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Sample records for control orthopaedics perspective

  1. Patient Perspectives of Midlevel Providers in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Blaine T; Bohl, Daniel D; Hannon, Charles P; Redondo, Michael L; Christian, David R; Forsythe, Brian; Nho, Shane J; Bach, Bernard R

    2018-04-01

    Midlevel providers (eg, nurse practitioners and physician assistants) have been integrated into orthopaedic systems of care in response to the increasing demand for musculoskeletal care. Few studies have examined patient perspectives toward midlevel providers in orthopaedic sports medicine. To identify perspectives of orthopaedic sports medicine patients regarding midlevel providers, including optimal scope of practice, reimbursement equity with physicians, and importance of the physician's midlevel provider to patients when initially selecting a physician. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 690 consecutive new patients of 3 orthopaedic sports medicine physicians were prospectively administered an anonymous questionnaire prior to their first visit. Content included patient perspectives regarding midlevel provider importance in physician selection, optimal scope of practice, and reimbursement equity with physicians. Of the 690 consecutive patients who were administered the survey, 605 (87.7%) responded. Of these, 51.9% were men and 48.1% were women, with a mean age of 40.5 ± 15.7 years. More than half (51.2%) perceived no differences in training levels between physician assistants and nurse practitioners. A majority of patients (62.9%) reported that the physician's midlevel provider is an important consideration when choosing a new orthopaedic sports medicine physician. Patients had specific preferences regarding which services should be physician provided. Patients also reported specific preferences regarding those services that could be midlevel provided. There lacked a consensus on reimbursement equity for midlevel practitioners and physicians, despite 71.7% of patients responding that the physician provides a higher-quality consultation. As health care becomes value driven and consumer-centric, understanding patient perspectives on midlevel providers will allow orthopaedic sports medicine physicians to optimize efficiency and patient

  2. Computer-assisted Orthopaedic Surgery: Current State and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoyan eZheng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduced about two decades ago, computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery (CAOS has emerged as a new and independent area, due to the importance of treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in orthopaedics and traumatology, increasing availability of different imaging modalities, and advances in analytics and navigation tools. The aim of this paper is to present the basic elements of CAOS devices and to review state-of-the-art examples of different imaging modalities used to create the virtual representations, of different position tracking devices for navigation systems, of different surgical robots, of different methods for registration and referencing, and of CAOS modules that have been realized for different surgical procedures. Future perspectives will also be outlined.

  3. International Patients on Operation Vacation – Perspectives of Patients Travelling to Hungary for Orthopaedic Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Kovacs

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background The importance of cross-border healthcare, medical and health tourism plays a significant role in the European health policy and health management. After dentistry, orthopaedic treatments are the leading motivation for seeking care in Hungary, as patients with rheumatic and motion diseases are drawn to the thermal spas and well-established orthopaedic centres. This paper aims to gain insight into foreign patients’ perspectives on their experience of having sought medical tourism in orthopaedic care in Hungary. Methods A patient survey was conducted in 2012 on motivations for seeking treatment abroad, orthopaedic care received and overall satisfaction. In addition, health professionals’ interviews, and 17 phone interviews were conducted in 2013 with Romanian patients who had orthopaedic treatment in Hungary. Finally, medical records of foreign patients were analysed. Results The survey was completed by 115 participants – 61.1% females, mean age= 41.9, 87% Romanian origin. Most of the patients came to Hungary for orthopaedic surgeries, e.g. arthroscopy, knee/hip prosthesis or spinal surgery. 72.6% chose Hungary because of related to perceived better quality and longstanding culture of Hungarian orthopaedic care. Over 57% of patients reported being ‘very satisfied’ with care received and 41.6% ‘satisfied’. The follow-up interviews further reflected this level of satisfaction, therefore many respondents stating they have already recommended the Hungarian healthcare to others. Conclusion Based on the findings, patients from neighbouring regions are increasingly seeking orthopaedic care in Hungary. Patients having orthopaedic care are highly satisfied with the quality of care, the whole treatment process from the availability of information to discharge summaries and would consider returning for further treatments.

  4. Image guidance in orthopaedics and traumatology: A historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Gabor; Nolte, Lutz-P

    2016-10-01

    In this note we summarize the history of computer aided surgery in orthopaedics and traumatology from the end of the nineteenth century to currently observable future trends. We concentrate on the two major components of such systems, pre-operative planning and intra-operative execution. The evolution of the necessary technological components, the numerous platforms and components offered commercially as well as their clinical use are surveyed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Churg-Strauss syndrome from an orthopaedic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, K L; Yee, P K

    2015-12-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome, which has been frequently described by physicians in the literature, is a small and medium-sized vessel systemic vasculitis typically associated with asthma, lung infiltrates, and hypereosinophilia. We report a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with presenting symptoms of bilateral lower limb weakness and numbness only. The patient was admitted to an orthopaedic ward for management and a final diagnosis was reached following sural nerve biopsy. The patient's symptoms responded promptly to steroid treatment and she was able to walk with a stick 3 weeks following admission. This report emphasises the need to be aware of this syndrome when managing patients with neurological deficit in order to achieve prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Internet based patient education improves informed consent for elective orthopaedic surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraval, Andrew; Chandrananth, Janan; Chong, Yew M; Coventry, Lillian S; Tran, Phong

    2015-02-07

    Obtaining informed consent is an essential step in the surgical pathway. Providing adequate patient education to enable informed decision making is a continued challenge of contemporary surgical practice. This study investigates whether the use of a patient information website, to augment patient education and informed consent for elective orthopaedic procedures is an effective measure. A randomised controlled trial was conducted comparing the quality of informed consent provided by a standard discussion with the treating surgeon compared to augmentation of this discussion with an online education resource (www.orthoanswer.org). Participants were recruited from orthopaedic outpatient clinics. Patients undergoing five common orthopaedic procedures were eligible to participate in the trial. The primary outcome measure was knowledge about their operation. Satisfaction with their informed consent and anxiety relating to their operation were the secondary outcome measures. There was a statistically significant increase in patient knowledge for the intervention arm as compared to the control arm (p education website as an augment to informed consent improves patient knowledge about their planned operation as well as satisfaction with the consent process whilst not increasing their anxiety levels. We recommend that all patients be directed to web based education tools to augment their consent. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR) ACTRN12614001058662 .

  7. Treating natural disaster victims is dealing with shortages: An orthopaedics perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewo, Punto; Magetsari, Rahadyan; Busscher, Henk J.; van Horn, Jim R.; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob

    2008-01-01

    During natural disasters such as earthquakes or tsunamis, most of the casualties are known to suffer from musculoskeletal injuries. This leads to an enormous need of orthopaedic (surgical) implants such as osteosynthesis plates, which are difficult to provide in developing countries that rely on

  8. Pediatric elbow trauma: an orthopaedic perspective on the importance of radiographic interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Sidney M; Herman, Martin J; Morrison, William B; Osterman, A Lee

    2007-03-01

    Radiographic interpretation of pediatric elbow trauma presents a daunting task for both the radiologist and treating orthopaedic surgeon. Proper radiographic diagnosis and appropriate intervention requires a thorough understanding and appreciation of developmental anatomy. As the pediatric elbow matures, it transitions from multiple cartilaginous anlagen through a predictable pattern of ossification and fusion. When children sustain trauma to the elbow, they may have a limited capacity to communicate specific complaints and are sometimes difficult to examine reliably. Furthermore, the presence of multiple growth centers, and their variability, makes radiographic evaluation of pediatric elbow injuries particularly challenging. These variables, coupled with the known adverse long-term sequelae of pediatric elbow trauma (painful nonunion, malunion, elbow stiffness, growth disturbance, etc.) highlight the importance of accurate radiographic interpretation, which facilitates appropriate treatment. By using an orderly, systematic approach based on well-defined anatomical relationships and accepted radiographic markers, the radiologist may effectively interpret and communicate pertinent findings to the treating orthopaedic surgeon. Furthermore, using common classification systems may facilitate interdisciplinary communication. Finally, it is crucial that caregivers of children consider the possibility of child abuse in suspect cases.

  9. A guideline to medical photography: a perspective on digital photography in an orthopaedic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Meijer, P P G; Karlsson, J; LaPrade, R F; Verhaar, J A N; Wijdicks, C A

    2012-12-01

    Quality photographs are essential for clinical documentation, research, and publication in scientific journals and teaching. Oftentimes, non-ideal lighting and a sterile environment restrict the medical photographer, resulting in lower-quality photographs. This article aims to provide a clear and comprehensible guideline for medical photography in an orthopaedic setting. This article is based on extensive photographic involvement in operating and laboratory settings, in close collaboration with medical professionals from the Steadman Clinic (Vail, Colorado, USA), Gothenburg University (Göteborg, Sweden) and Erasmus MC (Rotterdam, the Netherlands). Background literature was searched through Google Scholar and PubMed. Three relevant journal articles, and one book on medical photography, were used to write this paper. Seventeen Internet articles were used for background information. A relevant, up-to-date and comprehensive guideline to medical photography for medical professionals, with or without photographic experience, is provided. Expert opinion, Level V.

  10. Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective: A qualitative content analysis of the provision of individualised nursing care in orthopaedic fast-track programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2017-02-01

    The lack of individualised care in orthopaedic regimes is often explained by the extended use of patient pathways and clinical guidelines. The aim of this study was to illuminate orthopaedic nurses' perceptions and experiences of providing individual nursing care for older patients in standardised fast-track programmes after total hip or knee replacement. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with orthopaedic nurses in orthopaedic wards at three Danish hospitals between April and June of 2015. Data were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis according to Graneheim and Lundman. The main theme of the overall interpretation was Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective, accompanied by three sub-themes: Identifying and legitimising relevant individual care in the fast-track programme, Struggling to fit all patients in the fast-track programme and Justifying individualised care-related actions in the fast-track programme. The study concluded that, even though the nurses struggled to comply with the programme, they still found themselves compromising their nursing care and ethics to follow the standardised regime. There is a need to establish more specific inclusion criteria to maintain the effective elements in the programme and to facilitate nurses' opportunities to offer individual care, thereby ensuring that fragile patients have access to other possibilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Web-Based Education Prior to Outpatient Orthopaedic Surgery Enhances Early Patient Satisfaction Scores: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, Carola F; Toor, Aneet; Banffy, Michael B; Gambardella, Ralph A

    2018-01-01

    A good patient-surgeon relationship relies on adequate preoperative education and counseling. Several multimedia resources, such as web-based education tools, have become available to enhance aspects of perioperative care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an interactive web-based education tool on perioperative patient satisfaction scores after outpatient orthopaedic surgery. It was hypothesized that web-based education prior to outpatient orthopaedic surgery enhances patient satisfaction scores. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. All patients undergoing knee arthroscopy with meniscectomy, chondroplasty, or anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction or shoulder arthroscopy with rotator cuff repair were eligible for inclusion and were randomized to the study or control group. The control group received routine education by the surgeon, whereas the study group received additional web-based education. At the first postoperative visit, all patients completed the OAS CAHPS (Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey. Differences in patient satisfaction scores between the study and control groups were determined with an independent t test. A total of 177 patients were included (104 [59%] males; mean age, 42 ± 14 years); 87 (49%) patients were randomized to receive additional web-based education. Total patient satisfaction score was significantly higher in the study group (97 ± 5) as compared with the control group (94 ± 8; P = .019), specifically for the OAS CAHPS core measure "recovery" (92 ± 13 vs 82 ± 23; P = .001). Age, sex, race, workers' compensation status, education level, overall health, emotional health, procedure type and complexity, and addition of a video did not influence patient satisfaction scores. Supplemental web-based patient education prior to outpatient orthopaedic surgery enhances patient satisfaction scores.

  12. Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective: Orthopaedic nurses’ perceptions and experiences of providing individualised nursing care in older patients’ standardised fast-track programmes after total hip or knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher Berthelsen, Connie; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    The lack of individualised care in orthopaedic regimes is often explained by the extended use of patient pathways and clinical guidelines. The aim of this study was to illuminate orthopaedic nurses' perceptions and experiences of providing individual nursing care for older patients in standardised...... fast-track programmes after total hip or knee replacement. Ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with orthopaedic nurses in orthopaedic wards at three Danish hospitals between April and June of 2015. Data were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis according to Graneheim...... and Lundman. The main theme of the overall interpretation was Orchestrating care through the fast-track perspective, accompanied by three sub-themes: Identifying and legitimising relevant individual care in the fast-track programme, Struggling to fit all patients in the fast-track programme and Justifying...

  13. A Perspective on the Effect of the 80-Hour Work Week: Has It Changed the Graduating Orthopaedic Resident?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Vincent D

    2017-06-01

    Orthopaedic residency education has changed substantially in recent decades because of the imposition of the 80-hour work week, a decrease in quality and quantity of general surgical education, regulations mandating closer trainee supervision, and an expansion of orthopaedic subspecialty rotations. These factors pose a challenge in efforts to prepare competent, confident, cautious, caring, and communicative orthopaedic residents within the traditional 5-year program. Evidence suggests that contemporary graduates are more intelligent, better balanced in life and work, and more in touch with humanistic aspects of medicine than were earlier graduates. Yet insufficient competence and confidence in surgical skills after residency and a lack of "ownership" of patient care have become an increasing concern of educators and trainees. The concept of 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to achieve mastery of a technical skill applies to orthopaedic residency education. A different approach to graduate medical education must address the critical minimum training time required to achieve the necessary skills to support independent medical and surgical practice.

  14. Use of external fixators for damage-control orthopaedics in natural disasters like the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Syed; Saeed, Ayesha; Ch, Asad

    2014-08-01

    In the 2005 Pakistan earthquake, the great many injured with multiple fractures and open wounds provided a unique opportunity to practice damage-control orthopaedics. External fixators remain a time-tested tools for operating surgeons on such occasions. The locally manufactured, readily available Naseer-Awais (NA) external fixator filled such needs of this disaster with good outcome. This is a retrospective descriptive study of 19,700 patients that presented over seven months to the two centres established by the lead author (SMA) in Muzaffarabad and Mansehra just one night after the 2005 earthquake. A series of local and foreign orthopaedic surgeon teams operated in succession. The computerised patient data collection of 1,145 operations was retrospectively analysed. Of the 19,700 patients presenting to the SMA centres, 50% had limb injuries. Total fracture fixations were 1,145, of which 295 were external fixations: 185 were applied on the lower limb and 90 on upper limb, the majority were applied on tibia. External fixators are valuable damage-control tools in natural disasters and warfare injuries. The locally manufactured NA external fixator served the needs of the many limb injuries during the 2005 Pakistan earthquake.

  15. Efficacy of Bobath versus orthopaedic approach on impairment and function at different motor recovery stages after stroke: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ray-Yau; Chen, Hsiu-I; Chen, Chen-Yin; Yang, Yea-Ru

    2005-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of Bobath on stroke patients at different motor stages by comparing their treatment with orthopaedic treatment. A single-blind study, with random assignment to Bobath or orthopaedic group. Physical therapy department of a medical centre. Twenty-one patients with stroke with spasticity and 23 patients with stroke at relative recovery stages participated. Twenty sessions of Bobath programme or orthopaedic treatment programme given in four weeks. Stroke Impairment Assessment Set (SIAS), Motor Assessment Scale (MAS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) for impairment and functional limitation level. Participants with spasticity showed greater improvement in tone control (change score: 1.20 +/- 1.03 versus 0.08 +/- 0.67, p = 0.006), MAS (change score: 7.64 +/- 4.03 versus 4.00 +/- 1.95, p = 0.011), and SIS (change score: 7.30 +/- 6.24 versus 1.25 +/- 5.33, p = 0.023) after 20 sessions of Bobath treatment than with orthopaedic treatment. Participants with relative recovery receiving Bobath treatment showed greater improvement in MAS (change score: 6.14 +/- 5.55 versus 2.77 +/- 9.89, p = 0.007), BBS (change score: 19.18 +/- 15.94 versus 6.85 +/- 5.23, p = 0.015), and SIS scores (change score: 8.50 +/- 3.41 versus 3.62 +/- 4.07, p = 0.006) than those with orthopaedic treatment. Bobath or orthopaedic treatment paired with spontaneous recovery resulted in improvements in impairment and functional levels for patient with stroke. Patients benefit more from the Bobath treatment in MAS and SIS scores than from the orthopaedic treatment programme regardless of their motor recovery stages.

  16. [Reducing of unwanted side effects of modified fluid gelatin by promethazine: controlled clinical trial with orthopaedic patints (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöning, B; Koch, H

    1981-01-01

    In order to determine the undesirable side effects of standard commercially available plasma substitutes, 450 stationary patients covering 5 age groups were randomly allocated to various methods of pre-medication and 3 batches of modified fluid gelatin (Neo-Plasmagel). The incidence of allergoid and anaphylactoid reactions depended on the pre-medication (p less than 0.025). Atosil proved to be an strong histamine blocker: the incidence of reactions between the control and the promethazine group was p less than 0.005. Seen as a whole reactions among females were greater than with males (p less than 0.025). No relationship could be determined statistically between the different batches and the incidence of side-effects. -The prophylactic use of Neo-Plasmagel in orthopaedic patients is therefore dependent on a sufficient blockade of histamine receptors.

  17. A randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of music and relaxation interventions on perceived anxiety in hospitalized patients receiving orthopaedic or cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhouse, Diane R; Hurd, Mary; Cotter-Schaufele, Susan; Sulo, Suela; Sokolowski, Malgorzata; Barbour, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    Nonpharmacological interventions, including combinations of music, education, coping skills, and relaxation techniques, have been found to have a positive effect on patients' perceived anxiety in many settings. However, few research studies have assessed and compared the effectiveness of music and relaxation interventions in reducing the anxiety levels of orthopaedic and oncology patients. We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled study to examine the effectiveness of music and relaxation interventions on perceived anxiety during initial hospitalization for patients receiving orthopaedic or cancer care treatment at a Midwestern teaching hospital. This was a pre-test/post-test study design utilizing the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. One hundred twelve patients were randomized into 3 study groups. Thirty-eight subjects (34%) were randomized in the music-focused relaxation group, 35 subjects (31%) in the music and video group, and 39 (35%) subjects in the control group. Fifty-seven (51%) were orthopaedic patients and 55 (49%) were oncology patients. Comparison of the 3 study groups showed no statistically significant differences with regard to patients' demographics. Although reduced anxiety levels were reported for all 3 groups postintervention, the differences were not statistically significant (p > .05). Also, there was no significant difference found between the perceived anxiety levels of patients admitted to the orthopaedic and oncology care units (p > .05). Finally, the results of the intragroup comparisons (regardless of the group assignment) showed a significant decrease in anxiety levels reported by all patients postintervention (p Music and relaxation interventions could be an additional tool in assisting patients to become less anxious during their hospital stay. Music focused relaxation and music and video are both valuable and cost-effective strategies that can assist the orthopaedic and oncology patient population. Identifying opportunities to

  18. Communication skills training in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundine, Kristopher; Buckley, Richard; Hutchison, Carol; Lockyer, Jocelyn

    2008-06-01

    Communication skills play a key role in many aspects of both medical education and clinical patient care. The objectives of this study were to identify the key components of communication skills from the perspectives of both orthopaedic residents and their program directors and to understand how these skills are currently taught. This study utilized a mixed methods design. Quantitative data were collected with use of a thirty-item questionnaire distributed to all Canadian orthopaedic residents. Qualitative data were collected through focus groups with orthopaedic residents and semistructured interviews with orthopaedic program directors. One hundred and nineteen (37%) of 325 questionnaires were completed, twelve residents participated in two focus groups, and nine of sixteen program directors from across the country were interviewed. Both program directors and residents identified communication skills as being the accurate and appropriate use of language (i.e., content skills), not how the communication was presented (i.e., process skills). Perceived barriers to effective communication included time constraints and the need to adapt to the many personalities and types of people encountered daily in the hospital. Residents rarely have explicit training in communication skills. They rely on communication training implicitly taught through observation of their preceptors and clinical experience interacting with patients, peers, and other health-care professionals. Orthopaedic residents and program directors focus on content and flexibility within communication skills as well as on the importance of being concise. They value the development of communication skills in the clinical environment through experiential learning and role modeling. Education should focus on developing residents' process skills in communication. Care should be taken to avoid large-group didactic teaching sessions, which are perceived as ineffective.

  19. Radiologic examination of orthopaedics. Methods and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafner, E.; Meuli, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    This volume describes in detail radiological examinations of the skeleton modern procedures in orthopaedic surgery. Special emphasis is given to functional examination techniques based upon the authors' extensive work on standardized radiological examinations best suited to the needs of orthopaedic surgeons. These techniques were developed at the Radiodiagnostic Department of the Central Radiological Clinic, Bern University, in cooperation with the University Clinic of Orthopaedics and Surgery of the Locomotor System. Exposure techniques are explained concisely, yet with extraordinary precision and attention to detail. They have proved highly successful in teaching programs for X-ray technicians and as standard examination techniques for many hospitals, X-ray departments, orthopaedic units, and private clinics. Recommended for orthopaedic surgeons, radiologists, general surgeons, and X-ray technicians, this definitive treatise, with its superb X-ray reproductions and complementary line drawings, explains how to achieve improved diagnoses and standardized control with the least possible radiation exposure to the patient

  20. Treatment timing for functional jaw orthopaedics followed by fixed appliances: a controlled long-term study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavoni, Chiara; Lombardo, Elisabetta Cretella; Lione, Roberta; Faltin, Kurt; McNamara, James A; Cozza, Paola; Franchi, Lorenzo

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the role of treatment timing on long-term dentoskeletal effects of Class II treatment with removable functional appliances followed by full-fixed appliance therapy. A group of 46 patients (23 females and 23 males) with Class II malocclusion treated consecutively with either Bionator or Activator, followed by fixed appliances was compared with a matched control group of 31 subjects (16 females and 15 males) with untreated Class II malocclusion. The treated sample was evaluated at T1, start of treatment (mean age: 9.9 ± 1.3 years); T2, end of functional treatment and prior to fixed appliances (mean age: 11.9 ± 1.3 years); and T3, long-term observation (mean age: 18.3 ± 2.1 years). The treated and the control samples were divided into pre-pubertal and pubertal groups according to skeletal maturity observed at the start of treatment. Statistical comparisons were performed with independent sample t-tests. When treatment was initiated before puberty, Class II correction was mostly confined to the dentoalveolar changes, with significant improvements of both overjet and molar relationships. On the other hand, treatment with the outset at puberty produced significant long-term improvement of sagittal skeletal relationships, which were mainly sustained by mandibular changes. Treatment with removable functional appliances (Bionator or Activator) followed by full-fixed appliances produced significant skeletal long-term changes when it begins at puberty. Prepubertal Class II treatment results primarily in dentoalveolar changes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Vancouver winters: Environmental influences on inpatient adult orthopaedic trauma demographics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordin, S.; Masri, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the pattern of adult inpatient orthopaedic injuries admitted at three Vancouver hospitals following one of the worst winter snowstorms in the region with the preceding control winter period. Methods: The surveillance study was conducted at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 2007 to 2010. Inpatient adult admissions for orthopaedic injuries at three hospitals were recorded, including age, gender, anatomic location of injury, type of fracture (open or closed), fixation method (internal versus external fixation), and length of acute care hospital stay. Comparisons between admissions during this weather pattern and admission during a previous winter with minimal snow were made. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 511 patients admitted under Orthopaedic trauma service during the significant winter snowstorms of December 2008 - January 2009, 100 (19.6%) (CI: 16.2%-23.2%) were due to ice and snow, whereas in the preceding mild winter only 18 of 415 (4.3%) (CI: 2.5%-6.8%) cases were related to snow (p<0.05). Ankle and wrist fractures were the most frequent injuries during the index snow storm period (p<0.05). At all the three institutions, 97 (96.5%) fractures were closed during the snowstorm as opposed to 17 (95%) during the control winter period. Internal fixation in 06 (89%) fractures as opposed to external fixation in 12 (11%) patients was the predominant mode of fixation across the board during both time periods. Conclusion: The study demonstrated a significantly higher inpatient orthopaedic trauma volume during the snowstorm more rigorous prospective studies need to be designed to gain further insight to solving these problems from a public health perspective. (author)

  2. Orthopaedic training in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Orthopaedic training in Kenya, like in other East, central and .... quite a number of good facilities that would train an ... provide a forum for exchange of ideas and training. (2,3) ... administrators purely interested in service provision,.

  3. The financial impact of orthopaedic fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Trevor; Cook, Chad; Nunley, James; Mather, R Chad

    2009-07-01

    Previous reports have compared the expected financial return of a medical education with those expected in other professions. However, we know of no published report estimating the financial return of orthopaedic training. The purpose of this study was to estimate the financial incentives that may influence the decision to invest an additional year of training in each of the major orthopaedic fellowships. With survey data from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and using standard financial techniques, we calculated the estimated return on investment of an additional year of orthopaedic training over a working lifetime. The net present value, internal rate of return, and the break-even point were estimated. Eight fellowships were examined and compared with general orthopaedic practice. Investment in an orthopaedic fellowship yields variable returns. Adult spine, shoulder and elbow, sports medicine, hand, and adult arthroplasty may yield positive returns. Trauma yields a neutral return, while pediatrics and foot and ankle have negative net present values. On the basis of mean reported incomes, the break-even point was two years for spine, seven years for hand, eight years for shoulder and elbow, twelve years for adult arthroplasty, thirteen years for sports medicine, and twenty-seven years for trauma. Fellowship-trained pediatric and foot and ankle surgeons did not break even following the initial investment. When working hours were controlled for, the returns for adult arthroplasty and trauma became negative. The financial return of an orthopaedic fellowship varies on the basis of the specialty chosen. While reasons to pursue fellowship training vary widely, and many are not financial, there are positive and negative financial incentives. Therefore, the decision to pursue fellowship training is best if it is not made on the basis of financial incentives. This information may assist policy makers in analyzing medical education economics to ensure the

  4. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Research Tools Research Roadmap Facts and Figures Unified Orthopaedic Research Agenda Sex and Gender in Research ... Career Center Clinician Scholar Career Development Clinician-Patient Communication Leadership Fellows Program Medical Student Resources Postgraduate Orthopaedic ...

  5. Nature of motor control: perspectives and issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Michael T; Fonseca, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Four perspectives on motor control provide the framework for developing a comprehensive theory of motor control in biological systems. The four perspectives, of decreasing orthodoxy, are distinguished by their sources of inspiration: neuroanatomy, robotics, self-organization, and ecological realities. Twelve major issues that commonly constrain (either explicitly or implicitly) the understanding of the control and coordination of movement are identified and evaluated within the framework of the four perspectives. The issues are as follows: (1) Is control strictly neural? (2) Is there a divide between planning and execution? (3) Does control entail a frequently involved knowledgeable executive? (4) Do analytical internal models mediate control? (5) Is anticipation necessarily model dependent? (6) Are movements preassembled? (7) Are the participating components context independent? (8) Is force transmission strictly myotendinous? (9) Is afference a matter of local linear signaling? (10) Is neural noise an impediment? (11) Do standard variables (of mechanics and physiology) suffice? (12) Is the organization of control hierarchical?

  6. Orthopaedic Footwear Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Although the need for orthopaedic shoes is increasing, the number of skilled shoemakers has declined. This has led to the development of a CAD/CAM system to design and fabricate, orthopaedic footwear. The NASA-developed RIM database management system is the central repository for CUSTOMLAST's information storage. Several other modules also comprise the system. The project was initiated by Langley Research Center and Research Triangle Institute in cooperation with the Veterans Administration and the National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research. Later development was done by North Carolina State University and the University of Missouri-Columbia. The software is licensed by both universities.

  7. East African Orthopaedic Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The East African Orthopaedic Journal is published biannually by the Kenya Orthopaedics Association. Its primary objective is to give researchers in orthopaedics and ... Format should be as follows; Details of authors as for original articles, summary of not more than 200 words, introduction, case report,

  8. The Libyan civil conflict: selected case series of orthopaedic trauma managed in Malta in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Colin; Mifsud, Max; Borg, Joseph N; Mizzi, Colin

    2015-11-20

    The purpose of this series of cases was to analyse our management of orthopaedic trauma casualties in the Libyan civil war crisis in the European summer of 2014. We looked at both damage control orthopaedics and for case variety of war trauma at a civilian hospital. Due to our geographical proximity to Libya, Malta was the closest European tertiary referral centre. Having only one Level 1 trauma care hospital in our country, our Trauma and Orthopaedics department played a pivotal role in the management of Libyan battlefield injuries. Our aims were to assess acute outcomes and short term mortality of surgery within the perspective of a damage control orthopaedic strategy whereby aggressive wound management, early fixation using relative stability principles, antibiotic cover with adequate soft tissue cover are paramount. We also aim to describe the variety of war injuries we came across, with a goal for future improvement in regards to service providing. Prospective collection of six interesting cases with severe limb and spinal injuries sustained in Libya during the Libyan civil war between June and November 2014. We applied current trends in the treatment of war injuries, specifically in damage control orthopaedic strategy and converting to definitive treatment where permissible. The majority of our cases were classified as most severe (Type IIIB/C) according to the Gustilo-Anderson classification of open fractures. The injuries treated reflected the type of standard and improved weaponry available in modern warfare affecting both militants and civilians alike with increasing severity and extent of damage. Due to this fact, multidisciplinary team approach to patient centred care was utilised with an ultimate aim of swift recovery and early mobilisation. It also highlighted the difficulties and complex issues required on a hospital management level as a neighbouring country to war zone countries in transforming care of civil trauma to military trauma.

  9. [Orthopaedics' megalomania - myth or mobbing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundtoft, Per Hviid; Brand, Eske; Klit, Jakob; Weisskirchner, Kristoffer Barfod

    2016-12-12

    It is a general impression in the world of medicine that orthopaedic surgeons differ from doctors of other specialities in terms of intellect and self-confidence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the self-confidence of orthopaedics. We asked doctors from 30 different specialities to fill out a questionnaire. In addition to this, the participating orthopaedics were asked to rate their self-perceived surgical skills. In all, 120 orthopaedics and 416 non-orthopaedic doctors completed the questionnaire. There was no difference in GSE scores between orthopaedics and other doctors (p = 0.58). 98% of young orthopaedics estimated that their surgical talent was average or above average when compared with their colleagues on the same level of education. 72% believed that they were "equally talented", "more talented", or "far more talented" than their colleagues on a higher level of education. 76% believed that when assisting a senior surgeon the patients would "sometimes" (60%), "often" (14%) or "always" (2%) be better off if they were the ones performing the operation. More orthopaedics than non-orthopaedics believed that their speciality was regarded as one of the least important specialities in the world of medicine (p = 0.001). Orthopaedic surgeons in general are not more self-confident than other doctors or the average population, but young orthopaedic surgeons have a very high level of confidence in their own operation skills. none. none.

  10. Biomaterials in orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, M; Michiardi, A; Castaño, O; Planell, J.A

    2008-01-01

    At present, strong requirements in orthopaedics are still to be met, both in bone and joint substitution and in the repair and regeneration of bone defects. In this framework, tremendous advances in the biomaterials field have been made in the last 50 years where materials intended for biomedical purposes have evolved through three different generations, namely first generation (bioinert materials), second generation (bioactive and biodegradable materials) and third generation (materials designed to stimulate specific responses at the molecular level). In this review, the evolution of different metals, ceramics and polymers most commonly used in orthopaedic applications is discussed, as well as the different approaches used to fulfil the challenges faced by this medical field. PMID:18667387

  11. Smartphones in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said

    2012-08-01

    With the introduction of the European Working Time Directive, surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities and doctors are required to maximise their training opportunities. Smartphone sales have been rapidly increasing over the last five years and can be used as a training tool for the orthopaedic trainee and surgeon. Common uses include applications (AO, eLogbook and PubMed), Ebooks, online Logbooks, Guidelines and surgical techniques. In addition, smartphones can be used to immediately complete work-based assessments, in the absence of computers, hopefully increasing completion rates and reliability. Some journals now provide podcasts and video tutorials which may be accessed on smartphones, which is useful for higher examinations. Smartphones can also be used in the clinical setting to take photographs of wounds. Smartphones are enjoying increased uptake and application in the workplace and we review their use for orthopaedic surgeons and trainees to allow them to make the most out of their training opportunities.

  12. Effect of informational internet web pages on patients' decision-making: randomised controlled trial regarding choice of spinal or general anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, N D; Humphreys, H W; Williams, A J; Jones, A

    2010-03-01

    This study explored whether patients' preference for particular types of anaesthesia could be influenced pre-operatively by giving them the addresses of various relevant websites. Patients at an orthopaedic pre-assessment education clinic completed a questionnaire, which included a short multiple-choice general knowledge quiz about anaesthesia, and also questioned them as to their choice of anaesthesia (general or neuraxial). Patients were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Intervention group members were given the addresses of three relevant anaesthesia and health related websites to access at home. All patients were asked to complete the questionnaires on a second occasion, before surgery. Initially, most patients stated a preference for general anaesthesia. Subsequently, the intervention group altered their preference towards neuraxial anaesthesia compared to the control group (p < or = 0.0001). The increase in median (IQR [range]) anaesthesia knowledge test score was greater in the intervention group (from 10.0 (9.0-12.0 [5.0-14.0]) to 13.0 (11.0-14.0 [6.0-14.0])) than in the control group (from 10.0 (9.0-11.5 [3.0-13.0]) to 11.0 (9.0-12.0 [4.0-14.0]); p = 0.0068).

  13. Smartphones in orthopaedics

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Gikas, Panagiotis D; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of the European Working Time Directive, surgical trainees are facing limited training opportunities and doctors are required to maximise their training opportunities. Smartphone sales have been rapidly increasing over the last five years and can be used as a training tool for the orthopaedic trainee and surgeon. Common uses include applications (AO, eLogbook and PubMed), Ebooks, online Logbooks, Guidelines and surgical techniques. In addition, smartphones can be used to ...

  14. Perspective on BVDV control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, M Daniel; Newcomer, Benjamin W

    2015-06-01

    Programs for control and eradication of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are often considered prudent when the expense of a control program within a specified time frame effectively prevents loss due to disease and the expense of control does not exceed the costs associated with infection. In some geographic areas, concerns about animal welfare or desires to reduce antibiotic usage may motivate BVDV control even when control programs are associated with a lack of financial return on investment. In other geographic areas, concerns about financial return on investment may be the key motivating factor in considering implementation of BVDV control programs. Past experiences indicate that systematic, well-coordinated control programs have a clear potential for success, while voluntary control programs in cultures of distributed decision-making often result in notable initial progress that ultimately ends in dissolution of efforts. Segmentation of the cattle industry into cow-calf producers, stocker/backgrounders, and feedlot operators amplifies the distribution of decision-making regarding control programs and may result in control measures for one industry segment that are associated with significant costs and limited rewards. Though the host range of BVDV extends well beyond cattle, multiple eradication programs that focus only on testing and removal of persistently infected (PI) cattle have proven to be effective in various countries. While some individuals consider education of producers to be sufficient to stimulate eradication of BVDV, research surrounding the adoption of innovative health care procedures suggests that the process of adopting BVDV control programs has a social element. Collegial interactions and discussions may be crucial in facilitating the systematic implementation necessary to optimize the long-term success of control programs. Compulsory control programs may be considered efficient and effective in some regions; however, in a nation where

  15. Implementation and impact of an audit and feedback antimicrobial stewardship intervention in the orthopaedics department of a tertiary-care hospital: a controlled interrupted time series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Margarida; Carvalho, Ana Cláudia; Almeida, José Pedro; Andrade, Paulo; São-Simão, Ricardo; Soares, Pedro; Alves, Carlos; Pinto, Rui; Fontanet, Arnaud; Watier, Laurence

    2018-06-01

    A prospective audit and feedback antimicrobial stewardship intervention conducted in the Orthopaedics Department of a university hospital in Portugal was evaluated by comparing an interrupted time series in the intervention group with a non-intervention (control) group. Monthly antibiotic use (except cefazolin) was measured as the World Health Organization's Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical defined daily doses (ATC-DDD) from January 2012 to September 2016, excluding the 6-month phase of intervention implementation starting on 1 January 2015. Compared with the control group, the intervention group had a monthly decrease in the use of fluoroquinolones by 2.3 DDD/1000 patient-days [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.97 to -0.63]. An increase in the use of penicillins by 103.3 DDD/1000 patient-days (95% CI 47.42 to 159.10) was associated with intervention implementation, followed by a decrease during the intervention period (slope = -5.2, 95% CI -8.56 to -1.82). In the challenging scenario of treatment of osteoarticular and prosthetic joint infections, an audit and feedback intervention reduced antibiotic exposure and spectrum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Contemporary perspective on plaque control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P D

    2012-06-22

    The aim of this review article is to provide a scientific platform that will enable the dental team to develop a rational approach to plaque control based on the latest knowledge of the role of the oral microflora in health and disease. The resident oral microflora is natural and forms spatially-organised, interactive, multi-species biofilms on mucosal and dental surfaces in the mouth. These resident oral microbial communities play a key function in the normal development of the physiology of the host and are important in preventing colonisation by exogenous and often undesirable microbes. A dynamic balance exists between the resident microflora and the host in health, and disease results from a breakdown of this delicate relationship. Patients should be taught effective plaque control techniques that maintain dental biofilms at levels compatible with oral health so as to retain the beneficial properties of the resident microflora while reducing the risk of dental disease from excessive plaque accumulation. Antimicrobial and antiplaque agents in oral care products can augment mechanical plaque control by several direct and indirect mechanisms that not only involve reducing or removing dental biofilms but also include inhibiting bacterial metabolism when the agents are still present at sub-lethal concentrations.

  17. Implementing an intensified antibiotic stewardship programme targeting daptomycin use in orthopaedic surgery: a cost-benefit analysis from the hospital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borde, Johannes P; Nussbaum, Sarah; Hauser, Stefanie; Hehn, Philip; Hübner, Johannes; Sitaru, Gabriela; Köller, Sebastian; Schweigert, Bruno; deWith, Katja; Kern, Winfried V; Kaier, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Hospital antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programmes offer several evidence-based tools to control prescription rates of antibiotics in different settings, influence the incidence of nosocomial infections and to contain the development of multi-drug-resistant bacteria. In the context of endoprosthetic surgery, however, knowledge of core antibiotic stewardship strategies, comparisons of costs and benefits of hospital ABS programmes are still lacking. We identified a high daptomycin use for the treatment of methicillin-sensitive staphylococcal infections as a potential target for our ABS intervention. In addition, we endorsed periprosthetic tissue cultures for the diagnosis of PJI. Monthly antibiotic use data were obtained from the hospital pharmacy and were expressed as WHO-ATC defined daily doses (DDD) and dose definitions adapted to local guidelines (recommended daily doses, RDD), normalized per 1000 patient days. The pre-intervention period was defined from February 2012 through January 2014 (24 months). The post-intervention period included monthly time points from February 2014 to April 2015 (15 months). For a basic cost-benefit analysis from the hospital perspective, three cost drivers were taken into account: (1) the cost savings due to changes in antimicrobial prescribing; (2) costs associated with the increase in the number of cultured tissue samples, and (3) the appointment of an infectious disease consultant. Interrupted time-series analysis (ITS) was applied. Descriptive analysis of the usage data showed a decline in overall use of anti-infective substances in the post-intervention period (334.9 vs. 221.4 RDDs/1000 patient days). The drug use density of daptomycin dropped by -75 % (51.7 vs. 12.9 RDD/1000 patient days), whereas the utilization of narrow-spectrum penicillins, in particular flucloxacillin, increased from 13.8 to 33.6 RDDs/1000 patient days. ITS analysis of the consumption dataset showed significant level changes for overall prescriptions, as

  18. Orthopaedic resident preparedness for closed reduction and pinning of pediatric supracondylar fractures is improved by e-learning: a multisite randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearty, Thomas; Maizels, Max; Pring, Maya; Mazur, John; Liu, Raymond; Sarwark, John; Janicki, Joseph

    2013-09-04

    There is a need to provide more efficient surgical training methods for orthopaedic residents. E-learning could possibly increase resident surgical preparedness, confidence, and comfort for surgery. Using closed reduction and pinning of pediatric supracondylar humeral fractures as the index case, we hypothesized that e-learning could increase resident knowledge acquisition for case preparation in the operating room. An e-learning surgical training module was created on the Computer Enhanced Visual Learning platform. The module provides a detailed and focused road map of the procedure utilizing a multimedia format. A multisite prospective randomized controlled study design compared residents who used a textbook for case preparation (control group) with residents who used the same textbook plus completed the e-learning module (test group). All subjects completed a sixty-question test on the theory and methods of the case. After completion of the test, the control group then completed the module as well. All subjects were surveyed on their opinion regarding the effectiveness of the module after performing an actual surgical case. Twenty-eight subjects with no previous experience in this surgery were enrolled at four academic centers. Subjects were randomized into two equal groups. The test group scored significantly better (p < 0.001) and demonstrated competence on the test compared with the control group; the mean correct test score (and standard deviation) was 90.9% ± 6.8% for the test group and 73.5% ± 6.4% for the control group. All residents surveyed (n = 27) agreed that the module is a useful supplement to traditional methods for case preparation and twenty-two of twenty-seven residents agreed that it reduced their anxiety during the case and improved their attention to surgical detail. E-learning using the Computer Enhanced Visual Learning platform significantly improved preparedness, confidence, and comfort with percutaneous closed reduction and pinning of a

  19. Origins of eponymous orthopaedic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meals, Clifton; Wang, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    Orthopaedists make great use of eponymous equipment, however the origins of these tools are unknown to many users. This history enriches, enlightens, and enhances surgical education, and may inspire modern innovation. We explored the origins of common and eponymous orthopaedic equipment. We selected pieces of equipment named for their inventors and in the broadest use by modern orthopaedists. We do not describe specialized orthopaedic implants and instruments owing to the overwhelming number of these devices. The history of this equipment reflects the coevolution of orthopaedics and battlefield medicine. Additionally, these stories evidence the primacy of elegant design and suggest that innovation is often a process of revision and refinement rather than sudden inspiration. Their history exposes surgical innovators as brilliant, lucky, hardworking, and sometimes odd. These stories amuse, enlighten, and may inspire modern orthopaedists to develop creative solutions of their own. The rich history of the field's eponymous instruments informs an ongoing tradition of innovation in orthopaedics.

  20. An information revolution in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, A J; MacGregor, A; Spencer, S A

    2012-04-01

    With the established success of the National Joint Registry and the emergence of a range of new national initiatives for the capture of electronic data in the National Health Service, orthopaedic surgery in the United Kingdom has found itself thrust to the forefront of an information revolution. In this review we consider the benefits and threats that this revolution poses, and how orthopaedic surgeons should marshal their resources to ensure that this is a force for good.

  1. [Famous figures of the Poznań orthopaedics of the period of the occupation and post-war years. Coryphees of Polish orthopaedics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Władysław

    2008-01-01

    In this article author presents, from a perspective of own memories is portraying persons which he met in his professional activity. They participated in forming the orthopaedics in Poznań and different nooks of Poland. He resembles their, often very dramatic, fates and the influence they had on Polish medicine reviving after the II world war. With the special attention he is reminding one of most well-known and valued celebrities of the Polish orthopaedics professor Wiktor Dega.

  2. Physiotherapy following elective orthopaedic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kleijn, P; Blamey, G; Zourikian, N; Dalzell, R; Lobet, S

    2006-07-01

    As haemophilic arthropathy and chronic synovitis are still the most important clinical features in people with haemophilia, different kinds of invasive and orthopaedic procedures have become more common during the last decades. The availability of clotting factor has made arthroplasty of one, or even multiple joints possible. This article highlights the role of physiotherapy before and after such procedures. Synovectomies are sometimes advocated in people with haemophilia to stop repetitive cycles of intra-articular bleeds and/or chronic synovitis. The synovectomy itself, however, does not solve the muscle atrophy, loss of range of motion (ROM), instability and poor propriocepsis, often developed during many years. The key is in taking advantage of the subsequent, relatively safe, bleed-free period to address these important issues. Although the preoperative ROM is the most important variable influencing the postoperative ROM after total knee arthroplasty, there are a few key points that should be considered to improve the outcome. Early mobilization, either manual or by means of a continuous passive mobilization machine, can be an optimal solution during the very first postoperative days. Muscle isometric contractions and light open kinetic chain exercises should also be started in order to restore the quadriceps control. Partial weight bearing can be started shortly after, because of quadriceps inhibition and to avoid excessive swelling. The use of continuous clotting factor replacement permits earlier and intensive rehabilitation during the postoperative period. During the rehabilitation of shoulder arthroplasty restoring the function of the rotator cuff is of utmost importance. Often the rotator cuff muscles are inhibited in the presence of pain and loss of ROM. Physiotherapy also assists in improving pain and maintaining ROM and strength. Functional weight-bearing tasks, such as using the upper limbs to sit and stand, are often discouraged during the first 6

  3. Computational radiology for orthopaedic interventions

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuo

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a cohesive overview of the current technological advances in computational radiology, and their applications in orthopaedic interventions. Contributed by the leading researchers in the field, this volume covers not only basic computational radiology techniques such as statistical shape modeling, CT/MRI segmentation, augmented reality and micro-CT image processing, but also the applications of these techniques to various orthopaedic interventional tasks. Details about following important state-of-the-art development are featured: 3D preoperative planning and patient-specific instrumentation for surgical treatment of long-bone deformities, computer assisted diagnosis and planning of periacetabular osteotomy and femoroacetabular impingement, 2D-3D reconstruction-based planning of total hip arthroplasty, image fusion for  computer-assisted bone tumor surgery, intra-operative three-dimensional imaging in fracture treatment, augmented reality based orthopaedic interventions and education, medica...

  4. Regulatory perspective on incomplete control rod insertions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterton, M.

    1997-01-01

    The incomplete control rod insertions experienced at South Texas Unit 1 and Wolf Creek are of safety concern to the NRC staff because they represent potential precursors to loss of shutdown margin. Even before it was determined if these events were caused by the control rods or by the fuel there was an apparent correlation of the problem with high burnup fuel. It was determined that there was also a correlation between high burnup and high drag forces as well as with rod drop time histories and lack of rod recoil. The NRC staff initial actions were aimed at getting a perspective on the magnitude of the problem as far as the number of plants and the amount of fuel that could be involved, as well as the safety significance in terms of shutdown margin. As tests have been performed and data has been analyzed the focus has shifted more toward understanding the problem and the ways to eliminate it. At this time the staff's understanding of the phenomena is that it was a combination of factors including burnup, power history and temperature. The problem appears to be very sensitive to these factors, the interaction of which is not clearly understood. The model developed by Westinghouse provides a possible explanation but there is not sufficient data to establish confidence levels and sensitivity studies involving the key parameters have not been done. While several fixes to the problem have been discussed, no definitive fixes have been proposed. Without complete understanding of the phenomena, or fixes that clearly eliminate the problem the safety concern remains. The safety significance depends on the amount of shutdown margin lost due to incomplete insertion of the control rods. Were the control rods to stick high in the core, the reactor could not be shutdown by the control rods and other means such as emergency boration would be required

  5. April 2006. 32 Major Orthopaedic Procedures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2006-04-01

    Apr 1, 2006 ... Major Orthopaedic Procedures: 17 Year Trends. Biruk Lambisso Wamisho1 ... financial and logistic constraints with poor compliance of ... Modern orthopaedic surgery is very expensive. A highly ..... Case management. Tribury.

  6. Developmental orthopaedic diseases in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Şİrİn, Özlem; Alkan, Zeki

    2010-01-01

    Developmental Orthopaedic Diseases (DOD) is seen frequently in horses which completed their maturity. Osteochondrosis, physitis, angular limb deformities, flexural deformities, juvenil arthritis, cervical vertebral anomalies, cuboidal bone abnormalities are problems investigated under Developmental Orthopaedic Diseases title. This diseases can develop single or some together in fast growing, heavy animals (especially Arabian and English Thoroughbreds). Multifactorial causes of this diseases etiopathogenesis can be listed as genetic predisposition, trauma, nutrition, vitamins/minerals and endocrine disorders. But the exact causes of these diseases are not known. In this review detailed information are given about the diseases mentioned above

  7. Orthopaedic training in Kenya | Mulimba | East African Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To do a survey of the current orthopaedic specialists in Kenya's training since their first medical degrees. Determine the duration, facilities and methods of training. Methods: A number of doctors trained under different arrangements were identified, interviewed and where curriculum was available this was read.

  8. Patient compliance and effect of orthopaedic shoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, A B; Ellitsgaard, N; Krogsgaard, M R

    1999-01-01

    Orthopaedic shoes are individually handmade after a prescription from an orthopaedic surgeon, hence relatively expensive. Bad compliance is mentioned in the literature but not investigated. In order to evaluate patient compliance and the effect of orthopaedic shoes, 85 patients who were prescribed...

  9. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  10. 42 Editorial ADVOCACY IN ORTHOPAEDICS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-11

    Sep 11, 2017 ... East African Orthopaedic Journal. Advocacy may be ... taxation of medical equipment and implants in Kenya. In 2013 a change ... Asia countries especially India were doing the opposite. They reduced ... Most developing countries have been dealing with communicable ... The role of advocacy is huge here.

  11. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G.; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if

  12. Orthopaedic Perspective on Barefoot and Minimalist Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Jonathan; Neumann, Julie; Tao, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a movement toward barefoot and minimalist running. Advocates assert that a lack of cushion and support promotes a forefoot or midfoot strike rather than a rearfoot strike, decreasing the impact transient and stress on the hip and knee. Although the change in gait is theorized to decrease injury risk, this concept has not yet been fully elucidated. However, research has shown diminished symptoms of chronic exertional compartment syndrome and anterior knee pain after a transition to minimalist running. Skeptics are concerned that, because of the effects of the natural environment and the lack of a standardized transition program, barefoot running could lead to additional, unforeseen injuries. Studies have shown that, with the transition to minimalist running, there is increased stress on the foot and ankle and risk of repetitive stress injuries. Nonetheless, despite the large gap of evidence-based knowledge on minimalist running, the potential benefits warrant further research and consideration.

  13. Orthopaedic Implants And Prosthesis: Economic Costs Of Post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the economic impact of post-operative wound infection in trauma patients who had open reduction and internal fixation with implants and prostheses following fractures of the femur. METHOD: This is a 2-year case controlled prospective study carried out at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Lagos.

  14. Planning for life after orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Joseph S; McCaslin, Michael J; Hinds, Cynthia K

    2014-01-01

    The word retirement is going out of fashion. Many orthopaedic surgeons want to work in some capacity when they stop performing surgery. Making a smooth transition from a busy orthopaedic practice to alternative work demands advanced planning. The surgeon must consider personal issues that involve how to use human capital (his or her accumulated knowledge and experience). New ventures, hobbies, travel, and spending time with family and friends are some possibilities. Plans for slowing down or leaving the practice should be discussed and agreed on well ahead of time. Agreements for buyouts may be difficult to work out and will require creative thinking. The solo practitioner can close the practice or hire a successor. Financial planning is perhaps the most important consideration and should be started by approximately age 40. It is recommended that the surgeon develop a portfolio of secure investments and annuities to provide adequate income for as long as is needed and then to turn the residual income to one's family, favorite charities, or other desired cause. A team of competent advisors is needed to help develop and achieve one's goals, create financial security, and provide the discipline to carry out the needed planning for life after orthopaedics.

  15. Social Media in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Sarah T; Sanders, James O; Cook, Peter C; O'Malley, Natasha T

    Internet searches and social media utilization in health care has exploded over the past 5 years, and patients utilize it to gain information on their health conditions and physicians. Social media has the potential to serve as a means for education, communication, and marketing in all health care specialties. Physicians are sometimes reluctant to engage because of concerns of privacy, litigation, and lack of experience with this modality. Many surgical subspecialties have capitalized on social media but no study to date has examined the specific footprint of pediatric orthopaedic surgeons in this realm. We aim to quantify the utilization of individual social media platforms by pediatric orthopaedic surgeons, and identify any differences between private and hospital-based physicians, but also regional differences. Using the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America Member Directory, each active member's social media presence was reviewed through an Internet search. Members were stratified on the basis of practice model and geographic location. Individual Internet searches, social media sites, and number of publications were reviewed for social media presence. Of 987 Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America members, 95% had a professional webpage, 14.8% a professional Facebook page, 2.2% a professional Twitter page, 36.8% a LinkedIn profile, 25.8% a ResearchGate profile, 33% at least 1 YouTube. Hospital-based physicians had a lower mean level of utilization of social media compared with their private practice peers, and a higher incidence of Pubmed publications. Private practice physicians had double the social media utilization. Regional differences reveal that practicing Pediatric Orthopaedists in the Northeast had increased utilization of ResearchGate and LinkedIn and the West had the lowest mean social media utilization levels. The rapid expansion of social media usage by patients and their family members is an undeniable force affecting the health

  16. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  17. Development, implementation and evaluation of a patient handoff tool to improve safety in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnier, Joel J; Derosier, Joseph M; Maratt, Joseph D; Hake, Mark E; Bagian, James P

    2016-06-01

    To develop, implement and test the effect of a handoff tool for orthopaedic trauma residents that reduces adverse events associated with the omission of critical information and the transfer of erroneous information. Components of this project included a literature review, resident surveys and observations, checklist development and refinement, implementation and evaluation of impact on adverse events through a chart review of a prospective cohort compared with a historical control group. Large teaching hospital. Findings of a literature review were presented to orthopaedic residents, epidemiologists, orthopaedic surgeons and patient safety experts in face-to-face meetings, during which we developed and refined the contents of a resident handoff tool. The tool was tested in an orthopaedic trauma service and its impact on adverse events was evaluated through a chart review. The handoff tool was developed and refined during the face-to-face meetings and a pilot implementation. Adverse event data were collected on 127 patients (n = 67 baseline period; n = 60 test period). A handoff tool for use by orthopaedic residents. Adverse events in patients handed off by orthopaedic trauma residents. After controlling for age, gender and comorbidities, testing resulted in fewer events per person (25-27% reduction; P < 0.10). Preliminary evidence suggests that our resident handoff tool may contribute to a decrease in adverse events in orthopaedic patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  18. Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldager, Casper B.; Bendtsen, Michael; Berg, Lise C.

    2016-01-01

    to musculoskeletal pain and disability. The Aarhus Regenerative Orthopaedics Symposium (AROS) 2015 was motivated by the need to address regenerative challenges in an ageing population by engaging clinicians, basic scientists, and engineers. In this position paper, we review our contemporary understanding of societal......, patient-related, and basic science-related challenges in order to provide a reasoned roadmap for the future to deal with this compelling and urgent healthcare problem. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis on behalf of the Nordic Orthopedic Federation....

  19. International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies: A model for international collaboration to promote orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Miclau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In October 2013, the International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies (ICORS; http://i-cors.org was founded with inaugural member organisations from the previous Combined Orthopaedic Research Society, which had sponsored combined meetings for more than 2 decades. The ICORS is dedicated to the stimulation of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research in fields such as biomedical engineering, biology, chemistry, and veterinary and human clinical research. The ICORS seeks to facilitate communication with member organisations to enhance international research collaborations and to promote the development of new international orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research organisations. Through new categories of membership, the ICORS represents the broadest coalition of orthopaedic research organisations globally.

  20. Factors driving physician-hospital alignment in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alexandra E; Butler, Craig A; Bozic, Kevin J

    2013-06-01

    The relationships between physicians and hospitals are viewed as central to the proposition of delivering high-quality health care at a sustainable cost. Over the last two decades, major changes in the scope, breadth, and complexities of these relationships have emerged. Despite understanding the need for physician-hospital alignment, identification and understanding the incentives and drivers of alignment prove challenging. Our review identifies the primary drivers of physician alignment with hospitals from both the physician and hospital perspectives. Further, we assess the drivers more specific to motivating orthopaedic surgeons to align with hospitals. We performed a comprehensive literature review from 1992 to March 2012 to evaluate published studies and opinions on the issues surrounding physician-hospital alignment. Literature searches were performed in both MEDLINE(®) and Health Business™ Elite. Available literature identifies economic and regulatory shifts in health care and cultural factors as primary drivers of physician-hospital alignment. Specific to orthopaedics, factors driving alignment include the profitability of orthopaedic service lines, the expense of implants, and issues surrounding ambulatory surgery centers and other ancillary services. Evolving healthcare delivery and payment reforms promote increased collaboration between physicians and hospitals. While economic incentives and increasing regulatory demands provide the strongest drivers, cultural changes including physician leadership and changing expectations of work-life balance must be considered when pursuing successful alignment models. Physicians and hospitals view each other as critical to achieving lower-cost, higher-quality health care.

  1. 1 venous thromboembolism in orthopaedics references

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-05-23

    2004; 126: 338-400S. 3. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. American Academy of orthopaedic Surgeons clinical guidelines on prevention of symptomatic pulmonary embolism in patients undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty.www.aaos.org/Research/ guidelines/PE_guideline. Pdf (accessed May 23, 2008). 4.

  2. Mentorship in orthopaedic and trauma residency training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mentorship is important in residency training as it is necessary for personal and professional development of the resident trainees. Objectives: This study documents mentorship in orthopaedic residency training programme in Nigeria by assessing the awareness of orthopaedic residents on the role of a mentor, ...

  3. Orthopaedic research and education foundation and industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurth, Gene R; Sherr, Judy H; Coffman, Thomas M

    2003-07-01

    Members of orthopaedic industry commit a significant amount of funds each year to support research and education programs that are directly related to their product(s). In addition, industry supports organizations such as the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation. The relationship between the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and industry began in the early 1980s. The support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation from industry primarily has come in the form of unrestricted grants. These grants best can be looked at as an investment rather than a contribution. This form of giving, once called corporate philanthropy is more accurately referred to as strategic philanthropy. Members of industry make these investments to enhance their reputations, build brand awareness, market their products and services, improve employee morale, increase customer loyalty, and establish strategic alliances. The specialty of orthopaedics is among the leaders in medicine in the amount of funding raised within the specialty for research and education programs. This is because of the amount of support from members of industry and the surgeons. During the past 15 years, 40% of the annual support to the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation has come from industry and the balance has come from surgeons and members of lay public. Future industry support of the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation and other organizations within the specialty of orthopaedics will be dependent on the continued demonstration of tangible returns in areas described.

  4. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma publishes original papers, review articles and case reports on pathology, anaesthesia, orthopaedics and trauma. Vol 12, No 1 (2013). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access. Table of Contents. Articles. Management of ...

  5. Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic surgery at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... of surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute was high. This was associated with more than 2 hours length of surgery, lack of prophylaxis use, and pre-operative hospital stay.

  6. Do Orthopaedic Surgeons Acknowledge Uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, Teun; Janssen, Stein; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David; Parisien, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Much of the decision-making in orthopaedics rests on uncertain evidence. Uncertainty is therefore part of our normal daily practice, and yet physician uncertainty regarding treatment could diminish patients' health. It is not known if physician uncertainty is a function of the evidence alone or if other factors are involved. With added experience, uncertainty could be expected to diminish, but perhaps more influential are things like physician confidence, belief in the veracity of what is published, and even one's religious beliefs. In addition, it is plausible that the kind of practice a physician works in can affect the experience of uncertainty. Practicing physicians may not be immediately aware of these effects on how uncertainty is experienced in their clinical decision-making. We asked: (1) Does uncertainty and overconfidence bias decrease with years of practice? (2) What sociodemographic factors are independently associated with less recognition of uncertainty, in particular belief in God or other deity or deities, and how is atheism associated with recognition of uncertainty? (3) Do confidence bias (confidence that one's skill is greater than it actually is), degree of trust in the orthopaedic evidence, and degree of statistical sophistication correlate independently with recognition of uncertainty? We created a survey to establish an overall recognition of uncertainty score (four questions), trust in the orthopaedic evidence base (four questions), confidence bias (three questions), and statistical understanding (six questions). Seven hundred six members of the Science of Variation Group, a collaboration that aims to study variation in the definition and treatment of human illness, were approached to complete our survey. This group represents mainly orthopaedic surgeons specializing in trauma or hand and wrist surgery, practicing in Europe and North America, of whom the majority is involved in teaching. Approximately half of the group has more than 10 years

  7. New design of care: Assessment of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the province of Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; Bellemare, Christian; Bédard, Suzanne K; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2010-01-01

    New designs of care in orthopaedic clinics are needed to cope with the shortage of orthopaedic surgeons and the lengthening of waiting times. To assess the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the Canadian province of Quebec with regard to accessibility, quality of care, efficacy and efficiency of the clinic, and patient's quality of life. Two strategies were developed: (1) a selected cohort of new patients attending an orthopaedic service from February to September 2008 were entered into a database recording patient details, source of referral, diagnosis, satisfaction, and quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey version 2). In this setting, 2 sets of questionnaires were administered to the patients: the first one during the first visit and the second one, 2 months later. A total of 243 patients from the case control were compared with 89 patients of the case study, where an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse has been developed; (2) costs per patient were calculated using the staff timesheets provided by the two orthopaedic clinics. The results showed a significant reduction in the waiting-list duration (accessibility) in the case study clinic owing to a strong decrease in the inappropriate consultations with the orthopaedic consultant. The quality of care remained high, and the target surgeries for total hip and knee replacement were reached, despite a strong shortage of orthopaedic doctors. Interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse is a new approach in the province of Quebec and first results are encouraging.

  8. LWR control assembly designs: A historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennard, M.W.; Harbottle, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Control rod designs and materials have evolved in response to performance problems in both PWRs and BWRs. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) due to absorber swelling has primarily affected BWR control rods with B 4 C absorbers, but has also occurred in PWRs with Ag-In-Cd absorbers. The primary problems for some designs of PWR control rods have been wear of the rodlets against upper internal components and swelling with tip wear and cracking. Competition amongst vendors for supplying control rod reloads has also resulted in design improvements. This paper provides an historical review of PWR and BWR control rod designs, their problems and remedies. (author)

  9. Does sleep deprivation impair orthopaedic surgeons' cognitive and psychomotor performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Michael J; O'Toole, Robert V; Newell, Mary Zadnik; Lydecker, Alison D; Nascone, Jason; Sciadini, Marcus; Pollak, Andrew; Turen, Clifford; Eglseder, W Andrew

    2012-11-07

    Sleep deprivation may slow reaction time, cloud judgment, and impair the ability to think. Our purpose was to study the cognitive and psychomotor performances of orthopaedic trauma surgeons on the basis of the amount of sleep that they obtained. We prospectively studied the performances of thirty-two orthopaedic trauma surgeons (residents, fellows, and attending surgeons) over two four-week periods at an urban academic trauma center. Testing sessions used handheld computers to administer validated cognitive and psychomotor function tests. We conducted a multivariate analysis to examine the independent association between test performance and multiple covariates, including the amount of sleep the night before testing. Our analysis demonstrated that orthopaedic surgeons who had slept four hours or less the night before the test had 1.43 times the odds (95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 1.95; p = 0.03) of committing at least one error on an individual test compared with orthopaedic surgeons who had slept more than four hours the previous night. The Running Memory test, which assesses sustained attention, concentration, and working memory, was most sensitive to deterioration in performance in participants who had had four hours of sleep or less; when controlling for other covariates, the test demonstrated a 72% increase in the odds of making at least one error (odds ratio, 1.72 [95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.90]; p = 0.04). No significant decrease in performance with sleep deprivation was shown with the other three tests. Orthopaedic trauma surgeons showed deterioration in performance on a validated cognitive task when they had slept four hours or less the previous night. It is unknown how performance on this test relates to surgical performance.

  10. Shewhart control charts in new perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of estimating parameters and the violation of the assumption of normality when dealing with control charts are discussed. Corrections for estimating errors and extensions of the normal control chart to parametric and nonparametric charts are investigated. The underlying theory is

  11. Effortless self-control : A novel perspective on response conflict strategies in trait self-control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillebaart, Marleen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344390365; de Ridder, Denise T D|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070706174

    Self-control is of invaluable importance for well-being. While previous research has focused on self-control failure, we introduce a new perspective on self-control, including the notion of effortless self-control, and a focus on self-control success rather than failure. We propose that effortless

  12. Robot Control Overview: An Industrial Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Brogårdh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One key competence for robot manufacturers is robot control, defined as all the technologies needed to control the electromechanical system of an industrial robot. By means of modeling, identification, optimization, and model-based control it is possible to reduce robot cost, increase robot performance, and solve requirements from new automation concepts and new application processes. Model-based control, including kinematics error compensation, optimal servo reference- and feed-forward generation, and servo design, tuning, and scheduling, has meant a breakthrough for the use of robots in industry. Relying on this breakthrough, new automation concepts such as high performance multi robot collaboration and human robot collaboration can be introduced. Robot manufacturers can build robots with more compliant components and mechanical structures without loosing performance and robots can be used also in applications with very high performance requirements, e.g., in assembly, machining, and laser cutting. In the future it is expected that the importance of sensor control will increase, both with respect to sensors in the robot structure to increase the control performance of the robot itself and sensors outside the robot related to the applications and the automation systems. In this connection sensor fusion and learning functionalities will be needed together with the robot control for easy and intuitive installation, programming, and maintenance of industrial robots.

  13. Where Are the Women in Orthopaedic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Rachel S; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Adams, Julie E

    2016-09-01

    Although women account for approximately half of the medical students in the United States, they represent only 13% of orthopaedic surgery residents and 4% of members of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Furthermore, a smaller relative percentage of women pursue careers in orthopaedic surgery than in any other subspecialty. Formal investigations regarding the gender discrepancy in choice of orthopaedic surgery are lacking. (1) What reasons do women orthopaedic surgeons cite for why they chose this specialty? (2) What perceptions do women orthopaedic surgeons think might deter other women from pursuing this field? (3) What role does early exposure to orthopaedics and mentorship play in this choice? (4) What professional and personal choices do women in orthopaedics make, and how might this inform students who are choosing a career path? A 21-question survey was emailed to all active, candidate, and resident members of the Ruth Jackson Orthopaedic Society (RJOS, n = 556). RJOS is the oldest surgical women's organization incorporated in the United States. An independent orthopaedic specialty society, RJOS supports leadership training, mentorship, grant opportunities, and advocacy for its members and promotes sex-related musculoskeletal research. Although not all women in orthopaedic practice or training belong to RJOS, it is estimated that 42% of women AAOS fellows are RJOS members. Questions were formulated to determine demographics, practice patterns, and lifestyle choices of women who chose orthopaedic surgery as a specialty. Specifically, we evaluated the respondents' decisions about their careers and their opinions of why more women do not choose this field. For the purpose of this analysis, the influences and dissuaders were divided into three major categories: personal attributes, experience/exposure, and work/life considerations. The most common reasons cited for having chosen orthopaedic surgery were enjoyment of manual tasks (165 of 232

  14. Synthetic perspective optical flow: Influence on pilot control tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. Thomas; Johnson, Walter W.; Perrone, John A.; Phatak, Anil V.

    1989-01-01

    One approach used to better understand the impact of visual flow on control tasks has been to use synthetic perspective flow patterns. Such patterns are the result of apparent motion across a grid or random dot display. Unfortunately, the optical flow so generated is based on a subset of the flow information that exists in the real world. The danger is that the resulting optical motions may not generate the visual flow patterns useful for actual flight control. Researchers conducted a series of studies directed at understanding the characteristics of synthetic perspective flow that support various pilot tasks. In the first of these, they examined the control of altitude over various perspective grid textures (Johnson et al., 1987). Another set of studies was directed at studying the head tracking of targets moving in a 3-D coordinate system. These studies, parametric in nature, utilized both impoverished and complex virtual worlds represented by simple perspective grids at one extreme, and computer-generated terrain at the other. These studies are part of an applied visual research program directed at understanding the design principles required for the development of instruments displaying spatial orientation information. The experiments also highlight the need for modeling the impact of spatial displays on pilot control tasks.

  15. Access Control from an Intrusion Detection Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunes Leal Franqueira, V.

    Access control and intrusion detection are essential components for securing an organization's information assets. In practice, these components are used in isolation, while their fusion would contribute to increase the range and accuracy of both. One approach to accomplish this fusion is the

  16. A perspective on stage dynamics and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butler, H.

    2008-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, a wafer stepper is used to expose the pattern on a mask (‘reticle’) onto a wafer. Accurate positioning of the reticle and the wafer is of crucial importance for creating a working IC. This paper reflects on the stage dynamics and control design in Stepper technology,

  17. History of orthopaedics in China: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Zhang, Yingze

    2018-03-01

    Chinese orthopaedic surgeons have made a substantial contribution to the development of orthopaedics worldwide, and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in orthopaedics has a very long history in China. We make a brief review of the development of orthopaedics in China, intending to pave the way for further understanding of Chinese orthopaedics for scholars all over the world. The description of fractures firstly appeared in 3600 years ago in China, and the theories, experience, and treatment strategies of TCM still play important roles in clinical diagnosis and treatment of orthopaedic disorders in our country. Western orthopaedics was first introduced into China in the early twentieth century. After decades of development, Chinese scholars have made some gratifying achievements in orthopaedics. Orthopaedics is constantly evolving, and we need to strengthen the ability of independent innovation to achieve orthopaedic surgeons' Chinese dream, and better serve our patients.

  18. Commercial FPGA based multipurpose controller: implementation perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arredondo, I.; Campo, M. del; Echevarria, P.; Belver, D.; Muguira, L.; Garmendia, N.; Hassanzadegan, H.; Eguiraun, M.; Jugo, J.; Etxebarria, V.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a fast acquisition multipurpose controller, focussing on its EPICS integration and on its XML based configuration. This controller is based on a Lyrtech VHS-ADC board which encloses an FPGA, connected to a Host PC. This Host acts as local controller and implements an IOC integrating the device in an EPICS network. These tasks have been performed using Java as the main tool to program the PC to make the device fit the desired application. All the process includes the use of different technologies: JNA to handle C functions i.e. FPGA API, JavaIOC to integrate EPICS and XML w3c DOM classes to easily configure the particular application. In order to manage the functions, Java specific tools have been developed: Methods to manage the FPGA (read/write registers, acquire data,...), methods to create and use the EPICS server (put, get, monitor,...), mathematical methods to process the data (numeric format conversions,...) and methods to create/ initialize the application structure by means of an XML file (parse elements, build the DOM and the specific application structure). This XML file has some common nodes and tags for all the applications: FPGA registers specifications definition and EPICS variables. This means that the user only has to include a node for the specific application and use the mentioned tools. A main class is in charge of managing the FPGA and EPICS server according to this XML file. This multipurpose controller has been successfully used to implement a BPM and an LLRF application for the ESS-Bilbao (European Spallation Source) facility. (authors)

  19. Need for new perspectives in pollution control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, F M

    1977-01-01

    Environmental responsibility by corporations, nations, and society as a whole requires a national environment to nurture commitment and relax tensions between the private and public sectors. A review of the progress made in meeting the 1972 Water Pollution Control Act's goals demonstrates industry's commitment to both the cause and the timetable set by the Act. Speaking for Union Carbide, the author uses capital outlay, the number of employees involved in pollution abatement, and the number of technical advances developed by the corporation to improve pollution problems to illustrate his points. Municipalities, by contrast, lag in meeting the required upgrading of municipal waste water treatment. When the 1972 Act was written it was assumed that prosperity would continue and the goal of ''best available'' control technology in place for industrial waste water seemed reasonable. New priorities have emerged, however, and the case is made for postponing the requirements until the social and economic effects are more certain and until the goals can be re-evaluated to see if the costs and benefits justify a zero discharge goal. (DCK)

  20. American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Upcoming Meetings Online Education Archived Meetings Faculty Resources Sports Medicine Fellowships Traveling Fellowship Submit an Abstract Submit ... Support AOSSM Research Publications Toggle American Journal of Sports Medicine Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach Orthopaedic Journal ...

  1. Ireland's contribution to orthopaedic literature: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C; O Sullivan, P; Bilal, M; Walsh, A

    2013-10-01

    Bibliometric analysis of scientific performance within a country or speciality, facilitate the recognition of factors that may further enhance research activity and performance. Our aim was to illicit the current state of Irelands orthopaedic research output in terms of quantity and quality. We performed a retrospective bibliometric analysis of all Irish orthopaedic publications over the past 5 years, in the top 20 peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals. Utilising the MEDLINE database, each journal was evaluated for articles that were published over the study period. Reviews, editorials, reports and letters were excluded. Each article abstract was analysed for research content, and country of origin. A nation's mean IF was defined by multiplying each journal's IF by the number of articles. Publications per million (PmP) was calculated by dividing the total number of publications by the population of each country. We analysed a total of 25,595 article abstracts. Ireland contributed 109 articles in total (0.42% of all articles), however ranking according to population per million was 10th worldwide. Ireland ranked 18th worldwide in relation to mean impact factor, which was 2.91 over the study period. Ireland published in 16 of the top 20 journals, 9 of these were of European origin, and 1 of the top 5 was of American origin. In total, 61 Irish articles were assignable to clinical orthopaedic units. Clinical based studies (randomised controlled trials, observational, and epidemiology/bibliometric articles) and research based studies (In vivo, In vitro, and biomechanical) numbered 76 (69.7%) and 33 (30.2%) articles, respectively. This study provides a novel overview of current Irish orthopaedic related research, and how our standards translate to the worldwide orthopaedic community. In order to maintain our publication productivity, academic research should continue to be encouraged at post graduate level. Copyright © 2013 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh

  2. Surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Mabrey, Jay D; Jazrawi, Laith M; Egol, Kenneth A

    2012-07-01

    Mastering rapidly evolving orthopaedic surgical techniques requires a lengthy period of training. Current work-hour restrictions and cost pressures force trainees to face the challenge of acquiring more complex surgical skills in a shorter amount of time. As a result, alternative methods to improve the surgical skills of orthopaedic trainees outside the operating room have been developed. These methods include hands-on training in a laboratory setting using synthetic bones or cadaver models as well as software tools and computerized simulators that enable trainees to plan and simulate orthopaedic operations in a three-dimensional virtual environment. Laboratory-based training offers potential benefits in the development of basic surgical skills, such as using surgical tools and implants appropriately, achieving competency in procedures that have a steep learning curve, and assessing already acquired skills while minimizing concerns for patient safety, operating room time, and financial constraints. Current evidence supporting the educational advantages of surgical simulation in orthopaedic skills training is limited. Despite this, positive effects on the overall education of orthopaedic residents, and on maintaining the proficiency of practicing orthopaedic surgeons, are anticipated.

  3. The choice of foreign entry modes in a control perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr Ulrich, Anna Marie; Boyd, Britta; Hollensen, Svend

    The aim of this article is to investigate the choice of entry modes for international markets in a control perspective. A survey from The Confederation of Danish Industry with 234 Danish small- and medium sized enterprises served as a data base. The entry modes are categorized into three groups...... depending on the control that the company has over its activities abroad. The paper examines selected factors that influence the ‘entry modes’ of Danish SMEs in different strategic settings. Results show that the most deciding factor for the choice of high control entry mode (subsidiary) was the factor...

  4. Trust and control interrelatedness: New perspectives on the trust-control nexus in organizational relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, A.C.; Bijlsma-Frankema, K.M.

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces the special issue on New Perspectives on the Trust-Control Nexus in Organizational Relations. Trust and control are interlinked processes commonly seen as key to reach effectiveness in inter- and intraorganizational relations. The relation between trust and control is,

  5. Orthopaedic complications of osteogenesis imperfecta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azrak, S.; Ksyar, R.; Ben Rais, N.

    2009-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a genetic disease characterized by bone frailty. It is generally caused by an abnormal production of collagen, which is the main fibrous protein of the bone. Collagen is also present in the skin, tendons, the sclera of the eye and dentin. The most frequent manifestation of osteogenesis imperfecta is the occurrence of multiple fractures without major trauma. Severity and timing of the attack varies widely: some patients sustain a significant number of fractures during early childhood which may have a serious impact on growth, while others will have some fractures separated by a few years. In all cases, the bone strength improves in adulthood. The bone fractures cause pain and bone deformities sometimes result in a smaller size. Scoliosis is frequent and associated with painful vertebral collapses. We present a case of osteogenesis imperfecta in a 40-year-old adult and we describe the various orthopaedic complications of the disease, stressing the role of bone scintigraphy in the diagnosis and monitoring of these complications. (authors)

  6. Audit of Orthopaedic Surgical Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fionn Coughlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Royal College of Surgeons in England published guidelines in 2008 outlining the information that should be documented at each surgery. St. James’s Hospital uses a standard operation sheet for all surgical procedures and these were examined to assess documentation standards. Objectives. To retrospectively audit the hand written orthopaedic operative notes according to established guidelines. Methods. A total of 63 operation notes over seven months were audited in terms of date and time of surgery, surgeon, procedure, elective or emergency indication, operative diagnosis, incision details, signature, closure details, tourniquet time, postop instructions, complications, prosthesis, and serial numbers. Results. A consultant performed 71.4% of procedures; however, 85.7% of the operative notes were written by the registrar. The date and time of surgery, name of surgeon, procedure name, and signature were documented in all cases. The operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions were frequently not documented in the designated location. Incision details were included in 81.7% and prosthesis details in only 30% while the tourniquet time was not documented in any. Conclusion. Completion and documentation of operative procedures were excellent in some areas; improvement is needed in documenting tourniquet time, prosthesis and incision details, and the location of operative diagnosis and postoperative instructions.

  7. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Euan R B; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-12-19

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in order to compensate for the reduction in 'hands-on' experience. Simulation training provides the opportunity to develop surgical skills in a controlled environment whilst minimising risks to patient safety, operating theatre usage and financial expenditure. Many options for simulation exist within orthopaedics from cadaveric or prosthetic models, to arthroscopic simulators, to advanced virtual reality and three-dimensional software tools. There are limitations to this form of training, but it has significant potential for trainees to achieve competence in procedures prior to real-life practice. The evidence for its direct transferability to operating theatre performance is limited but there are clear benefits such as increasing trainee confidence and familiarity with equipment. With progressively improving methods of simulation available, it is likely to become more important in the ongoing and future training and assessment of orthopaedic surgeons.

  8. Time under control: time perspective and desire for control in substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieulaine, Nicolas; Martinez, Frederic

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the role of time perspective and desire for control in self-reported substance use and to test for a moderating effect of desire for control in the relation between time perspective and substance use. A random sample of 240 persons, aged 15 years and over, selected in various public spaces in an urban region in central France. Time perspective was measured using subscales of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (ZTPI, Zimbardo & Boyd, 1999), Desire for control was measured using a translated version of the Desire for Control Scale (DCS, Burger & Cooper, 1979), and substance use was self-reported. After controlling for age and gender, significant links were found between time perspective and substance use. Desire for control did not appear to be directly related to substance use. The interaction effect between TP and desire for control appeared to be related to substance use. There was evidence that the relation between TP and substance use is buffered by low desire for control. This study converges with previous studies demonstrating the relation between TP and substance use, but provides evidence of the moderating role played by desire for control. Desire for control thus appears as worthy of interest in the analysis of self-regulatory process, and further research on the links between TP and various aspects of control is required. In order to be more effective, the design of future studies and interventions based on time-related issues should consider how desire for control plays a part in establishing vulnerability profiles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Inpatient consultations to an orthopaedic service: the hidden workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, N T

    2011-12-01

    While the quality and efficiency of out-patient orthopaedic referrals are well documented in the literature, there is little on the standard and appropriateness of inpatient orthopaedic consultations.

  10. Current status and progress of digital orthopaedics in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Xian Pei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on the development of digital medicine and digital anatomy, the concept of “digital orthopaedics” was raised by Pei Guo-Xian in China in 2006. The most striking feature of digital orthopaedics is the combination of basic and clinical orthopaedic knowledge with digital technology. In this review, we summarised the development of digital orthopaedics in China in recent years with respect to: the foundation of the Chinese Association of Digital Orthopedics, virtual human project (VHP, three-dimensional (3D reconstruction, finite element simulation, navigation in orthopaedic operations, and robot-assisted orthopaedic operations. In addition, we briefly reviewed digital orthopaedics in world leading institutes. We also looked into the future of digital orthopaedics in China and proposed the major challenges in digital technology and application in orthopaedics.

  11. Establishing a children's orthopaedic hospital for Malawi: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ordinate the MNCP since 2007. At present the program has a total of 29 clinics, which have treated 5748 patients. Furthermore, BCIH has overseen the full or partial training of 5 orthopaedic surgeons and 82 orthopaedic clinical officers in Malawi.

  12. Radiation safety knowledge and practices among Irish orthopaedic trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, M

    2014-04-23

    Fluoroscopy is frequently used in orthopaedic surgery, particularly in a trauma setting. Exposure of patients and staff to ionising radiation has been studied extensively; however, little work has been done to evaluate current knowledge and practices among orthopaedic trainees.

  13. India's nuclear command and control: perspectives from organisation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasikumar, Shanmugasundaram

    2010-01-01

    Command and control of nuclear weapons was the edifice upon which great power nuclear strategy was based. Empirical Cold War research later proved that this edifice was, in fact, only a power keg. Therefore, US non-proliferation-minded analysts propounded logical reasons for their claim that new nuclear nations will be unable to demonstrate prudence in nuclear weapons management. The unique Indian case, pronounced from the organisation theory perspective, proves to the contrary. India's nuclear organisation is not a static entity; its unique strategic culture together with a political standard operating procedure for nuclear weapons management reduces the exaggerated possibility of any catastrophe. (author)

  14. Concept development of control system for perspective unmanned aerial vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koryanov Vsevolod V.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented actual aspects of the development of the control system of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs in the example of perspective. Because the current and future UAV oriented to implementation of a wide range of tasks, taking into account the use of several types of payload, in this paper discusses the general principles of construction of onboard control complex, in turn, a hardware implementation of the automatic control system has been implemented in the microcontroller Arduino platform and the Raspberry Pi. In addition, in the paper presents the most common and promising way to ensure the smooth and reliable communication of the command post with the UAV as well as to the ways of parry considered and abnormal situations.

  15. Regenerative Medicine Will Make Orthopaedic Implants Obsolete In Our Time Orthopaedic Research Society First Annual Meeting Debate, San Diego, March 21st , 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Brian; Jacobs, Joshua J; Sandell, Linda J; Wilkinson, J Mark

    2018-05-10

    The mission of the Orthopaedic Research Society is to promote and advance musculoskeletal research worldwide. With this in mind, the Annual Meeting Program Committee sought to establish a debate as a key component of the meeting. Our purpose was to provoke discussion on topics that are core to our mission and to engage all constituencies within the society by examining questions of broad relevance. To this end, the topic "Regenerative medicine will make orthopaedic implants obsolete in our time" was selected as the title of the inaugural debate. The arguments for and against the motion are presented in this perspectives article. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Orthopaedic surgeries - assessment of ionising radiations exposure in health care workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, E.S.; Uva, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: 1. Objectives: The health care workers are exposed to ionizing radiations during their activities. In the operating rooms, the ionizing radiations are used in orthopaedic surgery and the dose depends on some factors, like the characteristics of the equipment. This study aims to: Estimate the occupational dose of ionizing radiations exposure of the orthopaedic doctors and nurses during the orthopaedic surgeries, in a Portuguese operating room; Sensitize the health care workers to use the individual dosimeter and to adopt radiation preventive measures. 2. Population and methods The study was conducted on nine Orthopaedic doctors and two nurses of an operating room of a hospital in Lisbon neighborhoods. We made a risk evaluating concerning: the radiations dose in different points, corresponding to gonads, hands and crystalline lens levels of all the professionals, during the surgeries; the average period of radiation in the orthopaedic surgeries; the number of annual orthopaedic surgeries, looking for that in the surgeries registers, to estimate the annual ionizing radiations dose of each orthopaedic doctor and nurse. 3. Results The annual doses estimated at different levels for orthopaedic doctors were the following: gonads: between 20,63 and 68,75 mGy; hands: 4,95 16,50 mGy; crystalline lens: 8,25 27,50 mGy). For the orthopaedic nurses: gonads: 130,63 151,25 mGy; hands: 31,35 36,30 mGy; crystalline lens 52,25 60,25 mGy. 4. Conclusions Although the location and positions of health care workers are not the same during the different surgeries and the equipment has an automatic control of the X ray emission, the annual ionizing radiations dose exposure for health care workers is an important one. The risk rating justifies the use of individual dosimeters for better individual dose assessment as part of an ionizing radiations prevention program. As a matter of fact preventive measures begin with a good quantitative risk assessment of

  17. [Orthopaedic day surgery in Emilia-Romagna].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolli, M; Rodler, M; Petropulacos, K; Baldi, R

    2001-09-01

    It is well known that the organizational model of day surgery, concerning surgical problems defined by the literature as minor, has the aim of optimising the use of hospital resources and facilitating patients and their families, from a psychological and social point of view, by reducing hospitalisation time and the associated complications, and ensuring the same efficacy and more appropriateness of treatment. This study is firstly aimed at analysing the impact that the healthcare policy of the Emilia Romagna Region has had on the development of day surgery practice. Secondly, it compares the patients treated in orthopaedic day surgery in the hospitals of Bologna, Modena, Ferrara, Parma, Reggio Emilia, Maggiore hospital of Bologna and Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute of Bologna (II.OO.R). In the period 1997-2000 there was a marked increase in the number of operations carried out in day surgery in all of the above-mentioned hospitals. Also in the unispecialistic orthopaedic hospital there was a surprising increase in the percentage of operations carried out in day surgery with respect to the total number of operations performed. The aim of the Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute and the Emilia Romagna Region is to further implement this form of healthcare, contextually potentiating the appropriateness of hospital admission and avoiding, when not necessary, other forms of healthcare.

  18. Intimate partner violence in orthopaedic trauma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprague, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) or domestic violence is a common and serious public health problem around the globe. Victims of IPV frequently present to health care practitioners including orthopaedic surgeons. Substantial research has been conducted on IPV over the past few decades, but very

  19. The orthopaedic management of myelomeningocele | Horn | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The orthopaedic management of myelomeningocele. A Horn, S Dix-Peek, S Mears, EB Hoffman. Abstract. Despite improvement in antenatal care and screening, myelomeningocele remains the most common congenital birth defect, with a reported incidence of 1 - 2.5/1000 patients in the Western Cape, South Africa.

  20. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma is a peer reviewed journal publishing original research articles on all aspects of trauma, musculoskeletal ... initials and surnames of all authors, their highest academic degrees, affiliations / institutions and the name, address and e-mail address of the corresponding author.

  1. Self-control mediates the relationship between time perspective and BMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Menna; Higgs, Suzanne; Lee, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Trait future time perspective measures the extent to which behaviour is dominated by a striving for future goals and rewards. Trait present time perspective measures orientation towards immediate pleasure. Previous research has explored the relationship between future and present time perspective and BMI with mixed findings. In addition, the psychological mechanism underlying this relationship is unclear. Self-control is a likely candidate, as it has been related to both BMI and time perspective, but the relationship between all of these concepts has not been examined in a single study. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine if trait self-control mediates the relationship between time perspective (future and present) and BMI. Self-report time perspective (ZTPI), self-control (SCS) and height/weight data were collected using an online survey from a mixed student and community sample (N = 218) with wide ranging age (mean 29, SD 11, range 18-73 years) and BMI (mean 24, SD 4, range 15-43). The results of a structural equation model including both facets of time perspective suggested that the traits are related yet distinct measures that independently predict BMI through changes in self-control. Bootstrap mediation analysis showed that self-control mediated the relationship between both future time perspective (95% CI, -0.10 to -0.02) and present time perspective (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.17), and BMI in opposite directions. Participants with higher future time perspective scores (higher present time perspective scores) had higher (lower) self-control, which predicted lower (higher) BMI. These results are consistent with previous research suggesting an important role for time perspective in health outcomes. Self-control likely mediates the relationship between temporal perspectives and BMI, suggesting that time perspective may be a target for individualised interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Orthopaedic traumatology: fundamental principles and current controversies for the acute care surgeon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaon, Shad K; Schoch, Shawn; Marchand, Lucas; Mirza, Amer

    2018-01-01

    Multiply injured patients with fractures are co-managed by acute care surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons. In most centers, orthopaedic surgeons definitively manage fractures, but preliminary management, including washouts, splinting, reductions, and external fixations, may be performed by selected acute care surgeons. The acute care surgeon should have a working knowledge of orthopaedic terminology to communicate with colleagues effectively. They should have an understanding of the composition of bone, periosteum, and cartilage, and their reaction when there is an injury. Fractures are usually fixed urgently, but some multiply injured patients are better served with a damage control strategy. Extremity compartment syndrome should be suspected in all critically injured patients with or without fractures and a low threshold for compartment pressure measurements or empiric fasciotomy maintained. Acute care surgeons performing rib fracture fixation and other chest wall injury reconstructions should follow the principles of open fracture reduction and stabilization. PMID:29766123

  3. Orthopaedic traumatology: fundamental principles and current controversies for the acute care surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharaon, Shad K; Schoch, Shawn; Marchand, Lucas; Mirza, Amer; Mayberry, John

    2018-01-01

    Multiply injured patients with fractures are co-managed by acute care surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons. In most centers, orthopaedic surgeons definitively manage fractures, but preliminary management, including washouts, splinting, reductions, and external fixations, may be performed by selected acute care surgeons. The acute care surgeon should have a working knowledge of orthopaedic terminology to communicate with colleagues effectively. They should have an understanding of the composition of bone, periosteum, and cartilage, and their reaction when there is an injury. Fractures are usually fixed urgently, but some multiply injured patients are better served with a damage control strategy. Extremity compartment syndrome should be suspected in all critically injured patients with or without fractures and a low threshold for compartment pressure measurements or empiric fasciotomy maintained. Acute care surgeons performing rib fracture fixation and other chest wall injury reconstructions should follow the principles of open fracture reduction and stabilization.

  4. When Affect Supports Cognitive Control – A Working Memory Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolańczyk Alina

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper delineates a study of executive functions (EFs, construed as procedural working memory (WM, from a motivational perspective. Since WM theories and motivation theories are both concerned with purposive activity, the role of implicit evaluations (affects observed in goal pursuit can be anticipated to arise also in the context of cognitive control, e.g., during the performance of the Stroop task. The role of positive and negative affect in goal pursuit consists in controlling attention resources according to the goal and situational requirements. Positive affect serves to maintain goals and means in the scope of attention (EF1, whereas negative affect activates the inhibition of non-functional contents, e.g., distractors and irrelevant objects (resulting in attention disengagement; EF2. Adaptation to conflict proceeds via sequential triggering of negative and positive affect (EF3. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the focus on action or reflection changes the scope of contents subjected to implicit (affective control. Therefore, I suggest that the motivational system, to a large extent, plays the role of the Central Executive. The paper opens a discussion and proposes studies on affective mechanisms of cognitive control.

  5. Romania- New Tobacco control law from an NGO perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaltan Florin Dumitru

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In our presentation we are evaluating the progress of the tobacco control in Romania looking form the point of view on NGO in the last 26 years. We are signalling the progressive steps towards policy and an advocacy from our perspective and the consequences of our success. The final result is reflected in the new law starting in force on March 17th, 2016, a real advance in our fight. We are identifying in the same time the new challenging problems after launching the new law. Probably the biggest gain of our fight is the extensive partnership with all the factors, our efforts to bring together in a big family as the coalition “Romania Respira” politicians, advocates, judges, economists, young’s and also the new way found to encourage all: mass media, politicians, journalists, public to support us.

  6. Can asthma control be improved by understanding the patient's perspective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østrem Anders

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials show that asthma can be controlled in the majority of patients, but poorly controlled asthma still imposes a considerable burden. The level of asthma control achieved reflects the behaviour of both healthcare professionals and patients. A key challenge for healthcare professionals is to help patients to engage in self-management behaviours with optimal adherence to appropriate treatment. These issues are particularly relevant in primary care, where most asthma is managed. An international panel of experts invited by the International Primary Care Respiratory Group considered the evidence and discussed the implications for primary care practice. Discussion Causes of poor control Clinical factors such as exposure to triggers and concomitant rhinitis are important but so are patient behavioural factors. Behaviours such as smoking and nonadherence may reduce the efficacy of treatment and patients' perceptions influence these behaviours. Perceptual barriers to adherence include doubting the need for treatment when symptoms are absent and concerns about potential adverse effects. Under-treatment may also be related to patients' underestimation of the significance of symptoms, and lack of awareness of achievable control. Implications Three key implications for healthcare professionals emerged from the debate. First, the need for simple tools to assess asthma control. Two approaches considered were the monitoring of biometric markers of control and questionnaires to record patient-reported outcomes. Second, to understand the reasons for poor control for individual patients, identifying both clinical (e.g. rhinitis and behavioural factors (e.g. smoking and nonadherence to treatment. Third was the need to incorporate, within asthma review, an assessment of patient perspectives including their goals and aspirations and to elicit their beliefs and concerns about asthma and its treatment. This can be used as a basis for

  7. The Placenta: Applications in Orthopaedic Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, James Alexander; Jones, Ian A; Danilkovich, Alla; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Placenta has a long history of use for treating burns and wounds. It is a rich source of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins, tissue reparative growth factors, and stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Recent data show its therapeutic potential for orthopaedic sports medicine indications. To provide orthopaedic surgeons with an anatomic description of the placenta, to characterize its cellular composition, and to review the literature reporting the use of placenta-derived cells and placental tissue allografts for orthopaedic sports medicine indications in animal models and in humans. Systematic review. Using a total of 63 keyword combinations, the PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched for published articles describing the use of placental cells and/or tissue for orthopaedic sports medicine indications. Information was collected on placental tissue type, indications, animal model, study design, treatment regimen, safety, and efficacy outcomes. Results were categorized by indication and subcategorized by animal model. Outcomes for 29 animal studies and 6 human studies reporting the use of placenta-derived therapeutics were generally positive; however, the placental tissue source, clinical indication, and administration route were highly variable across these studies. Fourteen animal studies described the use of placental tissue for tendon injuries, 13 studies for osteoarthritis or articular cartilage injuries, 3 for ligament injuries, and 1 for synovitis. Both placenta-derived culture-expanded cells (epithelial cells or MSCs) and placental tissue allografts were used in animal studies. In all human studies, commercial placental allografts were used. Five of 6 human studies examined the treatment of foot and ankle pathological conditions, and 1 studied the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. A review of the small number of reported studies revealed a high degree of variability in placental cell types, placental tissue preparation, routes

  8. Critical roles of orthopaedic surgeon leadership in healthcare systems to improve orthopaedic surgical patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Calvin C; Robb, William J

    2013-06-01

    The prevention of medical and surgical harm remains an important public health problem despite increased awareness and implementation of safety programs. Successful introduction and maintenance of surgical safety programs require both surgeon leadership and collaborative surgeon-hospital alignment. Documentation of success of such surgical safety programs in orthopaedic practice is limited. We describe the scope of orthopaedic surgical patient safety issues, define critical elements of orthopaedic surgical safety, and outline leadership roles for orthopaedic surgeons needed to establish and sustain a culture of safety in contemporary healthcare systems. We identified the most common causes of preventable surgical harm based on adverse and sentinel surgical events reported to The Joint Commission. A comprehensive literature review through a MEDLINE(®) database search (January 1982 through April 2012) to identify pertinent orthopaedic surgical safety articles found 14 articles. Where gaps in orthopaedic literature were identified, the review was supplemented by 22 nonorthopaedic surgical references. Our final review included 36 articles. Six important surgical safety program elements needed to eliminate preventable surgical harm were identified: (1) effective surgical team communication, (2) proper informed consent, (3) implementation and regular use of surgical checklists, (4) proper surgical site/procedure identification, (5) reduction of surgical team distractions, and (6) routine surgical data collection and analysis to improve the safety and quality of surgical patient care. Successful surgical safety programs require a culture of safety supported by all six key surgical safety program elements, active surgeon champions, and collaborative hospital and/or administrative support designed to enhance surgical safety and improve surgical patient outcomes. Further research measuring improvements from such surgical safety systems in orthopaedic care is needed.

  9. Understanding barriers to glycaemic control from the patient's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janes R

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To better understand barriers to glycaemic control from the patient's perspective. METHODS: An interpretative phenomenological approach was used to study the experiences of 15 adults with Type 2 diabetes. Participants each gave a semi-structured interview of their experiences of living with diabetes. Interviews were transcribed, and themes extracted and organised using a patientcentred framework. FINDINGS: Participants' stories confirmed many of the barriers in the literature, particularly those related to context, such as family, finances, work. Barriers also related to negative emotional reactions to diabetes: fear of new events (diagnosis, starting pills/insulin; guilt about getting diabetes and not controlling it; and shame about having diabetes. Barriers also related to unscientific beliefs and personal beliefs. There were additional barriers related to poor clinician-patient relationships. Overall, participants had a poor understanding of diabetes, and complained that their clinician simply 'told them what to do'. CONCLUSION: Using a patient-centred approach, this study identified many barriers to glycaemic control. We suggest that a key barrier is clinician ignorance of their patients' fears, beliefs, expectations, context; of what constitutes a positive therapeutic relationship; and of the limitations of a biomedical approach to patient non-adherence. Faced with both a worsening diabetes epidemic and increasing health care workforce shortages, clinicians urgently need to understand that it is they, not their patients, who must change their approach if diabetes care is to be improved.

  10. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  11. Quality of life during orthopaedic training and academic practice. Part 1: orthopaedic surgery residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, M Catherine; Sotile, Wayne; Sotile, Mary O; Rubash, Harry; Barrack, Robert L

    2009-10-01

    A pilot study of two academic training programs revealed concerning levels of resident burnout and psychological dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to determine the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty on a national scale and to identify risk factors for decompensation. Three hundred and eighty-four orthopaedic residents and 264 full-time orthopaedic faculty members completed a voluntary, anonymous survey consisting of three validated instruments (the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale) and question sets assessing demographic information, relationship issues, stress reactions/management, and work/life balance. High levels of burnout were seen in 56% of the residents and 28% of the faculty members. Burnout risk was greatest among second-postgraduate-year residents and residents in training programs with six or more residents per postgraduate year. Sixteen percent of residents and 19% of faculty members reported symptoms of psychological distress. Sleep deprivation was common among the residents and correlated positively with every distress measure. Faculty reported greater levels of stress but greater satisfaction with work and work/life balance. A number of factors, such as making time for hobbies and limiting alcohol use, correlated with decreased dysfunction for both residents and faculty. Despite reporting high levels of job satisfaction, orthopaedic residents and faculty are at risk for burnout and distress. Identification of protective factors and risk factors may provide guidance to improve the quality of life of academic orthopaedic surgeons in training and beyond.

  12. The 2016 American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association Traveling Fellowship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Sumon; Cho, Samuel K; Freedman, Brett A; Firoozabadi, Reza

    2017-06-07

    The American Orthopaedic Association-Japanese Orthopaedic Association (AOA-JOA) Traveling Fellowship, which began in 1992 as a collaborative effort between the 2 orthopaedic communities, is aimed at fostering leadership among early-career surgeons through clinical, academic, and cultural exchange. Over 3 weeks, we experienced an extraordinary journey that led us across nearly 800 miles of the picturesque Japanese countryside, with stops at 6 distinguished academic centers. The opportunity to become personally acquainted with orthopaedic leaders in Japan, learn from their experiences, and immerse ourselves in the ancient and storied culture of a beautiful country was one that we will not soon forget. Along the way, we accumulated a wealth of information while enjoying the legendary hospitality of the Japanese people. There is a ubiquitous challenge in delivering cost-effective, accessible health care while maintaining a commitment to education and research. The U.S. orthopaedic community may take solace in the fact that our Japanese colleagues stand with us as partners in this pursuit, and our relationship with them continues to grow stronger through endeavors such as the AOA-JOA Traveling Fellowship. We look forward to honoring our Japanese colleagues in 2017 when we host them in the United States.

  13. The burden of gunshot injuries on orthopaedic healthcare resources in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Case; Thiart, Gerhard; McCollum, Graham; Roche, Stephen; Maqungo, Sithombo

    2017-06-30

    Injuries inflicted by gunshot wounds (GSWs) are an immense burden on the South African (SA) healthcare system. In 2005, Allard and Burch estimated SA state hospitals treated approximately 127 000 firearm victims annually and concluded that the cost of treating an abdominal GSW was approximately USD1 467 per patient. While the annual number of GSW injuries has decreased over the past decade, an estimated 54 870 firearm-related injuries occurred in SA in 2012. No study has estimated the burden of these GSWs from an orthopaedic perspective. To estimate the burden and average cost of treating GSW victims requiring orthopaedic interventions in an SA tertiary level hospital. This retrospective study surveyed more than 1 500 orthopaedic admissions over a 12-month period (2012) at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, SA. Chart review subsequently yielded data that allowed analysis of cost, theatre time, number and type of implants, duration of admission, diagnostic imaging studies performed, blood products used, laboratory studies ordered and medications administered. A total of 111 patients with an average age of 28 years (range 13 - 74) were identified. Each patient was hit by an average of 1.69 bullets (range 1 - 7). These patients sustained a total of 147 fractures, the majority in the lower extremities. Ninety-five patients received surgical treatment for a total of 135 procedures, with a cumulative surgical theatre time of >306 hours. Theatre costs, excluding implants, were in excess of USD94 490. Eighty of the patients received a total of 99 implants during surgery, which raised theatre costs an additional USD53 381 cumulatively, or USD667 per patient. Patients remained hospitalised for an average of 9.75 days, and total ward costs exceeded USD130 400. Individual patient costs averaged about USD2 940 (ZAR24 945) per patient. This study assessed the burden of orthopaedic firearm injuries in SA. It was estimated that on average, treating an orthopaedic GSW patient

  14. How does the knowledge environment shape procurement practices for orthopaedic medical devices in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingg, Myriam; Wyss, Kaspar; Durán-Arenas, Luis

    2016-07-08

    In organisational theory there is an assumption that knowledge is used effectively in healthcare systems that perform well. Actors in healthcare systems focus on managing knowledge of clinical processes like, for example, clinical decision-making to improve patient care. We know little about connecting that knowledge to administrative processes like high-risk medical device procurement. We analysed knowledge-related factors that influence procurement and clinical procedures for orthopaedic medical devices in Mexico. We based our qualitative study on 48 semi-structured interviews with various stakeholders in Mexico: orthopaedic specialists, government officials, and social security system managers or administrators. We took a knowledge-management related perspective (i) to analyse factors of managing knowledge of clinical procedures, (ii) to assess the role of this knowledge and in relation to procurement of orthopaedic medical devices, and (iii) to determine how to improve the situation. The results of this study are primarily relevant for Mexico but may also give impulsion to other health systems with highly standardized procurement practices. We found that knowledge of clinical procedures in orthopaedics is generated inconsistently and not always efficiently managed. Its support for procuring orthopaedic medical devices is insufficient. Identified deficiencies: leaders who lack guidance and direction and thus use knowledge poorly; failure to share knowledge; insufficiently defined formal structures and processes for collecting information and making it available to actors of health system; lack of strategies to benefit from synergies created by information and knowledge exchange. Many factors are related directly or indirectly to technological aspects, which are insufficiently developed. The content of this manuscript is novel as it analyses knowledge-related factors that influence procurement of orthopaedic medical devices in Mexico. Based on our results we

  15. Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Device Actuated with Pneumatic Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Petre

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Year after year recovery clinics worldwide report significant numbers of lower limb bearing joint disabilities. An effective method for the speedy rehabilitation of patients with such afflictions is Continuous Passive Motion (CPM, drawing upon a range of specific equipment. This paper presents an innovative constructive solution for such orthopaedic rehabilitation equipment, designed to ensure a swift reintegration of patients at as low a cost as possible. The absolute novelty consists in the utilization of the linear pneumatic muscle as actuator of the orthopaedic rehabilitation equipment, thus achieving a light and highly compliant construction that satisfies safety requirements related to man-machine interaction. Pneumatic muscles are bio-inspired actuation systems characterized by a passive variable compliant behaviour. This property, deployed in rehabilitation systems, enables the development of human friendly devices, which are comfortable for the patients, and capable of safe interaction. This paper presents the constructive schematic of the orthopaedic rehabilitation equipment, the structure of the actuation and positioning system, and several of its functional characteristics.

  16. Quality of online pediatric orthopaedic education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Daniel P; Komlos, Daniel; Agarwal, Nitin; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2014-12-03

    Increased availability of medical information on the Internet empowers patients to look up answers to questions about their medical conditions. However, the quality of medical information available on the Internet is highly variable. Various tools for the assessment of online medical information have been developed and used to assess the quality and accuracy of medical web sites. In this study we used the LIDA tool (Minervation) to assess the quality of pediatric patient information on the AAOS (American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons) and POSNA (Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America) web sites. The accessibility, usability, and reliability of online medical information in the "Children" section of the AAOS web site and on the POSNA web site were assessed with use of the LIDA tool. Flesch-Kincaid (FK) and Flesch Reading Ease (FRE) values were also calculated to assess the readability of the pediatric education material. Patient education materials on each web site scored in the moderate range in assessments of accessibility, usability, and reliability. FK and FRE values indicated that the readability of each web site remained at a somewhat higher (more difficult) level than the recommended benchmark. The quality and readability of online information for children on the AAOS and POSNA web sites are acceptable but can be improved further. The quality of online pediatric orthopaedic patient education materials may affect communication with patients and their caregivers, and further investigation and modification of quality are needed. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  17. Factors controlling nanoparticle pharmacokinetics: an integrated analysis and perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, S M; Hunter, A C; Andresen, T L

    2012-01-01

    Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion, and adverse effects must be outlined. These concepts are critically evaluated and an integrated perspective is provided on the basis of the recent application of nanoscience approaches to nanocarrier design and engineering. The future of this exciting field is bright; some regulatory-approved products are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further.

  18. Prospects for tobacco control in Zimbabwe: a historical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelk, G; Mtisi, S; Vaughan, J P

    2001-09-01

    Using a historical and political economy perspective, this paper explores the prospects for tobacco control in Zimbabwe, the world's sixth largest producer and third largest tobacco exporter. Tobacco production, which first began in the former Rhodesia in the early 1900s, is closely associated with colonial history and land occupation by white settlers. The Zimbabwe (formerly Rhodesia) Tobacco Association was formed in 1928 and soon became a powerful political force. Although land redistribution has always been a central issue, it was not adequately addressed after independence in 1980, largely due to the need for Zimbabwe to gain foreign currency and safeguard employment. However, by the mid-1990s political pressures forced the government to confront the mainly white, commercial farmers with a new land acquisition policy, but intense national and international lobbying prevented its implementation. With advent of global economic changes, and following the start of a structural adjustment programme in 1991, manufacturing began to decline and the government relied even more on the earnings from tobacco exports. Thus strengthening tobacco control policies has always had a low national and public health priority. Recent illegal occupation of predominantly white owned farms, under the guise of implementing the former land redistribution policy, was politically motivated as the government faced its first major challenge at the general elections in June 2000. It remains unclear whether this will lead to long term reductions in tobacco production, although future global declines in demand could weaken the tobacco lobby. However, since Zimbabwe is only a minor consumer of tobacco, a unique opportunity does exist to develop controls on domestic cigarette consumption. To achieve this the isolated ministry of health would need considerable support from international agencies, such as the World Health Organisation and World Bank.

  19. Hypertension Control and Cardiometabolic Risk: A Regional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Thoenes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the association between blood pressure control and common cardiometabolic risk factors from a global and regional perspective. Methods. In the present analysis of a large cross-sectional i-SEARCH study, 17.092 outpatients receiving antihypertensive treatment were included in 26 countries. According to clinical guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension, patients were classified based on the level of seated systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as SBP/DBP ≥140/90 mmHg for non-diabetics, and ≥130/80 mmHg for diabetics. Results. Overall, mean age was 63.1 years, 52.8% were male, and mean BMI was 28.9 kg/m2. Mean SBP/DBP was 148.9/87.0 mmHg, and 76.3% of patients had uncontrolled hypertension. Diabetes was present in 29.1% with mean HbA1c of 6.8%. Mean LDL-cholesterol was 3.2 mmol/L, HDL-cholesterol 1.3 mmol/L, and triglycerides 1.8 mmol/L; 49.0% had hyperlipidemia. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension had a higher BMI (29.4 versus 28.6 kg/m2, LDL-cholesterol (3.4 versus 3.0 mmol/L, triglycerides (1.9 versus 1.7 mmol/L, and HbA1c (6.8 versus 6.7% than those with controlled blood pressure (P<0.0001 for all parameters. Conclusions. Among outpatients treated for arterial hypertension, three quarters had uncontrolled blood pressure. Elevated SBP/DBP and uncontrolled hypertension were associated with increasing BMI, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, and HbA1c, both globally and regionally.

  20. Reno Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship business curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althausen, Peter L; Bray, Timothy J; Hill, Austin D

    2014-07-01

    The Reno Orthopaedic Center (ROC) Trauma Fellowship business curriculum is designed to provide the fellow with a graduate level business practicum and research experience. The time commitments in a typical 12-month trauma fellowship are significant, rendering a traditional didactic master's in business administration difficult to complete during this short time. An organized, structured, practical business education can provide the trauma leaders of tomorrow with the knowledge and experience required to effectively navigate the convoluted and constantly changing healthcare system. The underlying principle throughout the curriculum is to provide the fellow with the practical knowledge to participate in cost-efficient improvements in healthcare delivery. Through the ROC Trauma Fellowship business curriculum, the fellow will learn that delivering healthcare in a manner that provides better outcomes for equal or lower costs is not only possible but a professional and ethical responsibility. However, instilling these values without providing actionable knowledge and programs would be insufficient and ineffective. For this reason, the core of the curriculum is based on individual teaching sessions with a wide array of hospital and private practice administrators. In addition, each section is equipped with a suggested reading list to maximize the learning experience. Upon completion of the curriculum, the fellow should be able to: (1) Participate in strategic planning at both the hospital and practice level based on analysis of financial and clinical data, (2) Understand the function of healthcare systems at both a macro and micro level, (3) Possess the knowledge and skills to be strong leaders and effective communicators in the business lexicon of healthcare, (4) Be a partner and innovator in the improvement of the delivery of orthopaedic services, (5) Combine scientific and strategic viewpoints to provide an evidence-based strategy for improving quality of care in a

  1. Nanostructured diamond coatings for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    CATLEDGE, S.A.; THOMAS, V.; VOHRA, Y.K.

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of orthopaedic devices being implanted, greater emphasis is being placed on ceramic coating technology to reduce friction and wear in mating total joint replacement components, in order to improve implant function and increase device lifespan. In this chapter, we consider ultra-hard carbon coatings, with emphasis on nanostructured diamond, as alternative bearing surfaces for metallic components. Such coatings have great potential for use in biomedical implants as a result of their extreme hardness, wear resistance, low friction and biocompatibility. These ultra-hard carbon coatings can be deposited by several techniques resulting in a wide variety of structures and properties. PMID:25285213

  2. Prevalence and pattern of small animal orthopaedic conditions at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Small animal orthopaedic case records of a 20-year period were surveyed to obtain the prevalence and pattern of orthopaedic conditions presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH), University of Ibadan, Nigeria, with the objective of providing data for planning on small animal healthcare facilities, policy ...

  3. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  4. Effectiveness of the AAOS Leadership Fellows Program for Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Charles S; Tabrizi, Shervin; Kramer, Jeffrey; Yule, Arthur C; Ahn, Brian S

    2010-11-17

    Effective physician leadership is critical to the future success of healthcare organizations. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) Leadership Fellows Program is a one-year program designed to train young orthopaedic surgeons to become future leaders in orthopaedics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the AAOS Leadership Fellows Program on the leadership skills and achievements of its participants. Graduates of the Leadership Fellows Program were compared with a control group of previous applicants who were not accepted to the program (applicants) in a retrospective cohort comparison study. A subjective survey of leadership skills was used to assess the confidence of the two cohorts in eight areas of leadership. In addition, an updated curriculum vitae from each of sixty leadership fellows from the classes of 2003 through 2009 and from each of forty-seven applicants was retrospectively reviewed for evidence of leadership. The updated curriculum vitae of the leadership fellows was evaluated for leadership activity attained prior to and following participation in the program, while the updated curriculum vitae of applicants was evaluated for leadership activity attained prior to and following the last year of application to the program. Curricula vitae were assessed for demonstration of national leadership, academic rank, hospital administrative rank, and research experience. On the leadership survey, the graduates of the Leadership Fellows Program scored higher than the applicants in seven of eight categories. The review of the curricula vitae demonstrated that, prior to the Leadership Fellows Program, the leadership fellows were more likely than the applicants to have an academic practice and hold an academic rank. The difference between the two cohorts in administrative rank and leadership of national committees was not significant. Following the program, the leadership fellows were more likely to chair national committees (p

  5. The older orthopaedic patient: general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jane F

    2004-08-01

    People older than 65 years are more likely to need elective and emergent orthopaedic surgery compared with younger persons. They also experience significant benefits. Although age-related changes increase the risk of perioperative complications, understanding those changes allows prevention or at least early recognition and treatment when problems arise. Because of comorbidities, older persons take more medications that need to be managed in the perioperative period. Care could be simplified if patients were to bring their medications to the preoperative evaluation. Central nervous system sensitivity to certain pain medications (meperidine and propoxyphene) means that these drugs are best avoided as good alternatives exist (morphine and oxycodone). Adverse reactions to drugs are an important cause of acute confusion (delirium) that often complicates orthopaedic care. Early mobilization after surgery, avoiding certain drugs, avoiding restraints (including Foley catheters), attending to hydration, promoting normal sleep, compensating for sensory disorders, and stimulating daytime activities can prevent delirium. Patients with dementia are more likely to have delirium develop and, like many older people, will present special challenges in communication and decision making. Including family members in discussions may be helpful in ensuring truly informed consent.

  6. Multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Doral, M Nedim; Karlsson, Jon; Egol, Kenneth A; Jazrawi, Laith M; Coelho, Paulo G; Martinez, Amaury; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Owens, Brett D; Ochi, Mitsuo; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Atala, Anthony; Fu, Freddie H; Lu, Helen H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the recent developments in the field of tissue engineering as they relate to multilayer scaffold designs in musculoskeletal regeneration. Clinical and basic research studies that highlight the current knowledge and potential future applications of the multilayer scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering were evaluated and the best evidence collected. Studies were divided into three main categories based on tissue types and interfaces for which multilayer scaffolds were used to regenerate: bone, osteochondral junction and tendon-to-bone interfaces. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that the use of stratified scaffolds composed of multiple layers with distinct compositions for regeneration of distinct tissue types within the same scaffold and anatomic location is feasible. This emerging tissue engineering approach has potential applications in regeneration of bone defects, osteochondral lesions and tendon-to-bone interfaces with successful basic research findings that encourage clinical applications. Present data supporting the advantages of the use of multilayer scaffolds as an emerging strategy in musculoskeletal tissue engineering are promising, however, still limited. Positive impacts of the use of next generation scaffolds in orthopaedic tissue engineering can be expected in terms of decreasing the invasiveness of current grafting techniques used for reconstruction of bone and osteochondral defects, and tendon-to-bone interfaces in near future.

  7. Clinical features of anaerobic orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Dan; Kressmann, Benjamin; Gjoni, Shpresa; Zenelaj, Besa; Grosgurin, Olivier; Marti, Christophe; Zingg, Matthieu; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-02-01

    Some patient populations and types of orthopaedic surgery could be at particular risk for anaerobic infections. In this retrospective cohort study of operated adult patients with infections from 2004 to 2014, we assessed obligate anaerobes and considered first clinical infection episodes. Anaerobes, isolated from intra-operative samples, were identified in 2.4% of 2740 surgical procedures, of which half (33/65; 51%) were anaerobic monomicrobial infections. Propionibacterium acnes, a penicillin and vancomycin susceptible pathogen, was the predominantly isolated anaerobe. By multivariate analysis, the presence of fracture fixation plates was the variable most strongly associated with anaerobic infection (odds ratio: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.5). Anaerobes were also associated with spondylodesis and polymicrobial infections. In contrast, it revealed less likely in native bone or prosthetic joint infections and was not related to prior antibiotic use. In conclusion, obligate anaerobes in our case series of orthopaedic infections were rare, and mostly encountered in infections related to trauma with open-fracture fixation devices rather than clean surgical site infection. Anaerobes were often co-pathogens, and cultures most frequently recovered P. acnes. These observations thus do not support changes in current practices such as broader anaerobe coverage for perioperative prophylaxis.

  8. A Clinico- Epidemiological Study Of Filarial Related Orthopaedic Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patond K.R

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological study was undertaken to study the incidence and distribution of orthopaedic manifestations of filariasis in an endemic area. A total of 207 cases were clinically examined and investigated. Patients were divided into three groups , viz., Group A: Orthopaedic manifestations with no history of filariasis . Group B: Orthopaedic manifestations with history of filariasis such as microfilaraemia or filarial fevers etc., Group C: Orthopaedic manifestations with chronic manifestations such as elephantiasis, hydrocele etc. To confirm filarial etiology, all the cases were examined for the presence of filarial antibody by indirect ELISA using wuchereda bancrofti microfilarial excretory- secretary antigen (wd Mf ESAg . A total of 61 of 102 patients of Group A, 14 of 21 patients of group B, and 73 of 84 patients of Group C were positive for filarial antibody. This study showed the prevalence of filarial antibody in about 71.4% of various orthopaedic manifestations.

  9. Predicting the post-operative length of stay for the orthopaedic trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chona, Deepak; Lakomkin, Nikita; Bulka, Catherine; Mousavi, Idine; Kothari, Parth; Dodd, Ashley C; Shen, Michelle S; Obremskey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2017-05-01

    Length of stay (LOS) is a major driver of cost and quality of care. A bundled payment system makes it essential for orthopaedic surgeons to understand factors that increase a patient's LOS. Yet, minimal data regarding predictors of LOS currently exist. Using the ACS-NSQIP database, this is the first study to identify risk factors for increased LOS for orthopaedic trauma patients and create a personalized LOS calculator. All orthopaedic trauma surgery between 2006 and 2013 were identified from the ACS-NSQIP database using CPT codes. Patient demographics, pre-operative comorbidities, anatomic location of injury, and post-operative in-hospital complications were collected. To control for individual patient comorbidities, a negative binomial regression model evaluated hospital LOS after surgery. Betas (β), were determined for each pre-operative patient characteristic. We selected significant predictors of LOS (p < 0.05) using backwards stepwise elimination. 49,778 orthopaedic trauma patients were included in the analysis. Deep incisional surgical site infections and superficial surgical site infections were associated with the greatest percent change in predicted LOS (β = 1.2760 and 1.2473, respectively; p < 0.0001 for both). A post-operative LOS risk calculator was developed based on the formula: [Formula: see text]. Utilizing a large prospective cohort of orthopaedic trauma patients, we created the first personalized LOS calculator based on pre-operative comorbidities, post-operative complications and location of surgery. Future work may assess the use of this calculator and attempt to validate its utility as an accurate model. To improve the quality measures of hospitals, orthopaedists must employ such predictive tools to optimize care and better manage resources.

  10. Effects of time perspective and self-control on procrastination and Internet addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jinha; Hong, Hyeongi; Lee, Jungeun; Hyun, Myoung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims College students experiencing stress show tendencies to procrastinate and can develop Internet addiction problems. This study investigated the structural relationship between time perspective and self-control on procrastination and Internet addiction. Methods College students (N?=?377) residing in South Korea completed the following questionnaires: the Pathological Internet Use Behavior Symptom Scale for Adults, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Self-Control Rat...

  11. Radiation exposure to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanova, K.; Alyakov, M.; Vassileva, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the radiation dose to the eye lens of orthopaedic surgeons during various orthopaedic procedures and to make efforts to ensure that radiation protection is optimised. The study was performed for Fractura femoris and Fractura cruris procedures performed in orthopaedic operating theatres, as well as for fractures of wrist, ankle and hand/ shoulder performed in the emergency trauma room. The highest mean value of the eye lens dose of 47.2 μSv and higher mean fluoroscopy time of 3 min, as well as the corresponding highest maximum values of 77.1 μSv and 5.0 min were observed for the Fractura femoris procedure performed with the Biplanar 500e fluoroscopy systems. At a normal workload, the estimated mean annual dose values do not exceed the annual occupational dose limit for the lens of eye, but at a heavy workload in the department, this dose limit could be achieved or exceeded. The use of protective lead glasses is recommended as they could reduce the radiation exposure of the lens of the eye. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the use of half-dose mode could additionally reduce dose to the operator's eye lens. (authors)

  12. Thromboembolism prophylaxis practices in orthopaedic arthroplasty patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2010-10-01

    Thromboembolic events are a post-operative complication of arthroplasty surgery for up to 3 months. The incidence however, is not fully known. Some form of prophylaxis should be provided to all arthroplasty patients. Clinicians are wary of side effects, compliance profile and the associated cost. The objective of this study is to investigate practice patterns and their relevance to 3 risk groups. Ninety questionnaires were sent to orthopaedic surgeons with 3 hypothetical clinical scenarios and 10 prophylaxis regimes for thromboembolism across different risk groups. The response rate was 81\\/90 (90%). The most popular options in all 3 cases were early mobilisation, thrombo-embolism deterrant (TED) stockings and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (51\\/81, 62% of all cases). An inconsistent relationship exists between preferred practice and relevant guidelines. Preferred practice does not correlate with each level of risk.

  13. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions when using different patient education methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Katja; Salanterä, Sanna; Leppänen, Tiina; Vahlberg, Tero; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2012-07-01

    A randomised controlled trial was used to evaluate elective ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' emotions during internet-based patient education or face-to-face education with a nurse. The internet-based patient education was designed for this study and patients used websites individually based on their needs. Patients in the control group participated individually in face-to-face patient education with a nurse in the ambulatory surgery unit. The theoretical basis for both types of education was the same. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients scored their emotions rather low at intervals throughout the whole surgical process, though their scores also changed during the surgical process. Emotion scores did not decrease after patient education. No differences in patients' emotions were found to result from either of the two different patient education methods.

  14. Customer Value Controlling ¨C Combining Different Value Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Kramer; Thomas Burgartz

    2015-01-01

    The article begins by presenting a model for the structuring of customer data which can be used to demonstrate the value of data in different forms of aggregation. Since Customer Value plays a crucial role in this model the term is examined more closely. As part of a value-based customer relationship management critical parameters are customer benefits and customer profitability. Both perspectives are included in the term Customer Value. A segmentation approach is shown which integrates the k...

  15. PCR IN TRAUMATOLOGY AND ORTHOPAEDICS: METHOD DESCRIPTION AND APPLICABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Polyakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Review brief presents description of polymerase chain reaction method (PCR and its most common variants. Three PCR-based lines of research, carried out in the traumatology and orthopaedics, include identifying a causative agents of the implant-associated infection after orthopaedic surgery; detection of antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm forming genes. It was shown that PCR can be used as additional method for detection of genetic disorders, significant for traumatology and orthopaedics, and for investigation of cartilage and bone regeneration.

  16. Effects of time perspective and self-control on procrastination and Internet addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinha; Hong, Hyeongi; Lee, Jungeun; Hyun, Myoung-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims College students experiencing stress show tendencies to procrastinate and can develop Internet addiction problems. This study investigated the structural relationship between time perspective and self-control on procrastination and Internet addiction. Methods College students (N = 377) residing in South Korea completed the following questionnaires: the Pathological Internet Use Behavior Symptom Scale for Adults, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Self-Control Rating Scale, and the Aitken Procrastination Inventory. The sample variance–covariance matrix was analyzed using AMOS 20.0. Results Time perspective had a direct effect on self-control and an indirect effect on Internet use and procrastination. In addition, self-control affected procrastination and Internet use. Conclusions Individuals with a present-oriented time perspective tend to evidence poorer self-control, increasing the likelihood of procrastination and Internet addiction. Individuals with a future-oriented time perspective, on the other hand, tend to have stronger self-control, decreasing their risk of procrastination and Internet addiction. PMID:28494615

  17. Effects of time perspective and self-control on procrastination and Internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinha; Hong, Hyeongi; Lee, Jungeun; Hyun, Myoung-Ho

    2017-06-01

    Background and aims College students experiencing stress show tendencies to procrastinate and can develop Internet addiction problems. This study investigated the structural relationship between time perspective and self-control on procrastination and Internet addiction. Methods College students (N = 377) residing in South Korea completed the following questionnaires: the Pathological Internet Use Behavior Symptom Scale for Adults, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory, the Self-Control Rating Scale, and the Aitken Procrastination Inventory. The sample variance-covariance matrix was analyzed using AMOS 20.0. Results Time perspective had a direct effect on self-control and an indirect effect on Internet use and procrastination. In addition, self-control affected procrastination and Internet use. Conclusions Individuals with a present-oriented time perspective tend to evidence poorer self-control, increasing the likelihood of procrastination and Internet addiction. Individuals with a future-oriented time perspective, on the other hand, tend to have stronger self-control, decreasing their risk of procrastination and Internet addiction.

  18. Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic operations. ... the host and environmental risk factors for surgical site infections following clean ... Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who satisfied the inclusion ...

  19. Ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with internet-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Katja; Leino-Kilpi, H; Salanterä, S

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing need for patient education and an evaluation of its outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare ambulatory orthopaedic surgery patients' knowledge with Internet-based education and face-to-face education with a nurse. The following hypothesis was proposed: Internet-based patient education (experiment) is as effective as face-to-face education with a nurse (control) in increasing patients' level of knowledge and sufficiency of knowledge. In addition, the correlations of demographic variables were tested. The patients were randomized to either an experiment group (n = 72) or a control group (n = 75). Empirical data were collected with two instruments. Patients in both groups showed improvement in their knowledge during their care. Patients in the experiment group improved their knowledge level significantly more in total than those patients in the control group. There were no differences in patients' sufficiency of knowledge between the groups. Knowledge was correlated especially with patients' age, gender and earlier ambulatory surgeries. As a conclusion, positive results concerning patients' knowledge could be achieved with the Internet-based education. The Internet is a viable method in ambulatory care.

  20. A basic introduction to statistics for the orthopaedic surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Catherine; Van Riet, Roger; Verstreken, Frederik; Michielsen, Jef

    2012-02-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons should review the orthopaedic literature in order to keep pace with the latest insights and practices. A good understanding of basic statistical principles is of crucial importance to the ability to read articles critically, to interpret results and to arrive at correct conclusions. This paper explains some of the key concepts in statistics, including hypothesis testing, Type I and Type II errors, testing of normality, sample size and p values.

  1. Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0138 TITLE: Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic pla t Outcome 5b. GRANT NUMBER W91ZSQ0135N646 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Nadim James...DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEM ENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The effects of battlefield

  2. Bone Adaptation Around Orthopaedic Implants of Varying Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Mette

    1998-01-01

    The bone adaptation around orthopaedic implants is simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model. The remodeling scheme has its origin in optimization methods, and includes anisotropy and time-dependent loading......The bone adaptation around orthopaedic implants is simulated using a three-dimensional finite element model. The remodeling scheme has its origin in optimization methods, and includes anisotropy and time-dependent loading...

  3. Smartphone apps for orthopaedic sports medicine - a smart move?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Seng Juong; Robertson, Greg A; Connor, Katie L; Brady, Richard R; Wood, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of smartphones together with their downloadable applications (apps), there is increasing opportunities for doctors, including orthopaedic sports surgeons, to integrate such technology into clinical practice. However, the clinical reliability of these medical apps remains questionable. We reviewed available apps themed specifically towards Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and related conditions and assessed the level of medical professional involvement in their design and content, along with a review of these apps. The most popular smartphone app stores (Android, Apple, Blackberry, Windows, Samsung, Nokia) were searched for Orthopaedic Sports medicine themed apps, using the search terms; Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Orthopaedics, Sports medicine, Knee Injury, Shoulder Injury, Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear, Medial Collateral Ligament Tear, Rotator Cuff Tear, Meniscal Tear, Tennis Elbow. All English language apps related to orthopaedic sports medicine were included. A total of 76 individual Orthopaedic Sports Medicine themed apps were identified. According to app store classifications, there were 45 (59 %) medical themed apps, 28 (37 %) health and fitness themed apps, 1 (1 %) business app, 1 (1 %) reference app and 1 (1 %) sports app. Forty-nine (64 %) apps were available for download free of charge. For those that charged access, the prices ranged from £0.69 to £69.99. Only 51 % of sports medicine apps had customer satisfaction ratings and 39 % had named medical professional involvement in their development or content. We found the majority of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine apps had no named medical professional involvement, raising concerns over their content and evidence-base. We recommend increased regulation of such apps to improve the accountability of app content.

  4. The value of nasal mupirocin in containing an outbreak of methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an orthopaedic unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Barrett

    1990-01-01

    textabstractAn outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) occurred in two adjacent orthopaedic wards following the admission of a known carrier. The outbreak was not contained by ward closure or by standard infection control measures. Eventually several nasal carriers were

  5. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, P; de Sa, D; Evaniew, N; Farrokhyar, F; Bhandari, M; Ghert, M

    2016-04-01

    Evidence -based medicine (EBM) is designed to inform clinical decision-making within all medical specialties, including orthopaedic surgery. We recently published a pilot survey of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) membership and demonstrated that the adoption of EBM principles is variable among Canadian orthopaedic surgeons. The objective of this study was to conduct a broader international survey of orthopaedic surgeons to identify characteristics of research studies perceived as being most influential in informing clinical decision-making. A 29-question electronic survey was distributed to the readership of an established orthopaedic journal with international readership. The survey aimed to analyse the influence of both extrinsic (journal quality, investigator profiles, etc.) and intrinsic characteristics (study design, sample size, etc.) of research studies in relation to their influence on practice patterns. A total of 353 surgeons completed the survey. Surgeons achieved consensus on the 'importance' of three key designs on their practices: randomised controlled trials (94%), meta-analyses (75%) and systematic reviews (66%). The vast majority of respondents support the use of current evidence over historical clinical training; however subjective factors such as journal reputation (72%) and investigator profile (68%) continue to influence clinical decision-making strongly. Although intrinsic factors such as study design and sample size have some influence on clinical decision-making, surgeon respondents are equally influenced by extrinsic factors such as investigator reputation and perceived journal quality.Cite this article: Dr M. Ghert. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:130-136. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000578. © 2016 Ghert et al.

  6. Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...... at different time points along this longitudinal investigation are performed with a comprehensive set of omics platforms. These data sets are generated in a biological context, rather than biochemical compound class-driven manner, which we term "systems omics."...

  7. Review of Air Traffic Controller Selection: An International Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Broach, Dana

    1997-01-01

    ...) in Hamburg is reviewed. Job analysis, test battery development, and validation research for the controller occupation in the United Kingdom is presented next, followed by a description of the Swedish "MRU Project" on controller...

  8. (Mis)perceptions about intimate partner violence in women presenting for orthopaedic care: a survey of Canadian orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Mohit; Sprague, Sheila; Tornetta, Paul; D'Aurora, Valerie; Schemitsch, Emil; Shearer, Heather; Brink, Ole; Mathews, David; Dosanjh, Sonia

    2008-07-01

    Domestic violence is the most common cause of nonfatal injury to women in North America. In a review of 144 such injuries, the second most common manifestation of intimate partner violence was musculoskeletal injuries (28%). The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons is explicit that orthopaedic surgeons should play a role in the screening and appropriate identification of victims. We aimed to identify the perceptions, attitudes, and knowledge of Canadian orthopaedic surgeons with regard to intimate partner violence. We surveyed members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association to identify attitudes toward intimate partner violence. With use of a systematic random sample, 362 surgeons were mailed questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of three sections: (1) the general attitude of the orthopaedic surgeon toward intimate partner violence, (2) the attitude of the orthopaedic surgeon toward victims and batterers, and (3) the clinical relevance of intimate partner violence in orthopaedic surgery. Up to three follow-up mailings were performed to enhance response rates. A total of 186 orthopaedic surgeons responded (a response rate of 51%), and 167 (91%) of them were men. Most orthopaedic surgeons (95%) estimated that <10% of their patients were victims of intimate partner violence, and most respondents (80%) believed that it was exceedingly rare (a prevalence of <1%). The concept of mandatory screening for intimate partner violence was met with uncertainty by 116 surgeons (64%). Misconceptions were perpetuated by surgeons who believed that inquiring about intimate partner violence was an invasion of the victim's privacy, that investigating intimate partner violence was not part of their duty, that victims choose to be a victim, and that victims play a proactive role in causing their abuse. By the completion of the survey, the majority of surgeons (91%) believed that knowledge about intimate partner violence was relevant to their surgical practice. Discomfort with

  9. Computer Assisted Orthopaedic Surgery – CAOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enes M. Kanlić

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of computer navigation in orthopedic surgery allows for real time intraoperative feedback resulting in higher precision of bone cuts, better alignment of implants and extremities, easier fracture reductions, less radiation and better documentation than what is possible in classical orthopaedic procedures. There is no need for direct and repeated visualization of many anatomical landmarks (classical method in order to have good intraoperative orientation. Navigation technology depicts anatomy and position of "smart tools" on the screen allowing for high surgical precision (smaller number of outliers from desired goal and with less soft tissue dissection (minimally invasive surgery - MIS. As a result, there are more happy patients with less pain, faster recovery, better functional outcome and well positioned, long lasting implants. In general, navigation cases are longer on the average 10 to 20 minutes, special training is required and equipment is relatively expensive. CAOS applications in knee and hip joint replacement are discussed.

  10. A metrology solution for the orthopaedic industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bills, P; Brown, L; Jiang, X; Blunt, L

    2005-01-01

    Total joint replacement is one of the most common elective surgical procedures performed worldwide, with an estimate of 1.5 million operations performed annually. Currently joint replacements are expected to function for 10-15 years, however, with an increase in life expectancy, and a greater call for knee replacement due to increased activity levels, there is a requirement to improve their function to offer longer term improved quality of life for patients. The amount of wear that a joint incurs is seen as a good indicator of performance, with higher wear rates typically leading to reduced function and premature failure. New technologies and materials are pushing traditional wear assessment methods to their limits, and novel metrology solutions are required to assess wear of joints following in vivo and in vitro use. This paper presents one such measurement technique; a scanning co-ordinate metrology machine for geometrical assessment. A case study is presented to show the application of this technology to a real orthopaedic measurement problem: the wear of components in total knee replacement. This technique shows good results and provides a basis for further developing techniques for geometrical wear assessment of total joint replacements

  11. A utility perspective on radiation worker access control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.A.; Goff, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on an evaluation of the current commercial Radiation Worker Access Control Software Systems, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company has elected to design and develop a site specific access control and accountability system for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant. The vendor provided systems allow for radiation worker access control based on training and external exposure records and authorizations. These systems do not afford internal exposure control until after bioassay measurements or maximum permissible concentration-hours are tabulated. The vendor provided systems allow for data trending for ALARA purposes, but each software package must be modified to meet site specific requirements. Unlike the commercial systems, the Calvert Cliffs Radiological Controls and Accountability System (RCAS) will provide radiation worker exposure control, both internal and external. The RCAS is designed to fulfill the requirements by integrating the existing Radiation Safety, Dosemetry, and Training data bases with a comprehensive radiological surveillance program. Prior to each worker's entry into the Radiological Control Area; his training and qualifications, radiation exposure history and authorization, will be compared with administrative controls, such as radiation work permits, and respiratory protection requirements and the radiological conditions in the work area. The RCAS, a computer based applied health physics access control system is described as it is presently configured for development. The mechanisms for enhancing worker internal and external exposure controls are discussed. Proposed data application to both the Calvert Cliffs ALARA and outage planning programs is included

  12. Racial and ethnic diversity in orthopaedic surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okike, Kanu; Utuk, Mekeme E; White, Augustus A

    2011-09-21

    Although the U.S. population is increasingly diverse, the field of orthopaedic surgery has historically been less diverse. The purpose of this study was to quantify the representation of racial and ethnic minorities among orthopaedic surgery residents compared with those in other fields of medicine and to determine how these levels of diversity have changed over time. We determined the representation of minorities among residents in orthopaedic surgery and in other fields by analyzing the Graduate Medical Education reports published annually by the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), which provided data for African-Americans from 1968 to 2008, Hispanics from 1990 to 2008, Asians from 1995 to 2008, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders from 2001 to 2008. During the 1990s and 2000s, representation among orthopaedic residents increased rapidly for Asians (+4.53% per decade, p < 0.0001) and gradually for Hispanics (+1.37% per decade, p < 0.0001) and African-Americans (+0.68% per decade, p = 0.0003). Total minority representation in orthopaedics averaged 20.2% during the most recent years studied (2001 to 2008), including 11.7% for Asians, 4.0% for African-Americans, 3.8% for Hispanics, 0.4% for American Indians/Alaskan Natives, and 0.3% for Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders. However, orthopaedic surgery was significantly less diverse than all of the other residencies examined during this time period (p < 0.001). This was due primarily to the lower representation of Hispanics and Asians in orthopaedic surgery than in any of the other fields of medicine. Minority representation in orthopaedic residency programs has increased over time for Asians, Hispanics, and African-Americans. In spite of these gains, orthopaedic surgery has remained the least diverse of the specialty training programs considered in this study. While further efforts are needed to determine the factors underlying this lack of representation, we

  13. Asthma control in general practice -- GP and patient perspectives compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joan; Hancock, Kerry L; Armour, Carol; Harrison, Christopher; Miller, Graeme

    2013-10-01

    How general practitioners (GPs) and patients perceive asthma control, and concordance between these perceptions, may influence asthma management and medication adherence. The aims of this study were to determine asthma prevalence in adult patients, measure patient asthma control and the correlation between GP and patient perceptions of asthma control or impact. A Supplementary Analysis of Nominated Data (SAND) sub-study of the Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) program surveyed 2563 patients from 103 GPs. Asthma control was measured using the Asthma Control Questionnaire 5-item version (ACQ-5), and medication adherence by patient self-report. Survey procedures in SAS software and Pearson's correlation statistics were used. Asthma prevalence was 12.7% (95% confidence interval: 10.9-14.5), with good correlation between GP and patient perceptions of asthma control/impact, and with raw ACQ-5 scores. Grouped ACQ-5 scores showed higher levels of uncontrolled asthma. Medication adherence was sub-optimal. The ACQ-5 questions are useful for assessing asthma control, for prompting medication reviews, and for reinforcing benefits of medication compliance to improve long-term asthma control.

  14. Safety syringes and anti-needlestick devices in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbitt, Wilmer L; Band, Philip A; Kettwich, Lawrence G; Sibbitt, Cristina R; Sibbitt, Lori J; Bankhurst, Arthur D

    2011-09-07

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery (AAOS), The Joint Commission, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act encourage the integration of safety-engineered devices to prevent needlestick injuries to health-care workers and patients. We hypothesized that safety syringes and needles could be used in outpatient orthopaedic injection and aspiration procedures. The study investigated the orthopaedic uses and procedural idiosyncrasies of safety-engineered devices, including (1) four safety needles (Eclipse, SafetyGlide, SurGuard, and Magellan), (2) a mechanical safety syringe (RPD), (3) two automatic retractable syringes (Integra, VanishPoint), (4) three manual retractable syringes (Procedur-SF, Baksnap, Invirosnap), and (5) three shielded syringes (Safety-Lok, Monoject, and Digitally Activated Shielded [DAS] Syringe). The devices were first tested ex vivo, and then 1300 devices were used for 425 subjects undergoing outpatient arthrocentesis, intra-articular injections, local anesthesia, aspiration biopsy, and ultrasound-guided procedures. During the clinical observation, there were no accidental needlesticks (0 needlesticks per 1300 devices). Safety needles could be successfully used on a Luer syringe but were limited to ≤1.5 in (≤3.81 cm) in length and the shield could interfere with sonography. The mechanical safety syringes functioned well in all orthopaedic procedures. Automatic retractable syringes were too small for arthrocentesis of the knee, and the plunger blew out and prematurely collapsed with high-pressure injections. The manual retractable syringes and shielded syringes could be used with conventional needles for most orthopaedic procedures. The most effective and reliable safety devices for orthopaedic syringe procedures are shielded safety needles, mechanical syringes, manual retractable syringes, and shielded syringes, but not automatic retractable syringes. Even when adopting

  15. Control of the exercise hyperpnoea in humans: a modeling perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, S A

    2000-09-01

    Models of the exercise hyperpnoea have classically incorporated elements of proportional feedback (carotid and medullary chemosensory) and feedforward (central and/or peripheral neurogenic) control. However, the precise details of the control process remain unresolved, reflecting in part both technical and interpretational limitations inherent in isolating putative control mechanisms in the intact human, and also the challenges to linear control theory presented by multiple-input integration, especially with regard to the ventilatory and gas-exchange complexities encountered at work rates which engender a metabolic acidosis. While some combination of neurogenic, chemoreflex and circulatory-coupled processes are likely to contribute to the control, the system appears to evidence considerable redundancy. This, coupled with the lack of appreciable error signals in the mean levels of arterial blood gas tensions and pH over a wide range of work rates, has motivated the formulation of innovative control models that reflect not only spatial interactions but also temporal interactions (i.e. memory). The challenge is to discriminate between robust competing control models that: (a) integrate such processes within plausible physiological equivalents; and (b) account for both the dynamic and steady-state system response over a range of exercise intensities. Such models are not yet available.

  16. Client-controlled case information: a general system theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-07-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of controller and controlled system, as well as entropy and negentropy, are applied to the information flow and autopoietic behavior as they relate to the boundary-maintaining functions of today's organizations. The author's conclusions synthesize general system theory and human services values to lay the foundation for an information-sharing framework for human services in the 21st century.

  17. New Perspectives on Droop Control in AC MicroGrid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yao; Hou, Xiaochao; Yang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Virtual impedance, angle droop and frequency droop control play important roles in maintaining system stability, and load sharing among distributed generators (DGs) in microgrid. These approaches have been developed into three totally independent concepts, but present strong relevance....... In this letter, their similarities and differences are significantly revealed. Some new findings are established as follows: 1) angle droop control is intrinsically a virtual impedance method; 2) virtual impedance method can also be regarded as a special frequency droop control with a power derivative feedback......; 3) the combination of virtual impedance method and frequency droop control is equivalent to the proportional–derivative (PD) type frequency droop, which is introduced to enhance the power oscillation damping. As a whole, these analogous relationships provide the new insight into the design...

  18. Control Management and Business Performances: The Malaysian Family SMEs Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Wong Sek Khin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between control management and family business performance in the Malaysian context. It has two objectives, the first being to determine the relationship of organizational credit control policy and procedures, employee development and motivation, and intelligence collection systems to subsequent collection reports in Malaysian family SMEs. The second objective is to investigate the moderating effect of participation in decision-making and work effort towards innovation and business performance. This is a descriptive study involving 90 senior executives employed in 90 Malaysian family SMEs/firms. A correlation analysis from this study confirmed previous researchers’ observations that high-level organizational commitment to credit control management is linked to improvements in business performance. The results suggest that three components – credit policy, employee development, and intelligence collection systems – are the most important predictors for the efficiency and effectiveness of credit control management.    

  19. Managerial Risk Accounting and Control – A German perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments have sparked a renewed interest concerning risk related topics in nonfinancial companies. Risk management issues directly touch the domain of management accounting and control. In Germany, topics related to the support of corporate or enterprise risk management are commonly discussed under the label of “Risikocontrolling”, which will be translated as Managerial Risk Accounting and Control. However, the conceptual foundation of a risk oriented management accounting respecti...

  20. Allergies in orthopaedic and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, C H; Hameister, R; Singh, G

    2017-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to implants in orthopaedic and trauma surgery are a rare but devastating complication. They are considered as a delayed-type of hypersensitivity reaction (type IV), characterized by an antigen activation of sensitized T-lymphocytes releasing various cytokines and may result in osteoclast activation and bone resorption. Potential haptens are originated from metal alloys or bone-cement. A meta-analysis has confirmed a higher probability of developing a metal hypersensitivity postoperatively and noted a greater risk of failed replacements compared to stable implants. Hypersensitivity to implants may present with a variety of symptoms such as pain, joint effusion, delayed wound/bone healing, persistent secretion, allergic dermatitis (localized or systemic), clicking noises, loss of joint function, instability and failure of the implant. Various diagnostic options have been offered, including patch testing, metal alloy patch testing, histology, lymphocyte transformation test (LTT), memory lymphocyte immunostimulation assay (MELISA), leukocyte migration inhibition test (LIF) and lymphocyte activation test (LAT). No significant differences between in vivo and in vitro methods have been found. Due to unconvincing evidence for screening methods, predictive tests are not recommended for routine performance. Infectious aetiology always needs to be excluded. As there is a lack of evidence on large-scale studies with regards to the optimal treatment option, management currently relies on individual case-by-case decisions. Several options for patients with (suspected) metal-related hypersensitivity exist and may include materials based on ceramic, titanium or oxinium or modified surfaces. Promising results have been reported, but long-term experience is lacking. More large-scaled studies are needed in this context. In patients with bone-cement hypersensitivity, the component suspected for hypersensitivity should be avoided. The development of

  1. Building new hospitals: a UK infection control perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, J M; Constantine, C E; Orr, K E

    2006-03-01

    Infection control input is vital throughout the planning, design and building stages of a new hospital project, and must continue through the commissioning (and decommissioning) process, evaluation and putting the facility into full clinical service. Many hospitals continue to experience problems months or years after occupying the new premises; some of these could have been avoided by infection control involvement earlier in the project. The importance of infection control must be recognized by the chief executive of the hospital trust and project teams overseeing the development. Clinical user groups and contractors must also be made aware of infection control issues. It is vital that good working relationships are built up between the infection control team (ICT) and all these parties. ICTs need the authority to influence the process. This may require their specific recognition by the Private Finance Initiative National Unit, the Department of Health or other relevant authorities. ICTs need training in how to read design plans, how to write effective specifications, and in other areas with which they may be unfamiliar. The importance of documentation and record keeping is paramount. External or independent validation of processes should be available, particularly in commissioning processes. Building design in relation to infection control needs stricter national regulations, allowing ICTs to focus on more local usage issues. Further research is needed to provide evidence regarding the relationship between building design and the prevalence of infection.

  2. Oral appliances and functional orthopaedic appliances for obstructive sleep apnoea in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F R; Lentini-Oliveira, D; Machado, M A C; Prado, G F; Prado, L B F; Saconato, H

    2007-04-18

    Apnoea is a breathing disorder marked by the absence of airflow at the nose or mouth. In children, risk factors include adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity, neuromuscular disorders and craniofacial anomalies. The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in childhood is adenotonsillectomy. This approach is limited by its surgical risks, mostly in children with comorbities and, in some patients, by recurrence that can be associated with craniofacial problems. Oral appliances and functional orthopaedic appliances have been used for patients who have OSAS and craniofacial anomalies because they change the mandible posture forwards and potentially enlarge the upper airway and increase the upper airspace, improving the respiratory function. To assess the effectiveness of oral appliances or functional orthopaedic appliances for OSAS in children. A sensitive search was developed for the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 3); PubMed (January 1966 to September 2005); EMBASE (1980 to September 2005); Lilacs (1982 to September 2005); BBO-Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia (1986 to September 2005); and SciELO (1997 to September 2005). There was no restriction of language or source of information. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing all types of oral and functional orthopaedic appliances with placebo or no treatment, in children 15 years old or younger. reduction of apnoea to less than one episode per hour. dental and skeletal relationship, sleep parameters improvement, cognitive and phonoaudiologic function, behavioural problems, drop outs and withdrawals, quality of life, side effects (tolerability), economic evaluation. Data were independently extracted by two review authors. Authors were contacted for additional information. Risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for all important dichotomous outcomes. The initial search identified 384 trials

  3. Orthopaedic admissions due to sports and recreation injuries.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, R A

    2009-02-01

    The health benefits of exercise may be attenuated by sports and recreation related injury (SRI). Though the majority of SRI are mild and self-limiting, a significant number are serious and require orthopaedic intervention. The aims of this study were to assess the burden of these serious injuries on the orthopaedic inpatient service, and to investigate potential target areas for injury prevention. All 1,590 SRI seen in the ED over a 3-month period were analysed using the Patient Information Management System to determine which patients received inpatient orthopaedic care. The medical records of those 63 patients who required inpatient care under orthopaedics were reviewed and data collected on demographic features, history, operative procedure and theatre resources, and length of hospital stay. Data were analyzed using SPSS. SRI accounted for 12.3% of all ED presentations. The principal activities resulting in injury requiring orthopaedic care were soccer, hurling and informal play e.g. trampoline. Falls made up 37% of the overall mechanism of injury but 68% of the injuries severe enough to require operative management. Most operative procedures were performed as part of a routine day trauma list but 20% were performed out of hours. This group of injuries places a significant burden on a busy trauma service. Injury prevention measures such as public education regarding falls in sport may have a role in reducing this burden.

  4. Are the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Donald J; Rankin, Kenneth S; Jensen, Cyrus D; Moverley, Robert; Reed, Mike R; Sprowson, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    Advertisements are commonplace in orthopaedic journals and may influence the readership with claims of clinical and scientific fact. Since the last assessment of the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements ten years ago, there have been legislative changes and media scrutiny which have shaped this practice. The purpose of this study is to re-evaluate these claims. Fifty claims from 50 advertisements were chosen randomly from six highly respected peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals (published July-December 2011). The evidence supporting each claim was assessed and validated by three orthopaedic surgeons. The assessors, blinded to product and company, rated the evidence and answered the following questions: Does the evidence as presented support the claim made in the advertisement and what is the quality of that evidence? Is the claim supported by enough evidence to influence your own clinical practice? Twenty-eight claims cited evidence from published literature, four from public presentations, 11 from manufacturer "data held on file" and seven had no supporting evidence. Only 12 claims were considered to have high-quality evidence and only 11 were considered well supported. A strong correlation was seen between the quality of evidence and strength of support (Spearman r = 0.945, p advertisements. High-quality evidence is required by orthopaedic surgeons to influence clinical practice and this evidence should be sought by manufacturers wishing to market a successful product.

  5. Prevention and control of schistosomiasis: a current perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inobaya MT

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Marianette T Inobaya,1 Remigio M Olveda,1 Thao NP Chau,3 David U Olveda,2 Allen GP Ross21Department of Health, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Muntinlupa City, Philippines; 2Griffith Health Institute, School of Medical Sciences, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Southport, Australia; 3Discipline of Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, AustraliaAbstract: Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that ranks second only to malaria in terms of human suffering in the tropics and subtropics. Five species are known to infect man and there are currently over 240 million people infected worldwide. The cornerstone of control to date has been mass drug administration with 40 mg/kg of praziquantel but there are problems with this approach. Human and bovine vaccines are in various stages of development. Integrated control, targeting the life cycle, is the only approach that will lead to sustainability and future elimination.Keywords: schistosomiais, morbidity, treatment and control, mass drug administration

  6. The Perspective on Data and Control Flow Analysis in Topological Functioning Models by Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asnina Erika

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The perspective on integration of two mathematical formalisms, i.e., Colored Petri Nets (CPNs and Topological Functioning Model (TFM, is discussed in the paper. The roots of CPNs are in modeling system functionality. The TFM joins principles of system theory and algebraic topology, and formally bridges the solution domain with the problem domain. It is a base for further automated construction of software design models. The paper discusses a perspective on check of control and data flows in the TFM by CPNs formalism. The research result is definition of mappings from TFMs to CPNs.

  7. A new perspective on concepts of asthma severity and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Taylor; E.D. Bateman (Eric); L.P. Boulet; H.A. Boushey; W.W. Busse; T.B. Casale (Thomas); P. Chanez; P.L. Enright (Paul); P.G. Gibson; J.C. de Jongste (Johan); H.A. Kerstjens; S.C. Lazarus; M.L. Levy (Mark); P. O'byrne; M.R. Partridge; I.D. Pavord; M.R. Sears; P.J. Sterk (Peter); S.W. Stoloff; S.J. Szefler; S.D. Sullivan (Sean); M.D. Thomas; S.E. Wenzel; H.K. Reddel

    2008-01-01

    textabstractConcepts of asthma severity and control are important in the evaluation of patients and their response to treatment but the terminology is not standardised and the terms are often used interchangeably. This review, arising from the work of an American Thoracic Society/European

  8. A new perspective on concepts of asthma severity and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, D. R.; Bateman, E. D.; Boulet, L.-P.; Boushey, H. A.; Busse, W. W.; Casale, T. B.; Chanez, P.; Enright, P. L.; Gibson, P. G.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Lazarus, S. C.; Levy, M. L.; O'Byrne, P. M.; Partridge, M. R.; Pavord, I. D.; Sears, M. R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stoloff, S. W.; Szefler, S. J.; Sullivan, S. D.; Thomas, M. D.; Wenzel, S. E.; Reddel, H. K.

    2008-01-01

    Concepts of asthma severity and control are important in the evaluation of patients and their response to treatment but the terminology is not standardised and the terms are often used interchangeably. This review, arising from the work of an American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society

  9. A new perspective on concepts of asthma severity and control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, D. R.; Bateman, E. D.; Boulet, L-P.; Boushey, H. A.; Busse, W. W.; Casale, T. B.; Chanez, P.; Enright, P. L.; Gibson, P. G.; de Jongste, J. C.; Kerstjens, H. A. M.; Lazarus, S. C.; Levy, M. L.; O'Byrne, P. M.; Partridge, M. R.; Pavord, I. D.; Sears, M. R.; Sterk, P. J.; Stoloff, S. W.; Szefler, S. J.; Sullivan, S. D.; Thomas, M. D.; Wenzel, S. E.; Reddel, H. K.

    Concepts of asthma severity and control are important in the evaluation of patients and their response to treatment but the terminology is not standardised and the terms are often used interchangeably. This review, arising from the work of an American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society

  10. Regulatory control of radioactive sources: an international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flakus, F.N.

    1998-01-01

    Within its Regular Programme and its Technical Co-operation Programme, the IAEA undertakes a number of activities in support of national efforts aimed at strengthening national infrastructures for the control of radiation sources. The framework of these activities is described. (author)

  11. Client-Controlled Case Information: A General System Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Dale

    2004-01-01

    The author proposes a model for client control of case information via the World Wide Web built on principles of general system theory. It incorporates the client into the design, resulting in an information structure that differs from traditional human services information-sharing practices. Referencing general system theory, the concepts of…

  12. Electronic Performance Monitoring: An Organizational Justice and Concertive Control Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, G. Stoney; Tompkins, Phillip K.

    1997-01-01

    Applies theories of organizational justice/concertive control to account for contradictions inherent in electronic monitoring of workers by organizations. Argues that results are usually positive when workers are involved in the design and implementation of monitoring systems, and monitoring is restricted to performance-related activities with…

  13. [Financing of inpatient orthopaedics and trauma surgery in the 2011 G-DRG System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, D; Schemmann, F; Roeder, N; Siebert, H; Mahlke, L

    2011-09-01

    The German DRG system forms the basis for billing inpatient hospital services. It includes not only the case groups (G-DRGs), but also copayments. This paper analyses and evaluates the relevant developments of the 2011 G-DRG system for orthopaedics and traumatology from the medical and classificatory perspective. An analysis was performed of relevant diagnoses, medical procedures and G-DRGs in the 2010 and 2011 versions based on the publications of the German DRG Institute (InEK) and the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI). A number of codes for surgical measures have been newly established or modified - above all in foot surgery, arthroscopic surgery and wound surgery. Here, the identification and the correct and performance-based mapping of complex and elaborate scenarios was again the focus of the restructuring of the G-DRG system. The G-DRG structure in orthopaedics and traumatology is changed, especially for polytraumata. The allocation of common cases with a standardized treatment pattern appears to be appropriate and the reimbursement adequate. For the less common and more complex cases the 2011 G-DRG system still shows need for further modification (e.g. polytraumata, joint replacement, spine surgery). The proper integration of the modified OPS classification for foot surgery to the appropriate G-DRGs will be essential to maintain the high quality of the reimbursement structure for the future.

  14. The impact of inclusive business on ethical values & internal control quality: an accounting perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Tamer A. El Nashar

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the impact of inclusive business on the internal ethical values and the internal control quality while conceiving the accounting perspective. I construct the hypothesis for this paper based on the potential impact on the organizations’ awareness to be directed to the inclusive business approach that will significantly impact the culture of the organizations then the ethical values and the internal control quality. I use the approach of the expected va...

  15. Fluid Intelligence as a Mediator of the Relationship between Executive Control and Balanced Time Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajenkowski, Marcin; Stolarski, Maciej; Witowska, Joanna; Maciantowicz, Oliwia; Łowicki, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the cognitive foundations of the balanced time perspective (BTP) proposed by Zimbardo and Boyd (1999). Although BTP is defined as the mental ability to switch effectively between different temporal perspectives, its connection with cognitive functioning has not yet been established. We addressed this by exploring the relationships between time perspectives and both fluid intelligence (measured with Raven's and Cattell's tests) and executive control (Go/No-go and anti-saccade tasks). An investigation conducted among Polish adults ( N = 233) revealed that more balanced TP profile was associated with higher fluid intelligence, and higher executive control. Moreover, we found that the relationship between executive control and BTP was completely mediated by fluid intelligence with the effect size (the ratio of the indirect effect to the total effect) of 0.75, which suggests that cognitive abilities play an important role in adoption of temporal balance. The findings have relevance to time perspective theory as they provide valuable insight into the mechanisms involved in assigning human experience to certain time frames.

  16. Identity crisis: user perspectives on multiplicity and control in federated identitymanagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Steve; Satchell, C; Shanks, G

    2009-01-01

    Federated identity management systems synthesise complex and fragmented user information into a single entity. Literature from the provider’s perspective notes this integration extends many benefits to the end user and the privileges provided by digital identity authentication schemes have been...... well documented from this perspective. Less explored are the perceptions of federation from the user’s perspective. This study reports an empirical user study that examines the relationship between identity and technology using contextual interviews, focus groups and cultural probes. It emerges...... that while current federated systems satisfy user needs by allowing the construction of multiple digital data sets that are moored to a central identifier, they fail to provide the user with control over the capability to act in the ‘hatch’, ‘match’ and ‘dispatch’ phases of the digital identity lifecycle...

  17. Factors Controlling Nanoparticle Pharmacokinetics: An Integrated Analysis and Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moien; Hunter, A.C.; Andresen, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    of interrelated core and interfacial physicochemical and biological factors. Pertinent to realizing therapeutic goals, definitive maps that establish the interdependency of nanoparticle size, shape, and surface characteristics in relation to interfacial forces, biodistribution, controlled drug release, excretion......Intravenously injected nanoparticulate drug carriers provide a wide range of unique opportunities for site-specific targeting of therapeutic agents to many areas within the vasculature and beyond. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of these carriers are controlled by a complex array...... are already on the market and many are in late-phase clinical trials. With concomitant advances in extensive computational knowledge of the genomics and epigenomics of interindividual variations in drug responses, the boundaries toward development of personalized nanomedicines can be pushed further....

  18. US Export Controls and Technology Transfer Requirements: A UK Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    34 (La Franchi , 2006). Such requirements make it difficult for partners to participate and generate a large administrative burden on team members, who...if this critical impediment to enhanced cooperation is to be removed. The U.S. export control system is broken; its technology transfer rules ...Retrieved April 3, 2009, from http://www.jsf.mil/news/news2009.htm La Franchi , P. (2006, July 4). Australia demands JSF resolution. Flight International

  19. Adaptive active vibration isolation – A control perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landau Ioan Doré

    2015-01-01

    The paper will review a number of recent developments for adaptive feedback compensation of multiple unknown and time-varying narrow band disturbances and for adaptive feedforward compensation of broad band disturbances in the presence of the inherent internal positive feedback caused by the coupling between the compensator system and the measurement of the image of the disturbance. Some experimental results obtained on a relevant active vibration control system will illustrate the performance of the various algorithms presented.

  20. Using simulation to train orthopaedic trainees in non-technical skills: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Samuel R; Little, Zoe; Akhtar, Kash; Ramachandran, Manoj; Lee, Joshua

    2016-08-18

    To enhance non-technical skills and to analyse participant's experience of a course tailored for orthopaedic surgeons. A Delphi technique was used to develop a course in human factors specific to orthopaedic residents. Twenty-six residents (six per course) participated in total with seven course facilitators all trained in Crisis Resource Management providing structured feedback. Six scenarios recreated challenging real-life situations using high-fidelity mannequins and simulated patients. Environments included a simulated operating suite, clinic room and ward setting. All were undertaken in a purpose built simulation suite utilising actors, mock operating rooms, mock clinical rooms and a high fidelity adult patient simulator organised through a simulation control room. Participants completed a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire (strongly disagree to strongly agree) before and after the course. This assessed their understanding of non-technical skills, scenario validity, relevance to orthopaedic training and predicted impact of the course on future practice. A course evaluation questionnaire was also completed to assess participants' feedback on the value and quality of the course itself. Twenty-six orthopaedic residents participated (24 male, 2 female; post-graduation 5-10 years), mean year of residency program 2.6 out of 6 years required in the United Kingdom. Pre-course questionnaires showed that while the majority of candidates recognised the importance of non-technical (NT) skills in orthopaedic training they demonstrated poor understanding of non-technical skills and their role. This improved significantly after the course (Likert score 3.0-4.2) and the perceived importance of these skills was reported as good or very good in 100%. The course was reported as enjoyable and provided an unthreatening learning environment with the candidates placing particular value on the learning opportunity provided by reflecting on their performance. All agreed that the

  1. What Are the Strength of Recommendations and Methodologic Reporting in Health Economic Studies in Orthopaedic Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Steinhaus, Michael E; Swart, Eric; Bozic, Kevin J

    2015-10-01

    intervention, adequate description of a comparator, study perspective clearly stated, and reported discount rate for future costs and quality-adjusted life years. Reporting costs variables included economic data collected alongside a clinical trial or another primary source and clear statement of the year of monetary units. Finally, results reporting included whether a sensitivity analysis was performed. Given that a considerable portion of orthopaedic cost-effectiveness studies provide weak recommendations and that methodologic reporting practices varied greatly among strong and weak studies, we believe that clinicians should exercise great caution when considering the conclusions of cost-effectiveness studies. Future research could assess the effect of such cost-effectiveness studies in clinical practice, and whether the strength of recommendations of a study's conclusions has any effect on practice patterns. Given the increasing use of cost-effectiveness studies in orthopaedic surgery, understanding the quality of these studies and the reasons that limit the ability of studies to provide more definitive recommendations is critical. Highlighting the heterogeneity of methodologic reporting practices will aid clinicians in interpreting the conclusions of cost-effectiveness studies and improve future research efforts.

  2. Using financial incentives to improve value in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansky, David; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Bozic, Kevin J

    2012-04-01

    A variety of reforms to traditional approaches to provider payment and benefit design are being implemented in the United States. There is increasing interest in applying these financial incentives to orthopaedics, although it is unclear whether and to what extent they have been implemented and whether they increase quality or reduce costs. We reviewed and discussed physician- and patient-oriented financial incentives being implemented in orthopaedics, key challenges, and prerequisites to payment reform and value-driven payment policy in orthopaedics. We searched the MEDLINE database using as search terms various provider payment and consumer incentive models. We retrieved a total of 169 articles; none of these studies met the inclusion criteria. For incentive models known to the authors to be in use in orthopaedics but for which no peer-reviewed literature was found, we searched Google for further information. Provider financial incentives reviewed include payments for reporting, performance, and patient safety and episode payment. Patient incentives include tiered networks, value-based benefit design, reference pricing, and value-based purchasing. Reform of financial incentives for orthopaedic surgery is challenged by (1) lack of a payment/incentive model that has demonstrated reductions in cost trends and (2) the complex interrelation of current pay schemes in today's fragmented environment. Prerequisites to reform include (1) a reliable and complete data infrastructure; (2) new business structures to support cost sharing; and (3) a retooling of patient expectations. There is insufficient literature reporting the effects of various financial incentive models under implementation in orthopaedics to know whether they increase quality or reduce costs. National concerns about cost will continue to drive experimentation, and all anticipated innovations will require improved collaboration and data collection and reporting.

  3. Teleconsultation in paediatric orthopaedics in Djibouti: evaluation of response performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, A; Launay, F; Candoni, P; Mathieu, L; Rongieras, F; Chauvin, F

    2012-11-01

    Djibouti has no paediatric orthopaedics department and three options are available for difficult cases: transfer of the patient to another country; overseas mission transfer to Djibouti by a specialised surgical team; and management by a local orthopaedic surgeon receiving guidance from an expert. The extreme poverty of part of the population of Djibouti often precludes the first two options. Telemedecine can allow the local orthopaedic surgeon to receive expert advice. HYPOTHESES AND STUDY DESIGN: We prospectively recorded all the paediatric orthopaedics teleconsultations that occurred between November 2009 and November 2011. Our objective was to assess the performance of the teleconsultations. We hypothetized that this option was influential in decision making. We assessed the influence of the teleconsultation on patient management (i.e., change in the surgical indication and/or procedure). We then used the electronic patient records to compare the actual management to that recommended retrospectively by two independent orthopaedic surgeon consultants who had experience working overseas. Finally, we assessed the clinical outcomes in the patients. Of 48 teleconsultations for 39 patients, 13 dealt with diagnostic problems and 35 with therapeutic problems. The teleconsultation resolved the diagnostic uncertainties in 90% of cases. Advice from the expert modified the management in 37 (77%) teleconsultations; the change was related to the surgical indication in 18 cases, the surgical technique in 13 cases, and both in six cases. Agreement between the advice from the independent consultants and the treatment delivered by the local surgeon was 2.2/3. Clinical outcomes were good or very good in 31 (81%) of the 38 treated patients. This study establishes the feasibility and usefulness of paediatric orthopaedics teleconsultations in Djibouti. The introduction of telemedicine has changed our approach to challenges raised by patients in remote locations or precarious

  4. Controlling disease and creating disparities: a fundamental cause perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jo C; Link, Bruce G

    2005-10-01

    The United States and other developed countries experienced enormous improvements in population health during the 20th century. In the context of this dramatic positive change, health disparities by race and socioeconomic status emerged for several potent killers. Any explanation for current health disparities must take these changing patterns into account. Any explanation that ignores large improvements in population health and fails to account for the emergence of disparities for specific diseases is an inadequate explanation of current disparities. We argue that genetic explanations and some prominent social causation explanations are incompatible with these facts. We propose that the theory of "fundamental causes" can account for both vast improvements in population health and the creation of large socioeconomic and racial disparities in mortality for specific causes of death over time. Specifically, we argue that it is our enormously expanded capacity to control disease and death in combination with existing social and economic inequalities that create health disparities by race and socioeconomic status: When we develop the ability to control disease and death, the benefits of this new-found ability are distributed according to resources of knowledge, money, power, prestige, and beneficial social connections. We present data on changing mortality patterns by race and socioeconomic status for two types of diseases: those for which our capacity to prevent death has increased significantly and those for which we remain largely unable to prevent death. Time trends in mortality patterns are consistent with the fundamental cause explanation.

  5. The spectrum of orthopaedics at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Pillay, J; Ramokgopa, MT

    2013-01-01

    Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital (CHBAH) is the third largest hospital in the world and is the largest in the Southern hemisphere, serving a population of more than 3.5 million people.¹ The purpose of this review is to identify the orthopaedic-related health events that occur within the population being serviced by the hospital, and in doing so provide a tool to be used for improving orthopaedic-related patient care and outcomes in public health services.² We also took special interes...

  6. Orthopaedic nurses' perception of research utilization - A cross sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical....... The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack...

  7. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: a psychosocial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Mary; Leroi, Iracema; Simpson, Jane; Overton, Paul Geoffrey

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease primarily characterised by motor symptoms. However, another feature of PD which is receiving increasing attention is the phenomenon of impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling. To date, research into ICDs in PD has centred on a biomedical model of cause, related to the effects of dopamine replacement therapy. However, there are several areas of discrepancy in the current biomedical account of ICDs in PD. In addition, we argue that social and psychological factors also need to be considered to achieve a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. We present a novel conceptual model which combines biomedical and psychosocial factors in the genesis of ICDs in PD and use the model to identify a number of potential treatment intervention points and to highlight important outstanding questions concerning the inter-relationship between psychosocial and biomedical factors in the genesis of ICDs in PD.

  8. Detection and control of Ganoderma boninense: strategies and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hushiarian, Roozbeh; Yusof, Nor Azah; Dutse, Sabo Wada

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm, an economically important tree, has been one of the world's major sources of edible oil and a significant precursor of biodiesel fuel. Unfortunately, it now faces the threat of a devastating disease. Many researchers have identified Ganoderma boninense as the major pathogen that affects the oil palm tree and eventually kills it. But identification of the pathogen is just the first step. No single method has yet been able to halt the continuing spread of the disease. This paper discusses the modes of infection and transmission of Ganoderma boninense and suggests techniques for its early detection. Additionally, the paper proposes some possible ways of controlling the disease. Such measures, if implemented, could contribute significantly to the sustainability of the palm oil industry in South East Asia.

  9. PM10 standards and nontraditional particulate source controls: Research perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    Knowledge of how to measure suspended particles, what their concentrations are, what they are composed of, and where they come from has increased substantially since 1975. At that time, much of the pioneering work in these areas was just being conducted and published. Size-classified measurements, low-level elemental analysis, inorganic ion analysis, and carbon determinations for aerosol samples were novel research developments. Receptor modeling was not considered to be a scientific discipline, let alone a useful tool for source apportionment. Presentations at earlier conferences went to great lengths to document and justify methodologies which are taken for granted at this conference. This paper goes on to discuss research findings in control of wood smoke, fugitive dusts, motor vehicle exhausts, and secondary aerosols. Research results in source apportionment are also discussed

  10. A mathematical perspective on flight dynamics and control

    CERN Document Server

    L'Afflitto, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    This brief presents several aspects of flight dynamics, which are usually omitted or briefly mentioned in textbooks, in a concise, self-contained, and rigorous manner. The kinematic and dynamic equations of an aircraft are derived starting from the notion of the derivative of a vector and then thoroughly analysed, interpreting their deep meaning from a mathematical standpoint and without relying on physical intuition. Moreover, some classic and advanced control design techniques are presented and illustrated with meaningful examples. Distinguishing features that characterize this brief include a definition of angular velocity, which leaves no room for ambiguities, an improvement on traditional definitions based on infinitesimal variations. Quaternion algebra, Euler parameters, and their role in capturing the dynamics of an aircraft are discussed in great detail. After having analyzed the longitudinal- and lateral-directional modes of an aircraft, the linear-quadratic regulator, the linear-quadratic Gaussian r...

  11. 77 FR 66848 - Minimum Clinically Important Difference: An Outcome Metric in Orthopaedic Device Science and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ...] Minimum Clinically Important Difference: An Outcome Metric in Orthopaedic Device Science and Regulation... Clinically Important Difference: An Outcome Metric in Orthopaedic Device Science and Regulation.'' FDA is co... (MCID) for patient-reported outcome (PRO) instruments used in orthopaedic extremity device-related...

  12. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B; Drago, Lorenzo; Monti, Lorenzo; De Vecchi, Elena; Previdi, Sara; Banfi, Giuseppe; Romanò, Carlo L

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3) colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count), histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy). Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  13. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B Lovati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. METHODOLOGY: A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3 colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count, histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  14. Detecting Internal Control Problems Based on COSO and Islamic Perspective: Case on SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuniarti Hidayah Suyoso Putra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The presence of Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs has been able to be livelihoods sources and absorb more labor, even though it has a relative smaller contribution of additional value compared to the Large-scale Enterprises. The number of economic actors of SMEs spread across area from urban to rural. However, SMEs have faced several serious problems. These problems are caused by the unique characteristics of SMEs itself. First, lack of managerial skills due to limited human resources and lack of monitoring which it is rarely conducted by the manager or the owner. Second, lack of information and technology to carry out operations. Both problems have great impacts in lack of internal controls. Third, SMEs also face problems in developing business scale, limited access to capital to the banks and financial institutions due to the lack of transparency. Therefore, this research aimed to detect to what extent of the problems arising in the application and assessment of internal controls performed by SMEs.Method – The research employs descriptive qualitative research method through direct observation, interview and business documentation owned by the company. Research materials are 29 SMEs consisting of 19 trading SMEs and 10 service SMEs. All SMEs are located in Malang city. Detection of application and assessment of internal controls in this study is based on the COSO framework and the Islamic perspective.Result – Internal control activities indicators apply the five principles of COSO framework which focused on three layers. First layer is self-assessment control area. Second layer is environment control area and the third layer is independent control area. While the Islamic perspective is focused on the internal control of business activities based on the Qur'an and Hadith. The results derive from application and assessment based on COSO framework and Islamic perspectives are complementary in improving the practice of internal

  15. Model-based nonlinear control of hydraulic servo systems: Challenges, developments and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyong

    2018-06-01

    Hydraulic servo system plays a significant role in industries, and usually acts as a core point in control and power transmission. Although linear theory-based control methods have been well established, advanced controller design methods for hydraulic servo system to achieve high performance is still an unending pursuit along with the development of modern industry. Essential nonlinearity is a unique feature and makes model-based nonlinear control more attractive, due to benefit from prior knowledge of the servo valve controlled hydraulic system. In this paper, a discussion for challenges in model-based nonlinear control, latest developments and brief perspectives of hydraulic servo systems are presented: Modelling uncertainty in hydraulic system is a major challenge, which includes parametric uncertainty and time-varying disturbance; some specific requirements also arise ad hoc difficulties such as nonlinear friction during low velocity tracking, severe disturbance, periodic disturbance, etc.; to handle various challenges, nonlinear solutions including parameter adaptation, nonlinear robust control, state and disturbance observation, backstepping design and so on, are proposed and integrated, theoretical analysis and lots of applications reveal their powerful capability to solve pertinent problems; and at the end, some perspectives and associated research topics (measurement noise, constraints, inner valve dynamics, input nonlinearity, etc.) in nonlinear hydraulic servo control are briefly explored and discussed.

  16. Interventions to reduce tourniquet-related ischaemic damage in orthopaedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halladin, N L; Zahle, F V; Rosenberg, J

    2014-01-01

    -related oxidative damage in adults undergoing orthopaedic surgery, and the possible relationship between biochemical oxidative stress markers and postoperative clinical outcomes. Seventeen randomised controlled studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Most trials were of low methodological quality...... and postoperative clinical outcomes should be further investigated in the future....... and only two studies reported postoperative clinical outcomes. Nine studies tested anaesthetics (propofol, dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and spinal anaesthesia); four studies tested antioxidants (N-acetyl-cysteine, vitamin C, and mannitol); and four studies tested ischaemic pre-conditioning. Fifteen studies...

  17. Clearance and release from control - An international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierfeldt, S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper tries to give an overview of the clearance, or release from regulatory control, on an international scale, including some of those countries where clearance has become or is about to become vital for D and D. The emphasis lies on the impact of clearance, and in particular of differences between clearance levels of various countries, on D and D. Relevance of clearance for D and D of nuclear installations Clearance is an essential part of waste management (or more general, material management) in nuclear installations, and in particular during the decommissioning phase where waste streams continues to arise. Of course, the relevance of clearance in a particular country depends on a number of factors, like: availability of a final repository and its price; prevailing decommissioning strategy; number of nuclear installations reaching decommissioning phase. This small selection of reasons why clearance may be of varying importance for different countries may already suffice to illustrate why up to now clearance has been developed and implemented in quite different ways. If one thinks of additional reasons that may influence clearance, like politics, the public opinion, availability of funds etc., the situation becomes even more complex. It is, however safe to draw the conclusion that countries with a certain number of nuclear installations which have been or will soon be shut down or which are already in the decommissioning phase will need to implement provisions for clearance. This has indeed been the case with countries like the UK, Germany, the USA, Sweden, and a number of others. It is not essential for clearance levels to be exactly equal between various countries. They may differ as long as the difference is not too large, e.g. the values fall into the same order of magnitude. This is the reason why for example Germany has no problems with clearance levels which differ from the EU recommendation RP 122 partially adopted in a number of EU countries

  18. Orthopaedic Section Poster Presentations (Abstracts OPO1-OPO300).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    These abstracts are presented here as prepared by the authors. The accuracy and content of each abstract remain the responsibility of the authors. In the identification number above each abstract, OPO designates an Orthopaedic Section poster presentation. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2018;48(1):A67-A202. doi:10.2519/jospt.2018.48.1.A67.

  19. Transient aphasia following spinal anaesthesia in an orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 50-year-old male [American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade II] was scheduled for lower limb orthopaedic surgery. The subarachnoid space was localised with difficulty at L3/4 interspace and 3 ml of hyperbaric bupivacaine was given. Within a few minutes, the patient developed aphasia with a very high sensory ...

  20. Establishing a children's orthopaedic hospital for Malawi: A review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    At present the program has a total of 29 clinics, which .... Thus a total of 1154 paediatric orthopaedic operations were known to have taken place in Malawi during the 10th year of operational services with 53% of cases being performed at BCIH. ... regional hip replacement course, 1 regional knee replacement course for ...

  1. Compliance in Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orthopaedics and Trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compliance in Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orthopaedics and Trauma: Surgical Practice in a Tertiary Hospital, North-West Nigeria. ... or international guide lines, to reap the expected benefit of prophylactic antibiotics and avoid unwanted adverse effects like emergence of resistant bacteria strains and extra cost of healthcare.

  2. 99m Tc-labeled heparin test in orthopaedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouvier, J.F.; Lafon, J.C.; Colin, M.; Chatelut, J.; Beaubatie, F.

    1983-01-01

    99m Tc-labeled heparin test was performed for early detection of phlebitis or pulmonary embolism after orthopaedic prothesis. Heparinic treatment and surgery per se were demonstrated to have no effect on the results. If this test demonstrates a statistical difference for pathologic patients, it is of greater value to consider ratio between rates before and after intervention [fr

  3. Bone Graft Substitutes : Developed for Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Stok (Johan)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Bone grafting was established in the 19th century and has become a common procedure in which bone defects are filled with bone grafts or bone graft substitutes. Bone defects that require bone grafting are encountered in approximately 10% of trauma and orthopaedic

  4. Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs Usage In Orthopaedics And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds with nti inflammatory, analgesic and often times anti pyretic roperties. They are weak organic acids and are the most commonly used drugs in Orthopaedic/Trauma practice. hey provide mild to moderate pain relief.

  5. Orthopaedic injuries in children: Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide, trauma is a recognized leading cause of childhood morbidity, mortality and disability. Aim: To review the causes and consequences of orthopaedic injuries in children. Methods: A retrospective study of all injuries in children 14 years and below seen at the Federal Medical Centre Umuahia from 1st ...

  6. Infections in orthopaedic surgery : clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogely, Henri Charles

    2000-01-01

    The diagnostic difficulties, variability in outcome and the heterogeinity of the problem of orthopaedic infections stimulated the author to a study of the literature, and several clinical and experimental studies. The diagnosis prosthesis-related infection can only be reached with an acceptable

  7. Find an Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle MD/DO

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Find a Surgeon Find a Foot & Ankle Orthopaedic Surgeon Page Content Who ... your prescribed treatment (surgical and/or non-surgical) ​ Find a Surgeon ​ Click here to find a foot ...

  8. Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Robert H; Murray, Jayson N; Pezold, Ryan; Sevarino, Kaitlyn S

    2017-07-01

    The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, in collaboration with the American Dental Association, has developed Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for the Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures. Evidence-based information, in conjunction with the clinical expertise of physicians, was used to develop the criteria to improve patient care and obtain best outcomes while considering the subtleties and distinctions necessary in making clinical decisions. The Management of Patients with Orthopaedic Implants Undergoing Dental Procedures AUC clinical patient scenarios were derived from indications of patients with orthopaedic implants presenting for dental procedures, as well as from current evidence-based clinical practice guidelines and supporting literature to identify the appropriateness of the use of prophylactic antibiotics. The 64 patient scenarios and 1 treatment were developed by the writing panel, a group of clinicians who are specialists in this AUC topic. Next, a separate, multidisciplinary, voting panel (made up of specialists and nonspecialists) rated the appropriateness of treatment of each patient scenario using a 9-point scale to designate a treatment as Appropriate (median rating, 7 to 9), May Be Appropriate (median rating, 4 to 6), or Rarely Appropriate (median rating, 1 to 3).

  9. Motives for seeking a second opinion in orthopaedic surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, I. van; Groothoff, J.; Stewart, R.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Groenewegen, P.; Horn, J. van

    2001-01-01

    The number of second opinions in orthopaedic surgery is increading rapidly, yet the grounds on which patients and their doctors decide to seek a second opinion have been little studied. The goal of the study was to identify patient and consultant factors that appeared to contribute to a second

  10. Local corticosteroid injections: Rational use in common orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of local corticosteroid injections in orthopaedic practice is common due to their anti- inflammatory and analgesic effect. However, the use may result in local or systemic complications. Moreover, the conflicting reports on their benefits versus side effects, throws the average user in confusion or fear. This review ...

  11. Reading the small print - labelling recommendations for orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haene, Roger A; Sandhu, Ranbir S; Baxandall, Richard

    2009-11-01

    There exist, currently, no clear guidelines regarding standards for surgical implant labelling. Dimensions of the laminar flow canopies in orthopaedic use fixes the distance at which implant labels can be read. Mistakes when reading the label on an implant box can pose health risks for patients, and financial consequences for medical institutions. Using scientifically validated tools such as the Snellen Chart Formula, a theoretical minimum standard for text on implant labels was reached. This theoretical standard was then tested under real operating conditions. After discovering a minimum practical standard for implant labels, the authors then audited current labels in use on a wide range of orthopaedic implant packages. Furthermore, other non-text-related labelling problems were also noted. There is a definite minimum standard which should be observed when implant labels are manufactured. Implants in current use bear labels on the packaging that are of an insufficient standard to ensure patient safety in theatre. The authors have established text parameters that will increase the legibility of implant labels. In the interests of improving risk management in theatre, therefore, the authors propose a standard for orthopaedic implant labelling, and believe this will provide a useful foundation for further discussion between the orthopaedic community and implant manufacturers.

  12. Multiscale Inorganic Hierarchically Materials: Towards an Improved Orthopaedic Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; Sartuqui, Javier; Messina, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a biologically and structurally sophisticated multifunctional tissue. It dynamically responds to biochemical, mechanical and electrical clues by remodelling itself and accordingly the maximum strength and toughness are along the lines of the greatest applied stress. The challenge is to develop an orthopaedic biomaterial that imitates the micro- and nano-structural elements and compositions of bone to locally match the properties of the host tissue resulting in a biologically fixed implant. Looking for the ideal implant, the convergence of life and materials sciences occurs. Researchers in many different fields apply their expertise to improve implantable devices and regenerative medicine. Materials of all kinds, but especially hierarchical nano-materials, are being exploited. The application of nano-materials with hierarchical design to calcified tissue reconstructive medicine involve intricate systems including scaffolds with multifaceted shapes that provides temporary mechanical function; materials with nano-topography modifications that guarantee their integration to tissues and that possesses functionalized surfaces to transport biologic factors to stimulate tissue growth in a controlled, safe, and rapid manner. Furthermore materials that should degrade on a timeline coordinated to the time that takes the tissues regrow, are prepared. These implantable devices are multifunctional and for its construction they involve the use of precise strategically techniques together with specific material manufacturing processes that can be integrated to achieve in the design, the required multifunctionality. For such reasons, even though the idea of displacement from synthetic implants and tissue grafts to regenerative-medicine-based tissue reconstruction has been guaranteed for well over a decade, the reality has yet to emerge. In this paper, we examine the recent approaches to create enhanced bioactive materials. Their design and manufacturing procedures as well

  13. Management Control Systems and Strategy: A Resource based Perspective. Evidence from Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolaos Theriou; Dimitrios Maditinos; Georgios N. Theriou

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine from the resource-based perspective, the relationship between the use of management control systems (MCS) and organisational capabilities in the Greek context. Design/Methodology/Approach: The study follows Henri's (2006) methodology and explores the relationships between the diagnostic and interactive uses of performance measurement systems (PMS) and the five capabilities (e.g. market orientation, organisational learning, entrep...

  14. The 25 most cited articles in arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar Gheiti, Adrian J; Downey, Richard E; Byrne, Damien P; Molony, Diarmuid C; Mulhall, Kevin J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use Web of Knowledge to determine which published arthroscopic surgery-related articles have been cited most frequently by other authors by ranking the 25 most cited articles. We furthermore wished to determine whether there is any difference between a categorical "journal-by-journal" analysis and an "all-database" analysis in arthroscopic surgery and whether such a search methodology would alter the results of previously published lists of "citation classics" in the field. We analyzed the characteristics of these articles to determine what qualities make an article important to this subspecialty of orthopaedic surgery. Web of Knowledge was searched on March 7, 2011, using the term "arthroscopy" for citations to articles related to arthroscopy in 61 orthopaedic journals and using the all-database function. Each of the 61 orthopaedic journals was searched separately for arthroscopy-related articles to determine the 25 most cited articles. An all-database search for arthroscopy-related articles was carried out and compared with a journal-by-journal search. Each article was reviewed for basic information including the type of article, authorship, institution, country, publishing journal, and year published. The number of citations ranged from 189 to 567 in a journal-by-journal search and from 214 to 1,869 in an all-database search. The 25 most cited articles on arthroscopic surgery were published in 11 journals: 8 orthopaedic journals and 3 journals from other specialties. The most cited article in arthroscopic orthopaedic surgery was published in The New England Journal of Medicine, which was not previously identified by a journal-by-journal search. An all-database search in Web of Knowledge gives a more in-depth methodology of determining the true citation ranking of articles. Among the top 25 most cited articles, autologous chondrocyte implantation/transplantation is currently the most cited and most popular topic in arthroscopic

  15. Application of a cognitive neuroscience perspective of cognitive control to late-life anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreau, Sherry A.; MacKay-Brandt, Anna; Reynolds, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a negative association between anxiety and cognitive control. Given age-related reductions in some cognitive abilities and the relation of late life anxiety to cognitive impairment, this negative association may be particularly relevant to older adults. This critical review conceptualizes anxiety and cognitive control from cognitive neuroscience and cognitive aging theoretical perspectives and evaluates the methodological approaches and measures used to assess cognitive control. Consistent with behavioral investigations of young adults, the studies reviewed implicate specific and potentially negative effects of anxiety on cognitive control processes in older adults. Hypotheses regarding the role of both aging and anxiety on cognitive control, the bi-directionality between anxiety and cognitive control, and the potential for specific symptoms of anxiety (particularly worry) to mediate this association, are specified and discussed. PMID:23602352

  16. Understanding how orthopaedic surgery practices generate value for healthcare systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Steven A; Mather, Richard C

    2013-06-01

    Orthopaedic surgery practices can provide substantial value to healthcare systems. Increasingly, healthcare administrators are speaking of the need for alignment between physicians and healthcare systems. However, physicians often do not understand what healthcare administrators value and therefore have difficulty articulating the value they create in discussions with their hospital or healthcare organization. Many health systems and hospitals use service lines as an organizational structure to track the relevant data and manage the resources associated with a particular type of care, such as musculoskeletal care. Understanding service lines and their management can be useful for orthopaedic surgeons interested in interacting with their hospital systems. We provide an overview of two basic types of value orthopaedic surgeons create for healthcare systems: financial or volume-driven benefits and nonfinancial quality or value-driven patient care benefits. We performed a search of PubMed from 1965 to 2012 using the term "service line." Of the 351 citations identified, 18 citations specifically involved the use of service lines to improve patient care in both nursing and medical journals. A service line is a structure used in healthcare organizations to enable management of a subset of activities or resources in a focused area of patient care delivery. There is not a consistent definition of what resources are managed within a service line from hospital to hospital. Physicians can positively impact patient care through engaging in service line management. There is increasing pressure for healthcare systems and hospitals to partner with orthopaedic surgeons. The peer-reviewed literature demonstrates there are limited resources for physicians to understand the value they create when attempting to negotiate with their hospital or healthcare organization. To effectively negotiate for resources to provide the best care for patients, orthopaedic surgeons need to claim and

  17. Orthopaedic podiatry triage: process outcomes of a skill mix initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeming, Lyndon J; Kuipers, Pim; Nihal, Aneel

    2012-11-01

    The Orthopaedic Podiatry Triage Clinic (OPodTC) is a 'skill mix' model of care developed in Queensland Health to address the problem of lengthy waiting times for orthopaedic surgery on foot and ankle pathologies. It is based on the recognition that many orthopaedic surgery referrals can be identified early and treated conservatively with podiatry, averting the need for more costly and invasive surgical interventions. The model is collaborative and relies on screening and triage by the podiatrist, rather than delegation by the orthopaedic surgeon. Screening and triage through OPodTC was trialled at three Queensland Health hospital facilities during 2009 and 2010 to improve service timeliness. Patients identified by the OPodTC podiatrist as suitable for conservative management were provided with non-surgical podiatry interventions and discharged if appropriate. Those identified as still requiring surgical intervention after the benefit of interim conservative treatment provided by the podiatrist (or who chose to remain on the list) were returned to their previous place on the orthopaedic waiting list. This paper presents a summary and description of waiting list changes in association with this trial. The OPodTC intervention resulted in a reduction in the non-urgent category of the waiting list across the three hospitals of between 23.3% and 49.7%. Indications from wait-list service data demonstrated increased timeliness and improved patient flow, which are core goals of these skill mix initiatives. This study highlights the potential of screening and triage functions in the skill mix debate. In this example, conservative treatment options were considered first, suitable patients did not have to wait long periods to receive timely and appropriate interventions, and those for whom surgery was indicated, were provided with a more targeted service.

  18. Perspective on traffic control : Aspects of freeway control, intersection control and the control of transit flow in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hakkesteegt, P.

    1988-01-01

    Paper presented at the 1988 TRB Annual Meeting, Washington D.C., USA. The first part of this paper deals with the control and signalling system for motorways, directed to a more efficient use of available road capacity and to the improvement of road safety. The second part gives some insight into

  19. Compressed-air power tools in orthopaedic surgery: exhaust air is a potential source of contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, H C; DiPasquale, Thomas; Sanders, Roy; Herscovici, Dolfi

    2002-01-01

    To determine if the exhaust from surgical compressed-air power tools contains bacteria and if the exhaust leads to contamination of sterile surfaces. Bacteriologic study of orthopaedic power tools. Level I trauma center operative theater. None. Part I. Exhaust from two sterile compact air drills was sampled directly at the exhaust port. Part II. Exhaust from the drills was directed at sterile agar plates from varying distances. The agar plates represented sterile surfaces within the operative field. Part III. Control cultures. A battery-powered drill was operated over open agar plates in similar fashion as the compressed-air drills. Agar plates left open in the operative theater served as controls to rule out atmospheric contamination. Random cultures were taken from agar plates, gloves, drills, and hoses. Incidence of positive cultures. In Part I, all filters from both compressed-air drill exhausts were culture negative ( = 0.008). In Part II, the incidence of positive cultures for air drills number one and number two was 73% and 82%, respectively. The most commonly encountered organisms were, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, and Micrococcus species. All control cultures from agar plates, battery-powered drill, gloves, and hoses were negative ( compressed-air power tools in orthopaedic surgery may contribute to the dissemination of bacteria onto the surgical field. We do not recommend the use of compressed-air power tools that do not have a contained exhaust.

  20. Using behavioural activation in the treatment of depression: a control theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, P; Law, A; Bates, R; Hylton, K; Mansell, W

    2013-12-01

    Behavioural activation is an intervention that can be used to counteract the typical patterns of withdrawal, avoidance and inactivity that characterize depression. This paper examines the processes of change that may occur during behavioural activation from the perspective of control theory. Some of the key concepts that are associated with control theory are introduced and the process of change that may occur during behavioural activation is illustrated using two case studies. The case studies provide anecdotal evidence which supports the hypothesis that the effective implementation of behavioural activation may depend upon clients being able to retain or regain the sense of control that they value. The differences between a control-theory-based approach and more orthodox behavioural and cognitive approaches are highlighted and the implications of these differences are discussed. Flexible approaches that are informed by control theory, may offer a useful alternative to the more established behavioural and cognitive approaches towards behavioural activation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Stem cells in degenerative orthopaedic pathologies: effects of aging on therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Sekiya, Ichiro; Stolzing, Alexandra; Ochi, Mitsuo; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the current evidence on the use of stem cells in the elderly population with degenerative orthopaedic pathologies and to highlight the pathophysiologic mechanisms behind today's therapeutic challenges in stem cell-based regeneration of destructed tissues in the elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA), degenerative disc disease (DDD), and tendinopathies. Clinical and basic science studies that report the use of stem cells in the elderly patients with OA, DDD, and tendinopathies were identified using a PubMed search. The studies published in English have been assessed, and the best and most recent evidence was included in the current study. Evidence suggests that, although short-term results regarding the effects of stem cell therapy in degenerative orthopaedic pathologies can be promising, stem cell therapies do not appear to reverse age-related tissue degeneration. Causes of suboptimal outcomes can be attributed to the decrease in the therapeutic potential of aged stem cell populations and the regenerative capacity of these cells, which might be negatively influenced in an aged microenvironment within the degenerated tissues of elderly patients with OA, DDD, and tendinopathies. Clinical protocols guiding the use of stem cells in the elderly patient population are still under development, and high-level randomized controlled trials with long-term outcomes are lacking. Understanding the consequences of age-related changes in stem cell function and responsiveness of the in vivo microenvironment to stem cells is critical when designing cell-based therapies for elderly patients with degenerative orthopaedic pathologies.

  2. OSE inspection of materials control and accountability: Field perspective of inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Inspection and Evaluation (I and E) process for materials control and accountability (MC and A) is discussed from the perspective of an ''inspectee.'' Methods of preparing for a visit by the I and E team and the operational and budget impacts of the I and E Standards and Criteria are briefly discussed. The I and E process does not have to be traumatic, but it can be if the inspectee is not properly prepared and if ground rules and procedures have not been established. This paper presents the author's views and reflects his perspectives of the Office of Security Evaluations (OSE) MC and A process. In preparation for this paper, the author has talked at length with his peers and has included some of their perceptions of the I and E process. However, this paper is the sole responsibility of the author and does not constitute an official position of the Los Alamos National Laboratory or of any other entity

  3. Propulsion Control Technology Development in the United States A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaw, Link C.a; Garg, Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a historical perspective of the advancement of control technologies for aircraft gas turbine engines. The paper primarily covers technology advances in the United States in the last 60 years (1940 to approximately 2002). The paper emphasizes the pioneering technologies that have been tested or implemented during this period, assimilating knowledge and experience from industry experts, including personal interviews with both current and retired experts. Since the first United States-built aircraft gas turbine engine was flown in 1942, engine control technology has evolved from a simple hydro-mechanical fuel metering valve to a full-authority digital electronic control system (FADEC) that is common to all modern aircraft propulsion systems. At the same time, control systems have provided engine diagnostic functions. Engine diagnostic capabilities have also evolved from pilot observation of engine gauges to the automated on-board diagnostic system that uses mathematical models to assess engine health and assist in post-flight troubleshooting and maintenance. Using system complexity and capability as a measure, we can break the historical development of control systems down to four phases: (1) the start-up phase (1942 to 1949), (2) the growth phase (1950 to 1969), (3) the electronic phase (1970 to 1989), and (4) the integration phase (1990 to 2002). In each phase, the state-of-the-art control technology is described and the engines that have become historical landmarks, from the control and diagnostic standpoint, are identified. Finally, a historical perspective of engine controls in the last 60 years is presented in terms of control system complexity, number of sensors, number of lines of software (or embedded code), and other factors.

  4. Does Residency Selection Criteria Predict Performance in Orthopaedic Surgery Residency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Tina; Alrabaa, Rami George; Sood, Amit; Maloof, Paul; Benevenia, Joseph; Berberian, Wayne

    2016-04-01

    More than 1000 candidates applied for orthopaedic residency positions in 2014, and the competition is intense; approximately one-third of the candidates failed to secure a position in the match. However, the criteria used in the selection process often are subjective and studies have differed in terms of which criteria predict either objective measures or subjective ratings of resident performance by faculty. Do preresidency selection factors serve as predictors of success in residency? Specifically, we asked which preresidency selection factors are associated or correlated with (1) objective measures of resident knowledge and performance; and (2) subjective ratings by faculty. Charts of 60 orthopaedic residents from our institution were reviewed. Preresidency selection criteria examined included United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and Step 2 scores, Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores, number of clinical clerkship honors, number of letters of recommendation, number of away rotations, Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) honor medical society membership, fourth-year subinternship at our institution, and number of publications. Resident performance was assessed using objective measures including American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery (ABOS) Part I scores and Orthopaedics In-Training Exam (OITE) scores and subjective ratings by faculty including global evaluation scores and faculty rankings of residents. We tested associations between preresidency criteria and the subsequent objective and subjective metrics using linear correlation analysis and Mann-Whitney tests when appropriate. Objective measures of resident performance namely, ABOS Part I scores, had a moderate linear correlation with the USMLE Step 2 scores (r = 0.55, p communication skills" subsection of the global evaluations. We found that USMLE Step 2, number of honors in medical school clerkships, and AOA membership demonstrated the strongest correlations with resident performance. Our

  5. Internal Control in Capitalist Enterprises. A Look from the Perspective of Political Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Domingos-Sapilinha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available All work directly social or collective on a large scale, requires to a greater or lesser extent a direction that establishes a harmonic link between the various individual activities and perform general functions born of the total productive organism. Thus the tasks of management, supervision and control appear as a requirement of the production process organized on the basis of the social division of labor and purely technical activities. Since then control has become a benchmark for various sciences, and internal control in the tool that aims at the effectiveness of business management by transparent operations and make records reliable, being indispensable for all types of business, including The big multinationals. Evaluating the fulfillment of internal control in large capitalist enterprises, approaching it from the perspective of Political Economy, is the objective of this article.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders in growing patients after treatment of class II and III malocclusion with orthopaedic appliances: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Silva, Antonio; Carnevali-Arellano, Romano; Venegas-Aguilera, Matías; Tobar-Reyes, Julio; Palomino-Montenegro, Hernán

    2018-05-01

    To determine if the use of orthopaedic appliances in growing patients applied to correct Class II and III malocclusion is related to the development of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). A systematic review was conducted between 1960 and July 2017, based on electronic databases: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, Scopus, EBSCOhost, Scielo, Lilacs and Bireme. Controlled clinical trials (CCTs) and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified. The articles were selected and analyzed by two authors independently. The quality of the evidence was determined according to the guidelines of the Cochrane Risk Bias Assessment Tool and the Cochrane Quality Study Guide. Seven articles were included, four CCTs and three RCTs. The studies were grouped according to malocclusion treatment in (a) class II appliances (n = 4) and (b) class III appliances (n = 3). The quality of evidence was low due to the high risk of bias, independent of the association reported. All studies concluded that the use of orthopaedic appliances would not contribute to the development of TMD. The quality of evidence available is insufficient to establish definitive conclusions, since the studies were very heterogeneous and presented a high risk of bias. However, it is suggested that the use of orthopaedic appliances to correct class II and III malocclusion in growing patients would not be considered as a risk factor for the development of TMD. High-quality RCTs are required to draw any definitive conclusions.

  7. Determinants of Controlling in Foreign Subsidiaries of MNEs: On the Explanatory Potential of the Institutional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Kochalski

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of this paper is to identify gaps in extant literature on controlling in MNEs, in particular factors affecting related managerial decisions. Secondly, the relevance of the institutional perspective will be examined for its potential to explain the design of controlling in foreign subsidiaries. Research Design & Methods: The dimensions of international controlling are discussed. Further, the institutional approach is examined for its applicability to advance the understanding of the determinants of shaping controlling systems in foreign subsidiaries of MNEs. Findings: Institutional aspects can have a significant impact on the functioning of MNEs in relation to their controlling systems. Informal institutions can influence the formation of the controlling system in the relations between the subsidiaries of the MNE, whereby also institutions within the MNE itself should be taken into account. Implications & Recommendations: Conducting in-depth qualitative research will allow for a set of recommendations that are relevant to managers responsible for an effective implementation of management control systems. Contribution & Value Added: The relevance of the controlling system in parent-subsidiary relationships has not received significant attention in existing studies in the discipline of international controlling.

  8. Competency-based education: a new model for teaching orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alman, Benjamin A; Ferguson, Peter; Kraemer, William; Nousiainen, Markku T; Reznick, Richard K

    2013-01-01

    The current methods used to train residents to become orthopaedic surgeons are based on tradition, not evidence-based models. Educators have only a limited ability to assess trainees for competency using validated tests in various domains. The reduction in resident work hours limits the time available for clinical training, which has resulted in some calls for lengthening the training process. Another approach to address limited training hours is to focus training in a program that allows residents to graduate from a rotation based on demonstrated competency rather than on time on a service. A pilot orthopaedic residency curriculum, which uses a competency-based framework of resident training and maximizes the use of available training hours, has been designed and is being implemented.

  9. Bone graft materials in fixation of orthopaedic implants in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babiker, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Bone graft is widely used within orthopaedic surgery especially in revision joint arthroplasty and spine fusion. The early implant fixation in the revision situation of loose joint prostheses is important for the long-term survival. Bone autograft has been considered as gold standard in many...... orthopaedic procedures, whereas allograft is the gold standard by replacement of extensive bone loss. However, the use of autograft is associated with donor site morbidity, especially chronic pain. In addition, the limited supply is a significant clinical challenge. Limitations in the use of allograft include...... the risk of bacterial contamination and disease transmission as well as non-union and poor bone quality. Other bone graft and substitutes have been considered as alternative in order to improve implant fixation. Hydroxyapatite and collagen type I composite (HA/Collagen) have the potential in mimicking...

  10. Adverse Effects of Smoking on Outcomes of Orthopaedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sheung-tung Ho

    2017-01-01

    Smoking has many adverse effects on the musculoskeletal system, particularly on the outcomes after orthopaedic surgery. Smoking is associated with surgical site infection and postoperative wound complications after spine surgery, total joint arthroplasty, and fracture fixation; nonunion after spinal fusion, ankle fusion, osteotomy, and internal fixation and bone grafting for scaphoid nonunion; worse outcomes after lumbar disc prolapse, spinal stenosis, and cervical myelopathy surgery; peripro...

  11. Rapid Prototyping in Orthopaedic Surgery: A User's Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Frame, Mark; Huntley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is applicable to orthopaedic problems involving three dimensions, particularly fractures, deformities, and reconstruction. In the past, RP has been hampered by cost and difficulties accessing the appropriate expertise. Here we outline the history of rapid prototyping and furthermore a process using open-source software to produce a high fidelity physical model from CT data. This greatly mitigates the expense associated with the technique, allowing surgeons to produce pr...

  12. Biocompatibility of orthopaedic implants on bone forming cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kapanen, A. (Anita)

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Reindeer antler was studied for its possible use as a bone implant material. A molecular biological study showed that antler contains a growth factor promoting bone formation. Ectopic bone formation assay showed that antler is not an equally effective inducer as allogenic material. Ectopic bone formation assay was optimised for biocompatibility studies of orthopaedic NiTi implants. Ti-6Al-4V and stainless steel were used as reference materials. The assay...

  13. Surgical skills simulation in trauma and orthopaedic training

    OpenAIRE

    Stirling, Euan RB; Lewis, Thomas L; Ferran, Nicholas A

    2014-01-01

    Changing patterns of health care delivery and the rapid evolution of orthopaedic surgical techniques have made it increasingly difficult for trainees to develop expertise in their craft. Working hour restrictions and a drive towards senior led care demands that proficiency be gained in a shorter period of time whilst requiring a greater skill set than that in the past. The resulting conflict between service provision and training has necessitated the development of alternative methods in orde...

  14. Antimicrobial and Osseointegration Properties of Nanostructured Titanium Orthopaedic Implants

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Marcus; Jennissen, Herbert P.; Dittrich, Florian; Fischer, Alfons; Köhling, Hedda Luise

    2017-01-01

    The surface design of titanium implants influences not only the local biological reactions but also affects at least the clinical result in orthopaedic application. During the last decades, strong efforts have been made to improve osteointegration and prevent bacterial adhesion to these surfaces. Following the rule of “smaller, faster, cheaper”, nanotechnology has encountered clinical application. It is evident that the hierarchical implant surface micro- and nanotopography orchestrate the bi...

  15. Professional liability in orthopaedics and traumatology in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Umberto; Giai Via, Alessio; Macrì, Ernesto; Eramo, Alessandro; Marino, Valeria; Marsella, Luigi Tonino

    2013-10-01

    Interest in medical errors has increased during the last few years owing to the number of medical malpractice claims. Reasons for the increasing number of claims may be related to patients' higher expectations, iatrogenic injury, and the growth of the legal services industry. Claims analysis provides helpful information in specialties in which a higher number of errors occur, highlighting areas where orthopaedic care might be improved. We determined: (1) the number of claims involving orthopaedics and traumatology in Rome; (2) the risk of litigation in elective and trauma surgery; (3) the most common surgical procedures involved in claims and indemnity payments; (4) the time between the adverse medical event and the judgment date; and (5) issues related to informed consent. We analyzed 1925 malpractice judgments decided in the Civil Court of Rome between 2004 and 2010. In total, 243 orthopaedics claims were filed, and in 75% of these cases surgeons were found liable; 149 (61%) of these resulted from elective surgery. Surgical teams were sued in 30 claims and found liable in 22. The total indemnity payment ordered was more than €12,350,000 (USD 16,190,000). THA and spinal surgery were the most common surgical procedures involved. Inadequate informed consent was reported in 5.3% of cases. Our study shows that careful medical examination, accurate documentation in medical records, and adequate informed consent might reduce the number of claims. We suggest monitoring of court judgments would be useful to develop prevention strategies to reduce claims.

  16. Regenerative orthopaedics: in vitro, in vivo...in silico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geris, Liesbet

    2014-09-01

    In silico, defined in analogy to in vitro and in vivo as those studies that are performed on a computer, is an essential step in problem-solving and product development in classical engineering fields. The use of in silico models is now slowly easing its way into medicine. In silico models are already used in orthopaedics for the planning of complicated surgeries, personalised implant design and the analysis of gait measurements. However, these in silico models often lack the simulation of the response of the biological system over time. In silico models focusing on the response of the biological systems are in full development. This review starts with an introduction into in silico models of orthopaedic processes. Special attention is paid to the classification of models according to their spatiotemporal scale (gene/protein to population) and the information they were built on (data vs hypotheses). Subsequently, the review focuses on the in silico models used in regenerative orthopaedics research. Contributions of in silico models to an enhanced understanding and optimisation of four key elements-cells, carriers, culture and clinics-are illustrated. Finally, a number of challenges are identified, related to the computational aspects but also to the integration of in silico tools into clinical practice.

  17. State Variation in Medicaid Reimbursements for Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalezari, Ramin M; Pozen, Alexis; Dy, Christopher J

    2018-02-07

    Medicaid reimbursements are determined by each state and are subject to variability. We sought to quantify this variation for commonly performed inpatient orthopaedic procedures. The 10 most commonly performed inpatient orthopaedic procedures, as ranked by the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) National Inpatient Sample, were identified for study. Medicaid reimbursement amounts for those procedures were benchmarked to state Medicare reimbursement amounts in 3 ways: (1) ratio, (2) dollar difference, and (3) dollar difference divided by the relative value unit (RVU) amount. Variability was quantified by determining the range and coefficient of variation for those reimbursement amounts. The range of variability of Medicaid reimbursements among states exceeded $1,500 for all 10 procedures. The coefficients of variation ranged from 0.32 (hip hemiarthroplasty) to 0.57 (posterior or posterolateral lumbar interbody arthrodesis) (a higher coefficient indicates greater variability), compared with 0.07 for Medicare reimbursements for all 10 procedures. Adjusted as a dollar difference between Medicaid and Medicare per RVU, the median values ranged from -$8/RVU (total knee arthroplasty) to -$17/RVU (open reduction and internal fixation of the femur). Variability of Medicaid reimbursement for inpatient orthopaedic procedures among states is substantial. This variation becomes especially remarkable given recent policy shifts toward focusing reimbursements on value.

  18. Neoprene Orthopaedic Supports: An Underrecognised Cause of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hawkey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thioureas, often contained within neoprene to provide water resistance, are an important cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD in those who use neoprene products. We wish to present three cases of thiourea-induced ACD from three different orthopaedic supports containing neoprene. The first case was a 67-year-old woman who developed an itchy rash on her heel three weeks after using a neoprene insole for plantar fasciitis. The second case was a 47-year-old man who developed an itchy rash on his wrist after wearing neoprene wrist splints for psoriatic arthropathy. The third case was a 77-year-old woman who experienced a severe erythematous rash with blistering from a neoprene elbow brace she received following a humeral fracture. All patients were patch tested to the British Society of Cutaneous Allergy Standard and rubber series and a cut piece from all the relevant supports. At 96 hours, all patients had a + reaction to mixed dialkylthiourea, diethylthiourea, and the supports’ material. No other positive patch test reactions were identified. As neoprene is fast becoming one of the most popular materials used for orthopaedic supports, awareness of this reaction and close liaison between dermatologists and orthopaedic surgeons are therefore essential to allow for early recognition of this complication.

  19. Analysis of scientific articles published in two general orthopaedic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Lukas A; Holzer, Gerold

    2013-01-01

    To give an overview of the behaviour and scientific contributions of the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American (JBJS-A) and British Volume (JBJS-B). 480 original articles published in 2009 were identified through a combined comprehensive computer and manual library search. Articles were assigned to 11 orthopaedic categories and by country, type and specialty of the institution. Possible grants and citations were analysed. USA led all countries in published articles (36,87%), followed by UK (20,62%) and South Korea (5,83%). Most studies published were performed at academic institutions (65,83 %), only 4,16% at private practices. Almost half of the articles (46,24%) were published in three categories: hip (19.16%), knee (13.75%) and trauma (13.33%). In both journals 47.15% articles had at least one funding source. A review of articles published in major journals allows to show how research in orthopaedics is distributed worldwide. This study shows that a variety of different journals is neccessary to reflect the broad spectrum of orthopaedics in depth. Level of Evidence III, Retrospective Comparative Study.

  20. Polytobacco Use and the "Customization Generation"-New Perspectives for Tobacco Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kimberly; Pearson, Jennifer L; Villanti, Andrea C

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the United States observed a significant uptake in concurrent use of multiple tobacco products and alternative nicotine delivery devices among youth-a phenomenon identified as polytobacco use-making tobacco control efforts more complex for clinicians, policy makers, and scientists, alike.The present commentary stimulates new perspectives on tobacco control in the context of polytobacco use and a youth culture of customization. This culture-based value of today's youth may inform current patterns of tobacco use. More specifically, the authors hypothesize a concept of tobacco customization-the concurrent use of multiple tobacco products to create personalized tobacco experience matching lifestyle, culture, values, and addiction levels. With a range of experiences made possible through an ever-increasing menu of tobacco products, flavors, and novel devices, the current youth culture of customization may also translate to tobacco customization. Given the predominance of polytobacco use in youth-tobacco users, tobacco control initiatives must be challenged to new perspectives. Should we discover the viability of tobacco customization, tobacco use strategies that target cultural values, harness popular trends, and culture and provide customizable experiences may have a notable impact on tobacco use in this population.

  1. The impact of inclusive business on ethical values & internal control quality: an accounting perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer A. El Nashar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to examine the impact of inclusive business on the internal ethical values and the internal control quality while conceiving the accounting perspective. I construct the hypothesis for this paper based on the potential impact on the organizations’ awareness to be directed to the inclusive business approach that will significantly impact the culture of the organizations then the ethical values and the internal control quality. I use the approach of the expected value and variance of random variable test in order to analyze the potential impact of inclusive business. I support the examination by discrete probability distribution and continuous probability distribution. I find a probability of 85.5% to have a significant potential impact of the inclusive business by 100% score on internal ethical values and internal control quality. And to help contribute to sustainability growth, reduce poverty and improve organizational culture and learning.

  2. Preclinical trial of a novel surface architecture for improved primary fixation of cementless orthopaedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Noel; Field, John R; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Curtin, William; McHugh, Peter E; Mc Donnell, Pat

    2014-09-01

    A new surface architecture for cementless orthopaedic implants (OsteoAnchor), which incorporates a multitude of tiny anchor features for enhancing primary fixation, was tested in an ovine hemi-arthroplasty pilot study. Test animals were implanted with a hip stem component incorporating the OsteoAnchor surface architecture produced using additive layer manufacturing and control animals were implanted with stems containing a standard plasma sprayed titanium coating. Intra-operative surgeon feedback indicated that superior primary fixation was achieved for the OsteoAnchor stems and rapid return to normal gait and load bearing was observed post-operation. Following a 16-week recovery time, histological evaluation of the excised femurs revealed in-growth of healthy bone into the porous structure of the OsteoAnchor stems. Bone in-growth was not achieved for the plasma sprayed stems. These results indicate the potential for the OsteoAnchor surface architecture to enhance both the initial stability and long term lifetime of cementless orthopaedic implants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects; Radiotherapie thoracique et controle de la respiration: perspectives actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, F.; Mineur, L.; Paoli, J.B.; Bodez, V.; Oozeer, R.; Garcia, R. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France)

    2002-11-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  4. Does a Weekly Didactic Conference Improve Resident Performance on the Pediatric Domain of the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Corinna C; Bosch, Patrick P; Grudziak, Jan S; Dede, Ozgur; Ramirez, Rey N; Mendelson, Steven A; Ward, W Timothy; Brooks, Maria; Kenkre, Tanya; Lubahn, John D; Deeney, Vincent F; Roach, James W

    2017-03-01

    Performance on the Orthopaedic In-training Examination (OITE) has been correlated with performance on the written portion of the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery examination. Herein we sought to discover whether adding a regular pediatric didactic lecture improved residents' performance on the OITE's pediatric domain. In 2012, a didactic lecture series was started in the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) Hamot Orthopaedic Residency Program (Hamot). This includes all topics in pediatric orthopaedic surgery and has teaching faculty present, and occurs weekly with all residents attending. A neighboring program [UMPC Pittsburgh (Pitt)] shares in these conferences, but only during their pediatric rotation. We sought to determine the effectiveness of the conference by comparing the historic scores from each program on the pediatric domain of the OITE examination to scores after the institution of the conference, and by comparing the 2 programs' scores. Both programs demonstrated improvement in OITE scores. In 2008, the mean examination score was 19.6±4.3 (11.0 to 30.0), and the mean percentile was 57.7±12.6 (32.0 to 88.0); in 2014, the mean examination score was 23.5±4.2 (14.0 to 33.0) and the mean percentile was 67.1±12.1 (40.0 to 94.0). OITE scores and percentiles improved with post graduate year (Pdidactic pediatric lecture improved residents' scores on the OITE and indirectly suggests that more frequent attendance is associated with better scores. Level III-retrospective case-control study.

  5. Flash autoclave settings may influence eradication but not presence of well-established biofilms on orthopaedic implant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dustin L; Taylor, Nicholas B; Epperson, Richard T; Rothberg, David L

    2017-10-04

    Flash autoclaving is one of the most frequently utilized methods of sterilizing devices, implants or other materials. For a number of decades, it has been common practice for surgeons to remove implantable devices, flash autoclave and then reimplant them in a patient. Data have not yet indicated the potential for biofilms to survive or remain on the surface of orthopaedic-relevant materials following flash autoclave. In this study, monomicrobial and polymicrobial biofilms were grown on the surface of clinically relevant titanium materials and exposed to flash autoclave settings that included varying times and temperatures. Data indicated that when the sterilization and control temperatures of an autoclave were the same, biofilms were able to survive flash autoclaving that was performed for a short duration. Higher temperature and increased duration rendered biofilms non-viable, but none of the autoclave settings had the ability to remove or disperse the presence of biofilms from the titanium surfaces. These findings may be beneficial for facilities, clinics, or hospitals to consider if biofilms are suspected to be present on materials or devices, in particular implants that have had associated infection and are considered for re-implantation. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Oral appliances and functional orthopaedic appliances for obstructive sleep apnoea in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando R; Lentini-Oliveira, Débora A; Prado, Lucila Bf; Prado, Gilmar F; Carvalho, Luciane Bc

    2016-10-05

    Apnoea is a breathing disorder marked by the absence of airflow at the nose or mouth. In children, risk factors include adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity, neuromuscular disorders and craniofacial anomalies. The most common treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in childhood is adeno-tonsillectomy. This approach is limited by its surgical risks, mostly in children with comorbidities and, in some patients, by recurrence that can be associated with craniofacial problems. Oral appliances and functional orthopaedic appliances have been used for patients who have OSAS and craniofacial anomalies because they hold the lower jaw (mandible) forwards which potentially enlarges the upper airway and increases the upper airspace, improving the respiratory function. To assess the effects of oral appliances or functional orthopaedic appliances for obstructive sleep apnoea in children. We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 7 April 2016); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 3) in the Cochrane Library (searched 7 April 2016); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 7 April 2016); Embase Ovid (1980 to 7 April 2016); LILACS BIREME (from 1982 to 7 April 2016); BBO BIREME (from 1986 to 7 April 2016) and SciELO Web of Science (from 1997 to 7 April 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials on 7 April 2016. We placed no restrictions on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing all types of oral and functional orthopaedic appliances with placebo or no treatment, in children 15 years old or younger. reduction of apnoea to less than one episode per hour. dental and skeletal relationship, sleep parameters improvement, cognitive and phonoaudiological function, behavioural problems, quality of life, side effects

  7. [Differentiation of coding quality in orthopaedics by special, illustration-oriented case group analysis in the G-DRG System 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, U; Reichel, H; Dreinhöfer, K

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a grouping system for clinical practice which allows the separation of DRG coding in specific orthopaedic groups based on anatomic regions, operative procedures, therapeutic interventions and morbidity equivalent diagnosis groups. With this, a differentiated aim-oriented analysis of illustrated internal DRG data becomes possible. The group-specific difference of the coding quality between the DRG groups following primary coding by the orthopaedic surgeon and final coding by the medical controlling is analysed. In a consecutive series of 1600 patients parallel documentation and group-specific comparison of the relevant DRG parameters were carried out in every case after primary and final coding. Analysing the group-specific share in the additional CaseMix coding, the group "spine surgery" dominated, closely followed by the groups "arthroplasty" and "surgery due to infection, tumours, diabetes". Altogether, additional cost-weight-relevant coding was necessary most frequently in the latter group (84%), followed by group "spine surgery" (65%). In DRGs representing conservative orthopaedic treatment documented procedures had nearly no influence on the cost weight. The introduced system of case group analysis in internal DRG documentation can lead to the detection of specific problems in primary coding and cost-weight relevant changes of the case mix. As an instrument for internal process control in the orthopaedic field, it can serve as a communicative interface between an economically oriented classification of the hospital performance and a specific problem solution of the medical staff involved in the department management.

  8. The efficacy of an extended scope physiotherapy clinic in paediatric orthopaedics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O Mir, Marie

    2016-04-01

    The demand for paediatric orthopaedic care is growing, and providing the service required is an increasingly challenging task. Physiotherapist-led triage clinics are utilised in adult orthopaedics to enable the provision of care to patients who may not require a surgical consult. The Physiotherapy Orthopaedic Triage Clinic (POTC) was established in Our Lady\\'s Children\\'s Hospital Crumlin in response to increasing demands on the paediatric orthopaedic service. The clinic is run by physiotherapists working in an advanced practice role (APP), and is the first paediatric clinic of its type and scale in the Republic of Ireland.

  9. Exposure of the orthopaedic surgeon to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Kiyonobu; Koga, Takamasa; Matsuzaki, Akio; Kido, Masaki; Satoh, Tetsunori [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). Chikushi Hospital

    1995-09-01

    We monitored the amount of radiation received by surgeons and assistants during surgery carried out with fluoroscopic assistance. The radiation was monitored with the use of MYDOSE MINIX PDM107 made by Aloka Co. Over a one year period from Aug 20, 1992 to Aug 19, 1993, a study was undertaken to evaluate exposure of the groin level to radiation with or without use of the lead apron during 106 operation (Group-1). In another group, radiation was monitored at the breast and groin level outside of the lead apron during 39 operations (Group-2). In Group-1, the average exposure per person during one year was 46.0 {mu}SV and the average exposure for each procedure was 1.68 {mu}SV. The use of the lead apron affirmed its protective value; the average radiation dose at the groin level out-side of the apron was 9.11 {mu}SV, the measured dose beneath the apron 0.61 {mu}SV. The average dose of exposure to the head, breast at groin level outside of the lead apron, were 7.68 {mu}SV, 16.24 {mu}SV, 32.04 {mu}SV respectively. This study and review of the literature indicate that the total amount of radiation exposure during surgery done with fluoroscopic control remains well within maximum exposure limits. (author).

  10. Exposure of the orthopaedic surgeon to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Kiyonobu; Koga, Takamasa; Matsuzaki, Akio; Kido, Masaki; Satoh, Tetsunori

    1995-01-01

    We monitored the amount of radiation received by surgeons and assistants during surgery carried out with fluoroscopic assistance. The radiation was monitored with the use of MYDOSE MINIX PDM107 made by Aloka Co. Over a one year period from Aug 20, 1992 to Aug 19, 1993, a study was undertaken to evaluate exposure of the groin level to radiation with or without use of the lead apron during 106 operation (Group-1). In another group, radiation was monitored at the breast and groin level outside of the lead apron during 39 operations (Group-2). In Group-1, the average exposure per person during one year was 46.0 μSV and the average exposure for each procedure was 1.68 μSV. The use of the lead apron affirmed its protective value; the average radiation dose at the groin level out-side of the apron was 9.11 μSV, the measured dose beneath the apron 0.61 μSV. The average dose of exposure to the head, breast at groin level outside of the lead apron, were 7.68 μSV, 16.24 μSV, 32.04 μSV respectively. This study and review of the literature indicate that the total amount of radiation exposure during surgery done with fluoroscopic control remains well within maximum exposure limits. (author)

  11. Quality charters or quality members? A control theory perspective on team charters and team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Stephen H; McCormick, Brian W; Mistry, Sal; Wang, Jiexin

    2017-10-01

    Though prevalent in practice, team charters have only recently received scholarly attention. However, most of this work has been relatively devoid of theory, and consequently, key questions about why and under what conditions team charter quality affects team performance remain unanswered. To address these gaps, we draw on macro organizational control theory to propose that team charter quality serves as a team-level "behavior" control mechanism that builds task cohesion through a structured exercise. We then juxtapose team charter quality with an "input" team control mechanism that influences the emergence of task cohesion more organically: team conscientiousness. Given their redundant effects on task cohesion, we propose that the effects of team charter quality and team conscientiousness on team performance (through task cohesion) are substitutive such that team charter quality primarily impacts team performance for teams that are low (vs. high) on conscientiousness. We test and find support for our hypotheses in a sample of 239 undergraduate self-managing project teams. Our study contributes to the groups and teams literature in the following ways: first, relative to previous studies, we take a more theory-driven approach toward understanding team charters, and in doing so, uncover when and why team charter quality impacts team performance; second, we integrate two normally disparate perspectives on team effectiveness (team development and team selection) to offer a broader perspective on how teams are "built"; and third, we introduce team charter quality as a performance-enhancing mechanism for teams lower on conscientiousness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Rehabilitation robotics for the upper extremity: review with new directions for orthopaedic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Renée M; Tunis, Brandon G; Ross, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    The focus of research using technological innovations such as robotic devices has been on interventions to improve upper extremity function in neurologic populations, particularly patients with stroke. There is a growing body of evidence describing rehabilitation programs using various types of supportive/assistive and/or resistive robotic and virtual reality-enhanced devices to improve outcomes for patients with neurologic disorders. The most promising approaches are task-oriented, based on current concepts of motor control/learning and practice-induced neuroplasticity. Based on this evidence, we describe application and feasibility of virtual reality-enhanced robotics integrated with current concepts in orthopaedic rehabilitation shifting from an impairment-based focus to inclusion of more intense, task-specific training for patients with upper extremity disorders, specifically emphasizing the wrist and hand. The purpose of this paper is to describe virtual reality-enhanced rehabilitation robotic devices, review evidence of application in patients with upper extremity deficits related to neurologic disorders, and suggest how this technology and task-oriented rehabilitation approach can also benefit patients with orthopaedic disorders of the wrist and hand. We will also discuss areas for further research and development using a task-oriented approach and a commercially available haptic robotic device to focus on training of grasp and manipulation tasks. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a growing body of evidence describing rehabilitation programs using various types of supportive/assistive and/or resistive robotic and virtual reality-enhanced devices to improve outcomes for patients with neurologic disorders. The most promising approaches using rehabilitation robotics are task-oriented, based on current concepts of motor control/learning and practice-induced neuroplasticity. Based on the evidence in neurologic populations, virtual reality-enhanced robotics

  13. Evaluating the use of preoperative antibiotics in pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaini, Nathan; Jacob, Paul; Willis, Leisel; Kean, John R

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the rate of infection after minimally invasive procedures on a consecutive series of pediatric orthopaedic patients. We hypothesized that the use of preoperative antibiotics for minimally invasive pediatric orthopaedic procedures does not significantly reduce the incidence of surgical site infection requiring surgical debridement within 30 days of the primary procedure. We retrospectively reviewed 2330 patients having undergone minimally invasive orthopaedic procedures at our institution between March 2008 and November 2010. Knee arthroscopy, closed reduction with percutaneous fixation, soft tissue releases, excision of bony or soft-tissue masses, and removal of hardware constituted the vast majority of included procedures. Two groups, based on whether prophylactic antibiotics were administered before surgery, were created and the incidence of a repeat procedure required for deep infection was recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to determine significance, if any, between the 2 groups. Chart review of the 2330 patients identified 1087 as having received preoperative antibiotics, whereas the remaining 1243 patients did not receive antibiotics before surgery. Only 1 patient out of the 1243 cases in which antibiotics were not given required additional surgery within 30 days of the primary procedure due to a complicated surgical site infection (an incidence of 0.0008%). No patients in the antibiotic group developed a postoperative infection within 30 days requiring a return to the operating room for management. Our data revealed no significant increase in the incidence of complicated infection requiring additional procedures when antibiotics were not administered before surgery. Though prophylactic antibiotics have been shown to confer numerous benefits for patients undergoing relatively major operations, their use in cases of minimally invasive and/or percutaneous orthopaedic surgery is not well defined. Our data suggest that the use of

  14. Stress and coping among orthopaedic surgery residents and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, M Catherine; Sotile, Wayne; Sotile, Mary O; Rubash, Harry; Barrack, Robert L

    2004-07-01

    Evaluations of physicians and residents have revealed concerning levels of psychosocial dysfunction. The purposes of this study were to determine the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty and to identify the risk factors for decompensation. Twenty-one orthopaedic residents and twenty-five full-time orthopaedic faculty completed a 102-question voluntary, anonymous survey. The survey consisted of three validated instruments, i.e., the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Health Questionnaire-12, and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale; and three novel question sets addressing background and demographic information, stress reaction and management, and the balance between work and home life. Descriptive statistics, pairwise correlations, simple t tests, and Pearson and nonparametric Spearman correlations were calculated. The simple correlation coefficient was used to assess bivariate relationships. The mean overall quality-of-life score, on a scale of 0 to 4 points, was 2.5 points for residents compared with 3.6 points for faculty members. Residents reported considerable burnout, showing a high level of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and an average level of personal achievement, whereas faculty reported minimal burnout, showing a low level of emotional exhaustion (p burnout and psychiatric morbidity correlated with weekly work hours; conflict between the commitments of work and home life; discord with faculty, nursing staff, and senior residents; debt load; and work-related stress. Protective factors included being a parent, spending time with a spouse, having a physician father, and deriving satisfaction from discussing concerns with colleagues, friends, and family. In pursuit of our goal of determining the quality of life of orthopaedic residents and faculty, we identified a large disparity between the two groups. The resident group reported much greater levels of dysfunction particularly with regard to burnout and psychiatric morbidity

  15. Quantification of facial contamination with blood during orthopaedic procedures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, D

    2012-02-03

    Operative surgery exposes the surgeon to possible blood-borne infections. Risks include pen-etrating injuries and conjunctival contact with infected blood. Visor masks worn during orthopaedic trauma procedures were assessed for blood contamination using computer analysis. This was found to be present on 86% of masks, of which only 15% was recognized by the surgeon intraoperatively. Of the blood splashes 80% were less than 0.6mm in diameter. We conclude that power instrumentation produces a blood particulate mist causing considerable microscopic, facial contamination which is a significant risk to the surgeon.

  16. What I expect from an orthopaedic traumatology fellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Chip Routt, Milton; Stark, Delbert H

    2014-09-01

    After 2.5 decades working with a variety of orthopaedic traumatology fellows, I have learned that several qualities and behaviors are important to a successful experience. Most fellows possess them, but some do not. Those that do usually integrate quickly onto the team and are rewarded with enriched teaching and clinical experiences. Some that do not may be able to adjust or alter their behaviors and eventually fit in. Some cannot adjust and their experiences suffer. I realize that no 2 individuals are the same, so my expectations of a fellow serve as a relationship foundation to then build their experiences upon. Their qualities and behaviors guide our relationship.

  17. Conductive polymer sensor arrays for smart orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micolini, Carolina; Holness, F. B.; Johnson, James A.; Price, Aaron D.

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes and demonstrates the design, implementation, and characterization of a 3D-printed smartpolymer sensor array using conductive polyaniline (PANI) structures embedded in a polymeric substrate. The piezoresistive characteristics of PANI were studied to evaluate the efficacy of the manufacturing of an embedded pressure sensor. PANI's stability throughout loading and unloading cycles together with the response to incremental loading cycles was investigated. It is demonstrated that this specially developed multi-material additive manufacturing process for polyaniline is a good candidate for the manufacture of implant components with smart-polymer sensors embedded for the analysis of joint loads in orthopaedic implants.

  18. Rapid Prototyping in Orthopaedic Surgery: A User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Mark; Huntley, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) is applicable to orthopaedic problems involving three dimensions, particularly fractures, deformities, and reconstruction. In the past, RP has been hampered by cost and difficulties accessing the appropriate expertise. Here we outline the history of rapid prototyping and furthermore a process using open-source software to produce a high fidelity physical model from CT data. This greatly mitigates the expense associated with the technique, allowing surgeons to produce precise models for preoperative planning and procedure rehearsal. We describe the method with an illustrative case. PMID:22666160

  19. Antimicrobial and Osseointegration Properties of Nanostructured Titanium Orthopaedic Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Marcus; Jennissen, Herbert P; Dittrich, Florian; Fischer, Alfons; Köhling, Hedda Luise

    2017-11-13

    The surface design of titanium implants influences not only the local biological reactions but also affects at least the clinical result in orthopaedic application. During the last decades, strong efforts have been made to improve osteointegration and prevent bacterial adhesion to these surfaces. Following the rule of "smaller, faster, cheaper", nanotechnology has encountered clinical application. It is evident that the hierarchical implant surface micro- and nanotopography orchestrate the biological cascades of early peri-implant endosseous healing or implant loosening. This review of the literature gives a brief overview of nanostructured titanium-base biomaterials designed to improve osteointegration and prevent from bacterial infection.

  20. SCOSII: ESA's new generation of mission control systems: The user's perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufeler, P.; Pecchioli, M.; Shurmer, I.

    1994-01-01

    In 1974 ESOC decided to develop a reusable Mission Control System infrastructure for ESA's missions operated under its responsibility. This triggered a long and successful product development line, which started with the Multi Mission Support System (MSSS) which entered in service in 1977 and is still being used today by the MARECS and ECS missions; it was followed in 1989 by a second generation of systems known as SCOS-I, which was/is used by the Hipparcos, ERS-1 and EURECA missions and will continue to support all future ESCO controlled missions until approximately 1995. In the meantime the increasing complexity of future missions together with the emergence of new hardware and software technologies have led ESOC to go for the development of a third generation of control systems, SCOSII, which will support their future missions up to at least the middle of the next decade. The objective of the paper is to present the characteristics of the SCOSII system from the perspective of the mission control team; i.e. it will concentrate on the improvements and advances in the performance, functionality and work efficiency of the system.

  1. Historical perspective of sexually transmitted infections and their control in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, P J

    2010-04-01

    In designing an effective national response to sexually transmitted infections (STIs), one must incorporate a historical perspective of previous efforts that have addressed different aspects of STIs. One must understand who have been the key players, what aspects of STIs were the focus of efforts (prevention, treatment or control), and which, if any, societal subgroups were targeted (i.e. sex workers, military, men who have sex with men [MSM], etc.). In addition, one must consider historical and modern attitudes towards sex, sexuality and STIs, especially in terms of taboos and stigmas that may be attached to each. Most importantly, one must recognize which efforts have succeeded, which have failed, and why. This paper presents a historical overview of the perceptions of and responses to STIs at different points in Peru's history, and discusses current efforts to build upon past successes and avoid repeating previous failures that could be helpful for other countries in the Latin American region.

  2. Current status and perspectives of Clonorchis sinensis and clonorchiasis: epidemiology, pathogenesis, omics, prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ze-Li; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xin-Bing

    2016-07-06

    Clonorchiasis, caused by Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis), is an important food-borne parasitic disease and one of the most common zoonoses. Currently, it is estimated that more than 200 million people are at risk of C. sinensis infection, and over 15 million are infected worldwide. C. sinensis infection is closely related to cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), fibrosis and other human hepatobiliary diseases; thus, clonorchiasis is a serious public health problem in endemic areas. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, disease burden and treatment of clonorchiasis as well as summarizes the techniques for detecting C. sinensis infection in humans and intermediate hosts and vaccine development against clonorchiasis. Newer data regarding the pathogenesis of clonorchiasis and the genome, transcriptome and secretome of C. sinensis are collected, thus providing perspectives for future studies. These advances in research will aid the development of innovative strategies for the prevention and control of clonorchiasis.

  3. Comparison of the thermomechanical characteristics of porcher carbon fabric-based composites for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, E. S.; Yudin, V. E.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Elokhovskii, V. Yu.

    2012-07-01

    Prepregs of fiber-reinforced plastics based on a PORCHER-43200 carbon twill-weave fabric and two types of binders — thermoreactive and thermoplastic — were fabricated using electrostatic spraying, followed by rolling the prepregs in temperature-controlled calenders. A solid epoxy olygomer with dicyandiamine as a hardener and Fortron® polyphenylene sulfide were used as the thermoreactive and thermoplastic binders. The thermomechanical properties of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics processed from these prepregs, as well as commercial Sigranex® PREPREGCE8201-200-45 S prepregs as model ones, and composites manufactured from them were investigated for comparison. The latter ones are being used for the design of orthopaedic products. It is shown that the composites based on polyphenylene sulfide are characterized by higher values of flexural strength, flexural and shear moduli, and interlaminar fracture toughness ( G IC), the latter being the most important parameter.

  4. Laser-induced modification of structure and shape of cartilage in otolaryngology and orthopaedics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol', E. N.; Baum, O. I.; Omel'chenko, A. I.; Soshnikova, Yu. M.; Yuzhakov, A. V.; Kas'yanenko, E. M.; Tokareva, A. V.; Baskov, A. V.; Svistushkin, V. M.; Selezneva, L. V.; Shekhter, A. B.

    2017-11-01

    We present the results of basic research in laser modification of tissues in otolaryngology (correcting the shape of nasal septum and larynx cartilages), cosmetology (correcting ear and nose shape), orthopaedics and spinal surgery (treatment of diseases of spine disc and joints). The physical processes and mechanisms of laser-induced relaxation of stresses and regeneration of tissues are considered. New results of studies in this fast-developing field of laser surgery are presented, in particular, the results of laser correction of costal cartilage shape in the process of making implants for the treatment of larynx stenosis and controlled regeneration of the hyaline articular cartilage. Presented at the Fundamentals of Laser Assisted Micro- and Nanotechnologies (FLAMN-2016) International Symposium (Pushkin, Leningrad oblast, 27 June to 1 July 2016).

  5. Private Practitioners’ Perspectives on Their Involvement With the Tuberculosis Control Programme in a Southern Indian State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon Salve

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Public and private health sectors both play a crucial role in the health systems of low- and middleincome countries (LMICs. The tuberculosis (TB control strategy in India encourages the public sector to actively partner with private practitioners (PPs to improve the quality of front line service delivery. However, ensuring effective and sustainable involvement of PPs constitutes a major challenge. This paper reports the findings from an empirical study focusing on the perspectives and experiences of PPs towards their involvement in TB control programme in India. Methods The study was carried out between November 2010 and December 2011 in a district of a Southern Indian State and utilised qualitative methodologies, combining observations and in-depth interviews with 21 PPs from different medical systems. The collected data was coded and analysed using thematic analysis. Results PPs perceived themselves to be crucial healthcare providers, with different roles within the public-private mix (PPM TB policy. Despite this, PPs felt neglected and undervalued in the actual process of implementation of the PPM-TB policy. The entire process was considered to be government driven and their professional skills and knowledge of different medical systems remained unrecognised at the policy level, and weakened their relationship and bond with the policy and with the programme. PPs had contrasting perceptions about the different components of the TB programme that demonstrated the public sector’s dominance in the overall implementation of the DOTS strategy. Although PPs felt responsible for their TB patients, they found it difficult to perceive themselves as ‘partners with the TB programme.’ Conclusion Public-private partnerships (PPPs are increasingly utilized as a public health strategy to strengthen health systems. These policies will fail if the concerns of the PPs are neglected. To ensure their long-term involvement in the programme the

  6. Demographics, nature and treatment of orthopaedic trauma injuries occurring in an agricultural context in the West of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, F J

    2011-03-01

    Farming is a major industry in the West of Ireland. This prospective study examined the age profile, nature and treatment of orthopaedic injuries occurring in agricultural surroundings presenting at the Orthopaedic Unit of Merlin Park Hospital, Galway.

  7. Long Sick Leave after Orthopaedic Inpatient Rehabilitation: Treatment Failure or Relapse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangels, Marija; Schwarz, Susanne; Worringen, Ulrike; Holme, Martin; Rief, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    We investigated whether short-term versus long-term sick leave after orthopaedic inpatient rehabilitation can be predicted by initial assessment information, the clinical status at discharge, or whether the follow-up interval is crucial for later sick leave. We examined 214 patients from an orthopaedic rehabilitation hospital at admission,…

  8. Burnout and quality of life among orthopaedic trainees in a modern educational programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vendeloo, S. N.; Brand, P. L. P.; Verheyen, C. C. P. M.

    We aimed to determine quality of life and burnout among Dutch orthopaedic trainees following a modern orthopaedic curriculum, with strict compliance to a 48-hour working week. We also evaluated the effect of the clinical climate of learning on their emotional wellbeing. We assessed burnout, quality

  9. Advanced practice physiotherapy in paediatric orthopaedics: innovation and collaboration to improve service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Mír, M; O'Sullivan, C

    2018-02-01

    One in eight paediatric primary care presentations is for a musculoskeletal (MSK) disorder. These patients are frequently referred to paediatric orthopaedic surgeons; however, up to 50% of referrals are for normal variants. This results in excessive wait-times and impedes access for urgent surgical cases. Adult MSK medicine has successfully utilised advanced practice physiotherapists (APP) managing non-surgical candidates, with documented benefits both to patients and services. There is a gap in the literature with regard to APP in paediatric orthopaedics. In this review, we investigate demands on paediatric orthopaedic services, examine the literature regarding APP in paediatric orthopaedics and explore the value the role has to offer current outpatient services. Paediatric orthopaedic services are under-resourced with concurrent long wait times. Approximately 50% of referrals are for normal variants, which do not require specialist intervention. Poor musculoskeletal examination skills and low diagnostic confidence amongst primary care physicians have been identified as a cause of inappropriate referrals. APP clinics for normal variants have reported independent management rate and discharge rates of 95% and marked reduction in patient wait times. There is limited evidence to support the APP in paediatric orthopaedics. Further studies are needed investigating diagnostic agreement, patient/stakeholder satisfaction, patient outcomes and economic evaluation. Paediatric orthopaedics is in crisis as to how to effectively manage the overwhelming volume of referrals. Innovative multidisciplinary solutions are required so that the onus is not solely on physicians to provide all services. The APP in paediatric orthopaedics may be part of the solution.

  10. 78 FR 21129 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... radiofrequency band ranging between 13 megahertz to 27.12 megahertz and is intended for the treatment of medical...] Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices...

  11. Medical opinions, beliefs and prescription of orthopaedic footwear: A survey of Dutch orthopaedists and rehabilitation practitioners.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Hendrik; Seydel, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To get insight into medical opinions about the use of orthopaedic footwear and the medical and social factors related to the prescription of orthopaedic footwear by orthopaedists and rehabilitation practitioners. Methods: In this study 85 orthopaedists and 96 rehabilitation practitioners

  12. Consultation of orthopaedics cases using multimedia messaging services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eranki, Vivek; Munt, Justin; Lim, Ming J; Atkinson, Robert

    2010-04-23

    Frequently, radiological data is transferred verbally between the Emergency Department (ED) and orthopaedic registrar. Given the different language skills and medical experience of health staff, there is often a limit to the adequacy of the verbal description that could lead to suboptimal patient care. This study proposes that concurrent review of MMS teleradiology with traditional verbal reporting results in a significant therapeutic benefit. Case notes of 40 patients who presented to ED were reviewed. Images were captured and sent to an Orthopaedic registrar along with a brief clinical synopsis. Information was collected on the diagnosis of the MMS radiograph, need for urgent admission and management plan outlined to ED. Correct diagnosis was made in 27 of 40 cases. Using the latest technology available, MMS teleradiology had 79% sensitivity, 83% specificity and an accuracy of 80%. 50% of paediatric fractures and 60% of undisplaced fractures were diagnosed successfully. MMS teleradiology is not suitable by itself as a remote diagnostic tool. However, when combined with existing clinical practice, it is effective in screening patients, enhances confidence in decision making and communication between doctors.

  13. Assessing readability of patient education materials: current role in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarudeen, Sameer; Sabharwal, Sanjeev

    2010-10-01

    Health literacy is the single best predictor of an individual's health status. It is important to customize health-related education material to the individual patient's level of reading skills. Readability of a given text is the objective measurement of the reading skills one should possess to understand the written material. In this article, some of the commonly used readability assessment tools are discussed and guidelines to improve the comprehension of patient education handouts are provided. Where are we now? Several healthcare organizations have recommended the readability of patient education materials be no higher than sixth- to eighth-grade level. However, most of the patient education materials currently available on major orthopaedic Web sites are written at a reading level that may be too advanced for comprehension by a substantial proportion of the population. WHERE DO WE NEED TO GO?: There are several readily available and validated tools for assessing the readability of written materials. While use of audiovisual aids such as video clips, line drawings, models, and charts can enhance the comprehension of a health-related topic, standard readability tools cannot construe such enhancements. HOW DO WE GET THERE?: Given the variability in the capacity to comprehend health-related materials among individuals seeking orthopaedic care, stratifying the contents of patient education materials at different levels of complexity will likely improve health literacy and enhance patient-centered communication.

  14. Complex orthopaedic management of patients with skeletal dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Baindurashvili

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal dysplasias are challenging for diagnostics and treatment. We present a series of fifteen patients with different forms of skeletal dysplasias with age ranged from 6 to 17 years with variable clinical presentations managed as a part of the project of scientific cooperation between Turner Paediatric Orthopaedic Institute and Orthopaedic Hospital Vienna-Speising. The spectrum of diagnoses included multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, diastrophic dysplasia, metaphyseal dysplasia, spondylometaphyseal dysplasia, Stickler syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, and anauxetic dysplasia. Complex treatment, which included axial correction and juxta-articular realignment, was performed as a single-stage, or consecutive surgery. Surgical techniques included corrective osteotomies with internal fixation, guided growth technique and external fixation devices. Best results (full axial correction, normal alignment of the joint were achieved in 8 patients, including 2 patients with metaphyseal dysplasia, 2 patients with multiple epyphyseal dysplasia, 2 patients with spondyloepyphyseal dysplasia, patient with Stickler syndrome and patient with spondylometaphyseal dysplasia. Good results (partial correction at the present time were seen in 4 patients (2 patients with Kniest dysplasia, 1 - with multiple epyphyseal dysplasia and 1 - with anauxetic dysplasia. Satisfactory results (non-progressive condition in previous progression were obtained in 2 patients with diastrophic dysplasia, and poor results (progression of the deformity - in 1 patient with diastrophic dysplasia. Positive results in most of the cases of our series make promising future for usage of complex approach for orthopedic management of children with skeletal dysplasias; advanced international cooperation is productive and helpful for diagnostics and management of rare diseases.

  15. The effect of inclement weather on trauma orthopaedic workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Climate change models predict increasing frequency of extreme weather. One of the challenges hospitals face is how to make sure they have adequate staffing at various times of the year. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of this severe inclement weather on hospital admissions, operative workload and cost in the Irish setting. We hypothesised that there is a direct relationship between cold weather and workload in a regional orthopaedic trauma unit. METHODS: Trauma orthopaedic workload in a regional trauma unit was examined over 2 months between December 2009 and January 2010. This corresponded with a period of severe inclement weather. RESULTS: We identified a direct correlation between the drop in temperature and increase in workload, with a corresponding increase in demand on resources. CONCLUSIONS: Significant cost savings could be made if these injuries were prevented. While the information contained in this study is important in the context of resource planning and staffing of hospital trauma units, it also highlights the vulnerability of the Irish population to wintery weather.

  16. Congestion Control for a Fair Packet Delivery in WSN: From a Complex System Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Aguirre-Guerrero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose that packets travelling across a wireless sensor network (WSN can be seen as the active agents that make up a complex system, just like a bird flock or a fish school, for instance. From this perspective, the tools and models that have been developed to study this kind of systems have been applied. This is in order to create a distributed congestion control based on a set of simple rules programmed at the nodes of the WSN. Our results show that it is possible to adapt the carried traffic to the network capacity, even under stressing conditions. Also, the network performance shows a smooth degradation when the traffic goes beyond a threshold which is settled by the proposed self-organized control. In contrast, without any control, the network collapses before this threshold. The use of the proposed solution provides an effective strategy to address some of the common problems found in WSN deployment by providing a fair packet delivery. In addition, the network congestion is mitigated using adaptive traffic mechanisms based on a satisfaction parameter assessed by each packet which has impact on the global satisfaction of the traffic carried by the WSN.

  17. Caregiver perspective on pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: medication satisfaction and symptom control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fridman M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Moshe Fridman,1 Tobias Banaschewski,2 Vanja Sikirica,3 Javier Quintero,4 M Haim Erder,3 Kristina S Chen5 1AMF Consulting, Inc., Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim of the University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany; 3Global Health Economics Outcomes Research and Epidemiology, Shire, Wayne, PA, USA; 4Psychiatry Department, Hospital Universitario Infanta Leonor, Complutense University, Madrid, Spain; 5Global Health Economics Outcomes Research and Epidemiology, Shire, Lexington, MA, USA Abstract: The caregiver perspective on pediatric attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD study (CAPPA was a web-based, cross-sectional survey of caregivers of children and adolescents (6–17 years of age with ADHD and was conducted in 10 European countries. CAPPA included caregiver assessments of global medication satisfaction, global symptom control, and satisfaction with ADHD medication attributes. Overall, 2,326 caregiver responses indicated that their child or adolescent was currently receiving ADHD medication and completed the “off medication” assessment required for inclusion in the present analyses. Responses to the single-item global medication satisfaction question indicated that 88% were satisfied (moderately satisfied to very satisfied with current medication and 18% were “very satisfied” on the single-item question. Responses to the single-item global symptom control question indicated that 47% and 19% of caregivers considered their child or adolescent’s symptoms to be “controlled” or “very well controlled”, respectively. Significant variations in response to the questions of medication satisfaction and symptom control were observed between countries. The correlation between the global medication satisfaction and global symptom control questions was 0.677 (P<0.001. Global medication satisfaction was significantly

  18. Nanoinsecticidas: Nuevas perspectivas para el control de plagas Nanoinsecticides: New perspectives on insect pest control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Stadler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La agricultura de bajo impacto ambiental demanda nuevos pesticidas que deben ajustarse a las exigentes normativas internacionales. Parte de la búsqueda de nuevos productos bio-racionales se desarrolla por fuera del marco de la síntesis orgánica, explorando diferentes sustancias de origen natural como extractos vegetales, aceites insecticidas e insecticidas inorgánicos. Los polvos insecticidas representan el grupo más antiguo de sustancias utilizadas por el hombre para el control de plagas, cuya eficacia se basa principalmente en fenómenos físicos. Con el advenimiento de los insecticidas de síntesis, los polvos insecticidas fueron relegados por casi cinco décadas a la función de carriers de principios activos dentro de los insecticidas formulados. Con el desarrollo del caolín hidrófobo en la década de los 90´, los polvos inorgánicos resurgieron como insecticidas "per se", y, recientemente, a partir del descubrimiento de los nanoinsecticidas, afloran nuevas alternativas para expandir el espectro de aplicaciones de los polvos inorgánicos. El desarrollo y registro de nuevos productos a partir de nanomateriales manufacturados se basa en el paradigma "lo mismo pero diferente", ya que éstos difieren de las sustancias con idéntica estructura y composición química respecto de algunas propiedades como reactividad,área especifica, efectos cuánticos, carga eléctrica, etc. Estas sustancias con nuevas propiedades también se destacan como herramientas muy prometedoras para la protección de cultivos y la producción de alimentos y abren nuevas fronteras para el manejo de plagas con nanoinsecticidas. La alúmina nanoestructurada exhibe varias de las propiedades del insecticida ideal, ya que se trata de un producto natural desde el punto de vista químico, no reactivo, económico, con reducidas probabilidades de provocar resistencia en los insectos y su eficacia es mayor que la de otros polvos insecticidas como el caolín o la tierra de

  19. Footwear recommendations and patterns among orthopaedic foot and ankle surgeons: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Daniel C; Knutsen, Elisa J

    2013-12-01

    Foot and ankle surgeons are in a unique position to educate patients about the importance of proper footwear. Neither their recommendations regarding shoe selection nor their own footwear patterns have previously been reported. A total of 866 members of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) were asked to complete a survey via the Internet. Topics included specific shoe brands recommended to patients, how attributes of footwear are communicated, and respondents' footwear habits. In all, 276 (32%) surgeons responded, and 64% recommended New Balance athletic shoes to patients; 26% did not recommend specific brands. It was found that 50% wear New Balance athletic shoes; 25% wear Nike. Rockport (27%) and SAS (27%) were the most recommended dress shoes. In all, 76% are familiar with AOFAS guidelines for proper shoe fit, but only 56% educated their patients about the guidelines; 43% do not consider what patients might think of their shoes when selecting what to wear in the clinical setting. Despite the multitude of different brands, several were commonly recommended. Respondents seem to be aware of the impact of their own shoe selection on patients' perspectives of footwear, but many do not consider themselves role models for proper footwear.

  20. Orthopaedic Trauma Care Capacity Assessment and Strategic Planning in Ghana: Mapping a Way Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Barclay T; Gyedu, Adam; Tansley, Gavin; Yeboah, Dominic; Amponsah-Manu, Forster; Mock, Charles; Labi-Addo, Wilfred; Quansah, Robert

    2016-12-07

    Orthopaedic conditions incur more than 52 million disability-adjusted life years annually worldwide. This burden disproportionately affects low and middle-income countries, which are least equipped to provide orthopaedic care. We aimed to assess orthopaedic capacity in Ghana, describe spatial access to orthopaedic care, and identify hospitals that would most improve access to care if their capacity was improved. Seventeen perioperative and orthopaedic trauma care-related items were selected from the World Health Organization's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care. Direct inspection and structured interviews with hospital staff were used to assess resource availability and factors contributing to deficiencies at 40 purposively sampled facilities. Cost-distance analyses described population-level spatial access to orthopaedic trauma care. Facilities for targeted capability improvement were identified through location-allocation modeling. Orthopaedic trauma care assessment demonstrated marked deficiencies. Some deficient resources were low cost (e.g., spinal immobilization, closed reduction capabilities, and prosthetics for amputees). Resource nonavailability resulted from several contributing factors (e.g., absence of equipment, technology breakage, lack of training). Implants were commonly prohibitively expensive. Building basic orthopaedic care capacity at 15 hospitals without such capacity would improve spatial access to basic care from 74.9% to 83.0% of the population (uncertainty interval [UI] of 81.2% to 83.6%), providing access for an additional 2,169,714 Ghanaians. The availability of several low-cost resources could be better supplied by improvements in organization and training for orthopaedic trauma care. There is a critical need to advocate and provide funding for orthopaedic resources. These initiatives might be particularly effective if aimed at hospitals that could provide care to a large proportion of the population.

  1. The link between texting and motor vehicle collision frequency in the orthopaedic trauma population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil M. Issar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study will evaluate whether or not texting frequency while driving and/or texting frequency in general are associated with an increased risk of incurring a motor vehicle collision (MVC resulting in orthopaedic trauma injuries. METHODS: All patients who presented to the Vanderbilt University Medical Center Orthopaedic Trauma Clinic were administered a questionnaire to determine background information, mean phone use, texting frequency, texting frequency while driving, and whether or not the injury was the result of an MVC in which the patient was driving. RESULTS: 237 questionnaires were collected. 60 were excluded due to incomplete date, leaving 57 questionnaires in the MVC group and 120 from patients with non-MVC injuries. Patients who sent more than 30 texts per week (“heavy texters” were 2.22 times more likely to be involved in an MVC than those who texted less frequently. 84% of respondents claimed to never text while driving. Dividing the sample into subsets on the basis of age (25 years of age or below considered “young adult,” and above 25 years of age considered “adult”,young, heavy texters were 6.76 times more likely to be involved in an MVC than adult non-heavy texters (p = 0.000. Similarly, young adult, non-heavy texters were 6.65 (p = 0.005 times more likely to be involved in an MVC, and adult, heavy texters were 1.72 (p = 0.186 times more likely to be involved in an MVC. CONCLUSIONS: Patients injured in an MVC sent more text messages per week than non-MVC patients. Additionally, controlling for age demonstrated that young age and heavy general texting frequency combined had the highest increase in MVC risk, with the former being the variable of greatest effect

  2. Achilles tenotomy as an office procedure and current practising trends among New Zealand orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Lewis; Wickham, Angus; Walker, Cameron; Knudsen, Joshua

    2018-05-18

    Percutaneous Achilles tenotomy (PAT) is performed during the final phase of casting with Ponseti method. Several settings have been proposed as venues for this procedure, however it is increasingly being performed in theatre under a general anaesthetic (GA). General anaesthesia, however, is expensive and not without risks. The purpose of the present study was to compare results of outpatient releases to theatre releases, and assess current practising trends among orthopaedic surgeons. Retrospective comparison of patients with idiopathic clubfoot managed by Ponseti method who had Achilles tenotomy performed in outpatient clinic and in theatre. Surveys were sent to all POSNZ members to determine current practising trends in New Zealand. Parental satisfaction surveys were performed. Comparative cost analysis was performed using hospital billing information. The current study includes 64 idiopathic congenital clubfeet (19 bilateral cases). PAT was performed on 26 clubfeet under local anaesthetic in an outpatient setting, and 33 clubfeet under GA in a theatre setting. There was no significant difference for post-operative complications, or recurrence (p=0.67). Those in theatre group were exposed to a greater number of general anaesthetics before the age of four. Among practising New Zealand paediatric orthopaedic surgeons, 77.78% perform this in theatre under general anaesthesia, while only 22.22% perform PAT in outpatient clinic. The main barriers included concerns regarding pain control, concerns regarding incomplete release, concerns regarding distress to family and concerns regarding sterility. Parental satisfaction surveys found pain management to be excellent. Financial data was analysed and indicative costs were $6,061 NZD per procedure in theatre, compared to $378 NZD per procedure in clinic. PAT performed in a clinic setting is both safe and efficacious with results comparative to that performed in theatre. There was no difference in post

  3. Systematic review of a patient care bundle in reducing staphylococcal infections in cardiac and orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Cameron, Alun; Tivey, David; Grae, Nikki; Roberts, Sally; Morris, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious adverse events hindering surgical patients' recovery. In Australia and New Zealand, SSIs are a huge burden to patients and healthcare systems. A bundled approach, including pre-theatre nasal and/or skin decolonization has been used to reduce the risk of staphylococcal infection. The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of the bundle in preventing SSIs for cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Published literature was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library of Systematic reviews. Identified articles were selected and extracted based on a priori defined Population-Intervention-Comparator-Outcome and eligibility criteria. Data of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative observational studies were synthesized by meta-analyses. Quality appraisal tools were used to assess the evidence quality. The review included six RCTs and 19 observational studies. The bundled treatment regimens varied substantially across all studies. RCTs showed a trend of Staphylococcus aureus SSIs reduction due to the bundle (relative risk = 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33, 1.06) with moderate heterogeneity. Observational studies showed statistically significant reduction in all-cause and S. aureus SSIs, with 51% (95% CI = 0.41, 0.59) and 47% (95% CI = 0.35, 0.65), respectively. No publication biases were detected. SSIs in major cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries can be effectively reduced by approximately 50% with a pre-theatre patient care bundle approach. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Comparison of ropivacaine and bupivacaine as single-shot epidural anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, A.; Khan, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and side-effects of 0.5% ropivacaine with that of 0.5% bupivacaine when used for single-shot epidural anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anesthesiology, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, over a period of eight months from June 2013 to January 2014. Patients and Methods: The study was carried out in 60 ASA physical status I, II or III patients undergoing elective lower extremity orthopedic surgery. Two groups of 30 patients each received single-shot epidural anaesthesia either with ropivacaine 0.5% (ropivacaine group) or bupivacaine 0.5% (bupivacaine group). Onset, time for maximum height and median height of sensory block was assessed as well as time to two segment recession. Modified Bromage scale was used for motor blockade. Total duration of motor block and common side effects were also recorded. Results: The patients in both groups were similar in age, height, weight, gender and ASA status. There was no significant difference in onset of sensory block and time for maximum height of sensory block. The median heighest level of sensory block was T6 (T5-T8) for ropivacaine group and T5 (T4-T7) for bupivacaine group. Time for two segment regression and duration of sensory block were also comparable for both groups. The total duration of motor block was significantly more in bupivacaine group (159 min vs 134.2 min, p< 0.001). Modified Bromage scale was also significantly higher in bupivacaine group (2.86 vs 1.96 min, p<0.001). Side effects like hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting and shivering were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Epidural administration of 0.5% ropivacaine provided effective and good quality anaesthesia. Motor blockade was of less duration as compared to equivalent dose of 0.5% bupivacaine, which may offer potential benefit of early patient mobilization after orthopaedic surgery. (author)

  5. High strength, surface porous polyether-ether-ketone for load-bearing orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nathan T.; Torstrick, F. Brennan; Lee, Christopher S.D.; Dupont, Kenneth M.; Safranski, David L.; Chang, W. Allen; Macedo, Annie E.; Lin, Angela; Boothby, Jennifer M.; Whittingslow, Daniel C.; Carson, Robert A.; Guldberg, Robert E.; Gall, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Despite its widespread clinical use in load-bearing orthopaedic implants, polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK) is often associated with poor osseointegration. In this study, a surface porous PEEK material (PEEK-SP) was created using a melt extrusion technique. The porous layer thickness was 399.6±63.3 µm and possessed a mean pore size of 279.9±31.6 µm, strut spacing of 186.8±55.5 µm, porosity of 67.3±3.1%, and interconnectivity of 99.9±0.1%. Monotonic tensile tests showed that PEEK-SP preserved 73.9% of the strength (71.06±2.17 MPa) and 73.4% of the elastic modulus (2.45±0.31 GPa) of as-received, injection molded PEEK. PEEK-SP further demonstrated a fatigue strength of 60.0 MPa at one million cycles, preserving 73.4% of the fatigue resistance of injection molded PEEK. Interfacial shear testing showed the pore layer shear strength to be 23.96±2.26 MPa. An osseointegration model in the rat revealed substantial bone formation within the pore layer at 6 and 12 weeks via µCT and histological evaluation. Ingrown bone was more closely apposed to the pore wall and fibrous tissue growth was reduced in PEEK-SP when compared to non-porous PEEK controls. These results indicate that PEEK-SP could provide improved osseointegration while maintaining the structural integrity necessary for load-bearing orthopaedic applications. PMID:25463499

  6. Control assembly materials for water reactors: Experience, performance and perspectives. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    materials science and materials engineering of control assembly materials, the 1993 meeting and the current one are helping to fill a gap in the information exchange opportunities in this important branch of nuclear research and development. The second TCM, entitled Control Assembly Materials for Water Reactors: Experience, Performance and Perspectives, was attended by thirty-one participants from fourteen countries, nineteen papers were presented and are reproduced in this proceedings together with a summary of the meeting.

  7. Control assembly materials for water reactors: Experience, performance and perspectives. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    materials science and materials engineering of control assembly materials, the 1993 meeting and the current one are helping to fill a gap in the information exchange opportunities in this important branch of nuclear research and development. The second TCM, entitled Control Assembly Materials for Water Reactors: Experience, Performance and Perspectives, was attended by thirty-one participants from fourteen countries, nineteen papers were presented and are reproduced in this proceedings together with a summary of the meeting

  8. A dynamic parking charge optimal control model under perspective of commuters' evolutionary game behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, XuXun; Yuan, PengCheng

    2018-01-01

    In this research we consider commuters' dynamic learning effect by modeling the trip mode choice behavior from a new perspective of dynamic evolutionary game theory. We explore the behavior pattern of different types of commuters and study the evolution path and equilibrium properties under different traffic conditions. We further establish a dynamic parking charge optimal control (referred to as DPCOC) model to alter commuters' trip mode choice while minimizing the total social cost. Numerical tests show. (1) Under fixed parking fee policy, the evolutionary results are completely decided by the travel time and the only method for public transit induction is to increase the parking charge price. (2) Compared with fixed parking fee policy, DPCOC policy proposed in this research has several advantages. Firstly, it can effectively turn the evolutionary path and evolutionary stable strategy to a better situation while minimizing the total social cost. Secondly, it can reduce the sensitivity of trip mode choice behavior to traffic congestion and improve the ability to resist interferences and emergencies. Thirdly, it is able to control the private car proportion to a stable state and make the trip behavior more predictable for the transportation management department. The research results can provide theoretical basis and decision-making references for commuters' mode choice prediction, dynamic setting of urban parking charge prices and public transit induction.

  9. Risk management abilities in multimodal maritime supply chains: Visibility and control perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilko, Jyri; Ritala, Paavo; Hallikas, Jukka

    2016-11-29

    Supply chain complexity and disintegration lead to increased uncertainty from a stakeholders' perspective, which is emerging as one of the major challenges of risk management. The ability to identify risks has weakened, as the responsibility of supply chain risk management is handed over to outside service providers. Regardless, the risks, their visibility and their impact depend on the position of the companies in the supply chain. The actors in the chain must therefore collaborate to create effective risk management conditions. This challenging situation is especially pronounced in multimodal maritime supply chains, where the risks and actor focality are high. This paper contributes to current risk management literature by providing a holistic and systemic view of risk visibility and control in maritime supply chains. The study employs broad-based, qualitative interview data collected from actors operating in southern Finland and the Gulf of Finland as well as an expert-panel assessment of the related risk management abilities. The results show a high level of variance in the level of risk identification and visibility between the actors in question. This further suggests that collaboration in supply chain risk management is essential, as an awareness of the risks and their control mechanisms do not necessarily reside in the same company. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Young males' perspectives on pregnancy, fatherhood and condom use: Where does responsibility for birth control lie?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L; Fenwick, Jennifer; Skinner, Rachel; Merriman, Gareth; Hallett, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    To improve our understanding of males' role in contraceptive practices, this paper explores the relationship between young males' perspectives on pregnancy and fatherhood and their attitudes, beliefs and practices in relation to condom use and birth control. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a sample of 42 males aged 15-25 years. A systematic process of thematic analysis was used to reduce and organise the narrative data around the focus areas of relationships, sex, condom use, STIs and pregnancy/fatherhood. To facilitate the emergence of key patterns in the data, new data was constantly compared with existing ideas to formulate and refine codes and descriptive categories. The analysis revealed a clear discrepancy between young males' desire to prevent pregnancy and the level of control they assumed over this. Despite pregnancy emerging as the overriding concern for participants, this failed to motivate continued use of condoms when STI risk was perceived as low and a partner was using birth control. Reliance on a partner's use of hormonal contraceptives and in several cases, beliefs of low personal responsibility for pregnancy prevention reduced young males' participation in fertility control. Young males' unfavourable attitudes toward immediate pregnancy and fatherhood provide a unique opportunity for safe sex promotion by encouraging greater ownership over sexual and reproductive health outcomes. However, this requires a shift in the meanings associated with condoms, from a disease prevention only orientation to one that promotes condom use as a positive act for self and partner protection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Granular Control on Customers’ Perspective and Behavior with Automated Demand Response Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schetrit, Oren; Kim, Joyce; Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila

    2014-08-01

    Automated demand response (Auto-DR) is expected to close the loop between buildings and the grid by providing machine-to-machine communications to curtail loads without the need for human intervention. Hence, it can offer more reliable and repeatable demand response results to the grid than the manual approach and make demand response participation a hassle-free experience for customers. However, many building operators misunderstand Auto-DR and are afraid of losing control over their building operation. To ease the transition from manual to Auto-DR, we designed and implemented granular control of Auto-DR systems so that building operators could modify or opt out of individual load-shed strategies whenever they wanted. This paper reports the research findings from this effort demonstrated through a field study in large commercial buildings located in New York City. We focused on (1) understanding how providing granular control affects building operators’ perspective on Auto-DR, and (2) evaluating the usefulness of granular control by examining their interaction with the Auto-DR user interface during test events. Through trend log analysis, interviews, and surveys, we found that: (1) the opt-out capability during Auto-DR events can remove the feeling of being forced into load curtailments and increase their willingness to adopt Auto-DR; (2) being able to modify individual load-shed strategies allows flexible Auto-DR participation that meets the building’s changing operational requirements; (3) a clear display of automation strategies helps building operators easily identify how Auto-DR is functioning and can build trust in Auto-DR systems.

  12. Aspirin for Prophylaxis Against Venous Thromboembolism After Orthopaedic Oncologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gregory M; Patel, Yash M; Ricketti, Daniel A; Gaughan, John P; Lackman, Richard D; Kim, Tae Won B

    2017-12-06

    Patients who undergo orthopaedic oncologic surgical procedures are at increased risk of developing a venous thromboembolism (VTE). Guidelines from surgical societies are shifting to include aspirin as a postoperative VTE prophylactic agent. The purpose of this study was to review our experience using aspirin as postoperative VTE prophylaxis for orthopaedic oncologic surgical procedures. This study was a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with a primary malignant soft-tissue or bone tumor or metastatic carcinoma. Demographic information, histopathologic diagnosis, VTE history, surgical procedure, and VTE prophylaxis were analyzed. VTE rates in the overall and prophylactic-specific cohorts were recorded and compared. A total of 142 distinct surgical procedures in 130 patients were included. VTE prophylaxis with aspirin was used after 103 procedures, and non-aspirin prophylaxis was used after 39. In 33 cases, imaging was used to investigate for VTE because of clinical signs and symptoms. VTE developed after 7 (4.9%) of the 142 procedures. There were 6 deep venous thromboses (DVTs) and 1 pulmonary embolism, and 2 of the VTEs presented in patients with a VTE history. VTE developed in 2.9% (3) of the 103 aspirin cases and 10.3% (4) of the 39 non-aspirin cases. No patient in the aspirin group who had been diagnosed with metastatic carcinoma, malignant soft-tissue sarcoma, lymphoma, or multiple myeloma developed a VTE. Risk factors for VTE development included diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 10.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.61 to 67.30), a history of VTE (OR = 7.26, 95% CI = 1.19 to 44.25), postoperative transfusion (OR = 34.50, 95% CI = 3.94 to 302.01), and estimated blood losses of 250 mL (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.03), 500 mL (OR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23 to 4.13), and 1,000 mL (OR = 5.10, 95% CI = 1.52 to 17.04). Aspirin may be a suitable and effective option for VTE chemoprophylaxis in patients treated with orthopaedic oncologic surgery, especially

  13. Variability of Arthroscopy Case Volume in Orthopaedic Surgery Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Joseph A; Waryasz, Gregory R; Owens, Brett D; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-05-01

    To examine orthopaedic surgery case logs for arthroscopy case volume during residency training and to evaluate trends in case volume and variability over time. Publicly available Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education surgical case logs from 2007 to 2013 for orthopaedic surgery residency were assessed for variability and case volume trends in shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle arthroscopy. The national average number of procedures performed in each arthroscopy category reported was directly compared from 2009 to 2013. The 10th and 90th percentile arthroscopy case volume was compared between 2007 and 2013 for shoulder and knee arthroscopy procedures. Subsequently, the difference between the 10th and 90th percentile arthroscopy case volume in each category in 2007 was compared with the difference between the 10th and 90th percentile arthroscopy case volume in each category in 2013. From 2007 to 2013, shoulder arthroscopy procedures performed per resident increased by 43.1% (P = .0001); elbow arthroscopy procedures increased by 28.0% (P = .00612); wrist arthroscopy procedures increased by 8.6% (P = .05); hip arthroscopy procedures, which were first reported in 2012, increased by 588.9%; knee arthroscopy procedures increased by 8.5% (P = .0435); ankle arthroscopy increased by 27.6% (P = .00149). The difference in knee and shoulder arthroscopy volume between residents in the 10th and 90th percentile in 2007 and residents in the 10th and 90th percentile in 2013 was not significant (P > .05). There was a 3.66-fold difference in knee arthroscopy volume between residents in the 10th and 90th percentile in 2007, whereas the difference was 3.36-fold in 2013 (P = .70). There was a 5.86-fold difference in shoulder arthroscopy case volume between residents in the 10th and 90th percentile in 2007, whereas the difference was 4.96-fold in 2013 (P = .29). The volume of arthroscopy cases performed by graduating orthopaedic surgery residents has

  14. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Maryse; Kohler, Jillian C; Orbinski, James; Howard, Andrew

    2012-05-03

    Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants' experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher wages and benefits for workers could be

  15. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouchard Maryse

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct

  16. Corruption in the health care sector: A barrier to access of orthopaedic care and medical devices in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, injuries cause approximately as many deaths per year as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined, and 90% of injury deaths occur in low- and middle- income countries. Given not all injuries kill, the disability burden, particularly from orthopaedic injuries, is much higher but is poorly measured at present. The orthopaedic services and orthopaedic medical devices needed to manage the injury burden are frequently unavailable in these countries. Corruption is known to be a major barrier to access of health care, but its effects on access to orthopaedic services is still unknown. Methods A qualitative case study of 45 open-ended interviews was conducted to investigate the access to orthopaedic health services and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. Participants included orthopaedic surgeons, related healthcare professionals, industry and government representatives, and patients. Participants’ experiences in accessing orthopaedic medical devices were explored. Thematic analysis was used to analyze and code the transcripts. Results Analysis of the interview data identified poor leadership in government and corruption as major barriers to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices. Corruption was perceived to occur at the worker, hospital and government levels in the forms of misappropriation of funds, theft of equipment, resale of drugs and medical devices, fraud and absenteeism. Other barriers elicited included insufficient health infrastructure and human resources, and high costs of orthopaedic equipment and poverty. Conclusions This study identified perceived corruption as a significant barrier to access of orthopaedic care and orthopaedic medical devices in Uganda. As the burden of injury continues to grow, the need to combat corruption and ensure access to orthopaedic services is imperative. Anti-corruption strategies such as transparency and accountability measures, codes of conduct, whistleblower protection, and higher

  17. Explaining why larks are future-oriented and owls are present-oriented: self-control mediates the chronotype-time perspective relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milfont, Taciano L; Schwarzenthal, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies provide evidence for the chronotype-time perspective relationships. Larks are more future-oriented and owls are more present-oriented. The present study expands this initial research by examining whether the associations are replicable with other time perspective measures, and whether self-control explains the observed relationships. Chronotype was assessed with the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire and the basic associations with the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory were replicated in a sample of 142 New Zealand students, but not with other measures. Self-control mediated the influence of morningness on both future time perspective and delay of gratification. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. Private Practitioners' Perspectives on Their Involvement With the Tuberculosis Control Programme in a Southern Indian State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salve, Solomon; Sheikh, Kabir; Porter, John Dh

    2016-05-08

    Public and private health sectors both play a crucial role in the health systems of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The tuberculosis (TB) control strategy in India encourages the public sector to actively partner with private practitioners (PPs) to improve the quality of front line service delivery. However, ensuring effective and sustainable involvement of PPs constitutes a major challenge. This paper reports the findings from an empirical study focusing on the perspectives and experiences of PPs towards their involvement in TB control programme in India. The study was carried out between November 2010 and December 2011 in a district of a Southern Indian State and utilised qualitative methodologies, combining observations and in-depth interviews with 21 PPs from different medical systems. The collected data was coded and analysed using thematic analysis. PPs perceived themselves to be crucial healthcare providers, with different roles within the public-private mix (PPM) TB policy. Despite this, PPs felt neglected and undervalued in the actual process of implementation of the PPM-TB policy. The entire process was considered to be government driven and their professional skills and knowledge of different medical systems remained unrecognised at the policy level, and weakened their relationship and bond with the policy and with the programme. PPs had contrasting perceptions about the different components of the TB programme that demonstrated the public sector's dominance in the overall implementation of the DOTS strategy. Although PPs felt responsible for their TB patients, they found it difficult to perceive themselves as 'partners with the TB programme.' Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasingly utilized as a public health strategy to strengthen health systems. These policies will fail if the concerns of the PPs are neglected. To ensure their long-term involvement in the programme the abilities of PPs and the important perspectives from other

  19. An orthopaedic geriatric rehabilitation unit: the first two years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, R; Gillespie, W J; Armour, P C; Newman, E F

    1986-08-13

    Experience of the first two years of an orthopaedic geriatric rehabilitation unit is described. There were 325 admissions comprising 271 females and 54 males. The predominant diagnosis was fracture of the proximal femur. Average length of stay in the unit was 43 days for males and 36.7 days for females. 75.9% of patients admitted from home returned there and 66.1% of patients admitted from residential care returned to similar accommodation. In the first year there was a fall of 13.5 days in the average length of stay for elderly females with proximal femoral fracture, resulting in 2175 less bed days for this diagnosis. This improvement has continued.

  20. Validation of the Osteopenia Sheep Model for Orthopaedic Biomaterial Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    2009-01-01

    months. This suggests that a prolonged administration of GC is needed for a long-term observation to keep osteopenic bone.                 In conclusion, after 7 months of GC treatments with restricted diet, the microarchitectural characteristics, mechanical competence, mineralization of the bone tissues...... resemble osteoporosis in humans. This study aimed to validate glucocorticoid-induced osteopenia sheep model for orthopaedic implant and biomaterial research. We hypothesized that a 7-month GC treatment together with restricted diet but without OVX would induce osteopenia. Materials and Methods: Eighteen...... for 7 months. The sheep were housed outdoors in paddocks, and received restricted diet with low calcium and phosphorus (0.55% calcium and 0.35% phosphorus) and hay. After sacrifice, cancellous bone specimens from the 5th lumbar vertebra, bilateral distal femur, and bilateral proximal tibia, and cortical...

  1. 'Ready-access' CT imaging for an orthopaedic trauma clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2011-03-01

    \\'Ready-Access\\' to CT imaging facilities in Orthopaedic Trauma Clinics is not a standard facility. This facility has been available at the regional trauma unit, in Merlin Park Hospital, Galway for the past four years. We reviewed the use of this facility over a 2-year period when 100 patients had CT scans as part of their trauma clinic assessment. The rate of CT scan per clinic was 0.6. The mean waiting time for a CT scan was 30 minutes. 20 (20%) new fractures were confirmed, 33 (33%) fractures were out-ruled, 25 (25%) fractures demonstrated additional information and 8 (8%) had additional fractures. 20 (20%) patients were discharged and 12 (12%) patients were admitted as a result of the CT scan. It adds little time and cost to CT scanning lists.

  2. Overview of Implant Infections in Orthopaedics Department: Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugrul Bulut

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, our aim was to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria isolated from orthopedic implant infections. Within two years operated 1996 patients in an orthopedics and traumatology clinic were retrospectively investigated. Seventy-six (76/1996, 3.8% orthopedic implant infections were detected. Isolated bacteria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns were analyzed. The bacteries isolated from implant related infections and antibiotic sensitivity patterns were evaluated retrospectively in our orthopaedics and traumatology clinic. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism (30.3%. Gram negative bacterias were isolated in 65.8% of our patients. No resistance was determined against vancomycin and linezolid in gram positive bacterias. Imipenem, amicasin and cefepim was seen as the most effective antibiotics for gram negative bacterias.

  3. Patient handover in orthopaedics, improving safety using Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearkes, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Good inpatient handover ensures patient safety and continuity of care. An adjunct to this is the patient list which is routinely managed by junior doctors. These lists are routinely created and managed within Microsoft Excel or Word. Following the merger of two orthopaedic departments into a single service in a new hospital, it was felt that a number of safety issues within the handover process needed to be addressed. This quality improvement project addressed these issues through the creation and implementation of a new patient database which spanned the department, allowing trouble free, safe, and comprehensive handover. Feedback demonstrated an improved user experience, greater reliability, continuity within the lists and a subsequent improvement in patient safety.

  4. Acute and overuse elbow trauma: radio-orthopaedics overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Elisabetta Antonia; Cucchi, Davide; Arrigoni, Paolo; Brioschi, Marco; Fusi, Cristiano; Genovese, Eugenio A; Messina, Carmelo; Randelli, Pietro; Masciocchi, Carlo; Aliprandi, Alberto

    2018-01-19

    The correct management of acute, subacute and overuse-related elbow pathologies represents a challenging diagnostic and therapeutic problem. While major trauma frequently requires a rapid surgical intervention, subluxation and minor trauma allow taking more time for diagnostics and planning the correct elective treatment after careful clinical and radiological investigation. In these conditions, communication between orthopaedic surgeon and radiologist allow to create a detailed radiology report, tailored to the patient's and surgeon's needs and optimal to plan proper management. Imaging technique as X-Ray, CT, US, MRI, CTA and MRA all belong to the radiologist's portfolio in elbow diagnostics. Detailed knowledge of elbow pathology and its classification and of the possibilities and limits of each imaging technique is of crucial importance to reach the correct diagnosis efficiently. The aim of this review is to present the most frequent elbow pathologies and suggest a suitable diagnostic approach for each of them.

  5. Orthopaedic positioning in diagnostic radiology. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernau, A.

    1990-01-01

    Effective roentgenology of the skeletal system very much relies on good knowledge of three main factors, namely patient positioning, film cassette positioning, and radiation field. The functional approach developed in orthopaedic diagnostics has been adopted for practical adjustment techniques in all X-ray examinations, so that e.g. examinations of the vertebral column and lower extremities now are carried out in upright position instead of the lying position, which of course corresponds to the real functional demand. In order to guarantee good reproducibility of X-ray images, a high standardization of positioning and adjustment techniques is to be achieved. The aspect of optimum radiological protection is also discussed, referring to shielding of the gonads, foils, measures for reduction of scattered radiation fields, and unambiguous labelling of film material. (orig./GDG) With 490 figs. and 1 separate folded tab [de

  6. [Management of war orthopaedic injuries in recent armed conflicts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, M; Mathieu, L

    2013-01-01

    The extremities continue to be the most frequent sites of wounding during armed conflicts despite the change of combat tactics, soldier armour and battlefield medical support. Due to the advances in prehospital care and timely transport to the hospital, orthopaedic surgeons deal with severe and challenging injuries of the limbs. In contrast to civilian extremity trauma, the most combat-related injuries are open wounds that often have infection-related complications. Data from two recent large armed conflicts (Iraq, Afghanistan) show that extremity injuries are associated with a high complication rate, morbidity and healthcare utilization. A systematic approach that consists of sequential surgical care and good transport capabilities can reduce the complication rate of these injuries. New medical technologies have been implemented in the treatment strategy during the last decade. This article reviews the published scientific data and current opinions on combat-related extremity injuries. Key words: extremity, combat, trauma, medical support system.

  7. [Control of cervical cancer in Colombia: the perspective of the health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner-Ceballos, Carolina; Murillo Moreno, Raúl Hernando; Piñeros Petersen, Marion; Tovar-Murillo, Sandra Lourdes; Cendales Duarte, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Martha Cielo

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the health system stakeholder's perspective on the basics of the political, economic, and sanitary context, as well as the ways in which control activities are being realized in four of Colombia's health departments. This was a qualitative study of four Colombian health departments chosen for their differing cervical cancer mortality rates and their planned disease control efforts (Boyacá, Caldas, Magdalena, and Tolima). Semistructured interviews were conducted of health care managers, insurance coordinators, and public and private health institutions at the departmental and municipals levels. Focus groups comprised of professionals from health insurance companies and health care services providers were convened. Data analysis was based on the grounded theory with open codes related to the roles of health care managers, insurance companies, and heath care services provided. The technical reports were compared to the testimonies of interviewees. Thirty-eight interviews and 14 focus groups (70.9% response rate) were conducted and 12 technical reports reviewed. Cervical cancer is not perceived to be a public health priority. Interest centers on the flow of financial resources within the health system. Findings indicated unsatisfactory communication among the stakeholders and no consensus on the subject. Planning is limited to meeting the status quo. Staffing is inadequate. Cases with positive outcomes are lost to follow-up due to the fragmentation that results from affiliation with different health care systems. The financial situation, normative planning, and the challenges of decentralization affect the skill-building, at-risk coverage, and the control activities needed for effective screening programs. What is needed is an integrated, more efficiently organized program in which all the health system stakeholders participate.

  8. Hand-arm vibration in orthopaedic surgery: a neglected risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, F; Ferguson, K B; Clarke, J; Hill, K; Macdonald, E B; Macdonald, D J M

    2017-12-30

    Hand-arm vibration syndrome is an occupational disease caused by exposure to hand-arm transmitted vibration. The Health and Safety Executive has set limits for vibration exposure, including an exposure action value (EAV), where steps should be taken to reduce exposure, and an exposure limit value (ELV), beyond which vibrating equipment must not be used for the rest of the working day. To measure hand-arm transmitted vibration among orthopaedic surgeons, who routinely use hand-operated saws. We undertook a cadaveric study measuring vibration associated with a tibial cut using battery-operated saws. Three surgeons undertook three tibial cuts each on cadaveric tibiae. Measurements were taken using a frequency-weighted root mean square acceleration, with the vibration total value calculated as the root of the sums squared in each of the three axes. A mean (SD) vibration magnitude of 1 (0.2) m/s2 in the X-axis, 10.3 (1.9) m/s2 in the Y-axis and 4.2 (1.3) m/s2 in the Z-axis was observed. The weighted root mean squared magnitude of vibration was 11.3 (1.7) m/s2. These results suggest an EAV of 23 min and ELV of 1 h 33 min using this equipment. Our results demonstrate that use of a battery-operated sagittal saw can transmit levels of hand-arm vibration approaching the EAV or ELV through prolonged use. Further study is necessary to quantify this risk and establish whether surveillance is necessary for orthopaedic surgeons. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. The Development of Teacher Perspectives: Social Strategies and Institutional Control in the Socialization of Beginning Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeichner, Kenneth M.; Tabachnick, B. Robert

    1985-01-01

    The findings from a two-year longitudinal study of the development of teaching perspectives by four beginning teachers are reviewed. Individual responses of these teachers to the environment in which they worked and the extent to which these teachers abandoned or maintained perspectives they began with are examined. (Author/DF)

  10. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This review details the anatomy and interactions of the postural and somatosensory reflexes. We attempt to identify the important role the nervous system plays in maintaining reflex control of the spine and posture. We also review, illustrate, and discuss how the human vertebral column develops, functions, and adapts to Earth's gravity in an upright position. We identify functional characteristics of the postural reflexes by reporting previous observations of subjects during periods of microgravity or weightlessness. Background Historically, chiropractic has centered around the concept that the nervous system controls and regulates all other bodily systems; and that disruption to normal nervous system function can contribute to a wide variety of common ailments. Surprisingly, the chiropractic literature has paid relatively little attention to the importance of neurological regulation of static upright human posture. With so much information available on how posture may affect health and function, we felt it important to review the neuroanatomical structures and pathways responsible for maintaining the spine and posture. Maintenance of static upright posture is regulated by the nervous system through the various postural reflexes. Hence, from a chiropractic standpoint, it is clinically beneficial to understand how the individual postural reflexes work, as it may explain some of the clinical presentations seen in chiropractic practice. Method We performed a manual search for available relevant textbooks, and a computer search of the MEDLINE, MANTIS, and Index to Chiropractic Literature databases from 1970 to present, using the following key words and phrases: "posture," "ocular," "vestibular," "cervical facet joint," "afferent," "vestibulocollic," "cervicocollic," "postural reflexes," "spaceflight," "microgravity," "weightlessness," "gravity," "posture," and "postural." Studies were selected if they specifically tested any or

  11. The use of three-dimensional printing technology in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tak Man; Jin, Jimmy; Lau, Tak Wing; Fang, Christian; Yan, Chun Hoi; Yeung, Kelvin; To, Michael; Leung, Frankie

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) printing or additive manufacturing, an advanced technology that 3-D physical models are created, has been wildly applied in medical industries, including cardiothoracic surgery, cranio-maxillo-facial surgery and orthopaedic surgery. The physical models made by 3-D printing technology give surgeons a realistic impression of complex structures, allowing surgical planning and simulation before operations. In orthopaedic surgery, this technique is mainly applied in surgical planning especially revision and reconstructive surgeries, making patient-specific instruments or implants, and bone tissue engineering. This article reviews this technology and its application in orthopaedic surgery.

  12. Resources for your career in orthopaedic traumatology: what can the OTA do for you?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Samir; Smith, Jeffrey M

    2012-09-01

    For those choosing a career in orthopaedic traumatology, several resources have been established by the Orthopaedic Trauma Association to facilitate progression from the years in training to the early years in practice. Young practitioners have access to educational programming, such as preparation for Part II of the Board Examination, web-based resources, such as on-line job postings, advocacy in health policy for the issues that will affect their ability to practice, and public relations efforts to increase their presence in the community. Ultimately, the resources set aside for the young practitioner by the Orthopaedic Trauma Association are intended to facilitate a sense of excellence, service, and community.

  13. Research on the Influence of Orthopaedic Inserts on Pressure Distribution in the Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignas Rutulys

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the influence of individual orthopaedic inserts on pressure distribution in the foot. Feet deformations, types of orthopaedic inserts, materials and pressure in the foot testing methods are discussed. Experimental computer measurements of pressure in the foot before and after the use of inserts have been done. During research, the inserts made of different kinds of materials selected according to human weight, pathology, skin sensitivity and many other reasons has been used. It has been determinated that orthopaedic inserts have a more noticeable impact on children whose feet is adjusted easier if compared with those of adults.Article in Lithuanian

  14. Patient Involvement Can Affect Clinicians’ Perspectives and Practices of Infection Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wyer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study, set in a mixed, adult surgical ward of a metropolitan teaching hospital in Sydney, Australia, used a novel application of video-reflexive ethnography (VRE to engage patients and clinicians in an exploration of the practical and relational complexities of patient involvement in infection prevention and control (IPC. This study included individual reflexive sessions with eight patients and six group reflexive sessions with 35 nurses. VRE usually involves participants reflecting on video footage of their own (and colleagues’ practices in group reflexive sessions. We extended the method here by presenting, to nurses, video clips of their clinical interactions with patients, in conjunction with footage of the patients themselves analyzing the videos of their own care, for infection risks. We found that this novel approach affected the nurses’ capacities to recognize, support, and enable patient involvement in IPC and to reflect on their own, sometimes inconsistent, IPC practices from patients’ perspectives. As a “post-qualitative” approach, VRE prioritizes participants’ roles, contributions, and learning. Invoking affect as an explanatory lens, we theorize that a “safe space” was created for participants in our study to reflect on and reshape their assumptions, positionings, and practices.

  15. Management Control Systems and Strategy: A Resource based Perspective. Evidence from Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Theriou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine from the resource-based perspective, the relationship between the use of management control systems (MCS and organisational capabilities in the Greek context. Design/Methodology/Approach: The study follows Henri's (2006 methodology and explores the relationships between the diagnostic and interactive uses of performance measurement systems (PMS and the five capabilities (e.g. market orientation, organisational learning, entrepreneurship, innovativeness and market responsiveness leading to strategic choice. Structural equation modelling represents the relationships between the variables and data collected from the survey, which was analysed as a statistical tool with AMOS. Findings: Results revealed that diagnostic use of PMS negatively influence only the organisational learning, while the interactive use positively interacts with most of the capabilities. Research limitations/implications: This study can be further extended by incorporating more factors in the proposed model, such as environmental uncertainty, size and organisational culture, and examine their possible effect on the relationship between PMS uses, organisational capabilities and performance. Originality/Value: There is no similar empirical research in the context of Greece.

  16. Exploring the development of an organisational culture of control and dependency from a systems psychodynamic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René van Eeden

    2010-05-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this research was to study the impact of the change process at a plant of a South African production company. Motivations for the study: Problems were experienced in terms of production and a need for transformation at different levels was expressed. Co-dependence in the environment necessitated exploration of intra-organisational dynamics. Research design, approach and method: The study focused on the management team at a specifc plant, but by applying the systems psychodynamic perspective it was possible to also explore the mutual effect of relationships with other systems in the organisation, the company as a whole and the environment. Respondents included the directors of manufacturing and of human resources, the general manager, an 11-member management team and staff representatives. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews, group interviews and a group consultation session were held. Main findings: Hypotheses were formulated regarding the change experienced in the company, the overemphasis of control in the various systems, efforts to move from dependency to interdependence, personal authority as a requirement for interdependent functioning and problems with interrelatedness. Practical/managerial implications: The study illustrates the application of the systems psychodynamic approach in exploring the interaction between and mutual infuence of various organisational systems, especially in times of change. Contribution/value add: At a broader level, the study contributes to the understanding of the application of the theory as well as suggesting the use of a methodology. Recommendations for an intervention of this nature were also made.

  17. Perspectives of people in Mali toward genetically-modified mosquitoes for malaria control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Famenini Shannon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically-modified (GM mosquitoes have been proposed as part of an integrated vector control strategy for malaria control. Public acceptance is essential prior to field trials, particularly since mosquitoes are a vector of human disease and genetically modified organisms (GMOs face strong scepticism in developed and developing nations. Despite this, in sub-Saharan Africa, where the GM mosquito effort is primarily directed, very little data is available on perspectives to GMOs. Here, results are presented of a qualitative survey of public attitudes to GM mosquitoes for malaria control in rural and urban areas of Mali, West Africa between the months of October 2008 and June 2009. Methods The sample consisted of 80 individuals - 30 living in rural communities, 30 living in urban suburbs of Bamako, and 20 Western-trained and traditional health professionals working in Bamako and Bandiagara. Questions were asked about the cause of malaria, heredity and selective breeding. This led to questions about genetic alterations, and acceptable conditions for a release of pest-resistant GM corn and malaria-refractory GM mosquitoes. Finally, participants were asked about the decision-making process in their community. Interviews were transcribed and responses were categorized according to general themes. Results Most participants cited mosquitoes as one of several causes of malaria. The concept of the gene was not widely understood; however selective breeding was understood, allowing limited communication of the concept of genetic modification. Participants were open to a release of pest-resistant GM corn, often wanting to conduct a trial themselves. The concept of a trial was reapplied to GM mosquitoes, although less frequently. Participants wanted to see evidence that GM mosquitoes can reduce malaria prevalence without negative consequences for human health and the environment. For several participants, a mosquito control programme was

  18. CHAracteristics of research studies that iNfluence practice: a GEneral survey of Canadian orthopaedic Surgeons (CHANGES): a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, Darren; Thornley, Patrick; Evaniew, Nathan; Madden, Kim; Bhandari, Mohit; Ghert, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) is increasingly being applied to inform clinical decision-making in orthopaedic surgery. Despite the promotion of EBM in Orthopaedic Surgery, the adoption of results from high quality clinical research seems highly unpredictable and does not appear to be driven strictly by randomized trial data. The objective of this study was to pilot a survey to determine if we could identify surgeon opinions on the characteristics of research studies that are perceived as being most likely to influence clinical decision-making among orthopaedic surgeons in Canada. A 28-question electronic survey was distributed to active members of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) over a period of 11 weeks. The questionnaire sought to analyze the influence of both extrinsic and intrinsic characteristics of research studies and their potential to influence practice patterns. Extrinsic factors included the perceived journal quality and investigator profiles, economic impact, peer/patient/industry influence and individual surgeon residency/fellowship training experiences. Intrinsic factors included study design, sample size, and outcomes reported. Descriptive statistics are provided. Of the 109 members of the COA who opened the survey, 95 (87%) completed the survey in its entirety. The overall response rate was 11% (95/841). Surgeons achieved consensus on the influence of three key designs on their practices: 1) randomized controlled trials 94 (99%), 2) meta-analysis 83 (87%), and 3) systematic reviews 81 (85%). Sixty-seven percent of surgeons agreed that studies with sample sizes of 101-500 or more were more likely to influence clinical practice than smaller studies (n = design influencing adoption included 1) reputation of the investigators (99%) and 2) perceived quality of the journal (75%). Although study design and sample size (i.e. minimum of 100 patients) have some influence on clinical decision making, surgeon respondents are equally influenced

  19. Do developmental orthopaedic disorders influence future jumping performances in Warmblood stallions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Janssens, S; Busoni, V

    2013-01-01

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY: Few reports are available on the relationship between developmental orthopaedic diseases (DOD) and future performances in Warmblood horses. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between performance and the presence of DOD lesions. METHODS: Records of Warmbl...

  20. Behavioral Economics and Physician Board Meetings: Opportunity Cost, Regret, and Their Mitigation in Orthopaedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinicrope, Brent J; Roberts, Craig S; Sussman, Lyle

    2018-01-01

    Health care is a business. Health care providers must become familiar with terms such as opportunity costs, the potential loss or gain when one choice is made in lieu of another. The purpose of this study was to calculate the opportunity cost of two orthopaedic surgery society board meetings and discuss these in the context of behavioral economics and regret. A literature search was conducted to determine an orthopaedic surgeon's average yearly salary, hours worked per week, and weeks worked per year. The details of two orthopaedic surgery professional society meetings that one senior author (CSR) attended were used to calculate opportunity cost. Although the true benefits are multifactorial and difficult to objectively quantify, awareness of the cost-benefit ratio can help guide time and resource management to maximize the return on investment while minimizing buyer's remorse and perhaps influence the media by which medical meetings are held in the future. (Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances 27(1):10-13, 2018).

  1. Bioactive Coatings for Orthopaedic Implants—Recent Trends in Development of Implant Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill G. X. Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint replacement is a major orthopaedic procedure used to treat joint osteoarthritis. Aseptic loosening and infection are the two most significant causes of prosthetic implant failure. The ideal implant should be able to promote osteointegration, deter bacterial adhesion and minimize prosthetic infection. Recent developments in material science and cell biology have seen the development of new orthopaedic implant coatings to address these issues. Coatings consisting of bioceramics, extracellular matrix proteins, biological peptides or growth factors impart bioactivity and biocompatibility to the metallic surface of conventional orthopaedic prosthesis that promote bone ingrowth and differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts leading to enhanced osteointegration of the implant. Furthermore, coatings such as silver, nitric oxide, antibiotics, antiseptics and antimicrobial peptides with anti-microbial properties have also been developed, which show promise in reducing bacterial adhesion and prosthetic infections. This review summarizes some of the recent developments in coatings for orthopaedic implants.

  2. The role of recombinant activated factor VII in the haematological management of elective orthopaedic surgery in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaman, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    The clinical profile and expectations of haemophilic patients with inhibitors have changed over the last three decades, mainly because of the prolongation of life-expectancy, often resulting in an increase of the orthopaedic burden. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) is the most frequently used bypassing agent in haemophilia patients with inhibitors during elective orthopaedic surgery. For nearly 30 years, rFVIIa has been successfully used to control haemostasis in several major and minor surgical procedures. Clinical trials, case series, reports and surveys were progressively aimed at optimising rFVIIa usage in very demanding conditions managed in highly specialised centres. Recommendations from consensus opinions and guidelines have been provided on the basis of this clinical experience. PMID:28686157

  3. Facilitating central line-associated bloodstream infection prevention: a qualitative study comparing perspectives of infection control professionals and frontline staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Hefner, Jennifer L

    2014-10-01

    Infection control professionals (ICPs) play a critical role in implementing and managing healthcare-associated infection reduction interventions, whereas frontline staff are responsible for delivering direct and ongoing patient care. The objective of our study was to determine if ICPs and frontline staff have different perspectives about the facilitators and challenges of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention program success. We conducted key informant interviews at 8 hospitals that participated in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality CLABSI prevention initiative called "On the CUSP: Stop BSI." We analyzed interview data from 50 frontline nurses and 26 ICPs to identify common themes related to program facilitators and challenges. We identified 4 facilitators of CLABSI program success: education, leadership, data, and consistency. We also identified 3 common challenges: lack of resources, competing priorities, and physician resistance. However, the perspective of ICPs and frontline nurses differed. Whereas ICPs tended to focus on general descriptions, frontline staff noted program specifics and often discussed concrete examples. Our results suggest that ICPs need to take into account the perspectives of staff nurses when implementing infection control and broader quality improvement initiatives. Further, the deliberate inclusion of frontline staff in the implementation of these programs may be critical to program success. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A review of virtual reality based training simulators for orthopaedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N.; Wainwright, Tom; Middleton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This review presents current virtual reality based training simulators for hip, knee and other orthopaedic surgery, including elective and trauma surgical procedures. There have not been any reviews focussing on hip and knee orthopaedic simulators. A comparison of existing simulator features is provided to identify what is missing and what is required to improve upon current simulators. In total 11 total hip replacement pre-operative planning tools were analysed, plus 9 hip trauma fracture tr...

  5. "Is There An App For That?" Orthopaedic Patient Preferences For A Smartphone Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datillo, Jonathan R; Gittings, Daniel J; Sloan, Matthew; Hardaker, William M; Deasey, Matthew J; Sheth, Neil P

    2017-08-16

    Patients are seeking out medical information on the Internet and utilizing smartphone health applications ("apps"). Smartphone use has exponentially increased among orthopaedic surgeons and patients. Despite this increase, patients are rarely directed to specific apps by physicians. No study exists querying patient preferences for a patient-centered, orthopaedic smartphone application. The purpose of this study is to 1) determine Internet use patterns amongst orthopaedic patients; 2) ascertain access to and use of smartphones; and 3) elucidate what features orthopaedic patients find most important in a smartphone application. We surveyed patients in an orthopaedic practice in an urban academic center to assess demographics, access to and patterns of Internet and Smartphone use, and preferences for features in a smartphone app. A total of 310 surveys were completed. Eighty percent of patients reported Internet access, and 62% used the Internet for health information. Seventy-seven percent owned smartphones, 45% used them for health information, and 28% owned health apps. Only 11% were referred to an app by a physician. The highest ranked features were appointment reminders, ability to view test results, communication with physicians, and discharge instructions. General orthopaedic information and pictures or videos explaining surgery were the 2 lowest ranked features. Seventy-one percent of patients felt an app with some of the described features would improve their healthcare experiences, and 40% would pay for the app. The smartphone is an under-utilized tool to enhance patient-physician communication, increase satisfaction, and improve quality of care. Patients were enthusiastic about app features that are often included in patient health portals, but ranked orthopaedic educational features lowest. Further study is required to elucidate how best to use orthopaedic apps as physician-directed educational opportunities to promote patient satisfaction and quality of

  6. Orthopaedic research in Australia: a bibliographic analysis of the publication rates in the top 15 journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Erik; Glatt, Vaida; Tetsworth, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the publications rates and characteristics of the authors for manuscripts originating from Australia in the 15 highest ranked orthopaedic journals over a 5-year period. The 15 highest ranked journals in orthopaedics, based on their 2015 impact factor, were used to establish the total number of publications and cumulative impact factor points between January 2010 and December 2014. The affiliations of the primary author and co-authors were used to determine the involvement of Australian trained orthopaedic surgeons. Study location, research topic and anatomic areas were recorded. A total of 478 publications were identified; 110 of these manuscripts were principally authored by Australian trained orthopaedic surgeons or medical professionals affiliated with orthopaedics. In addition, 158 articles were published with orthopaedic surgery involvement where one of the co-authors was an Australian trained surgeon. Australian orthopaedic surgeon (FRACS) involvement was most commonly observed in the knee (n = 90; 33.6%) followed by the hip (n = 69; 25.7%) and basic sciences (n = 27; 10.1%). Surgeons in Sydney had the highest number of publications (n = 95; 35.4%), followed by Adelaide (n = 55; 20.5%) and Melbourne (n = 54; 20.1%). The results of this study demonstrate that the minority (23%) of the publications originating from Australia in the 15 highest-ranking orthopaedic journals were principally authored by either an Australian trained surgeon or a trainee surgeon. A total of 59% of the publications focused on the hip and knee. Sydney was the leading region, followed by Adelaide and Melbourne. These three regions published 76% of all manuscripts identified during the 5-year study period. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Cinnamon Oil and Chitosan Coating on Orthopaedic Implant Surface for Prevention of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    R Magetsari; P Dewo; BK Saputro; Z Lanodiyu

    2014-01-01

    S. Epidermidis is among the most frequently isolated microorganisms found in -infection related to implanted devices and the formation of biofilm will be more resistantcompared to the planktonic form. This study was carried out determine the effect of coating on stainless steel orthopaedic implants surfaces with cinnamon oil and chitosan as bioadhesive to prevent biofilms formation of S. Epidermidis.The rod shaped stainless steel 316 L orthopaedic implant with 5 mm diameters was coated 2 t...

  8. Prevalence and factors of burnout among Australian orthopaedic trainees: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Manit; Diwan, Ashish D; Harris, Ian A

    2014-12-01

    To assess the prevalence and factors of burnout among Australian orthopaedic trainees. 236 orthopaedic registrars of the Australian Orthopaedic Association were invited to participate in a 32-item survey by email. The questionnaire assessed potential factors associated with burnout, satisfaction with the choice of orthopaedics as a career and work-life balance, and subjective overall health, as well as 3 subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey for assessing burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and personal accomplishment. Participants with high levels of either emotional exhaustion or depersonalisation were defined as having burnout. Those with and without burnout were compared. 51 (22%) of the 236 trainees completed the questionnaire. Of whom, 88% were satisfied with their choice of orthopaedics as a career, whereas 27% were satisfied with their work-life balance. 27 (53%) respondents were considered burned out. Compared with those who did not burn out, those who burned out were less satisfied with their careers (p=0.004) and work-life balance (p=0.021). 53% of Australian orthopaedic trainees were burned out. Burnout trainees were more likely to be dissatisfied with their career choice and worklife balance. Active interventions to combat burnout and improve work-life balance are needed.

  9. Orthopaedic Patient Information on the World Wide Web: An Essential Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, John Tristan; Baker, Joseph F

    2016-02-17

    Patients increasingly use the Internet to research health-related issues. Internet content, unlike other forms of media, is not regulated. Although information accessed online can impact patients' opinions and expectations, there is limited information about the quality or readability of online orthopaedic information. PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar were searched using anatomic descriptors and three title keywords ("Internet," "web," and "online"). Articles examining online orthopaedic information from January 1, 2000, until April 1, 2015, were recorded. Articles were assessed for the number of reviewers evaluating the online material, whether the article examined for a link between authorship and quality, and the use of recognized quality and readability assessment tools. To facilitate a contemporary discussion, only publications since January 1, 2010, were considered for analysis. A total of thirty-eight peer-reviewed articles published since 2010 examining the quality and/or readability of online orthopaedic information were reviewed. For information quality, there was marked variation in the quality assessment methods utilized, the number of reviewers, and the manner of reporting. To date, the majority of examined information is of poor quality. Studies examining readability have focused on pages produced by professional orthopaedic societies. The quality and readability of online orthopaedic information are generally poor. For modern practices to adapt to the Internet and to prevent misinformation, the orthopaedic community should develop high-quality, readable online patient information. Copyright © 2016 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  10. Clock Synchronization in Wireless Sensor Networks: A New Model and Analysis Approach Based on Networked Control Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the importance of the clock synchronization in wireless sensor networks (WSNs, this paper proposes a new research approach and model approach, which quantitatively analyzes clock synchronization from the perspective of modern control theory. Two kinds of control strategies are used as examples to analyze the effect of the control strategy on clock synchronization from different perspectives, namely, the single-step optimal control and the LQG global optimal control. The proposed method establishes a state space model for clock relationship, thus making dimension extension and parameter identification easier, and is robust to changes under the condition of node failures and new nodes. And through the design of different control strategies and performance index functions, the method can satisfy various requirements of the synchronization precision, convergence speed, energy consumption and the computational complexity, and so on. Finally, the simulations show that the synchronization accuracy of the proposed method is higher than that of the existing protocol, and the former convergence speed of the synchronization error is faster.

  11. Importance of patient-centred signage and navigation guide in an orthopaedic and plastics clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Talha; Raju, Sneha; In, Eunji

    2016-01-01

    Gulshan & Nanji Orthopaedic and Plastics Center at the North York General Hospital is the second busiest site after the emergency department serving more than 26,000 patients annually. Increase in patient flow, overworked staff, and recent renovations to the hospital have resulted in patients experiencing long wait times, and thusly patient dissatisfaction and stress. Several factors contribute to patient dissatisfaction and stress: i) poor and unfriendly signage; ii) inconsistent utilization of the numbering system; and iii) difficulty navigating to and from the imaging center. A multidisciplinary QI team was assembled to improve the patient experience. We developed a questionnaire to assess patient stress levels at the baseline. Overall, more than half of the patients (54.8%) strongly agreed or agreed to having a stressful waiting experience. Subsequently, based on patient feedback and staff perspectives, we implemented two PDSA cycles. For PDSA 1, we placed a floor graphic (i.e. black tape) to assist patients in navigating from the clinic to the imaging centre and back. For PDSA 2, we involved creating a single 21"×32" patient-friendly sign at the entrance to welcome patients, with clear instructions outlining registration procedures. Surveys were re-administered to assess patient stress levels. A combination of both interventions caused a statistically significant reduction in patient stress levels based on the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests. The present project highlighted the importance of involving stakeholders as well as frontline staff when undertaking quality improvement projects as a way to identify bottlenecks as well as establish sustainable solutions. Additionally, the team recognized the importance of incorporating empirical based solutions and involving experts in the field to optimize results. The present project successfully implemented strategies to improve patient satisfaction and reduce stress in a high flow community clinic. These

  12. Controlling our destinies: Historical, philosophical, social and ethical perspectives on the Human Genome Project: Final report, July 1, 1995-June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, P.R.

    1996-09-25

    This report briefly describes the efforts by the organizing committee in preparation for the conference entitled Controlling Our Destinies: Historical, Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Perspectives on the Human Genome Project. The conference was held October 5-8, 1995.

  13. Effects of carprofen or meloxicam on selected haemostatic variables in miniature pigs after orthopaedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Raušer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to detect and compare the haemostatic variables and bleeding after 7‑days administration of carprofen or meloxicam in clinically healthy miniature pigs. Twenty-one clinically healthy Göttingen miniature pigs were divided into 3 groups. Selected haemostatic variables such as platelet count, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, fibrinogen, serum biochemical variables such as total protein, bilirubin, urea, creatinine, alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyltransferase and haemoglobin, haematocrit, red blood cells, white blood cells and buccal mucosal bleeding time were assessed before and 7 days after daily intramuscular administration of saline (1.5 ml per animal, control group, carprofen (2 mg·kg-1 or meloxicam (0.1 mg·kg-1. In pigs receiving carprofen or meloxicam, the thrombin time was significantly increased (p p p p < 0.05 compared to the control group. Significant differences were not detected in other haemostatic, biochemical variables or bleeding time compared to other groups or to the pretreatment values. Intramuscular administration of carprofen or meloxicam in healthy miniature pigs for 7 days causes sporadic, but not clinically important changes of selected haemostatic variables. Therefore, we can recommend them for perioperative use, e.g. for their analgesic effects, in orthopaedic or other surgical procedures without increased bleeding.

  14. Strategic planning in a highly specialized orthopaedic institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Institute for Orthopaedic Surgery 'Banjica' in Belgrade provides tertiary healthcare services on national level. After decades of constant development, a recent decline coincided with the decade of great social and governmental disturbance, the transition period after the dissociation of former Yugoslavia. Objective. In order to overcome the crisis, we used modern management methods to define problems in the institution management, and to propose appropriate strategies. Methods. A survey that included 100 employees (17.67% was carried out, followed by descriptive statistical analysis, PEST and SWOT analyses. Results The impact of political fluctuations, ageing of population, financing model, obsolete medical technology was evaluated. Various personal and interpersonal factors were assessed: the quality of medical service (3.59±0.76, mark 1-5; relations among health service participants (3.39±0.78; occupational conditions (not good-91%; human, financial and other resources; professional cooperation, stimulation; rivalry and mobbing (declared in 56%; public informing, institution image (rank 3.70±0.88 and PR activities (new to 78%. 93% declared to give maximum effort at work. Conclusion. Using these results, we defined several strategic objectives. These include strengthening scientific activities, general orientation to specific and exclusive pathological conditions and treatment methods, improvement of management transparency, introduction of quality-based stimulation of workers, support of promotional and PR activities.

  15. Orthopaedic Considerations for the Adult With Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Timothy T; Cepela, Daniel J; Uhl, Richard L; Lozman, Jeffery

    2016-05-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is a heritable group of collagen-related disorders that affects up to 50,000 people in the United States. Although the disease is most symptomatic in childhood, adults with osteogenesis imperfecta also are affected by the sequelae of the disease. Orthopaedic manifestations include posttraumatic and accelerated degenerative joint disease, kyphoscoliosis, and spondylolisthesis. Other manifestations of abnormal collagen include brittle dentition, hearing loss, cardiac valve abnormalities, and basilar invagination. In general, nonsurgical treatment is preferred for management of acute fractures. High rates of malunion, nonunion, and subsequent deformity have been reported with both closed and open treatment. When surgery is necessary, surgeons should opt for load-sharing intramedullary devices that span the entire length of the bone; locking plates and excessively rigid fixation generally should be avoided. Arthroplasty may be considered for active patients, but the procedure frequently is associated with complications in this patient population. Underlying deformities, such as malunion, bowing, rotational malalignment, coxa vara, and acetabular protrusio, pose specific surgical challenges and underscore the importance of preoperative planning.

  16. Improving operation notes to meet British Orthopaedic Association guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David; Fisher, Noel; Ahmad, Aman; Alam, Fazle

    2009-04-01

    Operation notes are an important part of medical records for clinical, academic and medicolegal reasons. This study audited the quality of operative note keeping for total knee replacements against the standards set by the British Orthopaedic Association (BOA). A prospective review of all patients undergoing total knee replacement at a district general hospital over 8 months. Data recorded were compared with those required by the BOA good-practice guidelines. Change in practice was implemented and the audit cycle completed. Data were statistically analysed. A total of 129 operation notes were reviewed. There was a significant improvement in the mean number of data points recorded from 9.6 to 13.1. The least well recorded data were diagnosis, description of findings, alignment and postoperative flexion range. All had a significant improvement except description of findings. The operating surgeon writing the note improved from 56% to 67%. Detailed postoperative instructions also improved in quality. Surgeon education and the use of a checklist produce better quality total knee replacement operation notes in line with BOA guidelines. Further improvements may be made by making the data points part of the operation note itself.

  17. Nanostructured glass–ceramic coatings for orthopaedic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocheng; Lu, Zufu; Liu, Xuanyong; Zhou, Xiaming; Ding, Chuanxian; Zreiqat, Hala

    2011-01-01

    Glass–ceramics have attracted much attention in the biomedical field, as they provide great possibilities to manipulate their properties by post-treatments, including strength, degradation rate and coefficient of thermal expansion. In this work, hardystonite (HT; Ca2ZnSi2O7) and sphene (SP; CaTiSiO5) glass–ceramic coatings with nanostructures were prepared by a plasma spray technique using conventional powders. The bonding strength and Vickers hardness for HT and SP coatings are higher than the reported values for plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. Both types of coatings release bioactive calcium (Ca) and silicon (Si) ions into the surrounding environment. Mineralization test in cell-free culture medium showed that many mushroom-like Ca and phosphorus compounds formed on the HT coatings after 5 h, suggesting its high acellular mineralization ability. Primary human osteoblasts attach, spread and proliferate well on both types of coatings. Higher proliferation rate was observed on the HT coatings compared with the SP coatings and uncoated Ti-6Al-4V alloy, probably due to the zinc ions released from the HT coatings. Higher expression levels of Runx2, osteopontin and type I collagen were observed on both types of coatings compared with Ti-6Al-4V alloy, possibly due to the Ca and Si released from the coatings. Results of this study point to the potential use of HT and SP coatings for orthopaedic applications. PMID:21292725

  18. Evaluating the outcomes of a podiatry-led assessment service in a public hospital orthopaedic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Daniel R; Medica, Virginia G; Tan, Daphne S; Spring, Anita A; Bird, Adam R; Gazarek, Jana

    2014-01-01

    In Australia, the demand for foot and ankle orthopaedic services in public health settings currently outweighs capacity. Introducing experienced allied health professionals into orthopaedic units to initiate the triage, assessment and management of patients has been proposed to help meet demand. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of introducing a podiatry-led assessment service in a public hospital orthopaedic unit. The outcomes of interest were determining: the proportion of patients discharged without requiring an orthopaedic appointment, agreement in diagnosis between the patient referral and the assessing podiatrist, the proportion of foot and ankle conditions presenting to the service, and the proportion of each condition to require an orthopaedic appointment. This study audited the first 100 patients to receive an appointment at a new podiatry-led assessment service. The podiatrist triaged 'Category 3' referrals consisting of musculoskeletal foot and ankle conditions and appointments were provided for those considered likely to benefit from non-surgical management. Following assessment, patients were referred to an appropriate healthcare professional or were discharged. At the initial appointment or following a period of care, patients were discharged if non-surgical management was successful, surgery was not indicated, patients did not want surgery, and if patient's failed to attend their appointments. All other patients were referred for an orthopaedic consultation as indicated. Ninety-five of the 100 patients (69 females and 31 males; mean age 51.9, SD 16.4 years) attended their appointment at the podiatry-led assessment service. The 95 referrals contained a total of 107 diagnoses, of which the podiatrist agreed with the diagnosis stated on the referral in 56 cases (Kappa =0.49, SE = 0.05). Overall, 34 of the 100 patients were referred to an orthopaedic surgeon and the remaining 66 patients were discharged from the orthopaedic waiting

  19. National Institutes of Health Funding to Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery at U.S. Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Ahn, Jaimo; Levin, L Scott

    2017-01-18

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the U.S., yet its contribution to orthopaedic research is poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the portfolio of NIH funding to departments of orthopaedic surgery at U.S. medical schools. The NIH RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) database was queried for NIH grants awarded to departments of orthopaedic surgery in 2014. Funding totals were determined for award mechanisms and NIH institutes. Trends in NIH funding were determined for 2005 to 2014 and compared with total NIH extramural research funding. Funding awarded to orthopaedic surgery departments was compared with that awarded to departments of other surgical specialties in 2014. Characteristics of NIH-funded principal investigators were obtained from department web sites. In 2014, 183 grants were awarded to 132 investigators at 44 departments of orthopaedic surgery. From 2005 to 2014, NIH funding increased 24.3%, to $54,608,264 (p = 0.030), but the rates of increase seen did not differ significantly from those of NIH extramural research funding as a whole (p = 0.141). Most (72.6%) of the NIH funding was awarded through the R01 mechanism, with a median annual award of $343,980 (interquartile range [IQR], $38,372). The majority (51.1%) of the total funds supported basic science research, followed by translational (33.0%), clinical (10.0%), and educational (5.9%) research. NIH-funded orthopaedic principal investigators were predominately scientists whose degree was a PhD (71.1%) and who were male (79.5%). Eleven NIH institutes were represented, with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) providing the preponderance (74.2%) of the funding. In 2014, orthopaedic surgery ranked below the surgical departments of general surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynecology, otolaryngology, and urology in terms of NIH funding received. The percentage increase of NIH

  20. Pediatric Orthopaedic Workforce in 2014: Current Workforce and Projections for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Jones, Kerwyn C; Copley, Lawson A; Chambers, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The changing nature of the United States (US) health care system has prompted debate concerning the physician supply. The basic questions are: do we have an adequate number of surgeons to meet current demands and are we training the correct number of surgeons to meet future demands? The purpose of this analysis was to characterize the current pediatric orthopaedic workforce in terms of supply and demand, both present and future. Databases were searched (POSNA, SF Match, KID, MGMA) to determine the current pediatric orthopaedic workforce and workforce distribution, as well as pediatric orthopaedic demand. The number of active Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) members increased over the past 20 years, from 410 in 1993 to 653 in 2014 (155% increase); however, the density of POSNA members is not equally distributed, but correlates to population density. The number of estimated pediatric discharges, orthopaedic and nonorthopaedic, has remained relatively stable from 6,348,537 in 1997 to 5,850,184 in 2012. Between 2003 and 2013, the number of pediatric orthopaedic fellows graduating from Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and non-Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education programs increased from 39 to 50 (29%), with a peak of 67 fellows (71%) in 2009. Although predicting the exact need for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons (POS) is impossible because of the complex interplay among macroeconomic, governmental, insurance, and local factors, some trends were identified: the supply of POS has increased, which may offset the expected numbers of experienced surgeons who will be leaving the workforce in the next 10 to 15 years; macroeconomic factors influencing demand for physician services, driven by gross domestic product and population growth, are expected to be stable in the near future; expansion of the scope of practice for POS is expected to continue; and further similar assessments are warranted. Level II-economic and

  1. Evaluation of the orthopaedics and traumatology resident education in Turkey: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Gazi; Cabuk, Yusuf Sertan; Gursoy, Safa; Akkaya, Mustafa; Ozkan, Secil; Oztuna, Volkan; Aydingoz, Onder; Senkoylu, Alparslan

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the current situation regarding the training, working conditions, future plans, fields of interest and satisfaction of orthopaedics and traumatology residents in Turkey. A descriptive survey questionnaire consisting of 24 questions was designed to identify the problems and solution suggestions concerning training of orthopaedic residents. All orthopaedics and traumatology residents who took the 2013 Progress Testing for Speciality in Medicine (UEGS) held by Turkish Orthopaedics and Traumatology Education Council (TOTEK) were surveyed in the class at the end thereof as well as the young orthopaedic surgeons who were reached through the email groups of Turkish Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology - Residents and Young Attendings Council (TOTBID-AGUH). A total of 725 residents and 132 young attendings were surveyed. The most outstanding answers are as follows: 62,7% of the respondents replied to the question "Is there a training program/Is it being applied" as "yes/yes". It was found out that 94,3% of the respondents wanted to be involved in a rotation abroad. The "patient care" was the most common answer, with a ratio of 36,9%, to the question "What's the priority of the department you are studying in?". Regarding work conditions, "many emergency on-calls" was found to be the most important parameter affecting life conditions (p traumatology residents in Turkey face as regards their training, this survey stands as a pioneering study with a high participation rate. Analysis of survey data highlights the importance of several key factors such as the development of training programs and increasing the time spent with academicians as well as spreading and promotion of log book application. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High incidence of hemiarthroplasty for shoulder osteoarthritis among recently graduated orthopaedic surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Tobias; Baumhauer, Judith F; O'Keefe, Regis J; Harrast, John; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Voloshin, Ilya

    2014-11-01

    Primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis is a common indication for shoulder arthroplasty. Historically, both total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and hemi-shoulder arthroplasty (HSA) have been used to treat primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis. The choice between procedures is a topic of debate, with HSA proponents arguing that it is less invasive, faster, less expensive, and technically less demanding, with quality of life outcomes equivalent to those of TSA. More recent evidence suggests TSA is superior in terms of pain relief, function, ROM, strength, and patient satisfaction. We therefore investigated the practice of recently graduated orthopaedic surgeons pertaining to the surgical treatment of this disease. We hypothesized that (1) recently graduated, board eligible, orthopaedic surgeons with fellowship training in shoulder surgery are more likely to perform TSA than surgeons without this training; (2) younger patients are more likely to receive HSA than TSA; (3) patient sex affects the choice of surgery; (4) US geographic region affects practice patterns; and (5) complication rates for HSA and TSA are not different. We queried the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery's database to identify practice patterns of orthopaedic surgeons taking their board examination. We identified 771 patients with primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis treated with TSA or HSA from 2006 to 2011. The rates of TSA and HSA were compared based on the treating surgeon's fellowship training, patient age and sex, US geographic region, and reported surgical complications. Surgeons with fellowship training in shoulder surgery were more likely (86% versus 72%; OR 2.32; 95% CI, 1.56-3.45, pguidelines for the treatment of glenohumeral osteoarthritis published by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. These guidelines favor using TSA over HSA in the treatment of shoulder arthritis. Further investigation is needed to clarify if these practice patterns are isolated to recently graduated board

  3. Etiology of Readmissions Following Orthopaedic Procedures and Medical Admissions. A Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Jed; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    The Federal Government, the largest payer of health care, considers readmission within 30 days of discharge an indicator of quality of care. Many studies have focused on causes for and strategies to reduce readmissions following medical admissions. However, few studies have focused on the differences between them. We believe that the causes for readmission following orthopaedic surgery are markedly different than those following medical admissions, and therefore, the strategies developed to reduce medical readmissions will not be as effective in reducing readmissions after elective orthopaedic surgery. All unplanned 30-day readmissions following an index hospitalization for an elective orthopaedic procedure (primary and revision total joint arthroplasty and spine procedure) or for one of the three publicly reported medical conditions (AMI, HF, and pneumonia, which accounted for 11% of readmissions) were identified at our institution from 2010 through 2012. A total of 268 patients and 390 medical patients were identified as having an unplanned 30-day readmission. We reviewed a prospectively collected data base to determine the reason for readmission in each encounter. A total of 233 (86.9%) orthopaedic patients were readmitted for surgical complications, most commonly for a wound infection (56.0%) or wound complication (11.6%). Following an index admission of HF or AMI, the primary reason for readmission was a disease of the circulatory system (55.9% and 57.4%, respectively). Following an index admission for pneumonia, the primary reason for readmission was a disease of the respiratory system (34.5%). The causes of readmissions following orthopaedic surgery and medical admissions are different. Patients undergoing orthopaedic procedures are readmitted for surgical complications, frequently unrelated to aftercare, and medicine patients are readmitted for reasons related to the index diagnosis. Interventions designed to reduce orthopaedic readmissions must focus on

  4. Heat-washout measurements compared to distal blood pressure and perfusion in orthopaedic patients with foot ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, M; Azad, B B S; Broholm, R

    2015-01-01

    Distal blood pressure and local skin perfusion pressure were compared to measurement of blood flow rate (BFR) measured by the heat-washout method in orthopaedic patients with and without diabetes, all with a foot ulcer in one foot, compared to healthy controls. The correlation was good between heat......-washout and distal blood pressure in patients with diabetes with and without an ulcer (P = 0·024 and 0·059, respectively). The correlation was weak in patients without diabetes with and without an ulcer, most probably due to power problems (P = 0·118 and 0·116, respectively). The correlation in the healthy controls...... the surrounding tissue, and therefore, measurements are easier made in these subjects. BFR in the first toe increased significantly in all patients when the foot was moved from heart level to 50 cm below heart level (P = between 0·03 and 0·05) as previously seen in patients with claudication...

  5. Quantum Optimal Control of Single Harmonic Oscillator under Quadratic Controls together with Linear Dipole Polarizability: A Fluctuation Free Expectation Value Dynamical Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayvaz, Muzaffer; Demiralp, Metin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the optimal control equations for one dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator under the quadratic control operators together with linear dipole polarizability effects are constructed in the sense of Heisenberg equation of motion. A numerical technique based on the approximation to the non-commuting quantum mechanical operators from the fluctuation free expectation value dynamics perspective in the classical limit is also proposed for the solution of optimal control equations which are ODEs with accompanying boundary conditions. The dipole interaction of the system is considered to be linear, and the observable whose expectation value will be suppressed during the control process is considered to be quadratic in terms of position operator x. The objective term operator is also assumed to be quadratic.

  6. Topological design and additive manufacturing of porous metals for bone scaffolds and orthopaedic implants: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojian; Xu, Shanqing; Zhou, Shiwei; Xu, Wei; Leary, Martin; Choong, Peter; Qian, M; Brandt, Milan; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-03-01

    One of the critical issues in orthopaedic regenerative medicine is the design of bone scaffolds and implants that replicate the biomechanical properties of the host bones. Porous metals have found themselves to be suitable candidates for repairing or replacing the damaged bones since their stiffness and porosity can be adjusted on demands. Another advantage of porous metals lies in their open space for the in-growth of bone tissue, hence accelerating the osseointegration process. The fabrication of porous metals has been extensively explored over decades, however only limited controls over the internal architecture can be achieved by the conventional processes. Recent advances in additive manufacturing have provided unprecedented opportunities for producing complex structures to meet the increasing demands for implants with customized mechanical performance. At the same time, topology optimization techniques have been developed to enable the internal architecture of porous metals to be designed to achieve specified mechanical properties at will. Thus implants designed via the topology optimization approach and produced by additive manufacturing are of great interest. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of topological design and manufacturing processes of various types of porous metals, in particular for titanium alloys, biodegradable metals and shape memory alloys. This review also identifies the limitations of current techniques and addresses the directions for future investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Scanning electron microscopical observation of an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture on micropatterned orthopaedic ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Mansur; Ker, Andrew; Meek, Rm Dominic; Nadeem, Danish; Sjostrom, Terje; Su, Bo; McNamara, Laura E; Dalby, Matthew J; Young, Peter S

    2014-01-01

    In biomaterial engineering, the surface of an implant can influence cell differentiation, adhesion and affinity towards the implant. On contact with an implant, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells demonstrate differentiation towards bone forming osteoblasts, which can improve osteointegration. The process of micropatterning has been shown to improve osteointegration in polymers, but there are few reports surrounding ceramics. The purpose of this study was to establish a co-culture of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with osteoclast progenitor cells and to observe the response to micropatterned zirconia toughened alumina ceramics with 30 µm diameter pits. The aim was to establish whether the pits were specifically bioactive towards osteogenesis or were generally bioactive and would also stimulate osteoclastogenesis that could potentially lead to osteolysis. We demonstrate specific bioactivity of micropatterns towards osteogenesis, with more nodule formation and less osteoclastogenesis compared to planar controls. In addition, we found that that macrophage and osteoclast-like cells did not interact with the pits and formed fewer full-size osteoclast-like cells on the pitted surfaces. This may have a role when designing ceramic orthopaedic implants.

  8. The role of elastomeric pumps in postoperative analgesia in orthopaedics and factors affecting their flow rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorides, Anthony Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Elastomeric pumps are mechanical devices composed of an elastomeric balloon reservoir into which the drug to be infused is stored, a protective casing (used by some manufacturers), a flow controller and a wound catheter. In orthopaedics they are used to provide continuous local infiltration analgesia. In this way patients rely less on other routes of analgesia and thus avoid their systemic side effects. Studies have shown good response to analgesia with these pumps for the first 24 hours but their benefit is not as clear at 48 and 72 hours. There are numerous factors that affect the flow rate of elastomeric pumps. Some are inherent to all elastomeric pumps such as: the pressure exerted by the elastomeric balloon, catheter size, the vertical height of the pump in relation to the wound, viscosity and partial filling. There are also other factors which vary according to the manufacturer such as: the optimal temperature to obtain the desired flow rate as this directly affects viscosity, the dialysate that the analgesic drug is mixed with (ie normal saline or 5% dextrose), and the storage conditions of the fluid to be infused. It is thus essential to follow the clinical guidelines provided by the manufacturer in order to obtain the desired flow rate. Copyright the Association for Perioperative Practice.

  9. Peer-assisted learning and orthopaedic evaluation psychomotor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Thomas G; Popp, Jennifer K

    2007-01-01

    Athletic training educators often anecdotally suggest that athletic training students enhance their learning by teaching their peers. However, peer-assisted learning (PAL) has not been examined within athletic training education to provide evidence for PAL's current use or for its use as a pedagogic tool. To assess the effectiveness of intentional, formal PAL on the performance of psychomotor skills and to identify students' perceptions of PAL. Randomized, pretest-posttest experimental design. Athletic Training Research and Education Laboratory. Fifty-one undergraduate students (27 athletic training majors, 24 nonmajors). Review sessions led by either an Approved Clinical Instructor or peer tutor. We assessed pretest and posttest performance scores (number of correct skills) and the amount of time to complete the psychomotor skills in 3 categories of orthopaedic evaluation of the hand and wrist for subjects assigned to either a peer tutor or an Approved Clinical Instructor review group. Using the Athletic Training Peer-Assisted Learning Assessment Survey, we evaluated the perceptions of students assigned to the peer-tutor group regarding the benefits of, and preferences for, PAL. Differences in the pretest-posttest skill scores were noted in both groups (P psychomotor skills with peer tutors than with the laboratory instructor, and many students (n = 12, 44.4%) felt more self-confident when practicing psychomotor skills with a peer tutor. Peer-assisted learning appears to be a valid method for improving athletic training psychomotor skills. Peers can be resources for practicing clinical skills and report benefiting from the collaboration. Peer-assisted learning should be deliberately integrated into athletic training education programs to enhance student learning and collaboration.

  10. A review of virtual reality based training simulators for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Neil; Dubey, Venketesh N; Wainwright, Thomas W; Middleton, Robert G

    2016-02-01

    This review presents current virtual reality based training simulators for hip, knee and other orthopaedic surgery, including elective and trauma surgical procedures. There have not been any reviews focussing on hip and knee orthopaedic simulators. A comparison of existing simulator features is provided to identify what is missing and what is required to improve upon current simulators. In total 11 hip replacements pre-operative planning tools were analysed, plus 9 hip trauma fracture training simulators. Additionally 9 knee arthroscopy simulators and 8 other orthopaedic simulators were included for comparison. The findings are that for orthopaedic surgery simulators in general, there is increasing use of patient-specific virtual models which reduce the learning curve. Modelling is also being used for patient-specific implant design and manufacture. Simulators are being increasingly validated for assessment as well as training. There are very few training simulators available for hip replacement, yet more advanced virtual reality is being used for other procedures such as hip trauma and drilling. Training simulators for hip replacement and orthopaedic surgery in general lag behind other surgical procedures for which virtual reality has become more common. Further developments are required to bring hip replacement training simulation up to date with other procedures. This suggests there is a gap in the market for a new high fidelity hip replacement and resurfacing training simulator. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Does virtual reality simulation have a role in training trauma and orthopaedic surgeons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, J D; Lawrence, J E; Stewart, M E; Nakano, N; Khanduja, V

    2018-05-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to assess the current evidence relating to the benefits of virtual reality (VR) simulation in orthopaedic surgical training, and to identify areas of future research. Materials and Methods A literature search using the MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar databases was performed. The results' titles, abstracts, and references were examined for relevance. Results A total of 31 articles published between 2004 and 2016 and relating to the objective validity and efficacy of specific virtual reality orthopaedic surgical simulators were identified. We found 18 studies demonstrating the construct validity of 16 different orthopaedic virtual reality simulators by comparing expert and novice performance. Eight studies have demonstrated skill acquisition on a simulator by showing improvements in performance with repeated use. A further five studies have demonstrated measurable improvements in operating theatre performance following a period of virtual reality simulator training. Conclusion The demonstration of 'real-world' benefits from the use of VR simulation in knee and shoulder arthroscopy is promising. However, evidence supporting its utility in other forms of orthopaedic surgery is lacking. Further studies of validity and utility should be combined with robust analyses of the cost efficiency of validated simulators to justify the financial investment required for their use in orthopaedic training. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:559-65.

  12. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Sankalp [Centre for Research in Engineering and Surface Technology, FOCAS Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland); School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland); Curtin, James [School of Food Science and Environmental Health, Cathal Brugha Street, Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland); Duffy, Brendan [Centre for Research in Engineering and Surface Technology, FOCAS Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland); Jaiswal, Swarna, E-mail: swarna.jaiswal@dit.ie [Centre for Research in Engineering and Surface Technology, FOCAS Institute, Dublin Institute of Technology (Ireland)

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. - Highlights: • The Mg based alloys are promising candidates for orthopaedic applications. • The rapid corrosion of Mg can affect human cells, and causes infection and implant failure. • The various physiological factors and Mg alloying elements affect the corrosion and mechanical properties of implants. • The polymeric deposit coatings enhance the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

  13. Supply and Demand Analysis of the Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeon Workforce in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sielatycki, John A; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Mir, Hassan R

    2016-05-01

    To investigate recent trends in the orthopaedic trauma workforce and to assess whether supply of orthopaedic trauma surgeons (OTS) matches the demand for their skills. Supply estimated using Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) membership and American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons census data. The annual number of operative pelvic and acetabular fractures reported by American College of Surgeons verified trauma centers in the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) was used as a surrogate of demand. Because surrogates were used, the annual rate of change in OTA membership versus rate of change in operative injuries per NTDB center was compared. From 2002 to 2012, reported operative pelvic and acetabular injuries increased by an average of 21.0% per year. The number of reporting trauma centers increased by 27.2% per year. The number of OTA members increased each year except in 2009, with mean annual increase of 9.8%. The mean number of orthopaedic surgeons per NTDB center increased from 7.98 to 8.58, an average of 1.5% per year. The annual number of operative pelvic and acetabular fractures per NTDB center decreased from 27.1 in 2002 to 19.03 in 2012, down 2.0% per year. In the United States, from 2002 to 2012, the number of OTS trended upward, whereas operative pelvic and acetabular cases per reporting NTDB center declined. These trends suggest a net loss of such cases per OTS over this period.

  14. Readability of Orthopaedic Oncology-related Patient Education Materials Available on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Akash K; Yi, Paul H; Stein, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    A person's health literacy is one of the most important indicators of a patient's health status. According to national recommendations, patient education materials should be written at no higher than the sixth- to eighth-grade reading level. The purpose of our study was to assess the readability of online patient education materials related to orthopaedic oncology on the websites of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), American Cancer Society (ACS), Bone and Cancer Foundation (BCF), and National Cancer Institute (NCI). We searched the online patient education libraries of the AAOS, ACS, BCF, and NCI for all articles related to orthopaedic oncology. The Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability score was calculated for each article and compared between sources. A total of 227 articles were identified with an overall mean FK grade level of 9.8. Stratified by source, the mean FK grade levels were 10.1, 9.6, 11.1, and 9.5 for the AAOS, ACS, BCF, and NCI, respectively (P education materials related to orthopaedic oncology appear to be written at a level above the comprehension ability of the average patient. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  15. Investigation on Alteration of Compression of Knitted Orthopaedic Supports during Exploitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana ALIŠAUSKIENĖ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the areas of medical textile is the spacer knitted orthopaedic products. The concept of compression therapy of orthopaedic supports lies on a simple and efficient mechanical principle – it consists of applying elastic garment around the limb. Spacer orthopaedic supports are knitted on flat knitting machines equipped with especial elastomeric thread feeder. Compression made by the support depends on the support area, shape and characteristics of knitting. Because of orthopaedic supports are intended for durable wearing and need to vouchsafe compression of fixed value, it is very important to known how processes acting during exploitation influence alteration of compression values. The aim of this study was to establish the alteration of compression of knitted support during exploitation, i. e. after multifold extension, washing and drying. The samples were knitted on a flat double needle bed knitting machine in combined jacquard-laid-in pattern with elastomeric weft threads. It was established that compressive properties of knits after cyclic tensile load changed slightly, i. e. range between margins of error. It was measured that knitted orthopaedic supports dimensions and density after washing and drying cycles changes significant, i. e. knitted supports shrinks and thickens and their compression decreases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.18.4.3097

  16. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. - Highlights: • The Mg based alloys are promising candidates for orthopaedic applications. • The rapid corrosion of Mg can affect human cells, and causes infection and implant failure. • The various physiological factors and Mg alloying elements affect the corrosion and mechanical properties of implants. • The polymeric deposit coatings enhance the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility.

  17. Review of Van earthquakes form an orthopaedic perspective: a multicentre retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guner, Savas; Guner, Sukriye Ilkay; Isik, Yasemin; Gormeli, Gokay; Kalender, Ali Murat; Turktas, Ugur; Gokalp, Mehmet Ata; Gozen, Abdurrahim; Isik, Mustafa; Ozkan, Sezai; Turkozu, Tulin; Karadas, Sevdegul; Ceylan, Mehmet Fethi; Ediz, Levent; Bulut, Mehmet; Gunes, Yusuf; Gormeli, Ayse; Erturk, Cemil; Eseoglu, Metehan; Dursun, Recep

    2013-01-01

    This is a descriptive analysis, of victims of Turkey's October 23, 2011 and November 21, 2011 Van earthquakes. The goal of this study is investigated the injury profile of the both earthquakes in relation to musculoskeletal trauma. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 3,965 patients admitted to in seven hospitals. A large share of these injuries were soft tissue injuries, followed by fractures, crush injuries, crush syndromes, nerve injuries, vascular injuries, compartment syndrome and joint dislocations. A total of 73 crush injuries were diagnosed and 31 of them were developed compartment syndrome. The patients with closed undisplaced fractures were treated with casting braces. For closed unstable fractures with good skin and soft-tissue conditions, open reduction and internal fixation was performed. All patients with open fracture had an external fixator applied after adequate debridement. Thirty one of 40 patients with compartment syndrome were treated by fasciotomy. For twelve of them, amputation was necessary. The most common procedure performed was debridement, followed by open reduction and internal fixation and closed reduction-casting, respectively. The results of this study may provide the basis for future development of strategy to optimise attempts at rescue and plan treatment of survivors with musculoskeletal injuries after earthquakes.

  18. Computer assisted orthopaedic and trauma surgery. State of the art and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, N. W. L.; Broeders, I. A. M. J.; van der Werken, Chr

    2003-01-01

    In recent years computer technologies have become more and more integrated in surgical procedures. The potential advantages of computer assisted surgery (CAS) are: increase of accuracy of surgical interventions, less invasive operations, better planning and simulation and reduction of radiation

  19. Feasibility of pre-operative autologous blood donation in Indian patients with elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saluja, Karan; Marwaha, Neelam; Thakral, Beenu; Goni, Vijay; Sharma, R R; Puri, G D

    2006-11-01

    Pre-operative autologous blood donation (PABD) in elective orthopaedic surgeries is a well known procedure in the West. We initiated this programme at a tertiary care hospital in north India to study its feasibility in Indian patients. In a prospective case-control study, 144 patients undergoing primary total hip or knee replacement, inter-vertebral discectomy, mal-union and non-union reconstruction were educated and motivated to pre-donate. Patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria and making autologous donation formed the PABD group (n=22). Patients eligible for PABD, but unwilling to participate; age, sex, pre-operative haemoglobin and operative procedure matched acted as controls (n=27). Unit(s) collected was processed like an allogeneic unit. Unit(s) found reactive for infectious markers or not utilized was discarded. Mean blood losses, transfusion trigger, allogeneic exposure and wastage between the two groups were compared. Of the 144 patients motivated, 40 per cent of the eligible subjects pre-deposited. The main motivational factor was fear of getting infection from someone's blood. Cardiac events and anaemia prevented 61.8 per cent patients to participate. Of the 50 units ordered, autologous units with a mean of 1.4 units/patient contributed 62 per cent. For total hip and total knee replacement (THR and TKR), autologous units met 76.2 and 80 per cent respectively of the total blood requirement. A significant decrease in the allogeneic exposure was observed between PABD and control group (18.2 vs 66.7%); 32.3 per cent of the autologous units were discarded. Comprehensive PABD programme may be an effective method for reducing the need for allogeneic transfusion in patients undergoing joint replacement surgeries in our country, where transfusion transmitted infections due to high percentage of replacement donations and lack of sensitive assays for testing are still a cause for concern.

  20. The First World War and its influence on the development of orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotland, T

    2014-01-01

    By December 1914, overwhelming numbers of soldiers with infected musculoskeletal wounds had filled hospitals in France and Britain. Frequently initial management had been inadequate. In 1915, patients with orthopaedic wounds were segregated for the first time when Robert Jones established an experimental orthopaedic unit in Alder Hey Hospital, Liverpool. In 1916 he opened the first of 17 orthopaedic centres in Britain to surgically treat and rehabilitate patients. Henry Gray from Aberdeen emerged as the leading authority in the management of acute musculoskeletal wounds in casualty clearing stations in France and Flanders. Gray had particular expertise in dealing with compound fractures of the femur for which he documented an 80% mortality rate in 1914-15.

  1. Surgical advances during the First World War: the birth of modern orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Arul; Eardley, W G P; Edwards, D S; Clasper, J C; Stewart, M P M

    2016-02-01

    The First World War (1914-1918) was the first truly industrial conflict in human history. Never before had rifle fire and artillery barrage been employed on a global scale. It was a conflict that over 4 years would leave over 750,000 British troops dead with a further 1.6 million injured, the majority with orthopaedic injuries. Against this backdrop, the skills of the orthopaedic surgeon were brought to the fore. Many of those techniques and systems form the foundation of modern orthopaedic trauma management. On the centenary of 'the War to end all Wars', we review the significant advances in wound management, fracture treatment, nerve injury and rehabilitation that were developed during that conflict. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. [The Development and Application of the Orthopaedics Implants Failure Database Software Based on WEB].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiahua; Zhou, Hai; Zhang, Binbin; Ding, Biao

    2015-09-01

    This article develops a new failure database software for orthopaedics implants based on WEB. The software is based on B/S mode, ASP dynamic web technology is used as its main development language to achieve data interactivity, Microsoft Access is used to create a database, these mature technologies make the software extend function or upgrade easily. In this article, the design and development idea of the software, the software working process and functions as well as relative technical features are presented. With this software, we can store many different types of the fault events of orthopaedics implants, the failure data can be statistically analyzed, and in the macroscopic view, it can be used to evaluate the reliability of orthopaedics implants and operations, it also can ultimately guide the doctors to improve the clinical treatment level.

  3. Barriers and facilitators experienced in collaborative prospective research in orthopaedic oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rendon, J S; Swinton, M; Bernthal, N

    2017-01-01

    by orthopaedic oncological surgeons involved or interested in prospective multicentre collaboration. METHODS: All surgeons who were involved, or had expressed an interest, in the ongoing Prophylactic Antibiotic Regimens in Tumour Surgery (PARITY) trial were invited to participate in a focus group to discuss......: The 13 surgeons who participated in the discussion represented orthopaedic oncology practices from seven countries (Argentina, Brazil, Italy, Spain, Denmark, United States and Canada). Four categories and associated themes emerged from the discussion: the need for collaboration in the field...... of orthopaedic oncology due to the rarity of the tumours and the need for high level evidence to guide treatment; motivational factors for participating in collaborative research including establishing proof of principle, learning opportunity, answering a relevant research question and being part...

  4. Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction Surveys in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Lee S; Plantikow, Carla; Hall, Randon; Wilson, Kristina; Shrader, M Wade

    2015-01-01

    Patient satisfaction survey scores are increasingly being tied to incentive compensation, impact how we practice medicine, influence decisions on where patients seek care, and in the future may be required for accreditation. The goal of this study is to compare the results of an internal distribution of patient satisfaction surveys at the point of care to responses received by mail in a hospital-based, high-volume pediatric orthopaedic practice. A pediatric outpatient survey is used at our institution to evaluate patient satisfaction. Surveys are randomly mailed out to families seen in our clinic by the survey vendor, and the results are determined on a quarterly basis. We distributed the same survey in a similar manner in our clinic. The results of the surveys, external/mailed (EXM) versus internal/point of care (INP) over the same 3-month time period (second quarter 2013) were compared. The survey questions are dichotomized from an ordinal scale into either excellent (9 to 10) or not excellent (0 to 8) commonly used in patient satisfaction methodology. We evaluated the raw data from the INP surveys for the question on provider rating by evaluating the mean score, the standard excellent response (9 to 10), and an expanded excellent response (8 to 10). Response rate was 72/469 (15.4%) for EXM, and 231/333 (69.4%) for INP. An excellent response for the "rating your provider" question was 72.2% (EXM) versus 84.8% (INP) (P=0.015). Our analysis of the raw data (INP) has a mean rating of 9.42. The expanded scale (8 to 10) for an excellent response increased the provider rating to 94.4% (P=0.001). Waiting time response within 15 minutes was the only item that correlated with rating of provider (P=0.02). For the majority of the items, the INP responses were consistently higher than the EXM responses, including 6/7 responses that were statistically significant (Ppatient satisfaction surveys will be important in determining health care outcomes. Properly designed and

  5. Skeletal metastases - the role of the orthopaedic and spinal surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastley, Nicholas; Newey, Martyn; Ashford, Robert U

    2012-09-01

    Developments in oncological and medical therapies mean that life expectancy of patients with metastatic bone disease (MBD) is often measured in years. Complications of MBD may dramatically and irreversibly affect patient quality of life, making the careful assessment and appropriate management of these patients essential. The roles of orthopaedic and spinal surgeons in MBD generally fall into one of four categories: diagnostic, the prophylactic fixation of metastatic deposits at risk of impending fracture (preventative surgery), the stabilisation or reconstruction of bones affected by pathological fractures (reactive surgery), or the decompression and stabilisation of the vertebral column, spinal cord, and nerve roots. Several key principals should be adhered to whenever operating on skeletal metastases. Discussions should be held early with an appropriate multi-disciplinary team prior to intervention. Detailed pre-assessment is essential to gauge a patient's suitability for surgery - recovery from elective surgery must be shorter than the anticipated survival. Staging and biopsies provide prognostic information. Primary bone tumours must be ruled out in the case of a solitary bone lesion to avoid inappropriate intervention. Prophylactic surgical fixation of a lesion prior to a pathological fracture reduces morbidity and length of hospital stay. Regardless of a lesion or pathological fracture's location, all regions of the affected bone must be addressed, to reduce the risk of subsequent fracture. Surgical implants should allow full weight bearing or return to function immediately. Post-operative radiotherapy should be utilised in all cases to minimise disease progression. Spinal surgery should be considered for those with spinal pain due to potentially reversible spinal instability or neurological compromise. The opinion of a spinal surgeon should be sought early, as delays in referral directly correlate to worse functional recovery following intervention

  6. The Malaysian Orthopaedic Association humanitarian mission to Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, I; Saw, A; Hyzan, Y; Sivananthan, K S

    2005-07-01

    The tsunami which occurred off the west coast of North Sumatra on December 26, 2004 devastated the coastal areas of North Sumatra, South-West Thailand, South-East India and Sri Lanka killing more than a quarter of a million people. The destruction was enormous with many coastal villages destroyed. The other countries affected were Malaysia, Myanmar, Maldives, Bangladesh, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania and the Seychelles. In January 2005, volunteers went in weekly rotation to Banda Aceh in collaboration with Global Peace Mission. These were Dr Hyzan Yusof, Dr Suryasmi Duski, Dr Sharaf Ibrahim, Dr Saw Aik, Dr Kamariah Nor and Dr Nor Azlin. In Banda Aceh, the surgical procedures that we could do were limited to external fixation of open fractures and debriding infected wounds at the Indonesian Red Crescent field hospital. In February, a team comprising Dato Dr K S Sivananthan, Dr T Kumar and Dr S Vasan spent a week in Sri Lanka. In Sri Lanka, Dato Sivananthan and his team were able to perform elective orthopaedic operations in Dr Poonambalam Memorial Hospital. We appealed for national and international aid and received support from local hospitals and the orthopaedic industry. International aid bound for Banda Aceh arrived in Kuala Lumpur from the Philippine Orthopaedic Association, the Chiba Children's Hospital in Japan and the Chinese Orthopaedic Association. The COA donated 1.5 tons of orthopaedic equipments. A special handing over ceremony from the COA to the Indonesian Orthopaedic Association was held in Putrajaya in March. Malaysia Airlines flew in the donated equipment to Kuala Lumpur while the onward flight to Aceh was provided by the Royal Malaysian Air Force. In April, Dr Saw Aik and Dr Yong Su Mei joined the Tsu-Chi International Medical Association for volunteer services on Batam Island, Indonesia. The MOA acknowledges the many individuals and organizations, both governmental and non-governmental, for their contributions in the humanitarian efforts.

  7. Postinjury anxiety and social support among collegiate athletes: a comparison between orthopaedic injuries and concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covassin, Tracey; Crutcher, Bryan; Bleecker, Alisha; Heiden, Erin O; Dailey, Alexander; Yang, Jingzhen

    2014-01-01

    When an athlete is injured, the primary focus of the sports medicine team is to treat the physical effects of the injury. However, many injured athletes experience negative psychological responses, including anxiety, regarding their injury. To compare the anxiety and social support of athletes with concussions and a matched group of athletes with orthopaedic injuries. Cross-sectional study. Athletic training room. A total of 525 injuries among athletes from 2 Big Ten universities were observed. Of these, 63 concussion injuries were matched with 63 orthopaedic injuries for the athlete's sex, sport, and time loss due to injury. Clinical measures included the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (which measures both state and trait anxiety) and the modified 6-item Social Support Questionnaire. The group with concussions relied on their family for social support 89% of the time, followed by friends (78%), teammates (65%), athletic trainers (48%), coaches (47%), and physicians (35%). The group with orthopaedic injuries relied on their family for social support 87% of the time, followed by friends (84%), teammates (65%), athletic trainers (57%), coaches (51%), and physicians (36%). We found no differences for the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (t = -1.38, P = .193) between the concussed and orthopaedic-injury groups. Social Support Questionnaire scores were significant predictors for postinjury state anxiety. Specifically, increased scores were associated with decreased postinjury state anxiety (β = -4.21, P = .0001). Both the concussed athletes and those with orthopaedic injuries experienced similar state and trait anxiety and relied on similar sources of social support postinjury. However, athletes with orthopaedic injuries reported greater satisfaction with support from all sources compared with concussed athletes. In contrast, concussed athletes showed more significant predictor models of social support on state anxiety at return to play.

  8. Metallic powder-bed based 3D printing of cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants: A state-of-the-art review on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, X P; Tan, Y J; Chow, C S L; Tor, S B; Yeong, W Y

    2017-07-01

    Metallic cellular scaffold is one of the best choices for orthopaedic implants as a replacement of human body parts, which could improve life quality and increase longevity for the people needed. Unlike conventional methods of making cellular scaffolds, three-dimensional (3D) printing or additive manufacturing opens up new possibilities to fabricate those customisable intricate designs with highly interconnected pores. In the past decade, metallic powder-bed based 3D printing methods emerged and the techniques are becoming increasingly mature recently, where selective laser melting (SLM) and selective electron beam melting (SEBM) are the two representatives. Due to the advantages of good dimensional accuracy, high build resolution, clean build environment, saving materials, high customisability, etc., SLM and SEBM show huge potential in direct customisable manufacturing of metallic cellular scaffolds for orthopaedic implants. Ti-6Al-4V to date is still considered to be the optimal materials for producing orthopaedic implants due to its best combination of biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. This paper presents a state-of-the-art overview mainly on manufacturing, topological design, mechanical properties and biocompatibility of cellular Ti-6Al-4V scaffolds via SLM and SEBM methods. Current manufacturing limitations, topological shortcomings, uncertainty of biocompatible test were sufficiently discussed herein. Future perspectives and recommendations were given at the end. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Irradiation of bioresorbable biomaterials for controlled surface degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simpson, M.; Gilmore, B.F.; Miller, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable polymers increasingly are the materials of choice for implantable orthopaedic fixation devices. Controlled degradation of these polymers is vital for preservation of mechanical properties during tissue repair and controlled release of incorporated agents such as osteoconductive or a...

  10. Tribology considerations for hip joint articulations in relation to the "new orthopaedic patient".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, C B

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine alternative bearings used in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and discuss the specific tribologic needs of the "New Orthopaedic Patient". As orthopaedic patients today are younger and more active, there is a clear need for hip joint implants and articulations minimising the amount of wear and guarantying better stability. Recent modern developments in tribology with highly cross-linked polyethylenes and hard-on-hard bearings allow the safe and effective use of larger diameter articulations in THA.

  11. Imaging in scoliosis from the orthopaedic surgeon's point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, Marc [Stiftung Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Abel, Rainer [Stiftung Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Schlierbacher Landstr. 200a, 69118 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: rainer.abel@ok.uni-heidelberg.de

    2006-04-15

    For treating patients with scoliosis orthopaedic surgeons need diagnostic imaging procedures in order to provide answers about a possible underlying disease, choice of treatment, and prognosis. Once treatment is instituted, imaging is also critical for monitoring changes of the deformity so as to optimize therapy. The combined effort of orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists helps detect treatable causes of scoliosis at an early stage, define the need and timing for surgery, and ensure that every precaution is taken to minimize the risks of surgery. Neurosurgical causes, with particular reference to spinal cord tumours and syringomyelia, need to be addressed before scoliosis surgery can be contemplated.

  12. Multicenter collaborative for orthopaedic research in India: An opportunity for global leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew George

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic accidents are increasing at an alarming rate and have become a major public health concern in India. In addition, there is a lack of trauma research output and reliable data from India. There are several issues and challenges that have presented an opportunity for researchers and surgeons in India to develop a collaborative aimed at improving the quality and productivity of orthopaedic trauma research. Establishing a network of surgical researchers across India is a necessary first step towards global leadership in orthopaedic surgery trials.

  13. Orthopaedic Disorders in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1: descriptive clinical study of 21 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of hereditary myopathy presenting in adults. This autosomal-dominant systemic disorder is caused by a CTG repeat, demonstrating various symptoms. A mild, classic and congenital form can be distinguished. Often the quality of life is reduced by orthopaedic problems, such as muscle weakness, contractures, foot or spinal deformities, which limit patients’ mobility. The aim of our study was to gather information about the orthopaedic impairments in patients with DM1 in order to improve the medical care of patients, affected by this rare disease. Methods A retrospective clinical study was carried out including 21 patients (11 male and 10 female), all diagnosed with DM1 by genetic testing. All patients were seen during our special consultations for neuromuscular diseases, during which patients were interviewed and examined. We also reviewed surgery reports of our hospitalized patients. Results We observed several orthopaedic impairments: spinal deformities (scoliosis, hyperkyphosis, rigid spine), contractures (of the upper extremities and the lower extremities), foot deformities (equinus deformity, club foot, pes cavus, pes planovalgus, pes cavovarus, claw toes) and fractures. Five patients were affected by pulmonary diseases (obstructive airway diseases, restrictive lung dysfunctions). Twelve patients were affected by cardiac disorders (congenital heart defects, valvular heart defects, conduction disturbances, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy). Our patients received conservative therapy (physiotherapy, logopaedic therapy, ergotherapy) and we prescribed orthopaedic technical devices (orthopaedic custom-made shoes, insoles, lower and upper leg orthoses, wheelchair, Rehab Buggy). We performed surgery for spinal and foot deformities: the scoliosis of one patient was stabilized and seven patients underwent surgery for correction of foot deformities. Conclusions An orthopaedic involvement in DM1

  14. Open access publishing: a study of current practices in orthopaedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Patel, Nirav; Johal, Karanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Open access (OA) publications have changed the paradigm of dissemination of scientific research. Their benefits to low-income countries underline their value; however, critics question exorbitant publication fees as well as their effect on the peer review process and research quality. This study reports on the prevalence of OA publishing in orthopaedic research and compares benchmark citation indices as well as evidence quality derived from OA journals with conventional subscription based orthopaedic journals. All 63 orthopaedic journals listed in ISI's Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Report (JCR) were examined. Bibliometric data attributed to each journal for the year 2012 was acquired from the JCR. Studies that fulfilled the criteria of level I evidence were identified for each journal within PubMed. Individual journal websites were reviewed to identify their open access policy. A total of 38 (60.3 %) journals did not offer any form of OA publishing; however, 20 (31.7 %) hybrid journals were identified which offered authors the choice to publish their work as OA if a publication fee was paid. Only five (8 %) journals published all their articles as OA. There was variability amongst the different publication fees for OA articles. Journals that published OA articles did not differ from subscription based journals on the basis of 2012 impact factor, citation number, self citation proportion or the volume of level I evidence published (p > 0.05). OA journals are present in orthopaedic research, though in small numbers. Over a third of orthopaedic journals catalogued in the ISI Web of Knowledge JCR® are hybrid journals that provide authors with the opportunity to publish their articles as OA after a publication fee is paid. This study suggests equivalent importance and quality of articles between OA and subscription based orthopaedic journals based on bibliometric data and the volume of level I evidence produced. Orthopaedic researchers must recognize the

  15. Perspectives in the control of infectious diseases by transgenic mosquitoes in the post-genomic era: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Aparecida Sperança

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne diseases caused by a variety of microorganisms such as dengue virus and malaria parasites afflict billions of people worldwide imposing major economic and social burdens. Despite many efforts, vaccines against diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, with the exception of yellow fever, are not available. Control of such infectious pathogens is mainly performed by vector management and treatment of affected individuals with drugs. However, the numbers of insecticide-resistant insects and drug-resistant parasites are increasing. Therefore, inspired in recent years by a lot of new data produced by genomics and post-genomics research, several scientific groups have been working on different strategies to control infectious arthropod-borne diseases. This review focuses on recent advances and perspectives towards construction of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to malaria parasites and dengue virus transmission.

  16. Perspectives in the control of infectious diseases by transgenic mosquitoes in the post-genomic era--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperança, Márcia Aparecida; Capurro, Margareth Lara

    2007-06-01

    Arthropod-borne diseases caused by a variety of microorganisms such as dengue virus and malaria parasites afflict billions of people worldwide imposing major economic and social burdens. Despite many efforts, vaccines against diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, with the exception of yellow fever, are not available. Control of such infectious pathogens is mainly performed by vector management and treatment of affected individuals with drugs. However, the numbers of insecticide-resistant insects and drug-resistant parasites are increasing. Therefore, inspired in recent years by a lot of new data produced by genomics and post-genomics research, several scientific groups have been working on different strategies to control infectious arthropod-borne diseases. This review focuses on recent advances and perspectives towards construction of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to malaria parasites and dengue virus transmission.

  17. Worldwide orthopaedic research activity 2010-2014: Publication rates in the top 15 orthopaedic journals related to population size and gross domestic product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, Erik; Glatt, Vaida; Tetsworth, Kevin

    2017-06-18

    To perform a bibliometric analysis of publications rates in orthopedics in the top 15 orthopaedic journals. Based on their 2015 impact factor, the fifteen highest ranked orthopaedic journals between January 2010 and December 2014 were used to establish the total number of publications; cumulative impact factor points (IF) per country were determined, and normalized to population size, GDP, and GDP/capita, comparison to the median country output and the global leader. Twenty-three thousand and twenty-one orthopaedic articles were published, with 66 countries publishing. The United States had 8149 publications, followed by the United Kingdom (1644) and Japan (1467). The highest IF was achieved by the United States (24744), United Kingdom (4776), and Japan (4053). Normalized by population size Switzerland lead. Normalized by GDP, Croatia was the top achiever. Adjusting GDP/capita, for publications and IF, China, India, and the United States were the leaders. Adjusting for population size and GDP, 28 countries achieved numbers of publications to be considered at least equivalent with the median academic output. Adjusting GDP/capita only China and India reached the number of publications to be considered equivalent to the current global leader, the United States. Five countries were responsible for 60% of the orthopaedic research output over this 5-year period. After correcting for GDP/capita, only 28 of 66 countries achieved a publication rate equivalent to the median country. The United States, United Kingdom, South Korea, Japan, and Germany were the top five countries for both publication totals and cumulative impact factor points.

  18. Moderator Roles of Optimism and Weight Control on the Impact of Playing Exergames on Happiness: The Perspective of Social Cognitive Theory Using A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huynh Van; Huang, Han-Chung; Wong, May-Kuen; Yang, Ya-Hui; Huang, Tzu-Ling; Teng, Ching-I

    2018-04-30

    The literature on exergames has examined their impact on user-perceived psychological health (i.e., user-perceived happiness), but little is known about whether such an impact depends on user characteristics. Therefore, this study used the perspective of social cognitive theory (SCT) to identify potential moderators (i.e., whether the user is optimistic or attempting to control his or her weight) of the impact of playing exergames on user-perceived happiness. This large-scale randomized controlled trial recruited 337 college students (of whom 57.3% were female and all were aged 20-40 years) as participants. The participants were randomly assigned to the intervention group or the control group. Participants in the intervention group were asked to use an Xbox 360 to play 1 of 10 exergame programs for 30 minutes once a week for 2 weeks. Participants in the control group were not required to do so. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used for the analyses. The analytical results indicate that playing exergames helped to maintain happiness levels and prevented them from decreasing. The maintained happiness was more prominent among participants who were trying to control their weight, but did not differ between participants who were highly optimistic and those who were less optimistic. This study is the first using SCT to explain the contingent effect of playing exergames on user happiness. Exergames can maintain happiness among users, and such maintenance can be the strongest among users who are trying to control their weight.

  19. Qualitative Assessment of Challenges in Tuberculosis Control in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia: Health Workers’ and Tuberculosis Control Program Coordinators’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senedu B. Gebreegziabher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Weak health systems pose many barriers to effective tuberculosis (TB control. This study aimed at exploring health worker’s and TB control program coordinator’s perspectives on health systems challenges facing TB control in West Gojjam Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Methods. This was a qualitative descriptive study. Eight in-depth interviews with TB control program coordinators and two focus group discussions among 16 health workers were conducted. Purposive sampling was used to recruit study participants. Thematic analysis was used to identify and analyse main themes. Results. We found that intermittent interruptions of laboratory reagents and anti-TB drugs supplies, absence of trained and motivated health workers, poor TB data documentation, lack of adherence to TB treatment guideline, and lack of access to TB diagnostic tools at peripheral health institutions were challenges facing the TB control program performance in the study zone. Conclusions. Ensuring uninterrupted supply of anti-TB drugs and laboratory reagents to all health institutions is essential. Continuous refresher training of health workers on standard TB care and data handling and developing and implementing a sound retention strategy to attract and motivate health professionals to work in rural areas are necessary interventions to improve the TB control program performance in the study zone.

  20. II Italian intersociety consensus statement on antithrombotic prophylaxis in orthopaedics and traumatology: arthroscopy, traumatology, leg immobilization, minor orthopaedic procedures and spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, F; Romanini, E; Biggi, F; Danelli, G; Della Rocca, G; Laurora, N R; Imberti, D; Palareti, G; Prisco, D

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacological prophylaxis for preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide established procedure in hip and knee replacement surgery, as well as in the treatment of femoral neck fractures, but few data exist in other fields of orthopaedics and traumatology. Thus, no guidelines or recommendations are available in the literature except for a limited number of weak statements about knee arthroscopy and lower limb fractures. In any case, none of them are a multidisciplinary effort as the one here presented. The Italian Society for Studies on Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET), the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (SIOT), the Association of Orthopaedic Traumatology of Italian Hospitals (OTODI), together with the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) and the Italian Society of General Medicine (SIMG) have set down easy and quick suggestions for VTE prophylaxis in a number of surgical conditions for which only scarce evidence is available. This inter-society consensus statement aims at simplifying the approach to VTE prophylaxis in the single patient with the goal to improve its clinical application.

  1. The Experience and Effectiveness of Nurse Practitioners in Orthopaedic Settings: A Comprehensive Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anita; Staruchowicz, Lynda

    This review asks "What is the experience and effectiveness of nurse practitioners in orthopaedic settings"?The objective of the quantitative component of this review is to synthesise the best available evidence on effectiveness of orthopaedic nurse practitioner specific care on patient outcomes and process indicators.The objective of the qualitative component of this review is to synthesise the best available evidence on the experience of becoming or being an orthopaedic nurse practitioner in relation to role development, role implementation and (ongoing) role evaluation.The objective of the text and opinion component of this review is to synthesise the best available evidence of the contemporary discourse on the effectiveness and experience of nurse practitioners in orthopaedic settings. Nurse practitioner roles have emerged in response to areas of unmet healthcare needs in a variety of settings. Nurse practitioners first evolved in the United States 40 years ago in response to a shortage of primary health care physicians. Nurse practitioners filled the void by providing access to primary health care services where otherwise there was none. Nurse practitioners comprise one branch of advanced nursing practice in the US along with Nurse Anaesthetists (NA), Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) and Nurse Midwives (NM). Canada soon followed America's lead by establishing the nurse practitioner role in 1967. Canada has two areas of advanced nursing practice, namely nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist; they are moving towards introducing nurse anaesthetists currently. The nurse practitioner role was introduced into the United Kingdom 20 years ago.There is commonality amongst the definition and characteristics of Nurse Practitioner (NP)/Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) role and practice internationally in terms of education, practice standards and regulation; operationally there is variability however. Australia's progress with nurse practitioners is very much

  2. An organizational perspective on inventory control : Theory and a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomerdijk, L.G.; de Vries, J.

    2003-01-01

    Inventory control is a well-covered area in literature. Nowadays, many concepts and techniques are available for effectively controlling inventories. Eminent examples are stochastic models to determine order quantities, techniques for forecasting demand and different kinds of ABC analysis.

  3. Control of tongue movements in speech: The Equilibrium point Hypothesis perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Perrier , Pascal; Loevenbruck , Hélène; Payan , Yohan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper , the application of the Equilibrium Point Hypothesis— originally proposed by Feldman for the control of limb movements— to speech control is analysed . In the first part , physiological data published in the literature which argue in favour of such control for the tongue are presented and the possible role of this motor process in a global control model of the tongue is explicated . In the second part , using the example of the acoustic variability associated with vowel reducti...

  4. Role of the clinical microbiology laboratory in infection control - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J

    2001-01-01

    for standardization and documentation of quality. Currently a national standard for infection control is being prepared. It consists of a main standard defining requirements for the management system and 12 subsidiary standards defining requirements for specific areas of infection control. Adoption of the standard...... will undoubtedly require additional resources for infection control at a local level, and some organizational changes may also be needed. Infection control should be maintained as an integrated part of clinical microbiology....

  5. Children's and Teachers' Perspectives on Children's Self-Control: The Development of Two Rating Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Laura Lynn

    1982-01-01

    Compared parallel scales of children's self-control developed for teachers and children. Self-control ratings by teachers and children related to naturalistic observations and to teacher ratings of frustration tolerance and acting-out/aggressive problems. Teachers' ratings of self-control related to IQ and achievement. Supported the validity of…

  6. [Quality in diabetes mellitus control in Primary Care Units in Mexico. A study of the perspectives of the patient's family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos García, María Isabel; López Ramón, Concepción; Morales García, Manuel Higinio; Priego Álvarez, Heberto Romeo; Garrido Pérez, Silvia María Guadalupe; Cargill Foster, Nelly Ruth

    2017-01-01

    To identify the perspectives of the patient's family in the quality of diabetes mellitus control. Qualitative methodology of exploratory design, oriented towards health services research, conducted in 2014 using non-probability sampling. Primary Care Units mainly situated in the state of Tabasco, Mexico. 42 family members were selected, who agreed to participate voluntarily in the study. Six focus groups were set up; interview guides and group dynamics were employed. The information was documented, saturated and categorised; the most representative discourses were used, and conclusions reached. The results show a highly critical position of the families as regards the patient, some of which appear justified, and others have a cultural, historical, and to some extent, an ignorance connotation. They have also commented on the health care and the role that patients and families can play, in both cases, also expressed critically. The family perspectives reveal what they think and feel about diabetes mellitus. It is important to note their lack of support and the content of their expressions due to lack of knowledge of the disease. Their discourses are critical, mythical, and with false beliefs of the fear of being future carriers of the disease. They feel sorry for the patient but they resist taking care of them, and do not want a life with diabetes. The family is the closest support for patients and an invaluable human resource for health services. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. THE ORTHOPAEDIC REHABILITATION OF BALANCE: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE ROLE OF MENTAL IMAGERY AND EMOTIONAL VARIABLES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santo F. Di Nuovo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mental Imagery (i.e., processing of objects’ properties and spatial relations, including the ability of mentally rotating and manipulating objects in the space, is relevant for movement and its development, and particularly for rehabilitation of motor skills. Few studies aimed at assessing  the efficacy of imagery training used objective scores of Mental Imagery skills, preferring self-evaluations of these abilities reported by the subjects themselves. The aim of the paper was to explore the relevance of Mental Imagery, assessed by objective tests, in predicting the improvement of balance skills, after a standard rehabilitative training in orthopaedic settings; taking into account also emotional variables as anxiety and depression. A controlled study was conducted assessing the changes in balance skills after rehabilitative training. The sample was composed of 30 orthopaedic inpatients (females 66.7%, age range 47-91 years. To measure the dependent variable for pre-post assessment, B-scale from Performance-oriented mobility assessment test (POMA was used. Independent variables were measured using Mental Imagery Test, Mini-Mental State Examination, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scales. The best predictor of improvement in balance after rehabilitation is the Mental Imagery test, followed by age and mental efficiency. Anxiety predicts negatively the improvement, while education and depression appear to influence less the rehabilitation process. In conclusion, the study demonstrates that mental imagery is relevant in helping balance rehabilitation. A training of this function could be essential for clinical practice; the trainers should assess preliminarily the subject's attitude and ability to use mental imagery, with the aim of optimizing the rehabilitative process.

  8. Staff and patient perspectives on the purpose of psychotropic prescribing in prisons: care or control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Lamiece; Edge, Dawn; Senior, Jane; Shaw, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to explore perspectives on reasons for psychotropic medication use in prisons. We recruited a purposive sample of healthcare staff and patients prescribed psychotropic medicines from four East of England prisons. Participants took part in qualitative, semistructured interviews, which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed thematically. While patients and healthcare staff viewed psychotropic medicines primarily as a treatment for reducing symptoms of mental illness, they were also used as a coping strategy and to reduce insomnia. Appropriate psychotropic prescribing was also thought to contribute towards the rehabilitation agenda and helped to maintain order in prisons. Staff voiced concerns regarding possible overreliance on psychotropic medicines. However, patients perceived insufficient access to alternative, nonpharmacological forms of treatment and support in prison. Psychotropic medicines are used for multiple purposes in prisons and are generally considered a useful resource. Nonetheless, further work may be needed to find the right balance between psychotropic medicines and alternative, nonpharmacological therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Recruitment barriers in a randomized controlled trial from the physicians' perspective – A postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karrer Werner

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The feasibility of randomized trials often depends on successful patient recruitment. Although numerous recruitment barriers have been identified it is unclear which of them complicate recruitment most. Also, most surveys have focused on the patients' perspective of recruitment barriers whereas the perspective of recruiting physicians has received less attention. Therefore, our aim was to conduct a postal survey among recruiting physicians of a multi-center trial to weigh barriers according to their impact on recruitment. Methods We identified any potential recruitment barriers from the literature and from our own experience with a multi-center trial of respiratory rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We developed and pilot-tested a self-administered questionnaire where recruiting physicians were asked to express their agreement with statements about recruitment barriers on a Likert-type scale from 1 (full agreement with statement = very substantial recruitment barrier to 7 (no agreement with statement = no recruitment barrier. Results 38 of 55 recruiting physicians returned questionnaires (69% response rate, of which 35 could be analyzed (64% useable response rate. Recruiting physicians reported that "time constraints" (median agreement of 3, interquartile range 2–5 had the most negative impact on recruitment followed by "difficulties including identified eligible patients" (median agreement of 5, IQR 3–6. Other barriers such as "trial design barriers", "lack of access to treatment", "individual barriers of recruiting physicians" or "insufficient training of recruiting physicians" were perceived to have little or no impact on patient recruitment. Conclusion Physicians perceived time constraints as the most relevant recruitment barrier in a randomized trial. To overcome recruitment barriers interventions, that are affordable for both industry- and investigator-driven trials, need to be

  10. Thermodynamic perspectives on genetic instructions, the laws of biology, diseased states and human population control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines in a broad perspective entropy and some examples of its relationship to evolution, genetic instructions and how we view diseases. Many knowledge gaps abound, hence our understanding is still fragmented and incomplete. Living organisms are programmed by functional genetic instructions (FGI), through cellular communication pathways, to grow and reproduce by maintaining a variety of hemistable, ordered structures (low entropy). Living organisms are far from equilibrium with their surrounding environmental systems, which tends towards increasing disorder (increasing entropy). Organisms must free themselves from high entropy (high disorder) to maintain their cellular structures for a period of time sufficient enough to allow reproduction and the resultant offspring to reach reproductive ages. This time interval varies for different species. Bacteria, for example need no sexual parents; dividing cells are nearly identical to the previous generation of cells, and can begin a new cell cycle without delay under appropriate conditions. By contrast, human infants require years of care before they can reproduce. Living organisms maintain order in spite of their changing surrounding environment, that decreases order according to the second law of thermodynamics. These events actually work together since living organisms create ordered biological structures by increasing local entropy. From a disease perspective, viruses and other disease agents interrupt the normal functioning of cells. The pressure for survival may result in mechanisms that allow organisms to resist attacks by viruses, other pathogens, destructive chemicals and physical agents such as radiation. However, when the attack is successful, the organism can be damaged until the cell, tissue, organ or entire organism is no longer functional and entropy increases. PMID:21262480

  11. [Study on the change of semantic perspective of schistosomiasis control in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-ying; Liu, Si-yuan; Li, Yu-ye; Deng, Yao; Yang, Kun

    2015-12-01

    To analyze the evolution process, discourse and semantic meaning of schistosomiasis prevention and control, so as to provide suggestions for control work. The official documents and mainstream media reports of schistosomiasis prevention and control were selected at different periods as discourse samples, and the deep social reasons behind the strategy change and the semantic meaning of the utterance were analyzed at different periods. The discourse of schistosomiasis prevention and control experienced the evolution of the political discourse, pluralistic discourse and public discourse, and the semantic connotations showed the authority conflict semantic features, and then transferred to semantic cooperation. The prevention and control of schistosomiasis have different semantic meanings at different periods, and the prevention and control work should correspond to a social practice, seek truth from facts, correctly understand the actual situation, and then establish the effective control policy.

  12. Control Theory Perspective of Effects-Based Thinking and Operations: Modelling "Operations" as a Feedback Control System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Farrell, Philip S

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores operations that involve effects-based thinking (EBT) using Control Theory techniques in order to highlight the concept's fundamental characteristics in a simple and straightforward manner...

  13. Hydrolytic Decomposition in a Polyamide/PDMS Composite for Orthopaedic Usage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Suchý, Tomáš; Sedláček, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 103 (2011), s. 2-3 ISSN 1429-7248 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1457 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : composite * hydrolic decomposition * orthopaedics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics http://www.biomat.krakow.pl/gazeta/archiwum/103.pdf

  14. Decellularized Tissue and Cell-Derived Extracellular Matrices as Scaffolds for Orthopaedic Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Christina W.; Solorio, Loran D.; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of musculoskeletal defects is a constant challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. Musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, chondral lesions, infections and tumor debulking can often lead to large tissue voids requiring reconstruction with tissue grafts. Autografts are currently the gold standard in orthopaedic tissue reconstruction; however, there is a limit to the amount of tissue that can be harvested before compromising the donor site. Tissue engineering strategies using allogeneic or xenogeneic decellularized bone, cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament have emerged as promising potential alternative treatment. The extracellular matrix provides a natural scaffold for cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. Decellularization of in vitro cell-derived matrices can also enable the generation of autologous constructs from tissue specific cells or progenitor cells. Although decellularized bone tissue is widely used clinically in orthopaedic applications, the exciting potential of decellularized cartilage, skeletal muscle, tendon and ligament cell-derived matrices has only recently begun to be explored for ultimate translation to the orthopaedic clinic. PMID:24417915

  15. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  16. Level of Perception of Individualized Care and Satisfaction With Nursing in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Fatma; Findik, Ummu Yildiz

    2015-01-01

    Lately, individualized nursing care and patient satisfaction are important and current issues being discussed. But there is not enough information for patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the individualized care perception and satisfaction in nursing care levels in orthopaedic surgery patients. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with 156 patients who underwent orthopaedic surgery. Data were collected using the personal information form, the Individualized Care Scale, and the Newcastle Satisfaction With Nursing Scale. The Spearman correlation analysis and descriptive statistics were performed. The mean individualized care and satisfaction with nursing care scores were found to be close to the preset maximum value, and it was determined that an increase in the level of awareness about nursing interventions and the level of perceived individualized care caused an increase in satisfaction levels regarding nursing care. Nurses should recognize the importance of performing individualized care in order to increase the level of satisfaction with nursing care in orthopaedic surgery patients.

  17. The available evidence on demineralised bone matrix in trauma and orthopaedic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van der Stok (Johan); Hartholt, K.A.; Schoenmakers, D.A.L.; J.J. Arts (Jacobus J.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess the clinical level of evidence of commercially available demineralised bone matrix (DBM) products for their use in trauma and orthopaedic related surgery. Methods: A total of 17 DBM products were used as search terms

  18. The available evidence on demineralised bone matrix in trauma and orthopaedic surgery : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stok, J.; Hartholt, K.A.; Schoenmakers, D.A.L.; Arts, J.J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess the clinical level of evidence of commercially available demineralised bone matrix (DBM) products for their use in trauma and orthopaedic related surgery. Methods: A total of 17 DBM products were used as search terms in two

  19. European Working Time Directive and the use of simulators and models in Irish orthopaedics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Egan, C

    2011-09-07

    OBJECTIVE: To report on the perceptions of a group of orthopaedic trainees and trainers on perceived effects of the proposed introduction of European Working Time Directive (EWTD) restrictions into Ireland and on the use of simulators in training orthopaedic skills. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was developed to evaluate the opinions of a group of orthopaedic surgeons and trainees at the annual national orthopaedic conference. RESULTS: There were 44 participants [12 consultants, 32 trainees (15 specialist registrars, 8 registrars, 9 senior house officers)]. Seventy-five percent of participants felt that both the quality of patient care and training would be negatively affected. A higher proportion of consultants than trainees felt that quality of life would be affected. A high proportion of participants (81.8%) had used a simulator or model to learn a surgical skill and 100% would consider using them again. CONCLUSIONS: While we wait for the full introduction of the EWTD hours the perception is that both quality of patient care and training will be affected. Models and simulators are well perceived as a method of training.

  20. European Working Time Directive and the use of simulators and models in Irish orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, C; Elliott, R; Fleming, P

    2012-03-01

    To report on the perceptions of a group of orthopaedic trainees and trainers on perceived effects of the proposed introduction of European Working Time Directive (EWTD) restrictions into Ireland and on the use of simulators in training orthopaedic skills. A structured questionnaire was developed to evaluate the opinions of a group of orthopaedic surgeons and trainees at the annual national orthopaedic conference. There were 44 participants [12 consultants, 32 trainees (15 specialist registrars, 8 registrars, 9 senior house officers)]. Seventy-five percent of participants felt that both the quality of patient care and training would be negatively affected. A higher proportion of consultants than trainees felt that quality of life would be affected. A high proportion of participants (81.8%) had used a simulator or model to learn a surgical skill and 100% would consider using them again. While we wait for the full introduction of the EWTD hours the perception is that both quality of patient care and training will be affected. Models and simulators are well perceived as a method of training.

  1. Advanced practice physiotherapy-led triage in Irish orthopaedic and rheumatology services: national data audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennelly, Orna

    2018-06-01

    Many people with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders wait several months or years for Consultant Doctor appointments, despite often not requiring medical or surgical interventions. To allow earlier patient access to orthopaedic and rheumatology services in Ireland, Advanced Practice Physiotherapists (APPs) were introduced at 16 major acute hospitals. This study performed the first national evaluation of APP triage services.

  2. Effect of extended scope physiotherapists assessments in orthopaedic diagnostic setting: a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Jeanette; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with musculoskeletal diseases can potentially be assessed by an extended scope physiotherapist (ESP) instead of by an orthopaedic surgeon (OS). Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of the diagnostic musculoskeletal assessment performed by ESP compared to OS. Data sources M...

  3. Burnout in Orthopaedic Surgeons: A Challenge for Leaders, Learners, and Colleagues: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, S Elizabeth; Cowan, James B; Kenter, Keith; Emery, Sanford; Halsey, David

    2017-07-19

    Burnout, depression, suicidal ideation, and dissatisfaction with work-life balance have been reported in all medical specialties and at all stages of medical education and practice experience. Burnout consists of progressive emotional, attitudinal, and physical exhaustion. Physicians with burnout may treat patients as objects and feel emotionally depleted. Burnout is characterized by a loss of enthusiasm for work (emotional exhaustion), feelings of cynicism (depersonalization), and a low sense of personal accomplishment. The most complete study of emotional burnout among different medical specialties demonstrated that orthopaedic surgery is one of the specialties with the highest burnout rate. Qualitative descriptive studies are available. There was a 45.8% burnout rate among physicians in the U.S. in 2012, and a 2014 update suggested even higher rates. Burnout has a correlation with medical education. Burnout rates are similar to those in the general population when medical students enter school, and increase steadily through medical education prior to residency. Burnout rates in residents are high, reported to be between 41% and 74% across multiple specialties. This impacts our young physician workforce in orthopaedics. The purpose of this review is to provide the available information that characterizes burnout and addresses the issues inherent to preventing burnout, and to build awareness in orthopaedic surgeons. Wellness "goes beyond merely the absence of distress and includes being challenged, thriving, and achieving success in various aspects of personal and professional life." The challenge for the orthopaedic community is to develop interventions and strategies that are personalized to the individuals in this specialty.

  4. Biodegradable magnesium alloys for orthopaedic applications: A review on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sankalp; Curtin, James; Duffy, Brendan; Jaiswal, Swarna

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys have been extensively explored as potential biodegradable implant materials for orthopaedic applications (e.g. Fracture fixation). However, the rapid corrosion of Mg based alloys in physiological conditions has delayed their introduction for therapeutic applications to date. The present review focuses on corrosion, biocompatibility and surface modifications of biodegradable Mg alloys for orthopaedic applications. Initially, the corrosion behaviour of Mg alloys and the effect of alloying elements on corrosion and biocompatibility is discussed. Furthermore, the influence of polymeric deposit coatings, namely sol-gel, synthetic aliphatic polyesters and natural polymers on corrosion and biological performance of Mg and its alloy for orthopaedic applications are presented. It was found that inclusion of alloying elements such as Al, Mn, Ca, Zn and rare earth elements provides improved corrosion resistance to Mg alloys. It has been also observed that sol-gel and synthetic aliphatic polyesters based coatings exhibit improved corrosion resistance as compared to natural polymers, which has higher biocompatibility due to their biomimetic nature. It is concluded that, surface modification is a promising approach to improve the performance of Mg-based biomaterials for orthopaedic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report Supplement, Psychomotor Skills, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    This document, as a supplement to the final report of the Orthopaedic Training Study, presents a discussion of the rationale behind the implementation of a laboratory course in psychomotor skills development for medical students. Medical educators examined resident training in terms of 3 components of cognitive elements of learning: cognitive,…

  6. Combining Clinical Information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures in Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, D.A. van

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated the use of clinical information and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) for patient evaluation in orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. In the first part, we showed that the Dutch version of the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) is a valid and reliable

  7. The 2007 ABJS Marshall Urist Award: The impact of direct-to-consumer advertising in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Kevin J; Smith, Amanda R; Hariri, Sanaz; Adeoye, Sanjo; Gourville, John; Maloney, William J; Parsley, Brian; Rubash, Harry E

    2007-05-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) has become an influential factor in healthcare delivery in the United States. We evaluated the influence of DTCA on surgeon and patient opinions and behavior in orthopaedics by surveying orthopaedic surgeons who perform hip and knee arthroplasties and patients who were scheduled to have hip or knee arthro-plasty. Respondents were asked for their opinions of and experiences with DTCA, including the influence of DTCA on surgeon and patient decision making. Greater than 98% of surgeon respondents had experience with patients who were exposed to DTCA. The majority of surgeon respondents reported DTCA had an overall negative impact on their practice and their interaction with patients (74%), and their patients often were confused or misinformed about the appropriate treatment for their condition based on an advertisement (77%). Fifty-two percent of patient respondents recalled seeing or hearing advertisements related to hip or knee arthroplasty. These patients were more likely to request a specific type of surgery or brand of implant from their surgeon and to see more than one surgeon before deciding to have surgery. Direct-to-consumer advertising seems to play a substantial role in surgeon and patient decision making in orthopaedics. Future efforts should be aimed at improving the quality and accuracy of information contained in consumer-directed advertisements related to orthopaedic implants and procedures.

  8. Canadian Orthopaedic Residents Perception of Their Needs in Elbow Surgery Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael; Drosdovech, Darren; Faber, Kenneth J.; Hildebrand, Kevin A.; King, Graham; Pollock, J.; Rouleau, Dominique M.; Sandman, Emilie

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this paper is to guide training program and review course curriculum planning in elbow disorders. To this end, a nationwide email survey was administered to residents' in orthopaedic surgery training programs. Material and Methods: The survey had 12 items that examined learning needs in several domains: assessment of acute…

  9. Immunotoxicity evaluation of novel bioactive composites in male mice as promising orthopaedic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan T. El-Bassyouni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective : In orthopaedics, novel bioactive composites are largely needed to improve the synthetic achievement of the implants. In this work, semiconducting metal oxides such as SiO 2 , TiO 2 , and ZrO 2 particles (Ps were used individually and in different ratios to obtain different biphasic composites. The immunotoxicity of these composites was tested to inspect the potential toxicity prior to their use in further medical applications. Materials and methods : In vitro mineralisation ability was inspected by soaking the composites in simulated body fluid (SBF. Additionally, in vivo experiments were performed consuming male mice using ISSR-PCR, micronucleus (MN test, comet assay, glutathione peroxidase activity, and determination of albumin, globulin, lymphocyte population, ALT, and AST levels. Several groups of adult male albino mice were treated with 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg body weight of SiO 2 , TiO 2 , and ZrO 2 -Ps in pure or mixed forms. Results : Our findings revealed that treatment of mice with low and medium doses of SiO 2 , TiO 2 , and ZrO 2 -Ps in pure or mixed form revealed values relatively similar to the control group. However, using 400 mg/kg especially from TiO 2 -Ps in genuine form or mixed with SiO 2 showed proliferation in the toxicity rates compared with the high dose of SiO 2 and ZrO 2 -Ps. Conclusions : The results suggest that TiO 2 composite induced in vivo toxicity, oxidative DNA damage, bargain of the antioxidant enzymes, and variations in the levels of albumin, globulin, lymphocyte population, ALT, and AST in a dose-dependent manner. However, SiO 2 , and ZrO 2 composites revealed a lower toxicity in mice compared with that of TiO 2 .

  10. Customizable orthopaedic oncology implants: one institution's experience with meeting current IRB and FDA requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Alexander R; Ippolito, Joseph A; Patterson, Francis R; Benevenia, Joseph; Beebe, Kathleen S

    2016-01-01

    Customizable orthopaedic implants are often needed for patients with primary malignant bone tumors due to unique anatomy or complex mechanical problems. Currently, obtaining customizable orthopaedic implants for orthopaedic oncology patients can be an arduous task involving submitting approval requests to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). There is great potential for the delay of a patient's surgery and unnecessary paperwork if the submission pathways are misunderstood or a streamlined protocol is not in place. The objective of this study was to review the existing FDA custom implant approval pathways and to determine whether this process was improved with an institutional protocol. An institutional protocol for obtaining IRB and FDA approval for customizable orthopaedic implants was established with the IRB at our institution in 2013. This protocol was approved by the IRB, such that new patients only require submission of a modification to the existing protocol with individualized patient information. During the two-year period of 2013-2014, eight patients were retrospectively identified as having required customizable implants for various orthopaedic oncology surgeries. The dates of request for IRB approval, request for FDA approval, and total time to surgery were recorded, along with the specific pathway utilized for FDA approval. The average patient age was 12 years old (7-21 years old). The average time to IRB approval of a modification to the pre-approved protocol was 14 days (7-21 days). Average time to FDA approval after submission of the IRB approval to the manufacturer was 12.5 days (7-19 days). FDA approval was obtained for all implants as compassionate use requests in accordance with Section 561 of the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act's expanded access provisions. Establishment of an institutional protocol with pre-approval by the IRB can expedite the otherwise time-consuming and complicated

  11. Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Interviews: Structure and Organization of the Interview Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haislup, Brett D; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Baweja, Rishi; McCarty, Eric C; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a trend toward an increasing subspecialization in orthopaedic surgery, with orthopaedic sports medicine being one of the most competitive subspecialties. Information regarding the application and interview process for sports medicine fellowships is currently lacking. To survey orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship program directors (PDs) to better define the structure of the sports medicine fellowship interview and to highlight important factors that PDs consider in selecting fellows. Cross-sectional study. A complete list of accredited programs was obtained from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) website. An anonymous survey was distributed to fellowship PDs of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships in the United States. The survey included 12 questions about the fellowship interview and selection process. Of the 95 orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship PDs surveyed, 38 (40%) responded. Of these, 16 (42.1%) indicated that they interview between 21 and 30 applicants per year. Eleven of the 38 fellowship programs (28.9%) have only 1 fellow per year at their respective program. Most programs (27/37, 73%) reported that between 0 and 5 faculty members interview applicants, and 29 of the 38 programs (76.3%) arrange for applicants to have ≥4 interviews during their interview day. Large group interviews are conducted at 36 of 38 (94.7%) sports medicine fellowship programs, and most programs (24/38, 63.2%) hold individual interviews that last between 5 and 15 minutes. The most important applicant criterion taken into account by PDs was the quality of the interview, with an average score of 8.68 of 10. The most significant factor taken into account by PDs when deciding how to rank applicants was the quality of the interview. Many orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs interview between 21 and 30 applicants per year

  12. Access to Orthopaedic Surgical Care in Northern Tanzania: A Modelling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Ajay; Ying, Xiaohan; Mack Hardaker, W; Massawe, Honest H; Mshahaba, David J; Mandari, Faiton; Pallangyo, Anthony; Temu, Rogers; Masenga, Gileard; Spiegel, David A; Sheth, Neil P

    2018-04-25

    The global burden of musculoskeletal disease and resulting disability is enormous and is expected to increase over the next few decades. In the world's poorest regions, the paucity of information defining and quantifying the current state of access to orthopaedic surgical care is a major problem in developing effective solutions. This study estimates the number of individuals in Northern Tanzania without adequate access to orthopaedic surgical services. A chance tree was created to model the probability of access to orthopaedic surgical services in the Northern Tanzanian regions of Arusha, Kilimanjaro, Tanga, Singida, and Manyara, with respect to four dimensions: timeliness, surgical capacity, safety, and affordability. Timeliness was estimated by the proportion of people living within a 4-h driving distance from a hospital with an orthopaedic surgeon, capacity by comparing number of surgeries performed to the number of surgeries indicated, safety by applying WHO Emergency and Essential Surgical Care infrastructure and equipment checklists, and affordability by approximating the proportion of the population protected from catastrophic out-of-pocket healthcare expenditure. We accounted for uncertainty in our model with one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Data sources included the Tanzanian National Bureau of Statistics and Ministry of Finance, World Bank, World Health Organization, New Zealand Ministry of Health, Google Corporation, NASA population estimator, and 2015 hospital records from Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Machame Hospital, Nkoroanga Hospital, Mt. Meru Hospital, and Arusha Lutheran Medical Center. Under the most conservative assumptions, more than 90% of the Northern Tanzanian population does not have access to orthopaedic surgical services. There is a near absence of access to orthopaedic surgical care in Northern Tanzania. These findings utilize more precise country and region-specific data and are consistent with prior published

  13. Orthopaedic Timing in Polytrauma in a Second Level Emergency Hospital. An Overrated Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Dei Giudici; N, Giampaolini; A, Panfighi; M, Marinelli; R, Procaccini; A, Gigante

    2015-01-01

    The main concern for orthopaedic treatment in polytrauma has always been the same for almost forty years, which also regards “where” and “when” to proceed; correct surgical timing and correct interpretation of the DCO concept are still being debated. In the last few years, several attempts have been made to classify patients based on their clinical presentation and by trying to figure out which vital parameters are able to predict the patient’s outcome. This study evaluated all patients who presented with code red at the Emergency Department of our Hospital, a level II trauma center. For every patient, the following characteristics were noted: sex, age, day of hospitalization, orthopaedic trauma, time to surgery, presence of an associated surgical condition in the fields of general surgery, thoracic surgery, neurosurgery and vascular surgery, cardiac frequency, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, Glasgow Coma Scale and laboratory data. All patients included were divided into subgroups based on orthopaedic surgical timing. Two other subgroups were also identified and analyzed in detail: deceased and weekend traumas. A total of 208 patients were included. Our primary goal was to identify a correlation between the mortality and surgical timing of the orthopaedic procedures; our secondary goal was to recognize, if present, a statistically relevant association between historical, clinical and laboratory data, and mortality rate, defining any possible risk factor. A correlation between mortality and orthopaedic surgical timing was not found. Analyzing laboratory data revealed an interesting correlation between mortality and: blood pressure, platelet count, cardiac frequency, hematocrit, hemoglobin and age. PMID:26312113

  14. Is There Value in Having Radiology Provide a Second Reading in Pediatric Orthopaedic Clinic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vivek; Bosch, Patrick; Dede, Ozgur; Deeney, Vincent; Mendelson, Stephen; Ward, Timothy; Brooks, Maria; Kenkre, Tanya; Roach, James

    2017-06-01

    The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations specifically mandates the dual interpretation of musculoskeletal radiographs by a radiologist in addition to the orthopaedist in all hospital-based orthopaedic clinics. Previous studies have questioned the utility of this practice. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the clinical significance of having the radiologist provide a second interpretation in a hospital-based pediatric orthopaedic clinic. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who had plain radiographs obtained in the pediatric orthopaedic clinic at an academic children's hospital over a 4-month period. For each radiographic series, the orthopaedist's note and the radiology interpretation were reviewed and a determination was made of whether the radiology read provided new clinically useful information and/or a new diagnosis, whether it recommended further imaging, or if it missed a diagnosis that was reflected in the orthopaedist's note. The hospital charges associated with the radiology read for each study were also quantified. The charts of 1570 consecutive clinic patients who were seen in the pediatric orthopaedic clinic from January to April, 2012 were reviewed. There were 2509 radiographic studies performed, of which 2264 had both a documented orthopaedist's note and radiologist's read. The radiologist's interpretation added new, clinically important information in 1.0% (23/2264) of these studies. In 1.7% (38/2264) of the studies, it was determined that the radiologist missed the diagnosis or clinically important information that could affect treatment. The total amount of the professional fees charged for the radiologists' interpretations was $87,362. On average, the hospital charges for each occurrence in which the radiologist's read provided an additional diagnosis or clinically important information beyond the orthopaedist's note were $3798. The results of this study suggest that eliminating the

  15. Advanced practice physiotherapy-led triage in Irish orthopaedic and rheumatology services: national data audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennelly, Orna; Blake, Catherine; FitzGerald, Oliver; Breen, Roisin; Ashton, Jennifer; Brennan, Aisling; Caffrey, Aoife; Desmeules, François; Cunningham, Caitriona

    2018-06-01

    Many people with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders wait several months or years for Consultant Doctor appointments, despite often not requiring medical or surgical interventions. To allow earlier patient access to orthopaedic and rheumatology services in Ireland, Advanced Practice Physiotherapists (APPs) were introduced at 16 major acute hospitals. This study performed the first national evaluation of APP triage services. Throughout 2014, APPs (n = 22) entered clinical data on a national database. Analysis of these data using descriptive statistics determined patient wait times, Consultant Doctor involvement in clinical decisions, and patient clinical outcomes. Chi square tests were used to compare patient clinical outcomes across orthopaedic and rheumatology clinics. A pilot study at one site identified re-referral rates to orthopaedic/rheumatology services of patients managed by the APPs. In one year, 13,981 new patients accessed specialist orthopaedic and rheumatology consultations via the APP. Median wait time for an appointment was 5.6 months. Patients most commonly presented with knee (23%), lower back (22%) and shoulder (15%) disorders. APPs made autonomous clinical decisions regarding patient management at 77% of appointments, and managed patient care pathways without onward referral to Consultant Doctors in more than 80% of cases. Other onward clinical pathways recommended by APPs were: physiotherapy referrals (42%); clinical investigations (29%); injections administered (4%); and surgical listing (2%). Of those managed by the APP, the pilot study identified that only 6.5% of patients were re-referred within one year. This national evaluation of APP services demonstrated that the majority of patients assessed by an APP did not require onward referral for a Consultant Doctor appointment. Therefore, patients gained earlier access to orthopaedic and rheumatology consultations in secondary care, with most patients conservatively managed.

  16. Contrasting Perspectives Of Junior versus Senior NASA ISS Flight Controllers On Leadership And Cultural Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L.; Boyd, J. E.; Saylor, S.; Kanas, N.

    2007-01-01

    NASA flight controllers have always worked in a very demanding environment, but the International Space Station (ISS) poses even more challenges than prior missions. A recent NASA/Ames survey by Parke and Orasanu of NASA/Johnson flight controllers uncovered concerns about communications problems between American personnel and their international counterparts. To better understand these problems, we interviewed 14 senior and 12 junior ISS flight controllers at NASA/Johnson about leadership and cultural challenges they face and strategies for addressing these challenges. The qualitative interview data were coded and tabulated. Here we present quantitative analyses testing for differences between junior and senior controllers. Based on nonparametric statistical tests comparing responses across groups, the senior controllers were significantly more aware of the impact of working in dispersed teams, the context of constant change, and the upcoming multilateral challenges, while junior controllers were more aware of language and cultural issues. We consider our findings in light of other studies of controllers and other known differences between senior and junior controllers. For example, the fact that senior controllers had their formative early experience controlling pre-ISS short-duration Shuttle missions seems to have both positive and negative aspects, which are supported by our data. Our findings may also reflect gender differences, but we cannot unconfound this effect in our data because all the senior respondents were males. Many of the junior-senior differences are not only due to elapsed time on the job, but also due to a cohort effect. The findings of this study should be used for training curricula tailored differently for junior and senior controllers.

  17. Hybrid Control of Supply Chains: a Structured Exploration from a Systems Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. P. J. Grefen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Supply chains are becoming increasingly complex these days, both in the structure of the chains and in the need for fine-grained, real-time control. This development occurs in many industries, such as manufacturing, logistics, and the service industry. The increasing structural complexity is caused by larger numbers of participating companies in supply chains because of increasing complexity of products and services. Increasing requirements to control are caused by developments like mass-customization, pressure on delivery times, and smaller margins for waste. Maintaining well-structured strategic, tactic, and operational control over these complex supply chains is not an easy task – certainly as they are pressured by end-to-end synchronization requirements and just-in-time demands. Things become even more complex when chains need to be flexible to react to changing requirements to the products or services they deliver. To enable design of well-structured control, clear models of control topologies are required. In this paper, we address this need by exploring supply chain control topologies in an organized fashion. The exploration is based on integrating a supply chain model and a control model in two alternative ways to obtain two extreme models for supply chain control. These two models are next combined to obtain a hybrid chain control model in which control parameters can be adapted to accommodate different circumstances, hence facilitating agility in supply chains and networks. We apply the developed model to a number of case studies to show its usability. The contribution of this paper is the structured analysis of the design space for chain-level control models - not the description of individual new models.

  18. Floor Effect of PROMIS Depression CAT Associated With Hasty Completion in Orthopaedic Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guattery, Jason M; Dardas, Agnes Z; Kelly, Michael; Chamberlain, Aaron; McAndrew, Christopher; Calfee, Ryan P

    2018-04-01

    The Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) was developed to provide valid, reliable, and standardized measures to gather patient-reported outcomes for many health domains, including depression, independent of patient condition. Most studies confirming the performance of these measures were conducted with a consented, volunteer study population for testing. Using a study population that has undergone the process of informed consent may be differentiated from the validation group because they are educated specifically as to the purpose of the questions and they will not have answers recorded in their permanent health record. (1) When given as part of routine practice to an orthopaedic population, do PROMIS Physical Function and Depression item banks produce score distributions different than those produced by the populations used to calibrate and validate the item banks? (2) Does the presence of a nonnormal distribution in the PROMIS Depression scores in a clinical population reflect a deliberately hasty answering of questions by patients? (3) Are patients who are reporting minimal depressive symptoms by scoring the minimum score on the PROMIS Depression Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) distinct from other patients according to demographic data or their scores on other PROMIS assessments? Univariate descriptive statistics and graphic histograms were used to describe the frequency distribution of scores for the Physical Function and Depression item banks for all orthopaedic patients 18 years or older who had an outpatient visit between June 2015 and December 2016. The study population was then broken into two groups based on whether they indicated a lack of depressive symptoms and scored the minimum score (34.2) on the Depression CAT assessment (Floor Group) or not (Standard Group). The distribution of Physical Function CAT scores was compared between the two groups. Finally, a time-per-question value was calculated for both the Physical

  19. Action control processes in autism spectrum disorder--insights from a neurobiological and neuroanatomical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Witold X; Beste, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) encompass a range of syndromes that are characterized by social interaction impairments, verbal and nonverbal communication difficulties, and stereotypic or repetitive behaviours. Although there has been considerable progress in understanding the mechanisms underlying the changes in the 'social' and 'communicative' aspects of ASD, the neurofunctional architecture of repetitive and stereotypic behaviours, as well as other cognitive domains related to response and action control, remain poorly understood. Based on the findings of neurobiological and neuroanatomical alterations in ASD and the functional neuroanatomy and neurobiology of different action control functions, we emphasize that changes in action control processes, including response inhibition, conflict and response monitoring, task switching, dual-tasking, motor timing, and error monitoring, are important facets of ASD. These processes must be examined further to understand the executive control deficits in ASD that are related to stereotypic or repetitive behaviours as a major facet of ASD. The review shows that not all domains of action control are strongly affected in ASD. Several factors seem to determine the consistency with which alterations in cognitive control are reported. These factors relate to the relevance of neurobiological changes in ASD for the cognitive domains examined and in how far action control relies upon the adjustment of prior experience. Future directions and hypotheses are outlined that may guide basic and clinical research on action control in ASD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Exercising freedom and control in the supermarket from an overweight perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annemette

    2005-01-01

    choices. We cannot consume anything if we want to be or become someone! Thus consumption of goods may be described as an arena, where freedom of choice is enacted alongside self-control over what and how to consume. This paper provides examples of how self-control and freedom is exercised in the context...

  1. The design and operation of the THORP central control room: a human factors perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Julie.

    1996-01-01

    The new Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) Sellafield Site is now operational. This paper describes the Central Control Room (CCR), focusing on the control system components. Throughout the design, commissioning and operation of THORP, human factors played an important part. (author)

  2. Prospects and constraints in biofouling control at Madras Atomic Power Plant: a historical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azariah, Jayapaul; Nair, K.V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The paper describes the various aspects of Madras Atomic Power Station -its prospects and constraints in biofouling control. It reviews the achievements in biofouling control. It also includes current studies on barnacles and mussels, suspended particulate matter as an antifoulant, flow conditions and larval settlement and biofilm and larval adhesion along with recommendations. (V.R.). 21 refs

  3. Goal Orientations, Locus of Control and Academic Achievement in Prospective Teachers: An Individual Differences Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulus, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of the prospective teachers' locus of control in goal orientations and of both orientations in academic achievement. The participants were 270 undergraduate students studying in different majors at the Faculty of Education in Pamukkale University. Goal Orientations and Locus of Control Scales were…

  4. Modeling and Control Perspectives of Two-Phase Fluid Systems - with Applications to Bubble Columns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djordjevic, S.

    2011-01-01

    The recent progress in the chemical industry is now forcing engineers and physicists to get to deal with control-oriented modeling of material properties on microscopic scale inside reactors in order to build more efficient chemical plants. The control-oriented modeling provides a new way of

  5. How the impact of median neuropathy on sensorimotor control capability of hands for diabetes: an achievable assessment from functional perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haw-Yen Chiu

    Full Text Available To comprehend the sensorimotor control ability in diabetic hands, this study investigated the sensation, motor function and precision pinch performances derived from a pinch-holding-up activity (PHUA test of the hands of diabetic patients and healthy subjects. The precision, sensitivity and specificity of the PHUA test in the measurements of diabetic patients were also analyzed. We hypothesized that the diabetic hands would have impacts on the sensorimotor functions of the hand performances under functionally quantitative measurements. One hundred and fifty-nine patients with clinically defined diabetes mellitus (DM and 95 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included. Semmes-Weinstein monofilament (SWM, static and moving two-point discrimination (S2PD and M2PD, maximal pinch strength and precision pinch performance tests were conducted to evaluate the sensation, motor and sensorimotor status of the recruited hands. The results showed that there were significant differences (all p<0.05 in SWM, S2PD, M2PD and maximum pinch strength between the DM and control groups. A higher force ratio in the DM patients than in the controls (p<0.001 revealed a poor ability of pinch force adjustment in the DM patients. The percentage of maximal pinch strength was also significantly different (p<0.001 between the DM and control groups. The sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.85, 0.51, and 0.724, respectively, for the PHUA test. Statistically significant degradations in sensory and motor functions and sensorimotor control ability were observed in the hands of the diabetic patients. The PHUA test could be feasibly used as a clinical tool to determine the sensorimotor function of the hands of diabetic patients from a functional perspective.

  6. Patient perspectives of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and methods for improving pain control and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patak, Lance S; Tait, Alan R; Mirafzali, Leela; Morris, Michelle; Dasgupta, Sunavo; Brummett, Chad M

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to (1) identify patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) attributes that negatively impact patient satisfaction and ability to control pain while using PCA and (2) obtain data on patient perceptions of new PCA design features. We conducted a prospective survey study of postoperative pain control among patients using a PCA device. The survey was designed to evaluate patient satisfaction with pain control, understanding of PCA, difficulties using PCA, lockout-period management, and evaluation of new PCA design features. A total of 350 eligible patients completed the survey (91%). Patients who had difficulties using PCA were less satisfied (P PCA. Forty-nine percent of patients reported not knowing if they would receive medicine when they pushed the PCA button, and of these, 22% believed that this uncertainty made their pain worse. The majority of patients preferred the proposed PCA design features for easier use, including a light on the button, making it easier to find (57%), and a PCA button that vibrates (55%) or lights up (70%), alerting the patient that the PCA pump is able to deliver more medicine. A majority of patients, irrespective of their satisfaction with PCA, preferred a new PCA design. Certain attributes of current PCA technology may negatively impact patient experience, and modifications could potentially address these concerns and improve patient outcomes.

  7. Tobacco Control Measures to Reduce Socioeconomic Inequality in Smoking: The Necessity, Time-Course Perspective, and Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Takahiro; Iso, Hiroyasu; Brunner, Eric

    2018-04-05

    Previous systematic reviews of population-level tobacco control interventions and their effects on smoking inequality by socioeconomic factors concluded that tobacco taxation reduce smoking inequality by income (although this is not consistent for other socioeconomic factors, such as education). Inconsistent results have been reported for socioeconomic differences, especially for other tobacco control measures, such as smoke-free policies and anti-tobacco media campaigns. To understand smoking inequality itself and to develop strategies to reduce smoking inequality, knowledge of the underlying principles or mechanisms of the inequality over a long time-course may be important. For example, the inverse equity hypothesis recognizes that inequality may evolve in stages. New population-based interventions are initially primarily accessed by the affluent and well-educated, so there is an initial increase in socioeconomic inequality (early stage). These inequalities narrow when the deprived population can access the intervention after the affluent have gained maximum benefit (late stage). Following this hypothesis, all tobacco control measures may have the potential to reduce smoking inequality, if they continue for a long term, covering and reaching all socioeconomic subgroups. Re-evaluation of the impact of the interventions on smoking inequality using a long time-course perspective may lead to a favorable next step in equity effectiveness. Tackling socioeconomic inequality in smoking may be a key public health target for the reduction of inequality in health.

  8. Creatures of habit (and control: a multi-level learning perspective on the modulation of congruency effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eEgner

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The congruency sequence effect (CSE describes the finding that congruency effects in classic probes of selective attention (like the Stroop, Simon, and flanker tasks are smaller following an incongruent than following a congruent trial. The past two decades have generated a large literature on determinants and boundary conditions for the CSE and similar, congruency-proportion based modulations of congruency effects. A prolonged and heated theoretical discussion has been guided primarily by a historically motivated dichotomy between top-down control versus associative bottom-up explanations for these effects. In the present article, I attempt to integrate and contextualize the major empirical findings in this field by arguing that CSEs (and related effects are best understood as reflecting a composite of multiple levels of learning that differ in their level of abstraction. Specifically, learning does not only involve the trial-by-trial encoding, binding, and cued retrieval of specific stimulus-response associations, but also of more abstract trial features, including the spatial and temporal context in which a stimulus occurs, as well as internal states, like the experience of difficulty, and the attentional control settings that were employed in dealing with the stimulus. From this perspective, top-down control and bottom-up priming processes work in concert rather than in opposition. They represent different levels of abstraction in the same learning scheme and they serve a single, common goal: forming memory ensembles that will facilitate fast and appropriate responding to recurring stimuli or events in the environment.

  9. Affective science perspectives on cancer control: Strategically crafting a mutually beneficial research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Rebecca A.; McDonald, Paige Green; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2015-01-01

    Cancer control research involves the conduct of basic and applied behavioral and social sciences to reduce cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, and improve quality of life. Given the importance of behavior in cancer control, fundamental research is necessary to identify psychological mechanisms underlying cancer risk, prevention, and management behaviors. Cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment are often emotionally-laden. As such, affective science research to elucidate questions related to basic phenomenological nature of emotion, stress, and mood is necessary to understand how cancer control can be hindered or facilitated by emotional experiences. To date, the intersection of basic affective science research and cancer control remains largely unexplored. The goal of this paper is to outline key questions in the cancer control research domain that provide an ecologically valid context for new affective science discoveries. We also provide examples of ways in which basic affective discoveries could inform future cancer prevention and control research. These examples are not meant to be exhaustive or prescriptive, but instead are offered to generate creative thought about the promise of a cancer research context for answering basic affective science questions. Together, these examples provide a compelling argument for fostering collaborations between affective and cancer control scientists. PMID:25987511

  10. New Perspective on Psychosocial Distress in Patients with Dysphonia: The Moderating Role of Perceived Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Stephanie; Meredith, Liza; Peterson, Carol B; Frazier, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Although an association between psychosocial distress (depression, anxiety, somatization, and perceived stress) and voice disorders has been observed, little is known about the relationship between distress and patient-reported voice handicap. Furthermore, the psychological mechanisms underlying this relationship are poorly understood. Perceived control plays an important role in distress associated with other medical disorders. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the relationship between distress and patient-reported voice handicap and (2) examine the role of perceived control in this relationship. This is a cross-sectional study in a tertiary care academic voice clinic. Distress, perceived stress, voice handicap, and perceived control were measured using established assessment scales. Association was measured with Pearson correlation coefficients; moderation was assessed using multiple hierarchical regression. A total of 533 patients enrolled. Thirty-four percent of the patients met criteria for clinically significant distress (ie, depression, anxiety, and/or somatization). A weak association (r = 0.13; P = 0.003) was observed between severity of psychosocial distress and vocal handicap. Present perceived control was inversely associated with distress (r = -0.41; P moderated by perceived control (b for interaction term, -0.15; P moderated by perceived control. Vocal handicap was more related to distress among those with low perceived control; targeting this potential mechanism may facilitate new approaches for improved care. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Control of Networked Traffic Flow Distribution - A Stochastic Distribution System Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Aziz, H M Abdul [ORNL; Young, Stan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Patil, Sagar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2017-10-01

    Networked traffic flow is a common scenario for urban transportation, where the distribution of vehicle queues either at controlled intersections or highway segments reflect the smoothness of the traffic flow in the network. At signalized intersections, the traffic queues are controlled by traffic signal control settings and effective traffic lights control would realize both smooth traffic flow and minimize fuel consumption. Funded by the Energy Efficient Mobility Systems (EEMS) program of the Vehicle Technologies Office of the US Department of Energy, we performed a preliminary investigation on the modelling and control framework in context of urban network of signalized intersections. In specific, we developed a recursive input-output traffic queueing models. The queue formation can be modeled as a stochastic process where the number of vehicles entering each intersection is a random number. Further, we proposed a preliminary B-Spline stochastic model for a one-way single-lane corridor traffic system based on theory of stochastic distribution control.. It has been shown that the developed stochastic model would provide the optimal probability density function (PDF) of the traffic queueing length as a dynamic function of the traffic signal setting parameters. Based upon such a stochastic distribution model, we have proposed a preliminary closed loop framework on stochastic distribution control for the traffic queueing system to make the traffic queueing length PDF follow a target PDF that potentially realizes the smooth traffic flow distribution in a concerned corridor.

  12. An integrated system for dynamic control of auditory perspective in a multichannel sound field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Jason Andrew

    An integrated system providing dynamic control of sound source azimuth, distance and proximity to a room boundary within a simulated acoustic space is proposed for use in multichannel music and film sound production. The system has been investigated, implemented, and psychoacoustically tested within the ITU-R BS.775 recommended five-channel (3/2) loudspeaker layout. The work brings together physical and perceptual models of room simulation to allow dynamic placement of virtual sound sources at any location of a simulated space within the horizontal plane. The control system incorporates a number of modules including simulated room modes, "fuzzy" sources, and tracking early reflections, whose parameters are dynamically changed according to sound source location within the simulated space. The control functions of the basic elements, derived from theories of perception of a source in a real room, have been carefully tuned to provide efficient, effective, and intuitive control of a sound source's perceived location. Seven formal listening tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the algorithm design choices. The tests evaluated: (1) loudness calibration of multichannel sound images; (2) the effectiveness of distance control; (3) the resolution of distance control provided by the system; (4) the effectiveness of the proposed system when compared to a commercially available multichannel room simulation system in terms of control of source distance and proximity to a room boundary; (5) the role of tracking early reflection patterns on the perception of sound source distance; (6) the role of tracking early reflection patterns on the perception of lateral phantom images. The listening tests confirm the effectiveness of the system for control of perceived sound source distance, proximity to room boundaries, and azimuth, through fine, dynamic adjustment of parameters according to source location. All of the parameters are grouped and controlled together to

  13. A review on bicycle and motorcycle rider control with a perspective on handling qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijman, J. D. G.; Schwab, A. L.

    2013-11-01

    This paper is a review study on handling and control of bicycles and motorcycles, the so-called single-track vehicles. The first part gives a brief overview on the modelling of the dynamics of single-track vehicles and the experimental validation. The second part focusses on a review of modelling and measuring human rider control. The third part deals with the concepts of handling and manoeuvrability and their experimental validation. Parallels are drawn with the literature on aircraft handling and pilot models. The paper concludes with the open ends and promising directions for future work in the field of handling and control of single-track vehicles.

  14. PC-based input/output controllers from a VME perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been widely adopted in the accelerator community. Although EPICS is available on many platforms, the majority of sites have deployed VME- or VXI-based input output controllers running the vxWorks real time operating system. Recently, a hybrid approach using vxWorks on both PC and traditional platforms is being implemented at LANL. To illustrate these developments the author compares his recent experience deploying PC-based EPICS input output controllers with experience deploying similar systems based on traditional EPICS platforms

  15. Legislative proposal for a controlled foreign companies regime in Poland from an international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Małgorzata Hybka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tackling corporate profit shifting requires appropriate anti-avoidance measures. This article reviews one of these measures, a controlled foreign companies (corporations regime. It has been implemented in many countries, in some of them as early as the 1960s. The need for its introduction has also been expressed on many occasions by the Polish legislator. The article is composed of three sections. The first considers the reasons for the implementation of the analyzed regime. The second describes the controlled foreign corporation legislation in the USA and selected European Union member states. The last section is devoted to a bill on taxing controlled foreign companies in Poland.

  16. Major parasitic diseases of poverty in mainland China: perspectives for better control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Li, Ting-Ting; Huang, Si-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in the prevention, control, and elimination of human parasitic diseases in China in the past 60 years. However, parasitic diseases of poverty remain major causes of morbidity and mortality, and inflict enormous economic costs on societies.In this article, we review the prevalence rates, geographical distributions, epidemic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of parasitic diseases of poverty listed in the first issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty on 25 October 2012. We also address the challenges facing control of parasitic diseases of poverty and provide suggestions for better control.

  17. CREDIT CONTROL MANAGEMENT AND BUSINESS PERFORMANCE : THE MALAYSIAN FAMILY SME PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Wong Sek Khin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between control management and family business performance in the Malaysian context. It has two objectives, the first being to determine the relationship of organizational credit control policy and procedures, employee development and motivation, and intelligence collection systems to subsequent collection reports in Malaysian family SMEs. The second objective is to investigate the moderating effect of participation in decision-making and work effort towards innovation and business performance. This is a descriptive study involving 90 senior executives employed in 90 Malaysian family SMEs/firms. A correlation analysis from this study confirmed previous researchers' observations that high-level organizational commitment to credit control management is linked to improvements in business performance. The results suggest that three components - credit policy, employee development, and intelligence collection systems - are the most important predictors for the efficiency and effectiveness of credit control management.

  18. Control of Discrete-Event Systems Automata and Petri Net Perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Manuel; Schuppen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Control of Discrete-event Systems provides a survey of the most important topics in the discrete-event systems theory with particular focus on finite-state automata, Petri nets and max-plus algebra. Coverage ranges from introductory material on the basic notions and definitions of discrete-event systems to more recent results. Special attention is given to results on supervisory control, state estimation and fault diagnosis of both centralized and distributed/decentralized systems developed in the framework of the Distributed Supervisory Control of Large Plants (DISC) project. Later parts of the text are devoted to the study of congested systems though fluidization, an over approximation allowing a much more efficient study of observation and control problems of timed Petri nets. Finally, the max-plus algebraic approach to the analysis and control of choice-free systems is also considered. Control of Discrete-event Systems provides an introduction to discrete-event systems for readers that are not familiar wi...

  19. Internally-directed cognition and mindfulness:An integrative perspective derived from reactive versus predictive control systems theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattie eTops

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we will apply the Predictive And Reactive Control Systems (PARCS theory as a framework that integrates competing theories of neural substrates of awareness by describing the default mode network (DMN and anterior insula (AI as parts of two different behavioral and homeostatic control systems. The DMN, a network that becomes active at rest when there is no external stimulation or task to perform, has been implicated in self-reflective awareness and prospection. By contrast, the AI is associated with awareness and task-related attention. This has led to competing theories stressing the role of the DMN in self-awareness versus the role of interoceptive and emotional information integration in the AI in awareness of the emotional moment. In PARCS, the respective functions of the DMN and AI in a specific control system explains their association with different qualities of awareness, and how mental states can shift from one state (e.g., prospective self-reflection to the other (e.g., awareness of the emotional moment depending on the relative dominance of control systems. These shifts between reactive and predictive control are part of processes that enable the intake of novel information, integration of this novel information within existing knowledge structures, and the creation of a continuous personal context in which novel information can be integrated and understood. As such, PARCS can explain key characteristics of mental states, such as their temporal and spatial focus (e.g., a focus on the here and now vs. the future; a 1st person vs. a 3rd person perspective. PARCS further relates mental states to brain states and functions, such as activation of the DMN or hemispheric asymmetry in frontal cortical functions. Together, PARCS deepens the understanding of a broad range of mental states, including mindfulness, mind wandering, rumination, autobiographical memory, imagery, and the experience of self.

  20. Patient Perspectives of Dignity, Autonomy and Control at the End of Life: Systematic Review and Meta-Ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Prat, Andrea; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Porta-Sales, Josep; Escribano, Xavier; Balaguer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Research in the end-of-life context has explored the sense of dignity experienced by patients with advanced disease, examining the factors associated with it. Whereas certain perspectives regard dignity as an intrinsic quality, independent of external factors, in the clinical setting it is generally equated with the person's sense of autonomy and control, and it appears to be related to patients' quality of life. This study aims to explore the relationship between perceived dignity, autonomy and sense of control in patients at the end of life. We conducted a systematic review and meta-ethnography using reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis. The search strategy used MeSH terms in combination with free-text searching of the Pubmed, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases, from their inception until 2015. This identified 186 articles, after excluding duplicates. The inclusion criterion was primary qualitative studies in which dignity, autonomy and control at the end of life were explored. Studies were evaluated using the CASP guidelines. Twenty-one studies recording the experiences of 400 participants were identified. Three themes emerged: a) dignity mediated by the loss of functionality, linked to the loss of control; b) dignity as identity; and c) autonomy as a determining factor of perceived dignity, understood as the desire for control over the dying process and the desire for self-determination. We propose an explanatory model which highlights that those patients with an intrinsic sense of dignity maintained a positive view of themselves in the face of their illness. This synthesis illustrates how dignity and autonomy are intertwined and can be perceived as a multidimensional concept, one that is close to the notion of personal identity. The ability to regard dignity as an intrinsic quality has a positive impact on patients, and the design of care strategies should take this into account.

  1. Patient Perspectives of Dignity, Autonomy and Control at the End of Life: Systematic Review and Meta-Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Prat, Andrea; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Porta-Sales, Josep; Escribano, Xavier; Balaguer, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Background Research in the end-of-life context has explored the sense of dignity experienced by patients with advanced disease, examining the factors associated with it. Whereas certain perspectives regard dignity as an intrinsic quality, independent of external factors, in the clinical setting it is generally equated with the person’s sense of autonomy and control, and it appears to be related to patients’ quality of life. This study aims to explore the relationship between perceived dignity, autonomy and sense of control in patients at the end of life. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-ethnography using reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis. The search strategy used MeSH terms in combination with free-text searching of the Pubmed, Web of Science, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Cochrane databases, from their inception until 2015. This identified 186 articles, after excluding duplicates. The inclusion criterion was primary qualitative studies in which dignity, autonomy and control at the end of life were explored. Studies were evaluated using the CASP guidelines. Results Twenty-one studies recording the experiences of 400 participants were identified. Three themes emerged: a) dignity mediated by the loss of functionality, linked to the loss of control; b) dignity as identity; and c) autonomy as a determining factor of perceived dignity, understood as the desire for control over the dying process and the desire for self-determination. We propose an explanatory model which highlights that those patients with an intrinsic sense of dignity maintained a positive view of themselves in the face of their illness. Conclusion This synthesis illustrates how dignity and autonomy are intertwined and can be perceived as a multidimensional concept, one that is close to the notion of personal identity. The ability to regard dignity as an intrinsic quality has a positive impact on patients, and the design of care strategies should take this into account

  2. Comparison of health literacy in privately insured and public hospital orthopaedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosic, Filip; Porter, Tabitha; Norsworthy, Cameron; Price, Rohan; Bedi, Harvinder

    2018-05-14

    Objective The aim of the present study was to quantify and compare patient health literacy between privately insured and public orthopaedic patients. Methods As part of the present cross-sectional study, elective postoperative orthopaedic patients across two sites were recruited and asked to complete a questionnaire at the first postoperative out-patient review. Patients were divided into three groups: (1) a public group (Public); (2) a private group (Private-pre); and (3) a private group that completed the questionnaire immediately after the out-patient review (Private-post). The questionnaire consisted of six questions regarding surgical management, expected recovery time and postoperative instructions. Patients were further asked to grade their satisfaction regarding information received throughout their management. Results In all, 150 patients completed the questionnaire, 50 in each of the three groups. Patients in the Public, Private-pre and Private-post groups answered a mean 2.74, 3.24 and 4.70 of 6 questions correctly respectively. The Private-pre group was 1.46-fold more likely to demonstrate correct health literacy than the Public group, whereas the Private-post group was 2.44-fold more likely to demonstrate improved health literacy than the Private-pre group. Patient satisfaction with information received was not associated with health literacy. Conclusion Limited health literacy in orthopaedic patients continues to be an area of concern. Both private and public orthopaedic patients demonstrated poor health literacy, but private patients demonstrated significant improvement after the out-patient review. What is known about the topic? Limited health literacy is a growing public health issue worldwide, with previous literature demonstrating a prevalence of low health literacy of 26% and marginal health literacy of 20% among all patient populations. Of concern, limited health literacy has been shown to result in a range of adverse health outcomes, including

  3. The Implications of a New ERa in Arms Control -- Perspectives and Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mladineo, Stephen V.; Durbin, Karyn R.; Indusi, Joseph P.; Smoot, John L.; Vannoni, Michael G.; Satkowiak, Lawrence J.

    2004-01-01

    On November 13, 2003 the INMM hosted a workshop in Washington, DC entitled 'The Implications of a New Era in Arms Control on Regional Nonproliferation and Nuclear Materials Management'. In this paper we summarize the workshop's highlights and provide our analysis of the dominant themes. Ambassador Linton Brooks, Administrator of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA), delivered the keynote address and focused on four points that are key to understanding the new era: (1) The demise of traditional East/West arms control; (2) The new strategic relationship between Russia and the United States; (3) The blurring of the distinction between nonproliferation and counter-terrorism; (4) The growing recognition that the nonproliferation regime is no longer adequate and needs to be strengthened. He issued a set of challenges to the workshop participants: if his premises were right, what should replace the lexicon of arms control? He described a four-part strategy for nuclear materials protection in Russia, and asked if that model should be replicated globally - potentially by leveraging the new relationship with Russia. Should it be through the IAEA, bilaterally, or some other mechanism? Asserting that the old Nonproliferation Treaty regime was inadequate, he asked what should replace it, and how do we bring it about? Three panel discussions were presented: (1) Implications of a New Era in US/Russia Arms Control Agreements; (2) Implications of a New in Arms Control Upon Regional Nuclear Nonproliferation: South Asia/East Asia/Middle East; and (3) Nuclear Materials Management in a New Era of Arms Control In the first panel, Daryl Kimball, Executive Director of the Arms Control Association argued that arms control agreements provided predictability in the reduction of arms, and had been successful in advancing the methods of verification. Lucas Fischer, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Arms Control at the US State Department acknowledged that INF and START provide a basis

  4. A sensemaking perspective on framing the mental picture of air traffic controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakis, Stathis; Kontogiannis, Tom

    2013-03-01

    It has long been recognized that controller strategies are based on a 'mental picture' or representation of traffic situations. Earlier studies indicated that controllers tend to maintain a selective representation of traffic flows based on a few salient traffic features that point out to interesting events (e.g., potential conflicts). A field study is presented in this paper that examines salient features or 'knowledge variables' that constitute the building blocks of controller mental pictures. Verbal reports from participants, a field experiment and observations of real-life scenarios provided insights into the cognitive processes that shape and reframe the mental pictures of controllers. Several cognitive processes (i.e., problem detection, elaboration, reframing and replanning) have been explored within a particular framework of sensemaking stemming from the data/frame theory (Klein et al., 2007). Cognitive maps, representing standard and non-standard air traffic flows, emerged as an explanatory framework for making sense of traffic patterns and for reframing mental pictures. The data/frame theory proved to be a useful theoretical tool for investigating complex cognitive phenomena. The findings of the study have implications for the design of training curricula and decision support systems in air traffic control systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. A review of sheep pox and goat pox: perspective of their control and eradication in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Mirzaie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sheep pox and goat pox (SGP of small ruminants are most severing pox diseases of domestic animals, and they have a very important role in agricultural economy. Thereby, SGP are included in the notifiable diseases of Office International des Epizooties (OIE. Time and place distributions of these diseases are relatively stable worldwide. Transportation of infected animals could spread these viruses to the new areas. In most countries in which capripox are enzootic, vaccination and bio-security are the only two main control measures. SGP control programs have been commenced about 50 years ago in Iran, and there is a good situation for eradication of it. In this review, readers can find latest information in some essential aspects of etiology, distribution, transmission, and control of the diseases. Besides, current situation of the disease in Iran has been described, which perhaps are similar to the other endemic areas in the world.

  6. Decision making, impulse control and loss of willpower to resist drugs: a neurocognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechara, Antoine

    2005-11-01

    Here I argue that addicted people become unable to make drug-use choices on the basis of long-term outcome, and I propose a neural framework that explains this myopia for future consequences. I suggest that addiction is the product of an imbalance between two separate, but interacting, neural systems that control decision making: an impulsive, amygdala system for signaling pain or pleasure of immediate prospects, and a reflective, prefrontal cortex system for signaling pain or pleasure of future prospects. After an individual learns social rules, the reflective system controls the impulsive system via several mechanisms. However, this control is not absolute; hyperactivity within the impulsive system can override the reflective system. I propose that drugs can trigger bottom-up, involuntary signals originating from the amygdala that modulate, bias or even hijack the goal-driven cognitive resources that are needed for the normal operation of the reflective system and for exercising the willpower to resist drugs.

  7. Balance control during gait initiation: State-of-the-art and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiou, Eric; Caderby, Teddy; Delafontaine, Arnaud; Fourcade, Paul; Honeine, Jean-Louis

    2017-11-18

    It is well known that balance control is affected by aging, neurological and orthopedic conditions. Poor balance control during gait and postural maintenance are associated with disability, falls and increased mortality. Gait initiation - the transient period between the quiet standing posture and steady state walking - is a functional task that is classically used in the literature to investigate how the central nervous system (CNS) controls balance during a whole-body movement involving change in the base of support dimensions and center of mass progression. Understanding how the CNS in able-bodied subjects exerts this control during such a challenging task is a pre-requisite to identifying motor disorders in populations with specific impairments of the postural system. It may also provide clinicians with objective measures to assess the efficiency of rehabilitation programs and better target interventions according to individual impairments. The present review thus proposes a state-of-the-art analysis on: (1) the balance control mechanisms in play during gait initiation in able bodied subjects and in the case of some frail populations; and (2) the biomechanical parameters used in the literature to quantify dynamic stability during gait initiation. Balance control mechanisms reviewed in this article included anticipatory postural adjustments, stance leg stiffness, foot placement, lateral ankle strategy, swing foot strike pattern and vertical center of mass braking. Based on this review, the following viewpoints were put forward: (1) dynamic stability during gait initiation may share a principle of homeostatic regulation similar to most physiological variables, where separate mechanisms need to be coordinated to ensure stabilization of vital variables, and consequently; and (2) rehabilitation interventions which focus on separate or isolated components of posture, balance, or gait may limit the effectiveness of current clinical practices.

  8. Overview of system of accounting and control of nuclear materials in Belarus and its development perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudakou, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of technical and software means involved in the system of accounting and control of nuclear materials (SSAC) in the Republic of Belarus. The existing SSAC and its main components are described, namely legal framework, requirements for accounting and control at the facility level, and reporting procedures. Further development of the SSAC is outlined along such lines as improvement of accounting information processing, measuring capabilities, training of personnel, upgrading of regulatory practice, and strengthening of international co-operation. The 2000 year problem concerning the SSAC is briefly addressed. (author)

  9. Quality of life during orthopaedic training and academic practice: part 2: spouses and significant others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, M Catherine; Sotile, Wayne; Sotile, Mary O; Rubash, Harry; Barrack, Robert L

    2012-10-03

    Orthopaedic residents and attending physicians who report having a supportive spouse show lower levels of burnout and psychological distress than those without supportive spouses. However, little is known about the experiences of the spouses. This nationwide study examines burnout, psychological distress, and marital satisfaction of the spouses and significant others (collectively referred to hereafter as spouses) of orthopaedists in training and in orthopaedic practice in an academic setting. Employing previously reported methodology, 259 spouses of orthopaedic residents and 169 spouses of full-time orthopaedic faculty completed a voluntary, anonymous survey. The survey included three validated instruments (the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the General Psychological Health Questionnaire-12, and the Revised Dyadic Adjustment Scale) and three novel question sets addressing demographic information, relationship issues, stress, and work/life balance. Psychological distress was noted in 18% of resident spouses compared with only 10% of faculty spouses (p = 0.014). Resident spouses reported greater loneliness (p < 0.0009) and stress (p = 0.03) than faculty spouses. Among working spouses, 30% of resident spouses and 13% of faculty spouses showed high levels of emotional exhaustion (p < 0.003). Twenty-eight percent of employed resident spouses and 5% of employed faculty spouses showed problematic levels of depersonalization (p < 0.0001). Twenty-six percent of employed resident spouses and 12% of employed faculty spouses showed a diminished sense of personal accomplishment (p = 0.012). Marital satisfaction was high for both resident and faculty spouses. Decreased satisfaction correlated with excessive mate irritability and fatigue that precluded their mate's involvement in family activities. A gratifying sex life, full-time work outside the home, and spending more than ninety minutes a day with their mate correlated significantly with marital satisfaction. Many orthopaedic

  10. What factors influence the production of orthopaedic research in East Africa? A qualitative analysis of interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Iain S; Sonshine, Daniel B; Akhavan, Sina; Slade Shantz, Angelique; Caldwell, Amber; Slade Shantz, Jesse; Gosselin, Richard A; Coughlin, R Richard

    2015-06-01

    Research addressing the burden of musculoskeletal disease in low- and middle-income countries does not reflect the magnitude of the epidemic in these countries as only 9% of the world's biomedical resources are devoted to addressing problems that affect the health of 90% of the world's population. Little is known regarding the barriers to and drivers of orthopaedic surgery research in such resource-poor settings, the knowledge of which would help direct specific interventions for increasing research capacity and help surgeons from high-income countries support the efforts of our colleagues in low- and middle-income countries. We sought to identify through surveying academic orthopaedic surgeons in East Africa: (1) barriers impeding research, (2) factors that support or drive research, and (3) factors that were identified by some surgeons as barriers and others as drivers (what we term barrier-driver overlap) as they considered the production of clinical research in resource-poor environments. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 21 orthopaedic surgeon faculty members at four academic medical centers in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Qualitative content analysis of the interviews was conducted using methods based in grounded theory. Grounded theory begins with qualitative data, such as interview transcripts, and analyzes the data for repeated ideas or concepts which then are coded and grouped into categories which allow for identification of subjects or problems that may not have been apparent previously to the interviewer. We identified and quantified 19 barriers to and 21 drivers of orthopaedic surgery research (mentioned n = 1688 and n = 1729, respectively). Resource, research process, and institutional domains were identified to categorize the barriers (n = 7, n = 5, n = 7, respectively) and drivers (n = 7, n = 8, n = 6, respectively). Resource barriers (46%) were discussed more often by interview subjects compared with the

  11. Evaluation of the content and accessibility of web sites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahey, Mary K; Gosselin, Michelle M; Fadale, Paul D

    2013-06-19

    The Internet is a common source of information for orthopaedic residents applying for sports medicine fellowships, with the web sites of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) and the San Francisco Match serving as central databases. We sought to evaluate the web sites for accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships with regard to content and accessibility. We reviewed the existing web sites of the ninety-five accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships included in the AOSSM and San Francisco Match databases from February to March 2012. A Google search was performed to determine the overall accessibility of program web sites and to supplement information obtained from the AOSSM and San Francisco Match web sites. The study sample consisted of the eighty-seven programs whose web sites connected to information about the fellowship. Each web site was evaluated for its informational value. Of the ninety-five programs, fifty-one (54%) had links listed in the AOSSM database. Three (3%) of all accredited programs had web sites that were linked directly to information about the fellowship. Eighty-eight (93%) had links listed in the San Francisco Match database; however, only five (5%) had links that connected directly to information about the fellowship. Of the eighty-seven programs analyzed in our study, all eighty-seven web sites (100%) provided a description of the program and seventy-six web sites (87%) included information about the application process. Twenty-one web sites (24%) included a list of current fellows. Fifty-six web sites (64%) described the didactic instruction, seventy (80%) described team coverage responsibilities, forty-seven (54%) included a description of cases routinely performed by fellows, forty-one (47%) described the role of the fellow in seeing patients in the office, eleven (13%) included call responsibilities, and seventeen (20%) described a rotation schedule. Two Google searches identified direct links for

  12. Evaluation of Pediatric Questions on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination-An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Nunez, Leah; Barfield, William R; Mooney, James F

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric orthopaedics is tested frequently on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE). The most recent data on the pediatrics section of the OITE were generated from content 10 years old. The purpose of this study is to assess the pediatric orthopaedic questions on the 2011 to 2014 OITE, and to compare question categories and cognitive taxonomy with previous data. Four years (2011 to 2014) of OITE questions, answers, and references were reviewed. The number of pediatric questions per year was recorded, as well as presence of a clinical photo or imaging modality. Each question was categorized and assigned a cognitive taxonomy level. Categories included: knowledge; knowledge-treatment modalities; diagnosis; diagnosis/recognition of associated conditions; diagnosis/further studies; and diagnosis/treatment. Cognitive taxonomy levels included: simple recall, interpretation of data, and advanced problem-solving. The 3 most commonly covered topics were upper extremity trauma (17.4%), scoliosis (10.1%), and developmental dysplasia of the hip (5.7%). Compared with previous data, the percentage of pediatric questions was constant (13% vs. 14%). Categorically, the more recent OITE examinations contained significantly fewer questions testing simple knowledge (19% vs. 39%, P=0.0047), and significantly more questions testing knowledge of treatment modalities (17% vs. 9%, P=0.016) and diagnosis with associated conditions (19% vs. 9%, P=0.0034). Regarding cognitive taxonomy, there was a significant increase in the average number of questions that required advanced problem-solving (57% vs. 46%, P=0.048). Significantly more questions utilized clinical photographs and imaging studies (62% vs. 48%, P=0.012). The most common reference materials provided to support correct responses included Lovell and Winter's Pediatric Orthopaedics (25.7%) and the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (23.4%). Although the percentage of pediatric questions on the OITE has remained essentially

  13. INNOVATIVE AND INDUSTRIAL-PERFORMANCE IN PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH-AND-DEVELOPMENT, A MANAGEMENT CONTROL PERSPECTIVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OMTA, SWF; BOUTER, LM; VANENGELEN, JML

    In this paper management control is related to innovative and industrial performance in 14 non-biotech pharmaceutical companies. The study consisted of questionnaires, sent to the heads of the different research departments of European research laboratories of leading pharmaceutical companies,

  14. A National Residue Control Plan from the analytical perspective-The Brazilian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauricio, Angelo de Q; Lins, Erick S.; Alvarenga, Marcelo B.

    2009-01-01

    Food safety is a strategic topic entailing not only national public health aspects but also competitiveness in international trade. An important component of any food safety program is the control and monitoring of residues posed by certain substances involved in food production. In turn, a National Residue Control Plan (NRCP) relies on an appropriate laboratory network, not only to generate analytical results, but also more broadly to verify and co-validate the controls built along the food production chain. Therefore laboratories operating under a NRCP should work in close cooperation with inspection bodies, fostering the critical alignment of the whole system with the principles of risk analysis. Beyond producing technically valid results, these laboratories should arguably be able to assist in the prediction and establishment of targets for official control. In pursuit of analytical excellence, the Brazilian government has developed a strategic plan for Official Agricultural Laboratories. Inserted in a national agenda for agricultural risk analysis, the plan has succeeded in raising laboratory budget by approximately 200%, it has started a rigorous program for personnel capacity-building, it has initiated strategic cooperation with international reference centres, and finally, it has completely renewed instrumental resources and rapidly triggered a program aimed at full laboratory compliance with ISO/IEC 17025 requirements

  15. A National Residue Control Plan from the analytical perspective--the Brazilian case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Angelo de Q; Lins, Erick S; Alvarenga, Marcelo B

    2009-04-01

    Food safety is a strategic topic entailing not only national public health aspects but also competitiveness in international trade. An important component of any food safety program is the control and monitoring of residues posed by certain substances involved in food production. In turn, a National Residue Control Plan (NRCP) relies on an appropriate laboratory network, not only to generate analytical results, but also more broadly to verify and co-validate the controls built along the food production chain. Therefore laboratories operating under a NRCP should work in close cooperation with inspection bodies, fostering the critical alignment of the whole system with the principles of risk analysis. Beyond producing technically valid results, these laboratories should arguably be able to assist in the prediction and establishment of targets for official control. In pursuit of analytical excellence, the Brazilian government has developed a strategic plan for Official Agricultural Laboratories. Inserted in a national agenda for agricultural risk analysis, the plan has succeeded in raising laboratory budget by approximately 200%, it has started a rigorous program for personnel capacity-building, it has initiated strategic cooperation with international reference centres, and finally, it has completely renewed instrumental resources and rapidly triggered a program aimed at full laboratory compliance with ISO/IEC 17025 requirements.

  16. A National Residue Control Plan from the analytical perspective-The Brazilian case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauricio, Angelo de Q [Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply of Brazil, Esplanada dos Ministerios, Bloco D, Annex B, Room 436, Zip code 70043-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)], E-mail: angelo.mauricio@agricultura.gov.br; Lins, Erick S.; Alvarenga, Marcelo B. [Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply of Brazil, Esplanada dos Ministerios, Bloco D, Annex B, Room 436, Zip code 70043-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2009-04-01

    Food safety is a strategic topic entailing not only national public health aspects but also competitiveness in international trade. An important component of any food safety program is the control and monitoring of residues posed by certain substances involved in food production. In turn, a National Residue Control Plan (NRCP) relies on an appropriate laboratory network, not only to generate analytical results, but also more broadly to verify and co-validate the controls built along the food production chain. Therefore laboratories operating under a NRCP should work in close cooperation with inspection bodies, fostering the critical alignment of the whole system with the principles of risk analysis. Beyond producing technically valid results, these laboratories should arguably be able to assist in the prediction and establishment of targets for official control. In pursuit of analytical excellence, the Brazilian government has developed a strategic plan for Official Agricultural Laboratories. Inserted in a national agenda for agricultural risk analysis, the plan has succeeded in raising laboratory budget by approximately 200%, it has started a rigorous program for personnel capacity-building, it has initiated strategic cooperation with international reference centres, and finally, it has completely renewed instrumental resources and rapidly triggered a program aimed at full laboratory compliance with ISO/IEC 17025 requirements.

  17. Controlling thought and action : a perspective from khat users and cocaine users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz Muñoz, Manuel Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that control thought and action vary with the fluctuating and dynamic nature of both internal physiological states and external environmental constraints. Psychoactive drugs have the ability to alter mood state or behavior by acting directly on these mechanisms. The alteration of

  18. Perceived behavioral control as a potential precursor of walking three times a week: Patient's perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Background Behavior change theories can identify people’s main motivations to engage in recommended health practices and thus provide better tools to design interventions, particularly human centered design interventions. Objectives This study had two objectives: (a) to identify salient beliefs about walking three times a week for 30 minutes nonstop among patients with hypertension in a low-resource setting and, (b) to measure the relationships among intentions, attitudes, perceived social pressure and perceived behavioral control about this behavior. Methods Face-to-face interviews with 34 people living with hypertension were conducted in September-October 2011 in Lima, Peru, and data analysis was performed in 2015. The Reasoned Action Approach was used to study the people’s decisions to walk. We elicited people’s salient beliefs and measured the theoretical constructs associated with this behavior. Results Results pointed at salient key behavioral, normative and control beliefs. In particular, perceived behavioral control appeared as an important determinant of walking and a small set of control beliefs were identified as potential targets of health communication campaigns, including (not) having someone to walk with, having work or responsibilities, or having no time. Conclusions This theory-based study with a focus on end-users provides elements to inform the design of an intervention that would motivate people living with hypertension to walk on a regular basis in low-resource settings. PMID:29451917

  19. Polytobacco Use and the "Customization Generation"--New Perspectives for Tobacco Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Kimberly; Pearson, Jennifer L.; Villanti, Andrea C.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the United States observed a significant uptake in concurrent use of multiple tobacco products and alternative nicotine delivery devices among youth--a phenomenon identified as polytobacco use--making tobacco control efforts more complex for clinicians, policy makers, and scientists, alike.The present commentary stimulates new…

  20. Self-control conflict in the eating domain : A cognitive, affective, and behavioral perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, D.

    2017-01-01

    Sometimes we are tempted to do one thing (e.g., order the burger) but know we should do another (e.g., choose a healthier alternative). Such self-control conflicts, moments in which an impulse and a higher order goal are in conflict, are pervasive in everyday life. They are at the heart of the

  1. Revisiting the Praise Paradox: An Action-Control Perspective on Negative Affect and Idea Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomberg, Carina; Klyver, Kim

    negative affect and idea generation. The patterns we identify provide a detailed understanding of how individuals’ action control determines the kind of feedback needed to increase originality. Thereby, we provide important new insights for research on the generation of original ideas that are necessary...... for entrepreneurs and organizations that aim to generate novelty and differentiate themselves from others....

  2. Hybrid control of supply chains : a structured exploration from a systems perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grefen, P.W.P.J.; Dijkman, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Supply chains are becoming increasingly complex these days, both in the structure of the chains and in the need for fine-grained, real-time control. This development occurs in many industries, such as manufacturing, logistics, and the service industry. The increasing structural complexity is caused

  3. E-Government controls in service-oriented auditing perspective : Beyond single window

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhsh, F.A.; Weigand, H.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas e-government used to be focused mainly on digitalizing documents, the attention is currently shifting to the question how the main governmental functions service, care and control can be realized in the best way in an information age. In this respect, e-customs is a case in point. Worldwide

  4. Complementary Roles of Care and Behavioral Control in Classroom Management: The Self-Determination Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Youyan; Lau, Shun

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how classroom management practices--care and behavioral control--were differentially associated with students' engagement, misbehavior, and satisfaction with school, using a large representative sample of 3196 Grade 9 students from 117 classes in Singapore. Results of hierarchical linear modeling showed differential relations.…

  5. Cost-effectiveness of preventive case management for parents with a mental illness: a randomized controlled trial from three economic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Henny J; Drost, Ruben M W A; Paulus, Aggie T G; Ruwaard, Dirk; Hosman, Clemens M H; Janssens, Jan M A M; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2016-07-07

    The children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI) are at increased risk for developing costly psychiatric disorders because of multiple risk factors which threaten parenting quality and thereby child development. Preventive basic care management (PBCM) is an intervention aimed at reducing risk factors and addressing the needs of COPMI-families in different domains. The intervention may lead to financial consequences in the healthcare sector and in other sectors, also known as inter-sectoral costs and benefits (ICBs). The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of PBCM from three perspectives: a narrow healthcare perspective, a social care perspective (including childcare costs) and a broad societal perspective (including all ICBs). Effects on parenting quality (as measured by the HOME) and costs during an 18-month period were studied in in a randomized controlled trial. Families received PBCM (n = 49) or care as usual (CAU) (n = 50). For all three perspectives, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Stochastic uncertainty in the data was dealt with using non-parametric bootstraps. Sensitivity analyses included calculating ICERs excluding cost outliers, and making an adjustment for baseline cost differences. Parenting quality improved in the PBCM group and declined in the CAU group, and PBCM was shown to be more costly than CAU. ICERs differ from 461 Euros (healthcare perspective) to 215 Euros (social care perspective) to 175 Euros (societal perspective) per one point improvement on the HOME T-score. The results of the sensitivity analyses, based on complete cases and excluding cost outliers, support the finding that the ICER is lower when adopting a broader perspective. The subgroup analysis and the analysis with baseline adjustments resulted in higher ICERs. This study is the first economic evaluation of family-focused preventive basic care management for COPMI in psychiatric and family services. The effects

  6. An evaluation of orthopaedic nurses’ participation in an educational intervention promoting research utilization – A triangulation convergence model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2016-01-01

    Aims and objectives To describe the orthopaedic nurses' experiences regarding the relevance of an educational intervention and their personal and contextual barriers to participation in the intervention. Background One of the largest barriers against nurses' research usage in clinical practice...... is the lack of participation. A previous survey identified 32 orthopaedic nurses as interested in participating in nursing research. An educational intervention was conducted to increase the orthopaedic nurses' research knowledge and competencies. However, only an average of six nurses participated. Design...... A triangulation convergence model was applied through a mixed methods design to combine quantitative results and qualitative findings for evaluation. Methods Data were collected from 2013–2014 from 32 orthopaedic nurses in a Danish regional hospital through a newly developed 21-item questionnaire and two focus...

  7. Three-dimensional image display by CT data processing and clinical applications in orthopaedics and craniofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zonneveld, F.W.; Akkerveeken, P.F. van; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The methods of generating three-dimensional images from two-dimensional CT data are described. Four cases are reported explaining its use in the planning of orthopaedic and craniofacial surgery. (orig.) [de

  8. Challenges and prospects for the control of foot-and-mouth disease: an African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maree FF

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Francois F Maree,1,2 Christopher J Kasanga,3, Katherine A Scott,1 Pamela A Opperman,1,2 Melanie Chitray,1,2, Abraham K Sangula,4 Raphael Sallu,3 Yona Sinkala,5 Philemon N Wambura,3 Donald P King,6 David J Paton,6 Mark M Rweyemamu,3 1Transboundary Animal Diseases Programme, Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute, Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort, Pretoria, South Africa; 2Department of Microbiology and Plant Pathology, Faculty of Agricultural and Natural Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa; 3Southern African Centre for Infectious Diseases Surveillance, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro, Tanzania; 4Foot-and-Mouth Disease Laboratory, Embakasi, Nairobi, Kenya; 5Department of Disease Control, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia; 6The Pirbright Institute, Pirbright, Surrey, UK Abstract: The epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD in Africa is unique in the sense that six of the seven serotypes of FMD viruses (Southern African Territories [SAT] 1, SAT2, SAT3, A, O, and C, with the exception of Asia-1, have occurred in the last decade. Due to underreporting of FMD, the current strains circulating throughout sub-Saharan Africa are in many cases unknown. For SAT1, SAT2, and serotype A viruses, the genetic diversity is reflected in antigenic variation, and indications are that vaccine strains may be needed for each topotype. This has serious implications for control using vaccines and for choice of strains to include in regional antigen banks. The epidemiology is further complicated by the fact that SAT1, SAT2, and SAT3 viruses are maintained and spread by wildlife, persistently infecting African buffalo in particular. Although the precise mechanism of transmission of FMD from buffalo to cattle is not well understood, it is facilitated by direct contact between these two species. Once cattle are infected they may maintain SAT infections without the further involvement of buffalo. No

  9. Local Voltage Control in Distribution Networks: A Game-Theoretic Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xinyang; Tian, Jie; Chen, Lijun; Dall' Anese, Emiliano

    2016-11-21

    Inverter-based voltage regulation is gaining importance to alleviate emerging reliability and power-quality concerns related to distribution systems with high penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems. This paper seeks contribution in the domain of reactive power compensation by establishing stability of local Volt/VAr controllers. In lieu of the approximate linear surrogate used in the existing work, the paper establishes existence and uniqueness of an equilibrium point using nonlinear AC power flow model. Key to this end is to consider a nonlinear dynamical system with non-incremental local Volt/VAr control, cast the Volt/VAr dynamics as a game, and leverage the fixed-point theorem as well as pertinent contraction mapping argument. Numerical examples are provided to complement the analytical results.

  10. Ideal gender identity related to parent images and locus of control: Jungian and social learning perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Hiroko; Keskinen, Soili

    2004-06-01

    In this research, we wanted to clarify how gender images are different or invariant and related to parents, attributes, and the attitude of controlling life (locus of control) in two cultural contexts, Japan and Finland. For this purpose, students' ideal gender images, consisting of ideal mother, female, father and male images, and parents' similarity to the four ideal gender images were studied in 135 Japanese and 119 Finnish university students. Major findings were (a) Japanese students' ideal gender images were more stereotypic than those of Finnish students; (b) students' ideal mother image and parents' similarity to the ideal mother image were related only to their sex, which supports Jung's theory; (c) students socially learned other ideal gender images, but these did not fit with expectation from social learning theory; (d) Japanese students' mothers are models or examples of gender images, but Finnish male students did not seem to base their ideal gender images on their parents. Implication of measures was discussed.

  11. Local Voltage Control in Distribution Networks: A Game-Theoretic Perspective: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xinyang; Tian, Jie; Chen, Lijun; Dall' Anese, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    Inverter-based voltage regulation is gaining importance to alleviate emerging reliability and power-quality concerns related to distribution systems with high penetration of photovoltaic (PV) systems. This paper seeks contribution in the domain of reactive power compensation by establishing stability of local Volt/VAr controllers. In lieu of the approximate linear surrogate used in the existing work, the paper establishes existence and uniqueness of an equilibrium point using nonlinear AC power flow model. Key to this end is to consider a nonlinear dynamical system with non-incremental local Volt/VAr control, cast the Volt/VAr dynamics as a game, and leverage the fixed-point theorem as well as pertinent contraction mapping argument. Numerical examples are provided to complement the analytical results.

  12. Infection control practices in dental school: A patient perspective from Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abdul Baseer

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: Patients revealed adequate knowledge towards the use of gloves, face mask and spectacles by dentist. However, their knowledge regarding the spread of Hepatitis-B, HIV infection and use of autoclave was poor. Previous visitor of dental clinics showed higher knowledge of infection control as compared to the first time visitors. Many patients expressed their negative attitudes towards dental care due to AIDS and Hepatitis-B concerns.

  13. The hybridising of financial and service expertise in English local authority budget control : a practice perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrens, T.; Ferry, L.; Khalifa, R.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to trace the hybridising of financial and service expertise in English local authority budget control to provide a more comprehensive understanding of the contexts that gave rise to hybridisation than do previous accountability research frameworks. Design/methodology/approach Using practice theory, this paper interprets the findings from a field study of Newcastle City Council and a review of relevant local authority regulation for England, stretching back to...

  14. Optimization and Control of Agent-Based Models in Biology: A Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, G; Fitzpatrick, B G; Christley, S; Federico, P; Kanarek, A; Neilan, R Miller; Oremland, M; Salinas, R; Laubenbacher, R; Lenhart, S

    2017-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABMs) have become an increasingly important mode of inquiry for the life sciences. They are particularly valuable for systems that are not understood well enough to build an equation-based model. These advantages, however, are counterbalanced by the difficulty of analyzing and using ABMs, due to the lack of the type of mathematical tools available for more traditional models, which leaves simulation as the primary approach. As models become large, simulation becomes challenging. This paper proposes a novel approach to two mathematical aspects of ABMs, optimization and control, and it presents a few first steps outlining how one might carry out this approach. Rather than viewing the ABM as a model, it is to be viewed as a surrogate for the actual system. For a given optimization or control problem (which may change over time), the surrogate system is modeled instead, using data from the ABM and a modeling framework for which ready-made mathematical tools exist, such as differential equations, or for which control strategies can explored more easily. Once the optimization problem is solved for the model of the surrogate, it is then lifted to the surrogate and tested. The final step is to lift the optimization solution from the surrogate system to the actual system. This program is illustrated with published work, using two relatively simple ABMs as a demonstration, Sugarscape and a consumer-resource ABM. Specific techniques discussed include dimension reduction and approximation of an ABM by difference equations as well systems of PDEs, related to certain specific control objectives. This demonstration illustrates the very challenging mathematical problems that need to be solved before this approach can be realistically applied to complex and large ABMs, current and future. The paper outlines a research program to address them.

  15. Microbiota Characterization of Compost Using Omics Approaches Opens New Perspectives for Phytophthora Root Rot Control

    OpenAIRE

    Blaya, Josefa; Marhuenda, Frutos C.; Pascual, Jose A.; Ros, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is an economically important disease in pepper crops. The use of suppressive composts is a low environmental impact method for its control. Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationship between microbiota and compost suppressiveness, little is known about the microorganisms associated with disease suppression. Here, an Ion Torrent platform was used to assess the microbial composition of composts made of different agro-indus...

  16. An Exemplary Case of Promotion Activities and Taste Panels from the Perspective of Tobacco Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Erdem İlker; Seydioğulları, Mustafa; Aslan, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control is a multilateral international agreement which has been generated to protect the health of nationals and nations against the hazards/risks of tobacco and its products. All high contracting parties to the Convention undertake the international responsibility to fulfill all the requirements of the Convention’s articles in national legal systems. The Framework Convention on Tobacco Control has a considerable place among other international conventions on health. Within the self-executing desing/system of the Convention, a vital regulation focuses on banning the advertisement, promotion, and sponsorship of tobacco products. Because they are one of the various components of tobacco advertisement, promotion, and sponsorship, taste panels should be assessed within the content of the Convention. Thus, banning taste panel activities is an important step in tobacco control and it is one of the basic areas where medical and law sciences should collaborate. In this article, a comprehensive frame has been drawn to the issue and recommendations have been developed for the future. PMID:29404102

  17. Sublethal Effects in Pest Management: A Surrogate Species Perspective on Fruit Fly Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Banks

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tephritid fruit flies are economically important orchard pests globally. While much effort has focused on controlling individual species with a combination of pesticides and biological control, less attention has been paid to managing assemblages of species. Although several tephritid species may co-occur in orchards/cultivated areas, especially in mixed-cropping schemes, their responses to pesticides may be highly variable. Furthermore, predictive efforts about toxicant effects are generally based on acute toxicity, with little or no regard to long-term population effects. Using a simple matrix model parameterized with life history data, we quantified the responses of several tephritid species to the sublethal effects of a toxicant acting on fecundity. Using a critical threshold to determine levels of fecundity reduction below which species are driven to local extinction, we determined that threshold levels vary widely for the three tephritid species. In particular, Bactrocera dorsalis was the most robust of the three species, followed by Ceratitis capitata, and then B. cucurbitae, suggesting individual species responses should be taken into account when planning for area-wide pest control. The rank-order of susceptibility contrasts with results from several field/lab studies testing the same species, suggesting that considering a combination of life history traits and individual species susceptibility is necessary for understanding population responses of species assemblages to toxicant exposure.

  18. Force Plate Assessment of Quiet Standing Balance Control: Perspectives on Clinical Application within Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avril Mansfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of balance control is essential to guide physical rehabilitation poststroke. However, current observational assessment tools available to physiotherapists provide limited information about underlying dyscontrol. This paper describes a force plate-based assessment of quiet standing balance control that we have implemented for individuals attending inpatient stroke rehabilitation. The assessment uses two force plates to measure location of ground reaction forces to maintain stability in quiet standing in five conditions (eyes open, eyes closed, standing symmetrically, and maximal loading on the less-affected and more-affected limbs. Measures of interest are variability of the centers of pressure under each foot and both feet combined, weight-bearing asymmetry, and correlation of center of pressure fluctuations between limbs. We present representative values for the above-mentioned measures and case examples to illustrate how the assessment can reveal patient-specific balance control problems and direct treatment. We identify limitations to our current assessment and recommendations for future research.

  19. Microbiota Characterization of Compost Using Omics Approaches Opens New Perspectives for Phytophthora Root Rot Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Josefa; Marhuenda, Frutos C; Pascual, Jose A; Ros, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is an economically important disease in pepper crops. The use of suppressive composts is a low environmental impact method for its control. Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationship between microbiota and compost suppressiveness, little is known about the microorganisms associated with disease suppression. Here, an Ion Torrent platform was used to assess the microbial composition of composts made of different agro-industrial waste and with different levels of suppressiveness against P. nicotianae. Both bacterial and fungal populations responded differently depending on the chemical heterogeneity of materials used during the composting process. High proportions (67-75%) of vineyard pruning waste were used in the most suppressive composts, COM-A and COM-B. This material may have promoted the presence of higher relative abundance of Ascomycota as well as higher microbial activity, which have proved to be essential for controlling the disease. Although no unique fungi or bacteria have been detected in neither suppressive nor conducive composts, relatively high abundance of Fusarium and Zopfiella were found in compost COM-B and COM-A, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that studies compost metabolome. Surprisingly, composts and peat clustered together in principal component analysis of the metabolic data according to their levels of suppressiveness achieved. This study demonstrated the need for combining the information provided by different techniques, including metagenomics and metametabolomics, to better understand the ability of compost to control plant diseases.

  20. Microbiota Characterization of Compost Using Omics Approaches Opens New Perspectives for Phytophthora Root Rot Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Blaya

    Full Text Available Phytophthora root rot caused by Phytophthora nicotianae is an economically important disease in pepper crops. The use of suppressive composts is a low environmental impact method for its control. Although attempts have been made to reveal the relationship between microbiota and compost suppressiveness, little is known about the microorganisms associated with disease suppression. Here, an Ion Torrent platform was used to assess the microbial composition of composts made of different agro-industrial waste and with different levels of suppressiveness against P. nicotianae. Both bacterial and fungal populations responded differently depending on the chemical heterogeneity of materials used during the composting process. High proportions (67-75% of vineyard pruning waste were used in the most suppressive composts, COM-A and COM-B. This material may have promoted the presence of higher relative abundance of Ascomycota as well as higher microbial activity, which have proved to be essential for controlling the disease. Although no unique fungi or bacteria have been detected in neither suppressive nor conducive composts, relatively high abundance of Fusarium and Zopfiella were found in compost COM-B and COM-A, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that studies compost metabolome. Surprisingly, composts and peat clustered together in principal component analysis of the metabolic data according to their levels of suppressiveness achieved. This study demonstrated the need for combining the information provided by different techniques, including metagenomics and metametabolomics, to better understand the ability of compost to control plant diseases.

  1. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses: What an orthopaedic surgeon should know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieker, Claude B

    2016-02-01

    Articulating components should minimise the generation of wear particles in order to optimize long-term survival of the prosthesis.A good understanding of tribological properties helps the orthopaedic surgeon to choose the most suitable bearing for each individual patient.Conventional and highly cross-linked polyethylene articulating either with metal or ceramic, ceramic-on-ceramic and metal-on-metal are the most commonly used bearing combinations.All combinations of bearing surface have their advantages and disadvantages. An appraisal of the individual patient's objectives should be part of the assessment of the best bearing surface. Cite this article: Rieker CB. Tribology of total hip arthroplasty prostheses: what an orthopaedic surgeon should know. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:52-57. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.000004.

  2. Readability of Orthopaedic Patient-reported Outcome Measures: Is There a Fundamental Failure to Communicate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jorge L; Mosher, Zachary A; Watson, Shawna L; Sheppard, Evan D; Brabston, Eugene W; McGwin, Gerald; Ponce, Brent A

    2017-08-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are increasingly used to quantify patients' perceptions of functional ability. The American Medical Association and NIH suggest patient materials be written at or below 6th to 8th grade reading levels, respectively, yet one recent study asserts that few PROMs comply with these recommendations, and suggests that the majority of PROMs are written at too high of a reading level for self-administered patient use. Notably, this study was limited in its use of only one readability algorithm, although there is no commonly accepted, standard readability algorithm for healthcare-related materials. Our study, using multiple readability equations and heeding equal weight to each, hopes to yield a broader, all-encompassing estimate of readability, thereby offering a more accurate assessment of the readability of orthopaedic PROMS. (1) What proportion of orthopaedic-related PROMs and orthopaedic-related portions of the NIH Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS ® ) are written at or below the 6th and 8th grade levels? (2) Is there a correlation between the number of questions in the PROM and reading level? (3) Using systematic edits based on guidelines from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, what proportion of PROMs achieved American Medical Association and NIH-recommended reading levels? Eighty-six (86) independent, orthopaedic and general wellness PROMs, drawn from commonly referenced orthopaedic websites and prior studies, were chosen for analysis. Additionally, owing to their increasing use in orthopaedics, four relevant short forms, and 11 adult, physical health question banks from the PROMIS ® , were included for analysis. All documents were analyzed for reading grade levels using 19 unique readability algorithms. Descriptive statistics were performed using SPSS Version 22.0. The majority of the independent PROMs (64 of 86; 74%) were written at or below the 6th grade level, with 81 of 86

  3. [Clinical safety and professional liability claims in Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bori, G; Gómez-Durán, E L; Combalia, A; Trilla, A; Prat, A; Bruguera, M; Arimany-Manso, J

    2016-01-01

    The specialist in orthopaedic and traumatological surgery, like any other doctor, is subject to the current legal provisions while exercising their profession. Mandatory training in the medical-legal aspects of health care is essential. Claims against doctors are a reality, and orthopaedic and traumatological surgery holds first place in terms of frequency of claims according to the data from the General Council of Official Colleges of Doctors of Catalonia. Professionals must be aware of the fundamental aspects of medical professional liability, as well as specific aspects, such as defensive medicine and clinical safety. The understanding of these medical-legal aspects in the routine clinical practice can help to pave the way towards a satisfactory and safe professional career. The aim of this review is to contribute to this training, for the benefit of professionals and patients. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Haemodilution study in major orthopaedic surgery experience as a technique of blood conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Y; Boon, P; Deshpande, S

    1994-08-01

    Haemodilution and auto-transfusion were carried out in 103 consecutive patients having major orthopaedic surgery. The records of 99 patients were available for retrospective assessment of this technique. Fifty-six per cent of the patients did not require any homologous blood transfusion. Homologous blood transfusion was given to 44% of the patients, who used up 99 units of blood in their entire hospital stay. There was no morbidity such as transfusion reaction, infection, decrease in platelets or re-operation for bleeding associated with the procedure, although there was one death secondary to myocardial infarction. This technique offered an alternative method to reduce the use of homologous blood transfusion in major orthopaedic operations.

  5. The presentation of rickets to orthopaedic clinics: return of the English disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Haris; Wall, Alun P; Sangster, Marshall; Paton, Robin W

    2011-04-01

    Rickets is a potentially treatable disease of the bone that is most commonly due to deficiency of vitamin D and is increasing in incidence in developed countries. Risk factors include dietary factors, the practice of covering up and darker skin pigmentation. This small retrospective case study set out to examine all cases of rickets presenting to the Paediatric Orthopaedic clinic over a 15-month period. Rickets presented in a bimodal fashion in the 6 cases identified: in males and females aged 3 or less and female adolescents aged 10 and above. This is in keeping with what is known regarding the rapid phases of growth during development. Five cases were from ethnic minority groups. Both female adolescents presented with genu valgum. Rickets can present primarily to Orthopaedic clinics with vague musculoskeletal symptoms. We recommend that biochemical screening be performed on patients from ethnic minorities who may be 'at risk'.

  6. What Provisions Do Orthopaedic Programs Make for Maternity, Paternity, and Adoption Leave?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jennifer; Teuscher, David

    2016-09-01

    The process of choosing medical specialty and residency programs is multifaceted. Today's generation of medical students may have an increased interest in work-life balance and time with their families. In considering this factor, medical students may be influenced by policy regarding maternity, paternity, and adoption leave during residency and fellowship training. Current policy among orthopaedic programs regarding maternity, paternity, and adoption leave is not well described. To understand the influence these policies may have on the choices that medical students make in choosing their specialty, the policies must first be better understood. (1) What proportion of orthopaedic programs have formal or unwritten policies regarding maternity, paternity, and adoptive leave? (2) What are the provisions for time away, allotment of time, and makeup options for trainees who take leave? (3) What proportion of orthopaedic programs report utilization of leave, and what proportions of leave are for maternity, paternity, or adoptive reasons? Accredited programs in orthopaedic surgery were identified through the Council of Orthopedic Residency Directors within the American Orthopaedic Association. Current program directors of these accredited programs were surveyed. The survey was emailed to 144 program directors, of which 141 emails were delivered. Responses were received from 45 program directors, representing 31% of programs. The survey focused on maternity, paternity, and adoptive leave, and it consisted of questions designed to explore program policies (formal, unwritten, no policy, or in development), time considerations (amount allowed, allocation of time away, and makeup requirements), and utilization (trainees who took leave and type of leave used). Most respondents have maternity leave policy (formal: 36 of 45 [80%]; unwritten: 17 of 45 [38%]). Sixteen programs (16 of 45 [36%]) reported having both a formal and an unwritten maternity leave policy. Less than half of

  7. Knowledge on Bone Banking among Participants in an Orthopaedic Conference: A Preliminary Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, S; Yusof, N; Ramalingam, S; Ng, W M; Mansor, A

    2017-07-01

    Despite increasing use of bone graft in Malaysia, there was still lack of data to quantify knowledge level on bone banking among orthopaedic community who are involved in transplantation related work. Therefore, a survey on awareness in tissue banking specifically bone banking, usage and choice of bone grafts was conducted. From 80 respondents, 82.5% were aware about tissue banking however only 12.5% knew of the existence of tissue banks in Malaysia. Femoral head was the bone allograft most often used as a substitute to autograft. Only 34.8% respondents preferred irradiated bone grafts whilst 46.9% preferred nonirradiated, indicating the need to educate the importance of radiation for sterilising tissues. Exhibition was the most preferred medium for awareness programme to disseminate information about bone banking in the orthopaedic community. The professional awareness is necessary to increase the knowledge on the use of bone graft, hence to increase bone transplantation for musculoskeletal surgeries in the country.

  8. Readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganta, Abhishek; Yi, Paul H; Hussein, Khalil; Frank, Rachel M

    2014-04-01

    Although studies have revealed high readability levels of orthopedic patient education materials, no study has evaluated sports medicine-related patient education materials. We conducted a study to assess the readability of sports medicine-related patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM). All sports medicine patient education articles available online in 2012 from the AAOS and the AOSSM, including the Stop Sports Injuries Campaign (STOP), were identified, and their readability was assessed with the Flesch-Kinkaid (FK) readability test. Mean overall FK grade level of the 170 articles reviewed (104 from AAOS, 36 from AOSSM, 30 from STOP) was 10.2. Mean FK levels for the 3 sources were 9.5 (AAOS), 11.0 (AOSSM), and 11.5 (STOP) (P = .16). Fifteen (8.8%) of the 170 articles had a readability level at or below eighth grade (average reading level of US adults); only 2 (1.2%) of the 170 articles were at or below the recommended sixth-grade level. The majority of sports medicine-related patient education materials from AAOS and AOSSM had reading levels higher than recommended, indicating that the majority of the patient population may find it difficult to comprehend these articles.

  9. Plasma under control: Advanced solutions and perspectives for plasma flux management in material treatment and nanosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, O.; Bazaka, K.; Kersten, H.; Keidar, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Xu, S.; Levchenko, I.

    2017-12-01

    Given the vast number of strategies used to control the behavior of laboratory and industrially relevant plasmas for material processing and other state-of-the-art applications, a potential user may find themselves overwhelmed with the diversity of physical configurations used to generate and control plasmas. Apparently, a need for clearly defined, physics-based classification of the presently available spectrum of plasma technologies is pressing, and the critically summary of the individual advantages, unique benefits, and challenges against key application criteria is a vital prerequisite for the further progress. To facilitate selection of the technological solutions that provide the best match to the needs of the end user, this work systematically explores plasma setups, focusing on the most significant family of the processes—control of plasma fluxes—which determine the distribution and delivery of mass and energy to the surfaces of materials being processed and synthesized. A novel classification based on the incorporation of substrates into plasma-generating circuitry is also proposed and illustrated by its application to a wide variety of plasma reactors, where the effect of substrate incorporation on the plasma fluxes is emphasized. With the key process and material parameters, such as growth and modification rates, phase transitions, crystallinity, density of lattice defects, and others being linked to plasma and energy fluxes, this review offers direction to physicists, engineers, and materials scientists engaged in the design and development of instrumentation for plasma processing and diagnostics, where the selection of the correct tools is critical for the advancement of emerging and high-performance applications.

  10. The Tension between the Decision and Control Perspectives of Accounting Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, John

    2009-01-01

    to use different accounting systems for different purposes. That is not the norm. The tensions are managed within a single accounting system and that leads to trade-offs in the accounting system. I will revisit these conflicts of uses of accounting systems using product costing, transfer pricing and fair......The accounting system is a carefully managed information system which is used for multiple purposes. Traditionally, the uses are categorized using the main headings of decision and control. Numerous conflicts are the consequence of the multi-purpose accounting system. The easy way out is apparently...

  11. Prevention and control of zoonoses at their source: from the Chinese perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songtao YANG,Yuwei GAO,Jun QIAN,Quan LIU,Xuexing ZHENG,Hualei WANG,Zhiping XIA,Xianzhu XIA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zoonoses are a significant public health concern and cause considerable socioeconomic problems globally. The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI, and Ebola virus disease (EVD has had a significant effect on the national economy and public health in China, and other countries. This review analyzed zoonotic disease issues faced by China, and the main factors contributing to the risk of zoonotic disease. The Chinese government has devised new strategies and has taken measures to deal with the challenges of these diseases, and the prevention and control of zoonoses at their source. A strategy that is suited to China's national conditions, is proposed.

  12. Extending the role of a healthcare digital library environment to support orthopaedic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Board, Timothy; Carr, Leslie; Wills, Gary; Power, Guillermo; Bailey, Christopher; Hall, Wendy; Stenning, Matthew; Grange, Simon

    2006-06-01

    A digital archive, together with its users and its contents, does not exist in isolation; there is a cycle of activities which provides the context for the archive's existence. In arguing for the broadening of the traditional view of digital libraries as merely collections towards the processes of collecting and deploying, we have developed an extend ed digital library environment for orthopaedic surgeons which bridges the gap between the undertaking of experimental work and the dissemination of its results through electronic publication.

  13. Types of wear and tear of biomaterials used in orthopaedic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    L. Klimek; E. Wołowiec; B. Majkowska

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this paper is presentation of observations on different kinds of wear and tear of biomaterials used in contemporary orthopaedic surgery.Design/methodology/approach: Types of prosthesis damage, encountered in medical practice, and their causes have been described. Results of many clinical studies were analysed to review prosthesis damage from the stage of implanting (such as intrusion of a foreign object between its components) to their natural wear and tear after many year...

  14. Variation in National ACGME Case Log Data for Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellowships: Are Fellow Coding Practices Responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Philip K; Woiczik, Marcella; Karol, Lori; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    The introduction of the 80-hour work week for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited fellowship programs initiated many efforts to optimize surgical training. One particular area of interest is on recording and tracking surgical experiences. The current standard is logging cases based on Current Procedural Terminology codes, which are primarily designed for billing. Proposed guidelines from the ACGME regarding logging exist, but their implementation is unknown, as is the variation in case volume across fellowship programs. The purpose of this study was to investigate variability in the national case log data, and explore potential sources of variation using fellow surveys. National ACGME case log data for pediatric orthopaedic fellowships from 2012 to 2015 were reviewed, with particular attention to the domains of spine, pelvis/hip, arthroscopy, trauma, and other (which includes clubfoot casting). To explore potential sources of case log variability, a survey on case logging behavior was distributed to all pediatric orthopaedic fellows for the academic year 2015 to 2016. Reported experiences based on ACGME case logs varied widely between fellows with percentage difference of up to 100% in all areas. Similarly, wide variability is present in coding practices of pediatric orthopaedic fellows, who often lack formal education on the topic of appropriate coding/logging. In the survey, hypothetical case scenarios had an absolute difference in recorded codes of up to 13 and a percentage difference of up to 100%. ACGME case log data for pediatric orthopaedic fellowships demonstrates wide variability in reported surgical experiences. This variability may be due, in part, to differences in logging practices by individual fellows. This observation makes meaningful interpretation of national data on surgical volume challenging. Proposed surgical experience minimums should be interpreted in light of these data, and may not be advisable unless

  15. Authorship trends in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research: A bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, Abhijit; Ali, Mohammed T; Wang, Christine Y; Schultz, Katherine E; Fischer, James P; Lunsford, Shatoria; Whipple, Elizabeth C; Loder, Randall T; Kacena, Melissa A

    2018-05-18

    Publications are an important tool to measure one's success and achievement in academia. They can help propel a career forward and move one into a position of leadership. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate changes in bibliometric variables, authorship, and collaboration trends in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research (JOR®), since its inception in 1983. A bibliometric analysis was completed for all manuscripts meeting the inclusion criteria (638), which were published throughout the inaugural year plus one representative year of each decade. Several parameters were investigated including numbers of manuscripts, authors, collaborating institutions/countries, references, pages, and citations; region of origin and gender of authors over time and by region were main focuses. Significant increases over time were observed in all bibliometric variables analyzed except in the number of pages and citations. There was an approximate 27% point increase for both female first and corresponding authors from 1983 to 2015. While this is most likely due to the increase in the number of women that have entered the field over time, similar increases in the percentage of women holding positions on the JOR editorial board or in leadership positions within in the field may have also contributed to improvements in gender parity. Understanding changes in publishing characteristics over time, by region, and by gender are critical, especially with the rising demands of publishing in academia. JOR has seen increase in most variables analyzed, including improvements in authorship by women in the field of orthopaedic research. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Database and Registry Research in Orthopaedic Surgery: Part I: Claims-Based Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Harwood, Jared; Ong, Kevin L; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2015-08-05

    The use of large-scale national databases for observational research in orthopaedic surgery has grown substantially in the last decade, and the data sets can be grossly categorized as either administrative claims or clinical registries. Administrative claims data comprise the billing records associated with the delivery of health-care services. Orthopaedic researchers have used both government and private claims to describe temporal trends, geographic variation, disparities, complications, outcomes, and resource utilization associated with both musculoskeletal disease and treatment. Medicare claims comprise one of the most robust data sets used to perform orthopaedic research, with >45 million beneficiaries. The U.S. government, through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, often uses these data to drive changes in health policy. Private claims data used in orthopaedic research often comprise more heterogeneous patient demographic samples, but allow longitudinal analysis similar to that offered by Medicare claims. Discharge databases, such as the U.S. National Inpatient Sample, provide a wide national sampling of inpatient hospital stays from all payers and allow analysis of associated adverse events and resource utilization. Administrative claims data benefit from the high patient numbers obtained through a majority of hospitals. Using claims, it is possible to follow patients longitudinally throughout encounters irrespective of the location of the institution delivering health care. Some disadvantages include lack of precision of ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) coding schemes. Much of these data are expensive to purchase, complicated to organize, and labor-intensive to manipulate--often requiring trained specialists for analysis. Given the changing health-care environment, it is likely that databases will provide valuable information that has the potential to influence clinical practice improvement and health policy for

  17. The Relationship of Obesity to Increasing Health-Care Burden in the Setting of Orthopaedic Polytrauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Heather; Murray, Mark; Vassaur, John; Jupiter, Daniel C; Regner, Justin L; Chaput, Christopher D

    2015-11-18

    With the rise of obesity in the American population, there has been a proportionate increase of obesity in the trauma population. The purpose of this study was to use a computed tomography-based measurement of adiposity to determine if obesity is associated with an increased burden to the health-care system in patients with orthopaedic polytrauma. A prospective comprehensive trauma database at a level-I trauma center was utilized to identify 301 patients with polytrauma who had orthopaedic injuries and intensive care unit admission from 2006 to 2011. Routine thoracoabdominal computed tomographic scans allowed for measurement of the truncal adiposity volume. The truncal three-dimensional reconstruction body mass index was calculated from the computed tomography-based volumes based on a previously validated algorithm. A truncal three-dimensional reconstruction body mass index of obese patients and ≥ 30 kg/m(2) denoted obese patients. The need for orthopaedic surgical procedure, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, hospital charges, and discharge disposition were compared between the two groups. Of the 301 patients, 21.6% were classified as obese (truncal three-dimensional reconstruction body mass index of ≥ 30 kg/m(2)). Higher truncal three-dimensional reconstruction body mass index was associated with longer hospital length of stay (p = 0.02), more days spent in the intensive care unit (p = 0.03), more frequent discharge to a long-term care facility (p obesity on patients with polytrauma. Obese patients were found to have higher total hospital charges, longer hospital stays, discharge to a continuing-care facility, and a higher rate of orthopaedic surgical intervention. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  18. The influence of alcohol and tobacco use in orthopaedic inpatients on complications of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gerard; Daly, Michelle; Proude, Elizabeth M; Kermode, Steven; Davis, Michelle; Barling, Jan; Haber, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    Tobacco use and heavy alcohol consumption are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. There is limited research on the correlation between tobacco and risky levels of alcohol use and the possible complications associated with a hospital admission. The underestimation of problem drinking, in particular, has obvious repercussions for the management of patients in hospital. If alcohol-related problems go undetected or unrecorded, treatment may be inadequate or inappropriate. The aims of the project were to assess the prevalence of high-risk alcohol and tobacco use in orthopaedic in-patients and to examine any relationship between alcohol and tobacco use and the number and type of complications, management and length of stay. One hundred and fifty-three consecutive orthopaedic admissions to the Orthopaedic Ward at Lismore Base Hospital were screened using the Drinkcheck questionnaire, which is based on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), but which also screens for tobacco use. Nursing staff on the ward completed a Complications Evaluation Questionnaire (CEQ). The risk status of the subjects was compared to the number and type of complications, to assess any effects of alcohol and tobacco on post-surgical complications. Significant correlations were found between tobacco use, hazardous and harmful alcohol use and numerous medical complications and behavioural problems. Behavioural problems associated with risky alcohol use included verbal abuse, agitation and sleep disturbances, particularly in men; problems associated with tobacco use included agitation and non-compliance. Orthopaedic patients who smoke and/or drink heavily prior to surgery may have more non-medical complications than non-smokers and light or non-drinkers. All surgery patients should thus be screened for alcohol and tobacco use and alcohol withdrawal, which may cause other symptoms such as behavioural problems, non-compliance and verbal abuse post-surgery.

  19. Bio-psychosocial determinants of time lost from work following non life threatening acute orthopaedic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Fiona J; Newstead, Stuart V; Watson, Wendy L; Ozanne-Smith, Joan; McClure, Roderick J

    2010-01-05

    To determine factors predicting the duration of time away from work following acute orthopaedic non life threatening trauma Prospective cohort study conducted at four hospitals in Victoria, Australia. The cohort comprised 168 patients aged 18-64 years who were working prior to the injury and sustained a range of acute unintentional orthopaedic injuries resulting in hospitalization. Baseline data was obtained by survey and medical record review. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to examine the association between potential predictors and the duration of time away from work during the six month study. The study achieved 89% follow-up. Of the 168 participants recruited to the study, 68% returned to work during the six month study. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis identified that blue collar work, negative pain attitudes with respect to work, high initial pain intensity, injury severity, older age, initial need for surgery, the presence of co-morbid health conditions at study entry and an orthopaedic injury to more than one region were associated with extended duration away from work following the injury. Participants in receipt of compensation who reported high social functioning at two weeks were 2.58 times more likely to have returned to work than similar participants reporting low social functioning. When only those who had returned to work were considered, the participant reported reason for return to work " to fill the day" was a significant predictor of earlier RTW [RR 2.41 (95% C.I 1.35-4.30)] whereas "financial security" and "because they felt able to" did not achieve significance. Many injury-related and psycho social factors affect the duration of time away from work following orthopaedic injury. Some of these are potentially modifiable and may be amenable to intervention. Further consideration of the reasons provided by participants for returning to work may provide important opportunities for social

  20. Battlefield-Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopaedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Attending Physician #N/A Control cpm 1308.0 Positive control (PHA) cpm 38247.3 29.2 Mildly Reactive 2 to 4 Reactive 4 to 8 Highly Reactive above 8...Kyron, The Veterans Health Administration has to follow Handbook 1200.05, which states: VHA HANDBOOK 1200.05 October 15, 2010 n. Advertising ...The facility Director is responsible for ensuring that recruiting documents, flyers, and advertisements for non-VA research are not posted within or