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Sample records for control virus tissue

  1. Tissue and host tropism of influenza viruses:Importance of quantitative analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that human influenza viruses preferentially bind to cell-surface glycoproteins/ glycolipids containing sialic acids in α2,6-linkage; while avian and equine influenza viruses preferentially bind to those containing sialic acids in α2,3-linkage. Even though this generalized view is accurate for H3 subtype isolates, it may not be accurate and absolute for all subtypes of influenza A viruses and, therefore, needs to be reevaluated carefully and realistically. Some of the studies published in major scientific journals on the subject of tissue tropism of influenza viruses are inconsistent and caused confusion in the scientific community. One of the reasons for the inconsistency is that most studies were quantitative descriptions of sialic acid receptor distributions based on lectin or influenza virus immunohistochemistry results with limited numbers of stained cells. In addition, recent studies indicate that α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids are not the sole receptors determining tissue and host tropism of influenza viruses. In fact, determinants for tissue and host tropism of human, avian and animal influenza viruses are more complex than what has been generally accepted. Other factors, such as glycan topology, concentration of invading viruses, local density of receptors, lipid raft microdomains, coreceptors or sialic acid-independent receptors, may also be important. To more efficiently control the global spread of pandemic influenza such as the current circulating influenza A H1N1, it is crucial to clarify the determinants for tissue and host tropism of influenza viruses through quantitative analysis of experimental results. In this review, I will comment on some conflicting issues related to tissue and host tropism of influenza viruses, discuss the importance of quantitative analysis of lectin and influenza virus immunohistochemistry results and point out directions for future studies in this area, which should lead to a better

  2. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Virus Infection Spreading in Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhans, Andreas; Bessonov, Nickolai; Trofimchuk, Sergei; Volpert, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Virus spreading in tissues is determined by virus transport, virus multiplication in host cells and the virus-induced immune response. Cytotoxic T cells remove infected cells with a rate determined by the infection level. The intensity of the immune response has a bell-shaped dependence on the concentration of virus, i.e., it increases at low and decays at high infection levels. A combination of these effects and a time delay in the immune response determine the development of virus infection in tissues like spleen or lymph nodes. The mathematical model described in this work consists of reaction-diffusion equations with a delay. It shows that the different regimes of infection spreading like the establishment of a low level infection, a high level infection or a transition between both are determined by the initial virus load and by the intensity of the immune response. The dynamics of the model solutions include simple and composed waves, and periodic and aperiodic oscillations. The results of analytical and numerical studies of the model provide a systematic basis for a quantitative understanding and interpretation of the determinants of the infection process in target organs and tissues from the image-derived data as well as of the spatiotemporal mechanisms of viral disease pathogenesis, and have direct implications for a biopsy-based medical testing of the chronic infection processes caused by viruses, e.g. HIV, HCV and HBV. PMID:27997613

  3. Hypothalamic control of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, A; Wiedmann, N M; Adler, E S; Oldfield, B J

    2014-10-01

    A detailed appreciation of the control of adipose tissue whether it be white, brown or brite/beige has never been more important to the development of a framework on which to build therapeutic strategies to combat obesity. This is because 1) the rate of fatty acid release into the circulation from lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) is integrally important to the development of obesity, 2) brown adipose tissue (BAT) has now moved back to center stage with the realization that it is present in adult humans and, in its activated form, is inversely proportional to levels of obesity and 3) the identification and characterization of "brown-like" or brite/beige fat is likely to be one of the most exciting developments in adipose tissue biology in the last decade. Central to all of these developments is the role of the CNS in the control of different fat cell functions and central to CNS control is the integrative capacity of the hypothalamus. In this chapter we will attempt to detail key issues relevant to the structure and function of hypothalamic and downstream control of WAT and BAT and highlight the importance of developing an understanding of the neural input to brite/beige fat cells as a precursor to its recruitment as therapeutic target.

  4. Control of virus diseases of berry crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Robert R; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E

    2015-01-01

    Virus control in berry crops starts with the development of plants free of targeted pathogens, usually viruses, viroids, phytoplasmas, and systemic bacteria, through a combination of testing and therapy. These then become the top-tier plants in certification programs and are the source from which all certified plants are produced, usually after multiple cycles of propagation. In certification schemes, efforts are made to produce plants free of the targeted pathogens to provide plants of high health status to berry growers. This is achieved using a systems approach to manage virus vectors. Once planted in fruit production fields, virus control shifts to disease control where efforts are focused on controlling viruses or virus complexes that result in disease. In fruiting fields, infection with a virus that does not cause disease is of little concern to growers. Virus control is based on the use of resistance and tolerance, vector management, and isolation.

  5. Cultivation of Hepatitis Virus in Tissue Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    as the feeder source and primary human hepatocytes as the feeder layer. Feeder layers are also being formed using other sensitive tissue culture lines including human diploid lung cells (WI 38) and Hela cells .

  6. Persistence of DNA sequences of BK virus and JC virus in normal human tissues and in diseased tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesters, P M; Heritage, J; McCance, D J

    1983-04-01

    Available evidence suggests that BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) persist in the kidneys of healthy individuals after primary infection and may reactivate when the host's immune response is impaired. Data supporting this hypothesis are presented. A previous study had shown BKV to be present in the kidneys of eight (57%) of 14 subjects. In the present study, which extended the investigation to a total of 30 subjects, BKV DNA was found in the renal tissues of 10 (33%) subjects, and JCV DNA was found in the renal tissues of three (10%) subjects. The viral DNA detected appeared not to be integrated with host DNA and to be isolated in foci. Investigation of normal and diseased brain tissue, including tissue from six subjects with multiple sclerosis, failed to reveal the presence of either JCV DNA or BKV DNA.

  7. Susceptibility of human lymphoid tissue cultured ex vivo to xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Curriu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was generated after a recombination event between two endogenous murine leukemia viruses during the production of a prostate cancer cell line. Although the associations of the XMRV infection with human diseases appear unlikely, the XMRV is a retrovirus of undefined pathogenic potential, able to replicate in human cells in vitro. Since recent studies using animal models for infection have yielded conflicting results, we set out an ex vivo model for XMRV infection of human tonsillar tissue to determine whether XMRV produced by 22Rv1 cells is able to replicate in human lymphoid organs. Tonsil blocks were infected and infection kinetics and its pathogenic effects were monitored RESULTS: XMRV, though restricted by APOBEC, enters and integrates into the tissue cells. The infection did not result in changes of T or B-cells, immune activation, nor inflammatory chemokines. Infectious viruses could be recovered from supernatants of infected tonsils by reinfecting DERSE XMRV indicator cell line, although these supernatants could not establish a new infection in fresh tonsil culture, indicating that in our model, the viral replication is controlled by innate antiviral restriction factors. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the replication-competent retrovirus XMRV, present in a high number of laboratories, is able to infect human lymphoid tissue and produce infectious viruses, even though they were unable to establish a new infection in fresh tonsillar tissue. Hereby, laboratories working with cell lines producing XMRV should have knowledge and understanding of the potential biological biohazardous risks of this virus.

  8. Control of virus diseases of citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    Citrus is thought to have originated in Southeast Asia and horticulturally desirable clonal selections have been clonally cultivated for hundreds of years. While some citrus species have nucellar embryony, most cultivation of citrus has been by clonal propagation to ensure that propagated plants have the same traits as the parent selection. Clonal propagation also avoids juvenility, and the propagated plants produce fruit sooner. Because of the clonal propagation of citrus, citrus has accumulated a large number of viruses; many of these viruses are asymptomatic until a susceptible rootstock and/or scion is encountered. The viruses reported to occur in citrus will be summarized in this review. Methods of therapy to clean selected clones from viruses will be reviewed; the use of quarantine, clean stock, and certification programs for control of citrus viruses and other strategies to control insect spread citrus viruses, such as mild strain cross-protection and the use of pest management areas will be discussed.

  9. Geometric control of tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Celeste M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Morphogenesis is the dynamic and regulated change in tissue form that leads to creation of the body plan and development of mature organs. Research over the past several decades has uncovered a multitude of genetic factors required for morphogenesis in animals. The behaviors of individual cells within a developing tissue are determined by combining these genetic signals with information from the surrounding microenvironment. At any point in time, the local microenvironment is influenced by macroscale tissue geometry, which sculpts long range signals by affecting gradients of morphogens and mechanical stresses. The geometry of a tissue thus acts as both a template and instructive cue for further morphogenesis. PMID:19167433

  10. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  11. Control of virus diseases in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    Soybean, one of the world's most important sources of animal feed and vegetable oil, can be infected by numerous viruses. However, only a small number of the viruses that can potentially infect soybean are considered as major economic problems to soybean production. Therefore, we consider management options available to control diseases caused by eight viruses that cause, or have the potential to cause, significant economic loss to producers. We summarize management tactics in use and suggest direction for the future. Clearly, the most important tactic is disease resistance. Several resistance genes are available for three of the eight viruses discussed. Other options include use of virus-free seed and avoidance of alternative virus hosts when planting. Attempts at arthropod vector control have generally not provided consistent disease management. In the future, disease management will be considerably enhanced by knowledge of the interaction between soybean and viral proteins. Identification of genes required for soybean defense may represent key regulatory hubs that will enhance or broaden the spectrum of basal resistance to viruses. It may be possible to create new recessive or dominant negative alleles of host proteins that do not support viral functions but perform normal cellular function. The future approach to virus control based on gene editing or exploiting allelic diversity points to necessary research into soybean-virus interactions. This will help to generate the knowledge needed for rational design of durable resistance that will maximize global production.

  12. The effect of tissue degradation on detection of infectious virus and viral RNA to diagnose classical swine fever virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weesendorp, E.; Willems, E.M.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    A considerable part of tissue samples that are collected for the monitoring of classical swine fever (CSF) from the wild boar population or from domestic pigs are unsuitable for virus detection using the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) or virus isolation (VI), due to tissue degradation. Reverse

  13. The effect of tissue degradation on detection of infectious virus and viral RNA to diagnose classical swine fever virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weesendorp, E.; Willems, E.M.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    A considerable part of tissue samples that are collected for the monitoring of classical swine fever (CSF) from the wild boar population or from domestic pigs are unsuitable for virus detection using the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) or virus isolation (VI), due to tissue degradation. Reverse tran

  14. Control of feline leukaemia virus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Weijer (Kees); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractFeline leukaemia virus (FeLV) usually occurs in its natural species, the domestic cat. FeLV is also important to human individuals as a comparative model, as it may cause a variety of diseases, some malignant and some benign, such as immunosuppression, which bears a resemblance to AIDS (

  15. Measles virus, immune control and persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E.; Lin, Wen-Hsuan; Pan, Chien-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    Measles remains one of the most important causes of child morbidity and mortality worldwide with the greatest burden in the youngest children. Most acute measles deaths are due to secondary infections that result from a poorly understood measles-induced suppression of immune responses. Young children are also vulnerable to late development of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a progressive, uniformly fatal neurologic disease caused by persistent measles virus (MeV) infection. During acute infection, the rash marks the appearance of the adaptive immune response and CD8+ T cell-mediated clearance of infectious virus. However, after clearance of infectious virus, MeV RNA persists and can be detected in blood, respiratory secretions, urine and lymphoid tissue for many weeks to months. This prolonged period of virus clearance may help to explain measles immunosuppression and the development of lifelong immunity to re-infection, as well as occasional infection of the nervous system. Once MeV infects neurons, the virus can spread transynaptically and the envelope proteins needed to form infectious virus are unnecessary, accumulate mutations and can establish persistent infection. Identification of the immune mechanisms required for clearance of MeV RNA from multiple sites will enlighten our understanding of the development of disease due to persistent infection. PMID:22316382

  16. Hepatitis B virus replication in damaged endothelial tissues of patients with extrahepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Andrew; Theal, Jeremy; Bain, Vince; Adams, Elizabeth; Perrillo, Robert

    2005-04-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may be complicated by extrahepatic manifestations such as polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), glomerulonephritis, polymyositis, and dermatitis, but the etiology of these processes is not yet clear. HBV replication has been demonstrated in a variety of extrahepatic tissues and cell types, but the possible pathogenetic role of extrahepatic HBV replication has not been fully explored in patients with extrahepatic manifestations of HBV infection. In this case series, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization studies were performed on extrahepatic tissues from one HBsAg-positive patient with PAN and another HBsAg-positive patient with polymyositis, using HBsAg-seronegative control subjects with the same vasculitic disorders as controls. Tissue samples from the two study patients had detectable HBV RNA, replicative intermediates of HBV DNA, as well as HBsAg and HBcAg localized to vascular endothelium. In contrast, HBsAg-negative control patients had no tissue reactivity. Our results suggest that patients with HBV-related extrahepatic disease have evidence of viral replication in damaged extrahepatic endothelial tissues. While further studies would be required to support a hypothesis of causality, these findings suggest a role for both immune complex deposition and viral replication within diseased endothelial tissue in the pathogenesis of these poorly understood extrahepatic disorders.

  17. Linking Influenza Virus Tissue Tropism to Population-Level Reproductive Fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); T. Kuiken (Thijs); B.T. Grenfell (Bryan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.P. Dobson (Andrew)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza virus tissue tropism defines the host cells and tissues that support viral replication and contributes to determining which regions of the respiratory tract are infected in humans. The location of influenza virus infection along the respiratory tract is a key determinant of vir

  18. Linking Influenza Virus Tissue Tropism to Population-Level Reproductive Fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A. Reperant (Leslie); T. Kuiken (Thijs); B.T. Grenfell (Bryan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.P. Dobson (Andrew)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza virus tissue tropism defines the host cells and tissues that support viral replication and contributes to determining which regions of the respiratory tract are infected in humans. The location of influenza virus infection along the respiratory tract is a key determinant of

  19. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biosecurity and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the recommended procedures involved in setting up biosecurity and control programs designed to limit bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in beef cattle operations. For the purpose of these discussions, a working definition of a biosecurity plan was considered to be an organiz...

  20. Oral immunization with recombinant listeria monocytogenes controls virus load after vaginal challenge with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-08-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and delivers an FIV Env-expressing DNA vaccine (LMgag/pND14-Lc-env). Control cats were either sham immunized or immunized with wild-type L. monocytogenes (LM-wt). At 1 year after vaginal challenge, provirus could not be detected in any of the nine tissues evaluated from cats immunized with the recombinant bacteria but was detected in at least one tissue in 8 of 10 control animals. Virus was isolated from bone marrow of four of five LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats by use of a stringent coculture system but required CD8(+) T-cell depletion, indicating CD8(+) T-cell suppression of virus replication. Control animals had an inverted CD4:CD8 ratio in mesenteric lymph node and were depleted of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) intestinal epithelial T cells, while LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized animals showed no such abnormalities. Vaginal FIV-specific immunoglobulin A was present at high titer in three LMgag/pND14-Lc-env-immunized cats before challenge and in all five at 1 year postchallenge. This study demonstrates that recombinant L. monocytogenes conferred some control of viral load after vaginal challenge with FIV.

  1. Biology, etiology, and control of virus diseases of banana and plantain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P Lava; Selvarajan, Ramasamy; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Chabannes, Matthieu; Hanna, Rachid

    2015-01-01

    Banana and plantain (Musa spp.), produced in 10.3 million ha in the tropics, are among the world's top 10 food crops. They are vegetatively propagated using suckers or tissue culture plants and grown almost as perennial plantations. These are prone to the accumulation of pests and pathogens, especially viruses which contribute to yield reduction and are also barriers to the international exchange of germplasm. The most economically important viruses of banana and plantain are Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV), a complex of banana streak viruses (BSVs) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV). BBTV is known to cause the most serious economic losses in the "Old World," contributing to a yield reduction of up to 100% and responsible for a dramatic reduction in cropping area. The BSVs exist as episomal and endogenous forms are known to be worldwide in distribution. In India and the Philippines, BBrMV is known to be economically important but recently the virus was discovered in Colombia and Costa Rica, thus signaling its spread into the "New World." Banana and plantain are also known to be susceptible to five other viruses of minor significance, such as Abaca mosaic virus, Abaca bunchy top virus, Banana mild mosaic virus, Banana virus X, and Cucumber mosaic virus. Studies over the past 100 years have contributed to important knowledge on disease biology, distribution, and spread. Research during the last 25 years have led to a better understanding of the virus-vector-host interactions, virus diversity, disease etiology, and epidemiology. In addition, new diagnostic tools were developed which were used for surveillance and the certification of planting material. Due to a lack of durable host resistance in the Musa spp., phytosanitary measures and the use of virus-free planting material are the major methods of virus control. The state of knowledge on BBTV, BBrMV, and BSVs, and other minor viruses, disease spread, and control are summarized in this review.

  2. 3D tissue-like assemblies: A novel approach to investigate virus-cell interactions.

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    Goodwin, Thomas J; McCarthy, Maureen; Cohrs, Randall J; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2015-11-15

    Virus-host cell interactions are most commonly analyzed in cells maintained in vitro as two-dimensional tissue cultures. However, these in vitro conditions vary quite drastically from the tissues that are commonly infected in vivo. Over the years, a number of systems have been developed that allow the establishment of three-dimensional (3D) tissue structures that have properties similar to their in vivo 3D counterparts. These 3D systems have numerous applications including drug testing, maintenance of large tissue explants, monitoring migration of human lymphocytes in tissues, analysis of human organ tissue development and investigation of virus-host interactions including viral latency. Here, we describe the establishment of tissue-like assemblies for human lung and neuronal tissue that we infected with a variety of viruses including the respiratory pathogens human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and SARS corona virus (SARS-CoV) as well as the human neurotropic herpesvirus, varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Wolbachia-Based Dengue Virus Inhibition Is Not Tissue-Specific in Aedes aegypti

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    Amuzu, Hilaria E.; McGraw, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue fever, caused by the dengue virus (DENV), is now the most common arbovirus transmitted disease globally. One novel approach to control DENV is to use the endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia pipientis, to limit DENV replication inside the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. Wolbachia that is naturally present in a range of insects reduces the capacity for viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi to replicate inside insects. Wolbachia’s mode of action is not well understood but may involve components of immune activation or competition with pathogens for limited host resources. The strength of Wolbachia-based anti DENV effects appear to correlate with bacterial density in the whole insect and in cell culture. Here we aimed to determine whether particular tissues, especially those with high Wolbachia densities or immune activity, play a greater role in mediating the anti DENV effect. Methodology/findings Ae. aegypti mosquito lines with and without Wolbachia (Wildtype) were orally fed DENV 3 and their viral loads subsequently measured over two time points post infection in the midgut, head, salivary glands, Malpighian tubules, fat body and carcass. We did not find correlations between Wolbachia densities and DENV loads in any tissue, nor with DENV loads in salivary glands, the endpoint of infection. This is in contrast with strong positive correlations between DENV loads in a range of tissues and salivary gland loads for Wildtype mosquitoes. Lastly, there was no evidence of a heightened role for tissues with known immune function including the fat body and the Malpighian tubules in Wolbachia’s limitation of DENV. Conclusion/significance We conclude that the efficacy of DENV blocking in Wolbachia infected mosquitoes is not reliant on any particular tissue. This work therefore suggests that the mechanism of Wolbachia-based antiviral effects is either systemic or acts locally via processes that are fundamental to diverse cell types. We further

  4. Implementation of immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus in persistently infected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedeković Tomislav

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea is a contagious disease of domestic and wild ruminants and one of the most economically important diseases in cattle. Bovine viral diarrhea virus belongs to the genus Pestivirus, within the family Flaviviridae. The identification and elimination of the persistently infected animals from herds is the initial step in the control and eradication programs. It is therefore necessary to have reliable methods for diagnosis of bovine viral diarrhea virus. One of those methods is immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue is a routine technique in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle from ear notch tissue samples. However, such technique is inappropriate due to complicated tissue fixation process and it requires more days for preparation. On the contrary, immunohistochemistry on frozen tissue was usually applied on organs from dead animals. In this paper, for the first time, the imunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples was described. Findings Seventeen ear notch tissue samples were obtained during the period 2008-2009 from persistently infected cattle. Samples were fixed in liquid nitrogen and stored on -20°C until testing. Ear notch tissue samples from all persistently infected cattle showed positive results with good section quality and possibility to determinate type of infected cells. Conclusions Although the number of samples was limited, this study indicated that immunohistochemistry on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue can be successfully replaced with immunohistochemistry on frozen ear notch tissue samples in diagnosis of persistently infected cattle.

  5. Influenza A virus targets a cGAS-independent STING pathway that controls enveloped RNA viruses.

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    Holm, Christian K; Rahbek, Stine H; Gad, Hans Henrik; Bak, Rasmus O; Jakobsen, Martin R; Jiang, Zhaozaho; Hansen, Anne Louise; Jensen, Simon K; Sun, Chenglong; Thomsen, Martin K; Laustsen, Anders; Nielsen, Camilla G; Severinsen, Kasper; Xiong, Yingluo; Burdette, Dara L; Hornung, Veit; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Duch, Mogens; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bahrami, Shervin; Mikkelsen, Jakob Giehm; Hartmann, Rune; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-19

    Stimulator of interferon genes (STING) is known be involved in control of DNA viruses but has an unexplored role in control of RNA viruses. During infection with DNA viruses STING is activated downstream of cGAMP synthase (cGAS) to induce type I interferon. Here we identify a STING-dependent, cGAS-independent pathway important for full interferon production and antiviral control of enveloped RNA viruses, including influenza A virus (IAV). Further, IAV interacts with STING through its conserved hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP). Interestingly, FP antagonizes interferon production induced by membrane fusion or IAV but not by cGAMP or DNA. Similar to the enveloped RNA viruses, membrane fusion stimulates interferon production in a STING-dependent but cGAS-independent manner. Abolishment of this pathway led to reduced interferon production and impaired control of enveloped RNA viruses. Thus, enveloped RNA viruses stimulate a cGAS-independent STING pathway, which is targeted by IAV.

  6. Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Help Control Mosquitoes that Spread Dengue, Chikungunya, and Zika Viruses B Z Z Z Z . Aside from ... or Aedes albopictus ) can spread dengue, chikungunya, or Zika viruses. People become infected with dengue, chikungunya, or ...

  7. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 in rheumatic valvular tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Zhi-gang; WANG Xiu-nan; LI Yan-wen; ZHANG Hong-yi; Leonard C. Archard

    2005-01-01

    Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is the most important sequela of rheumatic fever (RF): evidence that streptococcal infection is aetiological is prominent, but sometimes contradictory. Acute HSV-1 infection in mouse leads to carditis and valvulitis whereas recurrent infection results in inflammatory granulomatous lesions that resemble Aschoff bodies. Cells containing HSV-1 inclusions or virus infected giant cells appear similar to Anitschkow cells or Aschoff cells respectively. We hypothesized that HSV-1 infection also may be involved in RHD. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded valvular tissue samples from 32 patients with RHD were investigated for evidence of HSV-1 infection. HSV-1 antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry, using HSV-1-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. HSV-1 glycoprotein D gene sequences were amplified by nPCR, using β-globin gene amplification in the same samples as internal control. Valvular tissue from 5 cases of sudden death and 3 cases died of neisseria meningitis without a history of valvular disease was used for comparison. HSV-1-infected lung tissue was used as positive control. Results HSV-1 antigens were detected in valvular tissues from 21 of 32 (65.6%) patients. Fifteen of these 21 (46.9% of cases), but no antigen-negative sample, were positive also for HSV DNA. Nucleotide sequence of PCR products was homologous to the targeted region of the HSV-1 glycoprotein D gene. HSV-1 antigen was present also in one case of sudden death but viral DNA was not found in any tissue sample from the comparison group. Results from reagent and positive controls were as anticipated.Conclusions This is the first study to show the presence of HSV-1 antigen and genomic DNA in valvular tissues from patients with RHD and provides evidence for an association of HSV-1 infection with some cases of rheumatic valvular disease.

  8. Prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA in human cornea tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); R. Duan (Rui); J.M. van Dun (Jessica); M.A.W. Bettink; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. We determined the prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1), HSV type 2 (HSV-2), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in cornea tissues obtained after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was performed. Methods. The excised corneas of 83 patients

  9. Prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA in human cornea tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); R. Duan (Rui); J.M. van Dun (Jessica); M.A.W. Bettink; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. We determined the prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1), HSV type 2 (HSV-2), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in cornea tissues obtained after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was performed. Methods. The excised corneas of 83 patients

  10. Zika Virus RNA Replication and Persistence in Brain and Placental Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabeneck, Demi B.; Martines, Roosecelis B.; Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Ermias, Yokabed; Estetter, Lindsey B.C.; Suzuki, Tadaki; Ritter, Jana; Keating, M. Kelly; Hale, Gillian; Gary, Joy; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Lambert, Amy; Lanciotti, Robert; Oduyebo, Titilope; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Bolaños, Fernando; Saad, Edgar Alberto Parra; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus is causally linked with congenital microcephaly and may be associated with pregnancy loss. However, the mechanisms of Zika virus intrauterine transmission and replication and its tropism and persistence in tissues are poorly understood. We tested tissues from 52 case-patients: 8 infants with microcephaly who died and 44 women suspected of being infected with Zika virus during pregnancy. By reverse transcription PCR, tissues from 32 (62%) case-patients (brains from 8 infants with microcephaly and placental/fetal tissues from 24 women) were positive for Zika virus. In situ hybridization localized replicative Zika virus RNA in brains of 7 infants and in placentas of 9 women who had pregnancy losses during the first or second trimester. These findings demonstrate that Zika virus replicates and persists in fetal brains and placentas, providing direct evidence of its association with microcephaly. Tissue-based reverse transcription PCR extends the time frame of Zika virus detection in congenital and pregnancy-associated infections. PMID:27959260

  11. Transcriptional immunoresponse of tissue-specific macrophages in swine after infection with African swine fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalczyk Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and cytokines are important in the control of inflammation and regulation of the immune response. However, they can also contribute to immunopathology in the host after viral infection and the regulatory network can be subverted by infectious agents, including viruses, some of which produce cytokine analogues or have mechanisms that inhibit cytokine function. African swine fever virus (ASFV encodes a number of proteins which modulate cytokine and chemokine induction, host transcription factor activation, stress responses, and apoptosis. The aim of this review is to elucidate the mechanisms of immune responses to ASFV in different subpopulations of porcine macrophages. A transcriptional immune response in different resident tissue macrophages following ASFV infection was presented in many publications. ASFV-susceptible porcine macrophages can be of several origins, such as peripheral blood, lungs, bone marrow, etc. blood monocytes, blood macrophages, and lung macrophages have demonstrated a modulation of phenotype. Monocyte-derived macrophages could express surface markers not found on their monocyte precursors. Moreover, they can undergo further differentiation after infection and during inflammation. When viruses infect such cells, immunological activity can be seriously impaired or modified.

  12. Virus Innexins induce alterations in insect cell and tissue function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydnaviruses are dsDNA viruses that induce immune and developmental alterations in their caterpillar hosts. Characterization of polydnavirus gene families and family members is necessary to understand mechanisms of pathology and evolution of these viruses, and may aid to elucidate the role of host...

  13. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proenca-Modena, Jose Luiz; Pereira Valera, Fabiana Cardoso; Jacob, Marcos Gerhardinger; Buzatto, Guilherme Pietrucci; Saturno, Tamara Honorato; Lopes, Lucia; Souza, Jamila Mendonça; Escremim Paula, Flavia; Silva, Maria Lucia; Carenzi, Lucas Rodrigues; Tamashiro, Edwin; Arruda, Eurico; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha

    2012-01-01

    Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR) in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05), and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05) in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  14. High rates of detection of respiratory viruses in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic adenotonsillar disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luiz Proenca-Modena

    Full Text Available Chronic tonsillar diseases are an important health problem, leading to large numbers of surgical procedures worldwide. Little is known about pathogenesis of these diseases. In order to investigate the role of respiratory viruses in chronic adenotonsillar diseases, we developed a cross-sectional study to determine the rates of viral detections of common respiratory viruses detected by TaqMan real time PCR (qPCR in nasopharyngeal secretions, tonsillar tissues and peripheral blood from 121 children with chronic tonsillar diseases, without symptoms of acute respiratory infections. At least one respiratory virus was detected in 97.5% of patients. The viral co-infection rate was 69.5%. The most frequently detected viruses were human adenovirus in 47.1%, human enterovirus in 40.5%, human rhinovirus in 38%, human bocavirus in 29.8%, human metapneumovirus in 17.4% and human respiratory syncytial virus in 15.7%. Results of qPCR varied widely between sample sites: human adenovirus, human bocavirus and human enterovirus were predominantly detected in tissues, while human rhinovirus was more frequently detected in secretions. Rates of virus detection were remarkably high in tonsil tissues: over 85% in adenoids and close to 70% in palatine tonsils. In addition, overall virus detection rates were higher in more hypertrophic than in smaller adenoids (p = 0.05, and in the particular case of human enteroviruses, they were detected more frequently (p = 0.05 in larger palatine tonsils than in smaller ones. While persistence/latency of DNA viruses in tonsillar tissues has been documented, such is not the case of RNA viruses. Respiratory viruses are highly prevalent in adenoids and palatine tonsils of patients with chronic tonsillar diseases, and persistence of these viruses in tonsils may stimulate chronic inflammation and play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  15. Coat protein promoter from cotton leaf curl virus is not a tissue-specifically expressed promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Geminivirus is a kind of single-stranded DNA virus. Experimental results from tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) showed that expression pattern of coat protein gene (cp) promoter was phloem specifically expressed. In this note, the studies on cp promoter of cotton leaf curl virus (CLCuV) which is found and identified recently suggest that the promoter is not phloem specifically expressed. The expressing activity of gus gene driven by the promoter exists not only in phloem but also in mesophyll tissues and root tip meristem. Transient expression suggests that cp promoter transactivated by AC2 shows expressing activity in mesophyll and vascular tissue of leaf vein.

  16. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  17. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieisha Pentland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  18. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  19. Viruses vector control proposal: genus Aedes emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Nogueira Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract The dengue fever is a major public health problem in the world. In Brazil, in 2015, there were 1,534,932 cases, being 20,320 cases of severe form, and 811 deaths related to this disease. The distribution of Aedes aegypti, the vector, is extensive. Recently, Zika and Chikungunya viruses had arisen, sharing the same vector as dengue and became a huge public health issue. Without specific treatment, it is urgently required as an effective vector control. This article is focused on reviewing vector control strategies, their effectiveness, viability and economical impact. Among all, the Sterile Insect Technique is highlighted as the best option to be adopted in Brazil, once it is largely effectively used in the USA and Mexico for plagues related to agribusiness.

  20. Control of Influenza and Poliomyelitis with Killed Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas; Salk, Darrell

    1977-01-01

    Discusses control of poliomyelitis and influenza by live and killed virus vaccines. Considered are the etiological agents, pathogenic mechanisms and epidemiology of each disease. Reviews recent scientific studies of the diseases. Recommends use of killed virus vaccines in controlling both diseases. (CS)

  1. Spatio-temporal expression of miRNAs in tomato tissues upon Cucumber mosaic virus and Tomato aspermy virus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junli Feng; Xin Liu; Leiyu Lai; Jishuang Chen

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in regulating plant growth and development. Recent work has shown that miRNA-mediated regulation of cellular mRNA expression is involved in pathogen-host interactions. However, knowledge about the timing and spatial regulation of plant miRNA expression is still limited. Here, we use stem-loop real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to quantify the expression changes of seven miRNAs and their target mRNAs in different tomato tissues during the pathogenic processes. Compared with mock-inoculated plants, the expression levels of investigated miRNAs and mRNAs were enhanced by different degrees upon Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-Fny and Tomato aspermy virus-Bj infections, but were almost unchanged in CMV-FnyA2b (a CMV-Fny 2b-deletion mutant)-infected tomato seedlings. In addition, the obvious up-regulation of several miRNAs and target mRNAs in some tomato tissues suggested their special roles in these tissues' organogenesis and development. Temporal analyses also revealed that the expressions of these miRNAs and mRNAs were highly regulated by different viral infections. Taken together, the observed spatially and temporally changes in miRNAs and target mRNAs expression levels indicate the abilities of different viruses to interfere with miRNA pathway, and are correlated with their respective functions in phenotype determination in different tomato tissues.

  2. Comparison of internal process control viruses for detection of food and waterborne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Fernández, María Dolores; Barrios, Melina Elizabeth; Cammarata, Robertina Viviana; Torres, Carolina; Taboga, Oscar Alberto; Mbayed, Viviana Andrea

    2017-03-29

    Enteric viruses are pathogens associated with food- and waterborne outbreaks. The recovery of viruses from food or water samples is affected by the procedures applied to detect and concentrate them. The incorporation of an internal process control virus to the analyses allows monitoring the performance of the methodology. The aim of this study was to produce a recombinant adenovirus (rAdV) and apply it together with bacteriophage PP7 as process controls. The rAdV carries a DNA construction in its genome to differentiate it from wild-type adenovirus by qPCR. The stability of both control viruses was evaluated at different pH conditions. The rAdV was stable at pH 3, 7, and 10 for 18 h. PP7 infectious particles were stable at pH 7 and showed a 2.14 log reduction at pH 10 and total decay at pH 3 after 18 h. Three virus concentration methods were evaluated: hollow-fiber tap water ultrafiltration, wastewater ultracentrifugation, and elution-PEG precipitation from lettuce. Total and infectious viruses were quantified and their recoveries were calculated. Virus recovery for rAdV and PP7 by ultrafiltration showed a wide range (2.10-84.42 and 13.54-84.62%, respectively), whereas that by ultracentrifugation was 5.05-13.71 and 6.98-13.27%, respectively. The performance of ultracentrifugation to concentrate norovirus and enteroviruses present in sewage was not significantly different to the recovery of control viruses. For detection of viruses from lettuce, genomic copies of PP7 were significantly more highly recovered than adenovirus (14.74-18.82 and 0.00-3.44%, respectively). The recovery of infectious virus particles was significantly affected during sewage ultracentrifugation and concentration from lettuce. The simultaneous use of virus controls with dissimilar characteristics and behaviors might resemble different enteric viruses.

  3. Zika Virus: Transmission, Detection, Control, and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshika; Lal, Sunil K.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne Flavivirus discovered in Uganda in the 1940s. To date, three major ZIKV outbreaks have been reported. ZIKV infections have known to be primarily asymptomatic while causing mild illness in a few cases. However, the recent emergence and spread of ZIKV in the Americas has resulted in the declaration of “Public Health Emergency of International Concern” due to the potential association between the infection and prenatal microcephaly or other brain anomalies. In Brazil, a 20-fold increase in prenatal microcephaly cases and 19% increase in Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) cases were reported in 2015, as compared to the preceding year. The probable deleterious effects of ZIKV infection prompt the urgent development of diagnostics and therapeutics. To this end, the existing evidences supporting the increasingly common prenatal microcephaly and GBS association and the current known ZIKV transmission dynamics, modes of detection (molecular and serology-based), and current control strategies are summarized in this review. This review also emphasizes the importance of understanding ZIKV transmission in order to design a sensitive yet cost and time-efficient detection technique. Development of an efficient detection technique would subsequently allow for better surveillance and control of ZIKV infection. Currently, limited literature is available on the pathogenesis of ZIKV, hence, focusing on the modes of ZIKV transmission could potentially contribute to the understanding of the disease spectrum and formulation of targeted treatment and control. PMID:28217114

  4. Study on the change of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru-Qiong Luo; LiangTang; Ping Xie; Yan-Mei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study and observe the change status of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer.Methods:A total of 72 patients with cervical cancer in our hospital from February 2014 to September 2015 were selected as the observation group, 72 healthy women at the same period were selected as the control group, then the HPV DNA virus content and constitution, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of two groups were analyzed and compared, and the detection results of observation group with stageⅠ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ andⅣ of cervical cancer were compared.Results:The rates of HPV DNA virus content and>500 in the observation group were all higher than those of control group, the circulating blood and tissue miR-21 were all higher than those of control group, while the circulating blood and tissue miR-126, miR-143 and miR-145 were all lower than those of control group, and the detection results of observation group with stageⅠ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ andⅣ of cervical cancer all had obvious differences, the differences were all significant.Conclusion:The changes of the status of HPV DNA virus content, circulating blood and tissue miR indexes of patients with cervical cancer are great, and the influence of cervical cancer stage for the detection results are great, so it has active guiding significance for the diagnosis and treatment of disease.

  5. Cellular transcripts of chicken brain tissues in response to H5N1 and Newcastle disease virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramaniam Vinod RMT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly-pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 and Newcastle disease (ND viruses are the two most important poultry viruses in the world, with the ability to cause classic central nervous system dysfunction in poultry and migratory birds. To elucidate the mechanisms of neurovirulence caused by these viruses, a preliminary study was design to analyze host's cellular responses during infections of these viruses. Methods An improved mRNA differential display technique (Gene Fishing™ was undertaken to analyze differentially expressed transcripts regulated during HPAI H5N1 and velogenic neurotropic NDV infections of whole brain of chickens. The identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs was made possible as this technique uses annealing control primers that generate reproducible, authentic and long PCR products that are detectable on agarose gels. Results Twenty-three genes were identified to be significantly regulated during infections with both viruses, where ten of the genes have been selected for validation using a TaqMan® based real time quantitative PCR assay. Some of the identified genes demonstrated to be key factors involving the cytoskeletal system, neural signal transduction and protein folding during stress. Interestingly, Septin 5, one of the genes isolated from HPAI H5N1-infected brain tissues has been reported to participate in the pathogenic process of Parkinson's disease. Conclusions In this limited study, the differentially expressed genes of infected brain tissues regulated by the viruses were found not to be identical, thus suggesting that their neurovirulence and neuropathogenesis may not share similar mechanisms and pathways.

  6. Herpes viruses and human papilloma virus in nasal polyposis and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ioannidis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is a multifactorial disease entity with an unclear pathogenesis. Contradictory data exist in the literature on the potential implication of viral elements in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of human herpes viruses (1-6 and Human Papilloma Virus in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls. METHODS: Viral DNA presence was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction application to nasal polyps specimens from 91 chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps patients and nasal turbinate mucosa from 38 healthy controls. RESULTS: Epstein-Barr virus positivity was higher in nasal polyps (24/91; 26.4% versus controls (4/38; 10.5%, but the difference did not reach significance (p = 0.06. Human herpes virus-6 positivity was lower in nasal polyps (13/91; 14.29% versus controls (10/38; 26.32%,p = 0.13. In chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps group, 1 sample was herpes simplex virus-1-positive (1/91; 1.1%, and another was cytomegalovirus-positive (1/91; 1.1%, versus none in controls. No sample was positive for herpes simplex virus-2, varicella-zoster virus, high-risk-human papilloma viruses (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and low-risk-human papilloma viruses (6, 11. CONCLUSION: Differences in Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus-6 positivity among patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls are not statistically significant, weakening the likelihood of their implication in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps pathogenesis.

  7. Comparative proteome analysis of tracheal tissues in response to infectious bronchitis coronavirus, Newcastle disease virus, and avian influenza virus H9 subtype virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junfeng; Han, Zongxi; Shao, Yuhao; Cao, Zhongzan; Kong, Xiangang; Liu, Shengwang

    2014-06-01

    Infectious bronchitis coronavirus (IBV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), and avian influenza virus (AIV) H9 subtype are major pathogens of chickens causing serious respiratory tract disease and heavy economic losses. To better understand the replication features of these viruses in their target organs and molecular pathogenesis of these different viruses, comparative proteomic analysis was performed to investigate the proteome changes of primary target organ during IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 infections, using 2D-DIGE followed MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. In total, 44, 39, 41, 48, and 38 proteins were identified in the tracheal tissues of the chickens inoculated with IBV (ck/CH/LDL/97I, H120), NDV (La Sota), and AIV H9, and between ck/CH/LDL/97I and H120, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 induced similar core host responses involved in biosynthetic, catabolic, metabolic, signal transduction, transport, cytoskeleton organization, macromolecular complex assembly, cell death, response to stress, and immune system process. Comparative analysis of host response induced by different viruses indicated differences in protein expression changes induced by IBV, NDV, and AIV H9 may be responsible for the specific pathogenesis of these different viruses. Our result reveals specific host response to IBV, NDV, and AIVH9 infections and provides insights into the distinct pathogenic mechanisms of these avian respiratory viruses. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus 2 impairs virus control in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Giyong; Lee, Jin-Sol; Lee, Kyung-Hyun; Shin, Seung-Uk; Yoon, Ji Young; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2016-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen that causes development of mild to severe clinical signs in wild and domesticated ruminants. We previously showed that mice could be infected by BVDV. In the present study, we infected mice intraperitoneally with non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV1 or ncp BVDV2, harvested the blood and organs of the infected mice at days 4, 7, 10 and 14 postinfection (pi), and performed immunohistochemical analyses to confirm BVDV infection. Viral antigens were detected in the spleens of all infected mice from days 4 through 14 and were also found in the mesenteric lymph nodes, gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), heart, kidney, intestine, and bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (BALT) of some infected mice. In ncp BVDV2-infected mice, flow cytometric analysis revealed markedly fewer CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes and lower expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (I-A/I-E) than those in ncp BVDV1-infected mice. Production of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 was higher in the plasma of ncp BVDV2-infected mice than that in that of ncp BVDV1-infected mice. Our results demonstrate that ncp BVDV1 and ncp BVDV2 interact differently with the host innate immune response in vivo. These findings highlight an important distinction between ncp BVDV1 and ncp BVDV2 and suggest that ncp BVDV2 impairs the host's ability to control the infection and enhances virus dissemination.

  9. CD58 expression of liver tissue in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; QI Bao-tai; CHEN Ping; HE Lin-jing; LI Jie; JI Yu-qiang; XIE Ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Several kinds of intercellular adhesion molecules closely relate to hepatitis B.The complex of CD2 and CD58 plays an important role in enhancing the adhesion of T lymphocytes to target cells,hyperplasia and activation of T lymphocytes.In this study,we explored the relationship between the expression of CD58 in liver tissue and chronic hepatitus B infection.Methods We determined the expression of the CD58 molecule on the surface of hepatocytes by using immunohistochemistry and the levels of serum HBV DNA from patients with HBV infection and from normal controls.The biochemical parameters of hepatic function were analyzed as well.Results CD58 expression in hepatocytes significantly increased with the severity progression of chronic HBV infection.The IOD levels(1og10)of CD58 in the control,mild,moderate,and severe chronic HBV infection groups were O,(7.20±4.64)×103,(25.63±7.41)x103 and(37.47±11.17)×103 respectively(P<0.05 compared with the control group,respectively)Conclusion CD58 probably increases cell mediated immunity to eliminate hepatitis B virus and leads to damage of hepatocytes.

  10. Exacerbation of Soft Tissue Lesions in Lead Exposed Virus Infected Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PRATIBHA GUPTA; M. M. HUSAIN; RAVI SHANKER; R. K. S. DOGRA; P. K. SETH; R. K. MAHESHWARI

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of Lead (Pb) acetate exposure on Semliki forest virus (SFV)pathogenesis in mice. Methods Different doses (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 mg/Kg body weight) of Pb dissolved in normal saline were given to mice by oral intubation in a sub-acute (28 days) and sub-chronic (90 days) regimen followed by SFV infection. Morbidity, mortality, clinical symptoms,mean survival time (MST), changes in body and organ weight, accumulation of lead in soft tissues,virus titre in brain and histopathological alterations were compared between lead exposed and infected groups. Results Early appearance of virus symptoms, increased mortality, decreased MST, enhanced SFV titre and greater tissue damage were observed in lead exposed-SFV-infected mice. Conclusion Pre-exposure to lead increases the susceptibility of mice towards SFV infection. Further studies are suggested in view of the persistence of lead in the environment and the possibility of infection bymicrobial pathogens.

  11. West Nile Virus RNA in Tissues from Donor Associated with Transmission to Organ Transplant Recipients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-19

    William Hale reads an abridged version of the Emerging Infectious Diseases’ dispatch, West Nile Virus RNA in Tissues from Donor Associated with Transmission to Organ Transplant Recipients.  Created: 11/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2013.

  12. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) type 3, also known as lymphoid tissue inducer cells, plays a major role in both the development and remodeling of organized lymphoid tissues and the maintenance of adaptive immune responses. HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection causes breakdown of intestinal barriers resulting in microbial translocation, leading to systemic immune activation and disease progression. However, the effects of HIV/SIV infection on ILC3 are unknown. Here, we analyzed ILC3 from mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues in chronically SIV-infected macaques and uninfected controls. ILC3 cells were defined and identified in macaque lymphoid tissues as non-T, non-B (lineage-negative), c-Kit(+)IL-7Rα(+) (CD117(+)CD127(+)) cells. These ILC3 cells highly expressed CD90 (∼ 63%) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and produced IL-17 (∼ 63%), IL-22 (∼ 36%), and TNF-α (∼ 72%) but did not coexpress CD4 or NK cell markers. The intestinal ILC3 cell loss correlated with the reduction of total CD4(+) T cells and T helper (Th)17 and Th22 cells in the gut during SIV infection (P lymphoid tissues in SIV-infected macaques, further contributing to the HIV-induced impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue structure and function, especially in mucosal tissues.

  13. Prevention of Simian Virus 40 Tumors by Hamster Fetal Tissue: Influence of Parity Status of Donor Females on Immunogenicity of Fetal Tissue and on Immune Cell Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Anthony J.; Reppucci, Phyllis; Dierlam, Peggy; Rutala, William; Coggin, Joseph H.

    1973-01-01

    Fetal tissue from primiparous hamsters prevented simian virus 40 (SV40) tumorigenesis in male hamsters, whereas fetal tissue from multiparous hamsters did not. The parity status of normal (uninoculated) hamsters also influenced the cytotoxicity of their lymphoid cells against tumor cells. Lymph node cells from nonpregnant primiparous and multiparous animals were cytotoxic in microcytotoxicity tests against SV40, polyoma, and adenovirus 7 tumor cells, but were not active against control BHK cells. Lymph node cells from virgin female donors were inactive. Peritoneal exudate cells from these donors reacted in similar fashion against SV40 tumor cells in vitro and in adoptive transfer tests in vivo. However, the cytotoxicity of peritoneal exudate cells from multiparous hamsters was greatly reduced during pregnancy, a time when noncytotoxic humoral antibody reactive with surface antigen of SV40 tumor cells is present. This humoral antibody is not detected during first pregnancy, and peritoneal exudate cells obtained from pregnant primiparous hamsters demonstrated a high degree of cytotoxicity. PMID:4346032

  14. Clinical significance of connective tissue growth factor in hepatitis B virus-induced hepatic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong-Li Piao; David R Brigstock; Jie Zhu; Man-Li Zhang; Run-Ping Gao

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To determine the utility of connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) for assessing hepatic fibrosis in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-induced chronic liver diseases (CLD-B).METHODS:Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure CCN2 in sera from 107 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) and 39 patients with HBVinduced active liver cirrhosis and 30 healthy individuals.Liver samples from 31 patients with CHB,8 patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis and 8 HBV carriers with normal liver histology were examined for transforming growth factor β-1 (TGF-β1) or CCN2 mRNA levels by in situ hybridization,and computer image analysis was performed to measure integrated optimal density (IOD) of CCN2 mRNA-positive cells in liver tissues.Histological inflammation grading and fibrosis staging were evaluated by H and E staining and Van Gieson's method.RESULTS:Serum CCN2 concentrations were,respectively,4.0-or 4.9-fold higher in patients with CHB or active liver cirrhosis as compared to healthy individuals (P < 0.01).There was good consistency between the levels of CCN2 in sera and CCN2 mRNA expression in liver tissues (r =0.87,P < 0.01).The levels of CCN2 in sera were increased with the enhancement of histological fibrosis staging in patients with CLD-B (r =0.85,P < 0.01).Serum CCN2 was a reliable marker for the assessment of liver fibrosis,with areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC) of 0.94 or 0.85 for,respectively,distinguishing normal liver controls from patients with F1 stage liver fibrosis or discriminating between mild and significant fibrosis.CONCLUSION:Detection of serum CCN2 in patients with CLD-B may have clinical significance for assessment of severity of hepatic fibrosis.

  15. A STUDY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE TICK-BORNE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS IN HUMAN AND ANIMAL TISSUE CULTURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tick-borne encephalitis virus is successfully reproduced in tissue cultures of the human embryo, HeLa cells , monkey and dog kidney tissue, skin...tissue and the HeLa cells . A cytopathogenic effect is registered regularly in the cultures of human skin-muscle and kidney tissued on the 2nd-4th day...the embryonic skin-muscle tissue of the white rat. The virus’s cytopathogenic effect is not developed in cultures of human lung tissue, HeLa cells , monkey

  16. Control of pome and stone fruit virus diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Marina; Ilardi, Vincenza; Pasquini, Graziella

    2015-01-01

    Many different systemic pathogens, including viruses, affect pome and stone fruits causing diseases with adverse effects in orchards worldwide. The significance of diseases caused by these pathogens on tree health and fruit shape and quality has resulted in the imposition of control measures both nationally and internationally. Control measures depend on the identification of diseases and their etiological agents. Diagnosis is the most important aspect of controlling fruit plant viruses. Early detection of viruses in fruit trees or in the propagative material is a prerequisite for their control and to guarantee a sustainable agriculture. Many quarantine programs are in place to reduce spread of viruses among countries during international exchange of germplasm. All these phytosanitary measures are overseen by governments based on agreements produced by international organizations. Also certification schemes applied to fruit trees allow the production of planting material of known variety and plant health status for local growers by controlling the propagation of pathogen-tested mother plants. They ensure to obtain propagative material not only free of "quarantine" organisms under the national legislation but also of important "nonquarantine" pathogens. The control of insect vectors plays an important role in the systemic diseases management, but it must be used together with other control measures as eradication of infected plants and use of certified propagation material. Apart from the control of the virus vector and the use of virus-free material, the development of virus-resistant cultivars appears to be the most effective approach to achieve control of plant viruses, especially for perennial crops that are more exposed to infection during their long life span. The use of resistant or tolerant cultivars and/or rootstocks could be potentially the most important aspect of virus disease management, especially in areas in which virus infections are endemic. The

  17. Infection of hepatitis B virus in extrahepatic endothelial tissues mediated by endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lili

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV replication has been reported to be involved in many extrahepatic viral disorders; however, the mechanism by which HBV is trans-infected into extrahepatic tissues such as HBV associated myocarditis remains largely unknown. Results In this study, we showed that human cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs could be effectively infected by uptake of HBV in vitro. Exposure of EPCs with HBV resulted in HBV DNA and viral particles were detected in EPCs at day 3 after HBV challenge, which were peaked around day 7 and declined in 3 weeks. Consistently, HBV envelope surface and core antigens were first detected in EPCs at day 3 after virus challenge and were retained to be detectable for 3 weeks. In contrast, HBV covalently closed circular DNA was not detected in EPCs at any time after virus challenge. Intravenous transplantation of HBV-treated EPCs into myocardial infarction and acute renal ischemia mouse model resulted in incorporation of HBV into injured heart, lung, and renal capillary endothelial tissues. Conclusion These results strongly support that EPCs serve as virus carrier mediating HBV trans-infection into the injured endothelial tissues. The findings might provide a novel mechanism for HBV-associated myocarditis and other HBV-related extrahepatic diseases as well.

  18. Detection of Respiratory Viruses in Nasopharyngeal Swab and Adenoid Tissue from Children Submitted to Adenoidectomy: Pre- and Postoperative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biill Primo, Osvaldo Vinícius

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The presence of respiratory viruses in lymphoid tissues of the nasopharynx and oropharynx and its impact on recurrent infections and hypertrophy of these tissues are not yet fully understood. Objective To identify and determine the prevalence of major respiratory viruses in nasopharyngeal secretions and adenoid tissue pre- and postoperatively of children undergoing adenoidectomy. Methods A prospective observational study was conducted in 36 patients under 12 years of age with upper airway lymphoid hypertrophy who were undergoing adenoidectomy, in which various respiratory viruses were investigated using real-time polymerase chain reaction in adenoid tissue and nasopharyngeal secretions collected preoperatively and 30 days postoperatively. Results At least 1 viral agent was isolated in any of the samples collected in 58.3% of children and 25.9% of total samples. Respiratory viruses were identified in 33.8% of preoperative nasopharyngeal specimens and in 19.8% of postoperative secretion. Of the 21 patients with positive results for any respiratory virus, 6 (28.6% had more than 1 virus. Considering all 36 respiratory viruses found, the main agent isolated was rhinovirus (27.8%, followed by bocavirus (22.2%. Conclusion The virus found more frequently in all samples was rhinovirus. After removal of adenoid tissue, there was a decrease in the prevalence of the virus contained in nasopharyngeal secretion 30 days after surgery.

  19. Tissue-protective effects of NKG2A in immune-mediated clearance of virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Kenneth H; Matsuoka, Mitsuo; DeBerge, Matthew P; Ruby, Jessica A; Liu, Jun; Schneider, Mark J; Wang, Yan; Hahn, Young S; Enelow, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection triggers a CD8(+) T cell response that aids in virus clearance, but also expresses effector functions that may result in tissue injury. CD8(+) T cells express a variety of activating and inhibiting ligands, though regulation of the expression of inhibitory receptors is not well understood. The ligand for the inhibitory receptor, NKG2A, is the non-classical MHC-I molecule Qa1(b), which may also serve as a putative restricting element for the T cell receptors of purported regulatory CD8(+) T cells. We have previously shown that Qa1(b)-null mice suffer considerably enhanced immunopathologic lung injury in the context of CD8(+) T cell-mediated clearance of influenza infection, as well as evidence in a non-viral system that failure to ligate NKG2A on CD8(+) effector T cells may represent an important component of this process. In this report, we examine the requirements for induction of NKG2A expression, and show that NKG2A expression by CD8(+) T cells occurs as a result of migration from the MLN to the inflammatory lung environment, irrespective of peripheral antigen recognition. Further, we confirmed that NKG2A is a mediator in limiting immunopathology in virus infection using mice with a targeted deletion of NKG2A, and infecting the mutants with two different viruses, influenza and adenovirus. In neither infection is virus clearance altered. In influenza infection, the enhanced lung injury was associated with increased chemoattractant production, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, and significantly enhanced alveolar hemorrhage. The primary mechanism of enhanced injury was the loss of negative regulation of CD8(+) T cell effector function. A similar effect was observed in the livers of mutant mice infected intravenously with adenovirus. These results demonstrate the immunoregulatory role of CD8(+) NKG2A expression in virus infection, which negatively regulates T cell effector functions and contributes to protection of tissue integrity during

  20. Tissue localization, shedding, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) following inoculation of 4 week-old feeder pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) emerged in the U.S. in April 2013 and caused significant losses to the swine industry. The purpose of this investigation was to determine tissue localization, shedding patterns, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of PEDV following inocu...

  1. Virus diseases of peppers (Capsicum spp.) and their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lawrence; Kumar, Sanjeet; Tsai, Wen-Shi; Hughes, Jacqueline d'A

    2014-01-01

    The number of virus species infecting pepper (Capsicum spp.) crops and their incidences has increased considerably over the past 30 years, particularly in tropical and subtropical pepper production systems. This is probably due to a combination of factors, including the expansion and intensification of pepper cultivation in these regions, the increased volume and speed of global trade of fresh produce (including peppers) carrying viruses and vectors to new locations, and perhaps climate change expanding the geographic range suitable for the viruses and vectors. With the increased incidences of diverse virus species comes increased incidences of coinfection with two or more virus species in the same plant. There is then greater chance of synergistic interactions between virus species, increasing symptom severity and weakening host resistance, as well as the opportunity for genetic recombination and component exchange and a possible increase in aggressiveness, virulence, and transmissibility. The main virus groups infecting peppers are transmitted by aphids, whiteflies, or thrips, and a feature of many populations of these vector groups is that they can develop resistance to some of the commonly used insecticides relatively quickly. This, coupled with the increasing concern over the impact of over- or misuse of insecticides on the environment, growers, and consumers, means that there should be less reliance on insecticides to control the vectors of viruses infecting pepper crops. To improve the durability of pepper crop protection measures, there should be a shift away from the broadscale use of insecticides and the use of single, major gene resistance to viruses. Instead, integrated and pragmatic virus control measures should be sought that combine (1) cultural practices that reduce sources of virus inoculum and decrease the rate of spread of viruliferous vectors into the pepper crop, (2) synthetic insecticides, which should be used judiciously and only when the

  2. Plant virus infections control stomatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rose R.; Emblow, Mark S. M.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Stomata are important regulators of carbon dioxide uptake and transpirational water loss. They also represent points of vulnerability as bacterial and fungal pathogens utilise this natural opening as an entry portal, and thus have an increasingly complex relationship. Unlike the situation with bacterial and fungal pathogens, we know very little about the role of stomata in viral infection. Here we report findings showing that viral infection influences stomatal development in two susceptible host systems (Nicotiana tabacum with TMV (Tobacco mosaic virus), and Arabidopsis thaliana with TVCV (Turnip vein-clearing virus)), but not in resistant host systems (Nicotiana glutinosa and Chenopodium quinoa with TMV). Virus infected plants had significantly lower stomatal indices in systemic leaves of susceptible systems; N. tabacum 9.8% reduction and A. thaliana 12.3% reduction, but not in the resistant hosts. Stomatal density in systemic leaves was also significantly reduced in virus infected A. thaliana by 19.6% but not in N. tabacum or the resistant systems. In addition, transpiration rate was significantly reduced in TMV infected N. tabacum. PMID:27687773

  3. Plant virus infections control stomatal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rose R.; Emblow, Mark S. M.; Hetherington, Alistair M.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-09-01

    Stomata are important regulators of carbon dioxide uptake and transpirational water loss. They also represent points of vulnerability as bacterial and fungal pathogens utilise this natural opening as an entry portal, and thus have an increasingly complex relationship. Unlike the situation with bacterial and fungal pathogens, we know very little about the role of stomata in viral infection. Here we report findings showing that viral infection influences stomatal development in two susceptible host systems (Nicotiana tabacum with TMV (Tobacco mosaic virus), and Arabidopsis thaliana with TVCV (Turnip vein-clearing virus)), but not in resistant host systems (Nicotiana glutinosa and Chenopodium quinoa with TMV). Virus infected plants had significantly lower stomatal indices in systemic leaves of susceptible systems; N. tabacum 9.8% reduction and A. thaliana 12.3% reduction, but not in the resistant hosts. Stomatal density in systemic leaves was also significantly reduced in virus infected A. thaliana by 19.6% but not in N. tabacum or the resistant systems. In addition, transpiration rate was significantly reduced in TMV infected N. tabacum.

  4. Endothelial progenitor cell mediates transport of hepatitis B virus into myocardial tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication has been reported to be involved in many extrahepatic viral disorders;however,the mechanism by which HBV is transinfected into extrahepatic tissues such as myocardium and causes HBV associated myocarditis remains largely unknown.Methods In this study,endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were infected by HBV and then transfused into ischemic model of mice.HBV surface and core antigen as well as mutation of HBV particles were detected by immunonistochemistry,fluorescent activated cell sorter and transmission electron microscopy in vitro and in vivo.Results Human cord blood EPCs, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) could be effectively infected by taking up HBV in vitro.HBV envelope surface and core antigen expressions were first detectable in EPCs at day 3 after virus challenge,sustained for up to 11 days,and decreased thereafter.Similarly,the virus particles were the most abundant in EPCs ln the first week observed by a transmission electron microscope,and declined in 3 weeks after HBV infection.HBV DNA but not HBV cccDNA in EPCs were detectable even 3 weeks after virus challenge,as shown by PCR analysis.Furthermore,intravenous transplantation of HBV-treated EPCs into myocardial infarction Sprague & Dawley rats model resulted in incorporation of both EPCs and HBV into injured endothelial tissues of capillaries in the ischemic border zone.Conclusions These results strongly support that EPCs serve as virus carrier mediating HBV trans-infection into the injured myocardial tissues.The findings might suggest a novel mechanism for HBV-associated myocarditis.

  5. Evaluation of convenient pretreatment protocols for RNA virus metagenomics in serum and tissue samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosseel, Toon; Ozhelvaci, Orkun; Freimanis, Graham; Van Borm, Steven

    2015-09-15

    Viral metagenomic approaches are increasingly being used for viral discovery. Various strategies are applied to enrich viral sequences, but there is often a lack of knowledge about their effective influence on the viral discovery sensitivity. We evaluate some convenient and widely used approaches for RNA virus discovery in clinical samples in order to reveal their sensitivity and potential bias introduced by the enrichment or amplifications steps. An RNA virus was artificially spiked at a fixed titer in serum and lung tissue, respectively, low and high nucleic acid content matrices. For serum, a simple DNase treatment on the RNA extract gave the maximum gain in proportion of viral sequences (83×), and a subsequent ribosomal RNA removal nearly doubled once more the proportion of viral sequences. For lung tissue, a ribosomal RNA depletion step on the RNA extract had the biggest gain in proportion of viral sequences (32×). We show also that direct sequencing of cDNA is recommended above an extra random PCR amplification step, and a that the virion enrichment strategy (filtration and nuclease treatment) has a beneficial effect for sequencing-based virus discovery. Our findings provide sample-dependent guidelines for targeted virus discovery strategies.

  6. Glycomic analysis of human respiratory tract tissues and correlation with influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevenan Walther

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in influenza infection of the human respiratory tract is binding of the virus to sialic (Sia acid terminated receptors. The binding of different strains of virus for the receptor is determined by the α linkage of the sialic acid to galactose and the adjacent glycan structure. In this study the N- and O-glycan composition of the human lung, bronchus and nasopharynx was characterized by mass spectrometry. Analysis showed that there was a wide spectrum of both Sia α2-3 and α2-6 glycans in the lung and bronchus. This glycan structural data was then utilized in combination with binding data from 4 of the published glycan arrays to assess whether these current glycan arrays were able to predict replication of human, avian and swine viruses in human ex vivo respiratory tract tissues. The most comprehensive array from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics contained the greatest diversity of sialylated glycans, but was not predictive of productive replication in the bronchus and lung. Our findings indicate that more comprehensive but focused arrays need to be developed to investigate influenza virus binding in an assessment of newly emerging influenza viruses.

  7. Epidemiology, surveillance and control of Nipah virus infections in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, K B

    2010-12-01

    The outbreak of Nipah virus, affecting pigs and pig-farm workers, was first noted in September 1998 in the north-western part of peninsular Malaysia. By March 1999, the outbreak had spread to other pig-farming areas of the country, inclusive of the neighbouring country, Singapore. A total of 283 human cases of viral encephalitis with 109 deaths were recorded in Malaysia from 29 September 1998 to December 1999. During the outbreak period, a number of surveillances under three broad groups; Surveillance in Human Health Sector, Surveillance in Animal Health Sector, and Surveillance for the Reservoir Hosts, were carried out to determine the prevalence, risk of virus infections and transmission in human and swine populations as well as the source and reservoir hosts of Nipah virus. Surveillance data showed that the virus spread rapidly among pigs within infected farms and transmission was attributed to direct contact with infective excretions and secretions. The spread of the virus among pig farms within and between states of peninsular Malaysia was due to movement of pigs. The transmission of the virus to humans was through close contact with infected pigs. Human to human transmission was considered a rare event though the Nipah virus could be isolated from saliva, urine, nasal and pharyngeal secretions of patients. Field investigations identified fruitbats of the Pteropid species as the natural reservoir hosts of the viruses. The outbreak was effectively brought under control following the discovery of the virus and institution of correct control measures through a combined effort of multi-ministerial and multidisciplinary teams working in close co-operation and collaboration with other international agencies.

  8. Renin dynamics in adipose tissue: adipose tissue control of local renin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jason D; Krueth, Stacy B; Bernlohr, David A; Katz, Stephen A

    2009-02-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in a variety of adipose tissue functions, including tissue growth, differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. Although expression of all components necessary for a locally derived adipose tissue RAS has been demonstrated within adipose tissue, independence of local adipose RAS component concentrations from corresponding plasma RAS fluctuations has not been addressed. To analyze this, we varied in vivo rat plasma concentrations of two RAS components, renin and angiotensinogen (AGT), to determine the influence of their plasma concentrations on adipose and cardiac tissue levels in both perfused (plasma removed) and nonperfused samples. Variation of plasma RAS components was accomplished by four treatment groups: normal, DOCA salt, bilateral nephrectomy, and losartan. Adipose and cardiac tissue AGT concentrations correlated positively with plasma values. Perfusion of adipose tissue decreased AGT concentrations by 11.1%, indicating that adipose tissue AGT was in equilibrium with plasma. Cardiac tissue renin levels positively correlated with plasma renin concentration for all treatments. In contrast, adipose tissue renin levels did not correlate with plasma renin, with the exception of extremely high plasma renin concentrations achieved in the losartan-treated group. These results suggest that adipose tissue may control its own local renin concentration independently of plasma renin as a potential mechanism for maintaining a functional local adipose RAS.

  9. Detection of virus level in tissues of rainbow trout, Oncoryhinchus mykiss in clinical stage of viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghiasi, Farzad; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In order to detecting VHS virus titer in various tissues in clinical stage of VHS disease, rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were exposed to virus by bath. The experiments were carried out with 140 fish obtained from rainbow trout farm. The fish were divided into two equal groups in 120 Liter t...

  10. Control methods of virus diseases in the Mediterranean basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignus, Yehezkel

    2012-01-01

    Viral pathogens form an important group of obligatory parasites of plants. About 977 plant viruses have been described and classified in 14 families and 70 genera. This group of pathogens has complex interactions with their host plants and vectors due to their integration in the molecular mechanisms of living cells, interfering with our ability to manage the malfunctions of virus infected plants by curing means. These constraints led to the perception that the best protection from virus diseases is by prevention. Many cultural procedures used for virus control are aimed at eradicating or altering one or more of the primary participants in the transmission process (vector, virus source plants, and the crop) or preventing their coming together. Part of these control measures were devised to reduce to a minimum, the number of inoculative vector individuals that are active in the crop or interfere with the transmission process at any of its phases, thereby arresting virus spread. Advances in plant virology and a better understanding of plant vector interactions provide strategies based on the formation of mechanical and optical barriers that interfere with the ability of the viral pathogen or its vector to reach the plant and initiate an epidemic.

  11. RESULTS OF COLLABORATIVE STUDY FOR TISSUE TYPING QUALITY CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Abramov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HLA molecules appear to be the principal target of immune allorecognition. The efficiency of transplant directly depends on coincidence of the data obtained by different HLA laboratories. This study discusses the results produced by 12 tissue typing labs in the framework of the initiative program for tissue typing quality control in 2009. 

  12. Persistence of the tissue culture origin vaccine for infectious laryngotracheitis virus in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Silvana H Santander; Nuñez, Luis F; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2015-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a respiratory disease of great importance that causes serious economic losses in the poultry industry. Its control is based on biosecurity procedures and vaccination programs that use live attenuated vaccines such as tissue culture origin (TCO), chicken embryo origin (CEO), and vectored vaccines. However, problems have been reported, such as the reversion of virulence, virus latency, and field virus outbreaks. Several molecular techniques have been developed to differentiate between the field and vaccine strains. This study was conducted to determine the presence of infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) in Brazil from 2012 to 2014. PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) was used to detect and differentiate ILTV strains; DNA sequencing and predictive RFLP analysis were also used for this purpose. Molecular analysis detected the presence of ILTV in 15 samples that were characterized as strains of TCO vaccine origin. This study showed that the ILTV TCO vaccine strain has been circulating in commercial chicken flocks in Brazil since its introduction during the 2002 outbreak.

  13. Zika Virus infection of rhesus macaques leads to viral persistence in multiple tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Alec J.; Smith, Jessica L.; Parkins, Christopher J.; Kreklywich, Craig; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Denton, Michael; Smith, Patricia P.; Messer, William B.; Colgin, Lois M. A.; Ducore, Rebecca M.; Grigsby, Peta L.; Hennebold, Jon D.; Swanson, Tonya; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; MacAllister, Rhonda; Nelson, Jay A.; Streblow, Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging flavivirus, has recently spread explosively through the Western hemisphere. In addition to symptoms including fever, rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, ZIKV infection of pregnant women can cause microcephaly and other developmental abnormalities in the fetus. We report herein the results of ZIKV infection of adult rhesus macaques. Following subcutaneous infection, animals developed transient plasma viremia and viruria from 1–7 days post infection (dpi) that was accompanied by the development of a rash, fever and conjunctivitis. Animals produced a robust adaptive immune response to ZIKV, although systemic cytokine response was minimal. At 7 dpi, virus was detected in peripheral nervous tissue, multiple lymphoid tissues, joints, and the uterus of the necropsied animals. Notably, viral RNA persisted in neuronal, lymphoid and joint/muscle tissues and the male and female reproductive tissues through 28 to 35 dpi. The tropism and persistence of ZIKV in the peripheral nerves and reproductive tract may provide a mechanism of subsequent neuropathogenesis and sexual transmission. PMID:28278237

  14. Peste des petits ruminants virus tissue tropism and pathogenesis in sheep and goats following experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Thang; Boshra, Hani; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Nfon, Charles; Gerdts, Volker; Tikoo, Suresh; Babiuk, Lorne A; Kara, Pravesh; Chetty, Thireshni; Mather, Arshad; Wallace, David B; Babiuk, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a viral disease which primarily affects small ruminants, causing significant economic losses for the livestock industry in developing countries. It is endemic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the Indian sub-continent. The primary hosts for peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) are goats and sheep; however recent models studying the pathology, disease progression and viremia of PPRV have focused primarily on goat models. This study evaluates the tissue tropism and pathogenesis of PPR following experimental infection of sheep and goats using a quantitative time-course study. Upon infection with a virulent strain of PPRV, both sheep and goats developed clinical signs and lesions typical of PPR, although sheep displayed milder clinical disease compared to goats. Tissue tropism of PPRV was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Lymph nodes, lymphoid tissue and digestive tract organs were the predominant sites of virus replication. The results presented in this study provide models for the comparative evaluation of PPRV pathogenesis and tissue tropism in both sheep and goats. These models are suitable for the establishment of experimental parameters necessary for the evaluation of vaccines, as well as further studies into PPRV-host interactions.

  15. Peste des petits ruminants virus tissue tropism and pathogenesis in sheep and goats following experimental infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang Truong

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a viral disease which primarily affects small ruminants, causing significant economic losses for the livestock industry in developing countries. It is endemic in Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and the Indian sub-continent. The primary hosts for peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV are goats and sheep; however recent models studying the pathology, disease progression and viremia of PPRV have focused primarily on goat models. This study evaluates the tissue tropism and pathogenesis of PPR following experimental infection of sheep and goats using a quantitative time-course study. Upon infection with a virulent strain of PPRV, both sheep and goats developed clinical signs and lesions typical of PPR, although sheep displayed milder clinical disease compared to goats. Tissue tropism of PPRV was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Lymph nodes, lymphoid tissue and digestive tract organs were the predominant sites of virus replication. The results presented in this study provide models for the comparative evaluation of PPRV pathogenesis and tissue tropism in both sheep and goats. These models are suitable for the establishment of experimental parameters necessary for the evaluation of vaccines, as well as further studies into PPRV-host interactions.

  16. Zika Virus infection of rhesus macaques leads to viral persistence in multiple tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alec J Hirsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV, an emerging flavivirus, has recently spread explosively through the Western hemisphere. In addition to symptoms including fever, rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, ZIKV infection of pregnant women can cause microcephaly and other developmental abnormalities in the fetus. We report herein the results of ZIKV infection of adult rhesus macaques. Following subcutaneous infection, animals developed transient plasma viremia and viruria from 1-7 days post infection (dpi that was accompanied by the development of a rash, fever and conjunctivitis. Animals produced a robust adaptive immune response to ZIKV, although systemic cytokine response was minimal. At 7 dpi, virus was detected in peripheral nervous tissue, multiple lymphoid tissues, joints, and the uterus of the necropsied animals. Notably, viral RNA persisted in neuronal, lymphoid and joint/muscle tissues and the male and female reproductive tissues through 28 to 35 dpi. The tropism and persistence of ZIKV in the peripheral nerves and reproductive tract may provide a mechanism of subsequent neuropathogenesis and sexual transmission.

  17. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L.; Pesavento, Patricia A.; Keesler, Rebekah I.; Singapuri, Anil; Watanabe, Jennifer; Watanabe, Rie; Yee, JoAnn; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Cruzen, Christina; Christe, Kari L.; Reader, J. Rachel; von Morgenland, Wilhelm; Gibbons, Anne M.; Allen, A. Mark; Linnen, Jeff; Gao, Kui; Delwart, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Stone, Mars; Lanteri, Marion; Bakkour, Sonia; Busch, Michael; Morrison, John

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV) are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA) could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants. PMID:28141843

  18. Tissue-protective effects of NKG2A in immune-mediated clearance of virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth H Ely

    Full Text Available Virus infection triggers a CD8(+ T cell response that aids in virus clearance, but also expresses effector functions that may result in tissue injury. CD8(+ T cells express a variety of activating and inhibiting ligands, though regulation of the expression of inhibitory receptors is not well understood. The ligand for the inhibitory receptor, NKG2A, is the non-classical MHC-I molecule Qa1(b, which may also serve as a putative restricting element for the T cell receptors of purported regulatory CD8(+ T cells. We have previously shown that Qa1(b-null mice suffer considerably enhanced immunopathologic lung injury in the context of CD8(+ T cell-mediated clearance of influenza infection, as well as evidence in a non-viral system that failure to ligate NKG2A on CD8(+ effector T cells may represent an important component of this process. In this report, we examine the requirements for induction of NKG2A expression, and show that NKG2A expression by CD8(+ T cells occurs as a result of migration from the MLN to the inflammatory lung environment, irrespective of peripheral antigen recognition. Further, we confirmed that NKG2A is a mediator in limiting immunopathology in virus infection using mice with a targeted deletion of NKG2A, and infecting the mutants with two different viruses, influenza and adenovirus. In neither infection is virus clearance altered. In influenza infection, the enhanced lung injury was associated with increased chemoattractant production, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, and significantly enhanced alveolar hemorrhage. The primary mechanism of enhanced injury was the loss of negative regulation of CD8(+ T cell effector function. A similar effect was observed in the livers of mutant mice infected intravenously with adenovirus. These results demonstrate the immunoregulatory role of CD8(+ NKG2A expression in virus infection, which negatively regulates T cell effector functions and contributes to protection of tissue

  19. Mechanisms of foot-and-mouth disease virus tropism inferred from differential tissue gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Zhu

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV targets specific tissues for primary infection, secondary high-titer replication (e.g. foot and mouth where it causes typical vesicular lesions and long-term persistence at some primary replication sites. Although integrin αVβ6 receptor has been identified as primary FMDV receptors in animals, their tissue distribution alone fails to explain these highly selective tropism-driven events. Thus, other molecular mechanisms must play roles in determining this tissue specificity. We hypothesized that differences in certain biological activities due to differential gene expression determine FMDV tropism and applied whole genome gene expression profiling to identify genes differentially expressed between FMDV-targeted and non-targeted tissues in terms of supporting primary infection, secondary replication including vesicular lesions, and persistence. Using statistical and bioinformatic tools to analyze the differential gene expression, we identified mechanisms that could explain FMDV tissue tropism based on its association with differential expression of integrin αVβ6 heterodimeric receptor (FMDV receptor, fibronectin (ligand of the receptor, IL-1 cytokines, death receptors and the ligands, and multiple genes in the biological pathways involved in extracellular matrix turnover and interferon signaling found in this study. Our results together with reported findings indicate that differences in (1 FMDV receptor availability and accessibility, (2 type I interferon-inducible immune response, and (3 ability to clear virus infected cells via death receptor signaling play roles in determining FMDV tissue tropism and the additional increase of high extracellular matrix turnover induced by FMDV infection, likely via triggering the signaling of highly expressed IL-1 cytokines, play a key role in the pathogenesis of vesicular lesions.

  20. [The receptor-mediated endocytosis of influenza viruses and low-density lipoproteins by tissue cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleskov, V M; Bannikov, A I; Zaĭtsev, Iu V

    1994-01-01

    The experimental data obtained by immunological, immunomorphological, biochemical, and virological methods are presented which substantiate a concept that various strains of influenza virus under study may penetrate tissue cells at sites of high affinity usually meant for low-density lipoproteins (LDLP) providing the cells with cholesterol for construction of outer and inner membranes. A computer analysis of a bank of data on the primary structure of proteins (the package of GENBER programme) revealed significant similarity of amino acid sequences between the area of viral hemagglutinin site attachment to cells and corresponding amino acids comprising apoB LDLP. The presented proofs are a convincing example of virus particles mimicry realized at the molecular level and give new concepts concerning the mechanisms of virus penetration into body cells which are important for the development of a principally new approach to creation of highly effective antiviral compounds. Moreover, the observed phenomenon may serve for explanation of the nature and mechanism of action of the so-called thermostable virus-neutralizing blood serum inhibitor.

  1. Diagnosis and control of cereal viruses in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Ata, Aboul-Ata E; Mazyad, Hamed; El-Attar, Ahmad Kamal; Soliman, Ahmed Mohamed; Anfoka, Ghandi; Zeidan, Muhammad; Gorovits, Rena; Sobol, Iris; Czosnek, Henryk

    2011-01-01

    Middle Eastern countries are major consumers of small grain cereals. Egypt is the biggest bread wheat producer with 7.4 million tons (MT) in 2007, but at the same time, it had to import 5.9 MT. Jordan and Israel import almost all the grains they consume. Viruses are the major pathogens that impair grain production in the Middle East, infecting in some years more than 80% of the crop. They are transmitted in nonpersistent, semipersistent, and persistent manners by insects (aphids, leafhoppers, and mites), and through soil and seeds. Hence, cereal viruses have to be controlled, not only in the field but also through the collaborative efforts of the plant quarantine services inland and at the borders, involving all the Middle Eastern countries. Diagnosis of cereal viruses may include symptom observation, immunological technologies such as ELISA using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised against virus coat protein expressed in bacteria, and molecular techniques such as PCR, microarrays, and deep sequencing. In this chapter, we explore the different diagnoses, typing, and detection techniques of cereal viruses available to the Middle Eastern countries. We highlight the plant quarantine service and the prevention methods. Finally, we review the breeding efforts for virus resistance, based on conventional selection and genetic engineering.

  2. Natural Hendra Virus Infection in Flying-Foxes - Tissue Tropism and Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren K Goldspink

    Full Text Available Hendra virus (HeV is a lethal zoonotic agent that emerged in 1994 in Australia. Pteropid bats (flying-foxes are the natural reservoir. To date, HeV has spilled over from flying-foxes to horses on 51 known occasions, and from infected horses to close-contact humans on seven occasions. We undertook screening of archived bat tissues for HeV by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Tissues were tested from 310 bats including 295 Pteropodiformes and 15 Vespertilioniformes. HeV was detected in 20 individual flying-foxes (6.4% from various tissues including spleen, kidney, liver, lung, placenta and blood components. Detection was significantly higher in Pteropus Alecto and P. conspicillatus, identifying species as a risk factor for infection. Further, our findings indicate that HeV has a predilection for the spleen, suggesting this organ plays an important role in HeV infection. The lack of detections in the foetal tissues of HeV-positive females suggests that vertical transmission is not a regular mode of transmission in naturally infected flying-foxes, and that placental and foetal tissues are not a major source of infection for horses. A better understanding of HeV tissue tropism will strengthen management of the risk of spillover from flying-foxes to horses and ultimately humans.

  3. [Detection of bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) in tissue samples of naturally and experimentally infected cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teifke, Jens P; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W

    2008-01-01

    Enzootic bovine leukaemia (EBL) which is caused by the bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) still plays a remarkable role despite a significant success in sanitation programmes. In the Federal Republic of Germany it was not possible to eradicate the disease until today. Sporadically during slaughter or necropsy of cattle neoplastic lesions of the lymphatic tissues are observed that need to be clarified with regard to BLV as etiological agent. Due to the fact that in most instances no serological data are available from the respective animals and blood drawings from the original holdings are not easy to obtain the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) opens new avenues as supplementary diagnostic tool to test unfixed lymphatic tissues for the presence of BLV proviral DNA. Lymph node tissues from 10 naturally or experimentally BLV-infected cattle, which have been monitored virologically and serologically, and tissues from 4 negative animals were processed, DNA was extracted and subjected to PCR to amplify BLV env gene specific sequences. The results show that in cattle with BLV-induced leukosis as well as in cattle, which were clinically healthy and unsuspicious at slaughter or at post-mortem, either with persistent lymphocytosis (PL) or without, BLV proviral DNA could be detected easily in samples of lymphatic tissues and in high concordance with serological data. In this article data from the National and OIE reference laboratory for EBL at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (FLI, Germany) are presented. Elaborated laboratory protocols for processing of tissue samples and performing of BLV-PCR are recommended.

  4. Illumination of parainfluenza virus infection and transmission in living animals reveals a tissue-specific dichotomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal W Burke

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The parainfluenza viruses (PIVs are highly contagious respiratory paramyxoviruses and a leading cause of lower respiratory tract (LRT disease. Since no vaccines or antivirals exist, non-pharmaceutical interventions are the only means of control for these pathogens. Here we used bioluminescence imaging to visualize the spatial and temporal progression of murine PIV1 (Sendai virus infection in living mice after intranasal inoculation or exposure by contact. A non-attenuated luciferase reporter virus (rSeV-luc(M-F* that expressed high levels of luciferase yet was phenotypically similar to wild-type Sendai virus in vitro and in vivo was generated to allow visualization. After direct intranasal inoculation, we unexpectedly observed that the upper respiratory tract (URT and trachea supported robust infection under conditions that result in little infection or pathology in the lungs including a low inoculum of virus, an attenuated virus, and strains of mice genetically resistant to lung infection. The high permissivity of the URT and trachea to infection resulted in 100% transmission to naïve contact recipients, even after low-dose (70 PFU inoculation of genetically resistant BALB/c donor mice. The timing of transmission was consistent with the timing of high viral titers in the URT and trachea of donor animals but was independent of the levels of infection in the lungs of donors. The data therefore reveals a disconnect between transmissibility, which is associated with infection in the URT, and pathogenesis, which arises from infection in the lungs and the immune response. Natural infection after transmission was universally robust in the URT and trachea yet limited in the lungs, inducing protective immunity without weight loss even in genetically susceptible 129/SvJ mice. Overall, these results reveal a dichotomy between PIV infection in the URT and trachea versus the lungs and define a new model for studies of pathogenesis, development of live

  5. Tissue Sites of Persistent Infection and Active Replication of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus during Acute Disease and Asymptomatic Infection in Experimentally Infected Equids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Sharon M.; Cook, Sheila J.; Cook, R. Frank; Rushlow, Keith E.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses is characterized by recurring cycles of disease and viremia that typically progress to an inapparent infection in which clinical symptoms are absent as host immune responses maintain control of virus replication indefinitely. The dynamics of EIAV viremia and its association with disease cycles have been well characterized, but there has been to date no comprehensive quantitative analyses of the specific tissue sites of EIAV infection and replication in experimentally infected equids during acute disease episodes and during asymptomatic infections in long-term inapparent carriers. To characterize the in vivo site(s) of viral infection and replication, we developed a quantitative competitive PCR assay capable of detecting 10 copies of viral DNA and a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR assay with a sensitivity of about 30 copies of viral singly spliced mRNA. Animals were experimentally infected with one of two reference viruses: the animal-passaged field isolate designated EIAVWyo and the virulent cell-adapted strain designated EIAVPV. Tissues and blood cells were isolated during the initial acute disease or from asymptomatic animals and analyzed for viral DNA and RNA levels by the respective quantitative assays. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the appearance of clinical symptoms in experimentally infected equids coincided with rapid widespread seeding of viral infection and replication in a variety of tissues. During acute disease, the predominant cellular site of viral infection and replication was the spleen, which typically accounted for over 90% of the cellular viral burden. In asymptomatic animals, viral DNA and RNA persisted in virtually all tissues tested, but at extremely low levels, a finding indicative of tight but incomplete immune control of EIAV replication. During all disease states, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were found to harbor less than 1% of

  6. Role of antibodies in controlling dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Wilschut, Jan C.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2009-01-01

    The incidence and disease burden of arthropod-borne flavivirus infections have dramatically increased during the last decades due to major societal and economic changes, including massive urbanization, lack of vector control, travel, and international trade. Specifically, in the case of dengue virus

  7. Pelacakan Secara Imunohistokimiawi Antigen Virus pada Ayam yang Diinfeksi dengan Virus Penyakit Tetelo (IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL DETECTION OF VIRAL ANTIGEN IN TISSUE OF CHICKENS EXPERIMENTALLY INFECTED WITH NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Agung Ayu Mirah Adi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the distribution of Newcastle disease virus (NDV following infection, chickenswere experimentally infected with visceretropic velogenic NDV isolate. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbsagainst the NDV LaSota vaccine strain were then produced to detect viral antigen in the infectedorgans. The mAbs were firstly tested for their specificity by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA using NDV and normal allantoic fluids as antigens. Eight mAbs specific against NDVwere isolated and two mAbs were used for immunodetection of NDV antigen in chicken’s tissues.By immunohistochemistry labeled streptavidin-biotin (LSAB staining NDV–antigen was detectedin paraffin embedded tissues of NDV-infected chickens. NDV antigen was not detected in noninfected chickens. In the infected chickens, high intensity of NDV antigen was detected in thelymphoid tissues, lung and intestine. The NDV antigen with a lesser intensity was detected in thebrain, trachea, liver and myocardium. This study shows that although viscerotropic velogenicNDV isolate can infect almost all organs, the main target of infection are lung, intestine andlymphoids tissues

  8. Tissue distribution of virus replication in cats experimentally infected with distinct feline calicivirus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truyen, U; Geissler, K; Hirschberger, J

    1999-09-01

    Four specific pathogen-free (SPF) cats were each inoculated with one of two genetically and antigenically well characterized feline caliciviruses originally isolated from cats with acute respiratory disease (FCV-KS100/2), or with chronic stomatitis (FCV-KS20). Two cats of each group were euthanized at day 10 post infection and two cats at day 28. No clear differences between the clinical disease induced by the two isolates could be observed, and no apparent differences in the tissue spectrum were seen between day 10 and 28. No persistent virus shedding was observed over the 4-week period of this experiment.

  9. Phytocompounds for the control of human enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Doris H

    2014-02-01

    Plant extracts and associated polyphenols are known for their varied health benefits that include antioxidant effects and antimicrobial properties. The increasing consumer demand for cost-effective and natural alternatives to chemically-synthesized antimicrobials and therapeutics that are also sustainable makes the field of phytochemical research rather intriguing and challenging. Human enteric viruses are increasingly recognized worldwide as significant causes of human disease in adults and children, alike. In the absence of available vaccines for the human noroviruses, plant extracts are gaining popularity for the prevention and treatment of viral diseases. Research on plant extracts (particularly polyphenols derived from fruits) for human enteric virus control will be briefly summarized in this article.

  10. Functional Interplay between Type I and II Interferons Is Essential to Limit Influenza A Virus-Induced Tissue Inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian A Stifter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host control of influenza A virus (IAV is associated with exuberant pulmonary inflammation characterized by the influx of myeloid cells and production of proinflammatory cytokines including interferons (IFNs. It is unclear, however, how the immune system clears the virus without causing lethal immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to its known anti-viral activity, STAT1 signaling coordinates host inflammation during IAV infection in mice. This regulatory mechanism is dependent on both type I IFN and IFN-γ receptor signaling and, importantly, requires the functional interplay between the two pathways. The protective function of type I IFNs is associated with not only the recruitment of classical inflammatory Ly6Chi monocytes into IAV-infected lungs, but also the prevention of excessive monocyte activation by IFN-γ. Unexpectedly, type I IFNs preferentially regulate IFN-γ signaling in Ly6Clo rather than inflammatory Ly6Chi mononuclear cell populations. In the absence of type I IFN signaling, Ly6Clo monocytes/macrophages, become phenotypically and functionally more proinflammatory than Ly6Chi cells, revealing an unanticipated function of the Ly6Clo mononuclear cell subset in tissue inflammation. In addition, we show that type I IFNs employ distinct mechanisms to regulate monocyte and neutrophil trafficking. Type I IFN signaling is necessary, but not sufficient, for preventing neutrophil recruitment into the lungs of IAV-infected mice. Instead, the cooperation of type I IFNs and lymphocyte-produced IFN-γ is required to regulate the tissue neutrophilic response to IAV. Our study demonstrates that IFN interplay links innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity to orchestrate tissue inflammation and reveals an additional level of complexity for IFN-dependent regulatory mechanisms that function to prevent excessive immunopathology while preserving anti-microbial functions.

  11. Genetic control of organ shape and tissue polarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia A Green

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which genes control organ shape are poorly understood. In principle, genes may control shape by modifying local rates and/or orientations of deformation. Distinguishing between these possibilities has been difficult because of interactions between patterns, orientations, and mechanical constraints during growth. Here we show how a combination of growth analysis, molecular genetics, and modelling can be used to dissect the factors contributing to shape. Using the Snapdragon (Antirrhinum flower as an example, we show how shape development reflects local rates and orientations of tissue growth that vary spatially and temporally to form a dynamic growth field. This growth field is under the control of several dorsoventral genes that influence flower shape. The action of these genes can be modelled by assuming they modulate specified growth rates parallel or perpendicular to local orientations, established by a few key organisers of tissue polarity. Models in which dorsoventral genes only influence specified growth rates do not fully account for the observed growth fields and shapes. However, the data can be readily explained by a model in which dorsoventral genes also modify organisers of tissue polarity. In particular, genetic control of tissue polarity organisers at ventral petal junctions and distal boundaries allows both the shape and growth field of the flower to be accounted for in wild type and mutants. The results suggest that genetic control of tissue polarity organisers has played a key role in the development and evolution of shape.

  12. Detection of Human Herpes Virus 8 in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, Rabecca; Kaile, Trevor; Kafita, Doris; Chisanga, Chrispin; Kalonda, Annie; Zulu, Ephraim; Samutela, Mulemba; Polepole, Pascal; Kwenda, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Human herpes virus-8, a γ2-herpes virus, is the aetiological agent of Kaposi sarcoma. Recently, Kaposi's sarcoma cases have increased in Zambia. However, the diagnosis of this disease is based on morphological appearance of affected tissues using histological techniques, and the association with its causative agent, Human Herpes virus 8 is not sought. This means poor prognosis for affected patients since the causative agent is not targeted during diagnosis and KS lesions may be mistaken for other reactive and neoplastic vascular proliferations when only histological techniques are used. Therefore, this study was aimed at providing evidence of Human Herpes virus 8 infection in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. One hundred and twenty suspected Kaposi's sarcoma archival formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues stored from January 2013 to December 2014 in the Histopathology Laboratory at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia were analysed using histology and Polymerase Chain Reaction targeting the ORF26 gene of Human Herpes virus 8. The predominant histological type of Kaposi's sarcoma detected was the Nodular type (60.7%) followed by the plaque type (22.6%) and patch type (16.7%). The nodular lesion was identified mostly in males (40.5%, 34/84) than females (20.2%, 17/84) (p=0.041). Human Herpes virus 8 DNA was detected in 53.6% (45/84) and mostly in the nodular KS lesions (60%, 27/84) (p=0.035). The findings in this study show that the Human Herpes virus-8 is detectable in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues, and, as previously reported in other settings, is closely associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. The study has provided important baseline data for use in the diagnosis of this disease and the identification of the virus in the tissues will aid in targeted therapy.

  13. ZIKA virus reveals broad tissue and cell tropism during the first trimester of pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Costa, Hicham; Gouilly, Jordi; Mansuy, Jean-Michel; Chen, Qian; Levy, Claude; Cartron, Géraldine; Veas, Francisco; Al-Daccak, Reem; Izopet, Jacques; Jabrane-Ferrat, Nabila

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of the Zika Virus (ZIKV) and its association with fetal abnormalities have raised worldwide concern. However, the cellular tropism and the mechanisms of ZIKV transmission to the fetus during early pregnancy are still largely unknown. Therefore, we ex vivo modeled the ZIKV transmission at the maternal-fetal interface using organ culture from first trimester pregnancy samples. Here, we provide evidence that ZIKV strain circulating in Brazil infects and damages tissue architecture of the maternal decidua basalis, the fetal placenta and umbilical cord. We also show that ZIKV replicates differentially in a wide range of maternal and fetal cells, including decidual fibroblasts and macrophages, trophoblasts, Hofbauer cells as well as umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells. The striking cellular tropism of ZIKV and its cytopathic-induced tissue injury during the first trimester of pregnancy could provide an explanation for the irreversible congenital damages. PMID:27759009

  14. Physical controls on directed virus assembly at nanoscale chemical templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C L; Chung, S; Chatterji, A; Lin, T; Johnson, J E; Hok, S; Perkins, J; De Yoreo, J

    2006-05-10

    Viruses are attractive building blocks for nanoscale heterostructures, but little is understood about the physical principles governing their directed assembly. In-situ force microscopy was used to investigate organization of Cowpea Mosaic Virus engineered to bind specifically and reversibly at nanoscale chemical templates with sub-30nm features. Morphological evolution and assembly kinetics were measured as virus flux and inter-viral potential were varied. The resulting morphologies were similar to those of atomic-scale epitaxial systems, but the underlying thermodynamics was analogous to that of colloidal systems in confined geometries. The 1D templates biased the location of initial cluster formation, introduced asymmetric sticking probabilities, and drove 1D and 2D condensation at subcritical volume fractions. The growth kinetics followed a t{sup 1/2} law controlled by the slow diffusion of viruses. The lateral expansion of virus clusters that initially form on the 1D templates following introduction of polyethylene glycol (PEG) into the solution suggests a significant role for weak interaction.

  15. technologies: controlling african cassava mosaic virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthy planting material, rogue infected plants and change varieties in attempts at control. This ... Moreover, obstacles to adoption must be identified and overcome. Key Words: Cassava .... adaptability, ACMD resistance and yield of improved ...

  16. Tissue and cellular tropism, pathology and pathogenesis of Ebola and Marburg viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, Roosecelis Brasil; Ng, Dianna L; Greer, Patricia W; Rollin, Pierre E; Zaki, Sherif R

    2015-01-01

    Ebola viruses and Marburg viruses include some of the most virulent and fatal pathogens known to humans. These viruses cause severe haemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates in the range 25-90%. The diagnosis of filovirus using formalin-fixed tissues from fatal cases poses a significant challenge. The most characteristic histopathological findings are seen in the liver; however, the findings overlap with many other viral and non-viral haemorrhagic diseases. The need to distinguish filovirus infections from other haemorrhagic fevers, particularly in areas with multiple endemic viral haemorrhagic agents, is of paramount importance. In this review we discuss the current state of knowledge of filovirus infections and their pathogenesis, including histopathological findings, epidemiology, modes of transmission and filovirus entry and spread within host organisms. The pathogenesis of filovirus infections is complex and involves activation of the mononuclear phagocytic system, with release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, endothelial dysfunction, alterations of the innate and adaptive immune systems, direct organ and endothelial damage from unrestricted viral replication late in infection, and coagulopathy. Although our understanding of the pathogenesis of filovirus infections has rapidly increased in the past few years, many questions remain unanswered.

  17. Detection of Genotype 4 Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Systemic Tissues in Cross-Species Infected Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiaoxing; An, Junqing; She, Ruiping; Shi, Ruihan; Hao, Wenzhuo; Soomro, MajidHussain; Yuan, Xuerui; Yang, Jinling; Wang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be transmitted across species. According to previous reports, swine HEV has two genotypes, genotype 3 and 4, and both can infect humans by the fecal-oral route. Thus, it is crucial for the control of HEV zoonotic transmission to evaluate the dynamics of viral shedding and distribution in different tissues during cross-species infection by HEV. In this study, rabbits were infected with genotype 4 swine HEV by the intraperitoneal route. The results showed that HEV RNA not only shed in the feces but also in the saliva of some rabbits during infection with swine HEV. Viremia appeared late after infection, and anti-HEV IgG was not obvious until the appearance of high viremia levels. After the rabbits were euthanized, a histopathological examination showed that the livers developed overt hepatitis accompanied by an elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). Furthermore, HEV RNA was detected in various tissues, especially in the salivary glands and tonsils. Subsequently, negative-stranded HEV RNA was practiced in tissues with positive HEV RNA, which demonstrated that HEV replicated in the tissues. Next, we harvested additional tissues from the liver, salivary gland, tonsil, spleen, thymus gland, lymph node and intestine, which are known as replication sites of swine HEV. Additionally, we also observed the HEV antigen distributed in the organs above through immunohistochemical staining. These results demonstrate that rabbits could be used as an animal model for researching cross-species infection of genotype 4 HEV. It is also noteworthy that HEV can shed in the saliva and presents the risk of droplet transmission. These new data provide valuable information for understanding cross-species infection by HEV. PMID:28129390

  18. Thymidine Kinase-Negative Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Can Efficiently Establish Persistent Infection in Neural Tissues of Nude Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Yao, Hui-Wen; Wang, Li-Chiu; Shen, Fang-Hsiu; Hsu, Sheng-Min; Chen, Shun-Hua

    2017-02-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes latency in neural tissues of immunocompetent mice but persists in both peripheral and neural tissues of lymphocyte-deficient mice. Thymidine kinase (TK) is believed to be essential for HSV-1 to persist in neural tissues of immunocompromised mice, because infectious virus of a mutant with defects in both TK and UL24 is detected only in peripheral tissues, but not in neural tissues, of severe combined immunodeficiency mice (T. Valyi-Nagy, R. M. Gesser, B. Raengsakulrach, S. L. Deshmane, B. P. Randazzo, A. J. Dillner, and N. W. Fraser, Virology 199:484-490, 1994, https://doi.org/10.1006/viro.1994.1150). Here we find infiltration of CD4 and CD8 T cells in peripheral and neural tissues of mice infected with a TK-negative mutant. We therefore investigated the significance of viral TK and host T cells for HSV-1 to persist in neural tissues using three genetically engineered mutants with defects in only TK or in both TK and UL24 and two strains of nude mice. Surprisingly, all three mutants establish persistent infection in up to 100% of brain stems and 93% of trigeminal ganglia of adult nude mice at 28 days postinfection, as measured by the recovery of infectious virus. Thus, in mouse neural tissues, host T cells block persistent HSV-1 infection, and viral TK is dispensable for the virus to establish persistent infection. Furthermore, we found 30- to 200-fold more virus in neural tissues than in the eye and detected glycoprotein C, a true late viral antigen, in brainstem neurons of nude mice persistently infected with the TK-negative mutant, suggesting that adult mouse neurons can support the replication of TK-negative HSV-1.

  19. Virus expression in different tissues of normal and tumor-bearing mice inoculated with a murine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, J K; Santillana, M; Hue, G; Barski, G

    1977-11-15

    Evolution of virus expression in different lymphoid organs as well as in solid syngeneic tumors of mice inoculated with an MuLV was studied with the aid of in vitro XC co-culture technique. When normal adult mice of strain XLII were inoculated intraperitoneally with a cultured Rauscher virus (RC), the virus could be detected, 10 days after inoculation, only in bone marrow in small amounts and thereafter no virus could be found in any of the organs tested, including bone marrow, spleen, thymus, lymph node and kidney. However, when age- and sex-matched parallel mice bearing syngeneic subcutaneous non-viral tumors were inoculated similarly with the RC virus, the virus could be detected abundantly not only in bone marrow and spleen but also in tumors during the first 3 weeks and even 6 weeks after virus inoculation. Transitional decrease or disappearance of the virus was observed around the 25th-31st day in organs and tumors of the inoculated mice. When the tumor mass was removed from these mice by surgery, the virus disappeared rapidly and definitely from all the organs tested. The virus recovered from in vitro explanted and cultured tumors, taken from mice inoculated with the virus, induced typical lymphoid leukemia in BALB/c mice inoculated as newborns. However, from certain aspects (hypertrophy of the thymus and lymph nodes), this virus was different from the original RC virus.

  20. High-risk human papilloma virus in archival tissues of oral pathosis and normal oral mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Dhanapal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Oral cancer ranks third among all cancers in the Indian population. Human papilloma virus (HPV plays a significant role in oral carcinogenesis. Population-based subtype variations are present in the HPV prevalence. This study gives an emphasis on the parameters to be considered in formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissues for polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based research work. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional study on archival paraffin-embedded tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, epithelial dysplasia, and normal oral mucosa surrounding impacted tooth was amplified by PCR for the E6 gene of HPV type 16 and E1 gene of HPV type 18. Results: HPV 18 was positive in three OSCC cases. There was no statistically significant association of the positivity of HPV with the age, gender or habit. The HPV positive patients had a tobacco habit and were of a younger age group. Conclusion: The presence of HPV in carcinomatous tissue highlights the possible role of HPV in carcinogenesis and archival paraffin embedded tissue specimen can be used for this analysis. Recent studies on genomic analyses have highlighted that the HPV positive tumors are a separate subgroup based on genomic sequencing. The results of a larger retrospective study will help further in our understanding of the role of HPV in carcinogenesis, this study could form the baseline for such follow-up studies.

  1. miRNA control of tissue repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Chandan K; Ghatak, Subhadip

    2015-10-01

    Tissue repair and regeneration rely on the function of miRNA, molecular silencers that enact post-transcriptional gene silencing of coding genes. Disruption of miRNA homeostasis is developmentally lethal, indicating that fetal tissue development is tightly controlled by miRNAs. Multiple critical facets of adult tissue repair are subject to control by miRNAs, as well. Sources of cell pool for tissue repair and regeneration are diverse and provided by processes including cellular dedifferentiation, transdifferentiation, and reprogramming. Each of these processes is regulated by miRNAs. Furthermore, induced pluripotency may be achieved by miRNA-based strategies independent of transcription factor manipulation. The observation that miRNA does not integrate into the genome makes miRNA-based therapeutic strategies translationally valuable. Tools to manipulate cellular and tissue miRNA levels include mimics and inhibitors that may be specifically targeted to cells of interest at the injury site. Here, we discuss the extraordinary importance of miRNAs in tissue repair and regeneration based on emergent reports and rapid advances in miRNA-based therapeutics.

  2. Synthetic electrophysiology: optically controlled oscillators in an engineered bioelectric tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Harold; Zhang, Hongkang; Werley, Christopher; Cohen, Adam

    Multicellular electrical dynamics underlie crucial physiological functions, but the complexity of natural bioelectricity can obscure the relation of individual components (proteins, cells) to emergent system-level dynamics. Here we introduce optopatch-spiking HEK(OS-HEK) tissue, a minimal synthetic bioelectric tissue with 4 transgenic components that supports optical initiation of propagating electrical waves as well direct optical voltage readout. In conjunction with a home-built inverted microscope capable of patterned illumination, we use this tissue to probe the biophysical attributes of this excitable bioelectric medium, including dispersion relations, curvature-dependent wavefront propagation, electrotonic coupling, and effects of boundaries. We then used chemical patterning to define cellular circuits that support controllable oscillations and which retain memory for more than 2 hours (corresponding to 104 oscillations), constituting a substrate for binary bioelectric data storage. Finally, we use optical patterning of boundary conditions in a physically homogeneous tissue to design dynamically reconfigurable oscillators.

  3. Ebola virus. Two-pore channels control Ebola virus host cell entry and are drug targets for disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yasuteru; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Chen, Cheng-Chang; Tidwell, Michael W; Bauta, William E; Klugbauer, Norbert; Grimm, Christian; Wahl-Schott, Christian; Biel, Martin; Davey, Robert A

    2015-02-27

    Ebola virus causes sporadic outbreaks of lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans, but there is no currently approved therapy. Cells take up Ebola virus by macropinocytosis, followed by trafficking through endosomal vesicles. However, few factors controlling endosomal virus movement are known. Here we find that Ebola virus entry into host cells requires the endosomal calcium channels called two-pore channels (TPCs). Disrupting TPC function by gene knockout, small interfering RNAs, or small-molecule inhibitors halted virus trafficking and prevented infection. Tetrandrine, the most potent small molecule that we tested, inhibited infection of human macrophages, the primary target of Ebola virus in vivo, and also showed therapeutic efficacy in mice. Therefore, TPC proteins play a key role in Ebola virus infection and may be effective targets for antiviral therapy.

  4. In vitro propagation of plant virus using different forms of plant tissue culture and modes of culture operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sharon M-H; Doran, Pauline M

    2009-09-10

    Plant virus accumulation was investigated in vitro using three different forms of plant tissue culture. Suspended cells, hairy roots and shooty teratomas of Nicotiana benthamiana were infected with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) using the same initial virus:biomass ratio. Viral infection did not affect tissue growth or morphology in any of the three culture systems. Average maximum virus concentrations in hairy roots and shooty teratomas were similar and about an order of magnitude higher than in suspended cells. Hairy roots were considered the preferred host because of their morphological stability in liquid medium and relative ease of culture. The average maximum virus concentration in the hairy roots was 0.82+/-0.14 mg g(-1) dry weight; viral coat protein represented a maximum of approximately 6% of total soluble protein in the biomass. Virus accumulation in hairy roots was investigated further using different modes of semi-continuous culture operation aimed at prolonging the root growth phase and providing nutrient supplementation; however, virus concentrations in the roots were not enhanced compared with simple batch culture. The relative infectivity of virus in the biomass declined by 80-90% during all the cultures tested, irrespective of the form of plant tissue used or mode of culture operation. Hairy root cultures inoculated with a transgenic TMV-based vector in batch culture accumulated green fluorescent protein (GFP); however, maximum GFP concentrations in the biomass were relatively low at 39 microg g(-1) dry weight, probably due to genetic instability of the vector. This work highlights the advantages of using hairy roots for in vitro propagation of TMV compared with shooty teratomas and suspended plant cells, and demonstrates that batch root culture is more effective than semi-continuous operations for accumulation of high virus concentrations in the biomass.

  5. Optical control of excitation waves in cardiac tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Klimas, Aleksandra; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Tomek, Jakub; Corbett, Alex; Entcheva, Emilia; Bub, Gil

    2015-12-01

    In nature, macroscopic excitation waves are found in a diverse range of settings including chemical reactions, metal rust, yeast, amoeba and the heart and brain. In the case of living biological tissue, the spatiotemporal patterns formed by these excitation waves are different in healthy and diseased states. Current electrical and pharmacological methods for wave modulation lack the spatiotemporal precision needed to control these patterns. Optical methods have the potential to overcome these limitations, but to date have only been demonstrated in simple systems, such as the Belousov-Zhabotinsky chemical reaction. Here, we combine dye-free optical imaging with optogenetic actuation to achieve dynamic control of cardiac excitation waves. Illumination with patterned light is demonstrated to optically control the direction, speed and spiral chirality of such waves in cardiac tissue. This all-optical approach offers a new experimental platform for the study and control of pattern formation in complex biological excitable systems.

  6. Evaluation of Placental and Fetal Tissue Specimens for Zika Virus Infection - 50 States and District of Columbia, January-December, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan-Steiner, Sarah; Simeone, Regina; Simon, Elizabeth; Bhatnagar, Julu; Oduyebo, Titilope; Free, Rebecca; Denison, Amy M; Rabeneck, Demi B; Ellington, Sascha; Petersen, Emily; Gary, Joy; Hale, Gillian; Keating, M Kelly; Martines, Roosecelis B; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Ritter, Jana; Lee, Ellen; Davidson, Alexander; Conners, Erin; Scotland, Sarah; Sandhu, Kayleigh; Bingham, Andrea; Kassens, Elizabeth; Smith, Lou; St George, Kirsten; Ahmad, Nina; Tanner, Mary; Beavers, Suzanne; Miers, Brooke; VanMaldeghem, Kelley; Khan, Sumaiya; Rabe, Ingrid; Gould, Carolyn; Meaney-Delman, Dana; Honein, Margaret A; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Jamieson, Denise J; Fischer, Marc; Zaki, Sherif R

    2017-06-23

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1), and detection of Zika virus RNA in clinical and tissue specimens can provide definitive laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection. Whereas duration of viremia is typically short, prolonged detection of Zika virus RNA in placental, fetal, and neonatal brain tissue has been reported and can provide key diagnostic information by confirming recent Zika virus infection (2). In accordance with recent guidance (3,4), CDC provides Zika virus testing of placental and fetal tissues in clinical situations where this information could add diagnostic value. This report describes the evaluation of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens tested for Zika virus infection in 2016 and the contribution of this testing to the public health response. Among 546 live births with possible maternal Zika virus exposure, for which placental tissues were submitted by the 50 states and District of Columbia (DC), 60 (11%) were positive by Zika virus reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Among 81 pregnancy losses for which placental and/or fetal tissues were submitted, 18 (22%) were positive by Zika virus RT-PCR. Zika virus RT-PCR was positive on placental tissues from 38/363 (10%) live births with maternal serologic evidence of recent unspecified flavivirus infection and from 9/86 (10%) with negative maternal Zika virus immunoglobulin M (IgM) where possible maternal exposure occurred >12 weeks before serum collection. These results demonstrate that Zika virus RT-PCR testing of tissue specimens can provide a confirmed diagnosis of recent maternal Zika virus infection.

  7. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, Dylan P.; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs comp...

  8. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cui

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, a major cause of cancer death in China, is preceded by chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis (LC. Although hepatitis B virus (HBV has been regarded as a clear etiology of human hepatocarcinogenesis, the mechanism is still needs to be further clarified. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to identify the differential expression protein profiles between HCC and the adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues. Methods Eighteen cases of HBV-related HCC including 12 cases of LC-developed HCC and 6 cases of chronic hepatitis B (CHB-developed HCC were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS, and the results were compared to those of paired adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues. Results A total of 17 differentially expressed proteins with diverse biological functions were identified. Among these, 10 proteins were up-regulated, whereas the other 7 proteins were down-regulated in cancerous tissues. Two proteins, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2 and ADP/ATP carrier protein were found to be up-regulated only in CHB-developed HCC tissues. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and Rho-GTPase-activating protein 4 were down-regulated in LC-developed and CHB-developed HCC tissues, respectively. Although 11 out of these 17 proteins have been already described by previous studies, or are already known to be involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, this study revealed 6 new proteins differentially expressed in HBV-related HCC. Conclusion These findings elucidate that there are common features between CHB-developed HCC and LC-developed HCC. The identified proteins are valuable for studying the hepatocarcinogenesis, and may be potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets for HBV-related HCC.

  9. Impact of aphid alarm pheromone release on virus transmission efficiency: When pest control strategy could induce higher virus dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fang-Jing; Bosquée, Emilie; Liu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Ju-Lian; Yong, Liu; Francis, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Aphids cause serious damages to crops not only by tacking sap but also by transmitting numerous viruses. To develop biological control, the aphid alarm pheromone, namely E-β-farnesene (EβF), has been demonstrated to be efficient to repel aphids and as attract beneficials, making it a potential tool to control aphid pests. Considering aphids also as virus vectors, changes of their behavior could also interfere with the virus acquisition and transmission process. Here, a combination of two aphid species and two potato virus models were selected to test the influence of EβF release on aphid and virus dispersion under laboratory conditions. EβF release was found to significantly decrease the population of Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae around the infochemical releaser but simultaneously also increasing the dispersal of Potato Virus Y (PVY). At the opposite, no significant difference for Potato Leaf Roll Virus (PLRV) transmission efficiency was observed with similar aphid alarm pheromone releases for none of the aphid species. These results provide some support to carefully consider infochemical releasers not only for push-pull strategy and pest control but also to include viral disease in a the plant protection to aphids as they are also efficient virus vectors. Impact of aphid kinds and transmission mechanisms will be discussed according to the large variation found between persistent and non persistent potato viruses and interactions with aphids and related infochemicals.

  10. Detection and characterization of Newcastle disease virus in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from commercial broilers in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Glil, Mostafa Y; Mor, Sunil K; Sharafeldin, Tamer A; Porter, Robert E; Goyal, Sagar M

    2014-03-01

    Newcastle disease (ND) is highly contagious and causes severe economic losses to the poultry industry due to high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we describe the detection of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in formalin-fixed tissues from an outbreak of ND on broiler farms in Egypt. The affected birds experienced respiratory and/or nervous signs and a 75% mortality rate. Tissue samples were collected and placed in 10% neutral buffered formalin followed by embedding in paraffin. RNA was extracted from 80-microm formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks and recovered in 60 microl of elution buffer. All samples were negative for influenza virus by real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR but positive for NDV. These flocks were known to have been vaccinated with a live NDV vaccine (LaSota strain). The nucleic acid sequences of the virus detected in this study were similar to those of a velogenic virus at its cleavage site 111GRRQKR*F117 and clustered with class II genogroup VII lineage of NDV, with a nucleotide sequence identity of 94%-99%. Although extraction and amplification of NDV from paraffin-embedded tissues from experimentally infected birds has been reported previously, this study reports on the use of RT-PCR on formalin-fixed tissues from actual field samples.

  11. Control of the rescue and replication of Semliki Forest virus recombinants by the insertion of miRNA target sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar Ratnik

    Full Text Available Due to their broad cell- and tissue-tropism, alphavirus-based replication-competent vectors are of particular interest for anti-cancer therapy. These properties may, however, be potentially hazardous unless the virus infection is controlled. While the RNA genome of alphaviruses precludes the standard control techniques, host miRNAs can be used to down-regulate viral replication. In this study, target sites from ubiquitous miRNAs and those of miRNAs under-represented in cervical cancer cells were inserted into replication-competent DNA/RNA layered vectors of Semliki Forest virus. It was found that in order to achieve the most efficient suppression of recombinant virus rescue, the introduced target sequences must be fully complementary to those of the corresponding miRNAs. Target sites of ubiquitous miRNAs, introduced into the 3' untranslated region of the viral vector, profoundly reduced the rescue of recombinant viruses. Insertion of the same miRNA targets into coding region of the viral vector was approximately 300-fold less effective. Viruses carrying these miRNAs were genetically unstable and rapidly lost the target sequences. This process was delayed, but not completely prevented, by miRNA inhibitors. Target sites of miRNA under-represented in cervical cancer cells had much smaller but still significant effects on recombinant virus rescue in cervical cancer-derived HeLa cells. Over-expression of miR-214, one of these miRNAs, reduced replication of the targeted virus. Though the majority of rescued viruses maintained the introduced miRNA target sequences, genomes with deletions of these sequences were also detected. Thus, the low-level repression of rescue and replication of targeted virus in HeLa cells was still sufficient to cause genetic instability.

  12. Control of the rescue and replication of Semliki Forest virus recombinants by the insertion of miRNA target sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnik, Kaspar; Viru, Liane; Merits, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Due to their broad cell- and tissue-tropism, alphavirus-based replication-competent vectors are of particular interest for anti-cancer therapy. These properties may, however, be potentially hazardous unless the virus infection is controlled. While the RNA genome of alphaviruses precludes the standard control techniques, host miRNAs can be used to down-regulate viral replication. In this study, target sites from ubiquitous miRNAs and those of miRNAs under-represented in cervical cancer cells were inserted into replication-competent DNA/RNA layered vectors of Semliki Forest virus. It was found that in order to achieve the most efficient suppression of recombinant virus rescue, the introduced target sequences must be fully complementary to those of the corresponding miRNAs. Target sites of ubiquitous miRNAs, introduced into the 3' untranslated region of the viral vector, profoundly reduced the rescue of recombinant viruses. Insertion of the same miRNA targets into coding region of the viral vector was approximately 300-fold less effective. Viruses carrying these miRNAs were genetically unstable and rapidly lost the target sequences. This process was delayed, but not completely prevented, by miRNA inhibitors. Target sites of miRNA under-represented in cervical cancer cells had much smaller but still significant effects on recombinant virus rescue in cervical cancer-derived HeLa cells. Over-expression of miR-214, one of these miRNAs, reduced replication of the targeted virus. Though the majority of rescued viruses maintained the introduced miRNA target sequences, genomes with deletions of these sequences were also detected. Thus, the low-level repression of rescue and replication of targeted virus in HeLa cells was still sufficient to cause genetic instability.

  13. Detection and localisation of picorna-like virus particles in tissues of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ongus, J.R.; Boot, W.J.; Calis, J.; Bonmatin, J.M.; Bengsch, E.; Peters, D.

    2007-01-01

    Virus-like particles, 27 nm in diameter, were observed in extracts of individual Varroa destructor mites and in sections of mite tissue. Application of a purification procedure resulted in virus preparations that were used to prepare an antiserum to detect the virus in individual mites.

  14. Detection and localisation of picorna-like virus particles in tissues of Varroa destructor, an ectoparasite of the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ongus, J.R.; Boot, W.J.; Calis, J.; Bonmatin, J.M.; Bengsch, E.; Peters, D.

    2007-01-01

    Virus-like particles, 27 nm in diameter, were observed in extracts of individual Varroa destructor mites and in sections of mite tissue. Application of a purification procedure resulted in virus preparations that were used to prepare an antiserum to detect the virus in individual mites. Immunohistol

  15. White spot syndrome virus enters crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiajun; Li, Fang; Wu, Junjun; Yang, Feng

    2015-12-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen of aquacultured shrimp. However, the mechanism of its entry remains poorly understood. In this study, by analyzing the internalization of WSSV using crayfish hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, we showed that WSSV virions were engulfed by cell membrane invaginations sharing the features of clathrin-coated pits and then internalized into coated cytoplasmic vesicles. Further investigation indicated that WSSV internalization was significantly inhibited by chlorpromazine (CPZ) but not genistein. The internalized virions were colocalized with endogenous clathrin as well as transferrin which undergoes clathrin-dependent uptake. Preventing endosome acidification by ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) or chloroquine (CQ) dramatically reduced WSSV entry as well. Moreover, disturbance of dynamin activity or depletion of membrane cholesterol also blocked WSSV uptake. These data indicate that WSSV enters crayfish HPT cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a pH-dependent manner, and membrane cholesterol as well as dynamin is critical for efficient viral entry.

  16. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells but not hemocytes are permissive for white spot syndrome virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Li, Fang; Huang, Jiajun; Xu, Limei; Yang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Hemocytes are the major immune cells of crustaceans which are believed to be essential for the pathogenesis of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Crayfish hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells have been found to be susceptible to WSSV infection, but the procedure of WSSV infection to both cell types has not yet been carefully investigated. In this study, we analyzed the infection and proliferation of WSSV in crayfish hemocytes as well as HPT cells in detail through transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The results showed that WSSV could enter both hemocytes and HPT cells through endocytosis, but the production of progeny virus was only achieved in HPT cells. Further investigation demonstrated that although WSSV could transcribe its genes in both cell types, viral genome replication and structural protein expression were unsuccessful in hemocytes, which may be responsible for the failure of progeny production. Therefore, we propose that both hemocytes and HPT cells are susceptible to WSSV infection but only HPT cells are permissive to WSSV replication. These findings will extend our knowledge of the interaction between WSSV and the host immune system.

  17. Perinatal Exposure to Insecticide Methamidophos Suppressed Production of Proinflammatory Cytokines Responding to Virus Infection in Lung Tissues in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Watanabe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamidophos, a representative organophosphate insecticide, is regulated because of its severe neurotoxicity, but it is suspected of contaminating agricultural foods in many countries due to illicit use. To reveal unknown effects of methamidophos on human health, we evaluated the developmental immunotoxicity of methamidophos using a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection mouse model. Pregnant mice were exposed to methamidophos (10 or 20 ppm in their drinking water from gestation day 10 to weaning on postnatal day 21. Offsprings born to these dams were intranasally infected with RSV. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interferon-gamma in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids after infection were significantly decreased in offspring mice exposed to methamidophos. Treatment with methamidophos did not affect the pulmonary viral titers but suppressed moderately the inflammation of lung tissues of RSV-infected offspring, histopathologically. DNA microarray analysis revealed that gene expression of the cytokines in the lungs of offspring mice exposed to 20 ppm of methamidophos was apparently suppressed compared with the control. Methamidophos did not suppress IL-6 production in RSV-infected J774.1 cell cultures. Thus, exposure of the mother to methamidophos during pregnancy and nursing was suggested to cause an irregular immune response in the lung tissues in the offspring mice.

  18. In situ hybridization with labeled probes: assessment of african Swine Fever virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Maria; Rodríguez, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In situ hybridization (ISH) has become a very valuable molecular diagnostic tool to detect specific DNA or RNA sequences in biological samples through the use of complementary DNA- or RNA-labeled probes. Here, we describe an optimized in situ hybridization protocol to detect African swine fever virus (ASFV) DNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues using digoxigenin-labeled probes.

  19. Control of Scar Tissue Formation in the Cornea: Strategies in Clinical and Corneal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L. Wilson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation.

  20. Control of scar tissue formation in the cornea: strategies in clinical and corneal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Samantha L; El Haj, Alicia J; Yang, Ying

    2012-09-18

    Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation.

  1. Brown-adipose-tissue macrophages control tissue innervation and homeostatic energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Yochai; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Cortese, Nina; Haimon, Zhana; Sar Shalom, Hadas; Kuperman, Yael; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brandis, Alexander; David, Eyal; Segal-Hayoun, Yifat; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Yaron, Avraham; Jung, Steffen

    2017-06-01

    Tissue macrophages provide immunological defense and contribute to the establishment and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we used constitutive and inducible mutagenesis to delete the nuclear transcription regulator Mecp2 in macrophages. Mice that lacked the gene encoding Mecp2, which is associated with Rett syndrome, in macrophages did not show signs of neurodevelopmental disorder but displayed spontaneous obesity, which was linked to impaired function of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Specifically, mutagenesis of a BAT-resident Cx3Cr1(+) macrophage subpopulation compromised homeostatic thermogenesis but not acute, cold-induced thermogenesis. Mechanistically, malfunction of BAT in pre-obese mice with mutant macrophages was associated with diminished sympathetic innervation and local titers of norepinephrine, which resulted in lower expression of thermogenic factors by adipocytes. Mutant macrophages overexpressed the signaling receptor and ligand PlexinA4, which might contribute to the phenotype by repulsion of sympathetic axons expressing the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A. Collectively, we report a previously unappreciated homeostatic role for macrophages in the control of tissue innervation. Disruption of this circuit in BAT resulted in metabolic imbalance.

  2. Persistent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Infection in the Nasopharynx of Cattle; Tissue-Specific Distribution and Local Cytokine Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Pacheco

    Full Text Available Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 steers infected with FMDV serotype A, O or SAT2, had the highest prevalence of overall viral detection in the dorsal nasopharynx (80.95% and dorsal soft palate (71.43%. FMDV was less frequently detected in laryngeal mucosal tissues, oropharyngeal mucosal sites, and lymph nodes draining the pharynx. Immunomicroscopy indicated that within persistently infected mucosal tissues, FMDV antigens were rarely detectable within few epithelial cells in regions of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT. Transcriptome analysis of persistently infected pharyngeal tissues by qRT-PCR for 14 cytokine genes indicated a general trend of decreased mRNA levels compared to uninfected control animals. Although, statistically significant differences were not observed, greatest suppression of relative expression (RE was identified for IP-10 (RE = 0.198, IFN-β (RE = 0.269, IL-12 (RE = 0.275, and IL-2 (RE = 0.312. Increased relative expression was detected for IL-6 (RE = 2.065. Overall, this data demonstrates that during the FMDV carrier state in cattle, viral persistence is associated with epithelial cells of the nasopharynx in the upper respiratory tract and decreased levels of mRNA for several immunoregulatory cytokines in the infected tissues.

  3. Sensitivity of field tests, serological and molecular techniques for Plum Pox Virus detection in various tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca VIRŠČEK MARN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of field tests (AgriStrip  and Immunochromato, DAS-ELISA, two step RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR for Plum pox virus (PPV detection was tested in various tissues of apricot, peach, plum and damson plum trees infected with isolates belonging to PPV-D, PPV-M or PPV-Rec, the three strains present in Slovenia. Flowers of apricot and plum in full bloom proved to be a very good source for detection of PPV. PPV could be detected with all tested techniques in symptomatic parts of leaves in May and with one exception even in the beginning of August, but it was not detected in asymptomatic leaves using field tests, DAS-ELISA and partly also molecular techniques. PPV was detected only in some of the samples of asymptomatic parts of the leaves with symptoms and of stalks by field tests and DAS-ELISA. Infections were not detected in buds in August using field tests or DAS-ELISA. Field tests are useful for confirmation of the PPV infection in symptomatic leaves, but in tissues without symptoms DAS-ELISA should be combined or replaced by molecular techniques.

  4. Detection and quantitation of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using lethal and non-lethal tissue sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Robert M; Lapatra, Scott E; Dhar, Arun K

    2008-02-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is a bisegmented double-stranded RNA virus belonging to the family Birnaviridae, genus Aquabirnavirus, which is a major viral pathogen of salmonid fish. The virus infects wild and cultured salmonids, causing high mortality in juvenile trout and salmon. A highly sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assay using the fluorogenic dye SYBR((R)) Green I was developed for the detection and quantitation of IPNV in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Rainbow trout were infected experimentally with IPNV in the laboratory by injection or immersion and then pectoral fin, spleen, and head kidney samples were collected for analysis. The corresponding cDNA was synthesized using DNase I-treated total RNA and then real-time RT-PCR was performed using primers based on the IPNV non-structural protein gene, designated as either NS or VP4. Rainbow trout beta-actin and elongation factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) genes were used as internal controls. Using real-time RT-PCR, the virus was successfully detected in pectoral fin, spleen, and head kidney tissue samples. The dissociation curves for each amplicon showed a single melting peak at 83, 81.5, and 84 degrees C for IPNV NS, trout beta-actin, and EF-1alpha genes, respectively. The amplicon size and nucleotide sequence was used to confirm the specificity of the products. Using a dilution series of in vitro transcribed RNA, IPNV was reliably detected down to 10 RNA copies and had a dynamic range up to 10(7) RNA copies. A time course assay, using immersion challenged samples, revealed that the virus could be detected in pectoral fin, spleen, and head kidney as early as 24h post-challenge. The average viral load in all three tissues increased over time, reaching its highest level at 21 days post-challenge, which was followed by a slight decrease at 28 days post-challenge. IPNV load in pectoral fin tissue was comparable to the viral load in spleen and head kidney tissues, indicating that pectoral fin

  5. Examination of epithelial tissue cytokine response to natural peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection in sheep and goats by immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmaca, H T; Kul, O

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate expression of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and iNOS in lingual, buccal mucosa and lung epithelial tissue using immunoperoxidase technique and to compare with the tissues of control animals. The tissues used in the study were collected from 17 PPRV-affected and 5 healthy sheep and goats. In PPRV positive animals, the lungs, lingual and buccal mucosa had significantly higher iNOS, IFN-γ and TNF-α expressions compared to control group animals. There was no significant difference between PPRV positive and control groups for IL-4 and IL-10 expressions of epithelial tissues. In conclusion, the epithelial tissues infected by PPRV showed significant iNOS, IFN-γ and TNF-α expressions and they might play an important role in the initiation and regulation of cytokine response, as they take place in the first host barrier to be in contact with PPRV. It is suggested that the more epithelial damage produced by PPRV the more cytokine response may result in the infected epithelial cells. The first demonstration of iNOS expression and epithelial cytokine response to PPRV in natural cases is important because it may contribute to an early initiation of systemic immunity against PPRV infection, in addition to direct elimination of the virus during the initial epithelial phase of the infection.

  6. Zika Virus Infects Early- and Midgestation Human Maternal Decidual Tissues, Inducing Distinct Innate Tissue Responses in the Maternal-Fetal Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisblum, Yiska; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Vorontsov, Olesya M; Haimov-Kochman, Ronit; Zakay-Rones, Zichria; Meir, Karen; Shveiky, David; Elgavish, Sharona; Nevo, Yuval; Roseman, Moshe; Bronstein, Michal; Stockheim, David; From, Ido; Eisenberg, Iris; Lewkowicz, Aya A; Yagel, Simcha; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G

    2017-02-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has emerged as a cause of congenital brain anomalies and a range of placenta-related abnormalities, highlighting the need to unveil the modes of maternal-fetal transmission. The most likely route of vertical ZIKV transmission is via the placenta. The earliest events of ZIKV transmission in the maternal decidua, representing the maternal uterine aspect of the chimeric placenta, have remained unexplored. Here, we show that ZIKV replicates in first-trimester human maternal-decidual tissues grown ex vivo as three-dimensional (3D) organ cultures. An efficient viral spread in the decidual tissues was demonstrated by the rapid upsurge and continued increase of tissue-associated ZIKV load and titers of infectious cell-free virus progeny, released from the infected tissues. Notably, maternal decidual tissues obtained at midgestation remained similarly susceptible to ZIKV, whereas fetus-derived chorionic villi demonstrated reduced ZIKV replication with increasing gestational age. A genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that ZIKV substantially upregulated the decidual tissue innate immune responses. Further comparison of the innate tissue response patterns following parallel infections with ZIKV and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) revealed that unlike HCMV, ZIKV did not induce immune cell activation or trafficking responses in the maternal-fetal interface but rather upregulated placental apoptosis and cell death molecular functions. The data identify the maternal uterine aspect of the human placenta as a likely site of ZIKV transmission to the fetus and further reveal distinct patterns of innate tissue responses to ZIKV. Our unique experimental model and findings could further serve to study the initial stages of congenital ZIKV transmission and pathogenesis and evaluate the effect of new therapeutic interventions. In view of the rapid spread of the current ZIKV epidemic and the severe manifestations of congenital ZIKV infection, it is crucial to learn

  7. In situ localization and tissue distribution of the replication-associated proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus in tobacco and cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Fabrizio; Roberts, Ian M; Palukaitis, Peter

    2002-11-01

    The replication-associated proteins encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), the 1a and 2a proteins, were detected by immunogold labeling in two host species of this virus, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In both hosts, the 1a and 2a proteins colocalized predominantly to the vacuolar membranes, the tonoplast. While plus-strand CMV RNAs were found distributed throughout the cytoplasm by in situ hybridization, minus-strand CMV RNAs were barely detectable but were found associated with the tonoplast. In both cucumber and tobacco, 2a protein was detected at higher densities than 1a protein. The 1a and 2a proteins also showed quantitative differences with regard to tissue distributions in tobacco and cucumber. About three times as much 2a protein was detected in CMV-infected cucumber tissues as in CMV-infected tobacco tissues. In tobacco, high densities of these proteins were observed only in vascular bundle cells of minor veins. In contrast, in cucumber, high densities of 1a and 2a proteins were observed in mesophyll cells, followed by epidermis cells, with only low levels being observed in vascular bundle cells. Differences were also observed in the distributions of 2a protein and capsid protein in vascular bundle cells of the two host species. These observations may represent differences in the relative rates of tissue infection in different hosts or differences in the extent of virus replication in vascular tissues of different hosts.

  8. Effects of lyophilization on the infectivity of enveloped and non-enveloped viruses in bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenhaut, Christine; Dörner, Thomas; Pauli, Georg; Pruss, Axel

    2005-11-01

    Recently reported qualitative experiments proved that retroviral infectivity is not destroyed by lyophilization performed on systemically infected bone and tendon. The now accomplished quantitative determination of residual infectivity for enveloped and non-enveloped viruses allows a validation of the production process regarding viral safety in freeze-dried bone transplants. The lyophilization effect on the infectivity of two non-enveloped viruses (Maus Elberfeld virus, MEV; Porcine parvovirus, PPV) and one enveloped virus (Vesicular Stomatitis virus, VSV) was examined for virus-spiked bone material in comparison to lyophilized viruses, original virus stock, and air-dried viruses. All experiments were carried out with both cell-free and cell-associated virus. Significant differences were observed regarding the reduction of virus titers (TCID50). Infectivity of VSV was reduced by about 3-4 log10 using lyophilization in presence of bone matrix and of MEV by 6-7 log10, while no substantial reduction in virus titers was observed for PPV. Lyophilization of cell-free or cell-associated virus is not sufficient to inactivate viruses completely. However, lyophilization could have an additive effect in line with other production steps used in the manufacturing process.

  9. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Dylan P; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested.

  10. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Patrick Harding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides, and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested.

  11. Immunohistochemistry of colorectal cancer biomarker phosphorylation requires controlled tissue fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbey P Theiss

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated signaling molecules are biomarkers of cancer pathophysiology and resistance to therapy, but because phosphoprotein analytes are often labile, poorly controlled clinical laboratory practices could prevent translation of research findings in this area from the bench to the bedside. We therefore compared multiple biomarker and phosphoprotein immunohistochemistry (IHC results in 23 clinical colorectal carcinoma samples after either a novel, rapid tissue fixation protocol or a standard tissue fixation protocol employed by clinical laboratories, and we also investigated the effect of a defined post-operative "cold" ischemia period on these IHC results. We found that a one-hour cold ischemia interval, allowed by ASCO/CAP guidelines for certain cancer biomarker assays, is highly deleterious to certain phosphoprotein analytes, specifically the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGFR, but shorter ischemic intervals (less than 17 minutes facilitate preservation of phosphoproteins. Second, we found that a rapid 4-hour, two temperature, formalin fixation yielded superior staining in several cases with select markers (pEGFR, pBAD, pAKT compared to a standard overnight room temperature fixation protocol, despite taking less time. These findings indicate that the future research and clinical utilities of phosphoprotein IHC for assessing colorectal carcinoma pathophysiology absolutely depend upon attention to preanalytical factors and rigorously controlled tissue fixation protocols.

  12. Antibodies to the core proteins of Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus reveal details of the distribution of the proteins in infected cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecka, Lidia; Bin-Tarif, Abdelghani; Bridgen, Anne; Juleff, Nicholas; Waters, Ryan A; Baron, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV; also called Ganjam virus in India) is a bunyavirus of the genus Nairovirus. It causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%. The virus is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV). Little is currently known about the biology of NSDV. We have generated specific antibodies against the virus nucleocapsid protein (N) and polymerase (L) and used these to characterise NSDV in infected cells and to study its distribution during infection in a natural host. Due to its large size and the presence of a papain-like protease (the OTU-like domain) it has been suggested that the L protein of nairoviruses undergoes an autoproteolytic cleavage into polymerase and one or more accessory proteins. Specific antibodies which recognise either the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the NSDV L protein showed no evidence of L protein cleavage in NSDV-infected cells. Using the specific anti-N and anti-L antibodies, it was found that these viral proteins do not fully colocalise in infected cells; the N protein accumulated near the Golgi at early stages of infection while the L protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm, further supporting the multifunctional nature of the L protein. These antibodies also allowed us to gain information about the organs and cell types targeted by the virus in vivo. We could detect NSDV in cryosections prepared from various tissues collected post-mortem from experimentally inoculated animals; the virus was found in the mucosal lining of the small and large intestine, in the lungs, and in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), where NSDV appeared to target monocytes and/or macrophages.

  13. Antibodies to the core proteins of Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus reveal details of the distribution of the proteins in infected cells and tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Lasecka

    Full Text Available Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV; also called Ganjam virus in India is a bunyavirus of the genus Nairovirus. It causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%. The virus is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV. Little is currently known about the biology of NSDV. We have generated specific antibodies against the virus nucleocapsid protein (N and polymerase (L and used these to characterise NSDV in infected cells and to study its distribution during infection in a natural host. Due to its large size and the presence of a papain-like protease (the OTU-like domain it has been suggested that the L protein of nairoviruses undergoes an autoproteolytic cleavage into polymerase and one or more accessory proteins. Specific antibodies which recognise either the N-terminus or the C-terminus of the NSDV L protein showed no evidence of L protein cleavage in NSDV-infected cells. Using the specific anti-N and anti-L antibodies, it was found that these viral proteins do not fully colocalise in infected cells; the N protein accumulated near the Golgi at early stages of infection while the L protein was distributed throughout the cytoplasm, further supporting the multifunctional nature of the L protein. These antibodies also allowed us to gain information about the organs and cell types targeted by the virus in vivo. We could detect NSDV in cryosections prepared from various tissues collected post-mortem from experimentally inoculated animals; the virus was found in the mucosal lining of the small and large intestine, in the lungs, and in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN, where NSDV appeared to target monocytes and/or macrophages.

  14. Gene expression profiling in gill tissues of White spot syndrome virus infected black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon by DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, M S; Gomathi, A; Gopikrishna, G; Ponniah, A G

    2015-06-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) continues to be the most devastating viral pathogen infecting penaeid shrimp the world over. The genome of WSSV has been deciphered and characterized from three geographical isolates and significant progress has been made in developing various molecular diagnostic methods to detect the virus. However, the information on host immune gene response to WSSV pathogenesis is limited. Microarray analysis was carried out as an approach to analyse the gene expression in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in response to WSSV infection. Gill tissues collected from the WSSV infected shrimp at 6, 24, 48 h and moribund stage were analysed for differential gene expression. Shrimp cDNAs of 40,059 unique sequences were considered for designing the microarray chip. The Cy3-labeled cRNA derived from healthy and WSSV-infected shrimp was subjected to hybridization with all the DNA spots in the microarray which revealed 8,633 and 11,147 as up- and down-regulated genes respectively at different time intervals post infection. The altered expression of these numerous genes represented diverse functions such as immune response, osmoregulation, apoptosis, nucleic acid binding, energy and metabolism, signal transduction, stress response and molting. The changes in gene expression profiles observed by microarray analysis provides molecular insights and framework of genes which are up- and down-regulated at different time intervals during WSSV infection in shrimp. The microarray data was validated by Real Time analysis of four differentially expressed genes involved in apoptosis (translationally controlled tumor protein, inhibitor of apoptosis protein, ubiquitin conjugated enzyme E2 and caspase) for gene expression levels. The role of apoptosis related genes in WSSV infected shrimp is discussed herein.

  15. Controlled cellular energy conversion in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, J. M.; Plant, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue serves as a model system for nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) since a) it has as a primary physiological function the conversion of chemical energy to heat; and b) preliminary data from other tissues involved in NST (e.g., muscle) indicate that parallel mechanisms may be involved. Now that biochemical pathways have been proposed for brown fat thermogenesis, cellular models consistent with a thermodynamic representation can be formulated. Stated concisely, the thermogenic mechanism in a brown fat cell can be considered as an energy converter involving a sequence of cellular events controlled by signals over the autonomic nervous system. A thermodynamic description for NST is developed in terms of a nonisothermal system under steady-state conditions using network thermodynamics. Pathways simulated include mitochondrial ATP synthesis, a Na+/K+ membrane pump, and ionic diffusion through the adipocyte membrane.

  16. Virus isolation vs RT-PCR: which method is more successful in detecting VHSV and IHNV in fish tissue sampled under field conditions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüsel, R.; Bergmann, S. M.; Einer-Jensen, Katja;

    2007-01-01

    (total of 859 fish) originating from a field survey on the occurrence of VHSV and IHNV in farmed and wild salmonids in Switzerland. These samples represented all sites with fish that were either identified as virus-positive by means of virus isolation (three sites, four positive tissue sample pools) and......This study compared the results of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and traditional virus isolation on cell culture in detection of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). RT-PCR was used for 172 tissue sample pools....../or demonstrated positive anti-VHSV-antibody titres (83 sites, 121 positive blood samples) in a serum plaque neutralization test (SPNT). The RT-PCR technique confirmed the four VHSV-positive tissue sample pools detected by virus isolation and additionally identified one VHSV-positive sample that showed positive...

  17. Control of plant virus diseases in cool-season grain legume crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkouk, Khaled M; Kumari, Safaa G; van Leur, Joop A G; Jones, Roger A C

    2014-01-01

    Cool-season grain legume crops become infected with a wide range of viruses, many of which cause serious diseases and major yield losses. This review starts by discussing which viruses are important in the principal cool-season grain legume crops in different parts of the world, the losses they cause and their economic impacts in relation to control. It then describes the main types of control measures available: host resistance, phytosanitary measures, cultural measures, chemical control, and biological control. Examples are provided of successful deployment of the different types of measures to control virus epidemics in cool-season grain legume crops. Next it emphasizes the need for integrated approaches to control because single control measures used alone rarely suffice to adequately reduce virus-induced yield losses in these crops. Development of effective integrated disease management (IDM) strategies depends on an interdisciplinary team approach to (i) understand the ecological and climatic factors which lead to damaging virus epidemics and (ii) evaluate the effectiveness of individual control measures. In addition to using virus-resistant cultivars, other IDM components include sowing virus-tested seed stocks, selecting cultivars with low seed transmission rates, using diverse phytosanitary or cultural practices that minimize the virus source or reduce its spread, and using selective pesticides in an environmentally responsible way. The review finishes by briefly discussing the implications of climate change in increasing problems associated with control and the opportunities to control virus diseases more effectively through new technologies.

  18. Control strategies for sweet potato virus disease in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Richard W; Aritua, Valentine; Byamukama, Emmanuel; Mpembe, Isaac; Kayongo, James

    2004-03-01

    Sweet potato virus disease (SPVD), caused by dual infection with the whitefly-borne Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV) and the aphid-borne Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), is the most serious disease of sweet potato in Africa. SPVD has been known there since at least the 1940s, although it took several decades to elucidate its aetiology. It occurs throughout Africa and is particularly prevalent in the Great Lakes region. Production of sweet potato is largely by resource-poor farmers, growing mostly local landraces and for home consumption and so control strategies need to be appropriate to these circumstances. Most high yielding and/or early maturing landraces in Uganda are susceptible to SPVD and most resistant landraces are low-yielding, forcing farmers to compromise between the conflicting requirements of large and/or early yields, and food security. Accordingly, two strategies were tested to avoid the disadvantages associated with such compromises. These were deploying high-yielding SPVD-resistant cultivars and phytosanitation practices to enable susceptible landraces to be grown successfully. In on-farm trials in Masaka and Rakai Districts of Uganda, some SPVD-resistant cultivars bred at Namulonge Agricultural and Animal Research Station (NAARI), in Wakiso District, out-yielded local landraces. Other trials at NAARI and at nearby farms showed that roguing diseased cuttings within 1 month of planting and isolation from diseased crops, even by as little as 15m, can considerably decrease spread of SPVD to susceptible cultivars. This indicates that phytosanitation can protect desirable susceptible cultivars, even if adopted only locally. A dual approach of deploying both resistant varieties and phytosanitation provides farmers with a valuable increase in their choice of control strategies for SPVD.

  19. The quantity and diversity of infectious viruses in various tissues of SHIV-infected monkeys at the early and AIDS stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, A; Enose, Y; Ohkura, S; Suzuki, H; Kuwata, T; Shimada, T; Kato, S; Narayan, O; Hayami, M

    2004-05-01

    To detect the major sites of viral replication in immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals, we quantified proviral DNA and infectious viruses using quantitative PCR and a plaque assay, respectively, in various tissues of SHIV(KU-2)-infected monkeys in the early and AIDS stages of infection. Compared the quantity of infectious virus among PBMC and the lymphoid tissues, the mesenteric lymph node had the largest number of infectious viruses at the AIDS stage more than at the early stage of infection. These results suggested that the gastrointestinal tract was a major site of viral replication. In the brain, proviral DNA was detected at the early and AIDS stage of infection, but infectious viruses were detected at only the AIDS stage. Moreover, we analyzed the nucleotide sequences of the env V3 region in infectious virus clones isolated from each plaque. The viruses in the lymphoid tissues of the monkey that developed AIDS diverged from the inoculated virus and had the same three amino acid substitutions. However, the viruses in the brain were almost identical to the inoculated virus, suggesting that the virus entered the brain early after infection and persisted without replication and genetic diversion until the AIDS stage.

  20. New Challenges in Biorobotics: Incorporating Soft Tissue into Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry A. Trimmer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of truly biomimetic robots requires that soft materials be incorporated into the mechanical design and also used as an integral part of the motor control system. One approach to this challenge is to identify how soft animals control their movements and then apply the found principles in robotic applications. Here I show an example of how a combination of animal kinematics, neural patterning and constitutive modelling of tissues can be used to explore motor control in the caterpillar, Manduca sexta. Although still in the early stages, these findings are being used to design and fabricate a new type of robot that does not have a rigid skeleton and is structured entirely from soft or compliant materials. It is hoped that this new robotic platform will promote the development of actuators, sensors and electronics that are compatible with soft materials.

  1. Central neural control of thermoregulation and brown adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-04-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the homeostatic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response. This review summarizes the experimental underpinnings of our current model of the CNS pathways controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction controlling heat loss, and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these effectors is regulated by parallel but distinct, effector-specific, core efferent pathways within the CNS that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. Via the lateral parabrachial nucleus, skin thermal afferent input reaches the hypothalamic preoptic area to inhibit warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons which control heat production by inhibiting thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus that project to thermogenesis-controlling premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the raphe pallidus, that descend to provide the excitation of spinal circuits necessary to drive thermogenic thermal effectors. A distinct population of warm-sensitive preoptic neurons controls heat loss through an inhibitory input to raphe pallidus sympathetic premotor neurons controlling cutaneous vasoconstriction. The model proposed for central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation and elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein gene deletion in ovarian cancer: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of a tissue microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhu; Zeng, Manman; Liu, Y I; Yang, Xiaotao; Li, Yanan; Li, X U; Yu, Qiubo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the status of speckle-type POZ (pox virus and zinc finger protein) protein (SPOP) gene located on chromosome 17q21 in ovarian cancer (OC). The present study evaluated a tissue microarray, which contained 90 samples of ovarian cancer and 10 samples of normal ovarian tissue, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH is a method where a SPOP-specific DNA red fluorescence probe was used for the experimental group and a centromere-specific DNA green fluorescence probe for chromosome 17 was used for the control group. The present study demonstrated that a deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in 52.27% (46/88) of the ovarian cancer tissues, but was not identified in normal ovarian tissues. Simultaneously, monosomy 17 was frequently identified in the ovarian cancer tissues, but not in the normal ovarian tissues. Furthermore, the present data revealed that the ovarian cancer histological subtype and grade were significantly associated with a deletion of the SPOP gene, which was assessed by the appearance of monosomy 17 in the ovarian cancer samples; the deletion of the SPOP gene was observed in a large proportion of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (41/61; 67.21%), particularly in grade 3 (31/37; 83.78%). In conclusion, deletion of the SPOP gene on chromosome 17 in ovarian cancer samples, which results from monosomy 17, indicates that the SPOP gene may serve as a tumor suppressor gene in ovarian cancer.

  3. The replication of Rocio virus in brain tissue of suckling mice. Study by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Weigl, D R; de Souza Lopes, O

    1983-01-01

    By electron microscopy studies, Rocio virus particles were about 43 nm and spherically shaped. They were found within the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex of infected neurons. No precursor particles were detected nor virus budding was evident.

  4. Infection with Some Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Pathotypes Produces Virus in Chicken Muscle Tissue and the Role of Humoral Immunity as a Mitigation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Mariana Sá E; Bertran, Kateri; Moresco, Kira; Jackwood, Daral J; Swayne, David E

    2016-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) causes important economic losses and negatively affects global trade in poultry and poultry products. This study determined the presence of IBDV in primary lymphoid tissues and muscle tissue of infected broilers and the role of vaccination as a mitigation strategy. In the first study, specific-pathogen-free (SPF) broiler chickens were challenged with STC (classical [cIBDV]), Indiana (variant [varIBDV]), rA (very virulent [vvIBDV]), or Ohio (serotype 2, avirulent) IBDV. Infection was confirmed in all groups, but only the cIBDV group experienced morbidity or mortality. Virus was only isolated in low titers from a few breast and/or thigh muscle tissue samples from cIBDV and vvIBDV-infected chickens. For the second study, SPF broilers from three different treatment groups were challenged with IBDV viruses that currently circulate in the United States, varIBDV or vvIBDV: 1) maternal antibody-positive (MAb+), vaccinated with recombinant HVT-IBDV vaccine (Vaxxitek(®), Merial; MAb+/Vax); 2) MAb+, not-vaccinated (MAb+/Unvax); and 3) maternal antibody-negative, not-vaccinated chickens (MAb-/Unvax). MAb+/Vax and MAb+/Unvax chickens had significantly lower virus titers in primary lymphoid tissues compared to MAb-/Unvax chickens. No virus was detected in muscle tissues from any of the groups challenged with varIBDV, confirming the results of the first experiment. Only 1 of 36 (MAb+/Vax) and 2 of 36 (MAb+/Unvax) muscle samples were positive at minimal amounts (10(1.97) EID50/ml) in vvIBDV challenge, compared to the 9 of 36 muscle samples that were positive in the MAb-/Unvax group. This study indicates that only cIBDV and vvIBDV strains can be found in muscle at low titers of SPF meat chickens and that the breeder vaccination with MAb transfer to progeny with or without accompanying progeny vaccination, as practiced in the United States, was an effective mitigation strategy for vvIBDV-challenged birds.

  5. Vaccinia virus-mediated melanin production allows MR and optoacoustic deep tissue imaging and laser-induced thermotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritzker, Jochen; Kirscher, Lorenz; Scadeng, Miriam; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C; Morscher, Stefan; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Schaefer, Karin; Zhang, Qian; Buckel, Lisa; Hess, Michael; Donat, Ulrike; Bradley, William G; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Szalay, Aladar A

    2013-02-26

    We reported earlier the delivery of antiangiogenic single chain antibodies by using oncolytic vaccinia virus strains to enhance their therapeutic efficacy. Here, we provide evidence that gene-evoked production of melanin can be used as a therapeutic and diagnostic mediator, as exemplified by insertion of only one or two genes into the genome of an oncolytic vaccinia virus strain. We found that produced melanin is an excellent reporter for optical imaging without addition of substrate. Melanin production also facilitated deep tissue optoacoustic imaging as well as MRI. In addition, melanin was shown to be a suitable target for laser-induced thermotherapy and enhanced oncolytic viral therapy. In conclusion, melanin as a mediator for thermotherapy and reporter for different imaging modalities may soon become a versatile alternative to replace fluorescent proteins also in other biological systems. After ongoing extensive preclinical studies, melanin overproducing oncolytic virus strains might be used in clinical trials in patients with cancer.

  6. Tissue localization, shedding, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus following inoculation of 4-week-old feeder pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwerder, Megan C; Nietfeld, Jerome C; Bai, Jianfa; Peddireddi, Lalitha; Breazeale, Barbara; Anderson, Joe; Kerrigan, Maureen A; An, Baoyan; Oberst, Richard D; Crawford, Kimberly; Lager, Kelly M; Madson, Darin M; Rowland, Raymond R R; Anderson, Gary A; Hesse, Richard A

    2016-11-01

    We determined tissue localization, shedding patterns, virus carriage, antibody response, and aerosol transmission of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) following inoculation of 4-week-old feeder pigs. Thirty-three pigs were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups for the 42-day study: inoculated (group A; n = 23), contact transmission (group B; n = 5), and aerosol transmission (group C; n = 5). Contact transmission occurred rapidly to group B pigs whereas productive aerosol transmission failed to occur to group C pigs. Emesis was the first clinical sign noted at 3 days postinoculation (dpi) followed by mild to moderate diarrhea lasting 5 more days. Real-time PCR detected PEDV in fecal and nasal swabs, oral fluids, serum, and gastrointestinal and lymphoid tissues. Shedding occurred primarily during the first 2 weeks postinoculation, peaking at 5-6 dpi; however, some pigs had PEDV nucleic acid detected in swabs collected at 21 and 28 dpi. Antibody titers were measurable between 14 and 42 dpi. Although feces and intestines collected at 42 dpi were PEDV negative by PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively, small intestines from 70% of group A pigs were PCR positive. Although disease was relatively mild and transient in this age group, the results demonstrate that 4-week-old pigs are productively infected and can sustain virus replication for several weeks. Long-term shedding of PEDV in subclinically affected pigs should be considered an important source for PEDV transmission.

  7. Zika virus: History, emergence, biology, and prospects for control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Scott C; Costa, Federico; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Ko, Albert I; Ribeiro, Guilherme S; Saade, George; Shi, Pei-Yong; Vasilakis, Nikos

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a previously obscure flavivirus closely related to dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever viruses, has emerged explosively since 2007 to cause a series of epidemics in Micronesia, the South Pacific, and most recently the Americas. After its putative evolution in sub-Saharan Africa, ZIKV spread in the distant past to Asia and has probably emerged on multiple occasions into urban transmission cycles involving Aedes (Stegomyia) spp. mosquitoes and human amplification hosts, accompanied by a relatively mild dengue-like illness. The unprecedented numbers of people infected during recent outbreaks in the South Pacific and the Americas may have resulted in enough ZIKV infections to notice relatively rare congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndromes. Another hypothesis is that phenotypic changes in Asian lineage ZIKV strains led to these disease outcomes. Here, we review potential strategies to control the ongoing outbreak through vector-centric approaches as well as the prospects for the development of vaccines and therapeutics.

  8. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific b...

  9. Expanding the host range of small insect RNA viruses: Providence virus (Carmotetraviridae) infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiwaji, Meesbah; Short, James Roswell; Dorrington, Rosemary Ann

    2016-10-01

    Tetraviruses are small, positive (+ve)-sense ssRNA viruses that infect the midgut cells of lepidopteran larvae. Providence virus (PrV) is the only member of the family Carmotetraviridae (previously Tetraviridae). PrV particles exhibit the characteristic tetraviral T=4 icosahedral symmetry, but PrV is distinct from other tetraviruses with respect to genome organization and viral non-structural proteins. Currently, PrV is the only tetravirus known to infect and replicate in lepidopteran cell culture lines. In this report we demonstrate, using immunofluorescence microscopy, that PrV infects and replicates in a human tissue culture cell line (HeLa), producing infectious virus particles. We also provide evidence for PrV replication in vitro in insect, mammalian and plant cell-free systems. This study challenges the long-held view that tetraviruses have a narrow host range confined to one or a few lepidopteran species and highlights the need to consider the potential for apparently non-infectious viruses to be transferred to new hosts in the laboratory.

  10. Detection and localization of rabbit hepatitis e virus and antigen in systemic tissues from experimentally intraperitoneally infected rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jingjing; Zhao, Yue; She, Ruiping; Cao, Binbin; Xiao, Peng; Wu, Qiaoxing; Guo, Zhaojie; Ma, Longhuan; Soomro, Majid Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Rabbit hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a novel genotype of HEV, and is considered to pose a risk of zoonotic transmission. Research into the systemic distribution of rabbit HEV in rabbits during different periods of infection has rarely been reported. To better understand this virus, we infected rabbits with second-passage rabbit HEV via an intraperitoneal route. After inoculation, the infection showed two types, temporary and constant infection. The detection of HEV RNA in the feces varied with time, and serum antigen correlated with fecal HEV RNA. Viremia only appeared 72 days after inoculation. The rabbits remained antibody negative throughout the experimental period. When HEV was localized, several organs besides the liver were HEV RNA positive. Tissue antigen was observed immunohistochemically in the different cells of various organs, especially in parts of the small intestine and the characteristic rabbit gut-associated lymphoid tissue. These data provide valuable information for future research into the pathogenesis of HEV.

  11. Reduced Adipogenic Gene Expression in Thigh Adipose Tissue Precedes Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Lipoatrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Mario; Purnell, Jonathan Q.; Breen, Patricia A.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Utzschneider, Kristina M.; Carr, Darcy B.; Kahn, Steven E.; Hughes, James P.; Rutledge, Elizabeth A.; Van Yserloo, Brian; Yukawa, Michi; Weigle, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The expression of adipogenic genes in sc adipose tissue has been reported to be lower among patients with HIV-associated lipoatrophy than HIV-uninfected controls. It is unclear whether this is a result or cause of lipoatrophy. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the temporal relationships among changes in adipogenic gene expression in sc adipose tissue and changes in body fat distribution and metabolic complications in HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral therapy. Design: This was a prospective longitudinal study. Setting: The study was conducted at HIV clinics in Seattle, Washington. Participants: The study population included 31 HIV-infected and 12 control subjects. Interventions: Subjects were followed up for 12 months after they initiated or modified their existing antiretroviral regimen. Main Outcome Measures: Changes in body composition, plasma lipids, insulin sensitivity, and gene expression in sc abdominal and thigh adipose tissue. Results: Subjects who developed lipoatrophy (n = 10) had elevated fasting triglycerides [3.16 (sd 2.79) mmol/liter] and reduced insulin sensitivity as measured by frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test [1.89 (sd 1.27) × 10−4 min−1/μU·ml] after 12 months, whereas those without lipoatrophy (n = 21) did not show any metabolic complications [triglycerides 1.32 (sd 0.58) mmol/liter, P = 0.01 vs. lipoatrophy; insulin sensitivity 3.52 (sd 1.91) × 10−4 min−1/μU·ml, P = 0.01 vs. lipoatrophy]. In subjects developing lipoatrophy, the expression of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, lipid uptake, and local cortisol production in thigh adipose tissue was significantly reduced already at the 2-month visit, several months before any loss of extremity fat mass was evident. Conclusions: In HIV-infected subjects, lipoatrophy is associated with elevated fasting triglycerides and insulin resistance and might be caused by a direct or indirect effect of antiretroviral drugs on sc adipocyte

  12. Reduced adipogenic gene expression in thigh adipose tissue precedes human immunodeficiency virus-associated lipoatrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratz, Mario; Purnell, Jonathan Q; Breen, Patricia A; Thomas, Katherine K; Utzschneider, Kristina M; Carr, Darcy B; Kahn, Steven E; Hughes, James P; Rutledge, Elizabeth A; Van Yserloo, Brian; Yukawa, Michi; Weigle, David S

    2008-03-01

    The expression of adipogenic genes in sc adipose tissue has been reported to be lower among patients with HIV-associated lipoatrophy than HIV-uninfected controls. It is unclear whether this is a result or cause of lipoatrophy. The objective of the study was to investigate the temporal relationships among changes in adipogenic gene expression in sc adipose tissue and changes in body fat distribution and metabolic complications in HIV-infected subjects on antiretroviral therapy. This was a prospective longitudinal study. The study was conducted at HIV clinics in Seattle, Washington. The study population included 31 HIV-infected and 12 control subjects. Subjects were followed up for 12 months after they initiated or modified their existing antiretroviral regimen. Changes in body composition, plasma lipids, insulin sensitivity, and gene expression in sc abdominal and thigh adipose tissue. Subjects who developed lipoatrophy (n=10) had elevated fasting triglycerides [3.16 (sd 2.79) mmol/liter] and reduced insulin sensitivity as measured by frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test [1.89 (sd 1.27)x10(-4) min(-1)/microU.ml] after 12 months, whereas those without lipoatrophy (n=21) did not show any metabolic complications [triglycerides 1.32 (sd 0.58) mmol/liter, P=0.01 vs. lipoatrophy; insulin sensitivity 3.52 (sd 1.91)x10(-4) min(-1)/microU.ml, P=0.01 vs. lipoatrophy]. In subjects developing lipoatrophy, the expression of genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, lipid uptake, and local cortisol production in thigh adipose tissue was significantly reduced already at the 2-month visit, several months before any loss of extremity fat mass was evident. In HIV-infected subjects, lipoatrophy is associated with elevated fasting triglycerides and insulin resistance and might be caused by a direct or indirect effect of antiretroviral drugs on sc adipocyte differentiation.

  13. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  14. Demonstration of non-degraded Aleutian disease virus (ADV) proteins in lung tissue from experimentally infected mink kits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Søren; Uttenthal, Åse; Aasted, B.

    1986-01-01

    Isolates of ADV replicate to rather high quantities in lungs from neonatally infected mink kits. The virus was analysed for polypeptide composition, and for the first time high molecular weight polypeptides have been observed inin vivo produced ADVs. These polypeptides are analogous to those ofin...... described forin vitro produced ADV-G. Presence of the ADV coded, non-structural polypeptide with the molecular weight of 71kD (p71) was also demonstrated in the lung tissue from mink kits....

  15. Genomics of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma and adjacent noncancerous tissues with cDNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-kun; Fan, Xue-gong; Qiu, Fu; Wang, Zhi-ming

    2011-07-05

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common primary cancer frequently associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, whether these identified genes are particularly associated with HBV-related HCC remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the differential gene expression between HBV-related HCC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues. cDNA microarray was used to detect the differential gene expression profile in the HBV-related HCC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to verify the differential expression of candidate genes obtained from cDNA microarray experiment. In this study, 1369 genes or expressed sequence tags (ESTs) including 121 genes or ESTs with at least two-fold expression alterations between cancerous and noncancerous tissues were identified. Special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB-1) expression was positive in 73% (16/22) of cancerous tissues and negative (0/22) in all noncancerous tissues of HBV-related HCC patients. Transmembrane 4 superfamily member 1 (TM4SF-1) expression was positive in 86% (19/22) of cancerous tissues and negative (0/22) in all noncancerous tissues. Suppression of tumorigenicity 14 (ST-14) expression was positive in 73% (16/22) of noncancerous tissues in patients with HBV-related HCC and negative in all HCC tissues (0/22). This study provided the gene expression profile of HBV-related HCC and presented differential expression patterns of SATB-1, TM4SF-1 and ST-14 between cancerous and noncancerous tissues in patients with HBV-related HCC.

  16. Genomics of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma and adjacent noncancerous tissues with cDNA microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-kun; FAN Xue-gong; QIU Fu; WANG Zhi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common primary cancer frequently associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, whether these identified genes are particularly associated with HBV-related HCC remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the differential gene expression between HBV-related HCC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues.Methods cDNA microarray was used to detect the differential gene expression profile in the HBV-related HCC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to verify the differential expression of candidate genes obtained from cDNA microarray experiment.Results In this study, 1369 genes or expressed sequence tags (ESTs) including 121 genes or ESTs with at least two-fold expression alterations between cancerous and noncancerous tissues were identified. Special AT-rich sequence binding protein 1 (SATB-1) expression was positive in 73% (16/22) of cancerous tissues and negative (0/22) in all noncancerous tissues of HBV-related HCC patients. Transmembrane 4 superfamily member 1 (TM4SF-1) expression was positive in 86% (19/22) of cancerous tissues and negative (0/22) in all noncancerous tissues. Suppression of tumorigenicity 14 (ST-14) expression was positive in 73% (16/22) of noncancerous tissues in patients with HBV-related HCC and negative in all HCC tissues (0/22).Conclusion This study provided the gene expression profile of HBV-related HCC and presented differential expression patterns of SATB-1, TM4SF-1 and ST-14 between cancerous and noncancerous tissues in patients with HBV-related HCC.

  17. Tissue-resident macrophages can contain replication-competent virus in antiretroviral-naive, SIV-infected Asian macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Knox, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    SIV DNA can be detected in lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages of chronically SIV-infected Asian macaques. These macrophages also contain evidence of recently phagocytosed SIV-infected CD4+ T cells. Here, we examine whether these macrophages contain replication-competent virus, whether viral DNA can be detected in tissue-resident macrophages from antiretroviral (ARV) therapy–treated animals and humans, and how the viral sequences amplified from macrophages and contemporaneous CD4+ T cells compare. In ARV-naive animals, we find that lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages contain replication-competent virus if they also contain viral DNA in ARV-naive Asian macaques. The genetic sequence of the virus within these macrophages is similar to those within CD4+ T cells from the same anatomic sites. In ARV-treated animals, we find that viral DNA can be amplified from lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages of SIV-infected Asian macaques that were treated with ARVs for at least 5 months, but we could not detect replication-competent virus from macrophages of animals treated with ARVs. Finally, we could not detect viral DNA in alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected individuals who received ARVs for 3 years and had undetectable viral loads. These data demonstrate that macrophages can contain replication-competent virus, but may not represent a significant reservoir for HIV in vivo.

  18. Detection of respiratory virus antigens in nasopharyngeal secretions from patients with acute respiratory disease by radio-immunoassay and tissue culture isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlicher, L; Hoffmann, H G; Habermehl, K O

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was made of the sensitivity and specificity of four-layer radio-immunoassays (RIA) in the detection of adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus types A and B, as well as para-influenza virus types 1, 2 and 3 from nasopharyngeal aspirates of 146 patients with acute respiratory disease. The sensitivity of RIA was comparable with that of tissue culture isolation if the total number of positives is considered. The difference may have been caused both by a higher efficiency of the RIA for detection of inactivated or non-cultivable agents and by a higher efficiency of tissue culture methods if the samples contained only small amounts of antigen. Differences between the two antigen detection systems were found in particular with respiratory syncytial virus and influenza B virus. At present, the use of tissue culture isolation together with RIA is the optimal routine laboratory procedure for the diagnosis of respiratory infections.

  19. Transfer of UL41, the gene controlling virion-associated host cell shutoff, between different strains of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, M L; Everett, R D

    1990-02-01

    Studies with mutant viruses have suggested that the product of gene UL41 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) controls the virion-mediated inhibition of cellular protein synthesis as well as the rate of degradation of viral mRNAs. HSV-1 strain 17+ has a weak host shutoff function, whereas HSV-2 strain G shuts off strongly. A gene of HSV-2(G), judged from its position in the genome to be the probable analogue of gene UL41 of HSV-1, was inserted into the nonessential thymidine kinase gene of HSV-1(17+). The recombinant virus, 17G41, exhibited a strong shutoff function and its immediate early mRNA did not accumulate in the presence of cycloheximide. It resembled HSV-2(G) in these respects and not the parent, confirming the function of the transferred gene. Recombinant virus 17G41 carries the UL41 genes of both strains, 17+ and G, and in this situation the strong shutoff function was dominant. However, after mixed infection with equal multiplicities of 17G41 and HSV-1(17+) the weak shutoff function was dominant. The recombinant, 17G41, was further modified by insertion of a lacZ expression cassette into the coding region of the original gene UL41 (17+). The resulting virus, 17(41-)G41, also had a strong shutoff activity but grew poorly in tissue culture.

  20. Engineering prokaryotic channels for control of mammalian tissue excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung X.; Kirkton, Robert D.; Bursac, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    The ability to directly enhance electrical excitability of human cells is hampered by the lack of methods to efficiently overexpress large mammalian voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). Here we describe the use of small prokaryotic sodium channels (BacNav) to create de novo excitable human tissues and augment impaired action potential conduction in vitro. Lentiviral co-expression of specific BacNav orthologues, an inward-rectifying potassium channel, and connexin-43 in primary human fibroblasts from the heart, skin or brain yields actively conducting cells with customizable electrophysiological phenotypes. Engineered fibroblasts (‘E-Fibs') retain stable functional properties following extensive subculture or differentiation into myofibroblasts and rescue conduction slowing in an in vitro model of cardiac interstitial fibrosis. Co-expression of engineered BacNav with endogenous mammalian VGSCs enhances action potential conduction and prevents conduction failure during depolarization by elevated extracellular K+, decoupling or ischaemia. These studies establish the utility of engineered BacNav channels for induction, control and recovery of mammalian tissue excitability. PMID:27752065

  1. Renin dynamics in adipose tissue: adipose tissue control of local renin concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, Jason D.; Krueth, Stacy B.; Bernlohr, David A.; Katz, Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in a variety of adipose tissue functions, including tissue growth, differentiation, metabolism, and inflammation. Although expression of all components necessary for a locally derived adipose tissue RAS has been demonstrated within adipose tissue, independence of local adipose RAS component concentrations from corresponding plasma RAS fluctuations has not been addressed. To analyze this, we varied in vivo rat plasma concentrations of two ...

  2. Viral Interactions in Human Lymphoid Tissue: Human Herpesvirus 7 Suppresses the Replication of CCR5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 via CD4 Modulation▿

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affect...

  3. The challenges of avian influenza virus: mechanism, epidemiology and control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George F. GAO; Pang-Chui SHAW

    2009-01-01

    @@ Early 2009, eight human infection cases of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus, with 5 death cases, were reported in China. This again made the world alert on a possible pandemic worldwide, probably caused by avian-origin influenza virus. Again H5N1 is in the spotlight of the world, not only for the scientists but also for the ordinary people. How much do we know about this virus? Where will this virus go and where did it come? Can we avoid a possible pandemic of influenza? Will the human beings conquer this devastating agent? Obviously we can list more questions than we know the answers.

  4. Localization of Avian Influenza Virus in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Chicken Tissues by In Situ Hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wan-po; GU Chang-qin; BI Ding-ren; SONG Nian-hua; CHENG Guo-fu

    2005-01-01

    In this study, in situ hybridization (ISH) was developed to detect avian influenza virus (AIV) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded chicken tissues. A cDNA probe corresponding to a region of AIV nucleoprotein (NP) gene was synthesized and labeled with digoxigenin. Probe specificity was determined by AIV infected MDCK cells in vitro and the results showed that strong cytoplasmic staining was only detected in AIV-infected cells. Various tissues were collected from 12 h to 3 5 days post-infection (PI) following inoculation with the H9N2 subtype AIV. AIV was localized in the epithelial cells of the duodenum and cartilage of the throat and trachea at 12 h PI. Tissues from uninfected chickens were negative. The finding of this study indicated ISH was a sensitive and specific technique to detect and localize AIV as well as to study AIV pathogenesis.

  5. Recent Advances in Biological Control of Pest Insects by Using Viruses in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-lian SUN; Hui-yin PENG

    2007-01-01

    Insect viruses are attractive as biological control agents and could be a feasible alternative to chemical insecticides in the management of insect infestations. This review describes recent advances in the development of wild-type and genetically modified viruses as insecticides. A new strategy of application of insect viruses in China is reviewed. Also, the assessment of biosafety of genetically modified Helicoverpa armigera Nucleopolyhedovirus (HearNPV) is emphasized as a case-study.

  6. Imaging characteristics, tissue distribution, and spread of a novel oncolytic vaccinia virus carrying the human sodium iodide symporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oncolytic viruses show promise for treating cancer. However, to assess therapy and potential toxicity, a noninvasive imaging modality is needed. This study aims to determine the in vivo biodistribution, and imaging and timing characteristics of a vaccinia virus, GLV-1h153, encoding the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS. METHODS: GLV-1h153 was modified from GLV-1h68 to encode the hNIS gene. Timing of cellular uptake of radioiodide (131I in human pancreatic carcinoma cells PANC-1 was assessed using radiouptake assays. Viral biodistribution was determined in nude mice bearing PANC-1 xenografts, and infection in tumors confirmed histologically and optically via Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP and bioluminescence. Timing characteristics of enhanced radiouptake in xenografts were assessed via (124I-positron emission tomography (PET. Detection of systemic administration of virus was investigated with both (124I-PET and 99m-technecium gamma-scintigraphy. RESULTS: GLV-1h153 successfully facilitated time-dependent intracellular uptake of (131I in PANC-1 cells with a maximum uptake at 24 hours postinfection (P<0.05. In vivo, biodistribution profiles revealed persistence of virus in tumors 5 weeks postinjection at 10(9 plaque-forming unit (PFU/gm tissue, with the virus mainly cleared from all other major organs. Tumor infection by GLV-1h153 was confirmed via optical imaging and histology. GLV-1h153 facilitated imaging virus replication in tumors via PET even at 8 hours post radiotracer injection, with a mean %ID/gm of 3.82 ± 0.46 (P<0.05 2 days after intratumoral administration of virus, confirmed via tissue radiouptake assays. One week post systemic administration, GLV-1h153-infected tumors were detected via (124I-PET and 99m-technecium-scintigraphy. CONCLUSION: GLV-1h153 is a promising oncolytic agent against pancreatic cancer with a promising biosafety profile. GLV-1h153 facilitated time-dependent hNIS-specific radiouptake in pancreatic

  7. Lack of association between measles virus vaccine and autism with enteropathy: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mady Hornig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The presence of measles virus (MV RNA in bowel tissue from children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD and gastrointestinal (GI disturbances was reported in 1998. Subsequent investigations found no associations between MV exposure and ASD but did not test for the presence of MV RNA in bowel or focus on children with ASD and GI disturbances. Failure to replicate the original study design may contribute to continued public concern with respect to the safety of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR vaccine. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The objective of this case-control study was to determine whether children with GI disturbances and autism are more likely than children with GI disturbances alone to have MV RNA and/or inflammation in bowel tissues and if autism and/or GI episode onset relate temporally to receipt of MMR. The sample was an age-matched group of US children undergoing clinically-indicated ileocolonoscopy. Ileal and cecal tissues from 25 children with autism and GI disturbances and 13 children with GI disturbances alone (controls were evaluated by real-time reverse transcription (RT-PCR for presence of MV RNA in three laboratories blinded to diagnosis, including one wherein the original findings suggesting a link between MV and ASD were reported. The temporal order of onset of GI episodes and autism relative to timing of MMR administration was examined. We found no differences between case and control groups in the presence of MV RNA in ileum and cecum. Results were consistent across the three laboratory sites. GI symptom and autism onset were unrelated to MMR timing. Eighty-eight percent of ASD cases had behavioral regression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides strong evidence against association of autism with persistent MV RNA in the GI tract or MMR exposure. Autism with GI disturbances is associated with elevated rates of regression in language or other skills and may represent an endophenotype distinct

  8. Evaluating the Use of Commercial West Nile Virus Antigens as Positive Controls in the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform West Nile Virus Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, Kristen L; Savage, Harry M

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the utility of 2 types of commercially available antigens as positive controls in the Rapid Analyte Measurement Platform (RAMP®) West Nile virus (WNV) assay. Purified recombinant WNV envelope antigens and whole killed virus antigens produced positive RAMP results and either type would be useful as a positive control. Killed virus antigens provide operational and economic advantages and we recommend their use over purified recombinant antigens. We also offer practical applications for RAMP positive controls and recommendations for preparing them.

  9. Control of West Nile virus, Rhode Island, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Kenneth; Bandy, Utpala; Drew, Helen; Fulton, John P; Hayes, Gregory; Getman, Alan; Gurba, Kristen; Hanofin, Christofer; Lopes-Duguay, Liz; Marshall, Robert J; Mehta, Shashi; Powell, Stephanie

    2004-03-01

    Thanks largely to systematic larviciding by the State's 39 municipalities, and aided by the public's destruction of "backyard" mosquito habitats and adoption of personal protective measures (clothing, repellant), Rhode Island minimized the potential human burden of WNV during the 2003 mosquito season (six serious WNV cases, one death, and no reports of WNV-tainted blood donations). The potential burden of WNV on domestic animals was also reduced through immunization. Nonetheless, the State's first WNV death reminds us of the danger this disease poses for the very young, for elders, and for people of all ages who are immune-compromised. Similarly, the widespread location of birds positive for WNV signifies the ubiquity of risk. All mosquitoes must be avoided. Based on its experience with WNV control over the past few years, the State will continue and enhance its surveillance and control efforts in 2004. Once again, systematic larviciding by municipalities and continuing public education through multiple channels will form the backbone of control, supported by active surveillance for the virus in the wild, in domestic animals, and in humans. For the latter effort, the vigilance of the health care community is of signal importance to the protection of the public. Every human case is investigated thoroughly, to establish as accurately as possible the time and place of exposure. DEM and HEALTH use this information to assess potential weaknesses in WNV control efforts, and to take corrective action, as necessary. Health care providers also play an essential role in public education, reminding patients (all patients, but especially the very young, elders, and the immune-compromised) to avoid mosquito bites. Discussing the avoidance of mosquito bites with patients who engage in regular outdoor activity is especially important. School physicians and the medical directors of nursing homes are well-positioned to keep mosquito control and avoidance on the agenda of their

  10. Molecular characterization of SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus from post-outbreak slaughtered animals: implications for disease control in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balinda, Sheila N; Belsham, Graham; Masembe, Charles

    2010-01-01

    . Part of the coding region for the capsid protein VP1 was amplified and sequenced. All samples were identified as belonging to the SAT 2 serotype. The implications for FMD control of both virus introductions into Uganda and the presence of carrier animals following outbreaks are discussed.......In Uganda, limiting the extent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread during outbreaks involves short term measures such as ring vaccination and restrictions to the movement of livestock and their products to and from the affected areas. In this study, the presence of FMD virus RNA was investigated...... in cattle samples, three months after FMD quarantine measures had been lifted in the area in 2004 following an outbreak. Oropharyngeal tissue samples were obtained from 12 cattle slaughtered in a small town abattoir of Kiboga. FMD virus RNA was detected by diagnostic RT- PCR in 9 of the 12 tissue samples...

  11. Molecular characterization of SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease virus from post-outbreak slaughtered animals: implications for disease control in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balinda, S N; Belsham, G J; Masembe, C; Sangula, A K; Siegismund, H R; Muwanika, V B

    2010-08-01

    In Uganda, limiting the extent of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) spread during outbreaks involves short-term measures such as ring vaccination and restrictions of the movement of livestock and their products to and from the affected areas. In this study, the presence of FMD virus RNA was investigated in cattle samples 3 months after FMD quarantine measures had been lifted following an outbreak in 2004. Oropharyngeal tissue samples were obtained from 12 cattle slaughtered in a small town abattoir in Kiboga. FMD virus RNA was detected by diagnostic RT-PCR in nine of the 12 tissue samples. Part of the coding region for the capsid protein VP1 was amplified and sequenced. All samples were identified as belonging to the SAT 2 serotype. The implications for FMD control of both virus introduction into Uganda and the presence of carrier animals following outbreaks are discussed.

  12. Immunohistochemical investigation of the tissue distribution of mannan-binding lectin in non-infected and virus-infected chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.L.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Hedemand, J.;

    1998-01-01

    This-paper describes the results of immuno-histochemical staining for chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL) in formalin-fixed tissue sections from non-infected chickens, and from chickens infected with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) or infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). In the non......-infected chickens, MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of a few hepatocytes and in the germinal centres of the caecal tonsils, whereas sections of kidney, heart muscle, spleen, cerebrum, thymus, adrenal gland, bursa of Fabricius, bone marrow and trachea were without staining. In the ILTV-infected chickens, an intense...... staining reaction for MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of all hepatocytes and on the surface of, and inside, ILTV-infected cells. Also in the IBDV-infected chickens, an intense staining reaction for MBL was detected in the cytoplasm of all hepatocytes. No staining was seen in the follicles of the bursa...

  13. Detection of Epstein Barr virus in formalin-fixed paraffin tissues by fluorescent direct in situ PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Marziliano

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific viral laboratory diagnosis of primary Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection is usually based on antibody-detection assays. However, molecular detection is also considered the reference standard assay for diagnosis of central nervous system infections and of most cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. One-step or nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR has rapidly replaced immunological assays based on virus-specific Ig antibodies for the laboratory diagnosis of Herpesvirus infections, even if serological methods are considered an additional tool for defining clinical diagnosis. In this article, we will present a rapid, sensitive and robust molecular tool for the viral detection of EBV (EBNA-1 within tissue specimens by making use of in situ PCR (IS-PCR.

  14. Expression of the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) in brain tissues of human immunodeficiency virus patients with opportunistic cerebral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Cinque, Paola; Sidenius, Nicolai; Ferri, Angelita; Lauri, Eleonora; Omodeo-Zorini, Elisabetta; Zerbi, Pietro; Vago, Luca

    2009-01-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its ligand (uPA) play an important role in cell migration and extracellular proteolysis. We previously described uPAR/uPA overexpression in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related cerebral diseases. In this study, we examined uPAR/uPA expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in brains of HIV patients with opportunistic cerebral lesions and in HIV-positive/negative controls. uPAR was found in macrophages/microglia with the highest levels in cytomegalovirus (CMV) encephalitis, toxoplasmosis, and lymphomas; in cryptococcosis and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) cases, only a few positive cells were found and no positivity was observed in controls. uPA expression was demonstrated only in a few macrophages/microglia and lymphocytes in all the cases and HIV-positive controls without different pattern of distribution; no uPA immunostaining was found in cryptococcosis and HIV-negative controls. The higher expression of uPAR/uPA in most of the opportunistic cerebral lesions supports their role in these diseases, suggesting their contribution to tissue injury.

  15. Tropical food legumes: virus diseases of economic importance and their control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hema, Masarapu; Sreenivasulu, Pothur; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Kumar, P Lava; Reddy, Dodla V R

    2014-01-01

    Diverse array of food legume crops (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae) have been adopted worldwide for their protein-rich seed. Choice of legumes and their importance vary in different parts of the world. The economically important legumes are severely affected by a range of virus diseases causing significant economic losses due to reduction in grain production, poor quality seed, and costs incurred in phytosanitation and disease control. The majority of the viruses infecting legumes are vectored by insects, and several of them are also seed transmitted, thus assuming importance in the quarantine and in the epidemiology. This review is focused on the economically important viruses of soybean, groundnut, common bean, cowpea, pigeonpea, mungbean, urdbean, chickpea, pea, faba bean, and lentil and begomovirus diseases of three minor tropical food legumes (hyacinth bean, horse gram, and lima bean). Aspects included are geographic distribution, impact on crop growth and yields, virus characteristics, diagnosis of causal viruses, disease epidemiology, and options for control. Effectiveness of selection and planting with virus-free seed, phytosanitation, manipulation of crop cultural and agronomic practices, control of virus vectors and host plant resistance, and potential of transgenic resistance for legume virus disease control are discussed.

  16. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) for the localization of viruses and endosymbiotic bacteria in plant and insect tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Brumin, Marina; Cathrin, Pakkianathan Britto; Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Skaljac, Marisa; Belausov, Eduard; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-02-24

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a name given to a variety of techniques commonly used for visualizing gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells and can be further modified to visualize other components in the cell such as infection with viruses and bacteria. Spatial localization and visualization of viruses and bacteria during the infection process is an essential step that complements expression profiling experiments such as microarrays and RNAseq in response to different stimuli. Understanding the spatiotemporal infections with these agents complements biological experiments aimed at understanding their interaction with cellular components. Several techniques for visualizing viruses and bacteria such as reporter gene systems or immunohistochemical methods are time-consuming, and some are limited to work with model organisms and involve complex methodologies. FISH that targets RNA or DNA species in the cell is a relatively easy and fast method for studying spatiotemporal localization of genes and for diagnostic purposes. This method can be robust and relatively easy to implement when the protocols employ short hybridizing, commercially-purchased probes, which are not expensive. This is particularly robust when sample preparation, fixation, hybridization, and microscopic visualization do not involve complex steps. Here we describe a protocol for localization of bacteria and viruses in insect and plant tissues. The method is based on simple preparation, fixation, and hybridization of insect whole mounts and dissected organs or hand-made plant sections, with 20 base pairs short DNA probes conjugated to fluorescent dyes on their 5' or 3' ends. This protocol has been successfully applied to a number of insect and plant tissues, and can be used to analyze expression of mRNAs or other RNA or DNA species in the cell.

  17. Multimodal optical imaging database from tumour brain human tissue: endogenous fluorescence from glioma, metastasis and control tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulon, Fanny; Ibrahim, Ali; Zanello, Marc; Pallud, Johan; Varlet, Pascale; Malouki, Fatima; Abi Lahoud, Georges; Devaux, Bertrand; Abi Haidar, Darine

    2017-02-01

    Eliminating time-consuming process of conventional biopsy is a practical improvement, as well as increasing the accuracy of tissue diagnoses and patient comfort. We addressed these needs by developing a multimodal nonlinear endomicroscope that allows real-time optical biopsies during surgical procedure. It will provide immediate information for diagnostic use without removal of tissue and will assist the choice of the optimal surgical strategy. This instrument will combine several means of contrast: non-linear fluorescence, second harmonic generation signal, reflectance, fluorescence lifetime and spectral analysis. Multimodality is crucial for reliable and comprehensive analysis of tissue. Parallel to the instrumental development, we currently improve our understanding of the endogeneous fluorescence signal with the different modalities that will be implemented in the stated. This endeavor will allow to create a database on the optical signature of the diseased and control brain tissues. This proceeding will present the preliminary results of this database on three types of tissues: cortex, metastasis and glioblastoma.

  18. Use of polymerase chain reaction in detection of Marek’s disease and reticuloendotheliosis viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for the diagnosis of Marek’s disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues; and for the diagnosis of MD in tissues only preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin. MD virus (MDV) and RE vi...

  19. Persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in the nasopharynx of cattle: tissue-specific distribution and local cytokine expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissues obtained post-mortem from cattle persistently infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) were analyzed to characterize the tissue-specific localization of FMDV and partial transcriptome profiles for selected immunoregulatory cytokines. Analysis of 28 distinct anatomic sites from 21 st...

  20. A conformational switch controls hepatitis delta virus ribozyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Ailong; Zhou, Kaihong; Ding, Fang; Cate, Jamie H D; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2004-05-13

    Ribozymes enhance chemical reaction rates using many of the same catalytic strategies as protein enzymes. In the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme, site-specific self-cleavage of the viral RNA phosphodiester backbone requires both divalent cations and a cytidine nucleotide. General acid-base catalysis, substrate destabilization and global and local conformational changes have all been proposed to contribute to the ribozyme catalytic mechanism. Here we report ten crystal structures of the HDV ribozyme in its pre-cleaved state, showing that cytidine is positioned to activate the 2'-OH nucleophile in the precursor structure. This observation supports its proposed role as a general base in the reaction mechanism. Comparison of crystal structures of the ribozyme in the pre- and post-cleavage states reveals a significant conformational change in the RNA after cleavage and that a catalytically critical divalent metal ion from the active site is ejected. The HDV ribozyme has remarkable chemical similarity to protein ribonucleases and to zymogens for which conformational dynamics are integral to biological activity. This finding implies that RNA structural rearrangements control the reactivity of ribozymes and ribonucleoprotein enzymes.

  1. Fluorescently Tagged pUL47 of Marek's Disease Virus Reveals Differential Tissue Expression of the Tegument Protein In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Sina; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), a lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus, causes Marek's disease (MD) in chickens. MD is characterized by neurological signs, chronic wasting, and T cell lymphomas that predominate in the visceral organs. MDV replicates in a highly cell-associated manner in vitro and in vivo, with infectious virus particles being released only from feather follicle epithelial (FFE) cells in the skin. Virus produced and shed from FFE cells allows transmission of MDV from infected to naïve chickens, but the mechanisms or roles of differential virus gene expression have remained elusive. Here, we generated recombinant MDV in which we fused enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to the C terminus of the tegument protein pUL47 (vUL47-EGFP) or pUL49 (vUL49-EGFP). While vUL49-EGFP was highly attenuated in vitro and in vivo, vUL47-EGFP showed unaltered pathogenic potential and stable production of pUL47-EGFP, which facilitated direct analysis of pUL47 expression in cells and tissues. Our studies revealed that pUL47-EGFP is expressed at low levels and localizes to the nucleus during lytic replication in vitro and in lymphocytes in the spleen in vivo, while it is undetectable in tumors. In contrast, pUL47-EGFP is highly abundant and localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm in FFE cells in the skin, where MDV is shed into the environment. We concluded that differential expression and localization of MDV pUL47-EGFP tegument protein is potentially important for the unique cell-associated nature of MDV in vitro and in lymphocytes in vivo, as well as production of free virus in FFE cells. PMID:22190714

  2. Patterns of transcription of a virus-like agent in tumor and non-tumor tissues in bicolor damselfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn, Jennifer J; Gibbs, Patrick D L; Schmale, Michael C

    2004-07-01

    Damselfish neurofibromatosis (DNF) is a transmissible disease characterized by peripheral nerve sheath and pigment cell tumors which occurs in bicolor damselfish (Stegastes partitus) on Florida reefs. The damselfish virus-like agent (DVLA) is associated with the development of DNF and contains a 2.4-kb DNA genome which was found at high levels in tumors and tumor-derived cell lines and at lower levels in non-tumor tissues of both spontaneously diseased fish (TF) and fish with experimentally induced tumors (EF). An analysis of transcription patterns revealed up to five DVLA derived RNAs ranging in size from 300 to 1400 bp in these cell types. DNA was the most commonly distributed DVLA component in TF and EF followed by RNA. Prevalence of transcripts varied by tissue type. The smallest transcripts were the most common in all cell types and the most complete patterns, which included the larger transcripts, were observed primarily in tumors. The presence of viral RNAs in addition to DNA in non-tumor tissues suggested these tissues were infected by DVLA and indicated a wide tissue tropism for this agent. The high levels of DVLA nucleic acids found in tumors suggest that replication is occurring there. However, the potential for DVLA replication in other tissues where only a limited range of transcripts were present is not known. The mechanism of tumorigenesis by this agent is unknown. However, the association of the larger transcripts with most tumor tissues and their absence in most non-tumor tissues suggests that these RNAs may be involved in tumor formation.

  3. The Aedes aegypti toll pathway controls dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Xi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue viruses, utilizes its innate immune system to ward off a variety of pathogens, some of which can cause disease in humans. To date, the features of insects' innate immune defenses against viruses have mainly been studied in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which appears to utilize different immune pathways against different types of viruses, in addition to an RNA interference-based defense system. We have used the recently released whole-genome sequence of the Ae. aegypti mosquito, in combination with high-throughput gene expression and RNA interference (RNAi-based reverse genetic analyses, to characterize its response to dengue virus infection in different body compartments. We have further addressed the impact of the mosquito's endogenous microbial flora on virus infection. Our findings indicate a significant role for the Toll pathway in regulating resistance to dengue virus, as indicated by an infection-responsive regulation and functional assessment of several Toll pathway-associated genes. We have also shown that the mosquito's natural microbiota play a role in modulating the dengue virus infection, possibly through basal-level stimulation of the Toll immune pathway.

  4. Polyclonal antibody preparation and expression in liver tissues of transactivated protein 5 of hepatitis C virus nonstructural 5A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To prepare polyclonal antibody of transactivated protein 5 of hepatitis C virus nonstructural 5A (NA5ATP5) and to explore its expression in the liver tissues. Methods In Escherichia coli BL21,the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a(+)-NS5ATP5 was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG),and it was analyzed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting. And the purified protein was used to immunize the rabbit to prepare polyclonal antibody,wi...

  5. Compromised virus control and augmented perforin-mediated immunopathology in IFN-gamma-deficient mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, A; Jensen, Teis; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1999-01-01

    -specific TCR are adoptively transferred before virus challenge, indicating that the disease is the result of an unfortunate balance between virus replication in internal organs, e.g., liver and spleen, and the host response; resetting this balance by increasing host responsiveness will again lead to a rapidly...... in wild-type mice. Our results reveal that IFN-gamma is pivotal to T cell-mediated control of a rapidly invasive stain, whereas it is less important in the acute elimination of a slowly invasive strain. Moreover, the majority of mice infected with the rapidly invasive strain succumb to a wasting syndrome...... mediated by CD8+ effector cells. The primary effector mechanism underlying this disease is perforin-dependent lysis, but other mechanisms are also involved. Wasting disease can be prevented if naive CD8+ cells from mice transgenic for an MHC class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus...

  6. Detection of African swine fever virus from formalin fixed and non-fixed tissues by polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Luka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Formalin fixing and paraffin embedding of tissue samples is one of the techniques for preserving the structural integrity of cells for a very long time. However, extraction and analysis of genomic material from formalin fixed tissue (FFT remains a challenge despite numerous attempts to develop a more effective method. The success of polymerase chain reaction (PCR depends on the quality of DNA extract. Materials and Methods: Here we assessed the conventional method of DNA extraction from FFT for African swine fever virus (ASFV detection. The modified conventional method gave a higher quality DNA when compared with commercially available DNA extraction kits (QIAamp® DNA Mini Kit, DNeasy® Blood and Tissue Kit, and ZR Genomic DNA™ Tissue MiniPrep. Results: An average A260/A280 DNA purity of 0.86-1.68 and 3.22-5.32 μg DNA/mg for formalin fixed and non-fixed tissues, respectively using a conventional method. In a reproducible and three times repeat PCR, the ASFV DNA expected product size of 278 bp was obtained from the DNA extract of the conventional method but not from the DNA extract of the commercial kits. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that the conventional method extracts ASFV genome better than commercial kit. In summary, the commercial kit extraction appeared not suitable to purify ASFV DNA from FFT. We, therefore, recommend that the use of the conventional method be considered for African swine fever DNA extraction from FFT.

  7. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue and leukocytes of pigs infected with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors including microRNA (miRNA) in the local and systemic host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of miRNA, mRNA and proteins...... acute phase proteins. Likewise, the following miRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more time groups compared to the control pigs: miR-15a, miR-21, miR-146, miR-206, miR-223 and miR-451. At day one pi lung tissue protein levels of IL-6, IL-12 and IFN-α were significantly increased compared...... to the control group, and haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were at significantly increased at day three pi. MiRNA are small non coding RNA molecules, that regulate gene expression in a wide range of organisms. Cellular miRNAs might be involved in influenza infection, both by targeting immune related host...

  8. Oral Immunization with Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes Controls Virus Load after Vaginal Challenge with Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Rosemary; Howard, Kristina E.; Nordone, Sushila; Burkhard, MaryJo; Dean, Gregg A

    2004-01-01

    Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes has many attractive characteristics as a vaccine vector against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Wild-type and attenuated Listeria strains expressing HIV Gag have been shown to induce long-lived mucosal and systemic T-cell responses in mice. Using the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model of HIV we evaluated recombinant L. monocytogenes in a challenge system. Five cats were immunized with recombinant L. monocytogenes that expresses the FIV Gag and del...

  9. New Paradigms for Virus Detection, Surveillance and Control of Zika Virus Vectors in the Settings of Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vythilingam, Indra; Sam, Jamal I-C.; Chan, Yoke F.; Khaw, Loke T.; Sulaiman, Wan Y. Wan

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) has now become a global public health concern. The vectors for ZIKV are Aedes aegypti and A. albopictus. Both these mosquitoes are predominant in Southeast Asia and are also responsible for the spread of other arboviral diseases like dengue virus and chikungunya virus. The incidence of dengue has been increasing over the years and this is of concern to public health workers. Simple laboratory tools for the detection of ZIKV is also lacking. In the absence of drugs and vaccine for these arboviral diseases, vector control is the main option for surveillance and control. Aedes larval surveys have been the hallmark of dengue control along with larviciding and fogging when cases are reported. However, we need new paradigms and options for control of these vectors. The current situation in Southeast Asia clearly proves that effective strategies for vector control need to be proactive and not reactive. This will be the way forward to control epidemics of these diseases inclusive of ZIKV until a vaccine becomes available. PMID:27679623

  10. New Paradigms for Virus Detection, Surveillance and Control of Zika Virus Vectors in the Settings of Southeast Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Vythilingam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has now become a global public health concern. The vectors for ZIKV are Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Both these mosquitoes are predominant in Southeast Asia and are also responsible for the spread of other arboviral diseases like dengue virus (DENV and chikungunya virus (CHIKV. The incidence of dengue has been increasing over the years and this is of concern to public health workers. Simple laboratory tools for the detection of ZIKV is also lacking. In the absence of drugs and vaccine for these arboviral diseases, vector control is the main option for surveillance and control. Aedes larval surveys have been the hallmark of dengue control along with larviciding and fogging when cases are reported. However, we need new paradigms and options for control of these vectors. The current situation in Southeast Asia clearly proves that effective strategies for vector control need to be proactive and not reactive. This will be the way forward to control epidemics of these diseases inclusive of ZIKV until a vaccine becomes available.

  11. Immunogold silver staining associated with epi-fluorescence for cucumber mosaic virus localisation on semi-thin sections of banana tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Helliot

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The immunogold-silver staining (IGSS technique in combination with epi-fluorescence detection was used to localise cucumber mosaic virus (CMV particles within banana infected tissues. For this purpose, tissue samples (2 mm3 were excised from CMV-infected and highly proliferating meristem cultures of Williams BSJ banana (ITC. 0570, AAA, Cavendish subgroup. These samples were immediately fixed in a 2% paraformaldehyde/0.25% glutaraldehyde mixture, dehydrated in ethanol, and finally embedded in L.R.White resin. Semi-thin sections were cut, mounted on clean treated glass slides and immunostained for CMV particles using gold-labelled secondary antibodies and silver enhancement. Sections were counterstained with basic fuchsin and examined using laser scanning confocal microscopy. Negative controls included immuno-stained samples excised from non-virus infected material as well as infected material on which primary or secondary antibodies were not applied. Images of autofluorescence (in red and of epi-reflectance of silver-enhanced immunogold particles (in green were recorded separately and merged, allowing the specific localisation of CMV particles at the cellular level on semi-thin sections of aldehyde-fixed banana tissues. The main advantage of this analytical approach compared to previously published protocols is that it combines a fast staining procedure, stable preparation, a high resolution, and a narrow plane of focus with the flexibility in generation, processing and analysis of images offered by laser scanning confocal microscopy. Finally, the presence of numerous CMV particles within banana meristems constitutes a clear explanation of the very low CMV elimination efficiency when using meristem- tip culture alone.

  12. Use of polymerase chain reaction in detection of Marek's disease and reticuloendotheliosis viruses in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumorous tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Weisheng; Mays, Jody; Dunn, John; Fulton, Richard; Silva, Robert; Fadly, Aly

    2013-12-01

    A simple PCR method was developed for the detection of Marek's disease (MD) and reticuloendotheliosis (RE) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, and for the detection of MD in tissues only preserved in 10% neutral buffered formalin. MD virus (MDV) and RE virus proviral DNA were detected in FFPE tissues stored for over 20 yr. MDV was also detected in tissues only preserved in formalin for up to 6 mo. The data indicate that PCR of formalin-fixed and FFPE tissues is a simple and valuable tool that can be used to identify MD and RE infection. The method described in this paper is a good alternative to any biologic or immunohistochemical assay to confirm the detection of MD and RE, as it does not require shipping frozen tissues to the diagnostic laboratory.

  13. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus in formalin-fixed tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihu, Simon Mwangi; Gitao, George Chege; Bebora, Lily Caroline; Njenga, Munene John; Wairire, Gidraph Gachunga; Maingi, Ndichu; Wahome, Raphael Githaiga; Oyugi, Julius Otieno; Lutomia, Ernest

    2015-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus that causes a highly infectious and often fatal disease of sheep and goats is confirmed by various diagnostic techniques among them being isolation of the virus from cell culture systems, viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) detection by molecular assays, and viral antigen detection by immunocapture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC ELISA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and AGAR gel test. Whereas most of the confirmatory diagnostic procedures require pathological samples to be stored frozen to preserve integrity of the peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus RNA, samples for IHC tests are preserved in 10% formalin. In this study, nine formalin-fixed pathological samples from three goats suspected of PPR were processed for extraction of PPR viral RNA and analyzed for detection with real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay. The results showed that five out of the nine tested samples returned positive for presences PPR viral genome. This study has established that field pathological samples of PPR-suspected cases, collected and stored in 10% formalin for up 2 years, could be used for PPR virus RNA extraction for disease virus confirmation.

  14. potential for biological control of rice yellow mottle virus vectors ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    (ii) the diversity and the occurrence of potential major groups of predators and parasitoids were assessed. ... manage the yield losses caused by the virus infection in rice cropping systems. ... The aim of this work was to assess the species.

  15. Central neuroinvasion and demyelination by inflammatory macrophages after peripheral virus infection is controlled by SHP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophi, George P; Massa, Paul T

    2009-12-01

    SHP-1 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that negatively regulates cytokine signaling and inflammatory gene expression. Mice genetically lacking SHP-1 (me/me) display severe inflammatory demyelinating disease following intracranial inoculation with the BeAn strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) compared to infected wild-type mice. Furthermore, SHP-1-deficient mice show a profound and predominant infiltration of blood-derived macrophages into the CNS following intracerebral injection of TMEV, and these macrophages are concentrated in areas of demyelination in brain and spinal cord. In the present study we investigated the role of SHP-1 in controlling CNS inflammatory demyelination following a peripheral instead of an intracerebral inoculation of TMEV. Surprisingly, we found that while wild-type mice were entirely refractory to intraperitoneal (IP) infection by TMEV, in agreement with previous studies, all SHP-1-deficient mice displayed profound macrophage neuroinvasion and macrophage-mediated inflammatory demyelination. Moreover, SHP-1 deficiency led to increased expression of inflammatory molecules in macrophages, serum, and CNS following IP infection with TMEV. Importantly, pharmacological depletion of peripheral macrophages significantly decreased both paralysis and CNS viral loads in SHP-1-deficient mice. In addition, peripheral MCP-1 neutralization attenuated disease severity, decreased macrophage infiltration into the CNS, and decreased monocyte numbers in the blood of SHP-1-deficient mice, implicating MCP-1 as an important mediator of monocyte migration between multiple tissues. These results demonstrate that peripheral TMEV infection results in a unique evolution of macrophage-mediated demyelination in SHP-1-deficient mice, implicating SHP-1 in the control of neuroinvasion of inflammatory macrophages and neurotropic viruses into the CNS.

  16. Collagen scaffolds with controlled insulin release and controlled pore structure for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Himansu Sekhar; Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    Controlled and local release of growth factors and nutrients from porous scaffolds is important for maintenance of cell survival, proliferation, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The purpose of the present research was to design a controlled release porous collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold with controlled pore structure capable of releasing insulin for application to cartilage tissue regeneration. Collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold was prepared by hybridization of insulin loaded PLGA microbeads with collagen using a freeze-drying technique. The pore structure of the hybrid scaffold was controlled by using preprepared ice particulates having a diameter range of 150-250 μ m. Hybrid scaffold had a controlled pore structure with pore size equivalent to ice particulates and good interconnection. The microbeads showed an even spatial distribution throughout the pore walls. In vitro insulin release profile from the hybrid scaffold exhibited a zero order release kinetics up to a period of 4 weeks without initial burst release. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in the hybrid scaffold demonstrated high bioactivity of the released insulin. The hybrid scaffold facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution and promoted cell proliferation.

  17. Collagen Scaffolds with Controlled Insulin Release and Controlled Pore Structure for Cartilage Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himansu Sekhar Nanda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled and local release of growth factors and nutrients from porous scaffolds is important for maintenance of cell survival, proliferation, and promotion of tissue regeneration. The purpose of the present research was to design a controlled release porous collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold with controlled pore structure capable of releasing insulin for application to cartilage tissue regeneration. Collagen-microbead hybrid scaffold was prepared by hybridization of insulin loaded PLGA microbeads with collagen using a freeze-drying technique. The pore structure of the hybrid scaffold was controlled by using preprepared ice particulates having a diameter range of 150–250 μm. Hybrid scaffold had a controlled pore structure with pore size equivalent to ice particulates and good interconnection. The microbeads showed an even spatial distribution throughout the pore walls. In vitro insulin release profile from the hybrid scaffold exhibited a zero order release kinetics up to a period of 4 weeks without initial burst release. Culture of bovine articular chondrocytes in the hybrid scaffold demonstrated high bioactivity of the released insulin. The hybrid scaffold facilitated cell seeding and spatial cell distribution and promoted cell proliferation.

  18. Application of Genomics for Understanding Plant Virus-Insect Vector Interactions and Insect Vector Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navneet; Hasegawa, Daniel K; Ling, Kai-Shu; Wintermantel, William M

    2016-10-01

    The relationships between plant viruses and their vectors have evolved over the millennia, and yet, studies on viruses began virus and vector interactions even more recently. The advent of next generation sequencing, including rapid genome and transcriptome analysis, methods for evaluation of small RNAs, and the related disciplines of proteomics and metabolomics offer a significant shift in the ability to elucidate molecular mechanisms involved in virus infection and transmission by insect vectors. Genomic technologies offer an unprecedented opportunity to examine the response of insect vectors to the presence of ingested viruses through gene expression changes and altered biochemical pathways. This review focuses on the interactions between viruses and their whitefly or thrips vectors and on potential applications of genomics-driven control of the insect vectors. Recent studies have evaluated gene expression in vectors during feeding on plants infected with begomoviruses, criniviruses, and tospoviruses, which exhibit very different types of virus-vector interactions. These studies demonstrate the advantages of genomics and the potential complementary studies that rapidly advance our understanding of the biology of virus transmission by insect vectors and offer additional opportunities to design novel genetic strategies to manage insect vectors and the viruses they transmit.

  19. Detection of Human Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr Virus in Coronary Atherosclerotic Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbronito, Ana Vitória; Marcelino, Silvia Linardi; Grande, Sabrina Rosa; Nunes, Fabio Daumas; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that patients with atherosclerosis are predominantly infected by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), but rarely infected by type 1 Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-1). In this study, atheromas of 30 patients who underwent aortocoronary bypass surgery with coronary endartherectomy were tested for the presence of these two viruses. HCMV occurred in 93.3% of the samples and EBV-1 was present in 50% of them. Concurrent presence of both pathogens was detected in 43.3% of the samples. PMID:24031529

  20. Lectin Enzyme Assay Detection of Viruses, Tissue Culture, and a Mycotoxin Simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    Deconinek, I., "A State of Lymphocyte Activation Detected by Susceptibility to Vesicular Stomatitis Virus," Immunol. Let. Vol. 2, pp 291-296 (1981). 11...44, pp 1689-1691 (1980). 17 12. Rice, J.B., Schaller, J.P., Lewis, M.G., Mathes, L.E., Hoover, E.A., and Olsen, R.G., "Infection of Feline Embryo...Adherent Cells with Feline Leukemia Virus: Feline Oncornavirus- Associated Cell Membrane Antigen Expression and Morphologic Transformation," J. Natl

  1. HERPES VIRUS CONTAMINATION OF DONOR’S TISSUE AS A POTENTIAL ETIOLOGY OF CORNEAL GRAFT DISEASE AFTER PENETRATING KERATOPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Mironkova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the study of outcomes of PCR-diagnostics directed on detection of DNA of herpes-family viruses in donor’s corneal tissues taken during penetrating keratoplasty (PK. In total, there were 46 patients, who under- went PKs. They were followed up from 14 days till 12 months. PCR-research of fragments of a donor cornea re- vealed existence of DNA in 21.7%. The retrospective analysis showed that in the presence of herpes-virus DNA in donor’s cornea is the risk factor of postoperative complications development and increases the rejection rate 2–3 times, reaching 100% – 70%. Thus the high risk of graft failures remains associated not only with the system immunosupressive therapy which is usually considered as the precondition of activization of chronic infections, but also in the absence of that. It gives the ground to conclude that preoperative preparation of a donor material, especially «fresh» corneas, should include expanded PCR-diagnostics on herpes-viruses and its obligatory dis- carding in cases of positive tests. 

  2. Three-dimensional normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies: a model of persistent varicella-zoster virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Goodwin

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus (VZV is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs, which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  3. Three-dimensional normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies: a model of persistent varicella-zoster virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J; McCarthy, Maureen; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Cohrs, Randall J; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  4. Virus-driven Inflammation Is Associated With the Development of bNAbs in Spontaneous Controllers of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Arnold, Kelly; Lofano, Giuseppe; Moore, Sarah; Hoffner, Michelle; Simek, Melissa; Poignard, Pascal; Seaman, Michael; Suscovich, Todd J; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce D; Lauffenburger, Doug; Kwon, Douglas S; Keele, Brandon F; Alter, Galit

    2017-04-15

    Understanding the mechanism(s) by which broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) emerge naturally following infection is crucial for the development of a protective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Although previous studies have implicated high viremia and associated immune activation as potential drivers for the development of bNAbs, here we sought to unlink the effect of these 2 parameters by evaluating the key inflammatory predictors of bNAb development in HIV-infected individuals who spontaneously control HIV in the absence of antiretroviral therapy ("controllers"). The breadth of antibody-mediated neutralization against 11 tier 2 or 3 viruses was assessed in 163 clade B spontaneous controllers of HIV. Plasma levels of 17 cytokines were screened in the same set of subjects. The relationship of the inflammatory signature was assessed in the context of viral blips or viral RNA levels in peripheral blood or gastrointestinal biopsies from aviremic controllers (HIV controllers who developed bNAbs. Interestingly, viral load and tissue viremia, but not intermittent viral blips, were associated with these cytokine profiles. However, viral diversity was not significantly associated with increased breadth in controllers. These results suggest that low antigenic diversity in the setting of a unique inflammatory profile associated with antigen persistence may be linked to the evolution of neutralizing antibody breadth.

  5. Control of Ebola virus disease - firestone district, liberia, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaves, Erik J; Mabande, Lyndon G; Thoroughman, Douglas A; Arwady, M Allison; Montgomery, Joel M

    2014-10-24

    On March 30, 2014, the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) of Liberia alerted health officials at Firestone Liberia, Inc. (Firestone) of the first known case of Ebola virus disease (Ebola) inside the Firestone rubber tree plantation of Liberia. The patient, who was the wife of a Firestone employee, had cared for a family member with confirmed Ebola in Lofa County, the epicenter of the Ebola outbreak in Liberia during March-April 2014. To prevent a large outbreak among Firestone's 8,500 employees, their dependents, and the surrounding population, the company responded by 1) establishing an incident management system, 2) instituting procedures for the early recognition and isolation of Ebola patients, 3) enforcing adherence to standard Ebola infection control guidelines, and 4) providing differing levels of management for contacts depending on their exposure, including options for voluntary quarantine in the home or in dedicated facilities. In addition, Firestone created multidisciplinary teams to oversee the outbreak response, address case detection, manage cases in a dedicated unit, and reintegrate convalescent patients into the community. The company also created a robust risk communication, prevention, and social mobilization campaign to boost community awareness of Ebola and how to prevent transmission. During August 1-September 23, a period of intense Ebola transmission in the surrounding areas, 71 cases of Ebola were diagnosed among the approximately 80,000 Liberians for whom Firestone provides health care (cumulative incidence = 0.09%). Fifty-seven (80%) of the cases were laboratory confirmed; 39 (68%) of these cases were fatal. Aspects of Firestone's response appear to have minimized the spread of Ebola in the local population and might be successfully implemented elsewhere to limit the spread of Ebola and prevent transmission to health care workers (HCWs).

  6. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic.

  7. A new reportable disease is born: Taiwan Centers for Disease Control's response to emerging Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Angela Song-En; Shu, Pei-Yun; Yang, Chin-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus infection, usually a mild disease transmitted through the bite of Aedes mosquitos, has been reported to be possibly associated with microcephaly and neurologic complications. Taiwan's first imported case of Zika virus infection was found through fever screening at airport entry in January 2016. No virus was isolated from patient's blood taken during acute illness; however, PCR products showed that the virus was of Asian lineage closely related to virus from Cambodia. To prevent Zika virus from spreading in Taiwan, the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control has strengthened efforts in quarantine and surveillance, increased Zika virus infection diagnostic capacity, implemented healthcare system preparedness plans, and enhanced vector control program through community mobilization and education. Besides the first imported case, no additional cases of Zika virus infection have been identified. Furthermore, no significant increase in the number of microcephaly or Guillain- Barré Syndrome has been observed in Taiwan. To date, there have been no autochthonous transmissions of Zika virus infection.

  8. Subgrouping of bovine respiratory syncytial virus strains detected in lung tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, R.S.; Daus, E.; Kramps, J.A.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Buijs, R.; Middel, W.G.J.; Taylor, G.; Furze, J.; Huyben, M.W.C.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1996-01-01

    Bovine respiratory syncytial virus is an important respiratory pathogen in cattle. Recently, subgroups of BRSV have been identified, based on antigenic differences. However, little is known about subgroups of BRSV that circulate in the cattle population. Therefore, we determined the reactivity of

  9. THE GROWTH OF JAPANESE AND WEST NILE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES IN TISSUE CULTURES,

    Science.gov (United States)

    extinguishing it with a homologous immune serum. In the HeLa cells a specific cytopathogenic effect was registered after six cultural passages of the strain R...1. The cytopathogenic effect was retained in subinoculation. The West Nile encephalitis virus induced a cytopathogenic effect in the HeLa cells from

  10. Compartmentalization of Total and Virus-Specific Tissue-Resident Memory CD8+ T Cells in Human Lymphoid Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon, Heng Giap; Braun, Asolina; Li, Jane; Smith, Corey; Edwards, Jarem; Sierro, Frederic; Feng, Carl G; Khanna, Rajiv; Elliot, Michael; Bell, Andrew; Hislop, Andrew D; Tangye, Stuart G; Rickinson, Alan B; Gebhardt, Thomas; Britton, Warwick J; Palendira, Umaimainthan

    2016-08-01

    Disruption of T cell memory during severe immune suppression results in reactivation of chronic viral infections, such as Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and Cytomegalovirus (CMV). How different subsets of memory T cells contribute to the protective immunity against these viruses remains poorly defined. In this study we examined the compartmentalization of virus-specific, tissue resident memory CD8+ T cells in human lymphoid organs. This revealed two distinct populations of memory CD8+ T cells, that were CD69+CD103+ and CD69+CD103-, and were retained within the spleen and tonsils in the absence of recent T cell stimulation. These two types of memory cells were distinct not only in their phenotype and transcriptional profile, but also in their anatomical localization within tonsils and spleen. The EBV-specific, but not CMV-specific, CD8+ memory T cells preferentially accumulated in the tonsils and acquired a phenotype that ensured their retention at the epithelial sites where EBV replicates. In vitro studies revealed that the cytokine IL-15 can potentiate the retention of circulating effector memory CD8+ T cells by down-regulating the expression of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, required for T cell exit from tissues, and its transcriptional activator, Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2). Within the tonsils the expression of IL-15 was detected in regions where CD8+ T cells localized, further supporting a role for this cytokine in T cell retention. Together this study provides evidence for the compartmentalization of distinct types of resident memory T cells that could contribute to the long-term protection against persisting viral infections.

  11. Detection of the archetypal regulatory region of JC virus from the tonsil tissue of patients with tonsillitis and tonsilar hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Atsushi; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Takasaka, Tomokazu; Tominaga, Takashi; Ishikawa, Akira; Zheng, Huai-Ying; Yogo, Yoshiaki

    2004-08-01

    The regulatory regions of JC virus (JCV) DNAs in the brain of patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) (designated as PML-type regulatory regions) are hypervariable, whereas those in the urine and renal tissue of individuals without PML have the same basic structure, designated as the archetype. It is thought that JCV strains with the archetypal regulatory region circulate in the human population. Nevertheless, Monaco et al (J Virol 70: 7004-7012, 1996) reported that PML-type regulatory regions occur in human tonsil tissue. The purpose of this study is to confirm their findings. Using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the authors detected the regulatory region of JCV DNA in the tonsil tissue from 14 (44%) of 32 donors with tonsillitis and tonsilar hypertrophy. Sequencing of the detected regulatory regions indicated that they were identical with the archetypal regulatory regions detected previously or, in a few cases, slightly deviated from the archetype. This finding suggests not only that tonsil tissue is the potential site of initial JCV infection but also that archetypal JCV strains circulate in the human population.

  12. Tissue tropism and molecular characterization of a Japanese encephalitis virus strain isolated from pigs in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Rui; Liu, Hanyang; Wen, Xintian; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-04-02

    Since September 2012, an epidemic has been spreading among swine in a pig farm located in Sichuan province, southwest China, which has resulted in abortion, stillbirth, and fetal mummification. The brains of stillborn pigs were collected and a previously unknown Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), namely SCYA201201, was isolated. According to the results of agarose gel diffusion precipitation, indirect immunofluorescence analysis, neutralization testing, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) amplification, and physical and chemical testing, the virus was conformed to have the characteristics of JEV. The virus titer in BHK-21 cells was 10(8.47)PFU/ml and the median lethal dose (LD50) to 3-week-old and 7-day-old mice was 1.99 log10 and 1.02 log10 PFU/LD50, respectively. The results of tissue tropism for mice showed that the viral load in the brain was significantly higher than other organs, indicating that the isolate was strongly neurotropic. Additionally, the complete genome sequence of the isolate was determined and compared with other JEV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate belongs to genotype I and may be an imported virus. The isolate had 88.4% nucleotide identity with the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2. However, there were 69 amino acid substitutions compared with the strain SA14-14-2. Some substitutions indicated that SCYA201201 was highly neurovirulent and infective, in accordance with the results of animal testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in paraffin-embedded tissues from patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydas, Semra; Ergin, Melek; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Yavuz, Sinan; Disel, Umut; Kilic, Nil Banu; Erdogan, Seyda; Sahin, Berksoy; Tuncer, Ilhan; Burgut, Refik

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the possible role of hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in lymphomagenesis. HCV-RNA and anti-HCV antibodies were studied in tissue and serum samples taken from patients with non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL). The prevalence of HCV, the clinical presentation of these cases, and association with histologic subtypes were determined. RT-PCR was used to detect the HCV-RNA in serum and tissue samples. The anti-HCV antibodies were tested with microparticle enzyme immunoassay. Immunohistochemistry with the ABC method was used to detect the HCV core protein in HCV-RNA(+) cases. RNA could be detected in 30 of 35 cases, and other tests were performed in these 30 samples. HCV-RNA was detected in 11 tissue samples (11/30, 37%). HCV core protein was studied in 10 of 11 HCV-RNA(+) cases, and 1-3% nuclear staining was found in only 2 samples. Serologically, HCV-RNA was detected in 7 of 30 samples (23.3%) and anti-HCV antibody was detected in 3 of 30 samples (10%). Detection of HCV-RNA in 37% of the lymphoma tissue samples suggests that HCV may have a role or is a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of lymphoma. The very low HCV core protein in lymphoma tissues may be due to the low viral load in lymphoid tissues and/or higher sensitivity of the PCR method. Detection of anti-HCV antibody in only three cases may be associated with undetectable levels of antibodies due to the immune deficiency in cases with NHL. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Optically Controlled Oscillators in an Engineered Bioelectric Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Harold M.; Zhang, Hongkang; Werley, Christopher A.; Cohen, Adam E.

    2016-07-01

    Complex electrical dynamics in excitable tissues occur throughout biology, but the roles of individual ion channels can be difficult to determine due to the complex nonlinear interactions in native tissue. Here, we ask whether we can engineer a tissue capable of basic information storage and processing, where all functional components are known and well understood. We develop a cell line with four transgenic components: two to enable collective propagation of electrical waves and two to enable optical perturbation and optical readout of membrane potential. We pattern the cell growth to define simple cellular ring oscillators that run stably for >2 h (˜104 cycles ) and that can store data encoded in the direction of electrical circulation. Using patterned optogenetic stimulation, we probe the biophysical attributes of this synthetic excitable tissue in detail, including dispersion relations, curvature-dependent wave front propagation, electrotonic coupling, and boundary effects. We then apply the biophysical characterization to develop an optically reconfigurable bioelectric oscillator. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering bioelectric tissues capable of complex information processing with optical input and output.

  15. Ebola virus disease control in West Africa: an ecological, one health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseko, Clement Adebajo; Egbetade, Adeniyi Olugbenga; Fagbo, Shamsudeen

    2015-01-01

    The 2013-2015 Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in West Africa had similar nuances with the 1976 outbreaks in Central Africa; both were caused by the Zaire Ebola Virus strain and originated from rural forested communities. The definitive reservoir host of Ebola virus still remains unknown till date. However, from ecological perspective, it is known that the virus first emerged from forest ecotypes interfacing with human activities. As at March 2015, the outbreak has claimed over 9000 lives, which is unprecedented. Though it remains unproved, the primary sources of infection for past and present outbreaks are forest dwelling, human-hunted fauna. Understanding the ecological factors at play in these forest ecotypes where wild fauna interface with human and causing pathogen spill over is important. A broad based One Health approach incorporating these ecological concepts in the control of Ebola Virus Disease can effectively ameliorate or forestall infection now and in the future.

  16. Absence of XMRV and closely related viruses in primary prostate cancer tissues used to derive the XMRV-infected cell line 22Rv1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaydip Das Gupta

    Full Text Available The 22Rv1 cell line is widely used for prostate cancer research and other studies throughout the world. These cells were established from a human prostate tumor, CWR22, that was serially passaged in nude mice and selected for androgen independence. The 22Rv1 cells are known to produce high titers of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV. Recent studies suggested that XMRV was inadvertently created in the 1990's when two murine leukemia virus (MLV genomes (pre-XMRV1 and pre-XMRV-2 recombined during passaging of the CWR22 tumor in mice. The conclusion that XMRV originated from mice and not the patient was based partly on the failure to detect XMRV in early CWR22 xenografts. While that deduction is certainly justified, we examined the possibility that a closely related virus could have been present in primary tumor tissue. Here we report that we have located the original prostate tumor tissue excised from patient CWR22 and have assayed the corresponding DNA by PCR and the tissue sections by fluorescence in situ hybridization for the presence of XMRV or a similar virus. The primary tumor tissues lacked mouse DNA as determined by PCR for intracisternal A type particle DNA, thus avoiding one of the limitations of studying xenografts. We show that neither XMRV nor a closely related virus was present in primary prostate tissue of patient CWR22. Our findings confirm and reinforce the conclusion that XMRV is a recombinant laboratory-generated mouse virus that is highly adapted for human prostate cancer cells.

  17. Genetic Diversity and Tissue Compartmentalization of the Hepatitis C Virus Genome in Blood Mononuclear Cells, Liver, and Serum from Chronic Hepatitis C Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Sonia; Martín, Julio; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Castillo, Inmaculada; Carreño, Vicente

    1998-01-01

    The degree of genetic variability in the hypervariable region 1 of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was analyzed by cloning and sequencing HCV genomes obtained in paired samples of serum, liver tissue, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from four chronic hepatitis C patients. Genetic variability in serum was higher than in liver tissue or PBMC at the level of complexity (the number of different sequences obtained from each type of tissue) as well as at the level of genetic distance between all pairs of sequences within each tissue (compared by the Student t test; P viral genomes differed among the three types of tissue, as shown by segregation of sequences according to their tissue of origin in phylogenetic analysis and by statistical analysis of mean genetic distances observed between sequences obtained from different tissues (P < 0.001), but sequences from liver tissue and PBMC were more closely related to each other than to those from serum. PMID:9445070

  18. Viral and therapeutic control of IFN-β promoter stimulator 1 during hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Yueh-Ming; Owen, David M.; Li, Kui; Erickson, Andrea K.; Johnson, Cynthia L.; Fish, Penny M.; Carney, D. Spencer; Wang, Ting; Ishida, Hisashi; Yoneyama, Mitsutoshi; Fujita, Takashi; Saito, Takeshi; Lee, William M.; Hagedorn, Curt H.; Lau, Daryl T.-Y.; Weinman, Steven A.; Lemon, Stanley M.; Gale, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Viral signaling through retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and its adaptor protein, IFN promoter-stimulator 1 (IPS-1), activates IFN regulatory factor-3 (IRF-3) and the host IFN-α/β response that limits virus infection. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3/4A protease cleaves IPS-1 to block RIG-I signaling, but how this regulation controls the host response to HCV is not known. Moreover, endogenous IPS-1 cleavage has not been demonstrated in the context of HCV infection in vitro or in vivo. Here, we show that HCV infection transiently induces RIG-I- and IPS-1-dependent IRF-3 activation. This host response limits HCV production and constrains cellular permissiveness to infection. However, HCV disrupts this response early in infection by NS3/4A cleavage of IPS-1 at C508, releasing IPS-1 from the mitochondrial membrane. Cleavage results in subcellular redistribution of IPS-1 and loss of interaction with RIG-I, thereby preventing downstream activation of IRF-3 and IFN-β induction. Liver tissues from chronically infected patients similarly demonstrate subcellular redistribution of IPS-1 in infected hepatocytes and IPS-1 cleavage associated with a lack of ISG15 expression and conjugation of target proteins in vivo. Importantly, small-molecule inhibitors of NS3/4A prevent cleavage and restore RIG-I signaling of IFN-β induction. Our results suggest a dynamic model in which early activation of IRF-3 and induction of antiviral genes are reversed by IPS-1 proteolysis and abrogation of RIG-I signaling as NS3/4A accumulates in newly infected cells. HCV protease inhibitors effectively prevent IPS-1 proteolysis, suggesting they may be capable of restoring this innate host response in clinical practice. PMID:16585524

  19. Two-dimensional patterning of thin coatings for the control of tissue outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thissen, H.; Johnson, G.; Hartley, P.G.

    2006-01-01

    were used to provide evidence of successful surface modifications. Adsorption of the extracellular matrix protein collagen I followed by tissue outgrowth experiments with bovine corneal epithelial tissue for up to 21 days showed that two-dimensional control over tissue outgrowth is achievable with our......Control of the precise location and extent of cellular attachment and proliferation, and of tissue outgrowth is important in a number of biomedical applications, including biomaterials and tissue engineered medical devices. Here we describe a method to control and direct the location and define...... boundaries of tissue growth on surfaces in two dimensions. The method relies on the generation of a spatially defined surface chemistry comprising protein adsorbing and non-adsorbing areas that allow control over the adsorption of cell-adhesive glycoproteins. Surface modification was carried out...

  20. Polymorphisms in genes controlling inflammation and tissue repair in rheumatoid arthritis: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vogel Lisette

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various cytokines and inflammatory mediators are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We hypothesized that polymorphisms in selected inflammatory response and tissue repair genes contribute to the susceptibility to and severity of RA. Methods Polymorphisms in TNFA, IL1B, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL10, PAI1, NOS2a, C1INH, PARP, TLR2 and TLR4 were genotyped in 376 Caucasian RA patients and 463 healthy Caucasian controls using single base extension. Genotype distributions in patients were compared with those in controls. In addition, the association of polymorphisms with the need for anti-TNF-α treatment as a marker of RA severity was assessed. Results The IL8 781 CC genotype was associated with early onset of disease. The TNFA -238 G/A polymorphism was differentially distributed between RA patients and controls, but only when not corrected for age and gender. None of the polymorphisms was associated with disease severity. Conclusions We here report an association between IL8 781 C/T polymorphism and age of onset of RA. Our findings indicate that there might be a role for variations in genes involved in the immune response and in tissue repair in RA pathogenesis. Nevertheless, additional larger genomic and functional studies are required to further define their role in RA.

  1. Perspectives on Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Cure: HIV Persistence in Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boritz, Eli A; Douek, Daniel C

    2017-03-15

    The uneven anatomic distribution of cell subsets that harbor human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during antiretroviral therapy (ART) complicates investigation of the barriers to HIV cure. Here we propose that while previous studies done largely in blood cells have led to important investigations into HIV latency, other important mechanisms of HIV persistence during ART may not be readily apparent in the bloodstream. We specifically consider as an example the question of ongoing HIV replication during ART. We discuss how growing understanding of key anatomic sanctuaries for the virus can inform future experiments aimed at further clarifying this issue. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Haemostatic effect and tissue reactions of methods and agents used for haemorrhage control in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Simon Storgaard; Yazdi, P M; Hjørting-Hansen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    To compare the haemostatic effect and tissue reactions of different agents and methods used for haemorrhage control in apical surgery.......To compare the haemostatic effect and tissue reactions of different agents and methods used for haemorrhage control in apical surgery....

  3. Use of hygiene protocols to control the spread of viruses in a hotel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes, Laura Y; Koenig, David W; Phillips, Ronnie L; Reynolds, Kelly A; Gerba, Charles P

    2014-09-01

    The goals of this study were to observe the spread of viruses in a hotel setting and to assess the effectiveness of a hygiene intervention in reducing their spread. Selected fomites in one hotel room were inoculated with bacteriophage ϕx-174, and fomites in a conference center within the same hotel were inoculated using bacteriophage MS2. Cleaning of the contaminated room resulted in the spread of viruses to other rooms by the housekeeping staff. Furthermore, viruses were transferred by hotel guests to the conference center and a communal kitchen area. Additionally, conference attendees transferred viruses from the conference center to their hotel rooms and a communal kitchen area. This study demonstrated how viruses can be spread throughout a hotel setting by both housekeepers and guests. A hygiene intervention, which included providing hand hygiene products and facial tissues to the guests and disinfecting solutions with disposable wipes to the housekeeping staff, was successful in reducing the spread of viruses between the hotel guest rooms and conference center. The hygiene intervention resulted in significantly reduced transfer of the ϕx-174 between the contaminated hotel room and other hotel rooms, communal areas, and the conference center (p = 0.02).

  4. Foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in young lambs: pathogenesis and tissue tropism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Eoin; Horsington, Jacquelyn; Durand, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    were taken. Lambs were killed sequentially and tissue samples taken for analysis. Using real-time RT-PCR, viral RNA levels in tissue samples and serum were measured, and a novel strand-specific real-time RT-PCR assay was used to quantify viral replication levels in tissues. Tissue sections were...... examined for histopathological lesions, and in situ hybridisation (ISH) was used to localise viral RNA within histological sections. The contact-infected lambs became infected approximately 24 h after the ewes were inoculated. Vesicular lesions developed on the feet of all lambs and on the caudo......-lateral part of the tongues of six of the eight inoculated lambs and three of the four contact-infected lambs. Although no lambs developed severe clinical signs, one of the contact-infected lambs died acutely at 5 days post-exposure. Histological examination of the heart from this lamb showed multi-focal areas...

  5. The effect of transmission route on plant virus epidemic development and disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeger, Michael J; Madden, Laurence V; van den Bosch, Frank

    2009-05-21

    A model for indirect vector transmission and epidemic development of plant viruses is extended to consider direct transmission through vector mating. A basic reproduction number is derived which is the sum of the R(0) values specific for three transmission routes. We analyse the model to determine the effect of direct transmission on plant disease control directed against indirect transmission. Increasing the rate of horizontal sexual transmission means that vector control rate or indirect transmission rate must be increased/decreased substantially to maintain R(0) at a value less than 1. By contrast, proportionately increasing the probability of transovarial transmission has little effect. Expressions are derived for the steady-state values of the viruliferous vector population. There is clear advantage for an insect virus in indirect transmission to plants, especially where the sexual and transovarial transmission rates are low; however information on virulence-transmissibility relationships is required to explain the evolution of a plant virus from an insect virus.

  6. The use of microwave irradiation as a pretreatment to in situ hybridization for the detection of measles virus and chicken anaemia virus in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, J.; McQuaid, S. [Royal Group of Hospitals, Belfast (United Kingdom). Neuropathology Lab.]|[Queen`s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    Microwave irradiation was investigated as a pretreatment to in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Two probe/tissue systems were used: a single-stranded RNA probe for the detection of measles virus nucleocapsid genome in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brain tissue, and a double stranded DNA probe for chicken anaemia virus in thymus of chicken infected with the virus. Microwaving, when used as sold pretreatment, was not as effective as the more traditional enzyme pretreatments for in situ hybridization. However, when used in combination with existing pretreatments, a significant increase was found in hybridization signal in both brain and thymus tissue. This was emphasized when combination enzyme/microwave pretreatments were used prior to detection of measles virus by in situ hybridization in a series of five archival subacute sclerosing panencephalitis cases. The use of microwave irradiation would be recommended as a means of supplementing in situ hybridization methods, especially when using long-term formalin fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. (Author).

  7. Enhanced detection of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in fixed tissues by in situ hybridization following tyramide signal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, Nguyen Thi; Hirai, Takuya; Ngan, Pham Hong; Lan, Nguyen Thi; Fuke, Naoyuki; Toyama, Keiko; Yamamoto, Tsukasa; Yamaguchi, Ryoji

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the sensitivity of biotinyl-tyramide-based in situ hybridization (TISH) method by comparison with chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and immunohistochemical staining (IHC) methods. This study also determined the effect of fixative and fixation time on the detection of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in paraffin-embedded tissues. Lung samples were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA) or 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF) for various times before paraffin embedding. Of 30 paraffin-embedded lung samples, fixed for 1 day in 4% PFA or 10% NBF, 18 (60%) were positive for PRRSV by nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (nRT-PCR). All 18 lung samples (100%) also were positive for PRRSV by TISH, but only 10 of these 18 specimens (56%) were positive for PRRSV by IHC and CISH. We demonstrated that TISH can detect PRRSV RNA in paraffin-embedded tissues after up to 90 days of fixation. PRRSV nucleic acids and antigens were better preserved in 4% PFA than in 10% NBF. Compared with CISH and IHC testing methods, TISH appeared to be more sensitive for the detection of PRRSV in paraffin-embedded tissues.

  8. IMMUNITY AND DYNAMICS OF INFECTIONS IN HERPESVIRUS-CARRYING PREGNANT WOMEN WITH UNDIFFERENTIATED FORMS OF CONNECTIVE TISSUE DYSPLASIA HERPES VIRUSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Dorohova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We have studied some immune parameters in pregnant women with undifferentiated forms of connective tissue dysplasia (n = 51, who harboured herpesviruses, i.e., cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex virus. A relative insufficiency of CD3+ lymphocytes, along with deficiency of CD4+T cells, and predominance of CD16+ cells (NK cells, and CD20+ cells were revealed, accompanied by increase in IgM and the decrease in IgA and IgG levels. Disturbances of cellular and humoral immunity in such patients were more expressed than in women without undifferentiated forms of connective tissue dysplasia (n = 50, being associated with increased  frequency  of  infection  manifesting  as  inflammatory  placental  lesion  with  secondary  placental insufficiency and more pessimistic perinatal outcomes. The results obtained justify a need for second preventive measures  in  pregnant,  herpesvirus-carrying  women with undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 2-3, pp 175-180

  9. Development and evaluation of a reverse transcription-insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) assay for detection of equine arteritis virus in equine semen and tissue samples using the POCKIT™ system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carossino, Mariano; Lee, Pei-Yu A; Nam, Bora; Skillman, Ashley; Shuck, Kathleen M; Timoney, Peter J; Tsai, Yun-Long; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen G; Wang, Hwa-Tang T; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2016-08-01

    Equine arteritis virus (EAV) is the causative agent of equine viral arteritis (EVA), a respiratory and reproductive disease of horses. Most importantly, EAV induces abortion in pregnant mares and can establish persistent infection in up to 10-70% of the infected stallions, which will continue to shed the virus in their semen. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) for the detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples. The newly developed assay had a limit of detection of 10 RNA copies and a 10-fold higher sensitivity than a previously described real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Evaluation of 125 semen samples revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 98.46% and 100.00%, respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 100.00% and 98.33%, respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. Both assays had the same accuracy (99.2%, k=0.98) compared to virus isolation. Corresponding values derived from testing various tissue samples (n=122) collected from aborted fetuses, foals, and EAV carrier stallions are as follows: relative sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 88.14%, 96.83%, and 92.62% (k=0.85), respectively for the RT-qPCR assay, and 98.31%, 92.06%, and 95.08% (k=0.90), respectively for the RT-iiPCR assay. These results indicate that RT-iiPCR is a sensitive, specific, and a robust test enabling detection of EAV in semen and tissue samples with very considerable accuracy. Even though the RT-qPCR assay showed a sensitivity and specificity equal to virus isolation for semen samples, its diagnostic performance was somewhat limited for tissue samples. Thus, this new RT-iiPCR could be considered as an alternative tool in the implementation of EAV control and prevention strategies.

  10. Risks associated with commodity trade: transmission of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) to rainbow trout fry from VHSV-carrying tissue-homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oidtmann, B; Joiner, C; Reese, R A; Stone, D; Dodge, M; Dixon, P

    2011-06-01

    Movements of commodity fish present a potential risk of transferring pathogens. Within a study to estimate the risk from imported rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss carcases, fry were exposed to tissue homogenates from market size rainbow trout infected experimentally with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) by waterborne exposure to VHS virus (VHSV, isolate of genotype Ia). Tissues were collected from fish that showed clinical signs and from recent mortalities. Homogenates of (i) internal organs, (ii) brain/gills and (iii) muscle tissue were prepared and added to tanks holding the fry. Virus transmission occurred from all tissues tested, causing high mortality of the fry. The results underline the potential risk of introduction of VHSV through the trade of fish products.

  11. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for the localization of viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms in insect and plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Ghanim, Murad

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the localization of cellular components such as nucleic acids, proteins, cellular vesicles and more, and the localization of microorganisms including viruses, bacteria and fungi have become an important part of any research program in biological sciences that enable the visualization of these components in fixed and live tissues without the need for complex processing steps. The rapid development of microscopy tools and technologies as well as related fluorescent markers and fluorophores for many cellular components, and the ability to design DNA and RNA sequence-based molecular probes and antibodies which can be visualized fluorescently, have rapidly advanced this field. This review will focus on some of the localizations methods which have been used in plants and insect pests in agriculture, and other microorganisms, which are rapidly advancing the research in agriculture-related fields.

  12. Optimization of cDNA amplification of Apricot Latent Virus (ApLV) from various plant tissues sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, M; Sipahioğlu, H M; Paylan, I C; Erkan, S

    2007-03-15

    Although the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) procedure is basically simple operation, often it is not possible to achieve optimum results without optimizing the protocols. An RT-PCR method targeting a 200 bp sequence of the CP gene of Apricot Latent Virus (ApLV) was used as a model to improve the detection limit and to compare the behavior of three different plant tissues in a RT-PCR assay. A number of factors should be considered when selecting the optimal system for RT-PCR. Important considerations include the optimal concentrations of MgCl2, dNTP, Taq DNA polymerase enzyme, specific primer and the amount of cDNA for the downstream applications. This study therefore discusses a series of critical PCR parameters and feasible strategies for optimization of RT-PCR detection of ApLV.

  13. Evaluation of liver tissue by polymerase chain reaction for hepatitis B virus in patients with negative viremia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fouad Thakeb; Magdy El-Serafy; Soheir Zakaria; Bahaa Monir; Sahar Lashin; Raghda Marzaban; Mostafa El-Awady

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinical significance of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA localization in the liver tissue of patients with positive HBsAg and negative viremia.METHODS: HBV virological parameters of 33 HBsAg positive chronic hepatitis patients, including seromarkers and HBV DNA amplification in both sera and liver biopsies, were evaluated.RESULTS: Ten patients had negative viremia and positive HBV DNA in their liver biopsies. Most of them had HBeAg-negative/HBeAb-positive chronic hepatitis.Their liver biochemical and histopathological profiles were different from the viremic patients. Their disease pattern was designated as "hepatitis B in situ".CONCLUSION: Hepatitis B in situ is a consequential entity which can be missed in clinical practice. It is a new clinical pattern of chronic HBV infection that considers HBV in liver biopsy and adds a new indication for antiviral therapy.

  14. Enhanced gene delivery in porcine vasculature tissue following incorporation of adeno-associated virus nanoparticles into porous silicon microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kellie I; Rhudy, Jessica; Yokoi, Kenji; Gu, Jianhua; Mack, Aaron; Suh, Junghae; La Francesca, Saverio; Sakamoto, Jason; Serda, Rita E

    2014-11-28

    There is an unmet clinical need to increase lung transplant successes, patient satisfaction and to improve mortality rates. We offer the development of a nanovector-based solution that will reduce the incidence of lung ischemic reperfusion injury (IRI) leading to graft organ failure through the successful ex vivo treatment of the lung prior to transplantation. The innovation is in the integrated application of our novel porous silicon (pSi) microparticles carrying adeno-associated virus (AAV) nanoparticles, and the use of our ex vivo lung perfusion/ventilation system for the modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines initiated by ischemic pulmonary conditions prior to organ transplant that often lead to complications. Gene delivery of anti-inflammatory agents to combat the inflammatory cascade may be a promising approach to prevent IRI following lung transplantation. The rationale for the device is that the microparticle will deliver a large payload of virus to cells and serve to protect the AAV from immune recognition. The microparticle-nanoparticle hybrid device was tested both in vitro on cell monolayers and ex vivo using either porcine venous tissue or a pig lung transplantation model, which recapitulates pulmonary IRI that occurs clinically post-transplantation. Remarkably, loading AAV vectors into pSi microparticles increases gene delivery to otherwise non-permissive endothelial cells.

  15. An overview on hepatitis C virus genotypes and its control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Nouroz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a blood borne, circular and positive single stranded virus with high spread rates. With the passage of time the frequency of HCV is increasing in different parts of the world. HCV is a major cause, which may end in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV has six main genotypes with many subtypes, which have variable sequence homology with each other. Symptoms can appear anytime from 2 weeks to 6 months, which include jaundice, fatigue, gray-colored stool, joint pain, belly pain, weakness, anorexia, itchy skin and dark urine. Genotyping is more significant for planning of HCV treatment period and helps to cure HCV infections. For the quantification and identification of hepatitis C virus-ribonucleic acid, many molecular techniques are performed; the most significant are HCV ELISA, quantitative HCV-RNA PCR and recombinant immunoblot assay. PCR is the major technique targeting 5′ untranslated region (UTR. HCV can be transmitted by contaminated blood, ear and nose piercing and contaminated medical instruments. To overcome the rate of HCV, guidance should be provided to make aware the persons about risk factors, transmission and prevention. Discovery and designing of new therapies and vaccines to overcome this disease are the necessity of the present era. Four types of vaccines such as vector vaccines, peptide vaccines, DNA vaccines and recombinant protein vaccines are available in clinical trials.

  16. Haptic feedback control in medical robots through fractional viscoelastic tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yo; Moreira, Pedro; Liu, Chao; Poignet, Philippe; Zemiti, Nabil; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design of an adaptive control system for robot-assisted surgery with haptic feedback. Through a haptic device, the surgeon teleoperates the medical instrument in free space, fixed on a remote robot or in contact. In free space, the surgeon feels the motion of the robot. In the present paper, we evaluated the performance of the controller on viscoelastic tissue, modeled by a fractional derivative equation. In addition, we propose a novel controller using an integer formalization process that is suitable for these tissue properties. The simulation results suggested that performance, in terms of force control and telepresence, became poorer when the conventional controller, which was designed for elastic target object, was applied to the viscoelastic tissues. In contrast, the results suggested that our proposed controller maintained its performance on the viscoelastic tissues.

  17. Single Amino Acid Changes Can Influence Titer, Heparin Binding, and Tissue Tropism in Different Adeno-Associated Virus Serotypes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Asokan, Aravind; Grieger, Joshua C.; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, R. Jude

    2006-01-01

    Despite the high degree of sequence homology between adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 6 capsids (99.2%), these viruses have different liver transduction profiles when tested as vectors. Examination of the six amino acid residues that differ between AAV1 and AAV6 revealed that a lysine-to-glutamate change (K531E) suppresses the heparin binding ability of AAV6. In addition, the same mutation in AAV6 reduces transgene expression to levels similar to those achieved with AAV1 in HepG2 cells in vitro and in mouse liver following portal vein administration. In corollary, the converse E531K mutation in AAV1 imparts heparin binding ability and increases transduction efficiency. Extraction of vector genomes from liver tissue suggests that the lysine 531 residue assists in preferential transduction of parenchymal cells by AAV6 vectors in comparison with AAV1. Lysine 531 is unique to AAV6 among other known AAV serotypes and is located in a basic cluster near the spikes that surround the icosahedral threefold axes of the AAV capsid. Similar to studies with autonomous parvoviruses, this study describes the first example of single amino acid changes that can explain differential phenotypes such as viral titer, receptor binding, and tissue tropism exhibited by closely related AAV serotypes. In particular, a single lysine residue appears to provide the critical minimum charged surface required for interacting with heparin through electrostatic interaction and simultaneously plays an unrelated yet critical role in the liver tropism of AAV6 vectors. PMID:16943302

  18. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...

  19. Determination of which virus to use as a process control when testing for the presence of hepatitis A virus and norovirus in food and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennechart-Collette, Catherine; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Guillier, Laurent; Perelle, Sylvie

    2015-06-02

    Noroviruses (genogroup I (NoV GI) and genogroup II (NoV GII)) and the hepatitis A virus (HAV) are frequently involved in foodborne infections worldwide. They are mainly transmitted via the fecal-oral route, direct person-to-person contact or consumption of contaminated water and foods. In food virology, detection methods are currently based on identifying viral genomes using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR). One of the general requirements for detecting these viruses in food involves the use of a process control virus to monitor the quality of the entire viral extraction procedure as described in the ISO/TS 15216-1 and 15216-2 standards published in 2013. The selected process control virus should have similar morphological and physicochemical properties as the screened pathogenic virus and thus have the potential to provide comparable extraction efficiency. The aim of this study was to determine which virus should be used for process control, murine norovirus (MNV-1) or Mengovirus, when testing for the presence of HAV, NoV GI and NoV GII in bottled water, lettuce and semi-dried tomatoes. Food samples were spiked with HAV, NoV GI or NoV GII alone or in the presence of MNV-1 or Mengovirus. Recovery rates of each pathogenic virus were compared to those of both process control viruses using a multiple comparison procedure. Neither process control virus influenced the recovery of pathogenic virus regardless of the type of food matrix. MNV-1 was the most appropriate virus for validating the detection of HAV and NoV GII in all three food matrices as well as NoV GI in lettuce. Mengovirus proved to be the most appropriate control for NoV GI detection in bottled water and semi-dried tomatoes. The process control virus is essential for validating viral detection in food and the choice of virus depends on food type and the screened pathogenic virus.

  20. Distinct Patterns of Tryptophan Maintenance in Tissues during Kynurenine Pathway Activation in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L Drewes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of the kynurenine pathway (KP of tryptophan catabolism has been proposed to contribute to T cell dysfunction during human/simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV/SIV infection via depletion of local tryptophan levels and production of immunomodulatory KP metabolites. However, while changes in tryptophan and KP metabolites have been observed in plasma, their levels in lymphoid tissues and levels of enzymes downstream of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO1 have been relatively unexplored. We used our SIV-infected pigtailed macaque model to analyze longitudinal changes in KP metabolites and enzymes by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and NanoString nCounter gene expression analysis, respectively, in spleen and blood compared to changes previously established in brain and CSF. We found that tryptophan levels were remarkably stable in tissue sites despite robust depletion in the circulating plasma and CSF. We also demonstrated that intracellular tryptophan reserves were maintained in cultured cells even in the presence of depleted extracellular tryptophan levels. Kynurenine, 3-hydroxykynurenine, quinolinic acid, and the KP enzymes all displayed highly divergent patterns in the sites examined, though IDO1 expression always correlated with local kynurenine/tryptophan ratios. Finally, we demonstrated by FACS that myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs and cells of monocytic lineage were the highest producers of IDO1 in chronically infected spleens. Overall our study reveals insights into the tissue-specific regulation of KP enzymes and metabolites and, in particular, highlights the multiple mechanisms by which cells and tissues seek to prevent TRP starvation during inflammation.

  1. Effects of Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype and Tissue-Specific Expression on Circulating Biomarkers of Propionic Acidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Adam J.; Hillestad, Matthew L.; Matern, Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Propionic acidemia (PA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC). This enzyme is composed of six PCCA and six PCCB subunits and mediates a critical step in catabolism of odd chain fatty acids and certain amino acids. Current treatment options for PA are limited to stringent dietary restriction of protein consumption and some patients undergo elective liver transplantation. We previously generated a hypomorphic model of PA, designated Pcca−/−(A138T), with 2% of wild-type enzyme activity that mimics many aspects of the human disease. In this study, we used the differing tissue tropisms of adeno-associated virus (AAV) to probe the ability of liver or muscle-directed gene therapy to treat systemic aspects of this disease that affects many cell types. Systemic therapy with muscle-biased AAV1, liver-biased AAV8, and broadly tropic AAVrh10 mediated significant biochemical corrections in circulating propionylcarnitine (C3) and methyl citrate by all vectors. The innate tissue bias of AAV1 and AAV8 gene expression was made more specific by the use of muscle-specific muscle creatine kinase (specifically MCK6) and hepatocyte-specific transthyretin (TTR) promoters, respectively. Under these targeted conditions, both vectors mediated significant long-term correction of circulating metabolites, demonstrating that correction of muscle and likely other tissue types in addition to liver is necessary to fully correct pathology caused by PA. Liver-specific AAV8-TTR-PCCA mediated better correction than AAV1-MCK-PCCA. These data suggest that targeted gene therapy may be a viable alternative to liver transplantation for PA. They also demonstrate the effects of tissue-specific and broad gene therapy on a cell autonomous systemic genetic disease. PMID:25046265

  2. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control.

  3. Biological Control of Tortricidae in Tea Fields in Japan Using Insect Viruses and Parasitoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madoka Nakai

    2009-01-01

    Tea is a perennial and evergreen plant. Cultivated tea trees provide a habitat for insect pests and their natural enemies. In Japan, granuloviruses (GVs) have successfully controlled two of the most important pests of tea, Adoxophyes honmai and Homona magnanima (Tortricidae: Lepidoptera). The GVs are produced in vivo and a single application sustains pesticidal efficacy throughout a year, which encompasses 4 to 5 discrete generations of both species. A. honmai and H. magnanima also have various natural enemies, especially hymenopteran parasitoids. Such resident natural enemies also play a role in reducing the pest density in virus-controlled fields, but the effect of virus infection on parasitoids sharing the same host larva has not been well studied. Survival of one of the major parasitoids ofA. honmai, Ascogaster reticulata (Braconidae: Hymenoptera), is reduced by virus infection of the host. Viruses, including GV and entomopoxvirus (EPV), and certain koinobiont endoparasitoids, including A. reticulata, are both known to regulate host endocrinology. However, the GV and EPV have distinct host regulation mechanisms, and consequently have different impacts on the survival of A. retuculata, when A. reticulata parasitizes a host that is infected with either GV or EPV. These additional effects on host regulation displayed by both viruses and parasitoids affect the outcome of virus-parasitoid interactions.

  4. Preparing the United States for Zika Virus: Pre-emptive Vector Control and Personal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H

    2016-12-01

    Discovered in 1947 in a monkey in the Zika forest of Uganda, Zika virus was dismissed as a cause of a mild illness that was confined to Africa and Southeast Asia and transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. In 2007, Zika virus appeared outside of its endemic borders in an outbreak on the South Pacific Island of Yap. In 2013, Zika virus was associated with a major neurological complication, Guillain-Barré syndrome, in a larger outbreak in the French Polynesian Islands. From the South Pacific, Zika invaded Brazil in 2015 and caused another severe neurological complication, fetal microcephaly. The mosquito-borne transmission of Zika virus can be propagated by sexual transmission and, possibly, by blood transfusions, close personal contacts, and organ transplants, like other flaviviruses. Since these combined mechanisms of infectious disease transmission could result in catastrophic incidences of severe neurological diseases in adults and children, the public should know what to expect from Zika virus, how to prevent infection, and what the most likely failures in preventive measures will be. With federal research funding stalled, a Zika vaccine is far away. The only national strategies to prepare the United States for Zika virus invasion now are effective vector control measures and personal protection from mosquito bites. In addition to a basic knowledge of Aedes mosquito vectors and their biting behaviors, an understanding of simple household vector control measures, and the selection of the best chemical and physical mosquito repellents will be required to repel the Zika threat.

  5. Macaques with Rapid Disease Progression and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis Have a Unique Cytokine Profile in Peripheral Lymphoid Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    The influence of host cytokine response on viral load, disease progression, and neurologic lesions was investigated in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaque model of AIDS. Cytokine gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and viral loads were evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR in lymph nodes of 5 control animals and 28 animals infected with SIVmac251 at the terminal st...

  6. Plasminogen controls inflammation and pathogenesis of influenza virus infections via fibrinolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Berri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Detrimental inflammation of the lungs is a hallmark of severe influenza virus infections. Endothelial cells are the source of cytokine amplification, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, using combined pharmacological and gene-deletion approaches, we show that plasminogen controls lung inflammation and pathogenesis of infections with influenza A/PR/8/34, highly pathogenic H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Reduction of virus replication was not responsible for the observed effect. However, pharmacological depletion of fibrinogen, the main target of plasminogen reversed disease resistance of plasminogen-deficient mice or mice treated with an inhibitor of plasminogen-mediated fibrinolysis. Therefore, plasminogen contributes to the deleterious inflammation of the lungs and local fibrin clot formation may be implicated in host defense against influenza virus infections. Our studies suggest that the hemostatic system might be explored for novel treatments against influenza.

  7. Plasminogen controls inflammation and pathogenesis of influenza virus infections via fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Fatma; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Hanss, Michel; Albina, Emmanuel; Foucault-Grunenwald, Marie-Laure; Lê, Vuong B; Vogelzang-van Trierum, Stella E; Gil, Patrica; Camerer, Eric; Martinez, Dominique; Lina, Bruno; Lijnen, Roger; Carmeliet, Peter; Riteau, Béatrice

    2013-03-01

    Detrimental inflammation of the lungs is a hallmark of severe influenza virus infections. Endothelial cells are the source of cytokine amplification, although mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, using combined pharmacological and gene-deletion approaches, we show that plasminogen controls lung inflammation and pathogenesis of infections with influenza A/PR/8/34, highly pathogenic H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Reduction of virus replication was not responsible for the observed effect. However, pharmacological depletion of fibrinogen, the main target of plasminogen reversed disease resistance of plasminogen-deficient mice or mice treated with an inhibitor of plasminogen-mediated fibrinolysis. Therefore, plasminogen contributes to the deleterious inflammation of the lungs and local fibrin clot formation may be implicated in host defense against influenza virus infections. Our studies suggest that the hemostatic system might be explored for novel treatments against influenza.

  8. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus in various lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens by different reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabell, Susanne; Handberg, Kurt; Kusk, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays, including two recently developed strain-specific assays, were employed for detection of ribonucleic acid (RNA) from three different IBDV strains in bursa tissue samples from experimentally infected specific pathogen free chickens. The virus strains...

  9. A replication analysis of foot-and-mouth disease virus in swine lymphoid tissue might indicate a putative carrier stage in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Calvo Teresa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMVD, one of the most contagious viruses of cloven-hoofed animals, may cause a prolonged, asymptomatic but persistent infection in ruminants, named the "carrier state". However, it remains an open question whether this carrier state occurs in pigs. Here we present quantitative analyses of the duration of FMDV RNA and infectivity in lymphoid and epithelial tissues in experimentally infected pigs with FMDV C-S8c1. The data indicated that although FMDV RNA remained in blood until day 14 post-infection (pi, viremia was cleared by day 7 pi. However, all tissues tested were positive for FMDV until day 14-17 pi. Interestingly, the specific infectivity of FMDV in these tissues was in some cases even higher than the FMDV C-S8c1. We therefore propose that a "pseudopersistent state" may occur in pigs in which virus replicates in lymphoid tissues for a prolonged period of time, thereby representing a potential source of virus.

  10. Brain insulin controls adipose tissue lipolysis and lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Thomas; O'Hare, James; Diggs-Andrews, Kelly; Schweiger, Martina; Cheng, Bob; Lindtner, Claudia; Zielinski, Elizabeth; Vempati, Prashant; Su, Kai; Dighe, Shveta; Milsom, Thomas; Puchowicz, Michelle; Scheja, Ludger; Zechner, Rudolf; Fisher, Simon J; Previs, Stephen F; Buettner, Christoph

    2011-02-02

    White adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction plays a key role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (DM2). Unrestrained WAT lipolysis results in increased fatty acid release, leading to insulin resistance and lipotoxicity, while impaired de novo lipogenesis in WAT decreases the synthesis of insulin-sensitizing fatty acid species like palmitoleate. Here, we show that insulin infused into the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) of Sprague-Dawley rats increases WAT lipogenic protein expression, inactivates hormone-sensitive lipase (Hsl), and suppresses lipolysis. Conversely, mice that lack the neuronal insulin receptor exhibit unrestrained lipolysis and decreased de novo lipogenesis in WAT. Thus, brain and, in particular, hypothalamic insulin action play a pivotal role in WAT functionality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal control strategy for a novel computer virus propagation model on scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunming; Huang, Haitao

    2016-06-01

    This paper aims to study the combined impact of reinstalling system and network topology on the spread of computer viruses over the Internet. Based on scale-free network, this paper proposes a novel computer viruses propagation model-SLBOSmodel. A systematic analysis of this new model shows that the virus-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when its spreading threshold is less than one; nevertheless, it is proved that the viral equilibrium is permanent if the spreading threshold is greater than one. Then, the impacts of different model parameters on spreading threshold are analyzed. Next, an optimally controlled SLBOS epidemic model on complex networks is also studied. We prove that there is an optimal control existing for the control problem. Some numerical simulations are finally given to illustrate the main results.

  12. Status and prospects of plant virus control through interference with vector transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, C; Caciagli, P; Lemaire, O; Lopez-Moya, J J; MacFarlane, S; Peters, D; Susi, P; Torrance, L

    2013-01-01

    Most plant viruses rely on vector organisms for their plant-to-plant spread. Although there are many different natural vectors, few plant virus-vector systems have been well studied. This review describes our current understanding of virus transmission by aphids, thrips, whiteflies, leafhoppers, planthoppers, treehoppers, mites, nematodes, and zoosporic endoparasites. Strategies for control of vectors by host resistance, chemicals, and integrated pest management are reviewed. Many gaps in the knowledge of the transmission mechanisms and a lack of available host resistance to vectors are evident. Advances in genome sequencing and molecular technologies will help to address these problems and will allow innovative control methods through interference with vector transmission. Improved knowledge of factors affecting pest and disease spread in different ecosystems for predictive modeling is also needed. Innovative control measures are urgently required because of the increased risks from vector-borne infections that arise from environmental change.

  13. Transmission dynamics of rabies virus in Thailand: Implications for disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puanghat Apirom

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Thailand, rabies remains a neglected disease with authorities continuing to rely on human death statistics while ignoring the financial burden resulting from an enormous increase in post-exposure prophylaxis. Past attempts to conduct a mass dog vaccination and sterilization program have been limited to Bangkok city and have not been successful. We have used molecular epidemiology to define geographic localization of rabies virus phylogroups and their pattern of spread in Thailand. Methods We analyzed 239 nucleoprotein gene sequences from animal and human brain samples collected from all over Thailand between 1998 and 2002. We then reconstructed a phylogenetic tree correlating these data with geographical information. Results All sequences formed a monophyletic tree of 2 distinct phylogroups, TH1 and TH2. Three subgroups were identified in the TH1 subgroup and were distributed in the middle region of the country. Eight subgroups of TH2 viruses were identified widely distributed throughout the country overlapping the TH1 territory. There was a correlation between human-dependent transportation routes and the distribution of virus. Conclusion Inter-regional migration paths of the viruses might be correlated with translocation of dogs associated with humans. Interconnecting factors between human socioeconomic and population density might determine the transmission dynamics of virus in a rural-to-urban polarity. The presence of 2 or more rabies virus groups in a location might be indicative of a gene flow, reflecting a translocation of dogs within such region and adjacent areas. Different approaches may be required for rabies control based on the homo- or heterogeneity of the virus. Areas containing homogeneous virus populations should be targeted first. Control of dog movement associated with humans is essential.

  14. Climatic controls on West Nile virus and Sindbis virus transmission and outbreaks in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejio, Christopher K; Kemp, Alan; Comrie, Andrew C

    2012-02-01

    The processes influencing the magnitude of West Nile virus (WNV) transmission from 1 year to the next require thorough investigation. The intensity of WNV transmission is related to the dynamics and interactions between the pathogen, vector, vertebrate hosts, and environment. Climatic variability is one process that can influence interannual disease transmission. South Africa has a long WNV and Sindbis virus (SINV) record where consistent climate and disease relationships can be identified. We relate climate conditions to historic mosquito infection rates. Next, we detect similar associations with reported human outbreaks dating back to 1941. Both concurrent summer precipitation and the change in summer precipitation from the previous to the current summer were strongly associated with WNV and SINV transmission and recorded human outbreaks. Each 100 mm interannual summer precipitation change increased WNV infection rates by 0.39 WNV-positive Culex univittatus/1000 tested Cx. univittatus. An improved understanding of biotic and abiotic disease transmission dynamics may help anticipate and mitigate future outbreaks.

  15. Oncorhynchus Masou Virus (OMV) Epidemiology and its Control Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoru YOSHIMIZU; Nomura, Tetsuichi

    2001-01-01

    Distribution of salmonid herpesvirus was known in USA and Japan. Herpesviruses isolated in USA were classified to serotype 1 (SaHV-1) and in Japan were serotype 2 (SaHV-2). The reference strain of SaHV-1 is Herpesvirus salmonis and SaHV-2 is Oncorhynchus masou virus (OMV) strain OO-7812. OMV disease (OMVD) causes oncogenic and skin ulcer conditions. The main susceptible fish species are kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), masu salmon (O. masou), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and rainbow trout (O....

  16. Quantifying viruses and bacteria in wastewater—Results, interpretation methods, and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francy, Donna S.; Stelzer, Erin A.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.; Mailot, Brian E.; Spencer, Susan K.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Elber, Ashley G.; Riddell, Kimberly R.; Gellner, Terry M.

    2011-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBR), used for wastewater treatment in Ohio and elsewhere in the United States, have pore sizes small enough to theoretically reduce concentrations of protozoa and bacteria, but not viruses. Sampling for viruses in wastewater is seldom done and not required. Instead, the bacterial indicators Escherichia coli (E. coli) and fecal coliforms are the required microbial measures of effluents for wastewater-discharge permits. Information is needed on the effectiveness of MBRs in removing human enteric viruses from wastewaters, particularly as compared to conventional wastewater treatment before and after disinfection. A total of 73 regular and 28 quality-control (QC) samples were collected at three MBR and two conventional wastewater plants in Ohio during 23 regular and 3 QC sampling trips in 2008-10. Samples were collected at various stages in the treatment processes and analyzed for bacterial indicators E. coli, fecal coliforms, and enterococci by membrane filtration; somatic and F-specific coliphage by the single agar layer (SAL) method; adenovirus, enterovirus, norovirus GI and GII, rotavirus, and hepatitis A virus by molecular methods; and viruses by cell culture. While addressing the main objective of the study-comparing removal of viruses and bacterial indicators in MBR and conventional plants-it was realized that work was needed to identify data analysis and quantification methods for interpreting enteric virus and QC data. Therefore, methods for quantifying viruses, qualifying results, and applying QC data to interpretations are described in this report. During each regular sampling trip, samples were collected (1) before conventional or MBR treatment (post-preliminary), (2) after secondary or MBR treatment (post-secondary or post-MBR), (3) after tertiary treatment (one conventional plant only), and (4) after disinfection (post-disinfection). Glass-wool fiber filtration was used to concentrate enteric viruses from large volumes, and small

  17. Chemokine biomarkers in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in the Theiler's virus model mirror those in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, Andrew R; Li, Libin; Gilli, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Chemokines have increasingly been implicated in inflammatory and infectious disease of the central nervous system, both as biomarkers and as molecules important in pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is a disabling disease of unknown etiology, and recently chemokines have been identified as being upregulated molecules in the disease. We were interested in how the chemokine expression patterns in the central nervous system of a viral model of multiple sclerosis, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), compared to that in humans with multiple sclerosis. Cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord tissue were analyzed for expression of a range of cytokines and chemokines. Three chemokines, CXCL10, CXCL9, and CCL5 were strongly and specifically upregulated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and spinal cord in chronic disease, a pattern identical to that in multiple sclerosis. These data, the first study of cytokines in central nervous system tissue and cerebrospinal fluid in TMEV-IDD, support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is caused by chronic infection with an as-yet unidentified pathogen, possibly a picornavirus.

  18. Polyclonal antibody preparation and expression in liver tissues of transactivated protein 5 of hepatitis C virus nonstructural 5A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-quan Li; Shu-lin Zhang; Li-hua Zhong; Jun Cheng; Yuan Hong; Meng-dong Lan; Xiao-bin Chen; Cheng-fu Sun

    2009-01-01

    Objective To prepare polyclonal antibody of transactivated protein 5 of hepatitis C virus nonstructural 5A (NA5ATP5) and to explore its expression in the liver tissues. Methods In Escherichia coil BL21, the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a(+)-NS5ATP5 was induced by isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG), and it was analyzed with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyaerylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting. And the purified protein was used to immunize the rabbit to prepare polyelonai antibody, with which we studied the function of NSSATP5 by determining the different liver tissues with the streptavidin-perosidase (SP) immunohistochemistry method. Results Recombinant NS5ATP5 (molecular weight: 65 kD) and polyclonal antibody were successfully prepared. NS5ATP5 expression in the liver of patients with chronic HCV infection was much higher than that of a normal person, and it was detected mainly in the cytoplasm. Conclusion The findings of the expression difference between HCV patients and normal people led to a novel diagnostic marker to detect HCV infection.

  19. Acute infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus of low or high virulence leads to depletion and redistribution of WC1(+) γδ T cells in lymphoid tissues of beef calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Sakamoto, Kaori; Walz, Heather L; Brock, Kenny V; Hurley, David J

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the abundance and distribution of γδ T lymphocytes in lymphoid tissue during acute infection with high (HV) or low virulence (LV) non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in beef calves. This study was performed using tissue samples from a previous experiment in which thirty beef calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: LV [n=10; animals inoculated intranasally (IN) with LV BVDV-1a (strain SD-1)], HV [n=10; animals inoculated IN with HV BVDV-2 (strain 1373)], and control (n=10; animals inoculated with cell culture medium). On day 5 post inoculation, animals were euthanized, and samples from spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) were collected to assess the abundance of WC1(+) γδ T cells. A higher proportion of calves challenged with BVDV showed signs of apoptosis and cytophagy in MLN and spleen samples compared to the control group. A significantly lower number of γδ T cells was observed in spleen and MLN from calves in HV and LV groups than in the control calves (P<0.05). In conclusion, acute infection with HV or LV BVDV resulted in depletion of WC1(+) γδ T cells in mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues at five days after challenge in beef calves. This reduction in γδ T cells in the studied lymphoid tissues could be also due to lymphocyte trafficking to other tissues.

  20. Use of Tissue-Specific MicroRNA to Control Pathology of Wild-Type Adenovirus without Attenuation of Its Ability to Kill Cancer Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cawood, R.; Chen, H.H.; Carroll, F.; Bazan-Peregrino, M.; Rooijen, van N.; Seymour, L.W.

    2009-01-01

    Replicating viruses have broad applications in biomedicine, notably in cancer virotherapy and in the design of attenuated vaccines; however, uncontrolled virus replication in vulnerable tissues can give pathology and often restricts the use of potent strains. Increased knowledge of tissue-selective

  1. Immobilization of FLAG-Tagged Recombinant Adeno-Associated Virus 2 onto Tissue Engineering Scaffolds for the Improvement of Transgene Delivery in Cell Transplants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Li

    Full Text Available The technology of virus-based genetic modification in tissue engineering has provided the opportunity to produce more flexible and versatile biomaterials for transplantation. Localizing the transgene expression with increased efficiency is critical for tissue engineering as well as a challenge for virus-based gene delivery. In this study, we tagged the VP2 protein of type 2 adeno-associated virus (AAV with a 3×FLAG plasmid at the N-terminus and packaged a FLAG-tagged recombinant AAV2 chimeric mutant. The mutant AAVs were immobilized onto the tissue engineering scaffolds with crosslinked anti-FLAG antibodies by N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithiol propionate (SPDP. Cultured cells were seeded to scaffolds to form 3D transplants, and then tested for viral transduction both in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that our FLAG-tagged AAV2 exerted similar transduction efficiency compared with the wild type AAV2 when infected cultured cells. Following immobilization onto the scaffolds of PLGA or gelatin sponge with anti-FLAG antibodies, the viral mediated transgene expression was significantly improved and more localized. Our data demonstrated that the mutation of AAV capsid targeted for antibody-based immobilization could be a practical approach for more efficient and precise transgene delivery. It was also suggested that the immobilization of AAV might have attractive potentials in applications of tissue engineering involving the targeted gene manipulation in 3D tissue cultures.

  2. Preclinical pharmacokinetics and distribution to tissue of AG1343, an inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, B V; Kosa, M B; Khalil, D A; Webber, S

    1996-01-01

    AG1343, a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease (Ki = 2 nM), was designed by protein structure-based drug design techniques. AG1343 has potent antiviral activity (95% effective dose = 0.04 microgram/ml) against a number of HIV-1 strains in acute and chronic models of infection. As part of its preclinical development, the oral bioavailability of AG1343 in rats, dogs, monkeys, and marmosets was determined and its tissue distribution in rats was evaluated. There were no major interspecies differences in AG1343 pharmacokinetics. Following intravenous administration, the elimination half-life of AG1343 ranged from 1 to 1.4 hr. The total volume of distribution (2 to 7 liters/kg) exceeded the volume of total body water, indicating extensive tissue distribution. Systemic clearance of AG1343 (1 to 4 liters/kg) in the different species corresponded to hepatic blood flow, suggesting possible hepatic involvement in the elimination of AG1343. Following oral administration, peak levels in plasma ranged from 0.34 microgram/ml after treatment with 10 mg/kg of body weight in the dog to 1.7 micrograms/ml after dosing with 50 mg/kg in the rat. Because of the slow absorption of AG1343, plasma concentrations of AG1343 exceeding that required for 95% inhibition of HIV-1 replication were maintained for up to 7 h after a single oral dose in all species evaluated. Average oral bioavailability of AG1343 ranged from 17% in the marmoset to 47% in the dog. Studies of distribution to tissue in the rat after oral administration of 14C-AG1343 established extensive distribution with concentrations in most tissues exceeding that found in plasma. Of particular significance were high levels of AG1343 equivalent in mesenteric lymph nodes (32.05 micrograms/g) and spleen tissue (9.33 micrograms/g). The major excretory route for AG1343 was via feces, with 100% of the dose recovered by 48 h. Results from these studies demonstrate that AG1343 is orally bioavailable and

  3. Tissue Adhesives for Battlefield Hemorrhage Control. Phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    conducted by Microbiology Research Associates (Acton, MA). Silicone rubber disks loaded with 0, 1, 2, and 3% CHX were prepared. These were then used to...Consulting and Research Pg.2 Microbiology Research Associates, Inc. Whalen #007 4. After the contact time interval, each disc was aseptically placed in a...to the negative control disc. Pg.3 Microbiology Research Associates, Inc. Whalen #007 Conclusion continued: 4. In general, the 3% Chlorhexidine disc

  4. Control of aphid-vectored and thrips-borne virus spread in lily, tulip, iris and dahlia by sprays of mineral oil, polydimethylsiloxane and pyrethroid insecticide in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asjes, J.; Blom-Barnhoorn, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    In this study control of spread by insect vectors of non-persistent Lily symptomless virus and Lily mottle virus in lily, Tulip breaking virus in tulip, Iris mild mosaic virus, Narcissus latent virus and Iris severe mosaic virus in bulbous iris, and semi-persistent Dahlia mosaic virus and persistent

  5. [Distribution of hepatitis B virus in testicle tissue in patients with hepatitis B infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Z W

    1993-06-01

    To study distribution of HBV in the testicle tissue, we used polyclonal antibody and ABC method in detecting autopsy testicle in 34 cases. The positive rate of HBsAg and HBcAg was 52.9% and 11.8% respectively. The positive cells of spermatogonium, primary spermatocytes, spermatid and sertoli cells were single or grouped in clusters form in the seminiferous tubule. Of the 6 cases studied with in situ hybridization, 2 had HBV DNA in spermatogenic cells in individual nucleus. The findings support morphologically the transmission of HBV via sexual contact.

  6. Detection of Viral RNA in Tissues following Plasma Clearance from an Ebola Virus Infected Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordi, Licia; Castilletti, Concetta; Colavita, Francesca; Quartu, Serena; Nicastri, Emanuele; Lauria, Francesco Nicola; Petrosillo, Nicola; Lanini, Simone; Kobinger, Gary; Zumla, Alimuddin; Di Caro, Antonino; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Lalle, Eleonora

    2017-01-01

    An unprecedented Ebola virus (EBOV) epidemic occurred in 2013–2016 in West Africa. Over this time the epidemic exponentially grew and moved to Europe and North America, with several imported cases and many Health Care Workers (HCW) infected. Better understanding of EBOV infection patterns in different body compartments is mandatory to develop new countermeasures, as well as to fully comprehend the pathways of human-to-human transmission. We have longitudinally explored the persistence of EBOV-specific negative sense genomic RNA (neg-RNA) and the presence of positive sense RNA (pos-RNA), including both replication intermediate (antigenomic-RNA) and messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, in the upper and lower respiratory tract, as compared to plasma, in a HCW infected with EBOV in Sierra Leone, who was hospitalized in the high isolation facility of the National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Lazzaro Spallanzani” (INMI), Rome, Italy. We observed persistence of pos-RNA and neg-RNAs in longitudinally collected specimens of the lower respiratory tract, even after viral clearance from plasma, suggesting possible local replication. The purpose of the present study is to enhance the knowledge on the biological features of EBOV that can contribute to the human-to-human transmissibility and to develop effective intervention strategies. However, further investigation is needed in order to better understand the clinical meaning of viral replication and shedding in the respiratory tract. PMID:28056096

  7. Hepatitis C virus seroprevalence and genotypes in patients with diffuse connective tissue diseases and spondyloarthropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa V.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many extrahepatic manifestations, including rheumatic diseases, have been reported to be associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. In order to investigate the prevalence of HCV infection among patients with rheumatic diseases, in the present study we interviewed 367 patients and tested their blood samples for HCV antibodies (anti-HCV by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anti-HCV-reactive samples were retested for confirmation by a line immunoassay and also for HCV RNA detection by the polymerase chain reaction. HCV RNA-positive samples were genotyped by INNO-LIPA. An overall HCV infection prevalence of 1.9% (7/367 was found. Of the 7 HCV-infected patients, 4 had systemic lupus erythematosus and 3 rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in positivity rates of 2.3 and 3.4%, respectively. HCV RNA genotyping revealed the presence of subtypes 1a (57.1%, 1b (28.6% and 3a (14.3%. The clinical course was favorable for all HCV-infected patients, except one, who died due to renal insufficiency related to lupus nephritis. These results demonstrate a low HCV infection prevalence among the population studied. In the few positive cases, we observed no adverse influence of this infection on the clinical evolution of the rheumatic disease.

  8. Marek's disease virus isolates with unusual tropism and virulence for ocular tissues: clinical findings, challenge studies and pathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficken, M D; Nasisse, M P; Boggan, G D; Guy, J S; Wages, D P; Witter, R L; Rosenberger, J K; Nordgren, R M

    1991-09-01

    Outbreaks of Marek's disease (MD) were diagnosed in two flocks from the same company. Clinical signs, mainly blindness (>90%), but also depression, mild paralysis, and 11 to 12% mortality by 20 weeks of age were observed. MD virus, serotype 1 was isolated. The isolates were designated NC-1 (flock 1) and NC-2 (flock 2). Challenge experiments were conducted with these isolates and with two reference MD virus strains (JM/102W and Md5) in unvaccinated, turkey herpesvirus- (HVT) vaccinated and bivalent- (HVT and SB-1) vaccinated chickens. Blindness, gross ocular lesions and tumour formation were observed in a high proportion of all groups challenged with NC-1 and NC-2 when compared with chickens challenged with JM/102W and Md5. In chickens challenged with isolates NC-1 and NC-2, corneal changes included oedema, midstromal cellular infiltration consisting of macrophages, lymphocytes, plasma cells and lesser numbers of heterophils, collagen degeneration and keratic precipitates consisting primarily of macrophages covering the central endothelium. Eosinophilic intranuclear inclusion bodies were present in mononuclear cells infiltrating the cornea. Changes in the uveal tract consisted of inflammatory cell infiltrates similar to those present in the cornea. Retinal lesions included disruption of the retinal pigmented epithelium, inflammatory cell infiltration in the subretinal space, photoreceptor degeneration and in severely affected eyes, necrosis of retinal cellular elements. Pecten changes consisted of necrosis and mononuclear cell infiltration. Intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundantly present in cells of the retina's ganglion and inner nuclear cell layers. The unusual clinical manifestation of MD, the unusual tropism and virulence of NC-1 and NC-2 for ocular tissues and the incomplete protection afforded by conventional vaccination suggest that these isolates may be new pathotypes.

  9. V3 Recombinants Indicate a Central Role for CCR5 as a Coreceptor in Tissue Infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; Speck, Roberto F.; Power, Christopher; Gaffen, Sarah L.; Chesebro, Bruce; Goldsmith, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Binding of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 to both CD4 and one of several chemokine receptors (coreceptors) permits entry of virus into target cells. Infection of tissues may establish latent viral reservoirs as well as cause direct pathologic effects that manifest as clinical disease such as HIV-associated dementia. We sought to identify the critical coreceptors recognized by HIV-1 tissue-derived strains as well as to correlate these coreceptor preferences with site of infection and dementia diagnosis. To reconstitute coreceptor use, we cloned HIV-1 envelope V3 sequences encoding the primary determinants of coreceptor specificity from 13 brain-derived and 6 colon-derived viruses into an isogenic (NL4-3) viral background. All V3 recombinants utilized the chemokine receptor CCR5 uniformly and efficiently as a coreceptor but not CXCR4, BOB/GPR15, or Bonzo/STRL33. Other receptors such as CCR3, CCR8, and US28 were inefficiently and variably used as coreceptors by various envelopes. CCR5 without CD4 present did not allow for detectable infection by any of the tested recombinants. In contrast to the pathogenic switch in coreceptor specificity frequently observed in comparisons of blood-derived viruses early after HIV-1 seroconversion and after onset of AIDS, the characteristics of these V3 recombinants suggest that CCR5 is a primary coreceptor for brain- and colon-derived viruses regardless of tissue source or diagnosis of dementia. Therefore, tissue infection may not depend significantly on viral envelope quasispeciation to broaden coreceptor range but rather selects for CCR5 use throughout disease progression. PMID:9971818

  10. The Immune Response in Measles: Virus Control, Clearance and Protective Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Diane E

    2016-10-12

    Measles is an acute systemic viral infection with immune system interactions that play essential roles in multiple stages of infection and disease. Measles virus (MeV) infection does not induce type 1 interferons, but leads to production of cytokines and chemokines associated with nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasome. This restricted response allows extensive virus replication and spread during a clinically silent latent period of 10-14 days. The first appearance of the disease is a 2-3 day prodrome of fever, runny nose, cough, and conjunctivitis that is followed by a characteristic maculopapular rash that spreads from the face and trunk to the extremities. The rash is a manifestation of the MeV-specific type 1 CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cell adaptive immune response with lymphocyte infiltration into tissue sites of MeV replication and coincides with clearance of infectious virus. However, clearance of viral RNA from blood and tissues occurs over weeks to months after resolution of the rash and is associated with a period of immunosuppression. However, during viral RNA clearance, MeV-specific antibody also matures in type and avidity and T cell functions evolve from type 1 to type 2 and 17 responses that promote B cell development. Recovery is associated with sustained levels of neutralizing antibody and life-long protective immunity.

  11. Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses Era Tuladhar Abstract Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute and outbreak associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The outbreaks occur often in

  12. Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Intervention methods to control the transmission of noroviruses and other enteric and respiratory viruses Era Tuladhar Abstract Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute and outbreak associated gastroenteritis worldwide. The outbreaks occur often in hospitals

  13. Studies on the prevention and control of human immune deficiency virus associated tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakezha, T.

    2014-01-01

    The overall question the thesis intended to answer was how to optimise interventions for the prevention and control of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) -associated tuberculosis (TB) in high TB and HIV burden settings such as South Africa. In these settings the incidence of and mortality from TB

  14. Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, Adam J; Eggo, Rosalind M; Watson, Conall H; Camacho, Anton; Funk, Sebastian; Edmunds, W John

    2016-01-01

    Using an Ebola virus disease transmission model, we found that addition of ring vaccination at the outset of the West Africa epidemic might not have led to containment of this disease. However, in later stages of the epidemic or in outbreaks with less intense transmission or more effective control, this strategy could help eliminate the disease.

  15. Tissue localization of Toll-like receptors in biopsy specimens of liver from children infected with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozer-Lisewska, I; Sluzewski, W; Kaczmarek, M; Jenek, R; Szczepanski, M; Figlerowicz, M; Kowala-Piaskowska, A; Zeromski, J

    2005-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are important tools of innate immunity, localized mainly on cells of the immune system, but also have been shown on cells of other origin. In the current study, they have been searched in biopsy specimens of liver from children bearing chronic viral hepatitis of C type (HCV). TLR2, TLR3 and TLR4 were traced by means of polyclonal antibodies and avidin-biotin complex (ABC) immunohistochemistry. Besides, mRNA for TLR was looked for using specific primers and polymerase chain reaction. Several controls, including neutralization of primary antibody with respective blocking peptide, confirmed the specificity of the immunohistochemical reaction. All TLR tested could be visualized in a focal distribution in single hepatocytes and some cells of inflammatory infiltrates. There was no reaction whatsoever in liver samples not infected with hepatotropic virus. In molecular studies, mRNA for TLR2 and TLR4 was detected in both noninfected and hepatitis B virus-infected established cell lines of human hepatoma as well as in HCV(+) biopsy samples. These data indicate that TLR can be traced in liver cells, both at the protein and at the mRNA level. Their irregular and focal distribution in HCV(+), but not in HCV(-), liver suggests some role of TLR in the pathogenesis of chronic viral hepatitis, at least in children.

  16. HLA-associated alterations in replication capacity of chimeric NL4-3 viruses carrying gag-protease from elite controllers of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Toshiyuki; Brockman, Mark A; Brumme, Zabrina L; Brumme, Chanson J; Pereyra, Florencia; Trocha, Alicja; Block, Brian L; Schneidewind, Arne; Allen, Todd M; Heckerman, David; Walker, Bruce D

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons who maintain plasma viral loads of viruses (VRC) obtained from EC (n = 54) compared to those from chronic progressors (CP; n = 41) by constructing chimeric viruses using patient-derived gag-protease sequences amplified from plasma HIV RNA and inserted into an NL4-3 backbone. The chimeric viruses generated from EC displayed lower VRC than did viruses from CP (P viruses from B*57(+) EC (n = 18) demonstrated lower VRC than did viruses from B*57(+) CP (n = 8, P = 0.0245). Differences in VRC between EC and CP were also observed for viruses obtained from individuals expressing no described "protective" alleles (P = 0.0065). Intriguingly, two common HLA alleles, A*02 and B*07, were associated with higher VRC (P = 0.0140 and 0.0097, respectively), and there was no difference in VRC between EC and CP sharing these common HLA alleles. These findings indicate that cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) selection pressure on gag-protease alters VRC, and HIV-specific CTLs inducing escape mutations with fitness costs in this region may be important for strict viremia control in EC of HIV.

  17. Distribution pattern of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 genome in lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikalan, M; Rajukumar, K; Mishra, N; Kumar, M; Kalaiyarasu, S; Rajesh, K; Gavade, V; Behera, S P; Dubey, S C

    2016-06-01

    In this study, cellular localization and the distribution pattern of BVDV genome in lymphoid tissues during the course of experimental acute BVDV-1 infection of sheep was investigated. Tonsils, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and spleen were collected on 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days post infection (dpi) from twenty 4-month-old lambs, experimentally inoculated intra-nasally with 5 × 10(5) TCID50 of a non-cytopathic (ncp) BVDV-1 isolate, Ind-17555. Tissues collected from ten mock-infected lambs served as controls. In situ hybridization (ISH) was carried out in paraformaldehyde fixed paraffin embedded tissue sections using digoxigenin labelled riboprobe targeting 5'-UTR of BVDV-1. BVDV genome was detected at all the intervals from 3 dpi to 15 dpi in the lymphoid tissues with variations between the intervals and also amongst the infected sheep. During the early phase of acute infection, presence of viral genome was more in tonsils than MLN and spleen, whereas the distribution was higher in MLN during later stages. BVDV-1 genome positive cells included lymphocytes, macrophages, plasma cells, reticular cells and sometimes crypt epithelial cells. Genome distribution was frequently observed in the lymphoid follicles of tonsils, MLN and spleen, besides the crypt epithelium in tonsils, paracortex and medullary sinus and cords of MLN. Most abundant and widespread distribution of BVDV-1 genome was observed on 6 dpi while there was a reduction in number and intensity of positive signals by 15 dpi in most of the infected animals. This is the first attempt made to study the localisation of BVDV-1 in lymphoid tissues of acutely infected sheep by in situ hybridization. The results show that the kinetics of BVDV-1 distribution in lymphoid tissues of experimentally infected non-pregnant sheep follows almost a similar pattern to that demonstrated in BVDV infected cattle.

  18. 计算机病毒原理与防治技术%Computer Virus Principle and Control Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹

    2015-01-01

    本研究从计算机病毒的产生、发展、原理和病毒的危害分析其发展概况,提出合理的计算机病毒防治办法,为计算机用户提出计算机病毒防控建议。%This study from the generation, development, principle and the harm of the virus in the computer virus analysis of its development, and puts forward a reasonable method for the prevention and control of computer viruses, computer users to propose a computer virus prevention and control.

  19. Controlled Positioning of Cells in Biomaterials—Approaches Towards 3D Tissue Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Hofmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering techniques have various drawbacks: they often incorporate uncontrolled and imprecise scaffold geometries, whereas the current conventional cell seeding techniques result mostly in random cell placement rather than uniform cell distribution. For the successful reconstruction of deficient tissue, new material engineering approaches have to be considered to overcome current limitations. An emerging method to produce complex biological products including cells or extracellular matrices in a controlled manner is a process called bioprinting or biofabrication, which effectively uses principles of rapid prototyping combined with cell-loaded biomaterials, typically hydrogels. 3D tissue printing is an approach to manufacture functional tissue layer-by-layer that could be transplanted in vivo after production. This method is especially advantageous for stem cells since a controlled environment can be created to influence cell growth and differentiation. Using printed tissue for biotechnological and pharmacological needs like in vitro drug-testing may lead to a revolution in the pharmaceutical industry since animal models could be partially replaced by biofabricated tissues mimicking human physiology and pathology. This would not only be a major advancement concerning rising ethical issues but would also have a measureable impact on economical aspects in this industry of today, where animal studies are very labor-intensive and therefore costly. In this review, current controlled material and cell positioning techniques are introduced highlighting approaches towards 3D tissue printing.

  20. Breaking the chain: Rift Valley fever virus control via livestock vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Nichol, Stuart T

    2012-06-01

    Rift Valley fever virus is a mosquito-borne pathogen of livestock and humans that causes widespread and devastating outbreaks of severe and often fatal disease throughout Africa and portions of the Arabian Peninsula. Outbreaks can involve tens to hundreds of thousands of human cases, and millions of livestock. The severity of the disease varies by species, but in sheep and cattle 'abortion storms', high neonatal (∼70%), and adult mortality (20-30%) are features. Human cases are generally self-limiting, but severe complications such as hepatitis, retinitis, delayed-onset encephalitis, or a hemorrhagic syndrome with a case fatality of 10-20% can occur. There are no commercially available human vaccines. Livestock provide key ecological links between the Aedes sp. mosquito vector and humans. High viremias in livestock lead to spillover of RVFV into other anthrophillic vectors (Culex and Anopheles sp. mosquitoes), and, importantly, close contact with infected animal tissues and fluids or aborted fetal materials from these animals is a major risk factor for severe and lethal human infections. Vaccination programs targeting livestock during non-epidemic periods or as an early countermeasure against nascent outbreaks could therefore eliminate one of the main sources of human infection and limit the overall scope of epidemics. To this end, research groups have recently reported novel next generation RVFV vaccines that are safe for use in pregnant and young animals. Preventing RVFV infection of livestock by vaccination is a key element in breaking the chain of human epidemics, and could lead to control of this significant public health threat.

  1. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue of pigs infected experimentally with influenza virus (H1N2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors, including miRNA, in the local host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of microRNA (miRNA), mRNA and proteins were...... results suggest that, in addition to a wide range of innate immune factors, miRNAs may also be involved in controlling acute influenza infection in pigs....

  2. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue of pigs infected experimentally with influenza virus (H1N2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors, including miRNA, in the local host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of microRNA (miRNA), mRNA and proteins were...... results suggest that, in addition to a wide range of innate immune factors, miRNAs may also be involved in controlling acute influenza infection in pigs....

  3. Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus: Chapter 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Jo-Ann; Kurath, Gael

    2017-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a Rhabdovirus that causes significant disease in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and rainbow and steelhead trout (O. mykiss). IHNV causes necrosis of the haematopoietic tissues, and consequently it was named infectious haematopoietic necrosis. This virus is waterborne and may transmit horizontally and vertically through virus associated with seminal and ovarian fluids. The clinical signs of disease and diagnosis; pathology; pathophysiology; and control strategies against IHNV are discussed.

  4. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P; Ribeiro, Ana M

    2015-08-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. © 2015 Authors.

  5. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Miguel P.; Ribeiro, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. PMID:26551709

  6. Invasion Dynamics of Teratogenic Infections in Light of Rubella Control: Implications for Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Barrett, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The greatest burden for a subset of pathogens is associated with infection during pregnancy. Evidence for teratogenic effects of Zika Virus have highlighted the importance of understanding the epidemiology of such pathogens. Rubella is perhaps the most classic example, and there is much to be learned from the long history of modelling associated with this virus. Methods: We extended an existing framework for modeling age-specific dynamics of rubella to illustrate how the body of knowledge of rubella dynamics informs the dynamics of teratogenic infections more broadly, and particularly the impact of control on such infections in different transmission settings. Results: During invasion, the burden in women of childbearing age is expected to peak, but then fall to low levels before eventually levelling out. Importantly, as illustrated by rubella dynamics, there is potential for a paradoxical effect, where inadequate control efforts can increase the burden. Conclusions: Drawing on the existing body of work on rubella dynamics highlights key knowledge gaps for understanding the risks associated with Zika Virus. The magnitude and impacts of sterilizing immunity, plus antigenic maps measuring cross-protection with other flaviviruses, and the magnitude of transmission, as well as likely impact of control efforts on transmission are likely to be key variables for robust inference into the outcome of management efforts for Zika Virus. PMID:27617170

  7. Quantitation of infectious myonecrosis virus in different tissues of naturally infected Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, using real-time PCR with SYBR Green chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Suzianny Maria Bezerra Cabral; Pinheiro, Ana Cristina de Aguiar Saldanha; Coimbra, Maria Raquel Moura

    2011-11-01

    The Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, is the most important shrimp species in volume in world aquaculture. However, in recent decades, outbreaks of diseases, especially viral diseases, have led to significant economic losses, threatening the sustainability of shrimp farming worldwide. In 2004, Brazilian shrimp farming was seriously affected by a new disease caused by the Infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Thus, disease control based on rapid and sensitive pathogen detection methods has become a priority. In this study, a specific quantitation method for IMNV was developed using real-time PCR with SYBR Green chemistry and viral load of the principal target tissues of chronically infected animals was quantified. The quantitative analysis revealed that mean viral load ranged from 5.08×10(8) to 1.33×10(6)copies/μg of total RNA in the hemolymph, 5.096×10(5) to 1.26×10(3)copies/μg in the pleopods, 6.85×10(8) to 3.09×10(4)copies/μg in muscle and 8.15×10(6) to 3.90×10(3)copies/μg in gills. Different viral loads of IMNV were found with greater values in the hemolymph and muscle, followed by the pleopods and gills.

  8. Potential Use of Insecticides and Mineral Oils for the Control of Transmission of Major Aphid-Transmitted Potato Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drago Milošević

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses occurring in Serbia and other countries in the region are a huge problem constrainingseed potato production. At lower altitudes, in lowland and hilly regions, wheretable potato production is widely distributed, more than 50% of healthy plants becomeinfected with potato virus Y during one growing season. Under these conditions, seed potatoproduction is hindered due to a high infection pressure of potato virus Y which spreads farmore rapidly compared to leaf roll virus, virus S and other viruses hosted by this plant species.This study tended to clarify a frequent dilemma regarding the use of insecticides in preventingthe infection of healthy plants with potato virus Y and leaf roll virus, given the oraland written recommendations from pesticide manufacturers, agronomists and scientistsin the field of crop protection arising from a logical conclusion that aphid vector controlresults in virus transmission control.The present findings, which are in agreement with reports of authors from other countries,show that the use of insecticides is ineffective in preventing potato virus Y which isnonpersistently transmitted by aphids from an external source of infection.However, insecticides can exhibit efficacy in preventing potato virus Y transmissionfrom infected plants to healthy plants within a crop, which can have an overall positiveeffect only if seed potato is grown in areas that have no external source of infection.The present results and those of other authors show that insecticides are effective inpreventing the infection of healthy plants with persistently transmitted leaf roll virus.Mineral oils provide effective control of potato virus Y by preventing the infection ofpotato plants with the virus. They can be combined with other management practices toprotect seed potato crops against the virus.Given the fact that the initial first-year infection of healthy potato plants with virus Y inrelation to leaf roll virus is approximately 10

  9. Efficacious and safe tissue-selective controlled gene therapy approaches for the cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Rajiv R; Sinha, Sunilima; Tandon, Ashish; Gupta, Rangan; Tovey, Jonathan C K; Sharma, Ajay

    2011-04-12

    Untargeted and uncontrolled gene delivery is a major cause of gene therapy failure. This study aimed to define efficient and safe tissue-selective targeted gene therapy approaches for delivering genes into keratocytes of the cornea in vivo using a normal or diseased rabbit model. New Zealand White rabbits, adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5), and a minimally invasive hair-dryer based vector-delivery technique were used. Fifty microliters of AAV5 titer (6.5×10(12) vg/ml) expressing green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) was topically applied onto normal or diseased (fibrotic or neovascularized) rabbit corneas for 2-minutes with a custom vector-delivery technique. Corneal fibrosis and neovascularization in rabbit eyes were induced with photorefractive keratectomy using excimer laser and VEGF (630 ng) using micropocket assay, respectively. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to confirm fibrosis and neovascularization in rabbit corneas. The levels, location and duration of delivered-GFP gene expression in the rabbit stroma were measured with immunocytochemistry and/or western blotting. Slot-blot measured delivered-GFP gene copy number. Confocal microscopy performed in whole-mounts of cornea and thick corneal sections determined geometric and spatial localization of delivered-GFP in three-dimensional arrangement. AAV5 toxicity and safety were evaluated with clinical eye exam, stereomicroscopy, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and H&E staining. A single 2-minute AAV5 topical application via custom delivery-technique efficiently and selectively transduced keratocytes in the anterior stroma of normal and diseased rabbit corneas as evident from immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Transgene expression was first detected at day 3, peaked at day 7, and was maintained up to 16 weeks (longest tested time point). Clinical and slit-lamp eye examination in live rabbits and H&E staining did not reveal any significant changes between AAV5-treated and

  10. Efficacious and safe tissue-selective controlled gene therapy approaches for the cornea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv R Mohan

    Full Text Available Untargeted and uncontrolled gene delivery is a major cause of gene therapy failure. This study aimed to define efficient and safe tissue-selective targeted gene therapy approaches for delivering genes into keratocytes of the cornea in vivo using a normal or diseased rabbit model. New Zealand White rabbits, adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5, and a minimally invasive hair-dryer based vector-delivery technique were used. Fifty microliters of AAV5 titer (6.5×10(12 vg/ml expressing green fluorescent protein gene (GFP was topically applied onto normal or diseased (fibrotic or neovascularized rabbit corneas for 2-minutes with a custom vector-delivery technique. Corneal fibrosis and neovascularization in rabbit eyes were induced with photorefractive keratectomy using excimer laser and VEGF (630 ng using micropocket assay, respectively. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and immunocytochemistry were used to confirm fibrosis and neovascularization in rabbit corneas. The levels, location and duration of delivered-GFP gene expression in the rabbit stroma were measured with immunocytochemistry and/or western blotting. Slot-blot measured delivered-GFP gene copy number. Confocal microscopy performed in whole-mounts of cornea and thick corneal sections determined geometric and spatial localization of delivered-GFP in three-dimensional arrangement. AAV5 toxicity and safety were evaluated with clinical eye exam, stereomicroscopy, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and H&E staining. A single 2-minute AAV5 topical application via custom delivery-technique efficiently and selectively transduced keratocytes in the anterior stroma of normal and diseased rabbit corneas as evident from immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Transgene expression was first detected at day 3, peaked at day 7, and was maintained up to 16 weeks (longest tested time point. Clinical and slit-lamp eye examination in live rabbits and H&E staining did not reveal any significant changes between AAV5

  11. Insulin Receptor Signaling in POMC, but Not AgRP, Neurons Controls Adipose Tissue Insulin Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Andrew C; Filatova, Nika; Lindtner, Claudia; Chi, Tiffany; Degann, Seta; Oberlin, Douglas; Buettner, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Insulin is a key regulator of adipose tissue lipolysis, and impaired adipose tissue insulin action results in unrestrained lipolysis and lipotoxicity, which are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. Insulin regulates adipose tissue metabolism through direct effects on adipocytes and through signaling in the central nervous system by dampening sympathetic outflow to the adipose tissue. Here we examined the role of insulin signaling in agouti-related protein (AgRP) and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in regulating hepatic and adipose tissue insulin action. Mice lacking the insulin receptor in AgRP neurons (AgRP IR KO) exhibited impaired hepatic insulin action because the ability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production (hGP) was reduced, but the ability of insulin to suppress lipolysis was unaltered. To the contrary, in POMC IR KO mice, insulin lowered hGP but failed to suppress adipose tissue lipolysis. High-fat diet equally worsened glucose tolerance in AgRP and POMC IR KO mice and their respective controls but increased hepatic triglyceride levels only in POMC IR KO mice, consistent with impaired lipolytic regulation resulting in fatty liver. These data suggest that although insulin signaling in AgRP neurons is important in regulating glucose metabolism, insulin signaling in POMC neurons controls adipose tissue lipolysis and prevents high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. MRgHIFU: Feedback temperature control with automatic deduction of BHT tissue parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougenot, Charles; Kabongo, Luis; Quesson, Bruno; Moonen, Chrit T. W.

    2009-04-01

    The Bio Heat Transfer Equation (BHTE) has been shown to be an efficient tissue representation during HIFU heating. This model requires knowledge of the following tissue parameters: ultrasound absorption, thermal diffusion and perfusion. The proposed technique, comparing BHTE simulation with MR thermal map, provides in real time an accurate and stable measurement of the ultrasound absorption and thermal diffusion and can be used to measure also perfusion. Therefore, temperature feedback control is significantly improved with more stable and faster convergence of the temperature.

  13. Protein Profiling Gastric Cancer and Neighboring Control Tissues Using High-Content Antibody Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In this study, protein profiling was performed on gastric cancer tissue samples in order to identify proteins that could be utilized for an effective diagnosis of this highly heterogeneous disease and as targets for therapeutic approaches. To this end, 16 pairs of postoperative gastric adenocarcinomas and adjacent non-cancerous control tissues were analyzed on microarrays that contain 813 antibodies targeting 724 proteins. Only 17 proteins were found to be differentially regulated, with much ...

  14. Evaluation of impedance on biological Tissues using automatic control measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Sang Hyeong; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seong Mo [Pusan National University, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Moo Seok; Kim, Sang Sik [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun FDo; Lee, Jong Kyu [Pukyung National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Each biological tissue has endemic electrical characteristics owing to various differences such as those in cellular arrangement or organization form. The endemic electrical characteristics change when any biological change occurs. This work is a preliminary study surveying the changes in the electrical characteristics of biological tissue caused by radiation exposure. For protection against radiation hazards, therefore the electrical characteristics of living tissue were evaluated after development of the automatic control measurement system using LabVIEW. No alteration of biological tissues was observed before and after measurement of the electrical characteristics, and the biological tissues exhibited similar patterns. Through repeated measurements using the impedance/gain-phase analyzer, the coefficient of variation was determined as within 10%. The reproducibility impedance phase difference in electrical characteristics of the biological tissue did not change, and the tissue had resistance. The absolute value of impedance decreased constantly in proportion to the frequency. It has become possible to understand the electrical characteristics of biological tissues through the measurements made possible by the use of the developed.

  15. Controlled Bioactive Molecules Delivery Strategies for Tendon and Ligament Tissue Engineering using Polymeric Nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiong Teh, Thomas Kok; Hong Goh, James Cho; Toh, Siew Lok

    2015-01-01

    The interest in polymeric nanofibers has escalated over the past decade given its promise as tissue engineering scaffolds that can mimic the nanoscale structure of the native extracellular matrix. With functionalization of the polymeric nanofibers using bioactive molecules, localized signaling moieties can be established for the attached cells, to stimulate desired biological effects and direct cellular or tissue response. The inherently high surface area per unit mass of polymeric nanofibers can enhance cell adhesion, bioactive molecules loading and release efficiencies, and mass transfer properties. In this review article, the application of polymeric nanofibers for controlled bioactive molecules delivery will be discussed, with a focus on tendon and ligament tissue engineering. Various polymeric materials of different mechanical and degradation properties will be presented along with the nanofiber fabrication techniques explored. The bioactive molecules of interest for tendon and ligament tissue engineering, including growth factors and small molecules, will also be reviewed and compared in terms of their nanofiber incorporation strategies and release profiles. This article will also highlight and compare various innovative strategies to control the release of bioactive molecules spatiotemporally and explore an emerging tissue engineering strategy involving controlled multiple bioactive molecules sequential release. Finally, the review article concludes with challenges and future trends in the innovation and development of bioactive molecules delivery using polymeric nanofibers for tendon and ligament tissue engineering.

  16. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Dela, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects of ....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function....

  17. Simultaneous identification of DNA and RNA viruses present in pig faeces using process-controlled deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Sachsenröder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal faeces comprise a community of many different microorganisms including bacteria and viruses. Only scarce information is available about the diversity of viruses present in the faeces of pigs. Here we describe a protocol, which was optimized for the purification of the total fraction of viral particles from pig faeces. The genomes of the purified DNA and RNA viruses were simultaneously amplified by PCR and subjected to deep sequencing followed by bioinformatic analyses. The efficiency of the method was monitored using a process control consisting of three bacteriophages (T4, M13 and MS2 with different morphology and genome types. Defined amounts of the bacteriophages were added to the sample and their abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR during the preparation procedure. RESULTS: The procedure was applied to a pooled faecal sample of five pigs. From this sample, 69,613 sequence reads were generated. All of the added bacteriophages were identified by sequence analysis of the reads. In total, 7.7% of the reads showed significant sequence identities with published viral sequences. They mainly originated from bacteriophages (73.9% and mammalian viruses (23.9%; 0.8% of the sequences showed identities to plant viruses. The most abundant detected porcine viruses were kobuvirus, rotavirus C, astrovirus, enterovirus B, sapovirus and picobirnavirus. In addition, sequences with identities to the chimpanzee stool-associated circular ssDNA virus were identified. Whole genome analysis indicates that this virus, tentatively designated as pig stool-associated circular ssDNA virus (PigSCV, represents a novel pig virus. CONCLUSION: The established protocol enables the simultaneous detection of DNA and RNA viruses in pig faeces including the identification of so far unknown viruses. It may be applied in studies investigating aetiology, epidemiology and ecology of diseases. The implemented process control serves as quality control, ensures

  18. Detection of Foot-and-mouth Disease Virus RNA and Capsid Protein in Lymphoid Tissues of Convalescent Pigs Does Not Indicate Existence of a Carrier State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenfeldt, C; Pacheco, J M; Smoliga, G R; Bishop, E; Pauszek, S J; Hartwig, E J; Rodriguez, L L; Arzt, J

    2016-04-01

    A systematic study was performed to investigate the potential of pigs to establish and maintain persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection. Infectious virus could not be recovered from sera, oral, nasal or oropharyngeal fluids obtained after resolution of clinical infection with any of five FMDV strains within serotypes A, O and Asia-1. Furthermore, there was no isolation of live virus from tissue samples harvested at 28-100 days post-infection from convalescent pigs recovered from clinical or subclinical FMD. Despite lack of detection of infectious FMDV, there was a high prevalence of FMDV RNA detection in lymph nodes draining lesion sites harvested at 35 days post-infection, with the most frequent detection recorded in popliteal lymph nodes (positive detection in 88% of samples obtained from non-vaccinated pigs). Likewise, at 35 dpi, FMDV capsid antigen was localized within follicles of draining lymph nodes, but without concurrent detection of FMDV non-structural protein. There was a marked decline in the detection of FMDV RNA and antigen in tissue samples by 60 dpi, and no antigen or viral RNA could be detected in samples obtained at 100 dpi. The data presented herein provide the most extensive investigation of FMDV persistence in pigs. The overall conclusion is that domestic pigs are unlikely to be competent long-term carriers of infectious FMDV; however, transient persistence of FMDV protein and RNA in lymphoid tissues is common following clinical or subclinical infection.

  19. Gold nanoshell/polysaccharide nanofilm for controlled laser-assisted tissue thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redolfi Riva, Eugenio; Desii, Andrea; Sinibaldi, Edoardo; Ciofani, Gianni; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2014-06-24

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of a freestanding ultrathin, mucoadhesive gold nanoshell/polysaccharide multilayer nanocomposite (thermonanofilm, TNF), that can be used for controlled photothermal ablation of tissues through irradiation with near-infrared radiation (NIR) laser. The aim of this work is to provide a new strategy to precisely control particle concentration during photothermalization of cancerous lesions, since unpredictable and aspecific biodistributions still remains the central issue of inorganic nanoparticle-assisted photothermal ablation. Gold nanoshell encapsulation in polysaccharide matrix is achieved by drop casting deposition method combined with spin-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. Submicrometric thickness of films ensures tissue adhesion. Basic laser-induced heating functionality has been demonstrated by in vitro TNF-mediated thermal ablation of human neuroblastoma cancer cells, evidenced by irreversible damage to cell membranes and nuclei. Ex vivo localized vaporization and carbonization of animal muscular tissue is also demonstrated by applying TNF onto tissue surface. Thermal distribution in the tissue reaches a steady state in a few seconds, with significant increases in temperature (ΔT > 50) occurring across an 1 mm span, ensuring control of local photothermalization and providing more safety and predictability with respect to traditional laser surgery. A steady-state model of tissue thermalization mediated by TNFs is also introduced, predicting the temperature distribution being known the absorbance of TNFs, the laser power, and the tissue thermal conductivity, thus providing useful guidelines in the development of TNFs. Thermonanofilms can find applications for local photothermal treatment of cancerous lesions and wherever high precision and control of heat treatment is required.

  20. Avian metapneumovirus RT-nested-PCR: a novel false positive reducing inactivated control virus with potential applications to other RNA viruses and real time methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchieri, Marco; Brown, Paul A; Catelli, Elena; Naylor, Clive J

    2012-12-01

    Using reverse genetics, an avian metapneumovirus (AMPV) was modified for use as a positive control for validating all stages of a popular established RT-nested PCR, used in the detection of the two major AMPV subtypes (A and B). Resultant amplicons were of increased size and clearly distinguishable from those arising from unmodified virus, thus allowing false positive bands, due to control virus contamination of test samples, to be identified readily. Absorption of the control virus onto filter paper and subsequent microwave irradiation removed all infectivity while its function as an efficient RT-nested-PCR template was unaffected. Identical amplicons were produced after storage for one year. The modified virus is likely to have application as an internal standard as well as in real time methods. Additions to AMPV of RNA from other RNA viruses, including hazardous examples such HIV and influenza, are likely to yield similar safe RT-PCR controls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A new reportable disease is born: Taiwan Centers for Disease Control's response to emerging Zika virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Song-En Huang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus infection, usually a mild disease transmitted through the bite of Aedes mosquitos, has been reported to be possibly associated with microcephaly and neurologic complications. Taiwan's first imported case of Zika virus infection was found through fever screening at airport entry in January 2016. No virus was isolated from patient's blood taken during acute illness; however, PCR products showed that the virus was of Asian lineage closely related to virus from Cambodia. To prevent Zika virus from spreading in Taiwan, the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control has strengthened efforts in quarantine and surveillance, increased Zika virus infection diagnostic capacity, implemented healthcare system preparedness plans, and enhanced vector control program through community mobilization and education. Besides the first imported case, no additional cases of Zika virus infection have been identified. Furthermore, no significant increase in the number of microcephaly or Guillain- Barré Syndrome has been observed in Taiwan. To date, there have been no autochthonous transmissions of Zika virus infection.

  2. Spread of Zika virus:The key role of mosquito vector control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes(Diptera: Culicidae) represent a key threat for millions of humans and animals worldwide, since they act as vectors for important parasites and pathogens,including malaria, filariasis and a wide number of arboviruses. The recent outbreaks of Zika virus infections occurring in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean,represent the most recent four arrivals of important arboviruses in the western hemisphere, over the last 20 years, namely dengue, West Nile virus, and chikungunya. Since there are no specific treatments for Zika virus and the other arboviruses mentioned above,it should be highlighted that the eco-friendly and effective control of mosquito vectors is of pivotal importance. Besides radiation, transgenic and symbiont-based mosquito control approaches, an effective option may be the employ of biological control agents of mosquito young instars, in presence of ultra-low quantities of green-synthesized nanoparticles, which magnify their predation efficiency. Furthermore, behaviour-based control tools relying on the employ of swarming behaviour manipulation(i.e. the "lure and kill"approach), pheromone traps, sound traps need further research attention. In particular,detailed basic information on the physical and chemical cues routing mosquito swarming and mating dynamics is urgently required.

  3. Spread of Zika virus:The key role of mosquito vector control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2016-01-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) represent a key threat for millions of humans and ani-mals worldwide, since they act as vectors for important parasites and pathogens, including malaria, filariasis and a wide number of arboviruses. The recent outbreaks of Zika virus infections occurring in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean, represent the most recent four arrivals of important arboviruses in the western hemi-sphere, over the last 20 years, namely dengue, West Nile virus, and chikungunya. Since there are no specific treatments for Zika virus and the other arboviruses mentioned above, it should be highlighted that the eco-friendly and effective control of mosquito vectors is of pivotal importance. Besides radiation, transgenic and symbiont-based mosquito control approaches, an effective option may be the employ of biological control agents of mosquito young instars, in presence of ultra-low quantities of green-synthesized nano-particles, which magnify their predation efficiency. Furthermore, behaviour-based control tools relying on the employ of swarming behaviour manipulation (i.e. the“lure and kill”approach), pheromone traps, sound traps need further research attention. In particular, detailed basic information on the physical and chemical cues routing mosquito swarming and mating dynamics is urgently required.

  4. Spread of Zika virus: The key role of mosquito vector control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Benelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae represent a key threat for millions of humans and animals worldwide, since they act as vectors for important parasites and pathogens, including malaria, filariasis and a wide number of arboviruses. The recent outbreaks of Zika virus infections occurring in South America, Central America, and the Caribbean, represent the most recent four arrivals of important arboviruses in the western hemisphere, over the last 20 years, namely dengue, West Nile virus, and chikungunya. Since there are no specific treatments for Zika virus and the other arboviruses mentioned above, it should be highlighted that the eco-friendly and effective control of mosquito vectors is of pivotal importance. Besides radiation, transgenic and symbiont-based mosquito control approaches, an effective option may be the employ of biological control agents of mosquito young instars, in presence of ultra-low quantities of green-synthesized nanoparticles, which magnify their predation efficiency. Furthermore, behaviour-based control tools relying on the employ of swarming behaviour manipulation (i.e. the “lure and kill” approach, pheromone traps, sound traps need further research attention. In particular, detailed basic information on the physical and chemical cues routing mosquito swarming and mating dynamics is urgently required.

  5. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  6. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  7. Macaques with Rapid Disease Progression and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis Have a Unique Cytokine Profile in Peripheral Lymphoid Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandle, Marlene S.; Williams, Kenneth C.; MacLean, Andrew G.; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of host cytokine response on viral load, disease progression, and neurologic lesions was investigated in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaque model of AIDS. Cytokine gene expression (interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-2, IL-6, IL-10, gamma interferon [IFN-γ], and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) and viral loads were evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR in lymph nodes of 5 control animals and 28 animals infected with SIVmac251 at the terminal stages of AIDS. Infected animals showed higher expression of IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNAs compared with controls. Levels of all cytokines were comparable between animals with rapid (survival, 200 days) disease progression. However, among rapid progressors, the eight animals with SIV encephalitis had a unique cytokine profile (increased IL-2, IL-6, and IFN-γ) that was associated with higher viral loads. These observations provide evidence that host cytokine responses may influence SIV neuropathogenesis independent of disease progression. PMID:11287599

  8. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement.

  9. Puesta en evidencia del virus diarrea viral bovina en bovinos clínicamente afectados Isolation of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus from tissue of clinically affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O CELEDON

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Para conocer la presencia del virus diarrea viral bovina (VDVB en animales sospechosos de estar cursando un cuadro clínico provocado por este virus, se trabajó con un total de 33 animales, correspondiendo a 23 fetos abortados, 2 mortinatos, un nonato, 3 vacas: una madre de mortinato, una madre de aborto y una muerta, 2 novillos muertos y 2 terneros muertos. Muestras de órganos se inocularon en cultivos primarios de pulmón fetal bovino (PFB y en la línea MDBK. Después del primer pasaje en células de PFB, se detectó la presencia de antígenos del VDVB por la prueba de inmunoperoxidasa indirecta (IPI. Todas las muestras con reacción positiva a IPI se inocularon por segunda y tercera vez en células de PFB, aplicándose la prueba de IPI en el tercer pasaje. Sobre un cuarto pasaje se aplicó la prueba de inmunofluorescencia direccta (IFD. Todas las muestras, positivas y negativas a IPI, se inocularon en 3 pasajes seriados en las células MDBK. En 23 de los 33 animales se aisló VDVB cepas no citopatogénicas (NCP, correspondiendo a 14 fetos abortados, un nonato, un mortinato, 3 vacas, 2 novillos y 2 terneros. En 6 fetos abortados, independiente de los infectados con el VDVB, se aisló el virus de la rinotraqueítis infecciosa bovina (RIB. Se concluye que la presencia del VDVB es de alta frecuencia en muestras clínicas de ganado bovino con patologías asociables al VDVB, desconociéndose el rol patógeno del virus en estos aislados.Cattle infected with the bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD virus can present a variety of clinical signs. This research studied the presence of BVD virus in cattle by virus isolation in primary cell cultures of bovine embryo lungs. Virus identification was done using the immunoperoxidase staining assay and the direct fluorescent antibody staining. As a result, 23 out of 33 animals were identified as positive to BVD virus: 14 foetal abortions, 2 stillbirths, 3 dams, 2 steers and 2 calves. No cytopathogenic isolates were

  10. Multiplex RT-PCR detection of Cucumber mosaic virus subgroups and Tobamoviruses infecting Tomato using 18S rRNA as an internal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoning; Gu, Hao; Wang, Xiaoming; Chen, Jishuang; Zhu, Weimin

    2011-06-01

    A multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for simultaneous detection and discrimination of subgroups of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), including its satellite RNA, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), using 18S rRNA as an internal control. Species- and subgroups-specific primers designed to differentiate CMV subgroups I and II, ToMV and TMV, were assessed using the cDNA clones of viral genomes, CMV satellite RNA and 18S rRNA gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) or tobacco (Nicotiana tobacum). Using total RNA extracted from artificial mixture of tomato leaf tissues infected by each virus, the reaction components and cycling parameters were optimized and a multiplex RT-PCR procedure was established. Six fragments of 704, 593, 512, 421, 385, 255 bp, specific to CMV subgroup II, CMV subgroup I, ToMV, TMV, satellite RNA and 18S rRNA, respectively, were simultaneously amplified. The sensitivity of the multiplex RT-PCR method for detecting CMV was 100 times higher than that of double-antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). This method was successfully used for field detection. Among 141 samples collected from East China through tomato growth seasons, 106 single infections with one of the above isolates were detected and 13 mixed infections were found. The results showed the potential use of this method for investigating the epidemiology of viral diseases infecting tomato.

  11. Human Papilloma Virus Detection by INNOLiPA HPV in Prostate Tissue from Men of Northeast Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila-Rodríguez, Martha I; Ignacio Morales, Cesar V; Aragón Tovar, Anel R; Olache Jimenez, Delia; Castelán Maldonado, Edmundo; Lara Miranda, Sandra; Cortés Gutiérrez, Elva I

    2016-11-01

    Background: Prostatic adenocarcinoma by Prosate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and the second cause of cancer-related death among men in the Western world. Human papilloma virus (HPV) may be considered as a preventable risk factor. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of HPV infection in prostatic adenocarcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) cases in Northeast Mexico. Materials and Methods: A total of 87 paraffin-embedded blocks (from 25 and 62 patients with definite diagnoses of BPH and adenocarcinoma, respectively) were selected and subjected to INNOLiPA HPV Genotyping to detect 28 high- and low-risk HPV types. The rates of infection were compared in the two studied groups. Results: INNOLiPA HPV demonstrated great sensitivity for HPV detection on paraffin-embedded tissue. Global prevalence was 14.9% (13/87). HPV infection was positive in 19.4% (12/62) of patients with adenocarcinoma and 4.0% (1/25) of patients with BPH. HPV-11, which is considered to be low risk, was more prevalent. Interestingly, one patient with BPH and six with prostate cancer showed examples considered to be high risk (HPV-18, -51, -52, and -66). Conclusion: A higher rate of HPV infection among Mexican patients with prostatic carcinoma than among those with BPH was observed. HPV infections may thus contribute to the risk of prostate cancer. Further studies are required to elucidate any roles of HPV infection in prostate disease in Mexico and the effect of prevention and treatment of HPV infection on prostatic adenocarcinoma.

  12. Formation of spatially and geometrically controlled three-dimensional tissues in soft gels by sacrificial micromolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Alec; Garbe, James C; Todhunter, Michael E; Jee, Noel Y; Pinney, James R; LaBarge, Mark A; Desai, Tejal A; Gartner, Zev J

    2015-06-01

    Patterned three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models aim to more accurately represent the in vivo architecture of a tissue for the purposes of testing drugs, studying multicellular biology, or engineering functional tissues. However, patterning 3D multicellular structures within very soft hydrogels (<500 Pa) that mimic the physicochemical environment of many tissues remains a challenge for existing methods. To overcome this challenge, we use a Sacrificial Micromolding technique to temporarily form spatially and geometrically defined 3D cell aggregates in degradable scaffolds before transferring and culturing them in a reconstituted extracellular matrix. Herein, we demonstrate that Sacrificial Micromolding (1) promotes cyst formation and proper polarization of established epithelial cell lines, (2) allows reconstitution of heterotypic cell-cell interactions in multicomponent epithelia, and (3) can be used to control the lumenization-state of epithelial cysts as a function of tissue size. In addition, we discuss the potential of Sacrificial Micromolding as a cell-patterning tool for future studies.

  13. The operative treatment of complex pilon fractures: A strategy of soft tissue control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfeng He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pilon fractures are challenging to manage because of the complexity of the injury pattern and the risk of significant complications. The soft tissue injury and handling of the soft tissue envelope are crucial in pilon fracture outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early rate of complications using the strategy of "soft tissue control" for operative treatment of complex pilon fractures. Materials and Methods: 36 complex pilon fractures were treated with the "soft tissue control" strategy. Patients followed the standard staged protocol, anterolateral approach to the distal tibia, the "no-touch" technique and incisional negative pressure wound therapy for pilon fractures. Patients were examined clinically at 2-3 weeks and then 8 weeks for complications associated with the surgical technique. Results: All fractures were AO/OTA (Orthopaedic Trauma Association type C fractures (61% C3, 22% C2 and 16% C1. Only one patient developed superficial infection and resolved with antibiotics and local wound care. None developed deep infection. Conclusions: The strategy of soft tissue control for treatment of pilon fractures resulted in relatively low incidence of early wound complications in patients with complex pilon fractures.

  14. Composite microsphere-functionalized scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules in tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pandolfi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current tissue engineering strategies focus on restoring damaged tissue architectures using biologically active scaffolds. The ideal scaffold would mimic the extracellular matrix of any tissue of interest, promoting cell proliferation and de novo extracellular matrix deposition. A plethora of techniques have been evaluated to engineer scaffolds for the controlled and targeted release of bioactive molecules to provide a functional structure for tissue growth and remodeling, as well as enhance recruitment and proliferation of autologous cells within the implant. Recently, novel approaches using small molecules, instead of growth factors, have been exploited to regulate tissue regeneration. The use of small synthetic molecules could be very advantageous because of their stability, tunability, and low cost. Herein, we propose a chitosan–gelatin scaffold functionalized with composite microspheres consisting of mesoporous silicon microparticles and poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid for the controlled release of sphingosine-1-phospate, a small molecule of interest. We characterized the platform with scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and confocal microscopy. Finally, the biocompatibility of this multiscale system was analyzed by culturing human mesenchymal stem cells onto the scaffold. The presented strategy establishes the basis of a versatile scaffold for the controlled release of small molecules and for culturing mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine applications.

  15. Multicenter Quality Control of Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitor Resistance Genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Vallet, Sophie; Larrat, Sylvie; Laperche, Syria; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Bouchardeau, Françoise; Pivert, Adeline; Henquell, Cécile; Mirand, Audrey; André-Garnier, Elisabeth; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lagathu, Gisèle; Thibault, Vincent; Scholtes, Caroline; Schvoerer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor resistance-associated substitutions are selected during triple-therapy breakthrough. This multicenter quality control study evaluated the expertise of 23 French laboratories in HCV protease inhibitor resistance genotyping. A panel of 12 well-defined blinded samples comprising two wild-type HCV strains, nine transcripts from synthetic NS3 mutant samples or from clinical strains, and one HCV RNA-negative sample was provided to the participating laborat...

  16. A Cost-Effectiveness Tool for Informing Policies on Zika Virus Control.

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro-Murillo, Jorge A.; Parpia, Alyssa S.; Fitzpatrick, Meagan C.; Jules A Tamagnan; Jan Medlock; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L.; Durland Fish; María L Ávila-Agüero; Rodrigo Marín; Ko, Albert I.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    As Zika virus continues to spread, decisions regarding resource allocations to control the outbreak underscore the need for a tool to weigh policies according to their cost and the health burden they could avert. For example, to combat the current Zika outbreak the US President requested the allocation of $1.8 billion from Congress in February 2016.Illustrated through an interactive tool, we evaluated how the number of Zika cases averted, the period during pregnancy in which Zika infection po...

  17. A Cost-Effectiveness Tool for Informing Policies on Zika Virus Control

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro-Murillo, Jorge A.; Parpia, Alyssa S.; Fitzpatrick, Meagan C.; Jules A Tamagnan; Medlock, Jan; Ndeffo-Mbah, Martial L.; Fish, Durland; María L Ávila-Agüero; Marín,Rodrigo; Ko, Albert I.; Galvani, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    Background As Zika virus continues to spread, decisions regarding resource allocations to control the outbreak underscore the need for a tool to weigh policies according to their cost and the health burden they could avert. For example, to combat the current Zika outbreak the US President requested the allocation of $1.8 billion from Congress in February 2016. Methodology/Principal Findings Illustrated through an interactive tool, we evaluated how the number of Zika cases averted, the period ...

  18. Borna disease virus phosphoprotein impairs the developmental program controlling neurogenesis and reduces human GABAergic neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé Scordel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that persistent viral infection may impair cellular function of specialized cells without overt damage. This concept, when applied to neurotropic viruses, may help to understand certain neurologic and neuropsychiatric diseases. Borna disease virus (BDV is an excellent example of a persistent virus that targets the brain, impairs neural functions without cell lysis, and ultimately results in neurobehavioral disturbances. Recently, we have shown that BDV infects human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs and impairs neurogenesis, revealing a new mechanism by which BDV may interfere with brain function. Here, we sought to identify the viral proteins and molecular pathways that are involved. Using lentiviral vectors for expression of the bdv-p and bdv-x viral genes, we demonstrate that the phosphoprotein P, but not the X protein, diminishes human neurogenesis and, more particularly, GABAergic neurogenesis. We further reveal a decrease in pro-neuronal factors known to be involved in neuronal differentiation (ApoE, Noggin, TH and Scg10/Stathmin2, demonstrating that cellular dysfunction is associated with impairment of specific components of the molecular program that controls neurogenesis. Our findings thus provide the first evidence that a viral protein impairs GABAergic human neurogenesis, a process that is dysregulated in several neuropsychiatric disorders. They improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which a persistent virus may interfere with brain development and function in the adult.

  19. Virome profiling of bats from Myanmar by metagenomic analysis of tissue samples reveals more novel Mammalian viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao He

    Full Text Available Bats are reservoir animals harboring many important pathogenic viruses and with the capability of transmitting these to humans and other animals. To establish an effective surveillance to monitor transboundary spread of bat viruses between Myanmar and China, complete organs from the thorax and abdomen from 853 bats of six species from two Myanmar counties close to Yunnan province, China, were collected and tested for their virome through metagenomics by Solexa sequencing and bioinformatic analysis. In total, 3,742,314 reads of 114 bases were generated, and over 86% were assembled into 1,649,512 contigs with an average length of 114 bp, of which 26,698 (2% contigs were recognizable viral sequences belonging to 24 viral families. Of the viral contigs 45% (12,086/26,698 were related to vertebrate viruses, 28% (7,443/26,698 to insect viruses, 27% (7,074/26,698 to phages and 95 contigs to plant viruses. The metagenomic results were confirmed by PCR of selected viruses in all bat samples followed by phylogenetic analysis, which has led to the discovery of some novel bat viruses of the genera Mamastrovirus, Bocavirus, Circovirus, Iflavirus and Orthohepadnavirus and to their prevalence rates in two bat species. In conclusion, the present study aims to present the bat virome in Myanmar, and the results obtained further expand the spectrum of viruses harbored by bats.

  20. Neuro-adaptive control in beating heart surgery based on the viscoelastic tissue model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setareh Rezakhani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of 3D heart motion in beating heart surgery is resolved by proposing a parallel force-motion controller. Motion controller is designed based on neuro-adaptive approach to compensate 3D heart motion and deal with uncertainity in dynamic parameters, while an implicit force control is implemented by considering a viscoelastic tissue model. Stability analysis is proved through Lypanov’s stability theory and Barballet’s lemma. Simulation results, for D2M2 robot, which is done in nominal case and viscoelastic parameter mismatches demonstrate the robust performance of the controller.

  1. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, Pieter; Skolimowski, Maciej; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-ch

  2. Tumor control and normal tissue toxicity: The two faces of radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oorschot, B.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis discusses the two contrasting sides of radiotherapy: tumor control and normal tissue toxicity. On one hand, radiation treatment aims to target the tumor with the highest possible radiation dose, inducing as much lethal DNA damage as possible. On the other hand however, escalation of the

  3. Laser-activated nano-biomaterials for tissue repair and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Rossi, F; Pini, R [Institute of Applied Physics ' Nello Carrara' , National Research Council, via Madonna del Piano 10 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2014-07-31

    We present recent achievements of minimally invasive welding of biological tissue and controlled drug release based on laser-activated nano-biomaterials. In particular, we consider new advancements in the biomedical application of near-IR absorbing gold nano-chromophores as an original solution for the photothermal repair of surgical incisions and as nanotriggers of controlled drug release from hybrid biopolymer scaffolds. (laser biophotonics)

  4. Bioengineering of Tobacco Mosaic Virus to Create a Non-Infectious Positive Control for Ebola Diagnostic Assays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lam, Patricia; Gulati, Neetu M; Stewart, Phoebe L; Keri, Ruth A; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-01-01

    ...: we encapsulated scrambled Ebola RNA sequences inside of tobacco mosaic virus to create a biomimicry that is non-infectious, but stable, and could therefore serve as a positive control in Ebola diagnostic assays...

  5. A broad-spectrum, efficient and nontransgenic approach to control plant viruses by application of salicylic acid and jasmonic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jing; Xi, De-Hui; Xu, Fei; Wang, Shao-Dong; Cao, Sen; Xu, Mo-Yun; Zhao, Ping-Ping; Wang, Jian-Hui; Jia, Shu-Dan; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Yuan, Shu; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2011-02-01

    Plant viruses cause many diseases that lead to significant economic losses. However, most of the approaches to control plant viruses, including transgenic processes or drugs are plant-species-limited or virus-species-limited, and not very effective. We introduce an application of jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA), a broad-spectrum, efficient and nontransgenic method, to improve plant resistance to RNA viruses. Applying 0.06 mM JA and then 0.1 mM SA 24 h later, enhanced resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) in Arabidopsis, tobacco, tomato and hot pepper. The inhibition efficiency to virus replication usually achieved up to 80-90%. The putative molecular mechanism was investigated. Some possible factors affecting the synergism of JA and SA have been defined, including WRKY53, WRKY70, PDF1.2, MPK4, MPK2, MPK3, MPK5, MPK12, MPK14, MKK1, MKK2, and MKK6. All genes involving in the synergism of JA and SA were investigated. This approach is safe to human beings and environmentally friendly and shows potential as a strong tool for crop protection against plant viruses.

  6. Cidea controls lipid droplet fusion and lipid storage in brown and white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lizhen; Zhou, Linkang; Chen, Cheng; Gong, Jingyi; Xu, Li; Ye, Jing; Li, De; Li, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Excess lipid storage in adipose tissue results in the development of obesity and other metabolic disorders including diabetes, fatty liver and cardiovascular diseases. The lipid droplet (LD) is an important subcellular organelle responsible for lipid storage. We previously observed that Fsp27, a member of the CIDE family proteins, is localized to LD-contact sites and promotes atypical LD fusion and growth. Cidea, a close homolog of Fsp27, is expressed at high levels in brown adipose tissue. However, the exact role of Cidea in promoting LD fusion and lipid storage in adipose tissue remains unknown. Here, we expressed Cidea in Fsp27-knockdown adipocytes and observed that Cidea has similar activity to Fsp27 in promoting lipid storage and LD fusion and growth. Next, we generated Cidea and Fsp27 double-deficient mice and observed that these animals had drastically reduced adipose tissue mass and a strong lean phenotype. In addition, Cidea/Fsp27 double-deficient mice had improved insulin sensitivity and were intolerant to cold. Furthermore, we observed that the brown and white adipose tissues of Cidea/Fsp27 double-deficient mice had significantly reduced lipid storage and contained smaller LDs compared to those of Cidea or Fsp27 single deficient mice. Overall, these data reveal an important role of Cidea in controlling lipid droplet fusion, lipid storage in brown and white adipose tissue, and the development of obesity.

  7. Controlled delivery of antiangiogenic drug to human eye tissue using a MEMS device

    KAUST Repository

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate an implantable MEMS drug delivery device to conduct controlled and on-demand, ex vivo drug transport to human eye tissue. Remotely operated drug delivery to human post-mortem eyes was performed via a MEMS device. The developed curved packaging cover conforms to the eyeball thereby preventing the eye tissue from contacting the actuating membrane. By pulsed operation of the device, using an externally applied magnetic field, the drug released from the device accumulates in a cavity adjacent to the tissue. As such, docetaxel (DTX), an antiangiogenic drug, diffuses through the eye tissue, from sclera and choroid to retina. DTX uptake by sclera and choroid were measured to be 1.93±0.66 and 7.24±0.37 μg/g tissue, respectively, after two hours in pulsed operation mode (10s on/off cycles) at 23°C. During this period, a total amount of 192 ng DTX diffused into the exposed tissue. This MEMS device shows great potential for the treatment of ocular posterior segment diseases such as diabetic retinopathy by introducing a novel way of drug administration to the eye. © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Levels of feline infectious peritonitis virus in blood, effusions, and various tissues and the role of lymphopenia in disease outcome following experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Niels C; Eckstrand, Chrissy; Liu, Hongwei; Leutenegger, Christian; Murphy, Brian

    2015-02-25

    Twenty specific pathogen free cats were experimentally infected with a virulent cat-passaged type I field strain of FIPV. Eighteen cats succumbed within 2-4 weeks to effusive abdominal FIP, one survived for 6 weeks, and one seroconverted without outward signs of disease. A profound drop in the absolute count of blood lymphocytes occurred around 2 weeks post-infection (p.i.) in cats with rapid disease, while the decrease was delayed in the one cat that survived for 6 weeks. The absolute lymphocyte count of the surviving cat remained within normal range. Serum antibodies as measured by indirect immunofluorescence appeared after 2 weeks p.i. and correlated with the onset of disease signs. Viral genomic RNA was either not detectable by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) or detectable only at very low levels in terminal tissues not involved directly in the infection, including hepatic and renal parenchyma, cardiac muscle, lung or popliteal lymph node. High tissue virus loads were measured in severely affected tissues such as the omentum, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen. High levels of viral genomic RNA were also detected in whole ascitic fluid, with the cellular fraction containing 10-1000 times more viral RNA than the supernatant. Replicating virus was strongly associated with macrophages by immunohistochemistry. Virus was usually detected at relatively low levels in feces and there was no evidence of enterocyte infection. Viral genomic RNA was not detected at the level of test sensitivity in whole blood, plasma, or the white cell fraction in terminal samples from the 19 cats that succumbed or in the single survivor. These studies reconfirmed the effect of lymphopenia on disease outcome. FIPV genomic RNA was also found to be highly macrophage associated within diseased tissues and effusions as determined by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry but was not present in blood.

  9. Using polymeric materials to control stem cell behavior for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianli; Kohn, David H

    2012-03-01

    Patients with organ failure often suffer from increased morbidity and decreased quality of life. Current strategies of treating organ failure have limitations, including shortage of donor organs, low efficiency of grafts, and immunological problems. Tissue engineering emerged about two decades ago as a strategy to restore organ function with a living, functional engineered substitute. However, the ability to engineer a functional organ is limited by a limited understanding of the interactions between materials and cells that are required to yield functional tissue equivalents. Polymeric materials are one of the most promising classes of materials for use in tissue engineering, due to their biodegradability, flexibility in processing and property design, and the potential to use polymer properties to control cell function. Stem cells offer potential in tissue engineering because of their unique capacity to self-renew and differentiate into neurogenic, osteogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic lineages under appropriate stimuli from extracellular components. This review examines recent advances in stem cell-polymer interactions for tissue regeneration, specifically highlighting control of polymer properties to direct adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells, and how biomaterials can be designed to provide some of the stimuli to cells that the natural extracellular matrix does.

  10. Depletion of macrophages in mice results in higher dengue virus titers and highlights the role of macrophages for virus control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fink, K.; Ng, C.; Nkenfou, C.; Vasudevan, S.G.; Rooijen, van N.; Schul, W.

    2009-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are target cells for dengue infection. Besides their potential role for virus replication, activated monocytes/macrophages produce cytokines that may be critical for dengue pathology. To study the in vivo role of monocytes and macrophages for virus replication, we depleted

  11. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  12. Tsetse salivary gland hypertrophy virus: hope or hindrance for tsetse control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adly M M Abd-Alla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available MANY SPECIES OF TSETSE FLIES (DIPTERA: Glossinidae are infected with a virus that causes salivary gland hypertrophy (SGH, and flies with SGH symptoms have a reduced fecundity and fertility. The prevalence of SGH in wild tsetse populations is usually very low (0.2%-5%, but higher prevalence rates (15.2% have been observed occasionally. The successful eradication of a Glossina austeni population from Unguja Island (Zanzibar using an area-wide integrated pest management approach with a sterile insect technique (SIT component (1994-1997 encouraged several African countries, including Ethiopia, to incorporate the SIT in their national tsetse control programs. A large facility to produce tsetse flies for SIT application in Ethiopia was inaugurated in 2007. To support this project, a Glossina pallidipes colony originating from Ethiopia was successfully established in 1996, but later up to 85% of adult flies displayed symptoms of SGH. As a result, the colony declined and became extinct by 2002. The difficulties experienced with the rearing of G. pallidipes, epitomized by the collapse of the G. pallidipes colony originating from Ethiopia, prompted the urgent need to develop management strategies for the salivary gland hypertrophy virus (SGHV for this species. As a first step to identify suitable management strategies, the virus isolated from G. pallidipes (GpSGHV was recently sequenced and research was initiated on virus transmission and pathology. Different approaches to prevent virus replication and its horizontal transmission during blood feeding have been proposed. These include the use of antiviral drugs such as acyclovir and valacyclovir added to the blood for feeding or the use of antibodies against SGHV virion proteins. In addition, preliminary attempts to silence the expression of an essential viral protein using RNA interference will be discussed.

  13. Comparative Analyses of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus C4 Protein-Interacting Host Proteins in Healthy and Infected Tomato Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namgyu Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, a member of the genus Begomovirus, is one of the most important viruses of cultivated tomatoes worldwide, mainly causing yellowing and curling of leaves with stunting in plants. TYLCV causes severe problems in sub-tropical and tropical countries, as well as in Korea. However, the mechanism of TYLCV infection remains unclear, although the function of each viral component has been identified. TYLCV C4 codes for a small protein involved in various cellular functions, including symptom determination, gene silencing, viral movement, and induction of the plant defense response. In this study, through yeast-two hybrid screenings, we identified TYLCV C4-interacting host proteins from both healthy and symptom-exhibiting tomato tissues, to determine the role of TYLCV C4 proteins in the infection processes. Comparative analyses of 28 proteins from healthy tissues and 36 from infected tissues showing interactions with TYLCV C4 indicated that TYLCV C4 mainly interacts with host proteins involved in translation, ubiquitination, and plant defense, and most interacting proteins differed between the two tissues but belong to similar molecular functional categories. Four proteins—two ribosomal proteins, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, and 14-3-3 family protein—were detected in both tissues. Furthermore, the identified proteins in symptom-exhibiting tissues showed greater involvement in plant defenses. Some are key regulators, such as receptor-like kinases and pathogenesis-related proteins, of plant defenses. Thus, TYLCV C4 may contribute to the suppression of host defense during TYLCV infection and be involved in ubiquitination for viral infection.

  14. Thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum for the engineering of three-dimensional tissues with layer-by-layer architectural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Alex; Trosper, Nicole E; Yang, Hee Seok; Kim, Jinsung; Tsui, Jonathan H; Frankel, Samuel D; Murry, Charles E; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-05-27

    Current tissue engineering methods lack the ability to properly recreate scaffold-free, cell-dense tissues with physiological structures. Recent studies have shown that the use of nanoscale cues allows for precise control over large-area 2D tissue structures without restricting cell growth or cell density. In this study, we developed a simple and versatile platform combining a thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) incorporating nanotopographical cues and the gel casting method for the fabrication of scaffold-free 3D tissues. Our TNFS allows for the structural control of aligned cell monolayers which can be spontaneously detached via a change in culture temperature. Utilizing our gel casting method, viable, aligned cell sheets can be transferred without loss of anisotropy or stacked with control over individual layer orientations. Transferred cell sheets and individual cell layers within multilayered tissues robustly retain structural anisotropy, allowing for the fabrication of scaffold-free, 3D tissues with hierarchical control of overall tissue structure.

  15. Quality assessment and control of tissue specific RNA-seq libraries of Drosophila transgenic RNAi models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Andreia J; Brito, Francisco F; Chobanyan, Tamar; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Yokokura, Takakazu; Van Vactor, David; Gama-Carvalho, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is rapidly emerging as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, RNA-seq is not a bias free technique. It requires large amounts of RNA and library preparation can introduce multiple artifacts, compounded by problems from later stages in the process. Nevertheless, RNA-seq is increasingly used in multiple studies, including the characterization of tissue-specific transcriptomes from invertebrate models of human disease. The generation of samples in this context is complex, involving the establishment of mutant strains and the delicate contamination prone process of dissecting the target tissue. Moreover, in order to achieve the required amount of RNA, multiple samples need to be pooled. Such datasets pose extra challenges due to the large variability that may occur between similar pools, mostly due to the presence of cells from surrounding tissues. Therefore, in addition to standard quality control of RNA-seq data, analytical procedures for control of "biological quality" are critical for successful comparison of gene expression profiles. In this study, the transcriptome of the central nervous system (CNS) of a Drosophila transgenic strain with neuronal-specific RNAi of an ubiquitous gene was profiled using RNA-seq. After observing the existence of an unusual variance in our dataset, we showed that the expression profile of a small panel of marker genes, including GAL4 under control of a tissue specific driver, can identify libraries with low levels of contamination from neighboring tissues, enabling the selection of a robust dataset for differential expression analysis. We further analyzed the potential of profiling a complex tissue to identify cell-type specific changes in response to target gene down-regulation. Finally, we showed that trimming 5' ends of reads decreases nucleotide frequency biases, increasing the coverage of protein coding genes with a potential positive impact in the incurrence of systematic

  16. Quality assessment and control of tissue specific RNA-seq libraries of Drosophila transgenic RNAi models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia J Amaral

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq is rapidly emerging as the technology of choice for whole-transcriptome studies. However, RNA-seq is not a bias free technique. It requires large amounts of RNA and library preparation can introduce multiple artifacts, compounded by problems from later stages in the process. Nevertheless, RNA-seq is increasingly used in multiple studies, including the characterization of tissue-specific transcriptomes from invertebrate models of human disease. The generation of samples in this context is complex, involving the establishment of mutant strains and the delicate contamination prone process of dissecting the target tissue. Moreover, in order achieve the required amount of RNA, multiple samples need to be pooled. Such datasets pose extra challenges due to the large variability that may occur between similar pools, mostly due to the presence of cells from surrounding tissues. Therefore, in addition to standard quality control of RNA-seq data, analytical procedures for control of 'biological quality’ are critical for successful comparison of gene expression profiles. In this study, the transcriptome of the central nervous system of a Drosophila transgenic strain with neuronal-specific RNAi of an ubiquitous gene was profiled using RNA-seq. After observing the existence of an unusual variance in our dataset, we showed that the expression profile of a small panel of marker genes, including GAL4 under control of a tissue specific driver, can identify libraries with low levels of contamination from neighboring tissues, enabling the selection of a robust dataset for differential expression analysis. We further analyzed the potential of profiling a complex tissue to identify cell-type specific changes in response to target gene down-regulation. Finally, we showed that trimming 5’ ends of reads decreases nucleotide frequency biases, increasing the coverage of protein coding genes and decreasing the occurrence of systematic technical

  17. Virus spreading in wireless sensor networks with a medium access control mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ya-Qi; Yang Xiao-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,an extended version of standard susceptible-infected (SI) model is proposed to consider the influence of a medium access control mechanism on virus spreading in wireless sensor networks.Theoretical analysis shows that the medium access control mechanism obviously reduces the density of infected nodes in the networks,which has been ignored in previous studies.It is also found that by increasing the network node density or node communication radius greatly increases the number of infected nodes.The theoretical results are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  18. HIV-1 Nef control of cell signalling molecules: multiple strategies to promote virus replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alison L Greenway; Gavan Holloway; Dale A McPhee; Phoebe Ellis; Alyssa Cornall; Michael Lidman

    2003-04-01

    HIV-1 has at its disposal numerous proteins encoded by its genome which provide the required arsenal to establish and maintain infection in its host for a considerable number of years. One of the most important and enigmatic of these proteins is Nef. The Nef protein of HIV-1 plays a fundamental role in the virus life cycle. This small protein of approximately 27 kDa is required for maximal virus replication and disease progression. The mechanisms by which it is able to act as a positive factor during virus replication is an area of intense research and although some controversy surrounds Nef much has been gauged as to how it functions. Its ability to modulate the expression of key cellular receptors important for cell activation and control signal transduction elements and events by interacting with numerous cellular kinases and signalling molecules, including members of the Src family kinases, leading to an effect on host cell function is likely to explain at least in part its role during infection and represents a finely tuned mechanism where this protein assists HIV-1 to control its host.

  19. Antiviral immunity following smallpox virus infection: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W; Hanifin, Jon M; Mori, Motomi; Koudelka, Caroline W; Slifka, Mark K

    2010-12-01

    Outbreaks of smallpox (i.e., caused by variola virus) resulted in up to 30% mortality, but those who survived smallpox infection were regarded as immune for life. Early studies described the levels of neutralizing antibodies induced after infection, but smallpox was eradicated before contemporary methods for quantifying T-cell memory were developed. To better understand the levels and duration of immunity after smallpox infection, we performed a case-control study comparing antiviral CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and neutralizing antibody levels of 24 smallpox survivors with the antiviral immunity observed in 60 smallpox-vaccinated (i.e., vaccinia virus-immune) control subjects. We found that the duration of immunity following smallpox infection was remarkably similar to that observed after smallpox vaccination, with antiviral T-cell responses that declined slowly over time and antiviral antibody responses that remained stable for decades after recovery from infection. These results indicate that severe, potentially life-threatening disease is not required for the development of sustainable long-term immunity. This study shows that the levels of immunity induced following smallpox vaccination are comparable in magnitude to that achieved through natural variola virus infection, and this may explain the notable success of vaccination in eradicating smallpox, one of the world's most lethal diseases.

  20. Antiviral Immunity following Smallpox Virus Infection: a Case-Control Study▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Mori, Motomi; Koudelka, Caroline W.; Slifka, Mark K.

    2010-01-01

    Outbreaks of smallpox (i.e., caused by variola virus) resulted in up to 30% mortality, but those who survived smallpox infection were regarded as immune for life. Early studies described the levels of neutralizing antibodies induced after infection, but smallpox was eradicated before contemporary methods for quantifying T-cell memory were developed. To better understand the levels and duration of immunity after smallpox infection, we performed a case-control study comparing antiviral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses and neutralizing antibody levels of 24 smallpox survivors with the antiviral immunity observed in 60 smallpox-vaccinated (i.e., vaccinia virus-immune) control subjects. We found that the duration of immunity following smallpox infection was remarkably similar to that observed after smallpox vaccination, with antiviral T-cell responses that declined slowly over time and antiviral antibody responses that remained stable for decades after recovery from infection. These results indicate that severe, potentially life-threatening disease is not required for the development of sustainable long-term immunity. This study shows that the levels of immunity induced following smallpox vaccination are comparable in magnitude to that achieved through natural variola virus infection, and this may explain the notable success of vaccination in eradicating smallpox, one of the world's most lethal diseases. PMID:20926574

  1. Computational Modelling and Optimal Control of Ebola Virus Disease with non-Linear Incidence Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaidza, I.; Makinde, O. D.; Okosun, O. K.

    2017-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has exposed the need to connect modellers and those with relevant data as pivotal to better understanding of how the disease spreads and quantifying the effects of possible interventions. In this paper, we model and analyse the Ebola virus disease with non-linear incidence rate. The epidemic model created is used to describe how the Ebola virus could potentially evolve in a population. We perform an uncertainty analysis of the basic reproductive number R 0 to quantify its sensitivity to other disease-related parameters. We also analyse the sensitivity of the final epidemic size to the time control interventions (education, vaccination, quarantine and safe handling) and provide the cost effective combination of the interventions.

  2. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  3. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  4. 21 CFR 866.3310 - Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Hepatitis A virus (HAV) serological assays. (a) Identification. HAV serological assays are devices that... tissue donors. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is “Guidance...

  5. Adipose tissue transcriptomics and epigenomics in low birthweight men and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillberg, Linn; Perfilyev, Alexander; Brøns, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Individuals who had a low birthweight (LBW) are at an increased risk of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes when exposed to high-fat overfeeding (HFO). We studied genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA methylation in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) after 5 days of HFO and after...... in CDK5, IGFBP5 and SLC2A4) was altered in SAT after overfeeding in this and in another cohort. Conclusions/interpretation: Young men who had a LBW exhibit epigenetic alterations in their adipose tissue that potentially influence insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes. Short-term overfeeding...... influences gene transcription and, to some extent, DNA methylation in adipose tissue; there was no major difference in this response between LBW and control participants....

  6. DNA synthesis in mouse brown adipose tissue is under. beta. -adrenergic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehnmark, S.; Nedergaard, J. (Univ. of Stockholm (Sweden))

    1989-02-01

    The rate of DNA synthesis in mouse brown adipose tissue was followed with injections of ({sup 3}H)thymidine. Cold exposure led to a large increase in the rate of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation, reaching a maximum after 8 days, after which the activity abruptly ceased. A series of norepinephrine injections was in itself able to increase ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation. When norepinephrine was injected in combination with the {alpha}-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine or with the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, the stimulation was fully blocked by propranolol. It is suggested that stimulation of DNA synthesis in brown adipose tissue is a {beta}-adrenergically mediated process and that the tissue is an interesting model for studies of physiological control of DNA synthesis.

  7. Methods for Preparation of MS2 Phage-Like Particles and Their Utilization as Process Control Viruses in RT-PCR and qRT-PCR Detection of RNA Viruses From Food Matrices and Clinical Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikel, P; Vasickova, P; Kralik, P

    2015-02-25

    RNA viruses are pathogenic agents of many serious infectious diseases affecting humans and animals. The detection of pathogenic RNA viruses is based on modern molecular methods, of which the most widely used methods are the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and the real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). All steps of RT-PCR and qRT-PCR should be strictly controlled to ensure the validity of obtained results. False-negative results may be caused not only by inhibition of RT or/and PCR steps but also by failure of the nucleic acid extraction step, particularly in the case of viral RNA extraction. The control of nucleic acid extraction generally involves the utilization of a non-pathogenic virus (process control virus) of similar structural properties to those of the target virus. Although in clinical samples the use of such process control virus is only recommended, in other kinds of settings such as food matrices its use is necessary. Currently, several different process control viruses are used for these purposes. Process control viruses can also be constructed artificially using technology for production of MS2 phage-like particles, which have many advantages in comparison with other used controls and are especially suited for controlling the detection and quantification of certain types of RNA viruses. The technology for production of MS2 phage-like particles is theoretically well established, uses the knowledge gained from the study of the familiar bacteriophage MS2 and utilizes many different approaches for the construction of the various process control viruses. Nevertheless, the practical use of MS2 phage-like particles in routine diagnostics is relatively uncommon. The current situation with regard to the use of MS2 phage-like particles as process control viruses in detection of RNA viruses and different methods of their construction, purification and use are summarized and discussed in this

  8. Viral interactions in human lymphoid tissue: Human herpesvirus 7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 via CD4 modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisco, Andrea; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Biancotto, Angélique; Vanpouille, Christophe; Origgi, Francesco; Malnati, Mauro S; Schols, Dominique; Lusso, Paolo; Margolis, Leonid B

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is often accompanied by infection with other pathogens that affect the clinical course of HIV disease. Here, we identified another virus, human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) that interferes with HIV type 1 (HIV-1) replication in human lymphoid tissue, where critical events of HIV disease occur. Like the closely related HHV-6, HHV-7 suppresses the replication of CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in coinfected blocks of human lymphoid tissue. Unlike HHV-6, which affects HIV-1 by upregulating RANTES, HHV-7 did not upregulate any CCR5-binding chemokine. Rather, the inhibition of R5 HIV-1 by HHV-7 was associated with a marked downregulation of CD4, the cellular receptor shared by HHV-7 and HIV-1. HHV-7-induced CD4 downregulation was sufficient for HIV-1 inhibition, since comparable downregulation of CD4 with cyclotriazadisulfonamide, a synthetic macrocycle that specifically modulates expression of CD4, resulted in the suppression of HIV infection similar to that seen in HHV-7-infected tissues. In contrast to R5 HIV-1, CXCR4-tropic (X4) HIV-1 was only minimally suppressed by HHV-7 coinfection. This selectivity in suppression of R5 and X4 HIV-1 is explained by a suppression of HHV-7 replication in X4- but not in R5-coinfected tissues. These results suggest that HIV-1 and HHV-7 may interfere in lymphoid tissue in vivo, thus potentially affecting the progression of HIV-1 disease. Knowledge of the mechanisms of interaction of HIV-1 with HHV-7, as well as with other pathogens that modulate HIV-1 replication, may provide new insights into HIV pathogenesis and lead to the development of new anti-HIV therapeutic strategies.

  9. Gelatin Scaffolds with Controlled Pore Structure and Mechanical Property for Cartilage Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shangwu; Zhang, Qin; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-03-01

    Engineering of cartilage tissue in vitro using porous scaffolds and chondrocytes provides a promising approach for cartilage repair. However, nonuniform cell distribution and heterogeneous tissue formation together with weak mechanical property of in vitro engineered cartilage limit their clinical application. In this study, gelatin porous scaffolds with homogeneous and open pores were prepared using ice particulates and freeze-drying. The scaffolds were used to culture bovine articular chondrocytes to engineer cartilage tissue in vitro. The pore structure and mechanical property of gelatin scaffolds could be well controlled by using different ratios of ice particulates to gelatin solution and different concentrations of gelatin. Gelatin scaffolds prepared from ≥70% ice particulates enabled homogeneous seeding of bovine articular chondrocytes throughout the scaffolds and formation of homogeneous cartilage extracellular matrix. While soft scaffolds underwent cellular contraction, stiff scaffolds resisted cellular contraction and had significantly higher cell proliferation and synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan. Compared with the gelatin scaffolds prepared without ice particulates, the gelatin scaffolds prepared with ice particulates facilitated formation of homogeneous cartilage tissue with significantly higher compressive modulus. The gelatin scaffolds with highly open pore structure and good mechanical property can be used to improve in vitro tissue-engineered cartilage.

  10. GH response to GHRH plus arginine is impaired in lipoatrophic women with human immunodeficiency virus compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirilli, Lucia; Orlando, Gabriella; Carli, Federica; Madeo, Bruno; Cocchi, Stefania; Diazzi, Chiara; Carani, Cesare; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo

    2012-03-01

    GH secretion is impaired in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and inversely related to lipodystrophy-related fat redistribution in men. Less is known about the underlying mechanisms involved in reduced GH secretion in HIV-infected women. A case-control, cross-sectional study comparing GH/IGF1 status, body composition, and metabolic parameters in 92 nonobese women with HIV-related lipodystrophy and 63 healthy controls matched for age, ethnicity, sex, and body mass index (BMI). GH, IGF1, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), GH after GHRH plus arginine (GHRH+Arg), several metabolic variables, and body composition were evaluated. GH response to GHRH+Arg was lower in HIV-infected females than in controls. Using a cutoff of peak GH ≤ 7.5 μg/l, 20.6% of HIV-infected females demonstrated reduced peak GH response after GHRH+Arg. In contrast, none of the control subjects demonstrated a peak GH response ≤ 7.5 μg/l. Bone mineral density (BMD), quality of life, IGF1, and IGFBP3 were lowest in the HIV-infected females with a GH peak ≤ 7.5 μg/l. BMI was the main predictive factor of GH peak in stepwise multiregression analysis followed by age, with a less significant effect of visceral fat in the HIV-infected females. This study establishes that i) GH response to GHRH+Arg is lower in lipoatrophic HIV-infected women than in healthy matched controls, ii) BMI more than visceral adipose tissue or trunk fat influences GH peak in this population, and iii) HIV-infected women with a GH peak below or equal to 7.5 μg/l demonstrate reduced IGF1, IGFBP3, BMD, and quality of life.

  11. Localization and dynamic expression of a 27.8 kDa receptor protein for lymphocystis disease virus infection in sea bass ( Lateolabrax japonicus) tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ronghua; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Tang, Xiaoqian; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2017-10-01

    Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) infects target cells by attaching to a 27.8 kDa receptor (27.8R) protein in flounder Paralichthys olivaceus, and anti-27.8R monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have been developed. However, the 27.8R existence in tissues of sea bass ( Lateolabrax japonicus) and its role in LCDV infection have remained unclear. In this study, the results of western blotting demonstrated that the same 27.8R was shared by flounder and sea bass. LCDV-free sea bass individuals were intramuscularly injected with LCDV, and viral copies were detected in tissues from 3 h post infection and showed a time-dependent increase during 9 days infection. Distribution and synthesis of 27.8R in sea bass tissues were investigated by using anti-27.8R MAbs as probes. It was found that 27.8R was distributed in all the tested tissues. The levels of 27.8R protein were highest in gill and skin, then a bit lowly in stomach, head kidney and heart, followed by spleen, intestine, blood cells, gonad and liver, and least in kidney and brain in healthy sea bass. Upon LCDV infection, 27.8R synthesis was up-regulated in each tissue, and higher in the tissues with higher LCDV copies. The 27.8R and LCDV were detected in some peripheral blood leukocytes but not in red blood cells. These results suggested that 27.8R was widely distributed in sea bass tissues, and it served as a receptor and correlated with tissue tropism of LCDV infection. Furthermore, leukocytes had the potential of being a LCDV carrier and were responsible for a systemic infection of LCDV in sea bass.

  12. Tissue-specific genetic control of splicing: implications for the study of complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Heinzen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous genome-wide screens for polymorphisms that influence gene expression have provided key insights into the genetic control of transcription. Despite this work, the relevance of specific polymorphisms to in vivo expression and splicing remains unclear. We carried out the first genome-wide screen, to our knowledge, for SNPs that associate with alternative splicing and gene expression in human primary cells, evaluating 93 autopsy-collected cortical brain tissue samples with no defined neuropsychiatric condition and 80 peripheral blood mononucleated cell samples collected from living healthy donors. We identified 23 high confidence associations with total expression and 80 with alternative splicing as reflected by expression levels of specific exons. Fewer than 50% of the implicated SNPs however show effects in both tissue types, reflecting strong evidence for distinct genetic control of splicing and expression in the two tissue types. The data generated here also suggest the possibility that splicing effects may be responsible for up to 13 out of 84 reported genome-wide significant associations with human traits. These results emphasize the importance of establishing a database of polymorphisms affecting splicing and expression in primary tissue types and suggest that splicing effects may be of more phenotypic significance than overall gene expression changes.

  13. Design, construction and validation of a computer controlled system for functional loading of soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Vera; Correro, Maria Rita; Riener, Robert; Weber, Franz E; Gallo, Luigi M

    2011-07-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disease affecting body joints. Abnormal mechanical loading could be an initiating factor of cartilage damage, by influencing chondrocytes activity. To date, devices performing mechanical studies of viable tissues are mostly uniaxial. In this work, we developed and validated a multi-axial device for static and dynamic mechanical testing of viable soft tissues. The system, named RPETS, is composed of a motor driven indenter, moving vertically and horizontally along the bottom of a tank containing tissue samples and it can apply combined compression, sliding, and rolling on viable samples. Validation studies were performed with standard rubber and bovine nasal cartilage tissue. Static tests demonstrated that the system is comparable to existing uniaxial devices, with a maximum force control error smaller than 0.5N and a positioning resolution of 5 μm. Dynamic tests performed with different motion profiles showed that the system can exert a load of 100N with a maximum velocity of 100mm/s maintaining the force control error within 10% of the desired value. Sinusoidal motion frequency can vary between 0.05 and 0.5Hz. In practical tests, viability staining of dynamically loaded cartilage slices showed extents of cell death to depend on the indenter velocity. Copyright © 2011 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection and strain differentiation of infectious bronchitis virus in tracheal tissues from experimentally infected chickens by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Comparison with an immunohistochemical technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kurt; Nielsen, O.L.; Pedersen, M.W.;

    1999-01-01

    Oligonucleotide pairs were constructed for priming the amplification of fragments of nucleocapsid (N) protein and spike glycoprotein (S) genes of avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). One oligonucleotide pair amplified a common segment......3896 and 793B strains of IBV, respectively, Groups of specific pathogen free chickens were experimentally inoculated with the Massachusetts (H120, M41), the D1466 and the 793B strains of IBV, and tracheal tissue preparations were made from each bird for RT-PCR and for immunohistochemistry (IHC) up to 3...

  15. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infections: manifestations of infection and recent advances in understanding pathogenesis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, B W

    2014-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to be of economic significance to the livestock industry in terms of acute disease and fetal loss. Many of the lesions relating to BVDV infection have been well described previously. The virus is perpetuated in herds through the presence of calves that are persistently infected. Relationships between various species and biotypes of BVDV and host defenses are increasingly understood. Understanding of the host defense mechanisms of innate immunity and adaptive immunity continues to improve, and the effects of the virus on these immune mechanisms are being used to explain how persistent infection develops. The noncytopathic biotype of BVDV plays the major role in its effects on the host defenses by inhibiting various aspects of the innate immune system and creation of immunotolerance in the fetus during early gestation. Recent advances have allowed for development of affordable test strategies to identify and remove persistently infected animals. With these improved tests and removal strategies, the livestock industry can begin more widespread effective control programs.

  16. Studies with equine infectious anemia virus: transmission attempts by mosquitoes and survival of virus on vector mouthparts and hypodermic needles, and in mosquito tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D L; Issel, C J; Steelman, C D; Adams, W V; Benton, C V

    1981-09-01

    Biological and mechanical transmission trials with Psorophora columbiae (Dyar and Knab) and Aedes sollicitans (Walker) and ponies acutely infected with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) were negative. The EIAV antigen was detected by radioimmunoassay in Ae sollicitans immediately after the mosquitoes had fed on an acutely ill pony, but not 14 days after feeding. Psorophora columbiae mosquitoes had detectable EIAV antigen as determined by radioimmunoassay 24 hours after they fed on an acutely ill pony; this antigen was not detected again until 6 days after feeding and was still detected 14 days after feeding. The EIAV was detected on hypodermic needles held at 25 C for 96 hours, but was not detected 120 hours after the needles were dipped in solutions of EIAV. The virus was detected on the mouthparts of mosquitoes for 1 hour after they had fed on an EIAV-rich medium, but was not detected 4 hours after feeding. Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus Say ovarian cells maintained the infectivity of EIAV for 10 weekly passages, but no evidence for virus multiplication was obtained.

  17. Manufacturing of hydrogel biomaterials with controlled mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadghavami, Armin; Minooei, Farnaz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khetani, Sultan; Rezaei Kolahchi, Ahmad; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2017-10-15

    Hydrogels have been recognized as crucial biomaterials in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications due to their specific characteristics. These biomaterials benefit from retaining a large amount of water, effective mass transfer, similarity to natural tissues and the ability to form different shapes. However, having relatively poor mechanical properties is a limiting factor associated with hydrogel biomaterials. Controlling the biomechanical properties of hydrogels is of paramount importance. In this work, firstly, mechanical characteristics of hydrogels and methods employed for characterizing these properties are explored. Subsequently, the most common approaches used for tuning mechanical properties of hydrogels including but are not limited to, interpenetrating polymer networks, nanocomposites, self-assembly techniques, and co-polymerization are discussed. The performance of different techniques used for tuning biomechanical properties of hydrogels is further compared. Such techniques involve lithography techniques for replication of tissues with complex mechanical profiles; microfluidic techniques applicable for generating gradients of mechanical properties in hydrogel biomaterials for engineering complex human tissues like intervertebral discs, osteochondral tissues, blood vessels and skin layers; and electrospinning techniques for synthesis of hybrid hydrogels and highly ordered fibers with tunable mechanical and biological properties. We finally discuss future perspectives and challenges for controlling biomimetic hydrogel materials possessing proper biomechanical properties. Hydrogels biomaterials are essential constituting components of engineered tissues with the applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery. The mechanical properties of hydrogels play crucial roles in regulating the interactions between cells and extracellular matrix and directing the cells phenotype and genotype. Despite

  18. The control of glycolysis in aged slices of carrot root tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiz-Ur-Rahman, A T; Davies, D D; Trewavas, A J

    1974-09-01

    The possibility that the rate of glycolysis in aged slices of carrot (Daucus carota L.) is controlled by the enzyme phosphofructokinase was examined, by changing the rate of metabolism, by supplying the tissue with potassium chloride, potassium phosphate and potassium citrate and measuring the subsequent changes in levels of metabolites. Potassium chloride and potassium phosphate stimulate glycolysis, potassium citrate inhibits glycolysis and the associated changes in metabolites are consistent with the view that respiration is controlled by a dual system involving phosphofructokinase and glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase or possibly phosphoglycerate kinase. It is proposed that the control points are interlocked by phosphoenolpyruvate and phosphoglycerate. Thus if glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase is activated leading to an accumulation of phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate, these compounds will inhibit phosphofructokinase. Thus our proposal for metabolic control in carrot resembles those proposed in mammalian systems except that the negative feedback system involving ATP and AMP which controls phosphofructokinase in mammals is replaced by a negative feedback system involving phosphoenolpyruvate and phosphoglycerate.

  19. Decay-Accelerating Factor Mitigates Controlled Hemorrhage-Instigated Intestinal and Lung Tissue Damage and Hyperkalemia in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Decay-Accelerating Factor Mitigates Controlled Hemorrhage- Instigated Intestinal and Lung Tissue Damage and Hyperkalemia in Swine Jurandir J. Dalle...DAF treatment improved hemorrhage- induced hyperkalemia . The protective effects of DAF appear to be related to its ability to reduce tissue complement...Decay-accelerating factor mitigates controlled hemorrhage-instigated intestinal and lung tissue damage and hyperkalemia in swine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER

  20. Functional changes in adipose tissue in a randomised controlled trial of physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjögren Per

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A sedentary lifestyle predisposes to cardiometabolic diseases. Lifestyle changes such as increased physical activity improve a range of cardiometabolic risk factors. The objective of this study was to examine whether functional changes in adipose tissue were related to these improvements. Methods Seventy-three sedentary, overweight (mean BMI 29.9 ± 3.2 kg/m2 and abdominally obese, but otherwise healthy men and women (67.6 ± 0.5 years from a randomised controlled trial of physical activity on prescription over a 6-month period were included (control n = 43, intervention n = 30. Detailed examinations were carried out at baseline and at follow-up, including fasting blood samples, a comprehensive questionnaire and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies for fatty acid composition analysis (n = 73 and quantification of mRNA expression levels of 13 candidate genes (n = 51, including adiponectin, leptin and inflammatory cytokines. Results At follow-up, the intervention group had a greater increase in exercise time (+137 min/week and a greater decrease in body fat mass (−1.5 kg compared to the control subjects (changes of 0 min/week and −0.5 kg respectively. Circulating concentrations of adiponectin were unchanged, but those of leptin decreased significantly more in the intervention group (−1.8 vs −1.1 ng/mL for intervention vs control, P P P  Conclusions After a 6-month period of increased physical activity in overweight elderly individuals, circulating leptin concentrations decreased despite increased levels of leptin mRNA in adipose tissue. Otherwise, only minor changes occurred in adipose tissue, although several improvements in metabolic parameters accompanied the modest increase in physical activity.

  1. Multiple controls of oxidative metabolism in living tissues as studied by phosphorus magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, B; Leigh, J S; Kent, J; McCully, K; Nioka, S; Clark, B J; Maris, J M; Graham, T

    1986-12-01

    Three types of metabolic control of oxidative metabolism are observed in the various tissues that have been studied by phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The principal control of oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle is by ADP (or Pi/phosphocreatine). This conclusion is based upon studies of arm muscles of humans during steady-state exercise. A work-cost (Vm vs. Pi/phosphocreatine) relationship follows a Michaelis-Menten rectangular hyperbola, where Km values from 0.5 to 0.6 and Vmax values from 50 to 200 (at nearly constant pH) are found in linearized plots of the equation V/Vmax = 1/(1 + 0.6 phosphocreatine/Pi) where V is work level (which is equal to the velocity of the enzymatic reaction) and Vmax is the maximal work capacity that is a measure of the enzyme activity (E) of oxidative metabolism. Adaptation to exercise enhances the slope of the work-cost relationship and causes large changes in Vmax or E. A second metabolic control may enhance the slope of the work-cost relationship but not Vmax. For example, the initiation of exercise can lead to an improved characteristic that can be explained by 2-fold increased substrate delivery, for example, increased oxygen delivery by microcirculatory control. Cardiac tissue of the adult dog affords an example of optimal endurance performance adaptation and exhibits the steepest work-cost relationship observed and is attributed to a coordinated control of substrate delivery that may involve Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate control of NADH; control of O2 delivery may also be involved. The calculated work-cost relationship is similar to that observed in the beagle heart. The theoretical curve illustrates that the liability of multiple controls is a sharp break point in metabolic control at the end of the multiple control range--a possible cause of instability of cardiac performance at high V/Vmax.

  2. TFE3 controls lipid metabolism in adipose tissue of male mice by suppressing lipolysis and thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yuri; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Satoh, Aoi; Okuda, Kanako; Shingyouchi, Akiko; Naka, Ayano; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yahagi, Naoya; Shimada, Masako; Yatoh, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yogosawa, Satomi; Izumi, Tetsuro; Sone, Hirohito; Urayama, Osamu; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factor E3 (TFE3) is a transcription factor that binds to E-box motifs and promotes energy metabolism-related genes. We previously reported that TFE3 directly binds to the insulin receptor substrate-2 promoter in the liver, resulting in increased insulin response. However, the role of TFE3 in other tissues remains unclear. In this study, we generated adipose-specific TFE3 transgenic (aP2-TFE3 Tg) mice. These mice had a higher weight of white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue than wild-type (WT) mice under fasting conditions. Lipase activity in the WAT in these mice was lower than that in the WT mice. The mRNA level of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme for adipocyte lipolysis, was significantly decreased in aP2-TFE3 Tg mice. The expression of Foxo1, which directly activates ATGL expression, was also suppressed in transgenic mice. Promoter analysis confirmed that TFE3 suppressed promoter activities of the ATGL gene. In contrast, G0S2 and Perilipin1, which attenuate ATGL activity, were higher in transgenic mice than in WT mice. These results indicated that the decrease in lipase activity in adipose tissues was due to a decrease in ATGL expression and suppression of ATGL activity. We also showed that thermogenesis was suppressed in aP2-TFE3 Tg mice. The decrease in lipolysis in WAT of aP2-TFE3 Tg mice inhibited the supply of fatty acids to brown adipose tissue, resulting in the inhibition of the expression of thermogenesis-related genes such as UCP1. Our data provide new evidence that TFE3 regulates lipid metabolism by controlling the gene expression related to lipolysis and thermogenesis in adipose tissue.

  3. Novel Strategy to Control Transgene Expression Mediated by a Sendai Virus-Based Vector Using a Nonstructural C Protein and Endogenous MicroRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito

    2016-01-01

    Tissue-specific control of gene expression is an invaluable tool for studying various biological processes and medical applications. Efficient regulatory systems have been utilized to control transgene expression in various types of DNA viral or integrating viral vectors. However, existing regulatory systems are difficult to transfer into negative-strand RNA virus vector platforms because of significant differences in their transcriptional machineries. In this study, we developed a novel strategy for regulating transgene expression mediated by a cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp). Because of the capacity of Sendai virus (SeV) nonstructural C proteins to specifically inhibit viral RNA synthesis, overexpression of C protein significantly reduced transgene expression mediated by SeVdp vectors. We found that SeV C overexpression concomitantly reduced SeVdp mRNA levels and genomic RNA synthesis. To control C expression, target sequences for an endogenous microRNA were incorporated into the 3′ untranslated region of the C genes. Incorporation of target sequences for miR-21 into the SeVdp vector restored transgene expression in HeLa cells by decreasing C expression. Furthermore, the SeVdp vector containing target sequences for let-7a enabled cell-specific control of transgene expression in human fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells. Our findings demonstrate that SeV C can be used as an effective regulator for controlling transgene expression. This strategy will contribute to efficient and less toxic SeVdp-mediated gene transfer in various biological applications. PMID:27764162

  4. Controlled expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein and hepatitis B virus precore protein in mammalian cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel tetracycline regulation expression system was used to regulate the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and hepatitis B virus precore protein in the mammalian cell lines with lipofectAMINE. Flow cytometry assays showed that application of the system resulted in about 18-fold induction of EGFP expression in CHO cell lines and 5-fold induction in SSMC-7721 cells and about 2-fold in the HEK293 cells. Furthermore, the effective use of this system for the controlled expression of HBV precore protein gene in hepatocellular carcinoma cells was tested.

  5. Herpes-virus infection in patients with Langerhans cell histiocytosis: a case-controlled sero-epidemiological study, and in situ analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Jeziorski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a rare disease that affects mainly young children, and which features granulomas containing Langerhans-type dendritic cells. The role of several human herpesviruses (HHV in the pathogenesis of LCH was suggested by numerous reports but remains debated. Epstein-barr virus (EBV, HHV-4, & Cytomegalovirus (CMV, HHV-5 can infect Langerhans cells, and EBV, CMV and HHV-6 have been proposed to be associated with LCH based on the detection of these viruses in clinical samples. METHODOLOGY: We have investigated the prevalence of EBV, CMV and HHV-6 infection, the characters of antibody response and the plasma viral load in a cohort of 83 patients and 236 age-matched controls, and the presence and cellular localization of the viruses in LCH tissue samples from 19 patients. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results show that prevalence, serological titers, and viral load for EBV, CMV and HHV-6 did not differ between patients and controls. EBV was found by PCR in tumoral sample from 3/19 patients, however, EBV small RNAs EBERs -when positive-, were detected by in situ double staining in bystander B CD20+ CD79a+ lymphocytes and not in CD1a+ LC. HHV-6 genome was detected in the biopsies of 5/19 patients with low copy number and viral Ag could not be detected in biopsies. CMV was not detected by PCR in this series. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Therefore, our findings do not support the hypothesis of a role of EBV, CMV, or HHV-6 in the pathogenesis of LCH, and indicate that the frequent detection of Epstein-barr virus (EBV in Langerhans cell histiocytosis is accounted for by the infection of bystander B lymphocytes in LCH granuloma. The latter observation can be attributed to the immunosuppressive micro environment found in LCH granuloma.

  6. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus...

  7. Toward a quarter century of pathogen-derived resistance and practical approaches to plant virus disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottula, J; Fuchs, M

    2009-01-01

    The concept of pathogen-derived resistance (PDR) describes the use of genetic elements from a pathogen's own genome to confer resistance in an otherwise susceptible host via genetic engineering [J. Theor. Biol. 113 (1985) 395]. Illustrated with the bacteriophage Qbeta in Escherichia coli, this strategy was conceived as a broadly applicable approach to engineer resistance against pathogens. For plant viruses, the concept of PDR was validated with the creation of tobacco plants expressing the coat protein gene of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and exhibiting resistance to infection by TMV [Science 232 (1986) 738]. Subsequently, virus-resistant horticultural crops were developed through the expression of viral gene constructs. Among the numerous transgenic crops produced and evaluated in the field, papaya resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) [Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 36 (1998) 415] and summer squash resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Zucchini yellow mosaic virus, and/or Watermelon mosaic virus [Biotechnology 13 (1995) 1458] were released for commercial use in the USA. Although cultivated on limited areas, the adoption rate of cultivars derived from these two crops is increasing steadily. Tomato and sweet pepper resistant to CMV and papaya resistant to PRSV were also released in the People's Republic of China. Applying the concept of PDR provides unique opportunities for developing virus-resistant crops and implementing efficient and environmentally sound management approaches to mitigate the impact of virus diseases. Based on the tremendous progress made during the past quarter century, the prospects of further advancing this innovative technology for practical control of virus diseases are very promising.

  8. A proteomic study of protein variation between osteopenic and age-matched control bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, Christopher D; Dangott, Lawrence J; Rahm, Mark D; Hitt, Kirby D; Stewart, Donald S; Wayne Sampson, H

    2012-05-01

    The focus of this study was to identify changes in protein expression within the bone tissue environment between osteopenic and control bone tissue of human femoral neck patients with osteoarthritis. Femoral necks were compared from osteopenic patients and age-matched controls. A new method of bone protein extraction was developed to provide a swift, clear view of the bone proteome. Relative changes in protein expression between control and osteopenic samples were quantified using difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology after affinity chromatographic depletion of albumin and IgG. The proteins that were determined to be differentially expressed were identified using standard liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) and database searching techniques. In order to rule out blood contamination, blood from age-matched osteoporotic, osteopenic and controls were analyzed in a similar manner. Image analysis of the DIGE gels indicated that 145 spots in the osteopenic bone samples changed at least ± 1.5-fold from the control samples (P proteins were identified by LC/MS/MS. Of the proteins that increased in the osteopenic femurs, two were especially significant: carbonic anhydrase I and phosphoglycerate kinase 1. Apolipoprotein A-I was the most prominent protein that significantly decreased in the osteopenic femurs. The blood samples revealed no significant differences between groups for any of these proteins. In conclusion, carbonic anhydrase I, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 and apolipoprotein A-I appeared to be the most significant variations of proteins in patients with osteopenia and osteoarthritis.

  9. Knowledge and attitude of donor cardholders toward organ and tissue donation and transplantation in an Iranian tissue bank: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, B; Aghayan, S H; Goodarzi, P; Razavi, S H E; Jafarian, A; Larijani, B; Khalooghi, K; Charmchi, E; Arjmand, F

    2009-09-01

    Cadaveric organ shortage is the most important obstacle to more widespread provision of transplants. Many factors influence the donation rate: social factors, religion, familial relations, and especially knowledge and attitudes toward organ and tissue donation and transplantation. Increasing public awareness can reform the incorrect beliefs and myths about donation and transplantation. This study investigated knowledge and attitudes of donor cardholders toward organ and tissue donation as well as transplantation. This case-control study was performed in 2006 among 178 donor cardholders and the same number of a control group who completed a questionnaire including 23 questions and demographic information. Knowledge and attitude among the cardholder was significantly greater than the control group (P media can increase the rate of consent for organ and tissue donation and transplantation.

  10. Optimal control of an SIVRS epidemic spreading model with virus variation based on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Degang; Xu, Xiyang; Xie, Yongfang; Yang, Chunhua

    2017-07-01

    A novel SIVRS mathematical model for infectious diseases spreading is proposed and investigated in this paper. In this model virus variation factors are considered in the process of epidemic spreading based on complex networks, which can describe different contact status for different agents including the susceptible, the infectious, the variant and the recovered in a network. An optimal control problem is formulated to maximize the recovered agents with the limited resource allocation and optimal control strategies over the susceptible, the infected and the variant are investigated. Then the existence of a solution to the optimal control problem is given based on Pontryagin's Minimum Principle and modified forward backward sweep technique. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate obtained theoretical results.

  11. Rapid detection of herpes simplex virus in clinical samples by flow cytometry after amplification in tissue culture.

    OpenAIRE

    McSharry, J J; Costantino, R; McSharry, M B; Venezia, R A; Lehman, J M

    1990-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and -2, respectively) nuclear antigens were used to identify cells infected with HSV-1 or -2 by indirect immunofluorescence in conjunction with flow cytometry after virus amplification of MRC-5 cell monolayers. The results indicate that MAbs Q1, Q2, and H-640 detect HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected cells, MAb SD-1 detects HSV-2- but not HSV-1-infected cells, and MAb 58-S detects HSV-1- but not HSV-2-infected cells. ...

  12. A Polytropic Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis Virus Promoter Isolated from Multiple Tissues from a Sheep with Multisystemic Lentivirus-Associated Inflammatory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Murphy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV is a lentivirus that infects both goats and sheep and is closely related to maedi-visna virus that infects sheep; collectively, these viruses are known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV. Infection of goats and sheep with SRLV typically results in discrete inflammatory diseases which include arthritis, mastitis, pneumonia or encephalomyelitis. SRLV-infected animals concurrently demonstrating lentivirus-associated lesions in tissues of lung, mammary gland, joint synovium and the central nervous system are either very rare or have not been reported. Here we describe a novel CAEV promoter isolated from a sheep with multisystemic lentivirus-associated inflammatory disease including interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, polyarthritis and leukomyelitis. A single, novel SRLV promoter was cloned and sequenced from five different anatomical locations (brain stem, spinal cord, lung, mammary gland and carpal joint synovium, all of which demonstrated lesions characteristic of lentivirus associated inflammation. This SRLV promoter isolate was found to be closely related to CAEV promoters isolated from goats in northern California and other parts of the world. The promoter was denoted CAEV-ovine-MS (multisystemic disease; the stability of the transcription factor binding sites within the U3 promoter sequence are discussed.

  13. Control of the necrosed tissue volume during noninvasive ultrasound surgery using a 16-element phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X; Hynynen, K

    1995-03-01

    Focused high-power ultrasound beams are well suited for noninvasive local destruction of deep target volumes. In order to avoid cavitation and to utilize only thermal tissue damage, high frequencies (1-5 MHz) are used in ultrasonic surgery. However, the focal spots generated by sharply focused transducers become so small that only small tumors can be treated in a reasonable time. Phased array ultrasound transducers can be employed to electronically scan a focal spot or to produce multiple foci in the desired region to increase the treated volume. In this article, theoretical and experimental studies of spherically curved square-element phased arrays for use in ultrasonic surgery were performed. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from a 16-element array. It was shown that the phased array could control the necrosed tissue volume by using closely spaced multiple foci. The phased array can also be used to enlarge a necrosed tissue volume in only one direction at a time, i.e., lateral or longitudinal. The spherically curved 16 square-element phased array can produce useful results by varying the phase and amplitude setting. Four focal points can be easily generated with a distance of two or four wavelengths between the two closest peaks. The maximum necrosed tissue volume generated by the array can be up to sixteen times the volume induced by a similar spherical transducer. Therefore the treatment time could be reduced compared with single transducer treatment.

  14. Adipocyte SIRT1 controls systemic insulin sensitivity by modulating macrophages in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Mingliang; Gu, Ping; Li, Kuai; Gao, Yuan; Wu, Donghai; Wang, Yu; Xu, Aimin

    2017-04-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation, characterized by augmented infiltration and altered polarization of macrophages, contributes to insulin resistance and its associated metabolic diseases. The NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 serves as a guardian against metabolic disorders in multiple tissues. To dissect the roles of SIRT1 in adipose tissues, metabolic phenotypes of mice with selective ablation of SIRT1 in adipocytes and myeloid cells were monitored. Compared to myeloid-specific SIRT1 depletion, mice with adipocyte-selective deletion of SIRT1 are more susceptible to diet-induced insulin resistance. The phenotypic changes in adipocyte-selective SIRT1 knockout mice are associated with an increased number of adipose-resident macrophages and their polarization toward the pro-inflammatory M1 subtype. Mechanistically, SIRT1 in adipocytes modulates expression and secretion of several adipokines, including adiponectin, MCP-1, and interleukin 4, which in turn alters recruitment and polarization of the macrophages in adipose tissues. In adipocytes, SIRT1 deacetylates the transcription factor NFATc1 and thereby enhances the binding of NFATc1 to the Il4 gene promoter. These findings suggest that adipocyte SIRT1 controls systemic glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity via the cross talk with adipose-resident macrophages. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Application of a sensitive, specific and controlled real-time PCR assay to surveillance indicates a low prevalence of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in wild herring, Clupea harengus L., in Scottish waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejusova, I; McKay, P; Bland, F; Snow, M

    2010-10-01

    Surveillance data on the distribution of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in the North Sea (UK), targeting Atlantic herring in areas with previous virus detection, were obtained from research cruises conducted during 2005. The sensitive molecular approach of real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was applied alongside a newly developed endogenous positive control assay specific for herring (elongation factor 1α) to ensure integrity of template. Three hundred and five pools from 1937 individual herring were tested, and no evidence of VHSV in association with wild Atlantic herring was detected. Samples were obtained from Scottish waters where marine aquaculture is conducted. The results confirm that previous tissue culture studies have most likely not significantly underestimated the prevalence of carrier herring in this area. The significance of migratory species such as herring as a reservoir species for VHSV, with the potential to translocate virus genotypes between geographical areas, is discussed.

  16. Control of the Aedes vectors of the dengue viruses and Wuchereria bancrofti: the French Polynesian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardeux, F; Rivière, F; Séchan, Y; Loncke, S

    2002-12-01

    In most of the 130 islands of French Polynesia, the stenotopic mosquitoes Aedes aegypti (the main local vector for the viruses causing dengue) and Aedes polynesiensis (the main local vector of Wuchereria bancrofti) share many breeding sites in water containers such as discarded cans, coconut shells, buckets and water-storage pots and drums. In addition to selective application of insecticides, non-polluting methods of controlling these mosquitoes have been evaluated during the last decade in two main ecological situations: (1) villages, where Aedes breeding sites are typically peridomestic; and (2) flooded burrows of land crabs, the major source of Ae. polynesiensis throughout the South Pacific region. Large-scale trials of biological control agents, such as mosquito fish (Gambusia affinis and Poecilia reticulata) and copepods (Mesocyclops aspericornis), and of integrated-control strategies have demonstrated the efficacy of certain techniques and control agents against the target Aedes populations in some village situations. Generally, mechanical methods (the use of layers of polystyrene beads against mosquito larvae and pupae, and screening against adult mosquitoes) were more efficient than use of the biological control agents. By integrating several methods of control, mosquito densities (as measured by human-bait collections and larval surveys) were reduced significantly compared with the results of concurrent sampling from untreated villages, and control remained effective for months after the interventions ceased. In land-crab burrows, the first attempts to control Aedes larvae used bacterial agents (Bacillus thuringiensis) and predatory copepods gave disappointing results. Mesocyclops aspericornis could be an effective control agent if the burrows were constantly flooded, but most burrows dry out and refill periodically, so copepod populations do not survive. As it proved difficult to reach all corners of the long sinuous burrows with any control agent

  17. A Study of the Distribution of Apple stem pitting virus in Tissues of Pear Tree sing In Situ Hybridization and In Situ RT-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ying; LIU Na; NIU Jian-xin

    2009-01-01

    To understand the distribution of Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV) in tissues of pear tree and provide directly theorical and technical support for shoot tips detoxication, leaves and shoot tips of Korla pear were used as the materials, cDNA probe for ASPV was synthesized through RT-PCR reaction system using the unradioactive digoxigenin-labeled probe, and the specificity and sensitivity of probe were verified by blot hybridization method. Paraffin slice for in situ PCR and in situ hybridization was made and the location and distribution of ASPV RNA were detected in paraffin slices using in situ reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and the important factors which influenced the experiment results were optimized. ASPV mainly distributed in palisade tissue of mesophyll cells, external cortex of the tip, and the corresponding newborn vascular bundles. 20 min was the suitable digestive time for proteinase K. For the better amplication, RT reaction system should be above 0.2 U μL-1 and 0.4 mmol L-1 for RNasin and dNTPs respectively, 0.1-1.3 U μL-1 SuperScript Ⅱ, 0.6-0.8 μmol L-1 primer concentration, and above 0.5 U 100 μL-1 LA Taq DNA polymerase. The suitable annealing temperature in PCR reaction was 60℃ with 35 cycles. The apical meristem of 0.25 mm was the region of virus-free.

  18. Transmission potential of chikungunya virus and control measures: the case of Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Poletti

    Full Text Available During summer 2007 Italy has experienced an epidemic caused by Chikungunya virus - the first large outbreak documented in a temperate climate country - with approximately 161 laboratory confirmed cases concentrated in two bordering villages in North-Eastern Italy comprising 3,968 inhabitants. The seroprevalence was recently estimated to be 10.2%. In this work we provide estimates of the transmission potential of the virus and we assess the efficacy of the measures undertaken by public health authorities to control the epidemic spread. To such aim, we developed a model describing the temporal dynamics of the competent vector, known as Aedes albopictus, explicitly depending on climatic factors, coupled to an epidemic transmission model describing the spread of the epidemic in both humans and mosquitoes. The cumulative number of notified cases predicted by the model was 185 on average (95% CI 117-278, in good agreement with observed data. The probability of observing a major outbreak after the introduction of an infective human case was estimated to be in the range of 32%-76%. We found that the basic reproduction number was in the range of 1.8-6 but it could have been even larger, depending on the density of mosquitoes, which in turn depends on seasonal meteorological effects, besides other local abiotic factors. These results confirm the increasing risk of tropical vector-borne diseases in temperate climate countries, as a consequence of globalization. However, our results show that an epidemic can be controlled by performing a timely intervention, even if the transmission potential of Chikungunya virus is sensibly high.

  19. The production of antibody by invading B cells is required for the clearance of rabies virus from the central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Craig Hooper

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of rabies is associated with the inability to deliver immune effectors across the blood-brain barrier and to clear virulent rabies virus from CNS tissues. However, the mechanisms that facilitate immune effector entry into CNS tissues are induced by infection with attenuated rabies virus.Infection of normal mice with attenuated rabies virus but not immunization with killed virus can promote the clearance of pathogenic rabies virus from the CNS. T cell activity in B cell-deficient mice can control the replication of attenuated virus in the CNS, but viral mRNA persists. Low levels of passively administered rabies virus-neutralizing antibody reach infected cells in the cerebellum of B cell-deficient mice but are not sufficient to mediate virus clearance. Production of rabies virus-specific antibody by B cells invading CNS tissues is required for this process, and a substantial proportion of the B cells that accumulate in the CNS of mice infected with attenuated rabies virus produce virus-specific antibodies.The mechanisms required for immune effectors to enter rabies virus-infected tissues are induced by infection with attenuated rabies virus but not by infection with pathogenic rabies viruses or immunization with killed virus. T cell activities can inhibit rabies virus replication, but the production of rabies virus-specific antibodies by infiltrating B cells, as opposed to the leakage of circulating antibody across the BBB, is critical to elimination of the virus. These findings suggest that a pathogenic rabies virus infection may be treatable after the virus has reached the CNS tissues, providing that the appropriate immune effectors can be targeted to the infected tissues.

  20. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2016-02-10

    Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing) and the posterior abdomen (P-abd). We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism.

  1. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing and the posterior abdomen (P-abd. We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism.

  2. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitters, Tim W G M; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Deus, Filipe D; Costa, Ines B F; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Karperien, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    In cartilage, tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor that combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment system through which nutrients can be supplied solely by diffusion from opposite sides of a tissue-engineered construct. This design is based on the hypothesis that creating gradients of nutrients, growth factors, and growth factor antagonists can aid in the generation of zonal tissue-engineered cartilage. Computational modeling predicted that the design facilitates the creation of a biologically relevant glucose gradient. This was confirmed by quantitative glucose measurements in cartilage explants. In this system, it is not only possible to create gradients of nutrients, but also of anabolic or catabolic factors. Therefore, the bioreactor design allows control over nutrient supply and mechanical stimulation useful for in vitro generation of cartilage constructs that can be used for the resurfacing of articulated joints or as a model for studying osteoarthritis disease progression.

  3. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing) and the posterior abdomen (P-abd). We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism. PMID:26863941

  4. Ultrastructural localization of human papilloma virus by nonradioactive in situ hybridization on tissue of human cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Rafferty, P A; Warhol, M J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A nonradioactive in situ hybridization was developed to localize human papilloma virus (HPV) at the ultrastructural level. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Cervical biopsies from human uterine cervices clinically suspicious of condyloma were embedded in Lowicryl K4M at low temperature...... confirmed the specificity of the HPV positive signals. CONCLUSIONS: This study helps define the subcellular compartmentalization of HPV DNA in infected human cells....

  5. Infection of lymphoid tissues in the macaque upper respiratory tract contributes to the emergence of transmissible measles virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ludlow (Martin); R. de Vries (René); K. Lemon (Ken); S. McQuaid (Stephen); E.L. Millar (Emma); G. van Amerongen (Geert); S. Yüksel (Selma); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.L. de Swart (Rik); W.P. Duprex (Paul)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus (MV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. MV is spread by aerosols but the mechanism(s) responsible for the high transmissibility of MV are largely unknown. We previously infected macaques with en

  6. Declining malaria, rising of dengue and Zika virus: insights for mosquito vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benelli, Giovanni; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2016-05-01

    The fight against mosquito-borne diseases is a challenge of huge public health importance. To our mind, 2015 was an extraordinary year for malaria control, due to three hot news: the Nobel Prize to Youyou Tu for the discovery of artemisinin, the development of the first vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria [i.e. RTS,S/AS01 (RTS,S)], and the fall of malaria infection rates worldwide, with special reference to sub-Saharan Africa. However, there are major challenges that still deserve attention, in order to boost malaria prevention and control. Indeed, parasite strains resistant to artemisinin have been detected, and RTS,S vaccine does not offer protection against Plasmodium vivax malaria, which predominates in many countries outside of Africa. Furthermore, the recent outbreaks of Zika virus infections, occurring in South America, Central America and the Caribbean, represent the most recent of four arrivals of important arboviruses in the Western Hemisphere, over the last 20 years. Zika virus follows dengue (which slyly arrived in the hemisphere over decades and became more aggressive in the 1990s), West Nile virus (emerged in 1999) and chikungunya (emerged in 2013). Notably, there are no specific treatments for these arboviruses. The emerging scenario highlights that the effective and eco-friendly control of mosquito vectors, with special reference to highly invasive species such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus, is crucial. The concrete potential of screening plant species as sources of metabolites for parasitological purposes is worthy of attention, as elucidated by the Y. Tu's example. Notably, plant-borne molecules are often effective at few parts per million against Aedes, Ochlerotatus, Anopheles and Culex young instars, can be used for the rapid synthesis of mosquitocidal nanoformulations and even employed to prepare cheap repellents with low human toxicity. In addition, behaviour-based control tools relying to the employ of sound traps and the

  7. Zika virus - emergence, evolution, pathology, diagnosis, and control: current global scenario and future perspectives - a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raj Kumar; Dhama, Kuldeep; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Ramakrishnan, Muthannan Andavar; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Saurabh, Sharad; Sachan, Swati; Joshi, Sunil Kumar

    2016-09-01

    This review converses the Zika virus which has attained global concern due to its rapid pandemic potential and impact on humans. Though Zika virus was first isolated in 1947, till the recent large-scale outbreak which occurred in Micronesia, in 2007, the virus was placed into the innocuous pathogen category. The World Health Organization on 1 February 2016 declared it as a 'Public Health Emergency of International Concern.' Of the note, American as well as Pacific Island strains/isolates is relatively closer to Asian lineage strains. The African and American strains share more than 87.5% and 95% homologies with Asian strains/isolates, respectively. Asian strains form independent clusters, except those isolated from China, suggesting relatively more diversity than African strains. Prevention and control are mainly aimed at the vector population (mosquitoes) with Aedes aegypti being the main species. Surveys in Africa and Asia indicated seropositivity in various animal species. However, so far its natural reservoir is unknown. There is an urgent need to understand why Zika virus has shifted from being a virus that caused mild illness to unforeseen birth defects as well as autoimmune-neurological problems. Unfortunately, an effective vaccine is not available yet. Availability of cryo-electron microscopy based on 3.8 Å resolution revealing mature Zika virus structure and the probable virus attachment site to host cell would provide critical insights into the development of antiviral treatments and vaccines.

  8. Quantification of C4d deposition and hepatitis C virus RNA in tissue in cases of graft rejection and hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Tung Wan Song

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Histology is the gold standard for diagnosing acute rejection and hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation. However, differential diagnosis between the two can be difficult. We evaluated the role of C4d staining and quantification of hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA levels in liver tissue. This was a retrospective study of 98 liver biopsy samples divided into four groups by histological diagnosis: acute rejection in patients undergoing liver transplant for hepatitis C (RejHCV+, HCV recurrence in patients undergoing liver transplant for hepatitis C (HCVTx+, acute rejection in patients undergoing liver transplant for reasons other than hepatitis C and chronic hepatitis C not transplanted (HCVTx-. All samples were submitted for immunohistochemical staining for C4d and HCV RNA quantification. Immunoexpression of C4d was observed in the portal vessels and was highest in the HCVTx- group. There was no difference in C4d expression between the RejHCV+ and HCVTx+ groups. However, tissue HCV RNA levels were higher in the HCVTx+ group samples than in the RejHCV+ group samples. Additionally, there was a significant correlation between tissue and serum levels of HCV RNA. The quantification of HCV RNA in liver tissue might prove to be an efficient diagnostic test for the recurrence of HCV infection.

  9. Modeling and control of tissue compression and temperature for automation in robot-assisted surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Utkarsh; Li, Baichun; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgery is being used widely due to its various benefits that includes reduced patient trauma and increased dexterity and ergonomics for the operating surgeon. Making the whole or part of the surgical procedure autonomous increases patient safety and will enable the robotic surgery platform to be used in telesurgery. In this work, an Electrosurgery procedure that involves tissue compression and application of heat such as the coaptic vessel closure has been automated. A MIMO nonlinear model characterizing the tissue stiffness and conductance under compression was feedback linearized and tuned PID controllers were used to control the system to achieve both the displacement and temperature constraints. A reference input for both the constraints were chosen as a ramp and hold trajectory which reflect the real constraints that exist in an actual surgical procedure. Our simulations showed that the controllers successfully tracked the reference trajectories with minimal deviation and in finite time horizon. The MIMO system with controllers developed in this work can be used to drive a surgical robot autonomously and perform electrosurgical procedures such as coaptic vessel closures.

  10. Diagnosis and Control Strategies for Peste Des Petits Ruminants Virus: Global and Pakistan Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abubakar*, Samina Ashiq2, Aamir Bin Zahoor1, Muhammad Javed Arshed and Ashley C. Banyard3

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV causes an acute and highly contagious disease and belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae and genus Morbillivirus. The control of animal diseases is one of the primary objectives of government livestock departments in Pakistan. Control of any viral disease requires rapid, specific and sensitive diagnostic tests and efficacious vaccines. Small ruminants infected with PPRV are routinely diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination, gross pathology, histological findings and laboratory confirmation. A number of serological and molecular diagnostic tests are used for the detection of PPRV. Control of PPRV may be attained using measures including movement control of sheep and goats from affected areas, quarantine of infected animals, removal of potentially infected fomites and a restriction on the importation of sheep and goats from infected areas. The effective way to control PPR in Pakistan is by mass immunization of small ruminants as strict sanitary control measures, including the stamping out policy are not economically viable. Therefore, the control of PPR requires an effective vaccine and for this purpose several vaccines such as homologous and recombinant vaccines have been developed.

  11. Development of abamectin loaded plant virus nanoparticles for efficacious plant parasitic nematode control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Guenther, Richard H; Sit, Tim L; Lommel, Steven A; Opperman, Charles H; Willoughby, Julie A

    2015-05-13

    Plant parasitic nematodes are one of the world's major agricultural pests, causing in excess of $157 billion in worldwide crop damage annually. Abamectin (Abm) is a biological pesticide with a strong activity against a wide variety of plant parasitic nematodes. However, Abm's poor mobility in the soil compromises its nematicide performance because of the limited zone of protection surrounding the growing root system of the plant. In this study, we manipulated Abm's soil physical chemistry by encapsulating Abm within the Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) to produce a plant virus nanoparticle (PVN) delivery system for Abm. The transmission electron microscopic and dynamic light scattering characterization of Abm-loaded PVN (PVN(Abm)) indicated the resultant viral capsid integrity and morphology comparable to native RCNMV. In addition, the PVN(Abm) significantly increased Abm's soil mobility while enabling a controlled release strategy for Abm's bioavailability to nematodes. As a result, PVN(Abm) enlarged the zone of protection from Meloidogyne hapla root knot nematodes in the soil as compared to treating with free Abm molecules. Tomato seedlings treated with PVN(Abm) had healthier root growth and a reduction in root galling demonstrating the success of this delivery system for the increased efficacy of Abm to control nematode damage in crops.

  12. A Nodal-independent and tissue-intrinsic mechanism controls heart-looping chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Emily S.; Verhoeven, Manon; Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Tessadori, Federico; Smith, Kelly; Choorapoikayil, Suma; den Hertog, Jeroen; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2013-11-01

    Breaking left-right symmetry in bilateria is a major event during embryo development that is required for asymmetric organ position, directional organ looping and lateralized organ function in the adult. Asymmetric expression of Nodal-related genes is hypothesized to be the driving force behind regulation of organ laterality. Here we identify a Nodal-independent mechanism that drives asymmetric heart looping in zebrafish embryos. In a unique mutant defective for the Nodal-related southpaw gene, preferential dextral looping in the heart is maintained, whereas gut and brain asymmetries are randomized. As genetic and pharmacological inhibition of Nodal signalling does not abolish heart asymmetry, a yet undiscovered mechanism controls heart chirality. This mechanism is tissue intrinsic, as explanted hearts maintain ex vivo retain chiral looping behaviour and require actin polymerization and myosin II activity. We find that Nodal signalling regulates actin gene expression, supporting a model in which Nodal signalling amplifies this tissue-intrinsic mechanism of heart looping.

  13. Controlling thermal gelation properties of novel Tetronic RTM hydrogel-based tissue adhesive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejos, Martin Fernando

    The advancement in laparoscopic and robotic surgeries is calling for innovation in wound closure methods where the classical mechanical ligatures are proving very challenging due to reduction in surgical spaces, even for seasoned surgeons. Tissue adhesives have been investigated as an alternative and/or adjuvant method to address some of these unmet needs. Previously in our lab, Sanders and co-workers developed a successful synthetic adhesive by modifying Tetronic 1107 to incorporate acrylate (ACR) for chemical crosslinking and N-hydroxisuccinimide (NHS) to enhance tissue bonding, improving the seminal work done by Cho et al. However, solutions of modified T1107 would undergo reverse thermal gelation below room temperature, imposing a usability limitation since they could gel while being handled, and a functional limitation because if the material gelled to fast it would not make a good contact with the microstructure of the underlying tissues. Therefore, the main objective of this master's thesis research is to further improve the performance of these Tetronic-based adhesives by controlling the gelation temperature of these polymeric systems. To control the gelation temperatures of functionalized T1107 blends solutions, the acrylated version of a lower molecular Tetronic, T304, was incorporated into these polymers blends. This strategy proved to be effective to control de gelation temperature of the Tetronic-based adhesives, and also extended their degradation times. However, increased amounts of T304-ACR were correlated with lower adhesive strengths. With the right blend ratio, these three properties can be balanced to yield a mechanically strong adhesive, with a useful degradation profile and controlled gelation temperature.

  14. Carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum, intraperitoneal pressure, and peritoneal tissue hypoxia: a mouse study with controlled respiratory support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Sachiko; Jardon, Kris; Maleysson, Elodie; D'Arpiany, Francis; Canis, Michel; Bazin, Jean-Etienne; Mage, Gérard

    2010-11-01

    Animal experiments have suggested that the laparoscopic peritoneal environment is hypoxic. This study aimed to investigate whether peritoneal tissue is hypoxic on a cellular level during a carbon dioxide (CO(2)) pneumoperitoneum at different intraperitoneal pressures (IPPs) and to determine the short-term effects of surgical injury on the hypoxia status of peritoneal tissue in the injured peritoneum and the distant noninjured peritoneum at cellular and molecular levels. Experiment 1: Mice were divided into five groups according to the following treatments: anesthesia alone, laparotomy, and CO(2) pneumoperitoneum at IPPs of 2, 8, or 15 mmHg. Over the course of each experiment, the peritoneal tissue-oxygen tension (PitO(2)) was continuously monitored. Experiment 2: On the first day, the mice were divided into three groups according to the following treatments: CO(2) pneumoperitoneum at an IPP of either 2 or 8 mmHg or laparotomy. The bilateral caudal epigastric arteries and uterine horns then were coagulated using a bipolar cautery device. On day 7, peritoneal tissue samples were collected for real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. In both experiments, pimonidazole hydrochloride was used to detect tissue hypoxia at a cellular level. Experiment 1: Peritoneal hypoxia at both tissue and cellular levels was detected only in the groups treated with an IPP of 15 mmHg (PitO(2): 5.2 ± 1.0 mmHg, mean ± SEM). Experiment 2: The percentage of pimonidazole immunostained mesothelial and stromal cells from the distant noninjured peritoneum was significantly higher in the group treated with an IPP of 8 mmHg than in the other groups. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha subunit mRNA expression in the distant noninjured peritoneum of the group treated with an IPP of 8 mmHg was significantly higher than in the control group (anesthesia alone). The CO(2) pneumoperitoneum itself did not cause peritoneal hypoxia at either a tissue or a

  15. CD11b⁺, Ly6G⁺ cells produce type I interferon and exhibit tissue protective properties following peripheral virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Fischer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the innate immune system is containment of a pathogen at the site of infection prior to the initiation of an effective adaptive immune response. However, effector mechanisms must be kept in check to combat the pathogen while simultaneously limiting undesirable destruction of tissue resulting from these actions. Here we demonstrate that innate immune effector cells contain a peripheral poxvirus infection, preventing systemic spread of the virus. These innate immune effector cells are comprised primarily of CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁻ monocytes that accumulate initially at the site of infection, and are then supplemented and eventually replaced by CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells. The phenotype of the CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells resembles neutrophils, but the infiltration of neutrophils typically occurs prior to, rather than following, accumulation of monocytes. Indeed, it appears that the CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells that infiltrated the site of VACV infection in the ear are phenotypically distinct from the classical description of both neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages. We found that CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells produce Type I interferons and large quantities of reactive oxygen species. We also observed that depletion of Ly6G⁺ cells results in a dramatic increase in tissue damage at the site of infection. Tissue damage is also increased in the absence of reactive oxygen species, although reactive oxygen species are typically thought to be damaging to tissue rather than protective. These data indicate the existence of a specialized population of CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells that infiltrates a site of virus infection late and protects the infected tissue from immune-mediated damage via production of reactive oxygen species. Regulation of the action of this population of cells may provide an intervention to prevent innate immune-mediated tissue destruction.

  16. DDX3, a DEAD box RNA helicase, is deregulated in hepatitis virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma and is involved in cell growth control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P-C; Chi, C-W; Chau, G-Y; Li, F-Y; Tsai, Y-H; Wu, J-C; Wu Lee, Y-H

    2006-03-30

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide and is highly correlated with hepatitis virus infection. Our previous report shows that a DEAD box RNA helicase, DDX3, is targeted and regulated by hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, which implicates the involvement of DDX3 in HCV-related HCC development. In this study, the potential role of DDX3 in hepatocarcinogenesis is investigated by examining its expression in surgically excised human HCC specimens. Here we report the differential deregulation of DDX3 expression in hepatitis virus-associated HCC. A significant downregulation of DDX3 expression is found in HCCs from hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive patients, but not from HCV-positive ones, compared to the corresponding nontumor tissues. The expression of DDX3 is differentially regulated by the gender and, moreover, there is a tendency that the downregulation of DDX3 expression in HCCs is more frequent in males than in females. Genetic knockdown of DDX3 with small interfering RNAs (siRNA) in a nontransformed mouse fibroblast cell line, NIH-3T3, results in a premature entry to S phase and an enhancement of cell growth. This enhanced cell cycle progression is linked to the upregulation of cyclin D1 and the downregulation of p21(WAF1) in the DDX3 knockdown cells. In addition, constitutive reduction of DDX3 expression increases the resistance of NIH-3T3 cells to serum depletion-induced apoptosis and enhances the ras-induced anchorage-independent growth, indicating the involvement of DDX3 in cell growth control. These findings together with the previous study suggest that the deregulation of DDX3, a DEAD box RNA helicase with cell growth-regulatory functions, is involved in HBV- and HCV-associated pathogenesis.

  17. Implementing oxygen control in chip-based cell and tissue culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomen, Pieter E; Skolimowski, Maciej D; Verpoorte, Elisabeth

    2016-09-21

    Oxygen is essential in the energy metabolism of cells, as well as being an important regulatory parameter influencing cell differentiation and function. Interest in precise oxygen control for in vitro cultures of tissues and cells continues to grow, especially with the emergence of the organ-on-a-chip and the desire to emulate in vivo conditions. This was recently discussed in this journal in a Critical Review by Brennan et al. (Lab Chip (2014). DOI: ). Microfluidics can be used to introduce flow to facilitate nutrient supply to and waste removal from in vitro culture systems. Well-defined oxygen gradients can also be established. However, cells can quickly alter the oxygen balance in their vicinity. In this Tutorial Review, we expand on the Brennan paper to focus on the implementation of oxygen analysis in these systems to achieve continuous monitoring. Both electrochemical and optical approaches for the integration of oxygen monitoring in microfluidic tissue and cell culture systems will be discussed. Differences in oxygen requirements from one organ to the next are a challenging problem, as oxygen delivery is limited by its uptake into medium. Hence, we discuss the factors determining oxygen concentrations in solutions and consider the possible use of artificial oxygen carriers to increase dissolved oxygen concentrations. The selection of device material for applications requiring precise oxygen control is discussed in detail, focusing on oxygen permeability. Lastly, a variety of devices is presented, showing the diversity of approaches that can be employed to control and monitor oxygen concentrations in in vitro experiments.

  18. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Suan Poo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA.

  19. Temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation of cardiac tissue: an in vitro study of the impact of electrode orientation, electrode tissue contact pressure and external convective cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    1999-01-01

    A variety of basic factors such as electrode tip pressure, flow around the electrode and electrode orientation influence lesion size during radiofrequency ablation, but importantly is dependent on the chosen mode of ablation. However, only little information is available for the frequently used t...... temperature-controlled mode. The purpose of the present experimental study was to evaluate the impact during temperature-controlled radiofrequency ablation of three basic factors regarding electrode-tissue contact and convective cooling on lesion size....

  20. Controlling the contractile strength of engineered cardiac muscle by hierarchal tissue architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Adam W; Alford, Patrick W; Jin, Hongwei; Ripplinger, Crystal M; Werdich, Andreas A; Sheehy, Sean P; Grosberg, Anna; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2012-08-01

    The heart is a muscular organ with a wrapping, laminar structure embedded with neural and vascular networks, collagen fibrils, fibroblasts, and cardiac myocytes that facilitate contraction. We hypothesized that these non-muscle components may have functional benefit, serving as important structural alignment cues in inter- and intra-cellular organization of cardiac myocytes. Previous studies have demonstrated that alignment of engineered myocardium enhances calcium handling, but how this impacts actual force generation remains unclear. Quantitative assays are needed to determine the effect of alignment on contractile function and muscle physiology. To test this, micropatterned surfaces were used to build 2-dimensional myocardium from neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with distinct architectures: confluent isotropic (serving as the unaligned control), confluent anisotropic, and 20 μm spaced, parallel arrays of multicellular myocardial fibers. We combined image analysis of sarcomere orientation with muscular thin film contractile force assays in order to calculate the peak sarcomere-generated stress as a function of tissue architecture. Here we report that increasing peak systolic stress in engineered cardiac tissues corresponds with increasing sarcomere alignment. This change is larger than would be anticipated from enhanced calcium handling and increased uniaxial alignment alone. These results suggest that boundary conditions (heterogeneities) encoded in the extracellular space can regulate muscle tissue function, and that structural organization and cytoskeletal alignment are critically important for maximizing peak force generation.

  1. The Sexually Transmitted Insect Virus, Hz-2V

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John P. Burand

    2009-01-01

    Hz-2V is one of only a very few sexually transmitted viruses currently known in insects. Replication of this insect pathogenic virus results in sterility of infected moths rather than mortality. The sterility of the infected host is a consequence of virus directed malformation of adult reproductive tissues, which in females results in cellular proliferation and hypertrophy of these tissues. Virus replication has additional ramifications in infected females. Infected females produce more mating pheromones and attract more mates than healthy females, ultimately facilitating virus transmission and enhancing viral fitness. The molecular mechanisms used by the virus to manipulate the host to enhance its fitness are yet to be determined. Unraveling the underlying principles of these mechanisms promises to enhance our understanding of insect reproductive physiology, as well as provide molecular tools for use in novel approaches in sterile insect control programs.

  2. Expression of innate immune genes, proteins and microRNAs in lung tissue and leukocytes of pigs infected with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Cirera, Susanna; Vasby, Ditte

    This study aimed at providing a better understanding of the involvement of innate immune factors including microRNA (miRNA) in the local and systemic host response to influenza virus infection. Twenty pigs were challenged by influenza A virus subtype H1N2. Expression of miRNA, mRNA and proteins...... to the control group, and haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were at significantly increased at day three pi. MiRNA are small non coding RNA molecules, that regulate gene expression in a wide range of organisms. Cellular miRNAs might be involved in influenza infection, both by targeting immune related host...... transcripts but also by targeting viral gene products. Our results suggest that in addition to a wide range of immune factors, miRNAs are involved in fine tuning of an efficient innate immune response to influenza infection....

  3. Micropatterned, clickable culture substrates enable in situ spatiotemporal control of human PSC-derived neural tissue morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, G T; Sha, J; Ashton, R S

    2015-03-28

    We describe a modular culture platform that enables spatiotemporal control of the morphology of 2D neural tissues derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) by simply adding clickable peptides to the media. It should be widely applicable for elucidating how spatiotemporal changes in morphology and substrate biochemistry regulate tissue morphogenesis.

  4. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration : Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified,

  5. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration : Wnt signaling and stem cell control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified,

  6. Controlled Clinical Trial on Bone-anchored Hearing Implants and a Surgical Technique With Soft-tissue Preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besten, C.A. den; Bosman, A.J.; Nelissen, R.C.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Hol, M.K.S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the clinical and audiological outcomes after linear incision with soft-tissue preservation and standard linear incision with soft-tissue reduction for placement of percutaneous bone-anchored hearing implants. STUDY DESIGN: Clinical trial with historical control-group from a

  7. Peptide-controlled access to the interior surface of empty virus nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Frank; Saunders, Keith; Aljabali, Alaa A A; Evans, David J; Lomonossoff, George P

    2011-11-04

    The structure of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is known to high resolution, thereby enabling the rational use of the particles in diverse applications, from vaccine design to nanotechnology. A recently devised method for the production of empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) has opened up new possibilities for CPMV capsid-based technologies, such as internal mineralisation of the particle. We have investigated the role of the carboxyl (C) terminus of the small coat (S) protein in controlling access to the interior of CPMV eVLPs by determining the efficiency of internal mineralisation. The presence of the C-terminal 24-amino acid peptide of the S protein was found to inhibit internal mineralisation, an effect that could be eliminated by enzymatic removal of this region. We have also demonstrated the amenability of the C terminus to genetic modification. Substitution with six histidine residues generated stable particles and facilitated external mineralisation by cobalt. These findings demonstrate consistent internal and external mineralisation of CPMV, and will aid the further exploration and development of the use of eVLPs for bionanotechnological and medical applications. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Global distribution of peste des petits ruminants virus and prospects for improved diagnosis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyard, Ashley C; Parida, Satya; Batten, Carrie; Oura, Chris; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Genevieve

    2010-12-01

    Viral diseases of farm animals, rather than being a diminishing problem across the world, are now appearing with regularity in areas where they have never been seen before. Across the developing world, viral pathogens such as peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) place a huge disease burden on agriculture, in particular affecting small ruminant production and in turn increasing poverty in some of the poorest parts of the world. PPRV is currently considered as one of the main animal transboundary diseases that constitutes a threat to livestock production in many developing countries, particularly in western Africa and south Asia. Infection of small ruminants with PPRV causes a devastating plague and as well as being endemic across much of the developing world, in recent years outbreaks of PPRV have occurred in the European part of Turkey. Indeed, the relevance of many once considered 'exotic' viruses is now also high across the European Union and may threaten further regions across the globe in the future. Here, we review the spread of PPRV across Africa, Asia and into Europe through submissions made to the OIE Regional Reference Laboratories. Further, we discuss current control methods and the development of further tools to aid both diagnosis of the disease and prevention.

  9. Serologic control against hepatitis B virus among dental students of the University of Granada, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Laura; Liébana-Cabanillas, Francisco; Bernal, Carmen; Castillo, Francisca; Rodríguez-Archilla, Alberto; Castillo, Ana; Liébana, José

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the immunological situation against hepatitis B virus (HBV) of a cohort of dentistry students, to analyze the behavior of the levels of hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) after the administration of one or three vaccine doses, and to determine the influence of age and sex on the immune response. Material and Methods This retrospective cohort study included students attending the School of Dentistry of the institution where the study was performed from 2005 to 2012 who had completed the public health vaccination calendar for HBV at the age of 12-13. Data on age, sex, basal anti-HBs levels, post-vaccination anti-HBs results and final anti-HBs levels were collected. Comparisons of the basal and final levels, as well as associations regarding age and sex, were performed by means of the Student t and Chi-square tests. Results Of the 359 students, 97 (27.02%) had basal antibody concentrations Dentistry students. Key words:Dental students, hepatitis B virus, serologic control. PMID:26241457

  10. The induction of stromule formation by a plant DNA-virus in epidermal leaf tissues suggests a novel intra- and intercellular macromolecular trafficking route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn eKrenz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Stromules are dynamic thin protrusions of membrane envelope from plant cell plastids. Despite considerable progress in understanding the importance of certain cytoskeleton elements and motor proteins for stromule maintenance, their function within the cell has yet to be unraveled. Several viruses cause a remodulation of plastid structures and stromule biogenesis within their host plants. For RNA-viruses these interactions were demonstrated to be relevant to the infection process. An involvement of plastids and stromules is assumed in the DNA-virus life cycle as well, but their functional role needs to be determined. Recent findings support a participation of heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein (cpHSC70-1-containing stromules induced by a DNA-virus infection (Abutilon mosaic virus, AbMV, Geminiviridae in intra- and intercellular molecule exchange. The chaperone cpHSC70-1 was shown to interact with the AbMV movement protein (MP. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation confirmed the interaction of cpHSC70-1 and MP, and showed a homo-oligomerization of either protein in planta. The complexes were detected at the cellular margin and co-localized with plastids. In healthy plant tissues cpHSC70-1-oligomers occurred in distinct spots at chloroplasts and in small filaments extending from plastids to the cell periphery. AbMV-infection induced a cpHSC70-1-containing stromule network that exhibits elliptical dilations and transverses whole cells. Silencing of the cpHSC70-gene revealed an impact of cpHSC70 on chloroplast stability and restricted AbMV movement, but not viral DNA accumulation. Based on these data, a model is suggested in which these stromules function in molecule exchange between plastids and other organelles and perhaps other cells. AbMV may utilize cpHSC70-1 for trafficking along plastids and stromules into a neighboring cell or from plastids into the nucleus. Experimental approaches to investigate this hypothesis are discussed.

  11. Control of guided hard-tissue regeneration using phosphorylated gelatin and OCT imaging of calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Ma, Zhenhe; Ninomiya, Yoshihisa; Takegoshi, Minori; Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Hinds, Monica; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Wang, Ruikang K.; Awazu, Kunio

    2007-02-01

    Tendon and ligament are the transition tissues from a hard tissue to a soft tissue. The regenerative medicine of tendons needs reasonable biomaterials to regenerate precisely from the view point of composition and adhesion properties. In regenerative medicine of hard tissues, it has been reported that calcifications are influenced by phosphorylated proteins (phosphate groups) and the biomaterial possessing phosphate groups promote or inhibit the formation of HAP. We have studied to develop and evaluate the phosphorylated soft biomaterials, which is possible to control a calcification by the introduction ratio of phosphate groups, as biomaterials for tendon regeneration. In addition, we have studied measurement technologies. In the present study, we studied a FT-IR analysis of gelatins with different introduction ratio of phosphate groups, an evaluation of calcifications by the difference of introduction ratio of phosphate groups, and a fundamental survey on OCT imaging for calcifications of a gelatin and a phosphorylated gelatin. We use phosphorylated gelatins with different introduction ratios of phosphate group linked by ester bonds. The introduction ratios are measured by the FT-IR calibrated by a molybdenum blue method. Phosphorylated gelatin sheets were calcified using 1.5SBF soaking process and alternative soaking process. These gelatin sheets with different calcification conditions were measured using SD-OCT systems with 843nm centered wavelength SLD. As a result, we demonstrated that it was possible to measure the calcification on/in the gelatin sheets and sponges and phosphorylated using OCT. The main mechanism is the strong back scattering and the high scattering of deposited calcium particles.

  12. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  13. Microgravity Analogues of Herpes Virus Pathogenicity: Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) and Varicella Zoster (VZV) Infectivity in Human Tissue Like Assemblies (TLAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Albrecht, T.; Cohrs, R.

    2009-01-01

    The old adage we are our own worst enemies may perhaps be the most profound statement ever made when applied to man s desire for extraterrestrial exploration and habitation of Space. Consider the immune system protects the integrity of the entire human physiology and is comprised of two basic elements the adaptive or circulating and the innate immune system. Failure of the components of the adaptive system leads to venerability of the innate system from opportunistic microbes; viral, bacteria, and fungal, which surround us, are transported on our skin, and commonly inhabit the human physiology as normal and imunosuppressed parasites. The fine balance which is maintained for the preponderance of our normal lives, save immune disorders and disease, is deregulated in microgravity. Thus analogue systems to study these potential Risks are essential for our progress in conquering Space exploration and habitation. In this study we employed two known physiological target tissues in which the reactivation of hCMV and VZV occurs, human neural and lung systems created for the study and interaction of these herpes viruses independently and simultaneously on the innate immune system. Normal human neural and lung tissue analogues called tissue like assemblies (TLAs) were infected with low MOIs of approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) pfu hCMV or VZV and established active but prolonged low grade infections which spanned .7-1.5 months in length. These infections were characterized by the ability to continuously produce each of the viruses without expiration of the host cultures. Verification and quantification of viral replication was confirmed via RT_PCR, IHC, and confocal spectral analyses of the respective essential viral genomes. All host TLAs maintained the ability to actively proliferate throughout the entire duration of the experiments as is analogous to normal in vivo physiological conditions. These data represent a significant advance in the ability to study the triggering

  14. Epstein-Barr virus and its association with Fascin expression in colorectal cancers in the Syrian population: A tissue microarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Antary, Noor; Farghaly, Hanan; Aboulkassim, Tahar; Yasmeen, Amber; Akil, Nizar; Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2017-07-03

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignancy in both men and women worldwide. Colorectal carcinogenesis is a complex, multistep process involving environmental and lifestyle features as well as sequential genetic changes in addition to bacterial and viral infections. Viral infection has a proven role in the incidence of approximately 20% of human cancers including gastric malignancies. Accordingly, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been recently shown to be present in human gastric cancers, which could play an important role in the initiation and progression of these cancers. Therefore, this work explores the prevalence of EBV in 102 CRC tissues from the Syrian population using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and tissue microarray (TMA) analysis. We found that EBV is present in 37 (36.27%) of CRC samples. Additionally, the expression of LMP1 onco-protein of EBV was found to be correlated with Fascin expression/overexpression in the majority of CRC tissue samples, which are intermediate/high grade invasive carcinomas. Our data indicate that EBV is present in CRC and its presence is associated with more aggressive cancer phenotype. Consequently, future investigations are needed to expose the role of EBV in CRC initiation and progression.

  15. The Importance of the KR-Rich Region of the Coat Protein of Ourmia melon virus for Host Specificity, Tissue Tropism, and Interference With Antiviral Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Marika; Vallino, Marta; Abbà, Simona; Ciuffo, Marina; Balestrini, Raffaella; Genre, Andrea; Turina, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal region of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) coat protein (CP) contains a short lysine/arginine-rich (KR) region. By alanine scanning mutagenesis, we showed that the KR region influences pathogenicity and virulence of OuMV without altering viral particle assembly. A mutant, called OuMV6710, with three basic residue substitutions in the KR region, was impaired in the ability to maintain the initial systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and to infect both cucumber and melon plants systemically. The integrity of this protein region was also crucial for encapsidation of viral genomic RNA; in fact, certain mutations within the KR region partially compromised the RNA encapsidation efficiency of the CP. In Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0, OuMV6710 was impaired in particle accumulation; however, this phenotype was abolished in dcl2/dcl4 and dcl2/dcl3/dcl4 Arabidopsis mutants defective for antiviral silencing. Moreover, in contrast to CPwt, in situ immunolocalization experiments indicated that CP6710 accumulates efficiently in the spongy mesophyll tissue of infected N. benthamiana and A. thaliana leaves but only occasionally infects palisade tissues. These results provided strong evidence of a crucial role for OuMV CP during viral infection and highlighted the relevance of the KR region in determining tissue tropism, host range, pathogenicity, and RNA affinity, which may be all correlated with a possible CP silencing-suppression activity.

  16. Controlled multiple growth factor delivery from bone tissue engineering scaffolds via designed affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-González, Darilis; Lee, Jae Sung; Diggs, Alisha; Lu, Yan; Nemke, Brett; Markel, Mark; Hollister, Scott J; Murphy, William L

    2014-08-01

    It is known that angiogenesis plays an important role in bone regeneration and that release of angiogenic and osteogenic growth factors can enhance bone formation. Multiple growth factors play key roles in processes that lead to tissue formation/regeneration during natural tissue development and repair. Therefore, treatments aiming to mimic tissue regeneration can benefit from multiple growth factor release, and there remains a need for simple clinically relevant approaches for dual growth factor release. We hypothesized that mineral coatings could be used as a platform for controlled incorporation and release of multiple growth factors. Specifically, mineral-coated scaffolds were "dip coated" in multiple growth factor solutions, and growth factor binding and release were dictated by the growth factor-mineral binding affinity. Beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffolds were fabricated using indirect solid-free form fabrication techniques and coated with a thin conformal mineral layer. Mineral-coated β-TCP scaffolds were sequentially dipped in recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) and a modular bone morphogenetic peptide, a mineral-binding version of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), solutions to allow for the incorporation of each growth factor. The dual release profile showed sustained release of both growth factors for over more than 60 days. Scaffolds releasing either rhVEGF alone or the combination of growth factors showed an increase in blood vessel ingrowth in a dose-dependent manner in a sheep intramuscular implantation model. This approach demonstrates a "modular design" approach, in which a controllable biologics carrier is integrated into a structural scaffold as a thin surface coating.

  17. Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengjie; Su, Xin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Bin; Sun, Wei; Mi, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering. PMID:27091175

  18. Experimental West Nile Virus Infection in Rabbits: An Alternative Model for Studying Induction of Disease and Virus Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Willy W; Uddin, Muhammad J; Wang, Wenqi; Brown, Vienna; Adney, Danielle R; Broad, Nicole; Prow, Natalie A; Bowen, Richard A; Hall, Roy A; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2015-07-14

    The economic impact of non-lethal human and equine West Nile virus (WNV) disease is substantial, since it is the most common presentation of the infection. Experimental infection with virulent WNV strains in the mouse and hamster models frequently results in severe neural infection and moderate to high mortality, both of which are not representative features of most human and equine infections. We have established a rabbit model for investigating pathogenesis and immune response of non-lethal WNV infection. Two species of rabbits, New Zealand White (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and North American cottontail (Sylvilagus sp.), were experimentally infected with virulent WNV and Murray Valley encephalitis virus strains. Infected rabbits exhibited a consistently resistant phenotype, with evidence of low viremia, minimal-absent neural infection, mild-moderate neuropathology, and the lack of mortality, even though productive virus replication occurred in the draining lymph node. The kinetics of anti-WNV neutralizing antibody response was comparable to that commonly seen in infected horses and humans. This may be explained by the early IFNα/β and/or γ response evident in the draining popliteal lymph node. Given this similarity to the human and equine disease, immunocompetent rabbits are, therefore, a valuable animal model for investigating various aspects of non-lethal WNV infections.

  19. Experimental West Nile Virus Infection in Rabbits: An Alternative Model for Studying Induction of Disease and Virus Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willy W. Suen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The economic impact of non-lethal human and equine West Nile virus (WNV disease is substantial, since it is the most common presentation of the infection. Experimental infection with virulent WNV strains in the mouse and hamster models frequently results in severe neural infection and moderate to high mortality, both of which are not representative features of most human and equine infections. We have established a rabbit model for investigating pathogenesis and immune response of non-lethal WNV infection. Two species of rabbits, New Zealand White (Oryctolagus cuniculus and North American cottontail (Sylvilagus sp., were experimentally infected with virulent WNV and Murray Valley encephalitis virus strains. Infected rabbits exhibited a consistently resistant phenotype, with evidence of low viremia, minimal-absent neural infection, mild-moderate neuropathology, and the lack of mortality, even though productive virus replication occurred in the draining lymph node. The kinetics of anti-WNV neutralizing antibody response was comparable to that commonly seen in infected horses and humans. This may be explained by the early IFNα/β and/or γ response evident in the draining popliteal lymph node. Given this similarity to the human and equine disease, immunocompetent rabbits are, therefore, a valuable animal model for investigating various aspects of non-lethal WNV infections.

  20. Intramuscular Connective Tissue Differences in Spastic and Control Muscle: A Mechanical and Histological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J.; Kreulen, Michiel; Huijing, Peter A.; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) from CP patients (n = 29) and healthy controls (n = 10). The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05) and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190) in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322). However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold), i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n = 4 out of 23) did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients. PMID:24977410

  1. Intramuscular connective tissue differences in spastic and control muscle: a mechanical and histological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije de Bruin

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU from CP patients (n = 29 and healthy controls (n = 10. The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05 and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190 in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322. However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold, i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n = 4 out of 23 did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients.

  2. Intramuscular connective tissue differences in spastic and control muscle: a mechanical and histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J; Kreulen, Michiel; Huijing, Peter A; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) from CP patients (n = 29) and healthy controls (n = 10). The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05) and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190) in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322). However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold), i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n = 4 out of 23) did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients.

  3. Control of pore size and structure of tissue engineering scaffolds produced by supercritical fluid processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Tai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering scaffolds require a controlled pore size and structure to host tissue formation. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 processing may be used to form foamed scaffolds in which the escape of CO2 from a plasticized polymer melt generates gas bubbles that shape the developing pores. The process of forming these scaffolds involves a simultaneous change in phase in the CO2 and the polymer, resulting in rapid expansion of a surface area and changes in polymer rheological properties. Hence, the process is difficult to control with respect to the desired final pore size and structure. In this paper, we describe a detailed study of the effect of polymer chemical composition, molecular weight and processing parameters on final scaffold characteristics. The study focuses on poly(DL-lactic acid (PDLLA and poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA as polymer classes with potential application as controlled release scaffolds for growth factor delivery. Processing parameters under investigation were temperature (from 5 to 55oC and pressure (from 60 to 230 bar. A series of amorphous PDLLA and PLGA polymers with various molecular weights (from 13 KD to 96 KD and/or chemical compositions (the mole percentage of glycolic acid in the polymers was 0, 15, 25, 35 and 50 respectively were employed. The resulting scaffolds were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and micro X-ray computed tomography (µCT. This is the first detailed study on using these series polymers for scaffold formation by supercritical technique. This study has demonstrated that the pore size and structure of the supercritical PDLLA and PLGA scaffolds can be tailored by careful control of processing conditions.

  4. Complex genetic structure of the rabies virus in Bangkok and its surrounding provinces, Thailand: implications for canine rabies control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Ruankaew, Nipada; Hoonsuwan, Wirongrong; Puanghat, Apirom; Sakarasaeranee, Plyyonk; Briggs, Deborrah; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2006-03-01

    Dog vaccination and population management have been suggested as priorities in attempts at disease control in canine rabies-endemic countries. Budget limitations and the complexity of social, cultural and religious variables have complicated progress in the developing world. In Bangkok, Thailand, an intensive canine vaccination and sterilization programme has been in place since November 2002. Our objective was to determine if the rabies virus could be mapped according to its genetic variations and geographical location on the small localized scale of Bangkok and its surrounding provinces. Phylogenetic characterization of 69 samples from Bangkok and five neighbouring and two remote provinces, by limited sequence analysis of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene, distinguished six different clades. Rabies viruses of four clades were intermixed in Bangkok and in the surrounding highly populated regions whereas the other two clades were confined to rural and less populated provinces. Such a complex pattern of gene flow, particularly in Bangkok, may affect the outcome of canine control programmes.

  5. Determinants in HIV-1 Nef for enhancement of virus replication and depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel Serkan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef critically contributes to AIDS in part by augmenting virus titers in infected individuals. Analyzing which of Nef's activities contribute to HIV pathogenesis has been hampered by the lack of a cell culture model in which Nef exerts pronounced effects on HIV replication. The human lymphoid aggregate culture (HLAC from tonsil maintains the cell populations and cytokine milieu found in vivo, supports a productive infection without exogenous stimulation, and Nef contributes to efficient HIV-1 replication as well as CD4+ T cell depletion in this experimental ex vivo-model. Results To identify determinants in Nef that mediate these activities, we infected HLAC with a panel of isogenic HIV-1NL4-3 strains that encode for well-characterized mutants of HIV-1SF2 Nef. Determination of HIV-1 replication revealed that enhancement of the virus spread by Nef is governed by a complex set of protein interaction surfaces. In contrast, increased CD4+ T lymphocyte depletion depended on only two protein interaction surfaces in Nef that mediate either downregulation of cell surface CD4 or interaction with the NAKC signalosome. Consistently, in HLAC from 9 out of 14 donors, Nef enhanced CD4+ T cell depletion in the absence of a significant effect on virus replication. Moreover, our results suggest that this Nef-dependent enhancement in depletion occurred predominately in uninfected bystander CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that Nef facilitates depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes in HIV-1-infected lymphoid tissue ex vivo by increasing the pool of productively infected cells and by sensitizing bystander cells for killing. This ability might contribute to Nef's pathogenic potential in vivo.

  6. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in tissue culture fluid and in genital secretions by the spermicide benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainberg, M A; Spira, B; Bleau, G; Thomas, R

    1990-01-01

    We have shown that the spermicidal agent benzalkonium chloride can exert a direct inhibitory effect on the viral reverse transcriptase activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) when utilized at concentrations of 0.05% and higher. Exposure of HIV-1 to this disinfectant at concentrations of more than 0.05% was able to completely destroy viral infectivity, as assessed on susceptible target cells. We have further shown that HIV-1, which is present in both seminal and genital secretions, can be inactivated in such fluids by direct exposure to benzalkonium chloride. PMID:1688873

  7. Hypertrophy, hyperplasia, and infectious virus in gut-associated lymphoid tissue of mice after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C A; Dolfi, D V; Di Vietro, M L; Heaton, P A; Offit, P A; Clark, H F

    2001-04-01

    Oral inoculation of infants with a vaccine that contains simian-human reassortant rotaviruses has been found to be a rare cause of intussusception. Because intussusception can be associated with enlargement of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, we studied the capacity of simian-human and bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses to cause lymphoid hypertrophy and hyperplasia of Peyer's patches (PP) of adult BALB/c mice. Neither hypertrophy nor hyperplasia was detected in PP after oral inoculation with simian-human or bovine-human reassortant rotaviruses. However, infectious virus was detected in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes after oral inoculation with simian, but not bovine, reassortant rotaviruses. Implications of these findings on the pathogenesis of intussusception are discussed.

  8. Defective glucose and lipid metabolism in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy involve liver, muscle tissue and pancreatic beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    of glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism and beta-cell function in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients. METHODS: [3-3H]glucose was applied during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamps in association with indirect calorimetry in 43 normoglycaemic HIV-infected patients (18 lipodystrophic patients on HAART (LIPO....... CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that normoglycaemic lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism in multiple pathways involving liver, muscle tissue and beta-cell function.......OBJECTIVES: Lipodystrophy and insulin resistance are prevalent among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients on combined antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Aiming to provide a detailed description of the metabolic adverse effects of HIV-lipodystrophy, we investigated several aspects...

  9. Tissue tropisms, infection kinetics, histologic lesions, and antibody response of the MR766 strain of Zika virus in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawiecki, Anna B; Mayton, E Handly; Dutuze, M Fausta; Goupil, Brad A; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Del Piero, Fabio; Christofferson, Rebecca C

    2017-04-18

    The appearance of severe Zika virus (ZIKV) disease in the most recent outbreak has prompted researchers to respond through the development of tools to quickly characterize transmission and pathology. We describe here another such tool, a mouse model of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis using the MR766 strain of virus that adds to the growing body of knowledge regarding ZIKV kinetics in small animal models. We infected mice with the MR766 strain of ZIKV to determine infection kinetics via serum viremia. We further evaluated infection-induced lesions via histopathology and visualized viral antigen via immunohistochemical labeling. We also investigated the antibody response of recovered animals to both the MR766 and a strain from the current outbreak (PRVABC59). We demonstrate that the IRF3/7 DKO mouse is a susceptible, mostly non-lethal model well suited for the study of infection kinetics, pathological progression, and antibody response. Infected mice presented lesions in tissues that have been associated with ZIKV infection in the human population, such as the eyes, male gonads, and central nervous system. In addition, we demonstrate that infection with the MR766 strain produces cross-neutralizing antibodies to the PRVABC59 strain of the Asian lineage. This model provides an additional tool for future studies into the transmission routes of ZIKV, as well as for the development of antivirals and other therapeutics, and should be included in the growing list of available tools for investigations of ZIKV infection and pathogenesis.

  10. Sensitive Detection of Measles Virus Infection in the Blood and Tissues of Humanized Mouse by One-step Quantitative RT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota eIkeno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Live attenuated measles virus (MV has long been recognized as a safe and effective vaccine, and it has served as the basis for development of various MV-based vaccines. However, because MV is a human-tropic virus, the evaluation of MV-based vaccines has been hampered by the lack of a small-animal model. The humanized mouse, a recently developed system in which an immunodeficient mouse is transplanted with human fetal tissues or hematopoietic stem cells, may represent a suitable model. Here, we developed a sensitive one-step quantitative reverse transcription (qRT PCR that simultaneously measures nucleocapsid (N and human RNase P mRNA levels. The results can be used to monitor MV infection in a humanized mouse model. Using this method, we elucidated the replication kinetics of MV expressing EGFP both in vitro and in humanized mice in parallel with flow-cytometric analysis. Because our qRT-PCR system was sensitive enough to detect MV expression using RNA extracted from a small number of cells, it can be used to monitor MV infection in humanized mice by sequential blood sampling.

  11. Viral replication in excised fin tissues (VREFT) corresponds with prior exposure of Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii (Valenciennes), to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, C A; Gregg, J L; Wade, R M; Winton, J R; Hershberger, P K

    2011-01-01

    Procedures for a viral replication in excised fin tissue (VREFT) assay were adapted to Pacific herring, Clupea pallasii, and optimized both to reduce processing time and to provide the greatest resolution between naïve herring and those previously exposed to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), Genogroup IVa. The optimized procedures included removal of the left pectoral fin from a euthanized fish, inoculation of the fin with >10(5) plaque-forming units (PFU) mL(-1) VHSV for 1 h, rinsing the fin in fresh medium six times to remove unadsorbed virions, incubation of the fin in fresh medium for 4 days and enumeration of the viral titre in a sample of the incubation medium by plaque assay. The optimized VREFT assay was effective at identifying the prior exposure history of laboratory-reared Pacific herring to VHSV. The geometric mean VREFT value was significantly greater (P < 0.01) among naïve herring (1.2 × 10(3) PFU mL(-1) ) than among groups that survived exposure to VHSV (1.0-2.9 × 10(2) PFU mL(-1) ); additionally, the proportion of cultures with no detectable virus was significantly greater (P = 0.0002) among fish that survived exposure to VHSV (39-47%) than among naïve fish (3.3%). The optimized VREFT assay demonstrates promise for identifying VHSV exposure history and forecasting disease potential in populations of wild Pacific herring.

  12. Deceased tissue donor serology and molecular testing for HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses: a lack of cadaveric validated tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victer, Thayssa Neiva da Fonseca; Dos Santos, Cris Stéphany Rodrigues; Báo, Sônia Nair; Sampaio, Thatiane Lima

    2016-12-01

    Vital to patient safety is the accurate assessment and minimization of risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis C (HCV), and Hepatitis B (HBV) virus transmission by deceased donor organ and tissue transplantation. The pathogens are tested by serological kits based on enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chemiluminescence (CLIA) and eletrochemiluminescence (ECLIA) immunoassays. Organ transplantation is a highly successful life-saving treatment in Brazil, but the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency currently mandates that all deceased organ donors are screened for HIV, HCV and HBV following living donor policies. In this review, six ELISA (Wama(®), Bio-Rad(®), Biomerieux(®), DiaSorin(®), Acon Biotech(®) and Biokit(®)), three CLIA (Abbott(®), Siemens(®), Diasorin(®)) and one ECLIA (Roche(®)) were utilized for evaluating the effectiveness of those serological tests for deceased donors in Brazil according to manufacturer's guidelines. NAT for HIV, HCV and HBV can assist with detection of pre-seroconversion for those infections, and only Cobas(®) TaqScreen MPX(®) test, the Tigris System(®) Procleix Ultrio Assay(®) and the Bio-Manguinhos(®) HIV/HCV/HBV NAT are commercially available. Between all the tests, only the manufacturer Abbott(®) and Cobas(®) TaqScreen MPX(®) test are currently validated for cadaver samples.

  13. Weaning infants with respiratory syncytial virus from mechanical ventilation through a fuzzy-logic controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olliver, S; Davis, G M; Hatzakis, G E

    2003-01-01

    We have previously developed a fuzzy logic controller for weaning adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using pressure support ventilation (PSV). We used the core of our fuzzy logic-based weaning platform and further developed parametrizable components for weaning newborns of differing body size and disease-state. The controller was validated on neonates recovering from congenital heart disease (CHD) while receiving synchronous intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). We wished to compare the efficacy of this controller versus the bedside weaning protocol in children with respiratory syncytial virus pneumonitis/bronchiolitis (RSV) in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). The fuzzy controller evaluated the "current" and "trend" weaning status of the newborn to quantitatively determine the change in the SIMV integrated ventilatory setting. For the "current" status it used heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT) and oxygen saturation (SaO2), while for the "trend" status the differences of deltaRR/ deltat, deltaHR/ deltat, and deltaSaO2/ deltat recorded between two subsequent time points were utilized. The enumerated vital signs were fuzzified and then probability levels of occurrence were assigned. Individualized "golden" goals for SaO2 were set for each newborn. We retrospectively assessed the charts of 19 newborns, 113+/-128 days old, 5,546+/-2,321 gr body weight, weaning for 99+/-46 days, at 2-hour intervals. The SIMV levels proposed by the fuzzy controller were matched to those levels actually applied. In 60% of the time both values coincided. For the remaining 40%, the controller was more aggressive suggesting lower values of SIMV than the applied ones. The Area under the SIMV curves over time was 1,969+/-1,044 for the applied vs 1,886+/-978 for the suggested levels, respectively. The fuzzy controller adjusted for body size and disease-pattern can approximate the actual weaning course of newborns with RSV.

  14. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration: Wnt signaling and stem cell control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-10-03

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified, which constrains them to act as short-range cellular signals. The locality of Wnt signaling dictates that stem cells exiting the Wnt signaling domain differentiate, spatially delimiting the niche in certain tissues. In some instances, stem cells may act as or generate their own niche, enabling the self-organization of patterned tissues. In this Review, we discuss the various ways by which Wnt operates in stem cell control and, in doing so, identify an integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration.

  15. ALK5-mediated transforming growth factor β signaling in neural crest cells controls craniofacial muscle development via tissue-tissue interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Arum; Zhao, Hu; Li, Jingyuan; Pelikan, Richard; Chai, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The development of the craniofacial muscles requires reciprocal interactions with surrounding craniofacial tissues that originate from cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs). However, the molecular mechanism involved in the tissue-tissue interactions between CNCCs and muscle progenitors during craniofacial muscle development is largely unknown. In the current study, we address how CNCCs regulate the development of the tongue and other craniofacial muscles using Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice, in which loss of Alk5 in CNCCs results in severely disrupted muscle formation. We found that Bmp4 is responsible for reduced proliferation of the myogenic progenitor cells in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice during early myogenesis. In addition, Fgf4 and Fgf6 ligands were reduced in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice and are critical for differentiation of the myogenic cells. Addition of Bmp4 or Fgf ligands rescues the proliferation and differentiation defects in the craniofacial muscles of Alk5 mutant mice in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that CNCCs play critical roles in controlling craniofacial myogenic proliferation and differentiation through tissue-tissue interactions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Ebola Virus Diagnostics: The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Laboratory in Sierra Leone, August 2014 to March 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Mike; Goodman, Christin H; Bearden, Scott; Blau, Dianna M; Amman, Brian R; Basile, Alison J; Belser, Jessica A; Bergeron, Éric; Bowen, Michael D; Brault, Aaron C; Campbell, Shelley; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Dodd, Kimberly A; Erickson, Bobbie R; Freeman, Molly M; Gibbons, Aridth; Guerrero, Lisa W; Klena, John D; Lash, R Ryan; Lo, Michael K; McMullan, Laura K; Momoh, Gbetuwa; Massally, James L; Goba, Augustine; Paddock, Christopher D; Priestley, Rachael A; Pyle, Meredith; Rayfield, Mark; Russell, Brandy J; Salzer, Johanna S; Sanchez, Angela J; Schuh, Amy J; Sealy, Tara K; Steinau, Martin; Stoddard, Robyn A; Taboy, Céline; Turnsek, Maryann; Wang, David; Zemtsova, Galina E; Zivcec, Marko; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Ströher, Ute; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T; Bird, Brian H

    2015-10-01

    In August 2014, the Viral Special Pathogens Branch of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention established a field laboratory in Sierra Leone in response to the ongoing Ebola virus outbreak. Through March 2015, this laboratory tested >12 000 specimens from throughout Sierra Leone. We describe the organization and procedures of the laboratory located in Bo, Sierra Leone.

  17. Preparedness of institutions around the world for managing patients with Ebola virus disease: an infection control readiness checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tartari, E.; Allegranzi, B.; Ang, B.; Calleja, N.; Collignon, P.; Hopman, J.; Lang, L.; Lee, L.C.; Ling, M.L.; Mehtar, S.; Tambyah, P.A.; Widmer, A.; Voss, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In response to global concerns about the largest Ebola virus disease (EVD), outbreak to-date in West Africa documented healthcare associated transmission and the risk of global spread, the International Society of Chemotherapy (ISC) Infection Control Working Group created an Ebola Infect

  18. Placebo-controlled evaluation of a modified life virus vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis: safety and efficacy under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Fehr, D.; Holznagel, E.; Bolla, S.; Hauser, B.; Herrewegh, A.A.; Lutz, Hans

    1997-01-01

    A modified live virus vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) was evaluated in a double blind, placebo-controlled field trial in two high-risk populations. The vaccine was found to be safe and efficacious in one population of cats that had low antibody titre against feline coronavirus (F

  19. Preparedness of institutions around the world for managing patients with Ebola virus disease: an infection control readiness checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tartari, E.; Allegranzi, B.; Ang, B.; Calleja, N.; Collignon, P.; Hopman, J.; Lang, L.; Lee, L.C.; Ling, M.L.; Mehtar, S.; Tambyah, P.A.; Widmer, A.; Voss, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In response to global concerns about the largest Ebola virus disease (EVD), outbreak to-date in West Africa documented healthcare associated transmission and the risk of global spread, the International Society of Chemotherapy (ISC) Infection Control Working Group created an Ebola

  20. Signalling crosstalk at the leading edge controls tissue closure dynamics in the Drosophila embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballès, Fabrice; Parassol, Nadège; Schaub, Sébastien; Cérézo, Delphine; Noselli, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis relies on proper differentiation of morphogenetic domains, adopting specific cell behaviours. Yet, how signalling pathways interact to determine and coordinate these domains remains poorly understood. Dorsal closure (DC) of the Drosophila embryo represents a powerful model to study epithelial cell sheet sealing. In this process, JNK (JUN N-terminal Kinase) signalling controls leading edge (LE) differentiation generating local forces and cell shape changes essential for DC. The LE represents a key morphogenetic domain in which, in addition to JNK, a number of signalling pathways converges and interacts (anterior/posterior -AP- determination; segmentation genes, such as Wnt/Wingless; TGFβ/Decapentaplegic). To better characterize properties of the LE morphogenetic domain, we sought out new JNK target genes through a genomic approach: 25 were identified of which 8 are specifically expressed in the LE, similarly to decapentaplegic or puckered. Quantitative in situ gene profiling of this new set of LE genes reveals complex patterning of the LE along the AP axis, involving a three-way interplay between the JNK pathway, segmentation and HOX genes. Patterning of the LE into discrete domains appears essential for coordination of tissue sealing dynamics. Loss of anterior or posterior HOX gene function leads to strongly delayed and asymmetric DC, due to incorrect zipping in their respective functional domain. Therefore, in addition to significantly increasing the number of JNK target genes identified so far, our results reveal that the LE is a highly heterogeneous morphogenetic organizer, sculpted through crosstalk between JNK, segmental and AP signalling. This fine-tuning regulatory mechanism is essential to coordinate morphogenesis and dynamics of tissue sealing. PMID:28231245

  1. Impaired virus control and severe CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology in chimeric mice deficient in gamma interferon receptor expression on both parenchymal and hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Pernille; Bartholdy, Christina; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2005-01-01

    Bone marrow chimeras were used to determine the cellular target(s) for the antiviral activity of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). By transfusing such mice with high numbers of naive virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, a system was created in which the majority of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells would...... virus completely lack the ability to control the infection and develop severe wasting disease. Further, the study shows that IFN-gamma receptor expression on parenchymal cells in the viscera is more important for virus control than IFN-gamma receptor expression on bone marrow-derived cells....

  2. The rectal microbiota of cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus infection and uninfected controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, J S; Nichols, J; Jalali, M; Litster, A

    2015-10-22

    Rectal swabs were collected from 31 cats, 16 with FIV infection and 15 uninfected controls, to evaluate and compare the rectal bacterial microbiota in cats with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection and uninfected controls. The rectal microbiota was characterized via next generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene (V4 region) polymerase chain reaction products. Eighteen different phyla were identified. Firmicutes dominated in both groups, followed by Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, but there were no significant differences between groups. When predominant orders are compared, FIV-infected cats had significant higher median relative abundances of Bifidobacteriales (P=0.022), Lactobacillales (P=0.022) and Aeromonadales (P=0.043). No differences were identified in the 50 most common genera when adjusted for false discovery rate. There were significant differences in community membership (Jaccard index, unifrac P=0.008, AMOVA Pmicrobiota differed between cats with FIV infection and uninfected controls. Some of the changes that were noted have been associated with 'dysbiosis' and proinflammatory states in other species, so it is possible that subclinical alteration in the intestinal microbiota could influence the health of FIV-infected cats. Evaluation of the reasons for microbiota alteration and the potential impact on cat health is required.

  3. Distribution of viral antigen gp85 and provirus in various tissues from commercial meat-type and experimental white leghorn line 0 chickens with different subgroup J avian leukosis virus infection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to test for the presence of subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV J) envelope antigen gp85 and provirus, respectively in various tissues (adrenal gland, bone marrow, gonad, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, proventriculus, s...

  4. Advance on Virus-free Plant Tissue Culture and its Application on Crocus sativus L.%植物组培脱毒技术及其在药用植物藏红花中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军; 高广春; 李白; 朱志明

    2014-01-01

    The technique of virus elimination in plant tissue culture can eliminate the virus, rejuvenate, and improve yield and quality of plants. This paper summarized the virus-free methods and its application in the recent years, discussed the virus-free methods used in medicinal plant Crocus sativus L..%植物组培脱毒技术可以脱除患病毒病植株的病毒,起到植株复壮,提高产量及质量的作用。综述了植物组织培养脱毒的技术方法及其近几年的应用情况,同时针对药用植物藏红花脱毒球茎培育中应用的脱毒技术做了总结及探讨。

  5. Comparative studies on the pathogenicity and tissue distribution of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus, two field isolates and one vaccine strain, with special regard to immunohistochemical investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderhallen Hans

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare the tissue distribution and pathogenicity of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus (CSFV and to investigate the applicability of various conventional diagnostic procedures. Methods 64 pigs were divided into three groups and infected with the highly virulent isolate ISS/60, the moderately virulent isolate Wingene'93 and the live attenuated vaccine strain Riems, respectively. Clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes were compared in relation to time elapsed post infection. Virus spread in various organs was followed by virus isolation, by immunohistochemistry, applying monoclonal antibodies in a two-step method and by in situ hybridisation using a digoxigenin-labelled riboprobe. Results The tissue distribution data are discussed in details, analyzing the results of the various diagnostic approaches. The comparative studies revealed remarkable differences in the onset of clinical signs as well as in the development of the macro- and microscopical changes, and in the tissue distribution of CSFV in the three experimental groups. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that in the case of highly and moderately virulent virus variants the virulence does not affect the pattern of the viral spread, however, it influences the outcome, the duration and the intensity of the disease. Immunohistochemistry has the advantage to allow the rapid detection and localisation of the virus, especially in cases of early infection, when clinical signs are still absent. Compared to virus isolation, the advantage of this method is that no cell culture facilities are required. Thus, immunohistochemistry provides simple and sensitive tools for the prompt detection of newly emerging variants of CSFV, including the viruses of very mild virulence.

  6. Comparative studies on the pathogenicity and tissue distribution of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus, two field isolates and one vaccine strain, with special regard to immunohistochemical investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belák, Katinka; Koenen, Frank; Vanderhallen, Hans; Mittelholzer, Christian; Feliziani, Francesco; De Mia, Gian Mario; Belák, Sándor

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the tissue distribution and pathogenicity of three virulence variants of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and to investigate the applicability of various conventional diagnostic procedures. Methods 64 pigs were divided into three groups and infected with the highly virulent isolate ISS/60, the moderately virulent isolate Wingene'93 and the live attenuated vaccine strain Riems, respectively. Clinical signs, gross and histopathological changes were compared in relation to time elapsed post infection. Virus spread in various organs was followed by virus isolation, by immunohistochemistry, applying monoclonal antibodies in a two-step method and by in situ hybridisation using a digoxigenin-labelled riboprobe. Results The tissue distribution data are discussed in details, analyzing the results of the various diagnostic approaches. The comparative studies revealed remarkable differences in the onset of clinical signs as well as in the development of the macro- and microscopical changes, and in the tissue distribution of CSFV in the three experimental groups. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that in the case of highly and moderately virulent virus variants the virulence does not affect the pattern of the viral spread, however, it influences the outcome, the duration and the intensity of the disease. Immunohistochemistry has the advantage to allow the rapid detection and localisation of the virus, especially in cases of early infection, when clinical signs are still absent. Compared to virus isolation, the advantage of this method is that no cell culture facilities are required. Thus, immunohistochemistry provides simple and sensitive tools for the prompt detection of newly emerging variants of CSFV, including the viruses of very mild virulence. PMID:18775072

  7. PCR detection of JC virus DNA in the brain tissue of a 9-year-old child with pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldorini, R; Caldarelli-Stefano, R; Monga, G; Zocchi, M; Mediati, M; Tosoni, A; Ferrante, P

    1998-04-01

    Pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) is a rare cerebral tumor of young adults with a slow growth and a good prognosis. Due to its peculiar histopathological findings, the tumor resemble to the lytic phase of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a JC Virus (JCV) induced disease. For these reasons, the presence of JCV genoma and viral particles were searched for by means of nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and electron microscopy (EM) in a 9-year-old child with PXA. Although EM did not reveal any viral particles, nPCR did reveal genomic sequences of the LT, R, and VP1 regions of JCV. Sequence analysis showed that the R region was mutated with respect to the archetypal form thus yielding the Mad 4 variant of JCV previously reported as being oncogenic in animals. We suggest that JCV may have played a role in the development of this tumor.

  8. Taphonomic marks on pig tissue due to cadaveric Coleoptera activity under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Noelia I; Visciarelli, Elena C; Centeno, Néstor D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study taphonomic marks that cadaveric coleopteran can produce under controlled conditions. To evaluate this, pig trotters were initially exposed to adults of Dermestes maculatus De Geer at 21 ± 5°C and a 12:12-h day/night cycle. Observations were made and photographs taken every 4-5 days for 9 months. When feeding and reproducing, D. maculatus produced, in both adult and larvae stages, different types of marks such as holes, striations, scratches, and pits in several kinds of tissue such as integumental, connective, and muscular, in both their fresh and dried stages. Bite marks were also evident. The results in this study provide not only taphonomic but also biological and forensic information. This is the first time that this kind of experiment has been performed. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Periodontal tissue regeneration using fibroblast growth factor-2: randomized controlled phase II clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kitamura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The options for medical use of signaling molecules as stimulators of tissue regeneration are currently limited. Preclinical evidence suggests that fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 can promote periodontal regeneration. This study aimed to clarify the activity of FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration of periodontal tissue lost by periodontitis and to evaluate the safety of such stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used recombinant human FGF-2 with 3% hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC as vehicle and conducted a randomized double-blinded controlled trial involving 13 facilities. Subjects comprised 74 patients displaying a 2- or 3-walled vertical bone defect as measured > or = 3 mm apical to the bone crest. Patients were randomly assigned to 4 groups: Group P, given HPC with no FGF-2; Group L, given HPC containing 0.03% FGF-2; Group M, given HPC containing 0.1% FGF-2; and Group H, given HPC containing 0.3% FGF-2. Each patient underwent flap operation during which we administered 200 microL of the appropriate investigational drug to the bone defect. Before and for 36 weeks following administration, patients underwent periodontal tissue inspections and standardized radiography of the region under investigation. As a result, a significant difference (p = 0.021 in rate of increase in alveolar bone height was identified between Group P (23.92% and Group H (58.62% at 36 weeks. The linear increase in alveolar bone height at 36 weeks in Group P and H was 0.95 mm and 1.85 mm, respectively (p = 0.132. No serious adverse events attributable to the investigational drug were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Although no statistically significant differences were noted for gains in clinical attachment level and alveolar bone gain for FGF-2 groups versus Group P, the significant difference in rate of increase in alveolar bone height (p = 0.021 between Groups P and H at 36 weeks suggests that some efficacy could be expected from FGF-2 in stimulating regeneration

  10. Control of Tension-Compression Asymmetry in Ogden Hyperelasticity with Application to Soft Tissue Modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Nagel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses tension-compression asymmetry properties of Ogden hyperelastic formulations. It is shown that if all negative or all positive Ogden coefficients are used, tension-compression asymmetry occurs the degree of which cannot be separately controlled from the degree of non-linearity. A simple hybrid form is therefore proposed providing separate control over the tension-compression asymmetry. It is demonstrated how this form relates to a newly introduced generalised strain tensor class which encompasses both the tension-compression asymmetric Seth-Hill strain class and the tension-compression symmetric Ba\\v{z}ant strain class. If the control parameter is set to q=0.5 a tension-compression symmetric form involving Ba\\v{z}ant strains is obtained with the property {\\Psi}({\\lambda}_1,{\\lambda}_2,{\\lambda}_3 )={\\Psi}(1/{\\lambda}_1 ,1/{\\lambda}_2 ,1/{\\lambda}_3 ). The symmetric form may be desirable for the definition of ground matrix contributions in soft tissue modelling allowing all deviation from t...

  11. IRES-dependent translational control during virus-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eHanson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many virus infections and stresses can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response, a host self defense mechanism against viral invasion and stress. During this event, viral and cellular gene expression is actively regulated and often encounters a switching of the translation initiation from cap-dependent to IRES (internal ribosome entry sites-dependent. This switching is largely dependent on the mRNA structure of the 5’untranslated region (5’UTR and on the particular stress stimuli. Picornviruses and some other viruses contain an IRES within their 5’UTR of viral genome and employ an IRES-driven mechanism for translation initiation. Recently, a growing number of cellular genes involved in growth control, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were also found to contain one or more IRES within their long highly structured 5’UTRs. These genes initiate translation usually by a cap-dependent mechanism under normal physiological conditions; however, in certain environments, such as infection, starvation and heat shock they shift translation initiation to an IRES-dependent modality. Although the molecular mechanism is not entirely understood, a number of studies have revealed that several cellular biochemical processes are responsible for the switching of translation initiation to IRES-dependent. These include the cleavage of translation initiation factors by viral and/or host proteases, phosphorylation (inactivation of host factors for translation initiation, over-production of homologous proteins of cap-binding protein eIF4E, suppression of cap-binding protein eIF4E expression by specific microRNA, activation of enzymes for mRNA decapping, as well as others. Here, we summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for the switching of translation initiation, particularly for the proteins involved in cell survival and apoptosis in the ER stress pathways during viral infections.

  12. Simultaneous detection and identification of four cherry viruses by two step multiplex RT-PCR with an internal control of plant nad5 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorani, Md Salik; Awasthi, Prachi; Sharma, Maheshwar Prasad; Ram, Raja; Zaidi, Aijaz Asgar; Hallan, Vipin

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (mRT-PCR) was developed and standardized for the simultaneous detection of four cherry viruses: Cherry virus A (CVA, Genus; Capillovirus), Cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV, unassigned species of the Betaflexiviridae), Little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1, Genus; Closterovirus) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV, Genus; Ilarvirus) with nad5 as plant internal control. A reliable and quick method for total plant RNA extraction from pome and stone fruit trees was also developed. To minimize primer dimer formation, a single antisense primer for CVA and CNRMV was used. A mixture of random hexamer and oligo (dT) primer was used for cDNA synthesis, which was highly suited and economic for multiplexing. All four viruses were detected successfully by mRT-PCR in artificially created viral RNA mixture and field samples of sweet cherry. The identity of the viruses was confirmed by sequencing. The assay could detect above viruses in diluted cDNA (10(-4)) and RNA (10(-3), except PNRSV which was detected only till ten times lesser dilution). The developed mRT-PCR will not only be useful for the detection of viruses from single or multiple infections of sweet cherry plants but also for other stone and pome fruits. The developed method will be therefore quite helpful for virus indexing, plant quarantine and certification programs. This is the first report for the simultaneous detection of four cherry viruses by mRT-PCR.

  13. Laser Capture Microdissection of Cervical Human Papillomavirus Infections: Copy Number of the Virus in Cancerous and Normal Tissue and Heterogeneous DNA Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Mina; Garcia-Carranca, Alejandro; Morales-Vazquez, Claudia Dalia; Zuna, Rosemary; Montiel, Delia Perez; Calleja-Macias, Itzel E.; Johansson, Bo; Andersson, Sonia; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Research on the pathogenicity of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) during cervical carcinogenesis often relies on the study of homogenized tissue or cultured cells. This approach does not detect molecular heterogeneities within the infected tissue. It is desirable to understand molecular properties in specific histological contexts. We asked whether Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) of archival cervical tumors in combination with real-time polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing permits (i) sensitive DNA diagnosis of small clusters of formalin fixed cells, (ii) quantification of HPV DNA in neoplastic and normal cells, and (iii) analysis of HPV DNA methylation, a marker of tumor progression. We analyzed 26 tumors containing HPV-16 or 18. We prepared DNA from LCM dissected thin sections of 100 to 2000 cells, and analyzed aliquots corresponding to between nine and 70 cells. We detected nine to 630 HPV-16 genome copies and one to 111 HPV-18 genome copies per tumor cell, respectively. In 17 of the 26 samples, HPV DNA existed in histologically normal cells distant from the margins of the tumors, but at much lower concentrations than in the tumor, suggesting that HPVs can infect at low levels without pathogenic changes. Methylation of HPV DNA, a biomarker of integration of the virus into cellular DNA, could be measured only in few samples due to limited sensitivity, and indicated heterogeneous methylation patterns in small clusters of cancerous and normal cells. LCM is powerful to study molecular parameters of cervical HPV infections like copy number, latency and epigenetics. PMID:19497607

  14. Resistencia transgénica para el control del virus motoso del enanismo de la frambuesa (raspberry bushy dwarf virus-rbdv Transgenic resistance for the control of raspberry bushy dwarf virus-rbdv

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel J.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available

    RBDV se transmite en asociación con polen y por lo tanto la resistencia genética de algunos cultivares del género Rubus ha sido la única medida de control efectivo. Sin embargo, recientemente apareció la cepa viral R-15 de RBDV, la cual rompió la resistencia natural existente en algunos cultivares comerciales de frambuesa. El principal objetivo de este proyecto fue medir la resistencia   transgénica a la infección con RBDV, la cual podría conferirse mediante diferentes secuencias de genes pertenecientes a este virus, adicionalmente, otro objetivo fue entender los mecanismos moleculares de resistencia transgénica que podrían ser generados por estos genes. Para medir la resistencia transgénica a RBDV, se introdujeron siete construcciones conteniendo secuencias génicas de RBDV dentro de Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediante conjugación de la bacteria («triparental mating» y los cultivos resultantes se usaron para transformar fragmentos de hojas de Nicotiana tabacum o fragmentos de tallo de plantas de Nicotiana benthamiana provenientes de invernadero o de cultivo de tejido. Se utilizaron plantas regeneradas a partir de cultivo de tejido en medio que contenía kanamicina para obtener semillas que dieron origen a plantas de la generación F1, las cuales se evaluaron para medir su resistencia a RBDV mediante la inoculación manual de hojas jóvenes y se analizaron para determinar el título de virus mediante ELISA después de 5 y 10 días post-inoculación. Se analizaron más de 20 líneas por cada construcción y los resultados mostraron que cada transgen introducido tuvo algún efecto de protección contra el virus. De esta manera, se obtuvo evidencia de la resistencia inducida por los genes correspondientes a la cápside, la antisecuencia y la polimerasa de RBDV

  15. CONTROL AND CANCEROUS TISSUES OF HUMAN STOMACH, SMALL INTESTINE AND LARGE INTESTINE - THE AVERAGE CONTENT OF SODIUM AND POTASSIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Głogowska

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sodium and potassium regulate the total amount of water in the body and the transmission of sodium into and out of individual cells also plays a role in critical body functions. The movement of sodium is critical in generation of these electrical signals. Research was conducted on samples taken from women and men aged 20-90 years, derived from the stomach, small intestine and large intestine. Samples were dried at 80ºC for 24 hours, and then increased temperature to 105ºC and dried for seven days until dry mass was obtained. All dry material of each sample was weighted and placed in a separate mineralization tubes and mixed with 1 cm3 of 65% HNO3 and heated at 105°C for 120 minutes in a thermostat-controlled digestion block, VELP Scientifica DK 20. Metals such as sodium and potassium were detected using FAAS method. The average content of sodium in patients diagnosed with stomach cancer is lower, than in healthy person. Indicate higher mean content of sodium in the control tissues of stomach (2151,730 μg•g-1d.m., compared to a sodium content in tissues adjacent to the tumor (1813,958 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (2029,442 μg•g-1d.m.. In the case of colon, control tissues have lower average content of sodium (2160,886 μg•g-1d.m., than the tissues surrounding the tumor (3325,963 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (3037,121 μg•g-1d.m.. The potassium level is higher in the control tissues of stomach (1428,993 μg•g-1d.m., than in the tissues adjacent to the tumor (1091,544 μg•g-1d.m. and tumor tissues (1220,471 μg•g-1d.m.. In the large intestine higher average content of potassium is characterized by tumor tissues (2307,234 μg•g-1d.m. and tissues adjacent to the tumor (1712,779 μg•g-1d.m., than control tissue (1389,703 μg•g-1d.m.. Comparing this relationship with data on potassium channels, it can be assumed that in the some case of malignant transformation in the colon, potassium channels also play a big role.

  16. Multicenter quality control of hepatitis C virus protease inhibitor resistance genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Sophie; Larrat, Sylvie; Laperche, Syria; Le Guillou-Guillemette, Hélène; Legrand-Abravanel, Florence; Bouchardeau, Françoise; Pivert, Adeline; Henquell, Cécile; Mirand, Audrey; André-Garnier, Elisabeth; Giordanengo, Valérie; Lagathu, Gisèle; Thibault, Vincent; Scholtes, Caroline; Schvoerer, Evelyne; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Maylin, Sarah; Trimoulet, Pascale; Brochot, Etienne; Hantz, Sébastien; Gozlan, Joël; Roque-Afonso, Anne-Marie; Soussan, Patrick; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Charpentier, Charlotte; Chevaliez, Stéphane; Colson, Philippe; Mackiewicz, Vincent; Aguilera, Lina; Rosec, Sylvain; Gouriou, Stéphanie; Magnat, Nelly; Lunel-Fabiani, Françoise; Izopet, Jacques; Morand, Patrice; Payan, Christopher; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitor resistance-associated substitutions are selected during triple-therapy breakthrough. This multicenter quality control study evaluated the expertise of 23 French laboratories in HCV protease inhibitor resistance genotyping. A panel of 12 well-defined blinded samples comprising two wild-type HCV strains, nine transcripts from synthetic NS3 mutant samples or from clinical strains, and one HCV RNA-negative sample was provided to the participating laboratories. The results showed that any laboratory with expertise in sequencing techniques should be able to provide reliable HCV protease inhibitor resistance genotyping. Only a 0.7% error rate was reported for the amino acid sites studied. The accuracy of substitution identification ranged from 75% to 100%, depending on the laboratory. Incorrect results were mainly related to the methodology used. The results could be improved by changing the primers and modifying the process in order to avoid cross-contamination. This study underlines the value of quality control programs for viral resistance genotyping, which is required prior to launching observational collaborative multicenter studies on HCV resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

  17. The Epidemic of Zika Virus-Related Microcephaly in Brazil: Detection, Control, Etiology, and Future Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Maria G; Costa, Maria da Conceição N; de Oliveira, Wanderson K; Nunes, Marilia Lavocat; Rodrigues, Laura C

    2016-04-01

    We describe the epidemic of microcephaly in Brazil, its detection and attempts to control it, the suspected causal link with Zika virus infection during pregnancy, and possible scenarios for the future. In October 2015, in Pernambuco, Brazil, an increase in the number of newborns with microcephaly was reported. Mothers of the affected newborns reported rashes during pregnancy and no exposure to other potentially teratogenic agents. Women delivering in October would have been in the first trimester of pregnancy during the peak of a Zika epidemic in March. By the end of 2015, 4180 cases of suspected microcephaly had been reported. Zika spread to other American countries and, in February 2016, the World Health Organization declared the Zika epidemic a public health emergency of international concern. This unprecedented situation underscores the urgent need to establish the evidence of congenital infection risk by gestational week and accrue knowledge. There is an urgent call for a Zika vaccine, better diagnostic tests, effective treatment, and improved mosquito-control methods.

  18. Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) in Dairy Cattle: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, G; Egocheaga, R M F; Hein, H E; Miranda, I C S; Neto, W S; Almeida, L L; Canal, C W; Stein, M C; Corbellini, L G

    2016-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes one of the most important diseases of cattle in terms of economic costs and welfare. The aims were to estimate herd prevalence and to investigate the factors associated with antibodies in bulk tank milk (BTM) in dairy herds through a matched case-control study. To estimate herd prevalence, BTM samples were randomly selected (n = 314) from a population (N = 1604). The true prevalence of BVDV was 24.3% (CI 95% = 20.1-29.3%). For the case-control study, BVDV antibody-positive herds (high antibody titres) were classified as cases (n = 21) and matched (n = 63) by milk production with herds presenting low antibody titres (ratio of 1 : 3). Three multivariable models were built: 1) full model, holding all 21 variables, and two models divided according to empirical knowledge and similarity among variables; 2) animal factor model; and 3) biosecurity model. The full model (model 1) identified: age as a culling criteria (OR = 0.10; CI 95% = 0.02-0.39; P cattle of neighbouring farms (OR = 5.78; CI 95% = 1.41-23.67; P = 0.04). We recommend the application of grouping predictors as a good choice for model building because it could lead to a better understanding of disease-exposure associations.

  19. Insulin receptor signaling in POMC, but Not AgRP, neurons controls adipose tissue insulin action

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Oberlin, Douglas; Chi, Tiffany; Buettner, Christoph; Shin, Andrew C; Degann, Seta; Filatova, Nika; Lindtner, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Insulin is a key regulator of adipose tissue lipolysis, and impaired adipose tissue insulin action results in unrestrained lipolysis and lipotoxicity, which are hallmarks of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes...

  20. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  1. TaqMan real-time RT-PCR detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded Atlantic salmon Salmo salar tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, M G; Kibenge, F S; Kibenge, M J; Olmos, P; Ovalle, L; Yañez, A J; Avendaño-Herrera, R

    2010-05-18

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the application of a TaqMan real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) assay for the detection of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) fish tissues from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar with and without clinical signs of infection, and to compare it with histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques. Sixteen fish samples obtained in 2007 and 2008 from 4 different farms in Chile were examined. The real-time RT-PCR allowed the detection of ISAV in FFPE samples from 9 of 16 fish, regardless of the organs analyzed, whereas 4 of the real-time RT-PCR negative fish were positive as indicated by histological examination and 3 of the real-time RT-PCR positive fish were negative as indicated by immunohistochemistry evaluation. The presence of ISAV in RT-PCR positive samples was confirmed by amplicon sequencing. This work constitutes the first report on the use of real-time RT-PCR for the detection of ISAV in FFPE sections. The assay is very useful for the examination of archival wax-embedded tissues, and allows for both prospective and retrospective evaluation of tissue samples for the presence of ISAV. However, the method only confirms the presence of the pathogen and should be used in combination with histopathology, which is a more precise tool. The combination of both techniques would be invaluable for confirmatory diagnosis of infectious salmon anaemia (ISA), which is essential for solving salmon farm problems.

  2. Low-Replicating Viruses and Strong Anti-Viral Immune Response Associated with Prolonged Disease Control in a Superinfected HIV-1 LTNP Elite Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernas, María; Casado, Concepción; Arcones, Carolina; Llano, Anuska; Sánchez-Merino, Víctor; Mothe, Beatriz; Vicario, José L.; Grau, Eulalia; Ruiz, Lidia; Sánchez, Jorge; Telenti, Amalio; Yuste, Eloísa; Brander, Christian; Galíndez, Cecilio López-

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the causes for the lack of clinical progression in a superinfected HIV-1 LTNP elite controller patient. Methodology and Principal Findings We studied host genetic, virological and immunological factors associated with viral control in a SI long term non progressor elite controller (LTNP-EC). The individual contained both viruses and maintained undetectable viral loads for >20 years and he did not express any of the described host genetic polymorphisms associated with viral control. None of four full-length gp160 recombinants derived from the LTNP-EC replicated in heterologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CTL responses after SI were maintained in two samples separated by 9 years and they were higher in breadth and magnitude than responses seen in most of 250 treatment naïve patients and also 25 controller subjects. The LTNP-EC showed a neutralization response, against 4 of the 6 viruses analyzed, superior to other ECs. Conclusions The study demonstrated that a strong and sustained cellular and humoral immune response and low replicating viruses are associated with viral control in the superinfected LTNP-EC. PMID:22384103

  3. Quality control of cultured tissues requires tools for quantitative analyses of heterogeneous features developed in manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino-Oka, Masahiro; Takezawa, Yasunori; Taya, Masahito

    2009-02-01

    Tissue engineering and related technology have attracted a great deal of medical attention as promising fields for curing defective tissues in vivo. Nowadays, many companies have been established for supplying the reconstructed grafts of cultured tissues for transplantation. The manufacturing processes generally deals with the handlings of starter cells offered by patients (or donors) as raw materials to cultured tissues as products, requiring the construction of novel ex vivo methodologies based on principles different from conventional processes for chemical and pharmaceutical productions. In addition, the raw materials have heterogeneity depending on the state of patients and location of cell harvests, and the products possess spatial cell distribution in the three dimensional structure. These features request a unique strategy in manufacturing process accompanied with the quality control for raw materials and products. This review article describes the contribution of tissue bankers and biochemical engineers to the quality control of cultured tissues during manufacturing, introducing the advances in methodologies to evaluate spatial heterogeneity of cells (or aggregates) and matrices in cultured tissues.

  4. Autologous Skin Cell Spray for Massive Soft Tissue War Injuries: A Prospective, Case-Control, Multicenter Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0031 TITLE: Autologous Skin Cell Spray for Massive Soft Tissue War Injuries: A Prospective, Case...DATES COVERED 15Mar2013-31Oct2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Autologous Skin Cell Spray for Massive Soft Tissue War Injuries: A Prospective, Case-Control...assess the success of skin cell spray combined with a biocomposite subcutaneous (INTEGRA) layer for repair of large open wounds. The objective is the

  5. Effect of endurance training on adrenergic control of lipolysis in adipose tissue of obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richterova, B; Stich, V; Moro, C; Polak, J; Klimcakova, E; Majercik, M; Harant, I; Viguerie, N; Crampes, F; Langin, D; Lafontan, M; Berlan, M

    2004-03-01

    The effect of a 12-wk training program on sc abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) was studied in 11 obese women. Before and after the training, biopsies of SCAAT were performed for mRNA levels determination. Using the microdialysis method, involvement of alpha(2)- and beta-adrenergic receptor (ARs) in the control of lipolysis in SCAAT was studied using local perfusion of epinephrine alone or supplemented with phentolamine, an alpha(2)-AR antagonist. In addition, the variation in dialysate glycerol concentrations during exercise (50% peak oxygen consumption at 40 min) in a probe perfused with Ringer's solution was compared with that obtained in a probe perfused with Ringer's solution plus phentolamine. Training did not promote changes in the expression of key genes of the lipolytic pathway. The epinephrine-induced rise in the dialysate glycerol concentration was identical before and after training and was similarly potentiated by phentolamine. During exercise, the potentiating effect of phentolamine on the glycerol response was apparent before, but not after, training. The exercise-induced increase in plasma norepinephrine was lower after training (P = 0.04). In conclusion, training did not modify either the expression of genes involved in the control of lipolysis or alpha(2)- and beta-ARs in situ sensitivity to epinephrine in SCAAT. Training reduced the antilipolytic action of catecholamines mediated by alpha(2)-ARs during exercise, probably due to a reduction of exercise-induced catecholamine increase.

  6. Design and Preparation of Bone Tissue Engineering Scaffolds with Porous Controllable Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Liulan; ZHANG Huicun; ZHAO Li; HU Qingxi; FANG Minglun

    2009-01-01

    A novel method of designing and preparing bone tissue engineering scaffolds with controllable porous structure of both macro channels and micro pores was proposed. The CAD soft-ware UG NX3.0 was used to design the macro channels' shape, size and distribution. By integrating rapid prototyping and traditional porogen technique, the macro channels and micro pores were formed respectively. The size, shape and quantity of micro pores were controlled by porogen particulates. The sintered β-TCP porous scaffolds possessed connective macro channels of approximately 500 μm and micro pores of 200-400 μm. The porosity and connectivity of micro pores became higher with the in-crease of porogen ratio, while the mechanical properties weakened. The average porosity and com-pressive strength of β-TCP scaffolds prepared with porogen ratio of 60wt% were 78.12% and 0.2983 Mpa,respectively. The cells' adhesion ratio of scaffolds was 67.43%. The ALP activity, OCN content and cells micro morphology indicated that cells grew and proliferated well on the scaffolds.

  7. Neural innervation of white adipose tissue and the control of lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartness, Timothy J; Liu, Yang; Shrestha, Yogendra B; Ryu, Vitaly

    2014-10-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) is innervated by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and its activation is necessary for lipolysis. WAT parasympathetic innervation is not supported. Fully-executed SNS-norepinephrine (NE)-mediated WAT lipolysis is dependent on β-adrenoceptor stimulation ultimately hinging on hormone sensitive lipase and perilipin A phosphorylation. WAT sympathetic drive is appropriately measured electrophysiologically and neurochemically (NE turnover) in non-human animals and this drive is fat pad-specific preventing generalizations among WAT depots and non-WAT organs. Leptin-triggered SNS-mediated lipolysis is weakly supported, whereas insulin or adenosine inhibition of SNS/NE-mediated lipolysis is strongly supported. In addition to lipolysis control, increases or decreases in WAT SNS drive/NE inhibit and stimulate white adipocyte proliferation, respectively. WAT sensory nerves are of spinal-origin and sensitive to local leptin and increases in sympathetic drive, the latter implicating lipolysis. Transsynaptic viral tract tracers revealed WAT central sympathetic and sensory circuits including SNS-sensory feedback loops that may control lipolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Isolation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus from Brain Tissues of Bat in Yunnan Province%从云南省蝙蝠脑组织中分离出乙型脑炎病毒

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海林; 张云智; 黄文丽; 米竹青; 龚鹤琴; 王静林

    2001-01-01

    In July 1997, a strain (GB30) of virus was isolated from 60 samples of brain tissues of Murina aurata (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) co llec ted in Gengma county, Yunnan province, China. Isolation of virus was negative fr om 4 samples of brain tissues of Rousettus leschenaulti (Chiroptera: Pteropo did ae) collected in Gengma. GB30 virus strain could regularly cause illness and dea th in suckling mice, produced evident CPE in BHK21 cells. It agglutinated red b lood cells of dove at pH5.75~7.4. This virus has been identified serologically by hemagglutination inhibition and immunofluorescent tests using Japanese enceph alitis (JE), dengue (DEN) type 1,2,3,4, and chikungunya (CHIK) viruses monoclona l antibodies, and JE and sindbis (SIN) viruses immune sera. It showed specific r eaction to JE virus only and no reaction with DEN 1~4, CHIK and SIN viruses. Th erefore it can be identified as JE virus. This is the first report on the isolat ion of JE virus from Murina aurata. The results showed that bats are conside red as the reservoir and amplifier host of JE virus transmission in nature.%为进一步阐明蝙蝠在保存乙脑病毒中的作用,于1997年7月,在云南省耿马 县捕捉蝙蝠64只,取脑组织作病毒分离,从一只金管鼻蝠脑组织中分离出1株病毒。该毒株 能引起BHK21细胞病变和乳鼠发病死亡,在pH5.75~7.4时能凝集鸽红血球,经用单克隆抗 体血凝抑制和免疫荧光试验鉴定,证实为乙型脑炎病毒。进一步证明蝙蝠在乙型脑炎病毒保 存和扩散中具有重要作用。从金管鼻蝠体内分离出乙型脑炎病毒属国内外首次报道。

  9. Tissue distribution of hepatopancreatic parvo-like virus of shrimp in freshwater rice-field crab, Paratelphusa hydrodomous (Herbst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, N; Rajkumar, T; Sundar Raj, N; Farook, M A; Nambi, K S N; Abdul Majeed, S; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2014-11-01

    An attempt was made to determine the replication efficiency of hepatopancreatic parvo-like virus (HPV) of shrimp in different organs of freshwater rice-field crab Paratelphusa hydrodomous (Herbst) using bioassay, PCR, RT-PCR, ELISA, Western blot and q-PCR analyses. Another attempt was made to use this crab as an alternative to penaeid shrimp for the large-scale production of HPV. This crab was found to be highly susceptible to HPV by intramuscular injection. The systemic HPV infection was confirmed by PCR and Western blot analyses in freshwater crab. The expression of capsid protein gene in different organs of infected crab was revealed by RT-PCR analysis. Indirect ELISA was used to quantify the capsid protein in different organs of the crab. The copy number of HPV in different organs of the infected crab was quantified by q-PCR. The results revealed a steady decrease in CT values in different organs of the infected crab during the course of infection. The viral inoculum that was prepared from different organs of the infected crab caused significant mortality in post-larvae of tiger prawn, Penaeus monodon (Fabricius). The results revealed that this rice-field crab could be used as an alternative host for HPV replication and also for large-scale production of HPV.

  10. A Cost-Effectiveness Tool for Informing Policies on Zika Virus Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A Alfaro-Murillo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As Zika virus continues to spread, decisions regarding resource allocations to control the outbreak underscore the need for a tool to weigh policies according to their cost and the health burden they could avert. For example, to combat the current Zika outbreak the US President requested the allocation of $1.8 billion from Congress in February 2016.Illustrated through an interactive tool, we evaluated how the number of Zika cases averted, the period during pregnancy in which Zika infection poses a risk of microcephaly, and probabilities of microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS impact the cost at which an intervention is cost-effective. From Northeast Brazilian microcephaly incidence data, we estimated the probability of microcephaly in infants born to Zika-infected women (0.49% to 2.10%. We also estimated the probability of GBS arising from Zika infections in Brazil (0.02% to 0.06% and Colombia (0.08%. We calculated that each microcephaly and GBS case incurs the loss of 29.95 DALYs and 1.25 DALYs per case, as well as direct medical costs for Latin America and the Caribbean of $91,102 and $28,818, respectively. We demonstrated the utility of our cost-effectiveness tool with examples evaluating funding commitments by Costa Rica and Brazil, the US presidential proposal, and the novel approach of genetically modified mosquitoes. Our analyses indicate that the commitments and the proposal are likely to be cost-effective, whereas the cost-effectiveness of genetically modified mosquitoes depends on the country of implementation.Current estimates from our tool suggest that the health burden from microcephaly and GBS warrants substantial expenditures focused on Zika virus control. Our results justify the funding committed in Costa Rica and Brazil and many aspects of the budget outlined in the US president's proposal. As data continue to be collected, new parameter estimates can be customized in real-time within our user-friendly tool to provide

  11. Status and prospects of plant virus control through interference with vector transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragard, C.; Caciagli, P.; Lemaire, O.; Lopez-Moya, J.J.; MacFarlane, S.; Peters, D.; Susi, P.; Torrance, L.

    2013-01-01

    Most plant viruses rely on vector organisms for their plant-to-plant spread. Although there are many different natural vectors, few plant virus–vector systems have been well studied. This review describes our current understanding of virus transmission by aphids, thrips, whiteflies, leafhoppers, pla

  12. Control of bovine leukosis virus in a dairy herd by a change in dehorning.