; Karaban', R.T.; Mal'tseva, L.N.; Ignat'ev, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of combined action of of gamma-irradiation and sulfur dioxide or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidin on baceria (Bacillus subtilis) and higher plants (Hordeum vulgare L., Pinus sylvestris L.) have been studied. The number of barley germ root cells with chromosomal aberrations depends on the order of treatment with the studied agents. The coefficients of SO 2 and gamma-irradiation correlation fluctuate from 1,3 to 2,6 in the above experiments. In experiments with pine seedlings, these correlation coefficients were similar to additive ones. The data obtained suggest that the pattern of action of the agents is determined by the radiation sensitivity of objects and the order of action of the agents

  14. Effect of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza with compost, vermicompost and sulfural geranole on some quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. in a low input cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P rezvani moghaddam

    2016-03-01

    quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. in a low input cropping system was investigated. Materials and methods In order to evaluate the effects of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza and organic fertilizers on some quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L., an experiment was conducted based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural Research Farm, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during growing season 2009-2010 growing season. Treatments were mycorrhiza (Glomus mosseae, mycorrhiza+compost, mycorrhiza+vermicompost, mycorrhiza+organic sulfural geranole, compost, vermicompost, Organic sulfural geranole and control (no fertilizer. Finally, data analysis was done using SAS 9.1 and means were compared by duncan’s multiple range test at 5% level of probability. Results and discussion The results showed that the effect of different organic and biological fertilizers were significant on seed yield. Seed yield significantly increased by using mycorrhiza in both condition of single and mixed with organic sulfural geranole and vermicompost compared to control treatment. Biological yield, in simultaneous application of vermicompost and organic sulfural geranole with mycorrhiza increased significantly compared to separate use of these fertilizers. All study organic fertilizers with mycorrhiza had significant effect on increasing oil content of sesame. Seed oil increased in simultaneous application of mycorrhiza and each of compost, vermicompost and organic sulfural geranole compared to separate application of mycorrhiza 12, 13 and 10 percentages, respectively. It seems that mycorrhiza and organic fertilizers improved quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame due to provide better conditions to absorption and transportation of nutrient to the plant (Hawkes et al., 2008. Conclusion In general, the results showed that the simultaneous use of ecological inputs can improve

  15. Synthesis and reactivity of novel sulfur pentafluorides-Effect of the SF5 group on reactivity of nitrobenzenes in nucleophilic substitution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beier, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 192, č. 2 (2017), s. 212-215 ISSN 1042-6507. [International Symposium on the Organic Chemistry of Sulfur (ISOCS) /27./. Jena, 26.07.2016-29.07.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleophilic substitution * sulfur * fluorine * reaction rate Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 0.809, year: 2016

  16. Structure of amorphous sulfur

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Eichinger, BE

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The lambda-transition of elemental sulfur occurring at about 159°C has long been associated with the conversion of cyclic S8 rings (c-S8) to amorphous polymer (a-S) via a ring opening polymerization. It is demonstrated, with the use of both density...

  17. Effect of Aging Temperature on Corrosion Behavior of Sintered 17-4 PH Stainless Steel in Dilute Sulfuric Acid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk-Nykiel, Aneta; Kazior, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The general corrosion behavior of sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel processed under different processing conditions in dilute sulfuric acid solution at 25 °C was studied by open-circuit potential measurement and potentiodynamic polarization technique. The corrosion resistance was evaluated based on electrochemical parameters, such as polarization resistance, corrosion potential, corrosion current density as well as corrosion rate. The results showed that the precipitation-hardening treatment could significantly improve the corrosion resistance of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel in studied environment. As far as the influence of aging temperature on corrosion behavior of the sintered 17-4 PH stainless steel is concerned, polarization resistance and corrosion rate are reduced with increasing aging temperature from 480 up to 500 °C regardless of the temperature of solution treatment. It can be concluded that the highest corrosion resistance in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution exhibits 17-4 PH after solution treatment at 1040 °C followed by aging at 480 °C.

  18. Proposed Rule for Control of Air Pollution From New Motor Vehicles: Proposed Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle Standards and Highway Diesel Fuel Sulfur Control Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule summary, CFR citations and additional resources concerning proposed new emission standards that will begin to take effect in 2007 and corresponding diesel fuel requirements that take effect in 2006.

  19. Parameters Influencing Sulfur Speciation in Environmental Samples Using Sulfur K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwatt Pongpiachan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to enhance the credibility of applying the sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy as an innovative “fingerprint” for characterizing environmental samples. The sensitivities of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra of ten sulfur compound standards detected by two different detectors, namely, Lytle detector (LyD and Germanium detector (GeD, were studied and compared. Further investigation on “self-absorption” effect revealed that the maximum sensitivities of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra were achieved when diluting sulfur compound standards with boron nitride (BN at the mixing ratio of 0.1%. The “particle-size” effect on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum sensitivities was examined by comparing signal-to-noise ratios of total suspended particles (TSP and particulate matter of less than 10 millionths of a meter (PM10 collected at three major cities of Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratios of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra were positively correlated with sulfate content in aerosols and negatively connected with particle sizes. The combination of hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA and principal component analysis (PCA has proved that sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum can be used to characterize German terrestrial soils and Andaman coastal sediments. In addition, this study highlighted the capability of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra as an innovative “fingerprint” to distinguish tsunami backwash deposits (TBD from typical marine sediments (TMS.

  20. Ameliorating influence of sulfur on germination attributes of canola (brassica napus l.) under chromium stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, S.; Iqbal, S.; Jabeen, K.; Sadaf, S.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment was performed to evaluate the role of sulfur to induce tolerance in Brassica napus L. against chromium stress by estimating the changes in germination parameters. Petriplates were assembled in Randomized Complete Block Design. A total 9 sets of treatments viz., control, chromium treated (40 and 160ppm), sulfur treated (50 and 150ppm) and sulfur (50 and 150ppm) combined with chromium (40 and 160ppm) with three replicates was used. Chromium under both concentrations was responsible for significant decline in germination parameters i.e. germination percentage, germination rate, seedling vigor index, shoot and root length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings. Sulfur application under chromium stress resulted in improvement of germination parameters such as germination percentage, germination rate, seedling vigor index, shoot and root length, fresh weight and dry weight of seedlings in contrast to chromium treatment. So, it can be concluded that sulfur in appropriate dose can be used to ameliorate the negative effects of chromium by increasing the germination potential of canola. (author)

  1. Study on ionizing radiation effects in diesel and crude oil: organic compounds, hydrocarbon, sulfur and nitrogen; Estudo do efeito da radiacao ionizante em compostos organicos do diesel e do petroleo: hidrocarbonetos, sulfurados e nitrogenados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Luana dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Petroleum is the most important energy and pollution source in the world, nowadays. New technologies in petrochemical industry aim to minimize energy spending at the process and to reduce pollution products. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds generate environmental problems; the most relevant is air pollution that affects the population health directly. The nuclear technology has been used in environmental protection through pollutants removal by free radicals produced at action of the radiation in water molecule. The objective of this study is to evaluate the radiation effects on oil and diesel, mainly in the hydrocarbons, organic sulfur, and nitrogen compounds. It was studied a molecule model of sulfur, named benzothiophene, diesel and crude oil samples. The samples were irradiated using a Co-60 source, Gammacell type. The total sulfur concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and organic compounds were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The study of molecular model showed that 95% was degraded at 20 kGy dose rate. Irradiation at 15 kGy of absorbed dose showed some cracking in petrol hydrocarbons, however with higher doses it was observed polymerization and low efficiency of cracking. It was observed that the sulfur compounds from diesel and petroleum was efficiently reduced. The applied doses of 15 kGy and 30 kGy were the most efficient on desulfurization of petroleum, and for diesel the highest variation was observed with 30 kGy and 50 kGy of absorbed dose. The distillation and chromatographic separation using an open column with palladium chloride as stationary phase showed a preferential separation of organic sulfur compounds in petroleum. (author)

  2. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerecke, Donald R.; Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors

  3. Analysis of sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle for solar hydrogen production. Part 1: decomposition of sulfuric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Central Florida Univ., Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2005-05-01

    The sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical water splitting cycle is one of the most studied cycles for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production. S-I cycle consists of four sections: (I) acid production and separation and oxygen purification, (II) sulfuric acid concentration and decomposition, (III) hydroiodic acid (HI) concentration, and (IV) HI decomposition and H{sub 2} purification. Section II of the cycle is an endothermic reaction driven by the heat input from a high temperature source. Analysis of the S-I cycle in the past thirty years have been focused mostly on the utilization of nuclear power as the high temperature heat source for the sulfuric acid decomposition step. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic considerations indicate that both the extent and rate of sulfuric acid decomposition can be improved at very high temperatures (in excess of 1000 deg C) available only from solar concentrators. The beneficial effect of high temperature solar heat for decomposition of sulfuric acid in the S-I cycle is described in this paper. We used Aspen Technologies' HYSYS chemical process simulator (CPS) to develop flowsheets for sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) decomposition that include all mass and heat balances. Based on the HYSYS analyses, two new process flowsheets were developed. These new sulfuric acid decomposition processes are simpler and more stable than previous processes and yield higher conversion efficiencies for the sulfuric acid decomposition and sulfur dioxide and oxygen formation. (Author)

  4. The surface evolution of La0.4Sr0.6TiO3+δ anode in solid oxide fuel cells: Understanding the sulfur-promotion effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ning; Zanna, Sandrine; Klein, Lorena H.; Roushanafshar, Milad; Amirkhiz, Babak S.; Zeng, Yimin; Rothenberg, Gadi; Marcus, Philippe; Luo, Jing-Li

    2017-03-01

    The ideal solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) can be powered by readily available hydrocarbon fuels containing impurities. While this is commonly recognized as a key advantage of SOFC, it also, together with the elevated operating temperature, becomes the main barrier impeding the in-situ or operando investigations of the anode surface chemistry. Here, using a well-designed quenching experiment, we managed to characterize the near-surface structure of La0.4Sr0.6TiO3+δ (LST) anode in SOFCs fuelled by H2S-containing methane. This new method enabled us to clearly observe the surface amorphization and sulfidation of LST under simulated SOFC operating conditions. The ∼1 nm-thick two dimensional sulfur-adsorbed layer was on top of the disordered LST, containing -S, -SH and elemental sulfur species. In SOFC test, such "poisoned" anode showed increased performances: a ten-fold enhanced power density enhancement (up to 30 mW cm-2) and an improved open circuit voltage (from 0.69 V to 1.17 V). Moreover, its anodic polarization resistance in methane decreased to 21.53 Ω cm2, a difference of 95% compared with the sulfur-free anode. Control experiments confirmed that once the adsorbed sulfur species were removed electrochemically, methane conversion slowed down simultaneously till full stop.

  5. Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springston, Stephen R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The Sulfur Dioxide Analyzer measures sulfur dioxide based on absorbance of UV light at one wavelength by SO2 molecules which then decay to a lower energy state by emitting UV light at a longer wavelength. Specifically, SO2 + hυ1 →SO2 *→SO2 + hυ2 The emitted light is proportional to the concentration of SO2 in the optical cell. External communication with the analyzer is available through an Ethernet port configured through the instrument network of the AOS systems. The Model 43i-TLE is part of the i-series of Thermo Scientific instruments. The i-series instruments are designed to interface with external computers through the proprietary Thermo Scientific iPort Software. However, this software is somewhat cumbersome and inflexible. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has written an interface program in National Instruments LabView that both controls the Model 43i-TLE Analyzer AND queries the unit for all measurement and housekeeping data. The LabView vi (the software program written by BNL) ingests all raw data from the instrument and outputs raw data files in a uniform data format similar to other instruments in the AOS and described more fully in Section 6.0 below.

  6. Effects of air pollution on crops. I. Effects of gaseous sulfur dioxide and ozone on the occurrence of symptoms of injuries on vegetables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masahara, O; Mega, K

    1974-06-01

    In order to obtain information on plant injuries due to air pollution to utilize susceptible plants as biological indicators of air pollution, potted plants such as chard, spinach, Chinese cabbage, and Japanese radish or cut plants such as Welsh onion were exposed in a glass house to sulfur dioxide at 0.4 ppM continuously for a week or to ozone for 6 hr at 0.13, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 ppM. The symptoms due to sulfur dioxide appeared first as peripheral and interveinal necrosis, followed by dehydration. The period of exposure required for the appearance of injuries depended mainly on the vegetable species and ranged from 1 day for potted herb mustard to more than a week for maize. A variety of cabbage did not show any injury after 1 week of continuous exposure to sulfur dioxide. The symptoms due to ozone appeared on the veinal or interveinal parts of leaves and were white to light brown in color on cruciferous vegetables and onions. Brown spots appeared on cucumber, and brown, reddish-purple, or dark purple lesions appeared on burdock, rice, and kidney bean. Damage was most severe on cucumbers occurring even at 0.13 ppM. The environmental conditions before and after the exposure to these gases affected the appearance of the symptoms.

  7. Towards Stable Lithium-Sulfur Batteries with a Low Self-Discharge Rate: Ion Diffusion Modulation and Anode Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Tao; Peng, Hong-Jie; Huang, Jia-Qi; Zhao, Chen-Zi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-09-07

    The self-discharge of a lithium-sulfur cell decreases the shelf-life of the battery and is one of the bottlenecks that hinders its practical applications. New insights into both the internal chemical reactions in a lithium-sulfur system and effective routes to retard self-discharge for highly stable batteries are crucial for the design of lithium-sulfur cells. Herein, a lithium-sulfur cell with a carbon nanotube/sulfur cathode and lithium-metal anode in lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide/1,3-dioxolane/dimethyl ether electrolyte was selected as the model system to investigate the self-discharge behavior. Both lithium anode passivation and polysulfide anion diffusion suppression strategies are applied to reduce self-discharge of the lithium-sulfur cell. When the lithium-metal anode is protected by a high density passivation layer induced by LiNO3 , a very low shuttle constant of 0.017 h(-1) is achieved. The diffusion of the polysulfides is retarded by an ion-selective separator, and the shuttle constants decreased. The cell with LiNO3 additive maintained a discharge capacity of 97 % (961 mAh g(-1) ) of the initial capacity after 120 days at open circuit, which was around three times higher than the routine cell (32 % of initial capacity, corresponding to 320 mAh g(-1) ). It is expected that lithium-sulfur batteries with ultralow self-discharge rates may be fabricated through a combination of anode passivation and polysulfide shuttle control, as well as optimization of the lithium-sulfur cell configuration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Getting sulfur on target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halbert, T.R.; Brignac, G.B. [ExxonMobil Process Research Labs. (United States); Greeley, J.P.; Demmin, R.A.; Roundtree, E.M. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co. (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The paper focuses on how the required reductions in sulfur levels in motor vehicle fuel may be achieved over about the next five years. It is said that broadly there are two possible approaches, they are: (a) to hydrotreat the feed to the FCC unit and (b) to treat the naphtha produced by the FCC unit. The difficulties associated with these processes are mentioned. The article is presented under the sub-headings of (i) technology options for cat naphtha desulfurisation; (ii) optimising fractionator design via improved VLE models; (iii) commercial experience with ICN SCANfining; (iv) mercaptan predictive models and (v) process improvements. It was concluded that the individual needs of the refiner can be addressed by ExxonMobil Research and Engineering (EMRE) and the necessary reductions in sulfur levels can be achieved.

  9. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eigh...

  10. Environmental aspects of the combustion of sulfur-bearing fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manowitz, B.; Lipfert, F.W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the origins of sulfur in fossil fuels and the consequences of its release into the environment after combustion, with emphasis on the United States. Typical sulfur contents of fuels are given, together with fuel uses and the resulting air concentrations of sulfur air pollutants. Atmospheric transformation and pollutant removal processes are described, as they affect the pathways of sulfur through the environment. The environmental effects discussed include impacts on human health, degradation of materials, acidification of ecosystems, and effects on vegetation and atmospheric visibility. The paper concludes with a recommendation for the use of risk assessment to assess the need for regulations which may require the removal of sulfur from fuels or their combustion products

  11. Sulfite-oxido-reductase is involved in the oxidation of sulfite in Desulfocapsa sulfoexigens during disproportionation of thiosulfate and elemental sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Trine-Maria; Finster, Kai

    2003-06-01

    The enzymatic pathways of elemental sulfur and thiosulfate disproportionation were investigated using cell-free extract of Desulfocapsa sulfoexigens. Sulfite was observed to be an intermediate in the metabolism of both compounds. Two distinct pathways for the oxidation of sulfite have been identified. One pathway involves APS reductase and ATP sulfurylase and can be described as the reversion of the initial steps of the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway. The second pathway is the direct oxidation of sulfite to sulfate by sulfite oxidoreductase. This enzyme has not been reported from sulfate reducers before. Thiosulfate reductase, which cleaves thiosulfate into sulfite and sulfide, was only present in cell-free extract from thiosulfate disproportionating cultures. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes the first step in thiosulfate disproportionation. The initial step in sulfur disproportionation was not identified. Dissimilatory sulfite reductase was present in sulfur and thiosulfate disproportionating cultures. The metabolic function of this enzyme in relation to elemental sulfur or thiosulfate disproportionation was not identified. The presence of the uncouplers HQNO and CCCP in growing cultures had negative effects on both thiosulfate and sulfur disproportionation. CCCP totally inhibited sulfur disproportionation and reduced thiosulfate disproportionation by 80% compared to an unamended control. HQNO reduced thiosulfate disproportionation by 80% and sulfur disproportionation by 90%.

  12. The partitioning of sulfur between multicomponent aqueous fluids and felsic melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Bernd; Wenzel, Thomas; Keppler, Hans

    2018-02-01

    Sulfur partitioning between melt and fluid phase largely controls the environmental impact of volcanic eruptions. Fluid/melt partitioning data also provide the physical basis for interpreting changes in volcanic gas compositions that are used in eruption forecasts. To better constrain some variables that control the behavior of sulfur in felsic systems, in particular the interaction between different volatiles, we studied the partitioning of sulfur between aqueous fluids and haplogranitic melts at 200 MPa and 750-850 °C as a function of oxygen fugacity (Ni-NiO or Re-ReO2 buffer), melt composition (Al/(Na + K) ratio), and fluid composition (NaCl and CO2 content). The data confirm a first-order influence of oxygen fugacity on the partitioning of sulfur. Under "reducing conditions" (Ni-NiO buffer), D fluid/melt is nearly one order of magnitude larger (323 ± 14 for a metaluminous melt) than under "oxidizing conditions" (Re-ReO2 buffer; 74 ± 5 for a metaluminous melt). This effect is likely related to a major change in sulfur speciation in both melt and fluid. Raman spectra of the quenched fluids show the presence of H2S and HS- under reducing conditions and of SO4 2- and HSO4 - under oxidizing conditions, while SO2 is undetectable. The latter observation suggests that already at the Re-ReO2 buffer, sulfur in the fluid is almost completely in the S6+ state and, therefore, more oxidized than expected according to current models. CO2 in the fluid (up to x CO2 = 0.3) has no effect on the fluid/melt partitioning of sulfur, neither under oxidizing nor under reducing conditions. However, the effect of NaCl depends on redox state. While at oxidizing conditions, D fluid/melt is independent of x NaCl, the fluid/melt partition coefficient strongly decreases with NaCl content under reducing conditions, probably due to a change from H2S to NaSH as dominant sulfur species in the fluid. A decrease of D fluid/melt with alkali content in the melt is observed over the entire

  13. Biologically produced sulfur particles and polysulfide ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis deals with the effects of particles of biologically produced sulfur (or 'biosulfur') on a biotechnological process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from gas streams. Particular emphasis is given to the role of polysulfide ions in such a process. These

  14. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  15. A sulfur host based on titanium monoxide@carbon hollow spheres for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jintao; Guan, Buyuan; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-10-20

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show advantages for next-generation electrical energy storage due to their high energy density and cost effectiveness. Enhancing the conductivity of the sulfur cathode and moderating the dissolution of lithium polysulfides are two key factors for the success of lithium-sulfur batteries. Here we report a sulfur host that overcomes both obstacles at once. With inherent metallic conductivity and strong adsorption capability for lithium-polysulfides, titanium monoxide@carbon hollow nanospheres can not only generate sufficient electrical contact to the insulating sulfur for high capacity, but also effectively confine lithium-polysulfides for prolonged cycle life. Additionally, the designed composite cathode further maximizes the lithium-polysulfide restriction capability by using the polar shells to prevent their outward diffusion, which avoids the need for chemically bonding all lithium-polysulfides on the surfaces of polar particles.

  16. 23 CFR 750.705 - Effective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective control. 750.705 Section 750.705 Highways... BEAUTIFICATION Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.705 Effective control. In order to provide effective control of... of applicable control requirements will apply; (h) Develop laws, regulations, and procedures to...

  17. Effects of Reduced Sulfur Compounds on Pd-catalytic Hydrodechlorination of TCE in Groundwater by Cathodic H2 under Electrochemically-induced Oxidizing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Songhu; Chen, Mingjie; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) poison Pd catalysts for catalytic hydrodechlorination of contaminants in anoxic groundwater. This study investigates the effects of RSCs on Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in oxic groundwater. Water electrolysis in an undivided electrolytic cell is used to produce H2 for TCE hydrodechlorination under oxidizing conditions. TCE is efficiently hydrodechlorinated to ethane, with significant accumulation of H2O2 under acidic conditions. Presence of sulfide at concentrations less than 93.8 μM moderately inhibits TCE hydrodechlorination and H2O2 production. Presence of sulfite at low concentrations (≤ 1 mM) significantly enhances TCE decay, while at high concentration (3 mM) inhibits initially and enhances afterwards when sulfite concentration declines to less than 1 mM. Using radical scavenging experiments and electron spin resonance assay, SO3•− which is generated from sulfite under oxidizing conditions is validated as the new reactive species contributing to the enhancement. This study reveals a distinct mechanism of effect of sulfite on TCE hydrodechlorination by Pd and H2 in oxic groundwater and presents an alternative approach to increasing resistance of Pd to RSCs poisoning. PMID:23962132

  18. Inhibitory effect of self-generated extracellular dissolved organic carbon on carbon dioxide fixation in sulfur-oxidizing bacteria during a chemoautotrophic cultivation process and its elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Wang, Lei; Fu, Xiaohua; Hu, Jiajun; Li, Huan; Le, Yiquan

    2018-03-01

    The features of extracellular dissolved organic carbon (EDOC) generation in two typical aerobic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505 and Halothiobacillus neapolitanus DSM 15147) and its impact on CO 2 fixation during chemoautotrophic cultivation process were investigated. The results showed that EDOC accumulated in both strains during CO 2 fixation process. Large molecular weight (MW) EDOC derived from cell lysis and decay was dominant during the entire process in DSM 505, whereas small MW EDOC accounted for a large proportion during initial and middle stages of DSM 15147 as its cytoskeleton synthesis rate did not keep up with CO 2 assimilation rate. The self-generated EDOC feedback repressed cbb gene transcription and thus decreased total bacterial cell number and CO 2 fixation yield in both strains, but DSM 505 was more sensitive to this inhibition effect. Moreover, the membrane bioreactor effectively decreased the EDOC/TOC ratio and improved carbon fixation yield of DSM 505. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dramatic reduction of sulfur dioxide emission in Northeastern China in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J.

    2017-12-01

    Analysis of spatial and temporal variations of sulfur dioxide concentration in planetary boundary layer were conducted. The data were generated by NASA satellite daily from October of 2004 and were obtained through NASA Giovanni. The global monthly mean spatial distribution of sulfur dioxide showed several hot spots including: several spots on some islands in the Pacific Ocean, several spots in central America, and central Africa. Most of these hot spots of sulfur dioxide are related to known active volcanos. The biggest hot spot of sulfur dioxide were observed in Northeastern China. While high concentration sulfur dioxide was still observed in Northeastern China in 2017. The area averaged concentration of sulfur dioxide declined dramatically since its peak in 2008. This temporal trend indicates that sulfur reduction effort has been effective in the last decade or post 2008 financial crisis recovery lead an industry less sulfur dioxide emission.

  20. Biodiesel as a lubricity additive for ultra low sulfur diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subongkoj Topaiboul1 and 2,*

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With the worldwide trend to reduce emission from diesel engines, ultra low sulfur diesel has been introduced with thesulfur concentration of less than 10 ppm. Unfortunately, the desulfurization process inevitably reduces the lubricity of dieselfuel significantly. Alternatively, biodiesel, with almost zero sulfur content, has been added to enhance lubricity in an ultralow sulfur diesel. This work has evaluated the effectiveness of the biodiesel amount, sourced from palm and jatropha oil,and origin in ultra low sulfur diesel locally available in the market. Wear scar from a high-frequency reciprocating rig isbenchmarked to the standard value (460 m of diesel fuel lubricity. It was found that very small amount (less than 1% ofbiodiesel from either source significantly improves the lubricity in ultra low sulfur diesel, and the biodiesel from jatropha oilis a superior lubricity enhancer.

  1. Partial substitution of asphalt pavement with modified sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Souaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of sulfur in pavement laying was developed in 1980 but it was restricted in the late 19th century due to its environmental problems and its high reactivity toward oxidation processes which give sulfuric acid products that are capable of destroying the asphalt mixture. The study involved the conversion of elemental sulfur to a more stable modified one using a combination of byproducts of olefin hydrocarbons that were obtained from petroleum fractional distillates and cyclic hydrocarbon bituminous residue at 145 °C. The changes in the structural characteristics and morphology of prepared modified sulfur were studied using XRD and SEM respectively. Also DSC curves help us to elucidate the changes in sulfur phases from α-orthorhombic to β-mono clinic structure. The technique of nanoindentation helps us to compare the mechanical properties of modified and pure sulfur including modulus of elasticity and hardness. The hot mixture asphalt designs were prepared according to the Marshall Method in which the asphalt binder content was partially substituted with 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% modified sulfur. The mechanical properties were measured including Marshall Stability, flow, air voids, and Marshall Stiffness. From the overall study, the results indicated that asphalt could partially be substituted with modified sulfur with no significant deleterious effect on performance and durability of hot mixed asphalt.

  2. Method of removing and recovering elemental sulfur from highly reducing gas streams containing sulfur gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwal, Santosh K.; Nikolopoulos, Apostolos A.; Dorchak, Thomas P.; Dorchak, Mary Anne

    2005-11-08

    A method is provided for removal of sulfur gases and recovery of elemental sulfur from sulfur gas containing supply streams, such as syngas or coal gas, by contacting the supply stream with a catalyst, that is either an activated carbon or an oxide based catalyst, and an oxidant, such as sulfur dioxide, in a reaction medium such as molten sulfur, to convert the sulfur gases in the supply stream to elemental sulfur, and recovering the elemental sulfur by separation from the reaction medium.

  3. Sulfur flows and biosolids processing: Using Material Flux Analysis (MFA) principles at wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, R M; Alvarez-Gaitan, J P; Stuetz, R M; Moore, S J

    2017-08-01

    High flows of sulfur through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) may cause noxious gaseous emissions, corrosion of infrastructure, inhibit wastewater microbial communities, or contribute to acid rain if the biosolids or biogas is combusted. Yet, sulfur is an important agricultural nutrient and the direct application of biosolids to soils enables its beneficial re-use. Flows of sulfur throughout the biosolids processing of six WWTPs were investigated to identify how they were affected by biosolids processing configurations. The process of tracking sulfur flows through the sites also identified limitations in data availability and quality, highlighting future requirements for tracking substance flows. One site was investigated in more detail showing sulfur speciation throughout the plant and tracking sulfur flows in odour control systems in order to quantify outflows to air, land and ocean sinks. While the majority of sulfur from WWTPs is removed as sulfate in the secondary effluent, the sulfur content of biosolids is valuable as it can be directly returned to soils to combat the potential sulfur deficiencies. Biosolids processing configurations, which focus on maximising solids recovery, through high efficiency separation techniques in primary sedimentation tanks, thickeners and dewatering centrifuges retain more sulfur in the biosolids. However, variations in sulfur loads and concentrations entering the WWTPs affect sulfur recovery in the biosolids, suggesting industrial emitters, and chemical dosing of iron salts are responsible for differences in recovery between sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorus, sulfur and pyridine

    OpenAIRE

    Schönberger, Stefanie

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis of distinct neutral or anionic P,S compounds in solution provides a great challenge for chemists. Due to the similarity in the energies of the P–P, P–S and S–S bonds nearly solely a mixture of compounds with different composition and charge is obtained. Our interest focuses on the system consisting of phosphorus, sulfur and pyridine, with the aim of a greater selectivity of P,S compounds in solution. The combination of these three components offers the opportunity...

  5. Sulfur and selenium isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, T. R.; McInteer, B. B.; Montoya, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    Sulfur and selenium isotopes are used for labeled compounds and as precursors for radioisotope production; however, both limited availability and high costs are problems. A new method is needed for large-scale separation of these isotopes. Experimental distillation columns were used to measure isotopic separations for sulfur and selenium compounds. The maximum total isotope separation of 32 S vs. 34 S were 1.127 for H 2 S, 1.048 for COS, 0.838 for SF 4 , and 1.058 for CH 3 SH. Relative volatilities of 32 S vs. 34 S are 1.0006 for COS and 0.9976 for SF 4 . There is a reverse isotope effect for carbon in COS. No isotopic separation was observed for dimethyl selenide. The lower mass selenium isotopes in H 2 Se are more volatile. Distillation is a promising method for separating sulfur isotopes on a production scale. Existing distillation technology produced separated isotopes with an effect similar to that found for sulfur in SF 4 . 8 refs., 2 tabs

  6. Sulfur and selenium isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, T.R.; McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Sulfur and selenium isotopes are used for labeled compounds and as precursors for radioisotope production; however, both limited availability and high costs are problems. A new method is needed for large-scale separation of theses isotopes. Experimental distillation columns were used to measure isotopic separations for sulfur and selenium compounds. The maximum total isotope separations of 32 S vs. 34 S were 1.127 for H 2 S, 1.048 for COS, 0.838 for SF 4 , and 1.058 for CH 3 SH. Relative volatilities of 32 S and 34 S are 1.0006 for COS and 0.9976 for SF 4 . There is a reverse isotope effect for carbon in COS. No isotopic separation was observed for dimethyl selenide. The lower mass selenium isotopes in H 2 Se are more volatile. Distillation is a promising method for separating sulfur isotopes on a production scale. Existing distillation technology produces separated isotopes with an effect similar to that found for sulfur in SF 4 . (author). 8 refs.; 2 tabs

  7. Capsaicinoids, chloropicrin and sulfur mustard: Possibilities for exposure biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Pesonen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Incapacitating and irritating agents produce temporary disability persisting for hours to days after the exposure. One can be exposed to these agents occupationally in industrial or other working environments. Also general public can be exposed in special circumstances, like industrial accidents or riots. Incapacitating and irritating agents discussed in this review are chloropicrin and capsaicinoids. In addition, we include sulfur mustard, which is an old chemical warfare agent and known to cause severe long-lasting injuries or even death. Chloropicrin that was used as a warfare agent in the World War I is currently used mainly as a pesticide. Capsaicinoids, components of hot pepper plants, are used by police and other law enforcement personnel as riot control agents. Toxicity of these chemicals is associated particularly with the respiratory tract, eyes and skin. Their acute effects are relatively well known but the knowledge of putative long-term effects is almost non-existent. Also, mechanisms of effects at cellular level are not fully understood. There is a need for further research to get better idea of health risks, particularly of long-term and low-level exposures to these chemicals. For this, exposure biomarkers are essential. Validated exposure biomarkers for capsaicinoids, chloropicrin and sulfur mustard do not exist so far. Metabolites and macromolecular adducts have been suggested biomarkers for sulfur mustard and these can already be measured qualitatively, but quantitative biomarkers await further development and validation. The purpose of this review is, based on the existing mechanistic and toxicokinetic information, to shed light on the possibilities for developing biomarkers for exposure biomonitoring of these compounds. It is also of interest to find ideas for early effect biomarkers considering the need for studies on subchronic and chronic toxicity.

  8. Evaluation of Thiobacillus Bacteria and Mycorrhizal Symbiosis on Yield and Yield Components of Garlic (Allium sativum at Different Levels of Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    parvin Hejazi rad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Most researchers believe that good management and proper use of biofertilizers are the ways for preparation of better nutritional conditions for the medicinal plant. Garlic is one of the most important medicinal crops. Allicin is the main active ingredient in this plant. Biofertilizers contain beneficial soil microorganisms or the metabolic products. Mycorrhizal symbiosis improves the soil physical, chemical and biological properties. Mycorrhizae increase crop resistance to pathogens, nutrient and water uptake, also reduce the negative effects of environmental stress and improve the quality of their host plants. Adding sulfur to the soil to improve the nutritional status of the plant by the release of nutrients will be effective when that the oxidation of sulfur in the soil is significant. For sulfur uptake by the plant, it is necessary that this element convert to sulfate by soil microorganisms. If elemental sulfur distribute in the soil and mix with the organic material, conversion of sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms be faster in wet conditions. Materials and methods The experiment was conducted as randomized complete block design with three replications in 2012. Treatments were included control plot, mycorrhizal inoculation (M, Thiobacillus (T, M + T, 75 kg sulfur per hectare (75S, 75S + M, 75S + T, 75S + M + T, 150 kg sulfur per hectare (150S, 150S + M, 150S + T, 150S + M + T. Each plot consisted of four rows with a spacing of 40 cm and row length of 10 m. In treatments with 75 and 150 kg sulfur per hectare, 48 and 96 g of sulfur were used, respectively. Thiobacillus at the recommended dose was added to the soil a week before planting. Percent of fungal colonization obtained with Gridline Intersect Method. HPLC method was used to extract allicin content. Data were analyzed with the MSTAT-C software; the means were compared with LSD test at the 5% level of probability. Results and discussion The results showed that tuber dry

  9. The effect of gamma radiation on the ageing of sulfur cured nr/csm and nbr/csm rubber blends reinforced by carbon black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Marković

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the effect of the γ-radiation dose on ageing of carbon black reinforced elastomeric materials was studied. The compounds based on natural rubber/chlorosulfonated rubber blend (NR/CSM and butadiene acrylonitrile rubber/chlorosulfonated rubber blend (NBR/CSM (50:50, w/w with different loadings (0, 20, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100 phr of the filler with the average particle size of 40 nm were cured by sulfur. The obtained elastomeric composites were subjected to radiation doses (100, 200, 300 and 400 kGy in the presence of oxygen. The changes of material mechanical properties were estimated after radiation accelerated ageing. By using Fourier transform infrared measurements (ATR-FTIR it was assessed that after exposure to doses of 100 kGy alcohols, ethers, lactones, anhydrides, esters and carboxylic acids are formed in materials. The formation of shorter polyene sequences and aromatic rings in aged samples are assumed on the basis of the obtained spectra.

  10. The effects of copper fining on the wine content in sulfur off-odors and on their evolution during accelerated anoxic storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Eduardo; Hernández-Orte, Purificación; Franco-Luesma, Ernesto; Ferreira, Vicente

    2017-09-15

    Three different red wines with reductive character have been treated with two different doses of copper sulfate (0.06 and 0.5mg/L) and with a commercial copper-containing product at the recommended dose (0.6mg/L). Wines were in contact with copper one week, centrifuged and stored at 50°C in strict anoxia for 2weeks (up to 7 in one case). Brine-releasable (BR-) and free fractions of Volatile Sulfur Compounds were determined throughout the process. Relevant increases of BR-H 2 S suggest that those wines contained other H 2 S precursors non-detectable by the brine dilution method. Copper treatments had two major effects: 1) immediate decrease the levels of free H 2 S and methanethiol (MeSH); 2) slow the rate at which free H 2 S (not MeSH) increases during anoxic storage. After 7weeks of anoxia levels of free H 2 S and MeSH were high and similar regardless of the copper treatment. Higher copper doses could induce the accumulation of BR-H 2 S. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Layered sulfur/PEDOT:PSS nano composite electrodes for lithium sulfur cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anilkumar, K. M.; Jinisha, B.; Manoj, M.; Pradeep, V. S.; Jayalekshmi, S.

    2018-06-01

    Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) cells are emerging as the next generation energy storage devices owing to their impressive electrochemical properties with high theoretical specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. Lack of electronic conductivity of sulfur, its volume expansion during high lithium intake and the shuttling effect due to the formation of soluble polysulfides are the main limitations, delaying the commercialization of this technology. To address these challenges, in the present work, the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS is used as the covering matrix over the sulfur particles to improve their Li storage properties. The sulfur/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite is synthesised using the hydrothermal process and its formation with the polymer coating over sulfur nanoparticles is established from the XRD, Raman spectroscopy, FE-SEM and TEM studies. The electrochemical studies show that the cells assembled using the sulfur/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite as the cathode, with the components taken in the weight ratio of 9:1, offer a reversible capacity of 1191 mAh g-1 at 0.1C rate. These cells display stable electrochemical capacities over 200 cycles at gradually increasing current rates. The polymer layer facilitates electronic conduction and suppresses the polysulfide formation and the volume expansion of sulfur. A reversible capacity of 664 mAh g-1 is observed after 200 cycles at 1C rate with the capacity retention of 75 % of the initial stable capacity. The highlight of the present work is the possibility to achieve high discharge capacities at high C rates and the retention of a good percentage of the initial capacity over 200 cycles, for these Li-S cells.

  12. Sulfur problems in Swedish agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, O

    1959-01-01

    The present paper deals with some aspects of the sulfur situation in Swedish agriculture with special emphasis on the importance of and relationships among various sources of sulfur supply. An inventory of the sulfur content of Swedish soils and hay crops includes 649 soil samples and a corresponding number of hay samples from 59 locations. In a special investigation the samples were found to be representative of normal Swedish farm land. It is concluded that the amount of sulfur compounds in the air is the primary factor which determines the amount of sulfur added to the soil from the atmosphere. Compared with values obtained in other countries, the amount of sulfur added by the precipitation in Sweden is very low. The distribution in air and precipitation of sulfur from an industrial source was studied in a special investigation. An initial reason for the present study was the damage to vegetation caused by smoke from an industrial source. It was concluded that the average conditions in the vicinity of the industrial source with respect to smoke constituents in the air and precipitation were unfavorable only to the plants directly within a very narrow region. Relationships among the sulfur contents of air, of precipitation, of soils and of plants have been subject to special investigations. In the final general discussion and conclusions it is pointed out that the results from these investigations indicate evident differences in the sulfur status of Swedish soils. The present trend toward the use of more highly concentrated fertilizers poor in sulfur may be expected to cause a considerable change in the sulfur situation in Swedish agriculture. 167 references, 40 figures, 44 tables.

  13. Mechanism of the toxic action of sulfur dioxide on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaevskii, V S; Miroshnikova, A T; Firger, V V; Belokrylova, L M

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of sulfur dioxide on U CO2 metabolism and photosynthesis in fescue and timothy grass and in maple and barberry branches. The free radical inhibitors, ascorbic acid and thiourea, were found to decrease the damaging effects of the sulfur dioxide. These results indicated that the processes involved are of the free-radical chain type. Even at low sulfur dioxide concentrations, photosphosphorylation and carbon dioxide assimilation were inhibited. In addition, starch and protein as well as the formation of polymeric substances were also inhibited.

  14. Sulfur cathodes with hydrogen reduced titanium dioxide inverse opal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zheng; Zheng, Guangyuan; Li, Weiyang; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Yan, Kai; Kong, Desheng; Cui, Yi

    2014-05-27

    Sulfur is a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries with a high specific capacity of 1675 mAh/g. The rapid capacity fading, however, presents a significant challenge for the practical application of sulfur cathodes. Two major approaches that have been developed to improve the sulfur cathode performance include (a) fabricating nanostructured conductive matrix to physically encapsulate sulfur and (b) engineering chemical modification to enhance binding with polysulfides and, thus, to reduce their dissolution. Here, we report a three-dimensional (3D) electrode structure to achieve both sulfur physical encapsulation and polysulfides binding simultaneously. The electrode is based on hydrogen reduced TiO2 with an inverse opal structure that is highly conductive and robust toward electrochemical cycling. The relatively enclosed 3D structure provides an ideal architecture for sulfur and polysulfides confinement. The openings at the top surface allow sulfur infusion into the inverse opal structure. In addition, chemical tuning of the TiO2 composition through hydrogen reduction was shown to enhance the specific capacity and cyclability of the cathode. With such TiO2 encapsulated sulfur structure, the sulfur cathode could deliver a high specific capacity of ∼1100 mAh/g in the beginning, with a reversible capacity of ∼890 mAh/g after 200 cycles of charge/discharge at a C/5 rate. The Coulombic efficiency was also maintained at around 99.5% during cycling. The results showed that inverse opal structure of hydrogen reduced TiO2 represents an effective strategy in improving lithium sulfur batteries performance.

  15. [Sulfur dioxide limit standard and residues in Chinese medicinal materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chuan-Zhi; Yang, Wan-Zhen; Mo, Ge; Zhou, Li; Jiang, Jing-Yi; Lv, Chao-Geng; Wang, Sheng; Zhou, Tao; Yang, Ye; Guo, Lan-Ping

    2018-01-01

    The traditional sulfur fumigation processing method has been widely used in the initial processing and storage of traditional Chinese medicinal materials due to its economy, efficiency, convenience, high operability and effect on mold and insect prevention. However, excessive sulfur fumigation of traditional Chinese medicinal materials would lead to the changes in chemical compositions, and even endanger human health. This study showed that traditional Chinese medicinal materials were sulfur fumigated directly after being harvested for quick drying, or fumigated after being weted in the storage process for preventing mold and insects. We found that the sulfur dioxide limits for traditional Chinese medicinal materials were stricter than those for foods. Based on the existing limit standards, we obtained the data of sulfur dioxide residues for 35 types of traditional Chinese medicinal materials in a total of 862 batches. According to the limit standard in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (150, 400 mg·kg⁻¹), the average over-standard rate of sulfur dioxide was as high as 52.43%, but it was reduced to 29.47% if calculated based on the limit for vegetable additive standard (500 mg·kg⁻¹). Sulfur fumigation issue shall be considered correctly: sulfur dioxide is a type of low toxic substance and less dangerous than aflatoxin and other highly toxic substances, and a small amount of residue would not increase the toxicity of traditional Chinese medicinal materials. However, sulfur fumigation might change the content of chemical substances and affect the quality of traditional Chinese medicinal materials. Furthermore, the exposure hazards of toxic substances are comprehensively correlated with exposure cycle, exposure frequency, and application method. In conclusion, it is suggested to strengthen the studies on the limit standard of traditional Chinese medicinal materials, formulate practical and feasible limit standard for sulfur dioxide residues in traditional Chinese

  16. 23 CFR 751.9 - Effective control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effective control. 751.9 Section 751.9 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT JUNKYARD CONTROL AND ACQUISITION § 751.9 Effective control. (a) In order to provide effective control of junkyards located within 1...

  17. Transcriptional and Proteomic Profiling of Aspergillus flavipes in Response to Sulfur Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Ashraf S A; Yassin, Marwa A; Ali, Gul Shad

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus flavipes has received considerable interest due to its potential to produce therapeutic enzymes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism. In natural habitats, A. flavipes survives under sulfur limitations by mobilizing endogenous and exogenous sulfur to operate diverse cellular processes. Sulfur limitation affects virulence and pathogenicity, and modulates proteome of sulfur assimilating enzymes of several fungi. However, there are no previous reports aimed at exploring effects of sulfur limitation on the regulation of A. flavipes sulfur metabolism enzymes at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and proteomic levels. In this report, we show that sulfur limitation affects morphological and physiological responses of A. flavipes. Transcription and enzymatic activities of several key sulfur metabolism genes, ATP-sulfurylase, sulfite reductase, methionine permease, cysteine synthase, cystathionine β- and γ-lyase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase were increased under sulfur starvation conditions. A 50 kDa protein band was strongly induced by sulfur starvation, and the proteomic analyses of this protein band using LC-MS/MS revealed similarity to many proteins involved in the sulfur metabolism pathway.

  18. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) for Sulfur Oxides ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft document provides EPA’s evaluation and synthesis of the most policy-relevant science related to the health effects of sulfur oxides. When final, it will provide a critical part of the scientific foundation for EPA’s decision regarding the adequacy of the current primary (health-based) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for sulfur dioxide. The references considered for inclusion in or cited in the external review draft ISA are available at https://hero.epa.gov/hero/sulfur-oxides. The intent of the ISA, according to the CAA, is to “accurately reflect the latest scientific knowledge expected from the presence of [a] pollutant in ambient air” (U.S. Code, 1970a, 1970b). It includes an assessment of scientific research from atmospheric sciences, exposure sciences, dosimetry, mode of action, animal and human toxicology, and epidemiology. Key information and judgments formerly found in the Air Quality Criteria Documents (AQCDs) for sulfur oxides (SOx) are included; Annexes provide additional details supporting the ISA. Together, the ISA and Annexes serve to update and revise the last SOx ISA which was published in 2008.

  19. A composite of hollow carbon nanospheres and sulfur-rich polymers for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shao-Zhong; Yao, Yuechao; Zeng, Xierong; He, Qianjun; Zheng, Xianfeng; Chen, Shuangshuang; Tu, Wenxuan; Zou, Jizhao

    2017-07-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are the most promising candidates for future high-energy applications because of the unparalleled capacity of sulfur (1675 mAh g-1). However, lithium-sulfur batteries have limited cycle life and rate capability due to the dissolution of polysulfides and the extremely low electronic conductivity of sulfur. To solve these issues, various porous carbons including hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNs) have been used for improving the conductivity. However, these methods still suffer from polysulfides dissolution/loss owing to their weak physical adsorption to polysulfides. Herein, we introduced a covalent grafting route to composite the HCNs and the vulcanized trithiocyanuric acid (TTCA). The composite exhibits a high loading of the vulcanized TTCA by the HCNs with high surface area and large pore volume, and covalent bonds to sulfur, effectively depressing the dissolution of polysulfides. The first discharge capacity of the composite reaches 1430 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 1227 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C.

  20. Danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.; Mamatov, E.D.; Ashurov, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of danburite of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan by sulfuric acid. The process of decomposition of danburite concentrate by sulfuric acid was studied. The chemical nature of decomposition process of boron containing ore was determined. The influence of temperature on the rate of extraction of boron and iron oxides was defined. The dependence of decomposition of boron and iron oxides on process duration, dosage of H 2 SO 4 , acid concentration and size of danburite particles was determined. The kinetics of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was studied as well. The apparent activation energy of the process of danburite decomposition by sulfuric acid was calculated. The flowsheet of danburite processing by sulfuric acid was elaborated.

  1. Process for removal of sulfur oxides from hot gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauerle, G. L.; Kohl, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    A process for the removal of sulfur oxides from two gas streams containing the same. One gas stream is introduced into a spray dryer zone and contacted with a finely dispersed spray of an aqueous medium containing an absorbent for sulfur oxides. The aqueous medium is introduced at a controlled rate so as to provide water to the gas in an amount to produce a cooled product gas having a temperature at least 7 0 C. above its adiabatic saturation temperature and from about 125-300% of the stoichiometric amount of absorbent required to react with the sulfur oxides to be removed from the gas stream. The effluent from the spray dryer zone comprises a gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and contains entrained dry particulate reaction products including unreacted absorbent. This gas stream is then introduced into a particulate removal zone from which is withdrawn a gas stream substantially free of particles and having a reduced sulfur oxide content. the dry particulate reaction products are collected and utilized as a source of absorbent for a second aqueous scrubbing medium containing unreacted absorbent for the sulfur oxides. An effluent gas stream is withdrawn from the aqueous scrubbing zone and comprises a water-saturated gas stream of reduced sulfur oxide content and substantially free of particles. The effluent gas streams from the particulate removal zone and the aqueous scrubbing zone are combined in such proportions that the combined gas stream has a temperature above its adiabatic saturation temperature

  2. Ultra Low Sulfur Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batey, John E. [Energy Research Center, Inc., Easton, CT (United States); McDonald, Roger [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project was funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and has successfully quantified the environmental and economic benefits of switching to ULS (15 PPM sulfur) heating oil. It advances a prior field study of Low Sulfur (500 ppm sulfur) heating oil funded by NYSERDA and laboratory research conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Canadian researchers. The sulfur oxide and particulate matter (PM) emissions are greatly reduced as are boiler cleaning costs through extending cleaning intervals. Both the sulfur oxide and PM emission rates are directly related to the fuel oil sulfur content. The sulfur oxide and PM emission rates approach near-zero levels by switching heating equipment to ULS fuel oil, and these emissions become comparable to heating equipment fired by natural gas. This demonstration project included an in-depth review and analysis of service records for both the ULS and control groups to determine any difference in the service needs for the two groups. The detailed service records for both groups were collected and analyzed and the results were entered into two spreadsheets that enabled a quantitative side-by-side comparison of equipment service for the entire duration of the ULS test project. The service frequency for the ULS and control group were very similar and did indicate increased service frequency for the ULS group. In fact, the service frequency with the ULS group was slightly less (7.5 percent) than the control group. The only exception was that three burner fuel pump required replacement for the ULS group and none were required for the control group.

  3. Effects of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide on vegetation. Progress report, 1 June 1977--28 February 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstein, L.H.; McCune, D.C.; MacLean, D.C.

    1978-02-01

    The areas of research selected are related to fossil fuel combustion and are believed or are known to occur in the field: the mode of action of SO/sub 2/ in relation to its metabolic fate; the influence of NO/sub 2/ on the phytotoxicity of SO/sub 2/, and the combined effects of these pollutants on crop yield under field conditions; the effect of SO/sub 2/ on the plant with respect to its susceptibility to plant diseases; and the effect of SO/sub 2/ on the behavior and development of the Mexican bean beetle on soybean and on the production of volatile terpenoids in conifers with respect to their suitability for colonization by insects.

  4. Supply, storage and handling of elemental sulfur derived from sour gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.D.; Davis, P.M.; Dowling, N.I.; Calgary Univ., AB

    2003-01-01

    This presentation reviews the supply picture for solid elemental sulfur. It also assesses methods for its storage as well as the disposal of the precursor hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) by acid gas injection. Both above and below ground block storage is considered environmentally acceptable for sulfur storage as long as measures are taken to minimize the physical and biological breakdown of the sulfur. The preferred option is to store solid elemental sulfur underground, particularly if it is to remain in storage for a prolonged period. Future changes in supply of sulfur will likely be controlled by incremental production of sour gas and utilization of oil sands bitumen. It is expected that future sulfur production from conventional crude oil will remain static or will slowly decrease. The degree to which acid gas injection is applied to large sour gas developments in the Middle East and the Caspian regions will have a significant impact on world sulfur supply. 9 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  5. Determination of sulfur in human hair using high resolution continuum source graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry and its correlation with total protein and albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbek, Nil; Baysal, Asli

    2017-04-01

    Human hair is a valuable contributor for biological monitoring. It is an information storage point to assess the effects of environmental, nutritional or occupational sources on the body. Human proteins, amino acids or other compounds are among the key components to find the sources of different effects or disorders in the human body. Sulfur is a significant one of these compounds, and it has great affinity to some metals and compounds. This property of the sulfur affects the human health positively or negatively. In this manuscript, sulfur was determined in hair samples of autistic and age-match control group children via molecular absorption of CS using a high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer. For this purpose, hair samples were appropriately washed and dried at 75 °C. Then samples were dissolved in microwave digestion using HNO3 for sulfur determination. Extraction was performed with HCl hydrolysation by incubation for 24 h at 110 °C for total protein and albumin determination. The validity of the method for the sulfur determination was tested using hair standard reference materials. The results were in the uncertainty limits of the certified values at 95% confidence level. Finally correlation of sulfur levels of autistic children's hair with their total protein and albumin levels were done.

  6. Effects of a cold environment and of ammonia on the toxicity of sulfuric acid mist to guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattle, R E; Burgess, F; Cullumbine, H

    1956-01-01

    Exposure of guinea pigs for 8 hr to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ mist (2.7 ..mu..m MMD) yielded an LC/sub 50/ of 6.8 ppM. Animals either became dyspneic within 3 hr and died within 8 hr or suffered little effect during exposure. Some animals were particularly resistant. LC/sub 50/ for mist of 0.8 ..mu..m MMD was 14.9 ppM at room temperature (20/sup 0/C) and 11.7 ppM at 0/sup 0/C. Decrease was significant at 2% level. That cold especially affects more resistant animals is suggested. No evidence for tolerance was observed. Ammonium carbonate (NH/sub 3/ to neutralize mist) negated mortal effect of mist sufficient to produce > 50% mortality. Fatal effect was laryngeal spasm and bronchoconstriction. Pathology included emphysematous lungs. No pathological findings were observed in animals surviving short LC/sub 50/, but prolonged exposure produced slowly-repairable pathological lesions including capillary engorgement (perhaps sequel to bronchospasm).

  7. Micellar effect on the kinetics of oxidation of methyl blue by Ce(IV in sulfuric acid medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of oxidation of methyl blue (MB by Ce(IV in aqueous and surfactant media has been carried out to explore the micellar effect on the rate and kinetic parameters of the reaction. The reaction was found to be first order with respect to both oxidant and substrate and fractional order with respect to H+. The active kinetic species of the oxidant was found to be Ce(SO4+2 based on the effect of ionic strength and sulfate ion on the rate of the reaction. The presence of micelles was found to inhibit the reaction and this effect has been explained by the association of one of the reactants with the micelles leaving the other reactant in the bulk solution. The binding constant and first order rate constant in micellar medium has been obtained by the application of pseudo-phase model to the experimental data. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of the reaction reveals that the reaction has negative activation energy in the absence of micelles, which turns to a positive value in the presence of micelles.

  8. A comparison between the effects of gamma radiation and sulfur cure system on the microstructure and crosslink network of (styrene butadiene rubber/ethylene propylene diene monomer) blends in presence of nanoclay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoushtari Zadeh Naseri, Aida; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2015-10-01

    Rubber blends based on (styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR)/ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)) with and without organoclay (OC) were prepared through a melt mixing process. The concentration ratio of the rubber phases (EPDM/SBR; 50/50 wt%) and the amount of the OC were kept constant. The samples were then vulcanized by means of gamma radiation using a Co-60 gamma source as well as sulfur cure system. The effect of absorbed dose on the formation of the crosslinks was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of absorbed dose, sulfur cure system and OC on the gel content, and crosslink density were evaluated by the chemical tests. Applying the Charlesby-Pinner equation to estimate the radiation chemical yield, revealed that the use of OC in the blend caused 20% reduction in the degradation/crosslinking ratio. Employing the swelling test data, some thermodynamic parameters were determined. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to investigate microstructure of the samples revealed a more homogeneous structure and also an increase in compatibility of the blend components in the sample cured by the irradiation in comparison to that cured by the sulfur curing system.

  9. Sulfur dioxide: foe or friend for life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Bao; Cui, Hong; Liu, Xiaohong; Du, Jun-Bao

    2017-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO₂) is a toxic gas and air pollutant. The toxic effects of SO₂ have been extensively studied. Oxidative damage due to SO₂ can occur in multiple organs. Inhaled SO₂ can also cause chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and gene mutations in mammals. However, SO₂ can also be generated from the sulfur-containing amino acid, L-cysteine. Recent studies have shown that SO₂ has a vasorelaxant effect, and ameliorates pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. SO₂ can also reduce lung injury and myocardial injury in rats. In addition, SO₂ reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, SO₂ exerts both detrimental and protective effects in mammals. Is SO₂ a foe or friend for life?.

  10. Quantification and isotopic analysis of intracellular sulfur metabolites in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Min Sub; Paris, Guillaume; Adkins, Jess F.; Orphan, Victoria J.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2017-06-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction exhibits a normal isotope effect, leaving unreacted sulfate enriched in 34S and producing sulfide that is depleted in 34S. However, the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation is quite variable. The resulting changes in sulfur isotope abundance have been used to trace microbial sulfate reduction in modern and ancient ecosystems, but the intracellular mechanism(s) underlying the wide range of fractionations remains unclear. Here we report the concentrations and isotopic ratios of sulfur metabolites in the dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway of Desulfovibrio alaskensis. Intracellular sulfate and APS levels change depending on the growth phase, peaking at the end of exponential phase, while sulfite accumulates in the cell during stationary phase. During exponential growth, intracellular sulfate and APS are strongly enriched in 34S. The fractionation between internal and external sulfate is up to 49‰, while at the same time that between external sulfate and sulfide is just a few permil. We interpret this pattern to indicate that enzymatic fractionations remain large but the net fractionation between sulfate and sulfide is muted by the closed-system limitation of intracellular sulfate. This 'reservoir effect' diminishes upon cessation of exponential phase growth, allowing the expression of larger net sulfur isotope fractionations. Thus, the relative rates of sulfate exchange across the membrane versus intracellular sulfate reduction should govern the overall (net) fractionation that is expressed. A strong reservoir effect due to vigorous sulfate reduction might be responsible for the well-established inverse correlation between sulfur isotope fractionation and the cell-specific rate of sulfate reduction, while at the same time intraspecies differences in sulfate uptake and/or exchange rates could account for the significant scatter in this relationship. Our approach, together with ongoing investigations of the kinetic isotope

  11. A comparison between the effects of gamma radiation and sulfur cure system on the microstructure and crosslink network of (styrene butadiene rubber/ethylene propylene diene monomer) blends in presence of nanoclay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoushtari Zadeh Naseri, Aida; Jalali-Arani, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Rubber blends based on (styrene–butadiene rubber (SBR)/ethylene–propylene-diene monomer (EPDM)) with and without organoclay (OC) were prepared through a melt mixing process. The concentration ratio of the rubber phases (EPDM/SBR; 50/50 wt%) and the amount of the OC were kept constant. The samples were then vulcanized by means of gamma radiation using a Co-60 gamma source as well as sulfur cure system. The effect of absorbed dose on the formation of the crosslinks was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The effects of absorbed dose, sulfur cure system and OC on the gel content, and crosslink density were evaluated by the chemical tests. Applying the Charlesby–Pinner equation to estimate the radiation chemical yield, revealed that the use of OC in the blend caused 20% reduction in the degradation/crosslinking ratio. Employing the swelling test data, some thermodynamic parameters were determined. Using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) to investigate microstructure of the samples revealed a more homogeneous structure and also an increase in compatibility of the blend components in the sample cured by the irradiation in comparison to that cured by the sulfur curing system. - Highlights: • SBR/EPDM and SBR/EPDM/OC samples were prepared and irradiated by gamma radiation. • Increasing the absorbed dose and using OC enhanced gel content and crosslink density. • The increase in the absorbed dose resulted in an increase in ΔS and decrease in ΔG. • The use of OC in the blend caused 20% reduction in the degradation/crosslinking ratio. • In compare to sulfur cure sample the irradiated one showed more homogeneous structure

  12. Powering Lithium-Sulfur Battery Performance by Propelling Polysulfide Redox at Sulfiphilic Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhe; Peng, Hong-Jie; Hou, Ting-Zheng; Huang, Jia-Qi; Chen, Cheng-Meng; Wang, Dai-Wei; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Wei, Fei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-13

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery system is endowed with tremendous energy density, resulting from the complex sulfur electrochemistry involving multielectron redox reactions and phase transformations. Originated from the slow redox kinetics of polysulfide intermediates, the flood of polysulfides in the batteries during cycling induced low sulfur utilization, severe polarization, low energy efficiency, deteriorated polysulfide shuttle, and short cycling life. Herein, sulfiphilic cobalt disulfide (CoS2) was incorporated into carbon/sulfur cathodes, introducing strong interaction between lithium polysulfides and CoS2 under working conditions. The interfaces between CoS2 and electrolyte served as strong adsorption and activation sites for polar polysulfides and therefore accelerated redox reactions of polysulfides. The high polysulfide reactivity not only guaranteed effective polarization mitigation and promoted energy efficiency by 10% but also promised high discharge capacity and stable cycling performance during 2000 cycles. A slow capacity decay rate of 0.034%/cycle at 2.0 C and a high initial capacity of 1368 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C were achieved. Since the propelling redox reaction is not limited to Li-S system, we foresee the reported strategy herein can be applied in other high-power devices through the systems with controllable redox reactions.

  13. Acid or N? Disentangling Nutrient- and pH Effects of Nitrogen and Sulfur Deposition to Forest Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodale, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen deposition can act as both a nutrient and acidifying agent with sometimes synergistic and sometimes contradictory effects on ecosystem processes. However, these two roles are rarely separated. Similarly, deposition patterns of N and S often covary, making it difficult to correctly attribute their respective roles on the biogeochemistry of downwind ecosystems. In 2011, we initiated a N x pH (S) experiment in six mixed hardwood stands (3 primary, 3 secondary) in Central New York designed to separate nutrient and acidifying impacts of N and S deposition. Three treatments included two 50 N ha-1 yr-1 additions in forms intended to raise (NaNO3) or lower ((NH4)2SO4) soil pH as well as elemental S treatment to acidify without N. Five years of treatment shifted surface soil pH in the expected directions. Treatment effects on soil extract DOC correlated with pH, with lower DOC concentration and aromaticity in the acidifying treatments. Foliar litterfall did not vary by stand age or treatment, but N and S treatments enriched litterfall N and S concentrations, respectively. Wood production did not vary significantly by stand age or treatment but trended toward an increase in response to the N additions in both stand ages. The treatments did not affect early stages of litter decomposition, but both N additions and acidification suppressed decomposition in later stages, with largest effects from acidification alone. Soil respiration responses followed those of litter decomposition, except that the response of respiration to the NaNO3 addition depended on the stand's mycorrhizal composition, with greater suppression in stands with a higher fraction of ectomycorrhizal tree species. Together, these results show that both N addition and acidification can suppress decomposition rates, but likely for different reasons that may be linked to plant carbon allocation (for N) and microbial function (pH). Distinguishing these mechanisms will be important for projecting recovery of

  14. Acute effects of sulfur dioxide on the circulation of animals as well as on the contractility of isolated blood vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laszt, L; Schaad, R

    1974-01-01

    In support of earlier work on exhaust gases experiments were carried out to determine the acute effects of sulphur dioxide on the circulation of the cat and dog. Inhalation of SO/sub 2/ during 30 min at concentrations of up to 1000 ppm caused no circulatory reaction. Such a reaction first appeared after infusion of larger quantities of SO/sub 2/. The action of sulphur dioxide on systemic and pulmonar circulation is different. A difference was also observed for the contractility of the corresponding isolated vessels.

  15. Effects of atmospheric sulfur dioxide on the incidence of injury symptoms in vegetable crops and on their growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T; Ishikawa, H

    1971-05-01

    Four types of fruit crops (tomato, eggplant, cucumber, and green pepper), two types of root crops (turnip and radish), and four types of leaf crops (Chinese cabbage, cabbage, lettuce, and spinach) were continuously exposed for periods of 14-56 days to gas with a concentration of 0-0.26 ppm in order to study the effects of SO/sub 2/ on vegetable crops. The injury symptoms which were observed included: grayish-white or brown flecks on the leaves, yellowing of the leaves, and morphological changes in the leaves. The green peppers and radishes had the greatest resistance to SO/sub 2/ of all the vegetable crops tested; no injury symptoms appeared at 0.26 ppm; and there was no inhibition of their growth. The spinach was the most sensitive, injury symptoms appearing in one day (during summer and autumn) at 0.26 ppm. The other crops displayed a medium degree of sensitivity. That is, no injury symptoms appeared at a low concentration of 0.065 ppm; inhibition of growth was observed only in turnips, Chinese cabbage, and cabbage; but the others were not inhibited. There were no direct effects on flowering and fruiting within the experimental range of gas concentrations. Injury symptoms tended to appear less readily during the winter season.

  16. The Effects of Allicin, a Reactive Sulfur Species from Garlic, on a Selection of Mammalian Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C. H. Gruhlke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. has been used as a spice and medicinal plant since ancient times. Garlic produces the thiol-reactive defence substance, allicin, upon wounding. The effects of allicin on human lung epithelium carcinoma (A549, mouse fibroblast (3T3, human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC, human colon carcinoma (HT29 and human breast cancer (MCF7 cell lines were tested. To estimate toxic effects of allicin, we used a standard MTT-test (methylthiazoltetrazolium for cell viability and 3H-thymidine incorporation for cell proliferation. The glutathione pool was measured using monobromobimane and the formation of reactive species was identified using 2′,7′-dichlorofluoresceine-diacetate. The YO-PRO-1 iodide staining procedure was used to estimate apoptosis. Allicin reduced cell viability and cell proliferation in a concentration dependent manner. In the bimane test, it was observed that cells treated with allicin showed reduced fluorescence, suggesting glutathione oxidation. The cell lines tested differed in sensitivity to allicin in regard to viability, cell proliferation and glutathione oxidation. The 3T3 and MCF-7 cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis compared to the other cell types. These data show that mammalian cell lines differ in their sensitivity and responses to allicin.

  17. Amines are likely to enhance neutral and ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere more effectively than ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kurtén

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the structure and formation thermodynamics of dimer clusters containing H2SO4 or HSO4 together with ammonia and seven different amines possibly present in the atmosphere, using the high-level ab initio methods RI-MP2 and RI-CC2. As expected from e.g. proton affinity data, the binding of all studied amine-H2SO4 complexes is significantly stronger than that of NH3•H2SO4, while most amine-HSO4 complexes are only somewhat more strongly bound than NH3•HSO4. Further calculations on larger cluster structures containing dimethylamine or ammonia together with two H2SO4 molecules or one H2SO4 molecule and one HSO4 ion demonstrate that amines, unlike ammonia, significantly assist the growth of not only neutral but also ionic clusters along the H2SO4 co-ordinate. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the difference in complexation free energies for amine- and ammonia-containing clusters is large enough to overcome the mass-balance effect caused by the fact that the concentration of amines in the atmosphere is probably 2 or 3 orders of magnitude lower than that of ammonia. This implies that amines might be more important than ammonia in enhancing neutral and especially ion-induced sulfuric acid-water nucleation in the atmosphere.

  18. Simulation of global sulfate distribution and the influence of effective cloud drop radii with a coupled photochemistry-sulfur cycle model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, G.J.; Lelieveld, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.

    1998-01-01

    A sulfur cycle model is coupled to a global chemistry-climate model. The simulated surface sulfate concentrations are generally within a factor of 2 of observed concentrations, and display a realistic seasonality for most background locations. However, the model tends to underestimate sulfate and

  19. Measuring Sulfur Isotope Ratios from Solid Samples with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument and the Effects of Dead Time Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Kasprzak, W.; Lyness, E.; Raaen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite comprises the largest science payload on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity" rover. SAM will perform chemical and isotopic analysis of volatile compounds from atmospheric and solid samples to address questions pertaining to habitability and geochemical processes on Mars. Sulfur is a key element of interest in this regard, as sulfur compounds have been detected on the Martian surface by both in situ and remote sensing techniques. Their chemical and isotopic composition can belp constrain environmental conditions and mechanisms at the time of formation. A previous study examined the capability of the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) to determine sulfur isotope ratios of SO2 gas from a statistical perspective. Here we discuss the development of a method for determining sulfur isotope ratios with the QMS by sampling SO2 generated from heating of solid sulfate samples in SAM's pyrolysis oven. This analysis, which was performed with the SAM breadboard system, also required development of a novel treatment of the QMS dead time to accommodate the characteristics of an aging detector.

  20. Effect of UV irradiation on Cu2ZnSnS4 thin films prepared by the sol–gel sulfurization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, Hayato; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Uchiki, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) thin films were fabricated on Mo-coated soda lime glass substrates by the sol–gel sulfurization method, which is a non-vacuum process. UV irradiation was introduced to the drying process, resulting in a significant increase in the grain size and density as well as a remarkable improvement in the crystallinity of the CZTS films. In addition, sulfurization of the Mo substrate was suppressed due to the increased density. We confirmed that the carbon/metal ratio in the precursor increased as a result of the UV irradiation. - Graphical abstract: Surface and cross sectional SEM images of the (a) CZTS prepared without UV irradiation and (b) CZTS prepared with UV irradiation. - Highlights: • CZTS thin film was prepared by sol–gel sulfurization method. • UV irradiation was introduced during the drying process. • Density and crystallinity of the CZTS films were improved by the UV irradiation. • Sulfurization of Mo substrates was suppressed by the UV irradiation.

  1. Effects of climate, land management, and sulfur deposition on soil base cation supply in national forests of the southern Appalachian mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    T.C. McDonnell; T.J. Sullivan; B.J. Cosby; W.A. Jackson; K.J. Elliott

    2013-01-01

    Forest soils having low exchangeable calcium (Ca) and other nutrient base cation (BC) reserves may induce nutrient deficiencies in acid-sensitive plants and impact commercially important tree species. Past and future depletion of soil BC in response to acidic sulfur (S) deposition, forest management, and climate change alter the health and productivity of forest trees...

  2. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide on Authentic Mineral Dust: Effects of Relative Humidity and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liubin; Zhao, Yue; Li, Huan; Chen, Zhongming

    2015-09-15

    Heterogeneous reaction of SO2 on mineral dust seems to be an important sink for SO2. However, kinetic data about this reaction on authentic mineral dust are scarce and are mainly limited to low relative humidity (RH) conditions. In addition, little is known about the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in this reaction. Here, we investigated the uptake kinetics of SO2 on three authentic mineral dusts (i.e., Asian mineral dust (AMD), Tengger desert dust (TDD), and Arizona test dust (ATD)) in the absence and presence of H2O2 at different RHs using a filter-based flow reactor, and applied a parameter (effectiveness factor) to the estimation of the effective surface area of particles for the calculation of the corrected uptake coefficient (γc). We found that with increasing RH, the γc decreases on AMD particles, but increases on ATD and TDD particles. This discrepancy is probably due to the different mineralogy compositions and aging extents of these dust samples. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 can promote the uptake of SO2 on mineral dust at different RHs. The probable explanations are that H2O2 rapidly reacts with SO2 on mineral dust in the presence of adsorbed water, and OH radicals, which can be produced from the heterogeneous decomposition of H2O2 on the mineral dust, immediately react with adsorbed SO2 as well. Our results suggest that the removal of SO2 via the heterogeneous reaction on mineral dust is an important sink for SO2 and has the potential to alter the physicochemical properties (e.g., ice nucleation ability) of mineral dust particles in the atmosphere.

  3. Effect of salinity on carbon and sulfur cycles in Umm Alhool sabkha microbial mat ecosystem in Qatar

    KAUST Repository

    Alnajjar, Mohammad Ahmad

    2012-10-19

    Microbial mats are only present under extreme conditions, where grazing by higher organisms is limited. Therefore, microbial mats may provide insight into extraterrestrial life, due to their adaptations to extreme temperatures, desiccation or salinity. They are faced with a diurnal cycle with variable length based on their location, which exposes them to extreme salinity conditions (i.e., water withdrawal and high evaporation). Cyanobacteria in the photic zone of a mat ecosystem supply the other microorganism with the required organic material to produce energy and grow. Subsequently, this will reproduce the nutrients needed by the phototrophs through elemental re-mineralization. In this work, we investigated the effect of water salinity that covers the microbial mat ecosystem of Umm Alhool sabkha, Qatar, regarding the most important processes within microbial mats: photosynthesis and sulfate reduction (SR). Our results showed that both photosynthetic and sulfate reduction rates decreased with increasing the salinity. The microbial community structure, assessed by 454 pyro-sequencing, revealed that the cyanobacterial community structure changed in response to the change in salinity. This was not the case for the sulfate reducer community structure, which stayed as it is in the mats incubated at different salinities. Therefore, we speculate that salinity affects the photosynthetic community structure, and consequently affects the photosynthetic activity of the whole ecosystem. However, sulfate reduction rates decreased due to less organic material supply from the upper layers and not due to change in microbial community structure of SR. Other factors such as the activity of the enzymes could also have an effect on SRR, but it was not investigated in this study.

  4. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two

  5. Sulfur status in long distance runners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, L; Zamboni, C; Lourenço, T; Macedo, D

    2015-01-01

    In sports medicine, sulfur plays an important role and its deficiency can cause muscle injury affecting the performance of the athletes. However, its evaluation is unusual in conventional clinical practice. In this study the sulfur levels were determined in Brazilian amateur athlete's blood using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. Twenty six male amateur runners, age 18 to 36 years, participated of this study. The athletes had a balanced diet, without multivitamin/mineral supplements. The blood collection was performed at LABEX (Laboratoriode Bioquimica do Exercicio, UNICAMP-SP) and the samples were irradiated for 300 seconds in a pneumatic station in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 3-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP. The results were compared with the control group (subjects of same age but not involved with physical activities) and showed that the sulfur concentration was 44% higher in amateurs athletes than control group. These data can be considered for preparation of balanced diet, as well as contributing for proposing new protocols of clinical evaluation. (paper)

  6. Sulfur status in long distance runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, L.; Zamboni, C.; Lourenço, T.; Macedo, D.

    2015-07-01

    In sports medicine, sulfur plays an important role and its deficiency can cause muscle injury affecting the performance of the athletes. However, its evaluation is unusual in conventional clinical practice. In this study the sulfur levels were determined in Brazilian amateur athlete's blood using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. Twenty six male amateur runners, age 18 to 36 years, participated of this study. The athletes had a balanced diet, without multivitamin/mineral supplements. The blood collection was performed at LABEX (Laboratoriode Bioquimica do Exercicio, UNICAMP-SP) and the samples were irradiated for 300 seconds in a pneumatic station in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 3-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP. The results were compared with the control group (subjects of same age but not involved with physical activities) and showed that the sulfur concentration was 44% higher in amateurs athletes than control group. These data can be considered for preparation of balanced diet, as well as contributing for proposing new protocols of clinical evaluation.

  7. A new method to synthesize sulfur-doped graphene as effective metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Chunyang; Sun, Mingjuan [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Zhu, Mingshan, E-mail: mingshanzhu@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Song, Shaoqing [School of Chemistry, Biology and Materials Science, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Jiang, Shujuan, E-mail: sjjiang@ecit.edu.cn [School of Chemistry, Biology and Materials Science, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • S doped graphene was facile synthesized by one-pot solvothermal method. • DMSO acted as S source as well as reaction solvent. • S-RGO worked as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for ORR. • S-RGO acted as a promising candidate instead of Pt-based catalyst. - Abstract: The exploration of a metal-free catalyst with highly efficient yet low-cost for the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) is under wide spread investigation. In this paper, by using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as S source as well as solvent, we report a new, low-cost, and facile solvothermal route to synthesize S-doped reduced graphene oxide (S-RGO). The existence of S element in the framework of RGO was solidly confirmed by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The as-synthesized S-RGO can be worked as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for ORR. Moreover, compared to commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst, the S-RGO displays superior resistance to crossover effect and stability by evaluating the addition of methanol and CO poisoning experiment. This result not only shows S-RGO as a promising candidate instead of Pt-based catalyst for ORR, but also provides a new approach for the preparation of metal-free electrocatalyst in future.

  8. Effect of Exogenous Zirconia Nanophases on the Structural Properties of the Sulfur- and Tin-Containing Nickel Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuchkin, S. N.

    2017-11-01

    The surface tension and the density of the nickel melts with introduced ZrO2 nanoparticles are studied by the sessile drop method using a digital camera and computer processing of images. The revealed differently directed effects of nanoparticles on the surface tension in the Ni-Sn and Ni-S systems points to a change in the structure of the melt-gas surface layer. The nanoparticles are shown to affect the adsorption of surfactants, and the surface layer is likely to consist of adsorbed Ni + (ZrO2-surfactant) ensembles. The ZrO2 content in a metal is determined using the technique of separate determination of the zirconium content dissolved in a metal and zirconium in the form of ZrO2. It was found that, at 0.10 wt % ZrO2 initially present in a metal, 0.021-0.031 wt % ZrO2 are retained in samples; that is, about 70 rel % ZrO2 are removed to the interface in the form of ensembles. Auger spectroscopy analysis of the Ni-Sn-ZrO2 surface film detected 5-10 rel % Zr in the surface layer.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Sulfuric Acid Condensation and Corrosion Rate in Motored Bukh DV24 Diesel Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjemtrup, Lars; Cordtz, Rasmus Faurskov; Meyer, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The work conducted in this paper presents a novel experimental setup to study sulfuric acid cold corrosion of cylinder liners in large two-stroke marine diesel engines. The process is simulated in a motored light duty BUKH DV24 diesel engine where the charge air contain known amounts of H2SO4 and H......2O vapor. Liner corrosion is measured as iron accumulation in the lubeoil. Similarly sulfuric acid condensation is assessed by measuring the accumulation of sulfur in the lube oil. To clarify the corrosive effect of sulfuric acid the lube oil utilized for experiments is a sulfur free neutral oil...... without alkaline additives (Chevron Neutral Oil 600R). Iron and sulfur accumulation in the lube oil is analyzed withan Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) apparatus. Three test cases with different H2SO4 concentrations are run. Results reveal good agreement between sulfuric acid injection flow...

  10. Inhibitory Effects of Trapping Agents of Sulfur Drug Reactive Intermediates against Major Human Cytochrome P450 Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasleen K. Sodhi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In some cases, the formation of reactive species from the metabolism of xenobiotics has been linked to toxicity and therefore it is imperative to detect potential bioactivation for candidate drugs during drug discovery. Reactive species can covalently bind to trapping agents in in vitro incubations of compound with human liver microsomes (HLM fortified with β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH, resulting in a stable conjugate of trapping agent and reactive species, thereby facilitating analytical detection and providing evidence of short-lived reactive metabolites. Since reactive metabolites are typically generated by cytochrome P450 (CYP oxidation, it is important to ensure high concentrations of trapping agents are not inhibiting the activities of CYP isoforms. Here we assessed the inhibitory properties of fourteen trapping agents against the major human CYP isoforms (CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6 and 3A. Based on our findings, eleven trapping agents displayed inhibition, three of which had IC50 values less than 1 mM (2-mercaptoethanol, N-methylmaleimide and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM. Three trapping agents (dimedone, N-acetyl-lysine and arsenite did not inhibit CYP isoforms at concentrations tested. To illustrate effects of CYP inhibition by trapping agents on reactive intermediate trapping, an example drug (ticlopidine and trapping agent (NEM were chosen for further studies. For the same amount of ticlopidine (1 μM, increasing concentrations of the trapping agent NEM (0.007–40 mM resulted in a bell-shaped response curve of NEM-trapped ticlopidine S-oxide (TSO-NEM, due to CYP inhibition by NEM. Thus, trapping studies should be designed to include several concentrations of trapping agent to ensure optimal trapping of reactive metabolites.

  11. Demand outlook for sulfur and high-sulfur petroleum coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshkarov, V.Ya.; Danil' yan, P.G.; Feotov, V.E.; Gimaev, R.N.; Koshkarova, M.E.; Sadykova, S.R.; Vodovichenko, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using sulfur and high-sulfur petroleum coke fines in pyrometallurgical processes and also in the chemical and coal-tar chemical industry is examined. Results of industrial tests on briquetting fines of petroleum coke with a petroleum binder are presented. The feasibility of using the obtained briquets in shaft furnace smelting of oxidized nickel ores, production of anode stock, and also in the chemical industry are demonstrated.

  12. Sulfur equilibrium desulfurization of sulfur containing products of combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Abichandani, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes the method for the combustion of a carbon- and sulfur-containing fuel for substantially reducing emission of gaseous sulfur compounds formed during combustion of the fuel in a combustion zone. The zone having one or more fuel inlets and one or more oxidizer inlets, and having a combustion products outlet spaced therefrom, and having one or more inorganic sorbent inlets downstream of the fuel inlet(s) and oxidizer inlet(s) and upstream of the combustion products outlet

  13. Experimental and numerical modeling of sulfur plugging in carbonate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Kassem, J.H. [Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, UAE University, PO Box 17555, Al-Ain (United Arab Emirates)

    2000-05-01

    Sour gas, mainly in the form of hydrogen sulfide, is produced in large amounts from many oil and gas reservoirs in the United Arab Emirates. In addition to creating problems in production lines, the precipitation of elemental sulfur in vicinity of the wellbore is often reported to cause wellbore damage. While there have been several studies performed on the role of solid deposition in gas reservoirs, the role of sulfur deposition in oil reservoirs has not been investigated. This paper presents experimental results along with a comprehensive wellbore model that predicts sulfur precipitation as well as plugging. Two separate sets of experiments, one for a gas phase system and another for a crude oil system, were conducted to investigate the deposition of elemental sulfur in (linear) carbonate cores. The gas flow tests were conducted with elemental sulfur being carried with nitrogen through limestone cores. Changes in gas flow rate were monitored while the injection pressure was held constant. A series of experiments generated valuable data for plugging with elemental sulfur. X-ray diffraction tests provided evidence of sulfur deposition along the cores. The oil flow tests were carried out to observe sulfur precipitation and plugging in a carbonate core. The crude oil was de-asphalted before conducting these tests in order to isolate the effect of asphaltene plugging. Significant plugging was observed and was found to be dependent on flow rate and initial sulfur concentration. This information was used in a phenomenological model that was incorporated in the wellbore numerical model. The data for the numerical model were obtained from both test tube and oil flow experiments. By using a phenomenological model, the wellbore plugging was modeled with an excellent match (with experimental results)

  14. Sandwich-like graphene-mesoporous carbon as sulfur host for enhanced lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ting; Li, Bin; Zhu, Mengqi; Liu, Jianhua; Li, Songmei

    2017-10-01

    Graphene-mesoporous carbon/sulfur composites (G-MPC/S) were constructed by melt-infiltration of sulfur into graphene-mesoporous carbon which was synthesized by soft template method. The SEM and BET results of the graphene-mesoporous carbon show that the as-prepared sandwich-like G-MPC composites with a unique microporous-mesoporous structure had a high specific surface area of 554.164 m2 · g-1 and an average pore size of about 13 nm. The XRD analysis presents the existence of orthorhombic sulfur in the G-MPC/S composite, which indicates the complete infiltration of sulfur into the pores of the G-MPC. When the graphene-mesoporous carbon/surfur composites (G-MPC/S) with 53.9 wt.% sulfur loading were used as the cathode for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, it exhibited an outstanding electrochemical performance including excellent initial discharge specific capacity of 1393 mAh · g-1 at 0.1 °C, high cycle stability (731 mAh · g-1 at 200 cycles) and good rate performance (1038 mAh · g-1, 770 mAh · g-1, 518 mAh · g-1 and 377 mAh · g-1 at 0.1 °C, 0.2 °C, 0.5 °C and 1 °C, respectively), which suggested the important role of the G-MPC composite in providing more electrons and ions channels, in addition, the shuttle effect caused by the dissolved polysulfide was also suppressed.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide oxidation by a microbial consortium in a recirculation reactor system: sulfur formation under oxygen limitation and removal of phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Sergio; Velasco, Antonio; Muñoz, Ana; Cid, Juan; Revah, Sergio; Razo-Flores, Elías

    2004-02-01

    Wastewater from petroleum refining may contain a number of undesirable contaminants including sulfides, phenolic compounds, and ammonia. The concentrations of these compounds must be reduced to acceptable levels before discharge. Sulfur formation and the effect of selected phenolic compounds on the sulfide oxidation were studied in autotrophic aerobic cultures. A recirculation reactor system was implemented to improve the elemental sulfur recovery. The relation between oxygen and sulfide was determined calculating the O2/S2- loading rates (Q(O2)/Q(S)2- = Rmt), which adequately defined the operation conditions to control the sulfide oxidation. Sulfur-producing steady states were achieved at Rmt ranging from 0.5 to 1.5. The maximum sulfur formation occurred at Rmt of 0.5 where 85% of the total sulfur added to the reactor as sulfide was transformed to elemental sulfur and 90% of it was recovered from the bottom of the reactor. Sulfide was completely oxidized to sulfate (Rmt of 2) in a stirred tank reactor, even when a mixture of phenolic compounds was present in the medium. Microcosm experiments showed that carbon dioxide production increased in the presence of the phenols, suggesting that these compounds were oxidized and that they may have been used as carbon and energy source by heterotrophic microorganisms present in the consortium.

  16. Climate and air quality trade-offs in altering ship fuel sulfur content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, A.-I.; Laakso, A.; Schmidt, A.; Kokkola, H.; Kuokkanen, T.; Pietikäinen, J.-P.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Laakso, L.; Korhonen, H.

    2013-08-01

    Aerosol particles from shipping emissions both cool the climate and cause adverse health effects. The cooling effect is, however, declining because of shipping emission controls aiming to improve air quality. We used an aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ to test whether by altering ship fuel sulfur content, the present-day aerosol-induced cooling effect from shipping could be preserved while at the same time reducing premature mortality rates related to shipping emissions. We compared the climate and health effects of a present-day shipping emission scenario with (1) a simulation with strict emission controls in the coastal waters (ship fuel sulfur content of 0.1%) and twofold ship fuel sulfur content compared to current global average of 2.7% elsewhere; and (2) a scenario with global strict shipping emission controls (ship fuel sulfur content of 0.1% in coastal waters and 0.5% elsewhere) roughly corresponding to international agreements to be enforced by the year 2020. Scenario 1 had a slightly stronger aerosol-induced radiative flux perturbation (RFP) from shipping than the present-day scenario (-0.43 W m-2 vs. -0.39 W m-2) while reducing premature mortality from shipping by 69% (globally 34 900 deaths avoided per year). Scenario 2 decreased the RFP to -0.06 W m-2 and annual deaths by 96% (globally 48 200 deaths avoided per year) compared to present-day. A small difference in radiative effect (global mean of 0.04 W m-2) in the coastal regions between Scenario 1 and the present-day scenario imply that shipping emission regulation in the existing emission control areas should not be removed in hope of climate cooling. Our results show that the cooling effect of present-day emissions could be retained with simultaneous notable improvements in air quality, even though the shipping emissions from the open ocean clearly have a significant effect on continental air quality. However, increasing ship fuel sulfur content in the open ocean would violate existing

  17. An experimental study: Role of different ambient on sulfurization of MoO{sub 3} into MoS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Prabhat, E-mail: prabhat89k@gmail.com; Singh, Megha; Sharma, Rabindar K.; Reddy, G.B.

    2016-06-25

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanostructured thin films (NTFs) were synthesised by sulfurizing MoO{sub 3} NTFs using three different non-conventional methods (named methods 1–3). Method 1 uses sulfur vapors, second employs H{sub 2}S/Ar gas and third adopts plasma of H{sub 2}S/Ar gas. HRTEM revealed formation of core–shell nanostructures with maximum shell thickness obtained in method 3. The samples showed uniform nanoflakes (NFs) throughout substrate, revealed by SEM, same as their precursor MoO{sub 3.} XRD and Raman analysis disclosed crystalline MoS{sub 2} and degree of crystallinity was greatest in case of sulfurization in plasma ambient. Quantitative analysis of sulfurized films carried out by XPS shows presence of MoS{sub 2} in all three methods with percentage found to be 18%, 87% and ∼100% respectively. The effect of sulfurizing ambient on its efficiency to convert MoO{sub 3} into MoS{sub 2} has been studied and it was found out that plasma ambient has resulted in high quality of MoS{sub 2} NTFs based on parameters as crystallinity, purity, uniformity and stoichiometry control. - Highlights: • Comparison of three non-conventional methods of sulfurization. • Parameters used for comparison are crystallinity, purity, sulfurized thickness, uniformity and stoichiometry. • H{sub 2}S/Ar plasma based method came out to be best among other techniques. • A soft template reactions for sulfurization of MoO{sub 3} nanoflake is proposed.

  18. Graphene-sulfur nanocomposites for rechargeable lithium-sulfur battery electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lemmon, John P; Yang, Zhenguo; Cao, Yuiliang; Li, Xiaolin

    2014-06-17

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries having a cathode that includes a graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can exhibit improved characteristics. The graphene-sulfur nanocomposite can be characterized by graphene sheets with particles of sulfur adsorbed to the graphene sheets. The sulfur particles have an average diameter less than 50 nm..

  19. Controlled expression of nif and isc iron-sulfur protein maturation components reveals target specificity and limited functional replacement between the two systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Patricia C; Johnson, Deborah C; Ragle, Brook E; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Dean, Dennis R

    2007-04-01

    The nitrogen-fixing organism Azotobacter vinelandii contains at least two systems that catalyze formation of [Fe-S] clusters. One of these systems is encoded by nif genes, whose products supply [Fe-S] clusters required for maturation of nitrogenase. The other system is encoded by isc genes, whose products are required for maturation of [Fe-S] proteins that participate in general metabolic processes. The two systems are similar in that they include an enzyme for the mobilization of sulfur (NifS or IscS) and an assembly scaffold (NifU or IscU) upon which [Fe-S] clusters are formed. Normal cellular levels of the Nif system, which supplies [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase, cannot also supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of other cellular [Fe-S] proteins. Conversely, when produced at the normal physiological levels, the Isc system cannot supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase. In the present work we found that such target specificity for IscU can be overcome by elevated production of NifU. We also found that NifU, when expressed at normal levels, is able to partially replace the function of IscU if cells are cultured under low-oxygen-availability conditions. In contrast to the situation with IscU, we could not establish conditions in which the function of IscS could be replaced by NifS. We also found that elevated expression of the Isc components, as a result of deletion of the regulatory iscR gene, improved the capacity for nitrogen-fixing growth of strains deficient in either NifU or NifS.

  20. Sulfur, selenium, tellurium and polonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the coordination compounds of sulfur, selenium, tellurium and polonium starts with an introduction to the bonding, valence and geometry of the elements. Complexes of the group VIB elements are discussed with particular reference to the halo and pseudohalide complexes, oxo acid complexes, oxygen and nitrogen donor complexes and sulfur and selenium donor complexes. There is a section on the biological properties of the complexes discussed. (UK)

  1. New uses of sulfur - update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, K.P.

    1995-07-01

    An update to an extensive bibliography on alternate uses of sulfur was presented. Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., previously compiled a bibliography in volume 24 of this quarterly bulletin. This update provides an additional 44 new publications. The information regarding current research focusses on topics regarding the use of sulfur in oil and gas applications, mining and metallurgy, concretes and other structural materials, waste management, rubber and textile products, asphalts and other paving and highway applications.

  2. For sale: Sulfur emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiderscheit, J.

    1992-01-01

    The allowance trading market has started a slow march to maturity. Competitive developers should understand the risks and opportunities now presented. The marketplace for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions allowances - the centerpiece of Title 4's acid rain reduction program - remains enigmatic 19 months after the Clean Air Act amendments of 1990 were passed. Yet it is increasingly clear that the emission allowance market will likely confound the gloom and doom of its doubters. The recently-announced $10 million dollar Wisconsin Power and Light allowance sales to Duquesne Light and the Tennessee Valley Authority are among the latest indications of momentum toward a stabilizing market. This trend puts additional pressure on independent developers to finalize their allowance strategies. Developers who understand what the allowance trading program is and what it is not, know the key players, and grasp the unresolved regulatory issues will have a new competitive advantage. The topics addressed in this article include the allowance marketplace, marketplace characteristics, the regulatory front, forward-looking strategies, and increasing marketplace activity

  3. Preliminary study of varietal susceptibility to sulfur dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.E.; Xerikos, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    The injury response of plants to air pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, is known to vary in severity and type for different varieties or cultivars of a species. Differences in the susceptibility of soybean varieties to sulfur dioxide have previously been noted, but sufficient information is not available concerning the sulfur dioxide resistance of varieties commonly grown in the Midwest. Results are reported from preliminary experiments concerning acute sulfur dioxide effects on 12 soybean varieties. The injury symptoms ranged from cream colored necrotic lesions (generally on younger leaves) to a reddish brown necrotic stipling (on older leaves). Differences in the severity of symptom development for the varieties was evident on both the younger and older leaves. No injury was apparent with three of the varieties

  4. Process and device for liquid organic waste processing by sulfuric mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspart, A.; Gillet, B.; Lours, S.; Guillaume, B.

    1990-01-01

    In a chemical reactor containing sulfuric acid are introduced the liquid waste and nitric acid at a controlled flow rate for carbonization of the waste and oxidation of carbon on sulfur dioxide, formed during carbonization, regenerating simultaneously sulfuric acid. Optical density of the liquid is monitored to stop liquid waste feeding above a set-point. The liquid waste can be an organic solvent such as TBP [fr

  5. Standard practice for preparing sulfur prints for macrostructural evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice provides information required to prepare sulfur prints (also referred to as Baumann Prints) of most ferrous alloys to reveal the distribution of sulfide inclusions. 1.2 The sulfur print reveals the distribution of sulfides in steels with bulk sulfur contents between about 0.010 and 0.40 weight percent. 1.3 Certain steels contain complex sulfides that do not respond to the test solutions, for example, steels containing titanium sulfides or chromium sulfides. 1.4 The sulfur print test is a qualitative test. The density of the print image should not be used to assess the sulfur content of a steel. Under carefully controlled conditions, it is possible to compare print image intensities if the images are formed only by manganese sulfides. 1.5 The sulfur print image will reveal details of the solidification pattern or metal flow from hot or cold working on appropriately chosen and prepared test specimens. 1.6 This practice does not address acceptance criteria based on the use of the method. ...

  6. New method for reduction of burning sulfur of coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyutskanov, L.; Dushanov, D.

    1998-01-01

    The coal pyrolysis is key phase in the the pyrolysis-combustion cycle as it provides char for combustor. The behaviour of sulfur compounds during coal pyrolysis depends on factors as rank of coal, quantity of sulfur and sulfur forms distribution in the coal, quantity and kind of mineral matter and the process conditions. The mineral content of coal may inhibit or catalyze the formation of volatile sulfur compounds. The pyrolysis itself is a mean of removing inorganic and organic sulfur but anyway a portion of it remains in the char while the other moves into the tar and gas. The aim of this study was to determine an optimal reduction of burning sulfur at the coal pyrolysis by varying parametric conditions. The pyrolysis of different kinds of coal has been studied. The samples with size particles o C at atmospheric pressure and with a heating rate of 6-50 o C min -1 . They were treated with exhaust gas and nitrogen at an addition of steam and air. The char obtained remains up to 10 min at the final temperature. The char samples cool without a contact with air. Two methods of desulfurization-pyrolysis were studied - using 9-vertical tubular reactor and 9-horizontal turning reactor. The results obtained show that at all samples there is a decrease of burning sulfur with maximal removal efficiency 83%. For example at a pyrolysis of Maritsa Iztok lignite coal the burning sulfur is only 16% in comparison with the control sample. The remained is 90% sulfate, 10% organic and pyrite traces when a mixture 'exhaust gas-water stream-air' was used. The method of desulfurization by pyrolysis could be applied at different kinds of coal and different conditions. Char obtained as a clean product can be used for generating electric power. This innovation is in a stage of patenting

  7. Surface reaction modification: The effect of structured overlayers of sulfur on the kinetics and mechanism of the decomposition of formic acid on Pt(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, N.; Madix, R. J.

    The reaction of formic acid (DCOOH) on Pt(111), Pt(111)-(2×2)S and Pt(111)-(√3×√3)R30°S surfaces was examined by temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy. On the clean surface formic acid decomposed to yield primarily carbon dioxide and the hydrogenic species (H 2, HD and D 2) at low coverages. Although the formation of water and carbon monoxide via a dehydration reaction was observed at these coverages, the yield of these products was small when compared to the other products of reaction. The evolution of CO 2 at low temperature was ascribed to the decomposition of the formate intermediate. In the presence of sulfur the amount of molecularly adsorbed formic acid decreased up to a factor of three on the (√3×√3)R30°S surface, and a decline in the reactivity of over an order of magnitude was also observed. The only products formed were the hydrogenic species and carbon dioxide. The absence of carbon monoxide indicated that the dehydration pathway was blocked by sulfur. In addition to the low temperature CO 2 peak a high temperature CO 2-producing path was also evident. It was inferred from both the stoichiometry and the coincident evolution of D 2 and CO 2 in the high temperature states that these products also evolved due to the decomposition of the formate intermediate. On increasing the sulfur coverage to one-third monolayer this intermediate was further stabilized, and a predominance of the decomposition via the high temperature path was observed. Stability of the formate intermediate was attributed to inhibition of the decomposition reaction by sulfur atoms. The activation energy for formate decomposition increased from 15 kcal/gmole on the clean surface to 24.3 kcal/gmol on the (√3×√3)R30°S overlayer.

  8. Measurement of sulfur dioxide oxidation rates in wintertime orographic clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    SO2-reaction studies in the clouds are examined and summarized to experimentally confirm model predictions and previous field studies regarding dominant SO2-reaction pathways. Controlled amounts of SO2 were released into nonprecipitating orographic clouds, and sulfate yields are compared to oxidant depletions. The sulfate yields were taken from cloud-water samples and liquid-water-concentration measurements, and oxidant-depletion data were generated from continuous gas-phase measurements. Comparisons of Y sub SO4 and D sub H2O2 suggest that H2O2 is the dominant oxidant, and the in-cloud reaction between H2O2 and the bisulfite ion can be expressed by a simple rate that agrees with predictions and laboratory results. The rate measurements are found to be inconsistent with the rate law proposed by Hegg and Hobbs (1982) and with some observational data. The present conclusions are of interest to evaluating the effects of sulfur dioxide emissions on sulfuric acid deposition. 30 refs

  9. Health Endpoint Attributed to Sulfur Dioxide Air Pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Sulfur dioxide is a colorless gas, released from burning of coal, high-sulfur coal,s and diesel fuel. Sulfur dioxide harms human health by reacting with the moisture in the nose, nasal cavity and throat and this is the way by which it destroys the nerves in the respiratory system. Objectives The aim of this study was to focus on identifying the effects associated with sulfur dioxide on health in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods Data collections were performed by Ahvaz meteorological organization and the department of environment. Sampling was performed for 24 hours in four stations. Methods of sampling and analysis were according to US environmental protection agency (EPA guideline. Afterwards, we processed the raw data including instruction set correction of averaging, coding and filtering by Excel software and then, the impact of meteorological parameters were converted as the input file to the AirQ model. Finally, we calculated the health effects of exposure to sulfur dioxide. Results According to the findings, the concentration of sulfur dioxide in Ahvaz had an annual average of 51 μg/m3. Sum of the numbers of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases attributed to sulfur dioxide was 25 cases in 2012. Approximately, 5% of the total hospital admissions for respiratory disease and respiratory mortality happened when sulfur dioxide concentration was more than 10 mg/m3. Conclusions According to the results of this study, this increase could be due to higher fuel consumption, usage of gasoline in vehicles, oil industry, and steel and heavy industries in Ahwaz. The risk of mortality and morbidity were detected at the current concentrations of air pollutants.

  10. Unraveling multiple phases of sulfur cycling during the alteration of ancient ultramafic oceanic lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenbach, Esther M.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Johnston, David T.

    2018-02-01

    Ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems - characterized by ongoing serpentinization reactions - exert an important influence on the global sulfur cycle. Extensive water-rock interaction causes elemental exchange between seawater and the oceanic lithosphere, effectively removing sulfate from seawater through both abiogenic and biogenic processes. Here, we use bulk rock multiple sulfur isotope signatures (32S, 33S, 34S) and in situ sulfide analyses together with petrographic observations to track the sulfur cycling processes and the hydrothermal evolution of ancient peridotite-hosted hydrothermal systems. We investigate serpentinized peridotites from the Northern Apennine ophiolite in Italy and the Santa Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica and compare those with the Iberian Margin (Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 149 and 173) and the 15°20‧N Fracture Zone along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (ODP Leg 209). In situ measurements of sulfides in the Northern Apennine serpentinites preserve a large range in δ34Ssulfide of -33.8 to +13.3‰ with significant heterogeneities within single sulfide grains and depending on mineralogy. Detailed mineralogical investigation and comparison with bulk rock Δ33Ssulfide and in situ δ34Ssulfide data implies a thermal evolution of the system from high temperatures (∼350 °C) that allowed thermochemical sulfate reduction and input of hydrothermal sulfide to lower temperatures (rock associated with detachment faulting along a mid-ocean ridge spreading center. The Santa Elena peridotites preserve distinct signatures for fluid circulation at high temperatures with both closed system thermochemical sulfate reduction and input of mafic-derived sulfur. In addition, the peridotites provide strong evidence that low Ca2+ concentrations in peridotite-hosted systems can limit sulfate removal during anhydrite precipitation at temperatures above 150 °C. This may play a central role for the availability of sulfate to microbial communities within these

  11. Micro-Spherical Sulfur/Graphene Oxide Composite via Spray Drying for High Performance Lithium Sulfur Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yuan; Sun, Zhenghao; Zhang, Yongguang; Yin, Fuxing

    2018-01-01

    An efficient, industry-accepted spray drying method was used to synthesize micro-spherical sulfur/graphene oxide (S/GO) composites as cathode materials within lithium sulfur batteries. The as-designed wrapping of the sulfur-nanoparticles, with wrinkled GO composites, was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The unique morphological design of this material enabled superior discharge capacity and cycling performance, demonstrating a high initial discharge capacity of 1400 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C. The discharge capacity remained at 828 mAh g−1 after 150 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance indicates that the S/GO composite improves electrical conductivity and alleviates the shuttle effect. This study represents the first time such a facile spray drying method has been adopted for lithium sulfur batteries and used in the fabrication of S/GO composites. PMID:29346303

  12. Effects of anti-inflammatory compounds on sulfur mustard injured cells: Recommendations and caveats suggested by in vitro cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menacher, Georg; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Popp, Tanja; Worek, Franz; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Balszuweit, Frank

    2018-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicant agent who had its first military use 100 years ago, in Ypres. Since then it has been used in several conflicts like the Iran-Iraq war in the 1980s. The use of SM in Syria 2015 indicated the still existing threat. Despite decades of research no causal antidote against SM intoxication is available, so far. A SM intoxication is accompanied by necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. To counteract the SM-induced inflammation, glucocorticoids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds (NSAIDs) are recommended. Aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the anti-inflammatory compounds dexamethasone, ibuprofen and diclofenac in vitro. For that purpose, two different cell culture models were used. Firstly, a monoculture of keratinocytes (HaCaT) and secondly, an established co-culture of keratinocytes (HaCaT) and immunocompetent cells (THP-1) to identify the role of immune cells in the process and to mimic the dermal physiology more closely. Both models were challenged with different SM concentrations (100, 200 and 300μM) and treated with different anti-inflammatory compounds one hour after the SM exposure. Analytical analysis of necrosis (ToxiLight), apoptosis (CDDE) and inflammation (IL-6 and -8 ELISAs) followed 24h thereafter. Dexamethasone provided small but consistent protective effects in the monoculture. For the reduction of apoptosis, 3μM dexamethasone was sufficient. The most effective reduction regarding interleukin (IL) production was found with 6μM dexamethasone. Protective effects were less pronounced in co-culture, which implies, that the protective effects of dexamethasone are rather generic and not due to a modulation of the immune cells. Against our expectations, ibuprofen strongly amplified apoptosis and necrosis in SM exposed cells in the monoculture as well as the co-culture. Therefore, use of ibuprofen for treatment of SM intoxication should at least be considered most critically, if not even regarded as

  13. Capacity Fade Analysis of Sulfur Cathodes in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jianhua; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-01-01

    Rechargeable lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries are receiving ever‐increasing attention due to their high theoretical energy density and inexpensive raw sulfur materials. However, their rapid capacity fade has been one of the key barriers for their further improvement. It is well accepted that the major degradation mechanisms of S‐cathodes include low electrical conductivity of S and sulfides, precipitation of nonconductive Li2S2 and Li2S, and poly‐shuttle effects. To determine these degradation factors, a comprehensive study of sulfur cathodes with different amounts of electrolytes is presented here. A survey of the fundamentals of Li–S chemistry with respect to capacity fade is first conducted; then, the parameters obtained through electrochemical performance and characterization are used to determine the key causes of capacity fade in Li–S batteries. It is confirmed that the formation and accumulation of nonconductive Li2S2/Li2S films on sulfur cathode surfaces are the major parameters contributing to the rapid capacity fade of Li–S batteries. PMID:27981001

  14. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soleimani, Sahar, E-mail: ssoleima@connect.carleton.ca; Isgor, O. Burkan, E-mail: burkan_isgor@carleton.ca; Ormeci, Banu, E-mail: banu_ormeci@carleton.ca

    2013-11-15

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process.

  15. Resistance of biofilm-covered mortars to microbiologically influenced deterioration simulated by sulfuric acid exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleimani, Sahar; Isgor, O. Burkan; Ormeci, Banu

    2013-01-01

    Following the reported success of biofilm applications on metal surfaces to inhibit microbiologically influenced corrosion, effectiveness and sustainability of E. coli DH5α biofilm on mortar surface to prevent microbiologically influenced concrete deterioration (MICD) are investigated. Experiments simulating microbial attack were carried out by exposing incrementally biofilm-covered mortar specimens to sulfuric acid solutions with pH ranging from 3 to 6. Results showed that calcium concentration in control reactors without biofilm was 23–47% higher than the reactors with biofilm-covered mortar. Formation of amorphous silica gel as an indication of early stages of acid attack was observed only on the control mortar specimens without biofilm. During acidification, the biofilm continued to grow and its thickness almost doubled from ∼ 30 μm before acidification to ∼ 60 μm after acidification. These results demonstrated that E. coli DH5α biofilm was able to provide a protective and sustainable barrier on mortar surfaces against medium to strong sulfuric acid attack. -- Highlights: •Effectiveness of E.coli DH5α biofilm to prevent MICD was studied. •Conditions that lead to MICD were simulated by chemical acidification. •Biofilm-covered mortar specimens were exposed to sulfuric acid solutions. •The presence of biofilm helped reduce the chemically-induced mortar deterioration. •Biofilm remained alive and continued to grow during the acidification process

  16. Honeycomb-like Nitrogen and Sulfur Dual-Doped Hierarchical Porous Biomass-Derived Carbon for Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Manfang; Jiang, Shouxin; Huang, Cheng; Wang, Xianyou; Cai, Siyu; Xiang, Kaixiong; Zhang, Yapeng; Xue, Jiaxi

    2017-04-22

    Honeycomb-like nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped hierarchical porous biomass-derived carbon/sulfur composites (NSHPC/S) are successfully fabricated for high energy density lithium-sulfur batteries. The effects of nitrogen, sulfur dual-doping on the structures and properties of the NSHPC/S composites are investigated in detail by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and charge/discharge tests. The results show that N, S dual-doping not only introduces strong chemical adsorption and provides more active sites but also significantly enhances the electronic conductivity and hydrophilic properties of hierarchical porous biomass-derived carbon, thereby significantly enhancing the utilization of sulfur and immobilizing the notorious polysulfide shuttle effect. Especially, the as-synthesized NSHPC-7/S exhibits high initial discharge capacity of 1204 mA h g -1 at 1.0 C and large reversible capacity of 952 mA h g -1 after 300 cycles at 0.5 C with an ultralow capacity fading rate of 0.08 % per cycle even at high sulfur content (85 wt %) and high active material areal mass loading (2.8 mg cm -2 ) for the application of high energy density Li-S batteries. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Sulfur mustard and respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2012-09-01

    Victims exposed to sulfur mustard (HD) in World War I and Iran-Iraq war, and those suffered occupational or accidental exposure have endured discomfort in the respiratory system at early stages after exposure, and marked general physical deterioration at late stages due to pulmonary fibrosis, bronchiolitis obliterans or lung cancer. At molecule levels, significant changes of cytokines and chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum, and of selectins (in particular sE-selectin) and soluble Fas ligand in the serum have been reported in recent studies of patients exposed to HD in Iran-Iraq war, suggesting that these molecules may be associated with the pathophysiological development of pulmonary diseases. Experimental studies in rodents have revealed that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, their product peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), nitric oxide synthase, glutathione, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, activating protein-1 signaling pathway are promising drug targets for preventing HD-induced toxicity, whereas N-acetyl cysteine, tocopherols, melatonin, aprotinin and many other molecules have been proved to be effective in prevention of HD-induced damage to the respiratory system in different animal models. In this paper, we will systemically review clinical and pathophysiological changes of respiratory system in victims exposed to HD in the last century, update clinicians and researchers on the mechanism of HD-induced acute and chronic lung damages, and on the relevant drug targets for future development of antidotes for HD. Further research directions will also be proposed.

  18. Biogenic sulfur compounds and the global sulfur cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aneja, V.P.; Aneja, A.P.; Adams, D.F.

    1982-01-01

    Field measurements of biogenic sulfur compounds shows a great variation in concentrations and emission rates for H 2 S, DMS, CS 2 and COS. Measurements by the chamber method and estimates from micrometeorological sampling are employed to determine the earth-atmosphere flux of these gases. Much of the variation can be attributed to differences of climate and surface conditions, with marshes being a large source of biogenic sulfur (mean contribution 4 x 10 to the 6th ton/year maximum contribution 142 x 10 to the 6th ton/year). Considering that the estimated biogenic contribution needed to balance the global sulfur cycle ranges from 40- 230 x 10 to the 6th tons/year, the mean values are not sufficient to balance this cycle. Further experimental investigations are suggested in order to characterize the biogenic processes adequately

  19. Large sulfur isotope fractionations in Martian sediments at Gale crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H. B.; McAdam, A. C.; Ming, D. W.; Freissinet, C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Eldridge, D. L.; Fischer, W. W.; Grotzinger, J. P.; House, C. H.; Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Schwenzer, S. P.; Vaniman, D. T.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Atreya, S. K.; Conrad, P. G.; Dottin, J. W., III; Eigenbrode, J. L.; Farley, K. A.; Glavin, D. P.; Johnson, S. S.; Knudson, C. A.; Morris, R. V.; Navarro-González, R.; Pavlov, A. A.; Plummer, R.; Rampe, E. B.; Stern, J. C.; Steele, A.; Summons, R. E.; Sutter, B.

    2017-09-01

    Variability in the sulfur isotopic composition in sediments can reflect atmospheric, geologic and biological processes. Evidence for ancient fluvio-lacustrine environments at Gale crater on Mars and a lack of efficient crustal recycling mechanisms on the planet suggests a surface environment that was once warm enough to allow the presence of liquid water, at least for discrete periods of time, and implies a greenhouse effect that may have been influenced by sulfur-bearing volcanic gases. Here we report in situ analyses of the sulfur isotopic compositions of SO2 volatilized from ten sediment samples acquired by NASA’s Curiosity rover along a 13 km traverse of Gale crater. We find large variations in sulfur isotopic composition that exceed those measured for Martian meteorites and show both depletion and enrichment in 34S. Measured values of δ34S range from -47 +/- 14‰ to 28 +/- 7‰, similar to the range typical of terrestrial environments. Although limited geochronological constraints on the stratigraphy traversed by Curiosity are available, we propose that the observed sulfur isotopic signatures at Gale crater can be explained by equilibrium fractionation between sulfate and sulfide in an impact-driven hydrothermal system and atmospheric processing of sulfur-bearing gases during transient warm periods.

  20. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  1. Transnitrosation of alicyclic N-nitrosamines containing a sulfur atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Keiko; Kondo, Sonoe; Ono, Yuta; Saso, Chiharu; Mochizuki, Masataka

    2013-12-15

    Aromatic and aliphatic nitrosamines are known to transfer a nitrosonium ion to another amine. The transnitrosation of alicyclic N-nitroso compounds generates S-nitrosothiols, which are potential nitric oxide donors in vivo. In this study, certain alicyclic N-nitroso compounds based on non-mutagenic N-nitrosoproline or N-nitrosothioproline were synthesised, and the formation of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) was quantified under acidic conditions. We then investigated the effect of a sulfur atom as the substituent and as a ring component on the GSNO formation. In the presence of thiourea under acidic conditions, GSNO was formed from N-nitrosoproline and glutathione, and an N-nitroso compound containing a sulfur atom and glutathione produced GSNO without thiourea. The quantity of GSNO derived from the reaction of the N-nitrosamines containing a sulfur atom and glutathione was higher than that from the N-nitrosoproline and glutathione plus thiourea. Among the analogues that contained a sulfur atom either in the ring or as a substituent, the thiazolidines produced a slightly higher quantity of GSNO than the analogue with a thioamide group. A compound containing sulfur atoms both in the ring and as a substituent exhibited the highest activity for GSNO formation among the alicyclic N-nitrosamines tested. The results indicate that the intramolecular sulfur atom plays an important role in the transnitrosation via alicyclic N-nitroso compounds to form GSNO. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurements of sulfur compounds in CO2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzke, J.; Stancu, D.G.; Niemax, K.

    2003-01-01

    Two simple methods for the analysis of the total concentration of sulfur in CO 2 by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry of excited, metastable sulfur atoms in a direct current discharge are presented. In the first method, the CO 2 sample gas is mixed with the plasma gas (Ar or He) while the second is based on reproducible measurements of the sulfur released from the walls in a helium discharge after being deposited as a result of operating the discharge in pure CO 2 sample gas. The detection limits obtained satisfy the requirements for the control of sulfur compounds in CO 2 used in the food and beverage industry

  3. Ride control of surface effect ships using distributed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgeir J. Sørensen

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available A ride control system for active damping of heave and pitch accelerations of Surface Effect Ships (SES is presented. It is demonstrated that distributed effects that are due to a spatially varying pressure in the air cushion result in significant vertical vibrations in low and moderate sea states. In order to achieve a high quality human comfort and crew workability it is necessary to reduce these vibrations using a control system which accounts for distributed effects due to spatial pressure variations in the air cushion. A mathematical model of the process is presented, and collocated sensor and actuator pairs are used. The process stability is ensured using a controller with appropriate passivity properties. Sensor and actuator location is also discussed. The performance of the ride control system is shown by power spectra of the vertical accelerations obtained from full scale experiments with a 35 m SES.

  4. The impact of freeze-thawing on the friability of formed elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.D.; Almond, P.

    1995-10-01

    Winter weather fluctuation tests were performed in a laboratory to determine the freeze-thaw effect on the particle size distribution and friability of sulfur samples of Polish Air Prills, Procor GX Granules, Petrosul, Sandvik Rotoform, and slate. Formed elemental sulfur is often stored outdoors and is subjected to temperature fluctuations which could potentially result in structural stress, particularly if the sulfur contained any moisture from rainwater or melting snow. Concern was expressed that sulfur stored under these conditions might have increased friability during shipping and handling. Results of stress level tests indicated that winter weather fluctuations did not effect the particle size distribution or friability of the samples. When sulfur samples were in contact with water for one month, there were was no significant change in overall friability. It was concluded that all premium product forms of solid elemental sulfur could be stored outdoors, even if subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Sulfur Amino Acids in Diet-induced Fatty Liver: A New Perspective Based on Recent Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Toohey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationship of sulfur amino acids to diet-induced fatty liver was established 80 years ago, with cystine promoting the condition and methionine preventing it. This relationship has renewed importance today because diet-induced fatty liver is relevant to the current epidemics of obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes. Two recent papers provide the first evidence linking sulfane sulfur to diet-induced fatty liver opening a new perspective on the problem. This review summarizes the early data on sulfur amino acids in fatty liver and correlates that data with current knowledge of sulfur metabolism. Evidence is reviewed showing that the lipotropic effect of methionine may be mediated by sulfane sulfur and that the hepatosteatogenic effect of cystine may be related to the removal of sulfane sulfur by cysteine catabolites. Possible preventive and therapeutic strategies are discussed.

  6. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-base Alloys in Sulfur Containing Solutions at 340 .deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Hee; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Sung Woo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Sulfur has been identified as one of the major impurities introduced into the secondary water of pressurized water-reactors (PWRs). Sulfur can originate from various sources, such as resin sources, feed water, cooling water in-leakage, and condenser leaks. Many authors have investigated effects of reduced sulfur in a wide pH range with or without additives. The presence of reduced sulfur species on the surfaces of pulled tubes having stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was also identified. In present work, SCC tests were conducted to investigate effects of reduced sulfur species on the SCC behavior of Ni-base Alloys. The Alloy 690 TT showed the most SCC resistant, regardless of the sulfur species. The Cr content and heat treatments of alloys appeared the increase in the SCC resistance.

  7. Pengaruh sulfur terhadap sifat fisika campuran pale crepe dan SBR untuk karet tahan panas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Yuniari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur plays an important role in the rubber vulcanization process especially in the formation of crosslinks. Heat resistant rubber made from mixing pale crepe and SBR requires the right amount of sulfur as crosslinking agent. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of the addition of sulfur on the changes in physical properties before and after aging. Heat resistant rubber was made with variation of pale crepe/SBR: 80/20; 70/30; 60/40; 50/50 phr and sulfur variation of 1; 1.5 phr. The results showed that sulfur was influential in the crosslinks formation. The addition of 1 phr sulfur gave higher physical properties of the vulcanized with 1.5 phr sulfur. The changes of physical properties after aging process of the vulcanized with sulfur 1 phr was lower than the vulcanized with sulfur 1.5 phr. Vulcanized pale crepe/SBR (70/30 with 1 phr sulfur could be applied as heat-resistant rubber products.

  8. Transfer characterization of sulfur from coal-burning emission to plant leaves by PIXE and XANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, L.M.; Zhang, G.L.; Zhang, Y.X.; Li, Y.; Lin, J.; Liu, W.; Cao, Q.C.; Zhao, Y.D.; Ma, C.Y.; Han, Y. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics

    2009-11-15

    The impact of coal-burning emission on sulfur in camphor leaves was investigated using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and synchrotron radiation technique X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The PIXE results show that the sulfur concentrations in the leaves collected at the polluted site are significantly higher than those in controls. The sulfur XANES spectra show the presence of organic (disulfides, thiols, thioethers, sulfonates and sulfoxides) and inorganic sulfur (sulfates) in the leaves. The inorganic sulfur in the leaves of camphor tree polluted by coal combustion is 15% more than that of the control site. The results suggest that the long-term coal-burning pollution resulted in an enhanced content of the total sulfur and sulfate in the leaves, and the uptake of sulfur by leaves had exceeded the metabolic requirement of plants and the excess of sulfur was stored as SO{sub 4}2{sup -}. It can monitor the sulfur pollution in atmosphere.

  9. Influence of sulfur, phosphorus, and antimony segregation on the intergranular hydrogen embrittlement of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.; Thomas, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of sulfur, phosphorus, and antimony in promoting the intergranular embrittlement of nickel was investigated using straining electrode tests in 1N H 2 SO 4 at cathodic potentials. Sulfur was found to be the critical grain boundary segregant due to its large enrichment at grain boundaries (10 4 to 10 5 times the bulk content) and the direct relationship between sulfur coverage and hydrogeninduced intergranular failure. Phosphorus was shown to be significantly less effective than sulfur or antimony in inducing the intergranular hydrogen embrittlement of nickel. The addition of phosphoru to nickel reduced the tendency for intergranular fracture and improved ductility because phosphoru segregated strongly to grain interfaces and limited sulfur enrichment. The hydrogen embrittling potency of antimony was also less than that of sulfur while its segregation propensity was considerably less. It was found that the effectiveness of segregated phosphorus and antimony in prompting inter granular embrittlement vs that of sulfur could be expressed in terms of an equivalent grain boundary sulfur coverage. The relative hydrogen embrittling potencies of sulfur, phosphorus, and antimony are discussed in reference to general mechanisms for the effect of impurity segregation on hydrogeninduced intergranular fracture

  10. Sulfur cathode integrated with multileveled carbon nanoflake-nanosphere networks for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.H.; Wang, X.H.; Xia, X.H.; Wang, Y.D.; Wang, X.L.; Tu, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Tailored design/construction of high-quality sulfur/carbon composite cathode is critical for development of advanced lithium-sulfur batteries. We report a powerful strategy for integrated fabrication of sulfur impregnated into three-dimensional (3D) multileveled carbon nanoflake-nanosphere networks (CNNNs) by means of sacrificial ZnO template plus glucose carbonization. The multileveled CNNNs are not only utilized as large-area host/backbone for sulfur forming an integrated S/CNNNs composite electrode, but also serve as multiple carbon blocking barriers (nanoflake infrastructure andnanosphere superstructure) to physically confine polysulfides at the cathode. The designedself-supported S/CNNNs composite cathodes exhibit superior electrochemical performances with high capacities (1395 mAh g −1 at 0.1C, and 769 mAh g −1 at 5.0C after 200 cycles) and noticeable cycling performance (81.6% retention after 200 cycles). Our results build a new bridge between sulfur and carbon networks with multiple blocking effects for polysulfides, and provide references for construction of other high-performance sulfur cathodes.

  11. Catalysts for the reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.Q.; Chang, S.G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Catalysts have been prepared for the reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur by synthesis gas. A catalyst allows to obtain more than 97% yield of elemental sulfur with a single-stage reactor at 540{degrees}C. A lifetime test has been successfully performed. The mass balance of sulfur and carbon has been checked. The effect of H{sub 2}S, COS, and H{sub 2}O has been studied.

  12. Sulfur amino acids metabolism in magnesium deficient rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tojo, H.; Kosokawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1984-01-01

    Effect of magnesium (Mg) deficiency on sulfur amino acid metabolism was investigated in rats. Young male rats were fed on the diet containing either 2.26 (deficient rats) or 63.18 mg Mg/100g diet (control and low protein rats) for 2 weeks. A remarkable decrease of body weight gain, serum Mg contents and a slight decreases in the hematological parameters such as Hb, Ht and RBC was observed, while the hepatic Mg and Ca was not significantly changed. Erythema and cramps were observed 5 days after feeding on the Mg-depleted diet. The hepatic glutathione and cysteine contents increased in Mg-deficient rats. However, no significant change of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) activity and taurine content in Mg-deficient rat liver was observed. These results suggest that Mg deficiency affects the utilization and biosynthesis of hepatic glutathione but not the cysteine catabolism.

  13. Injury to fruit and forest trees from sulfur dioxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, H

    1959-01-01

    Observations and the results of examinations on the control of emissions in the northeastern part of the industrial area of Nordrhein-Westfalen led to the conclusions that under certain conditions plant analysis is an important tool in diagnosing smoke injuries. Schedules for the sensitivity of plants are only of local and temporary value. The applicability of comparative plant analyses to smoke injuries is demonstrated by examples. A number of examples show that parasitic attack or illness magnify the effects of SO/sub 2/. For several tree species the seasonal total content of sulfur (given as SO/sub 2/) in the foliage is shown by curves, which are similar to those obtained in Leicester. 17 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Genotypic variation in the sulfur assimilation and metabolism of onion (Allium cepa L.) I. Plant composition and transcript accumulation

    KAUST Repository

    McCallum, John A.

    2011-06-01

    Organosulfur compounds are major sinks for assimilated sulfate in onion (Allium cepa L.) and accumulation varies widely due to plant genotype and sulfur nutrition. In order to better characterise sulfur metabolism phenotypes and identify potential control points we compared plant composition and transcript accumulation of the primary sulfur assimilation pathway in the high pungency genotype \\'W202A\\' and the low pungency genotype \\'Texas Grano 438\\' grown hydroponically under S deficient (S-) and S-sufficient (S+) conditions. Accumulation of total S and alk(en)yl cysteine sulfoxide flavour precursors was significantly higher under S+ conditions and in \\'W202A\\' in agreement with previous studies. Leaf sulfate and cysteine levels were significantly higher in \\'W202A\\' and under S+. Glutathione levels were reduced by S- treatment but were not affected by genotype, suggesting that thiol pool sizes are regulated differently in mild and pungent onions. The only significant treatment effect observed on transcript accumulation in leaves was an elevated accumulation of O-acetyl serine thiol-lyase under S-. By contrast, transcript accumulation of all genes in roots was influenced by one or more treatments. APS reductase transcript level was not affected by genotype but was strongly increased by S-. Significant genotype × S treatment effects were observed in a root high affinity-sulfur transporter and ferredoxin-sulfite reductase. ATP sulfurylase transcript levels were significantly higher under S+ and in \\'W202A\\'. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Porous-Shell Vanadium Nitride Nanobubbles with Ultrahigh Areal Sulfur Loading for High-Capacity and Long-Life Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lianbo; Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Wenjun; Zhu, Guoyin; Wang, Yanrong; Hu, Yi; Zhao, Peiyang; Chen, Renpeng; Chen, Tao; Liu, Jie; Hu, Zheng; Jin, Zhong

    2017-12-13

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great promise for the applications of high energy density storage. However, the performances of Li-S batteries are restricted by the low electrical conductivity of sulfur and shuttle effect of intermediate polysulfides. Moreover, the areal loading weights of sulfur in previous studies are usually low (around 1-3 mg cm -2 ) and thus cannot fulfill the requirement for practical deployment. Herein, we report that porous-shell vanadium nitride nanobubbles (VN-NBs) can serve as an efficient sulfur host in Li-S batteries, exhibiting remarkable electrochemical performances even with ultrahigh areal sulfur loading weights (5.4-6.8 mg cm -2 ). The large inner space of VN-NBs can afford a high sulfur content and accommodate the volume expansion, and the high electrical conductivity of VN-NBs ensures the effective utilization and fast redox kinetics of polysulfides. Moreover, VN-NBs present strong chemical affinity/adsorption with polysulfides and thus can efficiently suppress the shuttle effect via both capillary confinement and chemical binding, and promote the fast conversion of polysulfides. Benefiting from the above merits, the Li-S batteries based on sulfur-filled VN-NBs cathodes with 5.4 mg cm -2 sulfur exhibit impressively high areal/specific capacity (5.81 mAh cm -2 ), superior rate capability (632 mAh g -1 at 5.0 C), and long cycling stability.

  16. Anaerobic Copper Toxicity and Iron-Sulfur Cluster Biogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guoqiang; Yang, Jing; Li, Tang; Zhao, Jin; Sun, Shujuan; Li, Xiaokang; Lin, Chuxian; Li, Jianghui; Zhou, Huaibin; Lyu, Jianxin; Ding, Huangen

    2017-08-15

    While copper is an essential trace element in biology, pollution of groundwater from copper has become a threat to all living organisms. Cellular mechanisms underlying copper toxicity, however, are still not fully understood. Previous studies have shown that iron-sulfur proteins are among the primary targets of copper toxicity in Escherichia coli under aerobic conditions. Here, we report that, under anaerobic conditions, iron-sulfur proteins in E. coli cells are even more susceptible to copper in medium. Whereas addition of 0.2 mM copper(II) chloride to LB (Luria-Bertani) medium has very little or no effect on iron-sulfur proteins in wild-type E. coli cells under aerobic conditions, the same copper treatment largely inactivates iron-sulfur proteins by blocking iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in the cells under anaerobic conditions. Importantly, proteins that do not have iron-sulfur clusters (e.g., fumarase C and cysteine desulfurase) in E. coli cells are not significantly affected by copper treatment under aerobic or anaerobic conditions, indicating that copper may specifically target iron-sulfur proteins in cells. Additional studies revealed that E. coli cells accumulate more intracellular copper under anaerobic conditions than under aerobic conditions and that the elevated copper content binds to the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins IscU and IscA, which effectively inhibits iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. The results suggest that the copper-mediated inhibition of iron-sulfur proteins does not require oxygen and that iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis is the primary target of anaerobic copper toxicity in cells. IMPORTANCE Copper contamination in groundwater has become a threat to all living organisms. However, cellular mechanisms underlying copper toxicity have not been fully understood up to now. The work described here reveals that iron-sulfur proteins in Escherichia coli cells are much more susceptible to copper in medium under anaerobic conditions than they

  17. Ação do enxofre em chuva ácida simulada sobre parâmetros morfofisiológicos de Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Fabaceae = Sulfur effect by simulated acid rain on morphophysiological parameters of the bean plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Borba Dias

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve o objetivo de analisar os efeitos do enxofre e da chuva ácida simulada sobre a estrutura foliar do feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L, nos aspectos morfoanatômicos, teores de clorofila a, b, total e feofitina. As plantas-controle sofreram simulações de chuva com pH 6,0 e as plantas-teste sofreram simulação de chuva ácida com pH 3,0. As concentrações de clorofila a, b e total diminuíram no estádio de floração (R6. Já, no estádio R7, onde surgem as primeiras vagens, os teores aumentaram, indicando possível resistência e/ou adaptação dos espécimes às simulações ácidas. O tratamento ácido afetou a concentração de clorofila que foi degradada por processos oxidativos sem a sua conversão em feofitina. Também se observou diminuição na frequência de tricomas tectores e glandulares, assim como de estômatos. As injúrias visualizadas foram classificadas como de caráter leve, provavelmente pela existência de anexos epidérmicos para proteção foliar e peciolar.The goal of this work was to evaluate the effects of sulfur and simulated acid rain on the leaf of Phaseolus vulgaris. Acid rain (pH 3.0 and an aqueous solution (Ph 6.0 were performed on test and control plants, respectively. A decrease in chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and total chlorophyll concentrations was observed in theflowering stage (R6. However, increased rates were determined in the maturation stage (R7, which can suggest a resistance and/or adjustment of the plants to the acid simulation conditions. The acid treatment achieved chlorophyll degradation by oxidative processes without conversion to pheophytin. A reduction was also seen in the number of glandular and non-glandular trichomes and stomata on the test plants. Moreover, only small injuries were verified on the blade and peciolar areas of the tested individuals of P. vulgaris, probablydue to the presence of the reported epidermal structures.

  18. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; David W. DeBerry

    2001-01-01

    This first quarter report of 2001 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H(sub 2)S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and offshore applications. CrystaSulf(trademark) (service mark of Gas Research Institute) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H(sub 2)S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H(sub 2)S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO(sub 2) at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H(sub 2)S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. During this reporting periods new catalyst formulations were tested. The experiments showed that the newest catalyst has slightly better performance, but catalyst TDA No.2 is still superior overall for use with the hybrid CrystaSulf process due to lower costs. Plans for catalyst pelletization and continued testing are described

  19. Sulfur isotope signatures in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cainey, J.

    2001-01-01

    The role of sulfur in cloud formation makes it a crucial ingredient in the global climate change debate. So it is important to be able to measure sulfur in the atmosphere and identify where it came from. (author)

  20. Model Prebiotic Iron-Sulfur Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfio, C.; Scintilla, S.; Shah, S.; Evans, D. J.; Jin, L.; Szostak, J. W.; Sasselov, D. D.; Sutherland, J. D.; Mansy, S. S.

    2017-07-01

    Iron-sulfur clusters form easily in aqueous solution in the presence of thiolates and iron ions. Polymerization of short, iron-sulfur binding tripeptide sequences leads to ferredoxin-like ligand spacing and activity.

  1. SYNTHESIS OF SULFUR-BASED WATER TREATMENT AGENT FROM SULFUR DIOXIDE WASTE STREAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. Brown; Maohong Fan; Adrienne Cooper

    2004-11-01

    Absorption of sulfur dioxide from a simulated flue gas was investigated for the production of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS), a highly effective coagulant useful in treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The reaction for PFS synthesis took place near atmospheric pressure and at temperatures of 30-80 C. SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved, with ferrous iron concentrations in the product less than 0.1%. A factorial analysis of the effect of temperature, oxidant dosage, SO{sub 2} concentration, and gas flow rate on SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was carried out, and statistical analyses are conducted. The solid PFS was also characterized with different methods. Characterization results have shown that PFS possesses both crystalline and non-crystalline structure. The kinetics of reactions among FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O, NaHSO{sub 3} and NaClO{sub 3} was investigated. Characterizations of dry PFS synthesized from SO{sub 2} show the PFS possesses amorphous structure, which is desired for it to be a good coagulant in water and wastewater treatment. A series of lab-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of PFS synthesized from waste sulfur dioxide, ferrous sulfate and sodium chlorate. The performance assessments were based on the comparison of PFS and other conventional and new coagulants for the removal of turbidity and arsenic under different laboratory coagulant conditions. Pilot plant studies were conducted at Des Moines Water Works in Iowa and at the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic (I&D) Water Treatment Plant in Port Wentworth, Georgia. PFS performances were compared with those of conventional coagulants. The tests in both water treatment plants have shown that PFS is, in general, comparable or better than other coagulants in removal of turbidity and organic substances. The corrosion behavior of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS) prepared from SO{sub 2} and ferric chloride (FC) were compared. Results

  2. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 2. Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Kangasluoma, J.; Wimmer, D.; Vuollekoski, H.; Schobesberger, S.; Lehtipalo, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Brus, D.; Donahue, N. M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dunne, E. M.; Guida, R.; Henschel, H.; Junninen, H.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Määttänen, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A. P.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Walther, H.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dommen, J.; Hansel, A.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Vrtala, A.; Wagner, P. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-09-04

    We report comprehensive, demonstrably contaminant‐free measurements of binary particle formation rates by sulfuric acid and water for neutral and ion‐induced pathways conducted in the European Organization for Nuclear Research Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber. The recently developed Atmospheric Pressure interface‐time of flight‐mass spectrometer was used to detect contaminants in charged clusters and to identify runs free of any contaminants. Four parameters were varied to cover ambient conditions: sulfuric acid concentration (105 to 109 mol cm−3), relative humidity (11% to 58%), temperature (207 K to 299 K), and total ion concentration (0 to 6800 ions cm−3). Formation rates were directly measured with novel instruments at sizes close to the critical cluster size (mobility size of 1.3 nm to 3.2 nm). We compare our results with predictions from Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by Quantum Chemical calculation (QC‐normalized CNT), which is described in a companion pape...

  3. Effects of compatibility of polymer binders with solvate ionic liquid electrolytes on discharge and charge reactions of lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Toshitada; Ikoma, Ai; Kido, Ryosuke; Ueno, Kazuhide; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical reactions in Li-S cells with a solvate ionic liquid (SIL) electrolyte composed of tetraglyme (G4) and Li[TFSA] (TFSA: bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide) are studied. The sulfur cathode (S cathode) comprises sulfur, carbon powder, and a polymer binder. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA-x) with different degrees of saponification (x%) are used as binders to prepare the composite cathodes. For the Li-S cell containing PEO binder, lithium polysulfides (Li2Sm, 2 ≤ m ≤ 8), reaction intermediates of the S cathode, dissolve into the electrolyte, and Li2Sm acts as a redox shuttle in the Li-S cell. In contrast, in the Li-S cell with PVA-x binder, the dissolution of Li2Sm is suppressed, leading to high columbic efficiencies during charge-discharge cycles. The compatibility of the PVA-x binder with the SIL electrolyte changes depending on the degree of saponification. Decreasing the degree of saponification leads to increased electrolyte uptake by the PVA-x binder, increasing the charge and discharge capacities of Li-S cell. The rate capability of Li-S cell is also enhanced by the partial swelling of the PVA-x binder. The enhanced performance of Li-S cell containing PVA-x is attributed to the lowering of resistance of Li+ ion transport in the composite cathode.

  4. Kinetic modeling of light limitation and sulfur deprivation effects in the induction of hydrogen production with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: Part I. Model development and parameter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchard, Swanny; Pruvost, Jérémy; Degrenne, Benoit; Titica, Mariana; Legrand, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a green microalga capable of turning its metabolism towards H2 production under specific conditions. However this H2 production, narrowly linked to the photosynthetic process, results from complex metabolic reactions highly dependent on the environmental conditions of the cells. A kinetic model has been developed to relate culture evolution from standard photosynthetic growth to H2 producing cells. It represents transition in sulfur-deprived conditions, known to lead to H2 production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and the two main processes then induced which are an over-accumulation of intracellular starch and a progressive reduction of PSII activity for anoxia achievement. Because these phenomena are directly linked to the photosynthetic growth, two kinetic models were associated, the first (one) introducing light dependency (Haldane type model associated to a radiative light transfer model), the second (one) making growth a function of available sulfur amount under extracellular and intracellular forms (Droop formulation). The model parameters identification was realized from experimental data obtained with especially designed experiments and a sensitivity analysis of the model to its parameters was also conducted. Model behavior was finally studied showing interdependency between light transfer conditions, photosynthetic growth, sulfate uptake, photosynthetic activity and O2 release, during transition from oxygenic growth to anoxic H2 production conditions.

  5. The effects and control of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.A.H.

    1982-12-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; ionising radiation (alpha and beta particles, gamma- and X-radiation, neutrons, half-life, sources of radiation); biological effects; risk estimates (somatic) (early effects, delayed effects); risk estimates (hereditary); control of radiation; risk estimates (accidents). (U.K.)

  6. Pyrite sulfur isotopes reveal glacial-interglacial environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Virgil; Sansjofre, Pierre; Rabineau, Marina; Revillon, Sidonie; Houghton, Jennifer; Fike, David A.

    2017-06-01

    The sulfur biogeochemical cycle plays a key role in regulating Earth’s surface redox through diverse abiotic and biological reactions that have distinctive stable isotopic fractionations. As such, variations in the sulfur isotopic composition (δ34S) of sedimentary sulfate and sulfide phases over Earth history can be used to infer substantive changes to the Earth’s surface environment, including the rise of atmospheric oxygen. Such inferences assume that individual δ34S records reflect temporal changes in the global sulfur cycle; this assumption may be well grounded for sulfate-bearing minerals but is less well established for pyrite-based records. Here, we investigate alternative controls on the sedimentary sulfur isotopic composition of marine pyrite by examining a 300-m drill core of Mediterranean sediments deposited over the past 500,000 y and spanning the last five glacial-interglacial periods. Because this interval is far shorter than the residence time of marine sulfate, any change in the sulfur isotopic record preserved in pyrite (δ34Spyr) necessarily corresponds to local environmental changes. The stratigraphic variations (>76‰) in the isotopic data reported here are among the largest ever observed in pyrite, and are in phase with glacial-interglacial sea level and temperature changes. In this case, the dominant control appears to be glacial-interglacial variations in sedimentation rates. These results suggest that there exist important but previously overlooked depositional controls on sedimentary sulfur isotope records, especially associated with intervals of substantial sea level change. This work provides an important perspective on the origin of variability in such records and suggests meaningful paleoenvironmental information can be derived from pyrite δ34S records.

  7. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  8. Biologically removing sulfur from dilute gas flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, R.; Dijkman, H.; Buisman, C. J. N.

    1999-05-01

    A biological process has been developed to clean off-gases containing sulfur dioxide from industrial installations. The sulfur dioxide is converted into hydrogen sulfide, which can then be oxidized to elemental sulfur if not used on-site. The process produces no waste products that require disposal and has a low reagent consumption.

  9. Method of distillation of sulfurous bituminous shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallback, A J.S.; Bergh, S V

    1918-04-22

    A method of distillation of sulfur-containing bituminous shales is characterized by passing the hot sulfur-containing and oil-containing gases and vapors formed during the distillation through burned shale containing iron oxide, so that when these gases and vapors are thereafter cooled they will be, as far as possible, free from sulfur compounds. The patent contains six more claims.

  10. 46 CFR 153.1046 - Sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sulfuric acid. 153.1046 Section 153.1046 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK....1046 Sulfuric acid. No person may liquefy frozen or congealed sulfuric acid other than by external tank...

  11. 21 CFR 582.1095 - Sulfuric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfuric acid. 582.1095 Section 582.1095 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1095 Sulfuric acid. (a) Product. Sulfuric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  12. Improved method for minimizing sulfur loss in analysis of particulate organic sulfur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Tae; Lee, Kitack; Shin, Kyoungsoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, Kwang Young

    2014-02-04

    The global sulfur cycle depends primarily on the metabolism of marine microorganisms, which release sulfur gas into the atmosphere and thus affect the redistribution of sulfur globally as well as the earth's climate system. To better quantify sulfur release from the ocean, analysis of the production and distribution of organic sulfur in the ocean is necessary. This report describes a wet-based method for accurate analysis of particulate organic sulfur (POS) in the marine environment. The proposed method overcomes the considerable loss of sulfur (up to 80%) that occurs during analysis using conventional methods involving drying. Use of the wet-based POS extraction procedure in conjunction with a sensitive sulfur analyzer enabled accurate measurements of cellular POS. Data obtained using this method will enable accurate assessment of how rapidly sulfur can transfer among pools. Such information will improve understanding of the role of POS in the oceanic sulfur cycle.

  13. Preparation and thermoelectric properties of sulfur doped Ag2Te nanoparticles via solvothermal methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenwen; Zhao, Weiyun; Lu, Ziyang; Zhu, Jixin; Fan, Shufen; Ma, Jan; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2012-07-07

    In this work, n-type Ag(2)Te nanoparticles are prepared by a solvothermal approach with uniform and controllable sizes, e.g. 5-15 nm. The usage of dodecanethiol during the synthesis effectively introduces sulfur doping into the sample, which optimizes the charge carrier concentration of the nanoparticles to >1 × 10(20) cm(-3). This allows us to achieve the desired electrical resistivities of nanoparticles with effective sulphur doping show a maximum ZT value of ~0.62 at 550 K.

  14. Relationship of sulfur content of soils and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengl, F; Reckendorfer, P

    1928-01-01

    Crops were fertilized with fertilizers which contained chloride and sulfate in order to examine how the sulfur content of a plant may be affected by that of the soil. At the time of flowering the respective chlorine or sulfate content of the plants was considerably above that of the controls; differences were less, however, when the plants were fully mature. Sulfate, in particular, was little different. In field observations, little correlation was noted between sulfate content of plants and soils. Natural variations in the sulfur content of plants were greater than the increases attributable to smoke air pollution. 2 tables.

  15. Development of novel processes for Cu concentrates without producing sulfuric acid; Hiryusan hasseigata no atarashii doshigen shori gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awakura, Y; Hirato, T [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Studies are conducted to develop a new wet method for copper concentrates to replace the conventional dry smelting method for the settlement of problems involving the processing of impurities for environmental protection. A specimen of pyrites polycrystals is subjected to leaching at 80 {degree}C in a strongly acidic cupric solution. Findings are that the element sulfur generated in this process does not impede leaching and only approximately 4% of the sulfur is oxidized into sulfur ions; that the presence of more than 2g/liter of bromide ions produced during bromine-aid leaching of gold changes the structure of sulfur for the inhibition of leaching; that circulation of a bromine-containing leaching liquid is not desired since even a small amount of approximately 0.02mol/liter inhibits the leaching rate. Controlled potential electrolysis is performed for the anode in an acid solution containing CuCl, NaCl, and NaBr, for the observation of oxidation/reduction potentials predicted by Nernst`s equation. It is then disclosed that bromine is more effective than chlorine in gold leaching and that the solution potential during leaching agent regeneration enables the monitoring of solution constitution. 2 refs.

  16. Sulfur transformation during rapid hydropyrolysis of coal under high pressure by using a continuous free fall pyrolyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.-C. Xu; M. Kumagai

    2003-02-01

    The behavior of sulfur transformation during rapid hydropyrolysis of coal was investigated using a pressurized, continuous free fall pyrolyzer under the conditions of temperature ranging from 923 to 1123 K and hydrogen pressure up to 5 MPa. The yields of sulfur converted to gas, tar and char were determined, together with the analyses of sulfur form distributions in coals and chars. The results showed that the decomposition of inorganic sulfur species was affected only by the temperature, while the increases in temperature and hydrogen pressure obviously enhanced the removal of organic sulfur from coal. The extent of organic sulfur removal was proportional to the coal conversion, depending on coal type. A significant retention of gaseous sulfur products by the organic matrix of the char was observed during hydropyrolysis of a Chinese coal above 1023 K, even under the pressurized hydrogen atmosphere. The kinetic analysis indicates that the rate of organic sulfur removal from coal was 0.2th-order with respect to the hydrogen pressure, and the activation energy for total sulfur removal and organic sulfur removal is 17 26 and 13 55 kJ/mol, respectively. The low activation energies suggest that the transformation and removal of sulfur from coal might be controlled by the diffusion and/or thermodynamic equilibrium during hydropyrolysis under the pressurized conditions. 29 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Reduction of produced elementary sulfur in denitrifying sulfide removal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Liu, Lihong; Chen, Chuan; Ren, Nanqi; Wang, Aijie; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2011-05-01

    Denitrifying sulfide removal (DSR) processes simultaneously convert sulfide, nitrate, and chemical oxygen demand from industrial wastewater into elemental sulfur, dinitrogen gas, and carbon dioxide, respectively. The failure of a DSR process is signaled by high concentrations of sulfide in reactor effluent. Conventionally, DSR reactor failure is blamed for overcompetition for heterotroph to autotroph communities. This study indicates that the elementary sulfur produced by oxidizing sulfide that is a recoverable resource from sulfide-laden wastewaters can be reduced back to sulfide by sulfur-reducing Methanobacterium sp. The Methanobacterium sp. was stimulated with excess organic carbon (acetate) when nitrite was completely consumed by heterotrophic denitrifiers. Adjusting hydraulic retention time of a DSR reactor when nitrite is completely consumed provides an additional control variable for maximizing DSR performance.

  18. Enhancement of the photo conversion efficiencies in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} solar cells fabricated by two-step sulfurization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, JungYup; Nam, Junggyu; Kim, Dongseop; Lee, Dongho, E-mail: dhlee0333@gmail.com, E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr [Photovoltaic Development Team, Energy Storage Business Division, Samsung SDI, Cheonan-si 331-300 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, GeeYeong; Jo, William [Department of Physics and New and Renewable Energy Research Center, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yoonmook, E-mail: dhlee0333@gmail.com, E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr [KUKIST Green School, Graduate School of Energy and Environment, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-09

    Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} (CIGSS) absorber layers were fabricated by using a modified two-stage sputter and a sequential selenization/sulfurization method, and the sulfurization process is changed from one-step to two-step. The two-step sulfurization was controlled with two different H{sub 2}S gas concentrations during the sulfurization treatment. This two-step process yielded remarkable improvements in the efficiency (+0.7%), open circuit voltage (+14 mV), short circuit current (+0.23 mA/cm{sup 2}), and fill factor (+0.21%) of a CIGSS device with 30 × 30 cm{sup 2} in size, owing to the good passivation at the grain boundary surface, uniform material composition among the grain boundaries, and modified depth profile of Ga and S. The deterioration of the P/N junction quality was prevented by the optimized S content in the CIGSS absorber layer. The effects of the passivation quality at the grain boundary surface, the material uniformity, the compositional depth profiles, the microstructure, and the electrical characteristics were examined by Kelvin probe force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and current-voltage curves, respectively. The two-step sulfurization process is experimentally found to be useful for obtaining good surface conditions and, enhancing the efficiency, for the mass production of large CIGSS modules.

  19. Three-Dimensionally Hierarchical Graphene Based Aerogel Encapsulated Sulfur as Cathode for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haipeng Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and effective method was developed to obtain the electrode for lithium/sulfur (Li/S batteries with high specific capacity and cycling durability via adopting an interconnected sulfur/activated carbon/graphene (reduced graphene oxide aerogel (S/AC/GA cathode architecture. The AC/GA composite with a well-defined interconnected conductive network was prepared by a reduction-induced self-assembly process, which allows for obtaining compact and porous structures. During this process, reduced graphene oxide (RGO was formed, and due to the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups on its surface, it not only improves the electronic conductivity of the cathode but also effectively inhibits the polysulfides dissolution and shuttle. The introduced activated carbon allowed for lateral and vertical connection between individual graphene sheets, completing the formation of a stable three-dimensionally (3D interconnected graphene framework. Moreover, a high specific surface area and 3D interconnected porous structure efficiently hosts a higher amount of active sulfur material, about 65 wt %. The designed S/AC/GA composite electrodes deliver an initial capacity of 1159 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C and can retain a capacity of 765 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles in potential range from 1 V to 3 V.

  20. Three-Dimensionally Hierarchical Graphene Based Aerogel Encapsulated Sulfur as Cathode for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Sun, Liancheng; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Yongguang; Tan, Taizhe; Wang, Gongkai

    2018-01-01

    A simple and effective method was developed to obtain the electrode for lithium/sulfur (Li/S) batteries with high specific capacity and cycling durability via adopting an interconnected sulfur/activated carbon/graphene (reduced graphene oxide) aerogel (S/AC/GA) cathode architecture. The AC/GA composite with a well-defined interconnected conductive network was prepared by a reduction-induced self-assembly process, which allows for obtaining compact and porous structures. During this process, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was formed, and due to the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups on its surface, it not only improves the electronic conductivity of the cathode but also effectively inhibits the polysulfides dissolution and shuttle. The introduced activated carbon allowed for lateral and vertical connection between individual graphene sheets, completing the formation of a stable three-dimensionally (3D) interconnected graphene framework. Moreover, a high specific surface area and 3D interconnected porous structure efficiently hosts a higher amount of active sulfur material, about 65 wt %. The designed S/AC/GA composite electrodes deliver an initial capacity of 1159 mAh g−1 at 0.1 C and can retain a capacity of 765 mAh g−1 after 100 cycles in potential range from 1 V to 3 V. PMID:29373525

  1. One-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene aerogels/sulfur nanocrystals for lithium–sulfur batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yong; Lu, Mengna; Ling, Xuetao; Jiao, Zheng; Chen, Lingli; Chen, Lu; Hu, Pengfei; Zhao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D porous GA/S nanocrystals are prepared by a one-step hydrothermal method. • The structure is affected by hydrothermal temperature and liquid sulfur’s viscosity. • The hybrid delivers a capacity of 716.2 mA h g −1 after 50 cycles at 100 mA g −1 . • The nanosized S, strong adsorbability and intimate contact of GNS are main factors. - Abstract: Lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries are receiving significant attention as a new energy source because of its high theoretical capacity and specific energy. However, the low sulfur loading and large particles (usually in submicron dimension) in the cathode greatly offset its advantage in high energy density and lead to the instability of the cathode and rapid capacity decay. Herein, we introduce a one-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene aerogels/sulfur nanocrystals to suppress the rapid fading of sulfur electrode. It is found that the hydrothermal temperature and viscosity of liquid sulfur have significant effects on particle size and loading mass of sulfur nanocrystals, graphitization degree of graphene and chemical bonding between sulfur and oxygen-containing groups of graphene. The hybrid could deliver a specific capacity of 716.2 mA h g −1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g −1 and reversible capacity of 517.9 mA h g −1 at 1 A g −1 . The performance we demonstrate herein suggests that Li–S battery may provide an opportunity for development of rechargeable battery systems

  2. One-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene aerogels/sulfur nanocrystals for lithium–sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong; Lu, Mengna; Ling, Xuetao; Jiao, Zheng; Chen, Lingli; Chen, Lu [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Hu, Pengfei [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhao, Bing, E-mail: bzhao@shu.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • 3D porous GA/S nanocrystals are prepared by a one-step hydrothermal method. • The structure is affected by hydrothermal temperature and liquid sulfur’s viscosity. • The hybrid delivers a capacity of 716.2 mA h g{sup −1} after 50 cycles at 100 mA g{sup −1}. • The nanosized S, strong adsorbability and intimate contact of GNS are main factors. - Abstract: Lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries are receiving significant attention as a new energy source because of its high theoretical capacity and specific energy. However, the low sulfur loading and large particles (usually in submicron dimension) in the cathode greatly offset its advantage in high energy density and lead to the instability of the cathode and rapid capacity decay. Herein, we introduce a one-step hydrothermal synthesis of three-dimensional porous graphene aerogels/sulfur nanocrystals to suppress the rapid fading of sulfur electrode. It is found that the hydrothermal temperature and viscosity of liquid sulfur have significant effects on particle size and loading mass of sulfur nanocrystals, graphitization degree of graphene and chemical bonding between sulfur and oxygen-containing groups of graphene. The hybrid could deliver a specific capacity of 716.2 mA h g{sup −1} after 50 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g{sup −1} and reversible capacity of 517.9 mA h g{sup −1} at 1 A g{sup −1}. The performance we demonstrate herein suggests that Li–S battery may provide an opportunity for development of rechargeable battery systems.

  3. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bern, Carleton R., E-mail: cbern@usgs.gov [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 (United States); Chadwick, Oliver A. [Department of Geography University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4060 (United States); Kendall, Carol [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pribil, Michael J. [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ{sup 34}S VCDT) of − 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ{sup 34}S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil δ{sup 34}S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls

  4. Steep spatial gradients of volcanic and marine sulfur in Hawaiian rainfall and ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Kendall, Carol; Pribil, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur, a nutrient required by terrestrial ecosystems, is likely to be regulated by atmospheric processes in well-drained, upland settings because of its low concentration in most bedrock and generally poor retention by inorganic reactions within soils. Environmental controls on sulfur sources in unpolluted ecosystems have seldom been investigated in detail, even though the possibility of sulfur limiting primary production is much greater where atmospheric deposition of anthropogenic sulfur is low. Here we measure sulfur isotopic compositions of soils, vegetation and bulk atmospheric deposition from the Hawaiian Islands for the purpose of tracing sources of ecosystem sulfur. Hawaiian lava has a mantle-derived sulfur isotopic composition (δ 34 S VCDT) of − 0.8‰. Bulk deposition on the island of Maui had a δ 34 S VCDT that varied temporally, spanned a range from + 8.2 to + 19.7‰, and reflected isotopic mixing from three sources: sea-salt (+ 21.1‰), marine biogenic emissions (+ 15.6‰), and volcanic emissions from active vents on Kilauea Volcano (+ 0.8‰). A straightforward, weathering-driven transition in ecosystem sulfur sources could be interpreted in the shift from relatively low (0.0 to + 2.7‰) to relatively high (+ 17.8 to + 19.3‰) soil δ 34 S values along a 0.3 to 4100 ka soil age-gradient, and similar patterns in associated vegetation. However, sub-kilometer scale spatial variation in soil sulfur isotopic composition was found along soil transects assumed by age and mass balance to be dominated by atmospheric sulfur inputs. Soil sulfur isotopic compositions ranged from + 8.1 to + 20.3‰ and generally decreased with increasing elevation (0–2000 m), distance from the coast (0–12 km), and annual rainfall (180–5000 mm). Such trends reflect the spatial variation in marine versus volcanic inputs from atmospheric deposition. Broadly, these results illustrate how the sources and magnitude of atmospheric deposition can exert controls over

  5. Cost effective material control and accountability training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robichaux, J.J.; Shull, L.M.; Salizzoni, L.M.

    1995-01-01

    DOE Order 5630.15, ''Safeguards and Security Training Program'' is being implemented at the Savannah River Site within the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's material control and accountability program. This paper reviews the development of a material control and accountability task analysis, the development of specific material control and accountability courses, and the cost effective and innovative strategies employed to implement the training program. The paper also discusses how the site material control and accountability policies and procedures are incorporated into the Westinghouse Savannah River Company training program to ensure that personnel receive the most current information

  6. Sulfur based electrode materials for secondary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yong

    Developing next generation secondary batteries has attracted much attention in recent years due to the increasing demand of high energy and high power density energy storage for portable electronics, electric vehicles and renewable sources of energy. This dissertation investigates sulfur based advanced electrode materials in Lithium/Sodium batteries. The electrochemical performances of the electrode materials have been enhanced due to their unique nano structures as well as the formation of novel composites. First, a nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets/sulfur (NGNSs/S) composite was synthesized via a facile chemical reaction deposition. In this composite, NGNSs were employed as a conductive host to entrap S/polysulfides in the cathode part. The NGNSs/S composite delivered an initial discharge capacity of 856.7 mAh g-1 and a reversible capacity of 319.3 mAh g-1 at 0.1C with good recoverable rate capability. Second, NGNS/S nanocomposites, synthesized using chemical reaction-deposition method and low temperature heat treatment, were further studied as active cathode materials for room temperature Na-S batteries. Both high loading composite with 86% gamma-S8 and low loading composite with 25% gamma-S8 have been electrochemically evaluated and compared with both NGNS and S control electrodes. It was found that low loading NGNS/S composite exhibited better electrochemical performance with specific capacity of 110 and 48 mAh g-1 at 0.1C at the 1st and 300th cycle, respectively. The Coulombic efficiency of 100% was obtained at the 300th cycle. Third, high purity rock-salt (RS), zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) MnS nanocrystals with different morphologies were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. RS-, ZB- and WZ-MnS electrodes showed the capacities of 232.5 mAh g-1, 287.9 mAh g-1 and 79.8 mAh g-1 at the 600th cycle, respectively. ZB-MnS displayed the best performance in terms of specific capacity and cyclability. Interestingly, MnS electrodes

  7. Controlling attribute effect in linear regression

    KAUST Repository

    Calders, Toon; Karim, Asim A.; Kamiran, Faisal; Ali, Wasif Mohammad; Zhang, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    In data mining we often have to learn from biased data, because, for instance, data comes from different batches or there was a gender or racial bias in the collection of social data. In some applications it may be necessary to explicitly control this bias in the models we learn from the data. This paper is the first to study learning linear regression models under constraints that control the biasing effect of a given attribute such as gender or batch number. We show how propensity modeling can be used for factoring out the part of the bias that can be justified by externally provided explanatory attributes. Then we analytically derive linear models that minimize squared error while controlling the bias by imposing constraints on the mean outcome or residuals of the models. Experiments with discrimination-aware crime prediction and batch effect normalization tasks show that the proposed techniques are successful in controlling attribute effects in linear regression models. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Controlling attribute effect in linear regression

    KAUST Repository

    Calders, Toon

    2013-12-01

    In data mining we often have to learn from biased data, because, for instance, data comes from different batches or there was a gender or racial bias in the collection of social data. In some applications it may be necessary to explicitly control this bias in the models we learn from the data. This paper is the first to study learning linear regression models under constraints that control the biasing effect of a given attribute such as gender or batch number. We show how propensity modeling can be used for factoring out the part of the bias that can be justified by externally provided explanatory attributes. Then we analytically derive linear models that minimize squared error while controlling the bias by imposing constraints on the mean outcome or residuals of the models. Experiments with discrimination-aware crime prediction and batch effect normalization tasks show that the proposed techniques are successful in controlling attribute effects in linear regression models. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Removal of sulfur from process streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brignac, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    A process wherein water is added to a non-reactive gas stream, preferably a hydrogen or hydrogen-containing gas stream, sufficient to raise the water level thereof to from about 0.2 percent to about 50 percent, based on the total volume of the process gas stream, and the said moist gas stream is contacted, at elevated temperature, with a particulate mass of a sulfur-bearing metal alumina spinel characterized by the formula MAl 2 O 4 , wherein M is chromium, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, cadmium, mercury, or zinc to desorb sulfur thereon. In the sulfur sorption cycle, due to the simultaneous adsorption of water and sulfur, the useful life of the metal alumina spinel for sulfur adsorption can be extended, and the sorbent made more easily regenerable after contact with a sulfur-bearing gas stream, notably sulfur-bearing wet hydrogen or wet hydrogen-rich gas streams

  10. Investigation of rare earths sorption from sulfuric- and hydrochloric media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikonov, V.N.; Mikhlin, E.B.; Norina, T.M.; Afonina, T.A.

    1978-01-01

    A rate of equilibrium attainment has been studied during REE sorption from sulfuric and hydrochloric acid solutions and pulps. It has been shown that equilibrium upon sorption from hydrochloric acid solutions is attained faster than from sulfuric acid solutions. Equilibrium upon sorption from pulps is attained considerably slower than upon sorption from solutions. In all cases REM of cerium subgroup are sorbed better. An effect has been studied of the medium acidity on sorbability of REM and elements of iron and calcium impurities. It has been established that sorbability of these elements decreases with increasing acid concentration. Selectivity of REM sorption from sulfuric acid solutions decreases with a rise in H 2 SO 4 concentration in the solution. For hydrochloric acid solutions it remains constant in a wide range of HCl concentrations. Sorption leaching of REM from concentrates and cakes of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in the presence of KU-2 leads to high technical and economic indexes: extraction with respect to the total amount of REM and yttrium into a commercial product is 76-86% for sulfuric acid solutions and 81-90% for hydrochloric solutions

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