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Sample records for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance

  1. Topical contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance dacryocystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Sugimura, Kazuro; Hirota, Shozo

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance dacryocystography (MRD) with topical administration of normal saline solution and diluted Gd-DTPA solution for the assessment of lacrimal outflow disorders. Two T2-weighted sequences and two T1-weighted sequences were evaluated in this study. The 1:100 diluted Gd solution was prepared by diluting Gd-DTPA (Magnevist) with normal saline solution. A phantom study using tube phantoms of various diameters filled with normal saline solution and 1:100 diluted Gd solution was performed. A preliminary study was performed in ten normal volunteers Eighteen patients with lacrimal outflow disorders underwent clinical MRD, and 14 also underwent conventional dacryocystography (CDG). MRD images were evaluated and compared with clinical symptoms and CDG images. In all sequences, MRD could visualize the full length of 0.7 to 1.7 mm diameter tube phantoms and could show all of the normal lacrimal sacs and nasolacrimal ducts. In the clinical study, MRD findings were compatible with the symptoms in 14 patients but were not compatible with CDG findings in half of the cases. Topical contrast-enhanced MRD provided a simple, non-invasive means of obtaining detailed morphological and functional information on the lacrimal drainage apparatus. (author)

  2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Enterography and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Rune; Peters, David A; Nielsen, Agnete Hedemann

    2017-01-01

    Purpose e Cross-sectional imaging methods are important for objective evaluationof small intestinal inflammationinCrohn'sdisease(CD).The primary aim was to compare relative parameters of intestinal perfusion between contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic...

  3. Recent advances in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meaney, J.F.M.; Goyen, M.

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) provides a means of visualizing vascular structures noninvasively and is increasingly replacing conventional X-ray angiography in routine use. Contrast-enhanced MRA (CE-MRA), in which gadolinium contrast agents are used to shorten the T1 relaxation, offers increased resolution and higher signal-to-noise ratio compared with earlier flow-dependent [time-of-flight (TOF) or phase-contrast (PC)] techniques. Currently available contrast agents differ in their ability to lower T1 values, and hence the choice of contrast agent is an important consideration in the successful use of CE-MRA. Gadofosveset trisodium (Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) is the first of a new class of intravascular contrast agents. This agent is extensively (approximately 85%) and reversibly bound to human serum albumin and is retained within the vasculature thus allowing steady-state imaging to be perform-ed. An additional benefit is that gado0fosveset offers higher relaxivity compared with other contrast agents, thus giving a lower blood T1 values which also makes it ideal for first-pass imaging. Clinical trials have consistently shown that gadofosveset enhanced MRA is more sensitive, specific and accurate than time-of-flight MRA, gives fewer uninterpretable scans and affords greater diagnostic confidence. Intravascular contrast agents such as gadofosveset, therefore, offer the potential for improved vascular imaging. (orig.)

  4. Image fusion for dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Martin O

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate imaging techniques such as dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI have been shown to provide valuable information for medical diagnosis. Even though these techniques provide new information, integrating and evaluating the much wider range of information is a challenging task for the human observer. This task may be assisted with the use of image fusion algorithms. Methods In this paper, image fusion based on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA is proposed for the first time. It is demonstrated that a priori knowledge about the data domain can be easily incorporated into the parametrisation of the KPCA, leading to task-oriented visualisations of the multivariate data. The results of the fusion process are compared with those of the well-known and established standard linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA by means of temporal sequences of 3D MRI volumes from six patients who took part in a breast cancer screening study. Results The PCA and KPCA algorithms are able to integrate information from a sequence of MRI volumes into informative gray value or colour images. By incorporating a priori knowledge, the fusion process can be automated and optimised in order to visualise suspicious lesions with high contrast to normal tissue. Conclusion Our machine learning based image fusion approach maps the full signal space of a temporal DCE-MRI sequence to a single meaningful visualisation with good tissue/lesion contrast and thus supports the radiologist during manual image evaluation.

  5. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  6. Confident Diagnosis of Bronchobiliary Fistula Using Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Cholangiography

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    Karabulut, Nevzat; Cakmak, Vefa; Kiter, Go ksel [Pamukkale University Medical Center, Denizli (Turkmenistan)

    2010-08-15

    We report the utility of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) using gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA) in the diagnosis of bronchobiliary fistula associated with liver hydatid cyst. Contrast-enhanced MRC clearly delineated the leakage of contrast agent from the biliary duct and its communication with the bronchial tree. Providing functional information about physiologic or pathologic biliary flow in addition to the display of biliary anatomy, contrast enhanced MRC stands as a robust technique in confidently detecting bronchobiliary fistula and bile leaks

  7. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cerebral gliomas showing imperceptible contrast enhancement on conventional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, A.; Tripathi, R.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to evaluate the utility of perfusion MRI in cerebral gliomas showing imperceptible contrast enhancement on conventional MRI, and to evaluate the relationships of perfusion MRI and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic results in these tumours. Twenty-two patients with histopathologically proven cerebral gliomas and showing insignificant contrast enhancement on conventional MR were included in the present study. All patients underwent perfusion MRI and MR spectroscopy on a 1.5-T MR system. Significant differences of the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) values and the choline : creatine ratios were noted between low-grade and anaplastic gliomas (P < 0.01). Good correlation was found between the rCBV values and the choline : creatine values (y = 0. 532x + 1.5643; r = 0.67). Perfusion MRI can be a useful tool in assessing the histopathological grade of non-contrast-enhancing cerebral gliomas. Along with MR spectroscopic imaging it can serve as an important technique for preoperative characterization of such gliomas, so that accurate targeting by stereotactic biopsies is possible. Copyright (2004) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  8. Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography techniques in candidates for kidney transplantation: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Ginnerup-Pedersen, Bodil; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Haislund, Margit; Laustsen, Sussie; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Detailed knowledge of vessel status in potential candidates for kidney transplantation is essential for the surgeon. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography has previously been used intensively for assessing this, but the discovery that use of gadolinium based contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging can cause Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis in patients suffering from severe kidney disease has lead to renewed interest in non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. The aim of this study was to find a non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography method for preoperative evaluation of the pelvic vessels prior to kidney transplantation, providing a sufficient image quality. Method: In a prospective study we consecutively included 54 patients undergoing examinations prior to kidney transplantation. The patients were examined with the following magnetic resonance angiography sequences: A 2D Time of flight (n = 54), 3D Time of flight (n = 52) patients, 3D Phase Contrast (n = 54), 3D Balanced Steady State Free Precession (n = 52) and a 2D TRiggered Angiography Non-Contrast Enhanced (TRANCE) (a Spin Echo sequence with subtraction) (n = 48). The sequences were evaluated with respect to contrast, diagnostic performance and artefact burden. Results: Evaluating contrast, 3D Phase Contrast was significantly better than 2D Time of flight (p 0.2). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. The artefact score was lowest for the Phase Contrast images and significantly superior to the 2D Time of flight (p < 0.005). The 2D Time of flight was significantly better than the three other sequences (p < 0.001) in all cases. Conclusion: Non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography offers a safe preoperative examination for assessment of vessel status before kidney transplantation. A combination of 2D Time of flight and 3D Phase Contrast acquisitions is recommended and can be performed within a

  9. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of persistent fifth aortic arch in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Yumin; Zhu, Ming; Sun, Aimin; Li, Yuhua; Jaffe, Richard B.; Gao, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Cine angiography and echocardiography have been utilized to diagnose congenital aortic arch anomalies. However, the visualization of great vessels by echocardiography is limited, while cine angiography requires cardiac catheterization with ionizing radiation. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive modality suitable for visualization of congenital aortic arch anomalies. To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced MRA in the diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch, a rare congenital aortic arch anomaly, and to compare the diagnostic accuracy of MRA with that of echocardiography and cine angiography. In four pediatric patients, contrast-enhanced MRA studies were performed for diagnosing persistent fifth aortic arch. The findings of MRA were compared with echocardiographic findings and confirmed by cine angiography and operation. Transthoracic surface echocardiography noted an aberrant vessel arising from the ascending aorta in two of four patients; the etiology of this vessel was uncertain. In the other two patients a diagnosis of coarctation was made. Of the four patients, only one was diagnosed with interruption of the aortic arch. Contrast-enhanced MRA clarified uncertain echocardiographic findings, enabling the correct diagnosis of persistent fifth aortic arch with fourth aortic arch interruption in all four patients. Contrast-enhanced MRA is a safe, accurate, and fast imaging technique for the evaluation of persistent fifth aortic arch and may obviate the need for conventional cine angiography. Cardiac catheterization may be reserved for some types of complicated congenital heart disease and for obtaining hemodynamic information. (orig.)

  10. Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leopoldino, Denise de Deus; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Bezerra, Alexandre Sergio de Araujo; Gracio, Tatiana Schiller

    2005-01-01

    With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources. (author)

  11. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors

  12. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: evaluation of renal arteries in living renal transplant donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firat, Ali; Akin, Oguz; Muhtesem Agildere, Ahmet; Aytekin, Cuneyt; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-10-01

    One of the most important steps before living-donor nephrectomy is assessment of renal vascular anatomy. The number, origins and lengths of the renal arteries and variations of renal veins must be determined in order to identify the kidney that is most suitable for transplantation. Digital subtraction angiography was long considered the standard procedure for this purpose, but this method has been replaced by non-invasive techniques. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is an accurate, safe and reliable method for imaging vasculature. This article reviews the technique and the clinical features of this method in the evaluation of living renal transplant donors.

  13. Differentiation between early rheumatoid arthritis patients and healthy persons by conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Mette Bjørndal; Ejbjerg, B J; Hetland, M L

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameter that best differentiates healthy persons and patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to investigated responsiveness to treatment of various MRI parameters. METHOD: Conventional MRI and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE...

  14. The optimization of scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Chang, Yong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu; Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Yong Sun; Kang, Duk Sik; Tirman, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the optimal scan timing for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and to evaluate a new timing method based on the arteriovenous circulation time. Eighty-nine contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiographic examinations were performed mainly in the extremities. A 1.5T scanner with a 3-D turbo-FLASH sequence was used, and during each study, two consecutive arterial phases and one venous phase were acquired. Scan delay time was calculated from the time-intensity curve by the traditional (n = 48) and/or the new (n = 41) method. This latter was based on arteriovenous circulation time rather than peak arterial enhancement time, as used in the traditional method. The numbers of first-phase images showing a properly enhanced arterial phase were compared between the two methods. Mean scan delay time was 5.4 sec longer with the new method than with the traditional. Properly enhanced first-phase images were found in 65% of cases (31/48) using the traditional timing method, and 95% (39/41) using the new method. When cases in which there was mismatch between the target vessel and the Time-intensity curve acquisition site are excluded, erroneous acquisition occurred in seven cases with the traditional method, but in none with the new method. The calculation of scan delay time on the basis of arteriovenous circulation time provides better timing for arterial phase acquisition than the traditional method

  15. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m 2 , and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m 2 , there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension

  16. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro, E-mail: lgpignataro@ig.com.br; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel [Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho, Ilha do Fundão, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a severe and progressive disease. Its early diagnosis is the greatest clinical challenge. To evaluate the presence and extension of the delayed myocardial contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance, as well as to verify if the percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass is a severity predictor. Cross-sectional study with 30 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension of groups I and IV, subjected to clinical, functional and hemodynamic evaluation, and to cardiac magnetic resonance. The mean age of patients was 52 years old, with female predominance (77%). Among the patients, 53% had right ventricular failure at diagnosis, and 90% were in functional class II/III. The mean of the 6-minute walk test was 395m. In hemodynamic study with right catheterism, the mean average pulmonary arterial pressure was 53.3mmHg, of the cardiac index of 2.1L/ min.m{sup 2}, and median right atrial pressure was 13.5 mmHg. Delayed myocardial contrast enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance was found in 28 patients. The mean fibrosis mass was 9.9 g and the median percentage of fibrosis mass was 6.17%. The presence of functional class IV, right ventricular failure at diagnosis, 6-minute walk test < 300 meters and right atrial pressure ≥ 15 mmHg, with cardiac index < 2.0 L/ min.m{sup 2}, there was a relevant association with the increased percentage of myocardial fibrosis. The percentage of the myocardial fibrosis mass indicates a non-invasive marker with promising perspectives in identifying patients with high risk factors for pulmonary hypertension.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Characterizing Lung Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Nagihan; Arslan, Arzu; Donmez, Muhammed; Sarisoy, Hasan Tahsin

    2016-01-01

    Background Imaging plays a critical role not only in the detection, but also in the characterization of lung masses as benign or malignant. Objectives To determine the diagnostic accuracy of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. Patients and Methods Ninety-four masses were included in this prospective study. Five dynamic series of T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (FFE) images were obtained, followed by a T1-weighted FFE sequence in the late phase (5th minutes). Contrast enhancement patterns in the early (25th second) and late (5th minute) phase images were evaluated. For the quantitative evaluation, signal intensity (SI)-time curves were obtained and the maximum relative enhancement, wash-in rate, and time-to-peak enhancement of masses in both groups were calculated. Results The early phase contrast enhancement patterns were homogeneous in 78.2% of the benign masses, while heterogeneous in 74.4% of the malignant tumors. On the late phase images, 70.8% of the benign masses showed homogeneous enhancement, while most of the malignant masses showed heterogeneous enhancement (82.4%). During the first pass, the maximum relative enhancement and wash-in rate values of malignant masses were significantly higher than those of the benign masses (P = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). The cutoff value at 15% yielded a sensitivity of 85.4%, specificity of 61.2%, and positive predictive value of 68.7% for the maximum relative enhancement. Conclusion Contrast enhancement patterns and SI-time curve analysis of MRI are helpful in the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant lung masses. PMID:27703654

  18. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  19. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumours of the central nervous systems: a clinical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graif, M.; Steiner, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The clinical application of the intravascular paramagnetic contrast agent gadolinium-DTPA for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging of tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) has been assessed over the past 3 years. Various patterns of contrast enhancement were observed, and situations in MRI where the administration of contrast medium may be useful have been defined. These include lesions which are isointense with normal brain matter, the separation of tumour from surrounding oedema, evaluation of the degree of blood-brain barrier breakdown, delineation of tumours obscured by overlying calcification on computed tomography (CT) and in the investigation of lesions in anatomical areas where CT has known limitations (brain, stem, cervical spine). Changes in relaxation times in normal and abnormal tissues following contrast medium, toxicity and dosage of gadolinium-DTPA, and MRI pulse sequence techniques are reviewed. (author)

  20. Reliability and responsiveness of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, M.B.; Poggenborg, R.P.; Stoltenberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    intraarticular injection with 80 mg methylprednisolone. Using semi-automated image processing software, DCE-MRI parameters, including the initial rate of enhancement (IRE) and maximal enhancement (ME), were generated for three regions of interest (ROIs): ‘Whole slice’, ‘Quick ROI’, and ‘Precise ROI......Objectives: To investigate the responsiveness to treatment and the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) knee joints. Methods: DCE-MRI was performed in 12 clinically active RA knee joints before and 1, 7, 30, and 180 days after......’. The smallest detectable difference (SDD), the smallest detectable change (SDC), and intra- and inter-reader intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to assess the reliability of DCE-MRI. Responsiveness to treatment was assessed by the standardized response mean (SRM). Results: In all patients...

  1. 3D Modeling of Vascular Pathologies from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor Rivera, Diego; Orkisz, Maciej; Arias, Julian; Uriza, Luis Felipe

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for generating 3D vascular models from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images (MRI) using a fast marching algorithm. The main contributions of this work are: the use of the original image for defining a speed function (which determines the movement of the interface) and the calculation of the time in which the interface identifies the artery. The proposed method was validated on pathologic carotid artery images of patients and vascular phantoms. A visual appraisal of vascular models obtained with the method shows a satisfactory extraction of the vascular wall. A quantitative assessment proved that the generated models depend on the values of algorithm parameters. The maximum induced error was equal to 1.34 voxels in the diameter of the measured stenoses.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco [Dipartimento di Scienze Morfologico-Biomediche, Sezione di Anatomia ed Istologia, Università di Verona, Verona, I-37194 (Italy)

    2002-06-05

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolato, Elena; Farace, Paolo; Asperio, Roberto M; Marzola, Pasquina; Lunati, Ernesto; Sbarbati, Andrea; Osculati, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) at high field intensity (4.7 T). The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6) and 20-month-old (n = 6) rats. At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the sarcopenic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sbarbati Andrea

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies about capillarity of the aged muscle provided conflicting results and no data are currently available about the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in vivo characteristics of the microvascular bed in aged rats. We have studied age-related modifications of the skeletal muscle by in vivo T2-relaxometry and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI at high field intensity (4.7 T. The aim of the work was to test the hypothesis that the ageing process involves microvessels in skeletal muscle. Methods The study was performed in 4-month-old (n = 6 and 20-month-old (n = 6 rats. Results At MRI examination, the relaxation time T2 of the gastrocnemius muscle showed no significant difference between these two groups. The kinetic of contrast penetration in the tissue showed that in 4-month-old rats the enhancement values of the signal intensity at different time-points were significantly higher than those found in senescent rats. Conclusion The reported finding suggests that there is a modification of the microcirculatory function in skeletal muscle of aged rats. This work also demonstrates that CE-MRI allows for an in vivo quantification of the multiple biological processes involving the skeletal muscle during aging. Therefore, CE-MRI could represent a further tool for the follow up of tissue modification and therapeutic intervention both in patients with sarcopenia and in experimental models of this pathology.

  5. Data driven analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging data in breast cancer diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twellmann, T.

    2005-01-01

    In the European Union, breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women. If diagnosed in an early stage, breast cancer has an encouraging cure rate. Thus, early detection of breast cancer continues to be the key for an effective treatment. Recently, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic

  6. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  7. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the brain using gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valk, J.; Slegte, R.G.M. de; Crezee, F.C.; Hazenberg, G.J.; Thjaha, S.I.; Nauta, J.J.P.; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam; Vrije Univ., Amsterdam

    1987-01-01

    This report concerns a clinical trial with gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) as an intravenous contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with disorders of the central nervous system. Fifty patients, 30 females and 20 males, were examined without and with Gd-GTPA. The contrast medium was well tolerated by all patients. The results of MRI scanning without and with Gd-DTPA and those obtained with computed tomography (CT) using intravenous contrast enhancement were compared. This investigation comprised mainly patients with intracranial tumors, multiple sclerosis, and nasopharyngeal tumors. The results may be summarized as follows: 1) MRI with Gd-DTPA (MRI+) gave better results than MRI without Gd as regards delineation of the lesion, blood vessels and edema in cerebral tumors, pituitary adenomas and acute forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). MRI+ was better than CT in 32 of the 50 cases examined; with intracerebral tumors it was better in 15 out of 18 cases. 3) MRI+ was always better than CT in patients with MS. In 3 out of 7 cases MRI demonstrated the acute MS lesions. 4) MRI+ seemed to have advantages also in nasopharyngeal tumors as ascertained from this limited experience. (orig.)

  8. Maximum Entropy Approach in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsani, Zahra Amini; Schmid, Volker J

    2017-01-01

    In the estimation of physiological kinetic parameters from Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) data, the determination of the arterial input function (AIF) plays a key role. This paper proposes a Bayesian method to estimate the physiological parameters of DCE-MRI along with the AIF in situations, where no measurement of the AIF is available. In the proposed algorithm, the maximum entropy method (MEM) is combined with the maximum a posterior approach (MAP). To this end, MEM is used to specify a prior probability distribution of the unknown AIF. The ability of this method to estimate the AIF is validated using the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Subsequently, the kinetic parameters can be estimated with MAP. The proposed algorithm is evaluated with a data set from a breast cancer MRI study. The application shows that the AIF can reliably be determined from the DCE-MRI data using MEM. Kinetic parameters can be estimated subsequently. The maximum entropy method is a powerful tool to reconstructing images from many types of data. This method is useful for generating the probability distribution based on given information. The proposed method gives an alternative way to assess the input function from the existing data. The proposed method allows a good fit of the data and therefore a better estimation of the kinetic parameters. In the end, this allows for a more reliable use of DCE-MRI. Schattauer GmbH.

  9. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja; Bae, Jong Myon

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image

  10. Venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography: Analysis of causative factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong Jae; Lee, Eun Ja [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jong Myon [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the causative factors of venous reflux on contrast-enhanced head and neck magnetic resonance angiography. We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients with right-arm injections and 150 patients with left-arm injections. We included the age, gender, body mass index, history of hypertension, and history of diabetes mellitus in the evaluation of all patients. We measured the shortest width of the left or right brachiocephalic vein (BCV), the diameter of the aortic arch, and the distance between the sternum and vertebral body. The relationship between these factors and the venous reflux was analyzed. In patients with venous reflux, we performed qualitative image scoring for suboptimal images. In patients with venous reflux, the image quality of the left-arm injection group was significantly inferior to the image quality of the right-arm injection group. The mean age and the male-to-female ratio of patients with venous reflux were significantly higher than those of patients without venous reflux. In patients receiving the left-arm injection, the mean shortest width of the left BCV was significantly narrower in patients with venous reflux than in patients without venous reflux. A left-arm injection should be avoided, especially in elderly patients, to acquire an optimal image.

  11. Demonstration of evolution of hemispherical spondysclerosis by contrast enhanced Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Majcen, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The purpose of the study was to estimate the value of Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in demonstrating the evolution of hemispherical spondylosclerosis (HSS). Patients and methods. In eighteen patients with chronic low back pain and typical radiographic findings of HSS seen on plain films, Gd-DTPA MRI of the lumbar spine was performed. MRI morphological and signal intensity appearances of HSS were analysed and compared with radiographic changes. Results. On the basis of MRI features, three distinct groups of cases were identifiable. Within the first group the region of dome-shaped osteosclerosis demonstrated low signal intensity on T1-weighted precontrast spin-echo images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and diffuse contrast enhancement on T1-weighted postcontrast images, findings compatible with bone marrow oedema and hyperaemia. The second group showed high signal intensity vertebral body corners surrounded by low signal intensity area, which indicated the combination of fat accumulation and the sclerotic bone. In the third intermediate group anterior disco-vertebral junctions revealed a mixture of MRI appearances characteristic of the first and the second group. Conclusions. Gd-DTPA MRI is capable of demonstrating a spectrum of features which reflect the evolution of HSS. These typical appearances showed by MRI could be of eventual clinical relevance in following the progression of HSS. (author)

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of urinary bladder carcinoma: tumor staging and gadolinium contrast-enhanced imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doringer, E.; Joos, H.; Forstner, R.; Schmoller, H.

    1992-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with urinary bladder carcinomas underwent pre-operative examinations using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The results of the MR examinations were correlated with the clinical-pathological findings following transurethral resection (TUR) and bimanual palpation (n = 47) or radical cystectomy (n = 2). The results of pre-contrast MR tumor staging (T1, T2), viewing stages Tis-T2 collectively, and subsequent to separate assessments of stages T3b-T4b, were correct 76.6% of the time. Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) contrast-enhanced examinations (pre-contrast T1 and after Gd-DTPA) showed a staging accuracy rate of 85.7%. T2-weighted images did not indicate any advantage when compared to T1-weighted images following Gd-DTPA. The signal intensity ratios of tumor/fat and tumor/muscle tissue were measured on T1-weighted pre-contrast images and following Gd-DTPA and then evaluated statistically, whereby the increased tumor signal intensity was statistically significant (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.01). Due to the relatively short examination time needed for T1-weighted images and the specific tumor enhancement, the administration of Gd-DTPA proves valuable in the diagnosis of bladder carcinomas. T2-weighted images are not necessary. (orig.)

  13. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, A.; Alonso, J.; Cucurella, G.; Nos, C.; Tintore, M.; Pedraza, S.; Rio, J.; Montalban, X.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs

  14. Clinical use of gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng KT

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth T Cheng1, Hannah Y Cheng2, Kam Leung31Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Freelance Technical Writer, New Orleans, LA, USA; 3National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI is an important clinical tool for diagnosing neurological diseases. The appropriate use of a suitable MRI contrast agent or contrast pharmaceutical is essential for CE-MRI to produce desirable diagnostic images. Currently, there are seven contrast agents (CAs or pharmaceuticals approved for clinical imaging of the central nervous system (CNS in the US, Europe, or Japan. All of the clinically approved CAs are water-soluble gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs which do not penetrate the CNS blood–brain barrier (BBB. These agents are used for imaging CNS areas without a BBB, or various pathologies, such as tumors and infection that break down the BBB and allow CAs to enter into the surrounding parenchyma. Clinically, GBCAs are most useful for detecting primary and secondary cerebral neoplastic lesions. Among these CNS GBCAs, gadobutrol (Gd-BT-DO3A, Gadovist™ is a neutral, nonionic, macrocyclic compound that showed promising results from clinical trials of CNS imaging. In comparison with other GBCAs, Gd-BT-DO3A has relatively high in vitro kinetic stability and r1 relaxivity. Gd-BT-DO3A has been recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2011 for CNS imaging. A review of available literature shows that Gd-BT-DO3A exhibits similar safety and clinical efficacy profiles to other GBCAs. Gd-BT-DO3A has the distinguishing feature that it is the only clinical agent commercially available in a formulation of 1.0 M concentration with a relatively higher in vitro T1 shortening per unit volume than other clinical GBCAs which are only

  15. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M.

    2017-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  16. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G; Askin, Gulce; Beneck, Debra M; Kovanlikaya, Arzu

    2017-10-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  17. Differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel G.; Kovanlikaya, Arzu [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Pediatric Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Askin, Gulce [Weill Cornell Medical College, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, New York, NY (United States); Beneck, Debra M. [New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-10-15

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in pediatric appendicitis is increasing; MRI findings predictive of appendiceal perforation have not been specifically evaluated. To assess the performance of MRI in differentiating perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. A retrospective review of pediatric patients undergoing contrast-enhanced MRI and subsequent appendectomy was performed, with surgicopathological confirmation of perforation. Appendiceal diameter and the following 10 MRI findings were assessed: appendiceal restricted diffusion, wall defect, appendicolith, periappendiceal free fluid, remote free fluid, restricted diffusion within free fluid, abscess, peritoneal enhancement, ileocecal wall thickening and ileus. Two-sample t-test and chi-square tests were used to analyze continuous and discrete data, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for individual MRI findings were calculated and optimal thresholds for measures of accuracy were selected. Seventy-seven patients (mean age: 12.2 years) with appendicitis were included, of whom 22 had perforation. The perforated group had a larger mean appendiceal diameter and mean number of MRI findings than the non-perforated group (12.3 mm vs. 8.6 mm; 5.0 vs. 2.0, respectively). Abscess, wall defect and restricted diffusion within free fluid had the greatest specificity for perforation (1.00, 1.00 and 0.96, respectively) but low sensitivity (0.36, 0.25 and 0.32, respectively). The receiver operator characteristic curve for total number of MRI findings had an area under the curve of 0.92, with an optimal threshold of 3.5. A threshold of any 4 findings had the best ability to accurately discriminate between perforated and non-perforated cases, with a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 85%. Contrast-enhanced MRI can differentiate perforated from non-perforated appendicitis. The presence of multiple findings increases diagnostic accuracy, with a threshold of any four findings optimally discriminating between

  18. Correlative Study of Angiogenesis and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, B.; Gao, Z.Q.; Yan, X.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the correlation between contrast-enhancement patterns on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and angiogenesis by analyzing microvessel density (MVD), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and P53 protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Material and Methods: MRI was performed with a GE Signa 5T MR scanner using SE and FMPSPGR sequences in 30 patients (38 lesions) during the period October 1998 to March 2000. All had histopathologically proven HCC. MR images were reviewed/analyzed retrospectively. The 30 patients were between 35 and 65 years of age. SE T1WI, PDWI, and T2WI were acquired initially. The FMPSPGR sequence was acquired in the same position. The DCE-MRI was performed in the arterial, portal vein, and delay phase after a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. The specimens were stained immunohistochemically for CD34, VEGF, and P53. MVD was highlighted by anti-CD34 antibody staining. The enhancement features of HCC lesions were studied correlatively with the tumor MVD, VEGF, and P53 expression at protein level. Results: In the arterial phase, the results showed that MVD of HCC in the high-enhancement group (229.76±80.96) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (173.09±61.38) and low-enhancement groups (153.00±108.58) (P <0.01, respectively). VEGF expression of HCC in the high-enhancement group (68.42%) was higher than that in the equal-enhancement (36.36%) and low-enhancement groups (38.89%) (P <0.05, respectively). In the portal vein phase, MVD of HCC in the enhancement group (259.80±93.30) was higher than that in the non-enhancement group (178.64±92.65) (P <0.05). No significant correlation was found between VEGF expression and the enhancement feature in the portal vein phase. In the delay phase, MVD of HCC in the ring-enhancement group (269.06±57.89) was significantly higher than that in the non-ring-enhancement group (144.10±88.90) (P <0.01). There was a significant difference in VEGF

  19. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K trans values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p trans decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p trans values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p e and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K trans values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological properties different from those of the R-18 tumors.

  20. Assessment of Hypoxia in Human Cervical Carcinoma Xenografts by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingsen, Christine; Egeland, Tormod A.M.; Gulliksrud, Kristine M.Sc.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cervical cancer and highly hypoxic primary tumors show increased frequency of locoregional treatment failure and poor disease-free and overall survival rates. The potential usefulness of gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) in assessing tumor hypoxia noninvasively was investigated in the present preclinical study. Methods and Materials: CK-160 and TS-415 human cervical carcinoma xenografts transplanted intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) in BALB/c nu/nu mice were subjected to DCE-MRI and measurement of fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. Tumor images of K trans (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v e (the extracellular volume fraction of the imaged tissue) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI data. Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells was measured by using the paired survival curve method. Results: Fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells differed significantly among the four tumor groups. The mean values ± SE were determined to be 44% ± 7% (i.m. CK-160), 77% ± 10% (s.c. CK-160), 23% ± 5% (i.m. TS-415), and 52% ± 6% (s.c. TS-415). The four tumor groups differed significantly also in K trans , and there was an unambiguous inverse relationship between K trans and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells. On the other hand, significant differences among the groups in v e could not be detected. Conclusions: The study supports the clinical development of DCE-MRI as a method for assessing the extent of hypoxia in carcinoma of the cervix

  1. Importance of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion reconvery magnetic resonance imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ja; Kim, Sung Won; Lee, Yong Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Goyang(Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Intracranial lesions may show contrast enhancement through various mechanisms that are closely associated with the disease process. The preferred magnetic resonance sequence in contrast imaging is T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) at most institutions. However, lesion enhancement is occasionally inconspicuous on T1WI. Although fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences are commonly considered as T2-weighted imaging with dark cerebrospinal fluid, they also show mild T1-weighted contrast, which is responsible for the contrast enhancement. For several years, FLAIR imaging has been successfully incorporated as a routine sequence at our institution for contrast-enhanced (CE) brain imaging in detecting various intracranial diseases. In this pictorial essay, we describe and illustrate the diagnostic importance of CE-FLAIR imaging in various intracranial pathologic conditions.

  2. Preoperative radiological characterization of hepatic angiomyolipoma using magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A hepatic angiomyolipoma is a rare benign tumor of the liver composed of a mixture of smooth muscle cells, blood vessels and a variable amount of adipose tissue. Differentiating them from malignant liver tumors can often be very difficult. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man presenting with a large liver mass in the right lobe. The results of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography were consistent with a well-demarcated adipose tissue- containing tumor, showing prolonged hyperperfusion in comparison with the surrounding liver tissue. Surgery was performed and the diagnosis of hepatic angiomyolipoma was made with histopathology. Conclusion Preoperative radiological characterization using magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography may improve diagnostic accuracy of hepatic angiomyolipoma. Identification of smooth muscle cells, blood vessels and adipose tissue with a positive immunohistochemical reaction for HMB-45 is the final evidence for an angiomyolipoma.

  3. Myocardial blood flow estimates from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: three quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrazzo, Cristian; Galea, Nicola; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Altabella, Luisa; Preziosi, Enrico; Carnì, Marco; Ciolina, Federica; Vullo, Francesco; Francone, Marco; Catalano, Carlo; Carbone, Iacopo

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging can be used to quantitatively assess the myocardial blood flow (MBF), recovering the tissue impulse response function for the transit of a gadolinium bolus through the myocardium. Several deconvolution techniques are available, using various models for the impulse response. The method of choice may influence the results, producing differences that have not been deeply investigated yet. Three methods for quantifying myocardial perfusion have been compared: Fermi function modelling (FFM), the Tofts model (TM) and the gamma function model (GF), with the latter traditionally used in brain perfusion MRI. Thirty human subjects were studied at rest as well as under cold pressor test stress (submerging hands in ice-cold water), and a single bolus of gadolinium weighing 0.1  ±  0.05 mmol kg-1 was injected. Perfusion estimate differences between the methods were analysed by paired comparisons with Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis, and Bland-Altman plots, as well as also using the two-way ANOVA, considering the MBF values of all patients grouped according to two categories: calculation method and rest/stress conditions. Perfusion estimates obtained by various methods in both rest and stress conditions were not significantly different, and were in good agreement with the literature. The results obtained during the first-pass transit time (20 s) yielded p-values in the range 0.20-0.28 for Student’s t-test, linear regression analysis slopes between 0.98-1.03, and R values between 0.92-1.01. From the Bland-Altman plots, the paired comparisons yielded a bias (and a 95% CI)—expressed as ml/min/g—for FFM versus TM, -0.01 (-0.20, 0.17) or 0.02 (-0.49, 0.52) at rest or under stress respectively, for FFM versus GF, -0.05 (-0.29, 0.20) or  -0.07 (-0.55, 0.41) at rest or under stress, and for TM versus GF, -0.03 (-0.30, 0.24) or  -0.09 (-0.43, 0.26) at rest or under stress. With the

  4. Complications after liver transplantation: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiography, and 3-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a single session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraschi, P.; Donati, F.; Gigoni, R.; Salemi, S.; Urbani, L.; Filipponi, F.; Falaschi, F.; Bartolozzi, C.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate a comprehensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol as noninvasive diagnostic modality for simultaneous detection of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications after liver transplantation. Fifty-two liver transplant recipients suspected to have parenchymal, biliary, and (or) vascular complications underwent our MRI protocol at 1.5T unit using a phased array coil. After preliminary acquisition of axial T 1 w and T 2 w sequences, magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) was performed through a breath-hold, thin- and thick-slab, single-shot T 2 w sequence in the coronal plane. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) was obtained using a 3-dimensional coronal spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which enabled acquisition of 32 partitions 2.0 mm thick. A fixed dose of 20 ml gadobenate dimeglumine was administered at 2 mL/s. A post-contrast T 1 w sequence was also performed. Two observers in conference reviewed source images and 3-dimensional reconstructions to determine the presence of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications. MRI findings were correlated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC), biopsy, digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and imaging follow-up. MRI revealed abnormal findings in 32 out of 52 patients (61%), including biliary complications (anastomotic and nonanastomotic strictures, and lithiasis) in 31, vascular disease (hepatic artery stenosis and thrombosis) in 9, and evidence of hepatic abscess and hematoma in 2. ERC confirmed findings of MRC in 30 cases, but suggested disease underestimation in 2. DSA confirmed 7 magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) findings, but suggested disease overestimation in 2. MRI combined with MRC and CEMRA can provide a comprehensive assessment of parenchymal, biliary, and vascular complications in most recipients of liver transplantation. (author)

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lavini, Cristina; Hemke, Robert; Caan, Matthan W.A.; Maas, Mario [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Emma Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-02-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI provides information on the heterogeneity of the synovium, the primary target of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in the wrist of children with JIA using conventional descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shape analysis. To explore the association between enhancement characteristics and clinical disease status. Thirty-two children with JIA and wrist involvement underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with movement-registration and were classified using validated criteria as clinically active (n = 27) or inactive (n = 5). Outcome measures included descriptive parameters and the classification into time-intensity-curve shapes, which represent the patterns of signal intensity change over time. Differences in dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI outcome measures between clinically active and clinically inactive disease were analyzed and correlation with the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score was determined. Comprehensive evaluation of disease status was technically feasible and the quality of the dynamic dataset was improved by movement registration. The conventional descriptive measure maximum enhancement differed significantly between clinically active and inactive disease (P = 0.019), whereas time-intensity-curve shape analysis showed no differences. Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score correlated moderately with enhancing volume (P = 0.484). Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is a promising biomarker for evaluating disease status in children with JIA and wrist involvement. Conventional descriptive dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI measures are better associated with clinically active disease than time-intensity-curve shape analysis. (orig.)

  6. Tracer kinetic model selection for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallehauge, Jesper Folsted; Tanderup, Kari; Duan, Chong

    2014-01-01

    , the TM was optimal in 17.0%, the ETM was optimal in 2.2%, the C-TU in 23.4% and the 2CXM was optimal in 57.3%. Throughout the tumour, a high correlation was found between Ktrans(TM) and Fp(2CXM), ρ = 0.91. Conclusion. The 2CXM was most often optimal in describing the contrast agent enhancement of pre......Background. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) offers a unique capability to probe tumour microvasculature. Different analysis of the acquired data will possibly lead to different conclusions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate under which...

  7. Evaluation of heart perfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas; Dirks, Christina G

    2004-01-01

    with acute transmural myocardial infarction were studied using a Turbo-fast low angle shot (FLASH) MRI sequence to monitor the first pass of an extravascular contrast agent (CA), gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Quantitation of perfusion, expressed as Ki (mL/100 g/minute), in five......PURPOSE: To investigate the diagnostic ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) heart perfusion in acute heart patients, a fast, multislice dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequence was applied to patients with acute myocardial infarction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven patients...

  8. Assessment of irradiated brain metastases using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida-Freitas, Daniela B.; Pinho, Marco C.; Otaduy, Maria C.G.; Costa Leite, Claudia da; Braga, Henrique F.; Meira-Freitas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) on cerebral metastases using the transfer constant (K trans ) assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate the ability of K trans measurements to predict midterm tumor outcomes after SRS. The study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Twenty-six adult patients with a total of 34 cerebral metastases underwent T1-weighted DCE MRI in a 1.5-T magnet at baseline (prior to SRS) and 4-8 weeks after treatment. Quantitative analysis of DCE MRI was performed by generating K trans parametric maps, and region-of-interest-based measurements were acquired for each metastasis. Conventional MRI was performed at least 16 weeks after SRS to assess midterm tumor outcome using volume variation. The mean (±SD) K trans value was 0.13 ± 0.11 min -1 at baseline and 0.08 ± 0.07 min -1 after 4-8 weeks post-treatment (p trans after SRS was predictive of tumor progression (hazard ratio = 1.50; 95 % CI = 1.16-1.70, p trans showed a sensitivity of 78 % and a specificity of 85 % for the prediction of progression at midterm follow-up. SRS was associated with a reduction of K trans values of the cerebral metastases in the early post-treatment period. Furthermore, K trans variation as assessed using DCE MRI may be helpful to predict midterm outcomes after SRS. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Yun [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun, E-mail: rad-ksh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Bong Joo [Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyeon Sook [Department of Radiology, St. Paul Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University, School of Medicine, Mokdong Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Youn [Department of Radiology, Yeouido St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea (Korea, Republic of); Song, Byung Joo [Department of Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  10. Characterization of the enhancing lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with interstitial mammoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Kim, Hyeon Sook; Cha, Eun Suk; Kim, Ji Youn; Song, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to categorize the morphologic and kinetic features of enhancing lesions in breasts with interstitial mammoplasty using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and to assess factors predictive of breast cancer. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological data of 21 enhancing lesions in 19 patients with interstitial mammoplasty, who underwent breast magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy or an operation in our hospital from September 2008 to July 2012. These lesions were sorted by morphological and kinetic features and final assessment category according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Results: Nine cases were confirmed to be ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 2) and invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 7), and the remaining 12 cases were fibrocystic disease (n = 2), fibroadenoma (n = 2), fat necrosis (n = 1), foreign body granuloma (n = 3) and silicone mastitis (n = 1). Common features of malignancy included irregular shape (50.0%), spiculated margins (75.0%), heterogeneous enhancement (50.0%) and type III kinetic pattern (87.5%). The correlations of margins and kinetic curve pattern with benignity and malignancy approached statistical significance (p = 0.02, respectively). We found no correlation for shape (p = 0.33) or internal enhancement (p = 0.42) between lesion types. The malignancy rate of enhancing lesions was 42.8% (9/21). The sensitivity and specificity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were 100% and 16.67%, respectively. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging were 47.38%, 100% and 52.38%. Overall inter-observer agreement for the kinetic curve pattern was good (κ = 0.67). Moderate agreement was seen in describing the shape, margin, enhancement and assessing the final category (κ = 0.59, 0.46, 0.58 and 0.49, respectively). Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging had a high

  11. Combined dynamic contrast-enhancement and serial 3D-subtraction analysis in magnetic resonance imaging of osteoid osteomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalle, T. von; Winkler, P. [Klinikum Stuttgart Olgahospital, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Stuttgart (Germany); Langendoerfer, M.; Fernandez, F.F. [Klinikum Stuttgart Olgahospital, Department of Paediatric Orthopaedics, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively correlate the results of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histological and clinical diagnoses in patients with osteoid osteomas. Fifty-four patients with the MR diagnosis of osteoid osteoma were studied. MRI (1.5 Tesla) consisted of thin-section STIR sequences, dynamic 3D T1 gradient echo sequences during application of contrast material, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation (maximum voxel size 0.6 x 0.6 x 3.0 mm). Evaluation was focused on serial image subtraction during the early phase after contrast injection and on time-intensity curves. The surrounding edema was helpful in finding the nidus in each lesion. In 49 of 54 patients (90.7%), the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was certain or highly probable (sensitivity 1.0, positive predictive value 0.91). A total of 38 of 54 osteoid osteomas were histologically proven. Five MRI diagnoses were regarded as false positives. A similar proportion has been reported for computed tomography. Tailored high-resolution MR examinations with dynamic contrast enhancement can reliably diagnose osteoid osteomas and exactly localize the nidus without radiation exposure. We propose a stepwise approach with STIR sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation. (orig.)

  12. Combined dynamic contrast-enhancement and serial 3D-subtraction analysis in magnetic resonance imaging of osteoid osteomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalle, T. von; Winkler, P.; Langendoerfer, M.; Fernandez, F.F.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively correlate the results of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histological and clinical diagnoses in patients with osteoid osteomas. Fifty-four patients with the MR diagnosis of osteoid osteoma were studied. MRI (1.5 Tesla) consisted of thin-section STIR sequences, dynamic 3D T1 gradient echo sequences during application of contrast material, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation (maximum voxel size 0.6 x 0.6 x 3.0 mm). Evaluation was focused on serial image subtraction during the early phase after contrast injection and on time-intensity curves. The surrounding edema was helpful in finding the nidus in each lesion. In 49 of 54 patients (90.7%), the diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was certain or highly probable (sensitivity 1.0, positive predictive value 0.91). A total of 38 of 54 osteoid osteomas were histologically proven. Five MRI diagnoses were regarded as false positives. A similar proportion has been reported for computed tomography. Tailored high-resolution MR examinations with dynamic contrast enhancement can reliably diagnose osteoid osteomas and exactly localize the nidus without radiation exposure. We propose a stepwise approach with STIR sequences, dynamic contrast-enhanced scanning, and high-resolution postcontrast T1 spin echo sequences with fat saturation. (orig.)

  13. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y.; Maruyama, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  14. Detection of eosinophilic myocarditis using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, N.; Murakami, Y.; Shimada, T.; Kashima, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Inoue, S.-I.; Sugamori, T.; Katoh, H.; Ishibashi, Y. [Shimane Medical Univ., The Fourth Dept. of Internal Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan); Maruyama, R. [Shimane Medical Univ., Dept. of Laboratory Medicine, Izumo City, Shimane (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome is characterized by idiopathic eosinophilia in the peripheral blood and multiorgan dysfunction secondary to mature eosinophil infiltration. It is essential to diagnose myocardial involvement in the early stage of the disease when active myocarditis due to cardiotoxic substances from eosinophils is still taking place, but clinical tools for the diagnosis of myocardial lesions in patients without overt cardiac dysfunction are not yet available. We present a case of successful detection of myocarditis due to hypereosinophilic syndrome by gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaascetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (author)

  15. Fast magnetic resonance fingerprinting for dynamic contrast-enhanced studies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuning; Wang, Charlie Y; Anderson, Christian E; Liu, Yuchi; Hu, He; Johansen, Mette L; Ma, Dan; Jiang, Yun; Ramos-Estebanez, Ciro; Brady-Kalnay, Susann; Griswold, Mark A; Flask, Chris A; Yu, Xin

    2018-05-09

    The goal of this study was to develop a fast MR fingerprinting (MRF) method for simultaneous T 1 and T 2 mapping in DCE-MRI studies in mice. The MRF sequences based on balanced SSFP and fast imaging with steady-state precession were implemented and evaluated on a 7T preclinical scanner. The readout used a zeroth-moment-compensated variable-density spiral trajectory that fully sampled the entire k-space and the inner 10 × 10 k-space with 48 and 4 interleaves, respectively. In vitro and in vivo studies of mouse brain were performed to evaluate the accuracy of MRF measurements with both fully sampled and undersampled data. The application of MRF to dynamic T 1 and T 2 mapping in DCE-MRI studies were demonstrated in a mouse model of heterotopic glioblastoma using gadolinium-based and dysprosium-based contrast agents. The T 1 and T 2 measurements in phantom showed strong agreement between the MRF and the conventional methods. The MRF with spiral encoding allowed up to 8-fold undersampling without loss of measurement accuracy. This enabled simultaneous T 1 and T 2 mapping with 2-minute temporal resolution in DCE-MRI studies. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting provides the opportunity for dynamic quantification of contrast agent distribution in preclinical tumor models on high-field MRI scanners. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piironen, A.; Kivisaari, R.; Pitkaeranta, P.; Poutanen, V.P.; Laippala, P.; Laurila, P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Eleven piglets with haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis and nine piglets with oedematous pancreatitis were imaged using a multi-breath-hold TurboFLASH (TR 6.5 ms, TE 3 ms, TI 300 ms, flip angle 8 , three slices) pre-excited T1-weighted sequence with an IV bolus injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA, 0.3 mmol/kg) as a contrast agent to show dynamic contrast enhancement of the pancreas by MRI. All piglets were imaged according to the same protocol before inducing the disease. Following the IV Gd-DTPA bolus, time-enhancement curve of the pancreas during haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis was significantly lower than during oedematous pancreatitis. The enhancement curves for the healthy piglets and piglets with oedematous pancreatitis did not differ significantly. Each piglet served as its own control. Because the results of this initial study are similar to those obtained with contrast-enhanced CT, we conclude that our results may encourage further clinical trials, and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI may be an alternative to the established method of CT for diagnosing acute haemorrhagic necrotizing pancreatitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  17. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain revisited with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasali, N.; Cubuk, R.; Aricak, M.; Ozarar, M.; Saydam, B.; Nur, H.; Tuncbilek, N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to assess the contrast enhancement patterns of the retrodiscal tissue with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) with respect to different temporomandibular joint disc pathologies. Additionally, we questioned the relationship between the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the contrast enhancement pattern of the retrodiscal tissue regardless of the TMJ disc position. Materials and methods: 52 joints of 26 patients (4 males and 22 females) who have pain in at least at one of their TMJ were included in this study. For the qualitative analysis, the joints were divided into four groups in terms of their disc positions: normal (1), partially displaced with or without reduction (2), totally dislocated with reduction (3) and totally dislocated without reduction (4). Besides, two different joint groups were constituted, namely the painful group and painless group according to the clinical findings without taking the TMJ disc positions into account. Quantitative analyses were made by means of measuring signal intensity ratios (SI) ratio at the retrodiscal tissue (from internal side and external side of the each joint) using DCE-MRI and these measurements were analyzed with paired samples t test to define the difference between the measurements. At the second stage, the time-dependent arithmetical mean values of the SI ratios were calculated for each joint group and significant differences between the groups were questioned using analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Besides, painful and painless groups which were classified on the basis of the clinical data were compared according to the mean SI ratios found for each joint and the significant differences between these two groups were assessed by means of Student's T test. The results were assessed in 95% confidence interval where the significance level was p < 0.05. Results: A significant difference was observed between the internal and external contrast enhancement of the joints with partial

  18. Acute myocardial ischemia: magnetic resonance contrast enhancement with gadolinium-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.; Higgins, C.B.; Ehman, R.L.; Revel, D.; Sievers, R.; Brasch, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) was used to improve the diagnostic utility of magnetic resonance (MR) in detecting early ischemia, before the onset of infarction. Following one minute of left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, 9 dogs were intraveneously injected with either 0.5 mM/kg of Gd-DTPA (6 dogs) or normal saline (3 dogs). There was no visible difference in intensity or alterations in magnetic relaxation times between normal and ischemic myocardium in the control (saline-injected) animals. The Gd-DTPA-injected dogs had a well-defined segment of high intensity representing the ischemic myocardium in the anterior wall of the left ventricle. Both T1 and T2 were significantly shortened in the normal myocardium of the Gd-DTPA animals, but relatively greater T2 relaxation rate enhancement resulted in reduced intensity of normal myocardium, thus increasing contrast with ischemic myocardium. It is concluded that Gd-DTPA has the potential to expand the sensitivity and diagnostic utility of MR in the study of occlusive coronary artery disease

  19. Cross-linkable liposomes stabilize a magnetic resonance contrast-enhancing polymeric fastener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cartney E; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-04-08

    Liposomes are commonly used to deliver drugs and contrast agents to their target site in a controlled manner. One of the greatest obstacles in the performance of such delivery vehicles is their stability in the presence of serum. Here, we demonstrate a method to stabilize a class of liposomes that load gadolinium, a magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent, as a model cargo on their surfaces. We hypothesized that the sequential adsorption of a gadolinium-binding chitosan fastener on the liposome surface followed by covalent cross-linking of the lipid bilayer would provide enhanced stability and improved MR signal in the presence of human serum. To investigate this hypothesis, liposomes composed of diyne-containing lipids were assembled and functionalized via chitosan conjugated with a hydrophobic anchor and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This postadsorption cross-linking strategy served to stabilize the thermodynamically favorable association between liposome and polymeric fastener. Furthermore, the chitosan-coated, cross-linked liposomes proved more effective as delivery vehicles of gadolinium than uncross-linked liposomes due to the reduced liposome degradation and chitosan desorption. Overall, this study demonstrates a useful method to stabilize a broad class of particles used for systemic delivery of various molecular payloads.

  20. Vessel Wall Inflammation of Takayasu Arteritis Detected by Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Association with Disease Distribution and Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Kato

    Full Text Available The assessment of the distribution and activity of vessel wall inflammation is clinically important in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a useful tool, but the clinical utility of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE in Takayasu arteritis has yet to be determined. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the utility of LGE in assessing vessel wall inflammation and disease activity in Takayasu arteritis.We enrolled 49 patients with Takayasu arteritis who had undergone 1.5 T MRI. Patients were divided into Active (n = 19 and Inactive disease (n = 30 groups. The distribution of vessel wall inflammation using angiography and LGE was assessed by qualitative analysis. In 79% and 63% of patients in Active and Inactive groups, respectively, greater distribution of vessel wall inflammation was observed with LGE than with conventional angiography. MRI values of pre- and post-contrast signal-to-noise ratios (SNR, SNR increment (post-SNR minus pre-SNR, pre- and post-contrast contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR, and CNR increment (post-CNR minus pre-CNR were evaluated at arterial wall sites with the highest signal intensity using quantitative analysis of post-contrast LGE images. No statistically significant differences in MRI parameters were observed between Active and Inactive groups. Contrast-enhanced MRI was unable to accurately detect active disease.Contrast-enhanced MRI has utility in detecting the distribution of vessel wall inflammation but has less utility in assessing disease activity in Takayasu arteritis.

  1. Marginal erosive discovertebral ''Romanus'' lesions in ankylosing spondylitis demonstrated by contrast enhanced Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Kos-Golja, M.; Rozman, B.; McCall, I.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To assess the value of Gd-DTPA magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the demonstration of marginal destructive discovertebral Romanus lesions in ankylosing spondylitis.Design and patients. A prospective study of Gd-DTPA MR imaging was performed in 39 patients with a clinical diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis and typical Romanus lesions seen on radiographs of the thoracolumbar spine. MR morphological appearances and signal intensity changes at the discovertebral junctions were analysed and compared with the radiographic findings.Results. Ninety-nine discovertebral junctions with Romanus lesions showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted and high signal on T2-weighted and T1-weighted postcontrast images at the vertebral corners consistent with oedematous hyperaemic inflammatory tissue. There were nine discovertebral junctions with similar MR findings but normal radiographs. Fifty-three discovertebral junctions showed syndesmophyte formation with increased signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images with no contrast enhancement. Sixty-five discovertebral junctions showed a mixture of radiographic features and varied high and low signal changes at the vertebral rim on MR imaging with rims of enhancement in the vertebral body following contrast administration.Conclusion. Gd-DTPA MR imaging demonstrates a variable signal pattern and degree of contrast enhancement which may reflect the evolutionary stages of discovertebral enthesitis in ankylosing spondylitis. MR imaging may identify early erosive changes in radiographically normal vertebra. The role of MR imaging needs further investigation. (orig.)

  2. A prospective study on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of testicular lesions: distinctive features of Leydig cell tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manganaro, Lucia; Vinci, Valeria; Saldari, Matteo; Bernardo, Silvia; Cantisani, Vito; Catalano, Carlo; Pozza, Carlotta; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pofi, Riccardo; Lenzi, Andrea; Isidori, Andrea M.; Scialpi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Up to 20 % of incidentally found testicular lesions are benign Leydig cell tumours (LCTs). This study evaluates the role of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the identification of LCTs in a large prospective cohort study. We enrolled 44 consecutive patients with at least one solid non-palpable testicular lesion who underwent scrotal MRI. Margins of the lesions, signal intensity and pattern of wash-in and wash-out were analysed by two radiologists. The frequency distribution of malignant and benign MRI features in the different groups was compared by using the chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. The sensitivity of scrotal MRI to diagnose LCTs was 89.47 % with 95.65 % specificity; sensitivity for malignant lesions was 95.65 % with 80.95 % specificity. A markedly hypointense signal on T2-WI, rapid and marked wash-in followed by a prolonged washout were distinctive features significantly associated with LCTs. Malignant lesions were significantly associated with blurred margins, weak hypointense signal on T2-WI,and weak and progressive wash-in. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 93 %. LCTs have distinctive contrast-enhanced MRI features that allow the differential diagnosis of incidental testicular lesions. (orig.)

  3. A prospective study on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of testicular lesions: distinctive features of Leydig cell tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manganaro, Lucia; Vinci, Valeria; Saldari, Matteo; Bernardo, Silvia; Cantisani, Vito; Catalano, Carlo [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Radiology, Rome (Italy); Pozza, Carlotta; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Pofi, Riccardo; Lenzi, Andrea; Isidori, Andrea M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Experimental Medicine, Rome (Italy); Scialpi, Michele [Perugia University, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Department of Surgical and Biomedical Sciences, Division of Radiology 2, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    Up to 20 % of incidentally found testicular lesions are benign Leydig cell tumours (LCTs). This study evaluates the role of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the identification of LCTs in a large prospective cohort study. We enrolled 44 consecutive patients with at least one solid non-palpable testicular lesion who underwent scrotal MRI. Margins of the lesions, signal intensity and pattern of wash-in and wash-out were analysed by two radiologists. The frequency distribution of malignant and benign MRI features in the different groups was compared by using the chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. The sensitivity of scrotal MRI to diagnose LCTs was 89.47 % with 95.65 % specificity; sensitivity for malignant lesions was 95.65 % with 80.95 % specificity. A markedly hypointense signal on T2-WI, rapid and marked wash-in followed by a prolonged washout were distinctive features significantly associated with LCTs. Malignant lesions were significantly associated with blurred margins, weak hypointense signal on T2-WI,and weak and progressive wash-in. The overall diagnostic accuracy was 93 %. LCTs have distinctive contrast-enhanced MRI features that allow the differential diagnosis of incidental testicular lesions. (orig.)

  4. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in carotid artery disease: does automated image registration improve image quality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke, Jan; Larsen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) is a noninvasive imaging alternative to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for patients with carotid artery disease. In DSA, image quality can be improved by shifting the mask image if the patient has moved during angiography. This study investigated whether such image registration may also help to improve the image quality of carotid MRA. Data from 370 carotid MRA examinations of patients likely to have carotid artery disease were prospectively collected. The standard nonregistered MRAs were compared to automatically linear, affine and warp registered MRA by using three image quality parameters: the vessel detection probability (VDP) in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in MIP images, and contrast-to-noise ratio in three-dimensional image volumes. A body shift of less than 1 mm occurred in 96.2% of cases. Analysis of variance revealed no significant influence of image registration and body shift on image quality (p > 0.05). In conclusion, standard contrast-enhanced carotid MRA usually requires no image registration to improve image quality and is generally robust against any naturally occurring body shift. (orig.)

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging Lesion and Contrast Enhancement May Represent Infectious Intracranial Aneurysm in Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Min; Rice, Cory; Marquardt, Robert J; Zhang, Lucy Q; Khoury, Jean; Thatikunta, Prateek; Buletko, Andrew B; Hardman, Julian; Uchino, Ken; Wisco, Dolora

    2017-01-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysm (IIA) can complicate infective endocarditis (IE). We aimed to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of IIA. We reviewed IIAs among 116 consecutive patients with active IE by conducting a neurological evaluation at a single tertiary referral center from January 2015 to July 2016. MRIs and digital cerebral angiograms (DSA) were reviewed to identify MRI characteristics of IIAs. MRI susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) was performed to collect data on cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) and sulcal SWI lesions. Out of 116 persons, 74 (63.8%) underwent DSA. IIAs were identified in 13 (17.6% of DSA, 11.2% of entire cohort) and 10 patients with aneurysms underwent MRI with SWI sequence. Nine (90%) out of 10 persons with IIAs had CMB >5 mm or sulcal lesions in SWI (9 in sulci, 6 in parenchyma, and 5 in both). Five out of 8 persons who underwent MRI brain with contrast had enhancement within the SWI lesions. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, both sulcal SWI lesions (p < 0.001, OR 69, 95% CI 7.8-610) and contrast enhancement (p = 0.007, OR 16.5, 95% CI 2.3-121) were found to be significant predictors of the presence of IIAs. In the individuals with IE who underwent DSA and MRI, we found that neuroimaging characteristics, such as sulcal SWI lesion with or without contrast enhancement, are associated with the presence of IIA. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Mammography combined with breast dynamic contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of early breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakun He; Guohui Xu; Jin Ren; Bin Feng; Xiaolei Dong; Hao Lu; Changjiu He

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the application of mammography combined with breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Methods Mammography and DCE-MRI were performed for 120 patients with breast cancer (malignant, 102; benign; 18). Results The sensitivity of mammography for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 66.67%, specificity was 77.78%, and accuracy was 68.33%. The sensitivity of MRI for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 94.12%, specificity was 88.89%, and accuracy was 93.33%. However, the sensitivity of mammography combined with DCE-MRI volume imaging with enhanced water signal (VIEWS) scanning for early diagnosis of breast cancer was 97.06%, specificity was 94.44%, and accuracy was 96.67%. Conclusion Mammography combined with DCE-MRI increased the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of diagnosing early breast cancer.

  7. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in neoadjuvant chemotherapy monitoring: a comparison with breast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Valentina; Ravaioli, Sara; Vacondio, Rita; Coriani, Chiara; Caffarri, Sabrina; Sghedoni, Roberto; Nitrosi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Moira; Gasparini, Elisa; Masini, Cristina; Bisagni, Giancarlo; Falco, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Braglia, Luca; Del Prato, Alberto; Malavolti, Ivana; Ginocchi, Vladimiro; Pattacini, Pierpaolo

    2017-09-11

    Neoadjuvant-chemotherapy (NAC) is considered the standard treatment for locally advanced breast carcinomas. Accurate assessment of disease response is fundamental to increase the chances of successful breast-conserving surgery and to avoid local recurrence. The purpose of this study was to compare contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) and contrast-enhanced-MRI (MRI) in the evaluation of tumor response to NAC. This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and written informed consent was obtained. Fifty-four consenting women with breast cancer and indication of NAC were consecutively enrolled between October 2012 and December 2014. Patients underwent both CESM and MRI before, during and after NAC. MRI was performed first, followed by CESM within 3 days. Response to therapy was evaluated for each patient, comparing the size of the residual lesion measured on CESM and MRI performed after NAC to the pathological response on surgical specimens (gold standard), independently of and blinded to the results of the other test. The agreement between measurements was evaluated using Lin's coefficient. The agreement between measurements using CESM and MRI was tested at each step of the study, before, during and after NAC. And last of all, the variation in the largest dimension of the tumor on CESM and MRI was assessed according to the parameters set in RECIST 1.1 criteria, focusing on pathological complete response (pCR). A total of 46 patients (85%) completed the study. CESM predicted pCR better than MRI (Lin's coefficient 0.81 and 0.59, respectively). Both methods tend to underestimate the real extent of residual tumor (mean 4.1mm in CESM, 7.5mm in MRI). The agreement between measurements using CESM and MRI was 0.96, 0.94 and 0.76 before, during and after NAC respectively. The distinction between responders and non-responders with CESM and MRI was identical for 45/46 patients. In the assessment of CR, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary lesions: Description of a technique aiming clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel; Optazaite, Elzbieta; Sommer, Gregor; Safi, Seyer; Heussel, Claus Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    To propose a technique for evaluation of pulmonary lesions using contrast-enhanced MRI; to assess morphological patterns of enhancement and correlate quantitative analysis with histopathology. Material and methods: Thirty-six patients were prospectively studied. Volumetric-interpolated T1W images were obtained during consecutive breath holds after bolus triggered contrast injection. Volume coverage of first three acquisitions was limited (higher temporal resolution) and last acquisition obtained at 4th min. Two radiologists individually evaluated the patterns of enhancement. Region-of-interest-based signal intensity (SI)-time curves were created to assess quantitative parameters. Results: Readers agreed moderately to substantially concerning lesions’ enhancement pattern. SI-time curves could be created for all lesions. In comparison to benign, malignant lesions showed higher values of maximum enhancement, early peak, slope and 4th min enhancement. Early peak >15% showed 100% sensitivity to detect malignancy, maximum enhancement >40% showed 100% specificity. Conclusions: The proposed technique is robust, simple to perform and can be applied in clinical scenario. It allows visual evaluation of enhancement pattern/progression together with creation of SI-time curves and assessment of derived quantitative parameters. Perfusion analysis was highly sensitive to detect malignancy, in accordance to what is recommended by most recent guidelines on imaging evaluation of pulmonary lesions

  9. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of pulmonary lesions: Description of a technique aiming clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Radiology Department, German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum – DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048 900 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Optazaite, Elzbieta, E-mail: optazaite@andrulis.eu [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.sommer@usb.ch [Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Basel, Petersgraben 4, CH-4031 Basel (Switzerland); Safi, Seyer, E-mail: seyer.safi@gmail.com [Surgery Department, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus Peter, E-mail: heussel@uni-heidelberg.de [Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik), University of Heidelberg, Amalienstraße 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center (TLRC), Member of the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), Im Neuenheimer Feld 350, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2015-01-15

    To propose a technique for evaluation of pulmonary lesions using contrast-enhanced MRI; to assess morphological patterns of enhancement and correlate quantitative analysis with histopathology. Material and methods: Thirty-six patients were prospectively studied. Volumetric-interpolated T1W images were obtained during consecutive breath holds after bolus triggered contrast injection. Volume coverage of first three acquisitions was limited (higher temporal resolution) and last acquisition obtained at 4th min. Two radiologists individually evaluated the patterns of enhancement. Region-of-interest-based signal intensity (SI)-time curves were created to assess quantitative parameters. Results: Readers agreed moderately to substantially concerning lesions’ enhancement pattern. SI-time curves could be created for all lesions. In comparison to benign, malignant lesions showed higher values of maximum enhancement, early peak, slope and 4th min enhancement. Early peak >15% showed 100% sensitivity to detect malignancy, maximum enhancement >40% showed 100% specificity. Conclusions: The proposed technique is robust, simple to perform and can be applied in clinical scenario. It allows visual evaluation of enhancement pattern/progression together with creation of SI-time curves and assessment of derived quantitative parameters. Perfusion analysis was highly sensitive to detect malignancy, in accordance to what is recommended by most recent guidelines on imaging evaluation of pulmonary lesions.

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and pharmacokinetic models in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, Tobias; Hamm, Bernd; Hricak, Hedvig

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI enables noninvasive analysis of prostate vascularization as well as tumour angiogenesis and capillary permeability characteristics in prostate cancers. Pharmacokinetic models summarizing the complex information provided by signal intensity-time curves for a few quantitative pharmacokinetic parameters are increasingly being used in the routine clinical setting. This review consists of two parts. The first part discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the MR pulse sequences that can be used for performing DCE-MRI and also of the most widely used pharmacokinetic parameters and models and the parameters they describe. The second part outlines the range of current and potential future clinical applications of DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic parametric maps in patients with prostate cancer, with reference to the current scientific literature on the topic. The potential clinical applications of DCE-MRI for prostate cancer include detection, localization, and staging, differentiation of recurrent cancer and estimation of the patient's prognosis, as well as monitoring of treatment response. (orig.)

  11. Evaluation of articular cartilage degeneration with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, Mikihiro

    1994-01-01

    The evaluation of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) concentration is important in the clinical diagnosis of articular cartilage degeneration. Glycosaminoglycan provides a large number of fixed negative charges. When manganese ion (Mn 2+ ) is administered to the cartilage matrix, this cation diffuses into the matrix and accumulates in accordance with the distribution of fixed negative charges owing to the electrostatic interaction. The accumulation of Mn 2+ causes a shortening of the relaxation times, resulting in high signal intensity in the MR image, when a T 1 -weighted image is obtained. The present study applied this new method to the articular cartilage to evaluate the degree of the cartilage degeneration. Small pieces of articular cartilage were dissected from the knee joints of young chickens. Experimentally degenerated articular cartilage was obtained by treating the specimen with various concentrations of papain solution. Then specimens were soaked in manganese solution until they obtained equilibrium and served for MR microimaging. The fixed charge density (FCD), the concentration of Mn 2+ and Na + , T 1 and T 2 relaxation times were also measured. In degenerated cartilage, lower accumulation of Mn 2+ due to lower GAG density caused a lower than normal signal intensity. Thus, administration of Mn 2+ enhances the biochemical change in the cartilage matrix in terms of differences in the relaxation time. The actual signal intensity on MRI of each specimen corresponded to the theoretical signal intensity, which was calculated from the FCD. It was concluded that MR images taken with contrast enhancement by Mn 2+ give direct visual information about the GAG density in the articular cartilage. MRI with cationic contrast agent could develop into a new method for early non-invasive diagnosis of cartilage dysfunction and degeneration. (author)

  12. Average arterial input function for quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neck nodal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Lee, Nancy; Stambuk, Hilda; Wang, Ya; Huang, Wei; Thaler, Howard T; Patel, Snehal G; Shah, Jatin P; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    The present study determines the feasibility of generating an average arterial input function (Avg-AIF) from a limited population of patients with neck nodal metastases to be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data in clinical trials of larger populations. Twenty patients (mean age 50 years [range 27–77 years]) with neck nodal metastases underwent pretreatment DCE-MRI studies with a temporal resolution of 3.75 to 7.5 sec on a 1.5T clinical MRI scanner. Eleven individual AIFs (Ind-AIFs) met the criteria of expected enhancement pattern and were used to generate Avg-AIF. Tofts model was used to calculate pharmacokinetic DCE-MRI parameters. Bland-Altman plots and paired Student t-tests were used to describe significant differences between the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from individual and average AIFs. Ind-AIFs obtained from eleven patients were used to calculate the Avg-AIF. No overall significant difference (bias) was observed for the transfer constant (K trans ) measured with Ind-AIFs compared to Avg-AIF (p = 0.20 for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and p = 0.18 for histogram median analysis). Similarly, no overall significant difference was observed for interstitial fluid space volume fraction (v e ) measured with Ind-AIFs compared to Avg-AIF (p = 0.48 for ROI analysis and p = 0.93 for histogram median analysis). However, the Bland-Altman plot suggests that as K trans increases, the Ind-AIF estimates tend to become proportionally higher than the Avg-AIF estimates. We found no statistically significant overall bias in K trans or v e estimates derived from Avg-AIF, generated from a limited population, as compared with Ind-AIFs. However, further study is needed to determine whether calibration is needed across the range of K trans . The Avg-AIF obtained from a limited population may be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data in larger population studies with neck nodal metastases. Further validation of

  13. Multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging features of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced granulomatous prostatitis in five patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawada, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Goshima, Satoshi; Kondo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Noda, Yoshifumi; Tanahashi, Yukichi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Hoshi, Hiroaki [Gifu University Hospital, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    To evaluate the multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)-induced granulomatous prostatitis (GP). Magnetic resonance images obtained from five patients with histopathologically proven BCG-induced GP were retrospectively analyzed for tumor location, size, signal intensity on T2-weighted images (T2WI) and diffusion-weighted images (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and appearance on gadolinium-enhanced multiphase images. MR imaging findings were compared with histopathological findings. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced GP (size range, 9-40 mm; mean, 21.2 mm) were identified in the peripheral zone in all patients. The T2WI showed lower signal intensity compared with the normal peripheral zone. The DWIs demonstrated high signal intensity and low ADC values (range, 0.44-0.68 x 10(-3) mm2/sec; mean, 0.56 x 10(-3) mm2/sec), which corresponded to GP. Gadolinium-enhanced multiphase MR imaging performed in five patients showed early and prolonged ring enhancement in all cases of GP. Granulomatous tissues with central caseation necrosis were identified histologically, which corresponded to ring enhancement and a central low intensity area on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. The findings on T2WI, DWI, and gadolinium-enhanced images became gradually obscured with time. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-induced GP demonstrates early and prolonged ring enhancement on gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging which might be a key finding to differentiate it from prostate cancer.

  14. The role of dynamic contrast-enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the female pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, Evis, E-mail: es220@radiol.cam.ac.uk [University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Rockall, Andrea, E-mail: Andrea.Rockall@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, St Bartholomew' s Hospital, West Smithfield, London EC1A 7ED (United Kingdom); Rangarajan, Deepa, E-mail: rdrangarajan@googlemail.com [Department of Radiology, Box 218, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A., E-mail: rahel.kubik@ksb.ch [Institute of Radiology, Department of Medical Services, Kantonsspital Baden Im Ergel, CH-5404 Baden (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    Functional imaging by means of dynamic multiphase contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) is now part of the standard imaging protocols for evaluation of the female pelvis. DCE-MRI and DW-MRI are important MR imaging techniques which enable the radiologist to move from morphological to functional assessment of diseases of the female pelvis. This is mainly due to the limitations of morphologic imaging, particularly in lesion characterization, accurate lymph node staging, assessment of tumour response and inability to differentiate post-treatment changes from tumour recurrence. DCE-MRI improves the accuracy of T2WI in staging of endometrial cancer. It also helps differentiate tumour recurrence from radiation fibrosis in patients with cervical cancer. DCE-MRI improves characterization of cystic adnexal lesions and detection of small peritoneal implants in patients with ovarian cancer. DW-MRI is valuable in preoperative staging of patients with endometrial and cervical cancer, especially in detection of extra-uterine disease. It does increase reader's confidence for detection of recurrent disease in gynaecological malignancies and improves detection of small peritoneal implants in patients with ovarian cancer. In this review article we give an overview of both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI techniques, concentrating on their main clinical application in the female pelvis, and present a practical approach of the added value of these techniques according to the main pathological conditions, highlighting the pearls and pitfalls of each technique.

  15. Diagnosing upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with non-contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Direct Thrombus Imaging: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronkers, C E A; Klok, F A; van Haren, G R; Gleditsch, J; Westerlund, E; Huisman, M V; Kroft, L J M

    2018-03-01

    Diagnosing upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) can be challenging. Compression ultrasonography is often inconclusive because of overlying anatomic structures that hamper compressing veins. Contrast venography is invasive and has a risk of contrast allergy. Magnetic Resonance Direct Thrombus Imaging (MRDTI) and Three Dimensional Turbo Spin-echo Spectral Attenuated Inversion Recovery (3D TSE-SPAIR) are both non-contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences that can visualize a thrombus directly by the visualization of methemoglobin, which is formed in a fresh blood clot. MRDTI has been proven to be accurate in diagnosing deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the leg. The primary aim of this pilot study was to test the feasibility of diagnosing UEDVT with these MRI techniques. MRDTI and 3D TSE-SPAIR were performed in 3 pilot patients who were already diagnosed with UEDVT by ultrasonography or contrast venography. In all patients, UEDVT diagnosis could be confirmed by MRDTI and 3D TSE-SPAIR in all vein segments. In conclusion, this study showed that non-contrast MRDTI and 3D TSE-SPAIR sequences may be feasible tests to diagnose UEDVT. However diagnostic accuracy and management studies have to be performed before these techniques can be routinely used in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aortic Volumetry at Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography: Feasibility as a Sensitive Method for Monitoring Bicuspid Aortic Valve Aortopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Brian; Dubin, Iram; Rahman, Ozair; Ferreira Botelho, Marcos P; Naro, Nicholas; Carr, James C; Collins, Jeremy D; Barker, Alex J

    2017-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve patients can develop thoracic aortic aneurysms and therefore require serial imaging to monitor aortic growth. This study investigates the reliability of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) volumetry compared with 2-dimensional diameter measurements to identify thoracic aortic aneurysm growth. A retrospective, institutional review board-approved, and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant study was conducted on 20 bicuspid aortic valve patients (45 ± 8.9 years, 20% women) who underwent serial CEMRA with a minimum imaging follow-up of 11 months. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1.5 T with electrocardiogram-gated, time-resolved CEMRA. Independent observers measured the diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva (SOVs) and mid ascending aorta (MAA) as well as ascending aorta volume between the aortic valve annulus and innominate branch. Intraobserver/interobserver coefficient of variation (COV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were computed to assess reliability. Growth rates were calculated and assessed by Student t test (P volumetry. Three-dimensional CEMRA volumetry exhibited a larger effect when examining percentage growth, a better ICC, and a marginally lower COV. Volumetry may be more sensitive to growth and possibly less affected by error than diameter measurements.

  17. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich [Department of Radio-Oncology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Piringer, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.piringer@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Wels-Grieskirchen Medical Hospital, Wels (Austria); Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Saely, Christoph Hubert [Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Department of Radio-Oncology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Öfner, Dietmar [Department of Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance, computed tomography and contrast enhanced ultrasound in radiological multimodality assessment of peribiliary liver metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Granata

    Full Text Available We compared diagnostic performance of Magnetic Resonance (MR, Computed Tomography (CT and Ultrasound (US with (CEUS and without contrast medium to identify peribiliary metastasis.We identified 35 subjects with histological proven peribiliary metastases who underwent CEUS, CT and MR study. Four radiologists evaluated the presence of peribiliary lesions, using a 4-point confidence scale. Echogenicity, density and T1-Weigthed (T1-W, T2-W and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI signal intensity as well as the enhancement pattern during contrast studies on CEUS, CT and MR so as hepatobiliary-phase on MRI was assessed.All lesions were detected by MR. CT detected 8 lesions, while US/CEUS detected one lesion. According to the site of the lesion, respect to the bile duct and hepatic parenchyma: 19 (54.3% were periductal, 15 (42.8% were intra-periductal and 1 (2.8% was periductal-intrahepatic. According to the confidence scale MRI had the best diagnostic performance to assess the lesion. CT obtained lower diagnostic performance. There was no significant difference in MR signal intensity and contrast enhancement among all metastases (p>0.05. There was no significant difference in CT density and contrast enhancement among all metastases (p>0.05.MRI is the method of choice for biliary tract tumors but it does not allow a correct differential diagnosis among different histological types of metastasis. The presence of biliary tree dilatation without hepatic lesions on CT and US/CEUS study may be an indirect sign of peribiliary metastases and for this reason the patient should be evaluated by MRI.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of radiation therapy-induced microcirculation changes in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussanet, Quido G. de; Backes, Walter H.; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Padhani, Anwar R.; Baeten, Coen I.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Lambin, Philippe; Beets, Geerard L.; Engelshoven, Jos van; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) allows noninvasive evaluation of tumor microvasculature characteristics. This study evaluated radiation therapy related microvascular changes in locally advanced rectal cancer by DCE-MRI and histology. Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced-MRI was performed in 17 patients with primary rectal cancer. Seven patients underwent 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy radiation therapy (RT) (long RT) before DCE-MRI and 10 did not. Of these 10, 3 patients underwent five fractions of 5 Gy RT (short RT) in the week before surgery. The RT treated and nontreated groups were compared in terms of endothelial transfer coefficient (K PS , measured by DCE-MRI), microvessel density (MVD) (scored by immunoreactivity to CD31 and CD34), and tumor cell and endothelial cell proliferation (scored by immunoreactivity to Ki67). Results: Tumor K PS was 77% (p = 0.03) lower in the RT-treated group. Histogram analyses showed that RT reduced both magnitude and intratumor heterogeneity of K PS (p = 0.01). MVD was significantly lower (37%, p 0.03) in tumors treated with long RT than in nonirradiated tumors, but this was not the case with short RT. Endothelial cell proliferation was reduced with short RT (81%, p = 0.02) just before surgery, but not with long RT (p > 0.8). Tumor cell proliferation was reduced with both long (57%, p PS values showed significant radiation therapy related reductions in microvessel blood flow in locally advanced rectal cancer. These findings may be useful in evaluating effects of radiation combination therapies (e.g., chemoradiation or RT combined with antiangiogenesis therapy), to account for effects of RT alone

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, a biodegradable nanosized magnetic resonance contrast agent for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzuo Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rongzuo Xu1, Todd Lyle Kaneshiro1, Eun-Kee Jeong2, Dennis L Parker2, Zheng-Rong Lu31Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Department of Radiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging has been recently shown to be effective for diagnostic urography. High-resolution urographic images can be acquired with T1 contrast agents for the kidney and urinary tract with minimal noise in the abdomen. Currently, clinical contrast agents are low molecular weight agents and can rapidly extravasate from blood circulation, leading to slow contrast agent elimination through kidney and consequently providing limited contrast enhancement in urinary tract. In this study, a new biodegradable macromolecular contrast agent, nanoglobule-G4-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A, was prepared by conjugating Gd-DO3A chelates on the surface of a generation 4 nanoglobule, poly-l-lysine octa(3-aminopropylsilsesquioxane dendrimer, via a disulfide spacer, where the carrier had a precisely defined nanosize that is far smaller than the renal filtration threshold. The in vivo contrast enhancement and dynamic imaging of the urinary tract of the agent was evaluated in nude mice using a low molecular weight agent Gd(DTPA-BMA as a control. The agent eliminated rapidly from blood circulation and accumulated more abundantly in urinary tract than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The fast elimination kinetics is ideal for functional evaluation of the kidneys. The morphology of the kidneys and urinary tract was better visualized by the biodegradable nanoglobular contrast agent than Gd(DTPA-BMA. The agent also resulted in low liver contrast enhancement, indicating low nonspecific tissue deposition. These features render the G4 nanoglobule-cystamine-(Gd-DO3A conjugate a promising contrast agent for magnetic

  1. Appearance of high signal intensity and gadolinium-DTPA contrast enhancement in hypertrophied myocardium by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Yamada, Naoaki; Nagata, Seiki

    1989-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the potential role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluating myocardial tissue characterization in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). ECG-gated MRI images were acquired in 32 HCM patients and 30 patients with hypertensive heart disease (HHD), using a 1.5 T superconducting magnet system. The thickened areas were depicted as high signal intensities in the septum of 12 HCM patients (38%) and the endocardium of 5 HHD patients (17%). Echocardiography revealed that MRI appearance of high signal intensity was associated with more thickened myocardial wall. For evaluable 16 patients receiving i.v. injection of Gd-DTPA in a dose of 0.1 mM/kg, enhancement effects were observed in 10 patients (63%). High signal intensity appearing in the hypertrophied myocardium, as well as contrast enhancement, may not be characteristic of HCM, but reflect the likelihood of myocardial degeneration associated with the hypertrophied myocardium. Although MRI may not be capable of differentiating tissue characterization in HCM from that in HHD, it may provide different information about tissue characterization in the hypertrophied myocardium from that obtained by other techniques. (N.K.)

  2. Role of technetium-99m sestamibi scintimammography and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of indeterminate mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiling, R.; Moser, R.; Meyer, G.; Tatsch, K.; Hahn, K.; Khalkhali, I.; Sommer, H.; Willemsen, F.; Pfluger, T.

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated and compared technetium-99m sestamibi scintimammography (SMM) and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results in patients with indeterminate mammograms to determine whether either technique can improve the sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of breast carcinoma. From 123 consecutive patients who underwent physical examination, mammography, SMM, and histopathologic confirmation, a subgroup of 82 patients presenting with indeterminate mammograms was studied. Sixty-eight patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI. SMM results were scored on the basis of the intensity and pattern of sestamibi uptake. MRI images were scored on the basis of signal intensity increase after administration of contrast material as well as the enhancement pattern and speed of gadolinium uptake. The results obtained with the two techniques were compared and related to the final histopathologic diagnoses. Considering indeterminate findings as positive, the sensitivity of SMM was 79% and the specificity, 70%. MRI displayed a sensitivity of 84% and a specificity of 49%. When indeterminate results were considered negative, the sensitivity and specificity of SMM were 62% and 83%, respectively. MRI revealed a sensitivity and specificity of 56% and 79%, respectively. The calculated sensitivities and specificities demonstrate the diagnostic limitations of both SMM and MRI in the evaluation of patients with indeterminate mammographic findings. Due to the higher specificity, SMM may be the preferred modality in the evaluation of selected patients with breast abnormalities. (orig.)

  3. Contrast-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance imaging findings of hepatocellular carcinoma and their correlation with histopathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Okkes I. [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, PK: 18 Talas 38280, Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: oikarahan@yahoo.com; Yikilmaz, Ali [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, PK: 18 Talas 38280, Kayseri (Turkey); Artis, Tarik [Department of General Surgery, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, PK: 18 Talas 38280, Kayseri (Turkey); Canoz, Ozlem [Department of Pathology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, PK: 18 Talas 38280, Kayseri (Turkey); Coskun, Abdulhakim [Department of Radiology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, PK: 18 Talas 38280, Kayseri (Turkey); Torun, Edip [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastrenterology, Erciyes University Medical Faculty, PK: 18 Talas 38280, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlations of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of large (>5 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas with tumor size and histopathologic findings. Materials and methods: MR imaging was performed in 30 patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma. The imaging protocol included non-contrast, hepatic arterial, portal venous and late phases. The signal intensities relative to the liver, enhancement patterns and the morphologic features of the lesions were evaluated in relation to size and degree of differentiation. Results: On histopathologic examination, 12 of 30 (40%) tumors were well-differentiated (grade 1), 6 of 30 (20%) were moderately differentiated (grades 2 and 3) and 12 of 30 (40%) were poorly differentiated (grade 4). Tumor size, tumor boundary, serum alpha-fetoprotein level and portal vein invasion were found to have statistically significant correlations with the degree of differentiation (p < 0.05). Portal vein invasion, capsule formation and tumor surface characteristics showed statistically significant correlations with tumor size (p < 0.05). Conclusion: MR imaging findings of hepatocellular carcinomas larger than 5 cm are partially dependent on tumor size and degree of differentiation.

  4. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pancreatic Cancer: Characteristics and Correlation With Histopathologic Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wanling; Li, Na; Zhao, Weiwei; Ren, Jing; Wei, Mengqi; Yang, Yong; Wang, Yingmei; Fu, Xin; Zhang, Zhuoli; Larson, Andrew C; Huan, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify diffusion and perfusion abnormalities and evaluate correlation between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), MR perfusion and histopathologic parameters of pancreatic cancer (PC). Eighteen patients with PC underwent diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Parameters of DCE-MRI and ADC of cancer and non-cancerous tissue were compared. Correlation between the rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the arterial blood into the extravascular extracellular space (K, volume of the extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue (Ve), and ADC of PC and histopathologic parameters were analyzed. The rate constant that represents transfer of contrast agent from the extravascular extracellular space into blood plasma, K, tissue volume fraction occupied by vascular space, and ADC of PC were significantly lower than nontumoral pancreases. Ve of PC was significantly higher than that of nontumoral pancreas. Apparent diffusion coefficient and K values of PC were negatively correlated to fibrosis content and fibroblast activation protein staining score. Fibrosis content was positively correlated to Ve. Apparent diffusion coefficient values and parameters of DCE-MRI can differentiate PC from nontumoral pancreases. There are correlations between ADC, K, Ve, and fibrosis content of PC. Fibroblast activation protein staining score of PC is negatively correlated to ADC and K. Apparent diffusion coefficient, K, and Ve may be feasible to predict prognosis of PC.

  5. Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data to Constrain a Positron Emission Tomography Kinetic Model: Theory and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob U. Fluckiger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We show how dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI data can constrain a compartmental model for analyzing dynamic positron emission tomography (PET data. We first develop the theory that enables the use of DCE-MRI data to separate whole tissue time activity curves (TACs available from dynamic PET data into individual TACs associated with the blood space, the extravascular-extracellular space (EES, and the extravascular-intracellular space (EIS. Then we simulate whole tissue TACs over a range of physiologically relevant kinetic parameter values and show that using appropriate DCE-MRI data can separate the PET TAC into the three components with accuracy that is noise dependent. The simulations show that accurate blood, EES, and EIS TACs can be obtained as evidenced by concordance correlation coefficients >0.9 between the true and estimated TACs. Additionally, provided that the estimated DCE-MRI parameters are within 10% of their true values, the errors in the PET kinetic parameters are within approximately 20% of their true values. The parameters returned by this approach may provide new information on the transport of a tracer in a variety of dynamic PET studies.

  6. Comparison of infarct size changes with delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and electrocardiogram QRS scoring during the 6 months after acutely reperfused myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, L.E.; Ripa, R.S.; Grande, P.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Magnetic resonance imaging using the delayed contrast-enhanced (DE-MRI) method can be used for characterizing and quantifying myocardial infarction (MI). Electrocardiogram (ECG) score after the acute phase of MI can be used to estimate the portion of left ventricular myocardium...

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can play a role in predicting flare in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M., E-mail: c.m.nusman@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Doctor Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatrics, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Doctor Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatrics, Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061 AE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J. Merlijn van den [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W. [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Subclinical synovitis is present in 40% of the inactive JIA patients. • One third of the inactive JIA patients flared during 2-year clinical follow-up. • DCE-MRI can play a role in predicting clinical flare in JIA patients. - Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to determine whether conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters of a previously affected target joint in patients with clinically inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have prognostic meaning for a flare of joint inflammation during follow-up. Material and methods: Thirty-two JIA patients with clinically inactive disease at the time of MRI of the knee were prospectively included. DCE-MRI provided both descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shapes, representing functional properties of the synovium. Conventional MRI outcome measures included validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow edema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. During a 2-year period the patients were monitored by their pediatric rheumatologist and clinical flares were registered. Results: MRI analysis revealed synovial hypertrophy in 13 (39.4%) of the clinically inactive patients. Twelve patients (37.5%) had at least one flare during 2-year clinical follow-up. Persistently inactive and flaring patients differed significantly in the maximum enhancement of the synovium on the DCE-MRI (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between these two groups in any of the baseline scores of conventional MRI. Conclusions: Our prospective clinical follow-up study indicates that the assessment of ‘maximum enhancement’ upon DCE-MRI may be able to predict a clinical flare within 2 years in inactive JIA patients.

  8. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) versus breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): A retrospective comparison in 66 breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Roth, R; Germaine, P; Ren, S; Lee, M; Hunter, K; Tinney, E; Liao, L

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively compare the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) with that of breast magnetic resonance imaging (BMRI) in breast cancer detection using parameters, including sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV), lesion size, morphology, lesion and background enhancement, and examination time. A total of 48 women (mean age, 56years±10.6 [SD]) with breast lesions detected between October 2012 and March 2014 were included. Both CESM and BMRI were performed for each patient within 30 days. The enhancement intensity of lesions and breast background parenchyma was subjectively assessed for both modalities and was quantified for comparison. Statistical significance was analyzed using paired t-test for mean size of index lesions in all malignant breasts (an index lesion defined as the largest lesion in each breast), and a mean score of enhancement intensity for index lesions and breast background. PPV, sensitivity, and accuracy were calculated for both CESM and BMRI. The average duration time of CESM and MRI examinations was also compared. A total of 66 lesions were identified, including 62 malignant and 4 benign lesions. Both CESM and BMRI demonstrated a sensitivity of 100% for detection of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant difference between the mean size of index lesions (P=0.108). The enhancement intensity of breast background was significantly lower for CESM than for BMRI (P0.05). The average examination time for CESM was significantly shorter than that of BMRI (P<0.01). CESM has similar sensitivity than BMRI in breast cancer detection, with higher PPV and less background enhancement. CESM is associate with significantly shorter exam time thus a more accessible alternative to BMRI, and has the potential to play an important tool in breast cancer detection and staging. Copyright © 2016 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced 3-T magnetic resonance imaging: a method for quantifying disease activity in early polyarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navalho, Marcio [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Rheumatology Research Unit, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital da Luz, Radiology Department, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital da Luz, Centro de Imagiologia, Lisbon (Portugal); Resende, Catarina [Hospital da Luz, Rheumatology Department, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital de Santa Maria, Rheumatology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisbon (Portugal); Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Canhao, Helena [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, Rheumatology Research Unit, Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Lisbon (Portugal); Hospital de Santa Maria, Rheumatology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisbon (Portugal); Gaspar, Augusto [Hospital da Luz, Radiology Department, Lisbon (Portugal); Campos, Jorge [Hospital de Santa Maria, Radiology Department, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Norte, EPE, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2012-01-15

    To determine whether measurement of synovial enhancement and thickness quantification parameters with 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) can reliably quantify disease activity in patients with early polyarthritis. Eighteen patients (16 women, 2 men; mean age 46 years) with early polyarthritis with less than 12 months of symptoms were included. MRI examination using 3-T device was performed by a new approach including both wrists and hands simultaneously in the examination field-of-view. MRI scoring of disease activity included quantification of synovial enhancement with simple measurements such as rate of early enhancement (REE; REE{sub 57} = S{sub 57}/S{sub 200}, where S{sub 57} and S{sub 200} are the signal intensities 57 s and 200 s after gadolinium injection) and rate of relative enhancement (RE; RE = S{sub 200} - S{sub 0}). Both wrists and hands were scored according to the Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring System (RAMRIS) for synovitis. Disease activity was clinically assessed by the 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28). DAS28 score was strongly correlated with RE (r = 0.8331, p < 0.0001), REE (r = 0.8112, p < 0.0001), and RAMRIS score for synovitis (r = 0.7659, p < 0.0002). An REE score above 0.778 accurately identified patients with clinically active disease (sensitivity 92%; specificity 67%; p < 0.05). A statistically significant difference was observed in the RE, REE, and RAMRIS scores for synovitis between patients with active and inactive disease (p < 0.05). Our findings support the use of 3-T dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for precise quantification of disease activity and for discriminating active disease from inactive disease in early polyarthritis. (orig.)

  10. Comparison between perfusion computed tomography and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Zhong Zheng, E-mail: jzz2397@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Wei, E-mail: sw740104@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shi, Jin Long, E-mail: shij_ns@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, 20 Xisi Road, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Shen, Dan Dan, E-mail: 1021121084@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Gu, Hong Mei, E-mail: guhongmei71@163.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Xue Jun, E-mail: 56516400@qq.com [Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nantong University, No. 20 Xisi Road Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China)

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) provide independent measurements of biomarkers related to tumor perfusion. The aim of this study was to compare the two techniques in assessing glioblastoma microvasculature. Materials and methods: Twenty-five patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (14 males and 11 females; 51 ± 11 years old, ranging from 33 to 70 years) were includede in this prospective study. All patients underwent both PCT and DCE-MRI. Imaging was performed on a 256-slice CT scanner and a 3-T MRI system. PCT yielded permeability surface-area product (PS) using deconvolution physiological models; meanwhile, DCE-MRI determined volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}) using the Tofts-Kermode compartment model. All cases were submitted to surgical intervention, and CD105-microvascular density (CD105-MVD) was measured in each glioblastoma specimen. Then, Spearman’s correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were obtained for PS, K{sup trans} and CD105-MVD. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Tumor PS and K{sup trans} values were correlated with CD105-MVD (r = 0.644, P < 0.001; r = 0.683, P < 0.001). In addition, PS was correlated with K{sup trans} in glioblastoma (r = 0.931, P < 0.001). Finally, Bland-Altman plots showed no significant differences between PS and K{sup trans} (P = 0.063). Conclusion: PCT and DCE-MRI measurements of glioblastoma perfusion biomarkers have similar results, suggesting that both techniques may have comparable utility. Therefore, PCT may serve as an alternative modality to DCE-MRI for the in vivo evaluation of glioblastoma microvasculature.

  11. Renal transplant failure due to urologic complications: Comparison of static fluid with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blondin, D. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Koester, A.; Andersen, K.; Kurz, K.D.; Moedder, U.; Cohnen, M. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Moorenstr. 5, D-40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Purpose: Postrenal reasons of renal transplant failure can be assessed by magnetic resonance urography. This study was designed to retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of static fluid (T2-)MRU compared to contrast enhanced (CE-)MRU in patients with renal transplant failure. Material and methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (14 female, 21 men; mean age 48.6 years) with renal transplant failure and sonographically detected hydronephrosis were examined both with T2-MRU as well as CE-MRU resulting in 39 MRU examinations. MRU was performed both using T2-weighted HASTE-sequence (T2-MRU) as well as Gadolinium-enhanced 3D-FLASH-sequence (CE-MRU) on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Medical Solutions). Subjective image quality of resulting maximum intensity projection was assessed in consensus by two readers blinded to the final diagnosis, using a five point scale. MRU findings were correlated to sonography, operative results or clinical follow up. Results: CE-MRU yielded a sensitivity of 85.7% (T2-MRU 76.2%), and a specificity of 83.3% (T2-MRU: 73.7%), however statistical significance was not reached. The subjective image quality was significantly better in CE-MRU. Conclusions: Only concerning subjective image quality CE-MRU proved superior to T2-MRU. Yet, there was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between T2- and CE-MRU. Thinking of incipient nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, T2-MRU can be used as reliable alternative in patients with decreased renal transplant function due to urological complications.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can play a role in predicting flare in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Dolman, Koert M.; Berg, J. Merlijn van den; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Subclinical synovitis is present in 40% of the inactive JIA patients. • One third of the inactive JIA patients flared during 2-year clinical follow-up. • DCE-MRI can play a role in predicting clinical flare in JIA patients. - Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to determine whether conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters of a previously affected target joint in patients with clinically inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have prognostic meaning for a flare of joint inflammation during follow-up. Material and methods: Thirty-two JIA patients with clinically inactive disease at the time of MRI of the knee were prospectively included. DCE-MRI provided both descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shapes, representing functional properties of the synovium. Conventional MRI outcome measures included validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow edema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. During a 2-year period the patients were monitored by their pediatric rheumatologist and clinical flares were registered. Results: MRI analysis revealed synovial hypertrophy in 13 (39.4%) of the clinically inactive patients. Twelve patients (37.5%) had at least one flare during 2-year clinical follow-up. Persistently inactive and flaring patients differed significantly in the maximum enhancement of the synovium on the DCE-MRI (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between these two groups in any of the baseline scores of conventional MRI. Conclusions: Our prospective clinical follow-up study indicates that the assessment of ‘maximum enhancement’ upon DCE-MRI may be able to predict a clinical flare within 2 years in inactive JIA patients.

  13. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-François, E-mail: Budzik.jean-francois@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); PMOI Physiopathology of Inflammatory Bone Diseases, EA 4490, Lille (France); Ding, Juliette, E-mail: Ding.juliette@gmail.com [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Norberciak, Laurène, E-mail: Norberciak.Laurene@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Biostatistics Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Pascart, Tristan, E-mail: Pascart.tristan@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Rheumatology Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Toumi, Hechmi, E-mail: hechmi.toumi@univ-orleans.fr [EA4708 I3MTO, Orleans Regional Hospital, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Verclytte, Sébastien, E-mail: Verclytte.Sebastien@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Coursier, Raphaël, E-mail: Coursier.Raphael@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France)

    2017-03-15

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  14. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzik, Jean-François; Ding, Juliette; Norberciak, Laurène; Pascart, Tristan; Toumi, Hechmi; Verclytte, Sébastien; Coursier, Raphaël

    2017-01-01

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  15. The benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for predicting vascular access surgery outcome: a computer model perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten A G Merkx

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vascular access (VA surgery, a prerequisite for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal-disease (ESRD patients, is hampered by complication rates, which are frequently related to flow enhancement. To assist in VA surgery planning, a patient-specific computer model for postoperative flow enhancement was developed. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA data as patient-specific geometrical input for the model-based prediction of surgery outcome. METHODS: 25 ESRD patients were included in this study. All patients received a NCE-MRA examination of the upper extremity blood vessels in addition to routine ultrasound (US. Local arterial radii were assessed from NCE-MRA and converted to model input using a linear fit per artery. Venous radii were determined with US. The effect of radius measurement uncertainty on model predictions was accounted for by performing Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting flow prediction interval of the computer model was compared with the postoperative flow obtained from US. Patients with no overlap between model-based prediction and postoperative measurement were further analyzed to determine whether an increase in geometrical detail improved computer model prediction. RESULTS: Overlap between postoperative flows and model-based predictions was obtained for 71% of patients. Detailed inspection of non-overlapping cases revealed that the geometrical details that could be assessed from NCE-MRA explained most of the differences, and moreover, upon addition of these details in the computer model the flow predictions improved. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate clearly that NCE-MRA does provide valuable geometrical information for VA surgery planning. Therefore, it is recommended to use this modality, at least for patients at risk for local or global narrowing of the blood vessels as well as for patients for whom an US-based model

  16. Spleen dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as a new method for staging liver fibrosis in a piglet model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhou

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To explore spleen hemodynamic alteration in liver fibrosis with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI, and to determine how to stage liver fibrosis with spleen DCE-MRI parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen piglets were prospectively used to model liver fibrosis staged by liver biopsy, and underwent spleen DCE-MRI on 0, 5th, 9th, 16th and 21st weekend after modeling this disease. DCE-MRI parameters including time to peak (TTP, positive enhancement integral (PEI, maximum slope of increase (MSI and maximum slope of decrease (MSD of spleen were measured, and statistically analyzed to stage this disease. RESULTS: Spearman's rank correlation tests showed that TTP tended to increase with increasing stages of liver fibrosis (r = 0.647, P0.05, and decreased from stage 2 to 4 (P0.05. Mann-Whitney tests demonstrated that TTP and PEI could classify fibrosis between stage 0 and 1-4, between 0-1 and 2-4, between 0-2 and 3-4, or between 0-3 and 4 (all P<0.01. MSD could discriminate between 0-2 and 3-4 (P = 0.006, or between 0-3 and 4 (P = 0.012. MSI could not differentiate between any two stages. Receiver operating characteristic analysis illustrated that area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC of TTP was larger than of PEI for classifying stage ≥1 and ≥2 (AUC = 0.851 and 0.783, respectively. PEI could best classify stage ≥3 and 4 (AUC = 0.903 and 0.96, respectively. CONCLUSION: Spleen DCE-MRI has potential to monitor spleen hemodynamic alteration and classify liver fibrosis stages.

  17. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Diffuse Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha, Yunfei; Li, Maojin; Yang, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the significance of the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters of diffuse spinal bone marrow infiltration in patients with hematological malignancies. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the lumbar spine was performed in 26 patients with histologically proven diffuse bone marrow infiltration, including multiple myeloma (n = 6), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5), chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 7), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2). Twenty subjects whose spinal MRI was normal, made up the control group. Peak enhancement percentage (E max ), enhancement slope (ES), and time to peak (TTP) were determined from a time intensity curve (TIC) of lumbar vertebral bone marrow. A comparison between baseline and follow-up MR images and its histological correlation were evaluated in 10 patients. The infiltration grade of hematopoietic marrow with plasma cells was evaluated by a histological assessment of bone marrow. Differences in E max , ES, and TTP values between the control group and the patients with diffuse bone marrow infiltration were significant (t = -11.51, -9.81 and 3.91, respectively, p max , ES, and TTP values were significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 1 and Grade 2 (Z = -2.72, -2.24 and -2.89 respectively, p max , ES and TTP values were not significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 2 and Grade 3 (Z = -1.57, -1.82 and -1.58 respectively, p > 0.05). A positive correlation was found between E max , ES values and the histological grade of bone marrow infiltration (r = 0.86 and 0.84 respectively, p max and ES values was observed with increased TTP values after treatment in all of the 10 patients who responded to treatment (t = -7.92, -4.55, and 5.12, respectively, p max , ES, and TTP can reflect the malignancies' histological grade

  18. Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Using Texture Analysis on Combined-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Images at 3.0T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yokoo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To noninvasively assess liver fibrosis using combined-contrast-enhanced (CCE magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and texture analysis. Materials and Methods. In this IRB-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 46 adults with newly diagnosed HCV infection and recent liver biopsy underwent CCE liver MRI following intravenous administration of superparamagnetic iron oxides (ferumoxides and gadolinium DTPA (gadopentetate dimeglumine. The image texture of the liver was quantified in regions-of-interest by calculating 165 texture features. Liver biopsy specimens were stained with Masson trichrome and assessed qualitatively (METAVIR fibrosis score and quantitatively (% collagen stained area. Using L1 regularization path algorithm, two texture-based multivariate linear models were constructed, one for quantitative and the other for quantitative histology prediction. The prediction performance of each model was assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC and correlation analyses. Results. The texture-based predicted fibrosis score significantly correlated with qualitative (r=0.698, P<0.001 and quantitative (r=0.757, P<0.001 histology. The prediction model for qualitative histology had 0.814–0.976 areas under the curve (AUC, 0.659–1.000 sensitivity, 0.778–0.930 specificity, and 0.674–0.935 accuracy, depending on the binary classification threshold. The prediction model for quantitative histology had 0.742–0.950 AUC, 0.688–1.000 sensitivity, 0.679–0.857 specificity, and 0.696–0.848 accuracy, depending on the binary classification threshold. Conclusion. CCE MRI and texture analysis may permit noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

  19. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of ruptured coronary plaques in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian H P Jansen

    Full Text Available X-ray coronary angiography (XCA is the current gold standard for the assessment of lumen encroaching coronary stenosis but XCA does not allow for early detection of rupture-prone vulnerable plaques, which are thought to be the precursor lesions of most acute myocardial infarctions (AMI and sudden death. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of delayed contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance coronary vessel wall imaging (CE-MRCVI for the detection of culprit lesions in the coronary arteries.16 patients (13 male, age 61.9±8.6 years presenting with sub-acute MI underwent CE-MRCVI within 24-72h prior to invasive XCA. CE-MRCVI was performed using a T1-weighted 3D gradient echo inversion recovery sequence (3D IR TFE 40±4 minutes following the administration of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA on a 3T MRI scanner equipped with a 32-channel cardiac coil.14 patients were found to have culprit lesions (7x LAD, 1xLCX, 6xRCA as identified by XCA. Quantitative CE-MRCVI correctly identified the culprit lesion location with a sensitivity of 79% and excluded culprit lesion formation with a specificity of 99%. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR of culprit lesions (9.7±4.1 significantly exceeded CNR values of segments without culprit lesions (2.9±1.9, p<0.001.CE-MRCVI allows the selective visualization of culprit lesions in patients immediately after myocardial infarction (MI. The pronounced contrast uptake in ruptured plaques may represent a surrogate biomarker of plaque activity and/or vulnerability.

  20. Renal transplant failure due to urologic complications: Comparison of static fluid with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blondin, D.; Koester, A.; Andersen, K.; Kurz, K.D.; Moedder, U.; Cohnen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Postrenal reasons of renal transplant failure can be assessed by magnetic resonance urography. This study was designed to retrospectively compare the diagnostic accuracy of static fluid (T2-)MRU compared to contrast enhanced (CE-)MRU in patients with renal transplant failure. Material and methods: Thirty-five consecutive patients (14 female, 21 men; mean age 48.6 years) with renal transplant failure and sonographically detected hydronephrosis were examined both with T2-MRU as well as CE-MRU resulting in 39 MRU examinations. MRU was performed both using T2-weighted HASTE-sequence (T2-MRU) as well as Gadolinium-enhanced 3D-FLASH-sequence (CE-MRU) on a 1.5-T clinical MRI scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Medical Solutions). Subjective image quality of resulting maximum intensity projection was assessed in consensus by two readers blinded to the final diagnosis, using a five point scale. MRU findings were correlated to sonography, operative results or clinical follow up. Results: CE-MRU yielded a sensitivity of 85.7% (T2-MRU 76.2%), and a specificity of 83.3% (T2-MRU: 73.7%), however statistical significance was not reached. The subjective image quality was significantly better in CE-MRU. Conclusions: Only concerning subjective image quality CE-MRU proved superior to T2-MRU. Yet, there was no significant difference in diagnostic accuracy between T2- and CE-MRU. Thinking of incipient nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, T2-MRU can be used as reliable alternative in patients with decreased renal transplant function due to urological complications

  1. Reproducibility of rest and exercise stress contrast-enhanced calf perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiji Ronny S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose was to determine the reproducibility and utility of rest, exercise, and perfusion reserve (PR measures by contrast-enhanced (CE calf perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the calf in normal subjects (NL and patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD. Methods Eleven PAD patients with claudication (ankle-brachial index 0.67 ±0.14 and 16 age-matched NL underwent symptom-limited CE-MRI using a pedal ergometer. Tissue perfusion and arterial input were measured at rest and peak exercise after injection of 0.1 mM/kg of gadolinium-diethylnetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA. Tissue function (TF and arterial input function (AIF measurements were made from the slope of time-intensity curves in muscle and artery, respectively, and normalized to proton density signal to correct for coil inhomogeneity. Perfusion index (PI = TF/AIF. Perfusion reserve (PR = exercise TF/ rest TF. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated from 11 NL and 10 PAD with repeated MRI on a different day. Results Resting TF was low in NL and PAD (mean ± SD 0.25 ± 0.18 vs 0.35 ± 0.71, p = 0.59 but reproducible (ICC 0.76. Exercise TF was higher in NL than PAD (5.5 ± 3.2 vs. 3.4 ± 1.6, p = 0.04. Perfusion reserve was similar between groups and highly variable (28.6 ± 19.8 vs. 42.6 ± 41.0, p = 0.26. Exercise TF and PI were reproducible measures (ICC 0.63 and 0.60, respectively. Conclusion Although rest measures are reproducible, they are quite low, do not distinguish NL from PAD, and lead to variability in perfusion reserve measures. Exercise TF and PI are the most reproducible MRI perfusion measures in PAD for use in clinical trials.

  2. Prevalence Study of Proximal Vertebral Artery Stenosis Using High-Resolution Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Lee, J.S.; Kwon, O.K.; Han, M.K.; Kim, J.H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of proximal vertebral artery stenosis, compared with those of the distal vertebral/basilar artery and extracranial internal carotid artery, in a large population of stroke and non-stroke patients. Material and Methods: Nine-hundred-and-thirty-five patients who underwent high-resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a regional general hospital were categorized into six groups based on neurological symptoms and disease: an asymptomatic group (n ∼ 182), a minor symptom group with headache or dizziness (n ∼ 519), a cardiac group with coronary artery steno-occlusive disease (n ∼ 15), a hemorrhagic group with old cerebral hemorrhage (n ∼ 26), an anterior circulation infarct group (n ∼ 121), and posterior circulation infarct group (n ∼ 72). Prevalence of stenosis of the proximal vertebral artery, distal vertebral/basilar artery, and internal carotid artery was analyzed. Results: The prevalence of stenosis of the proximal vertebral artery, distal vertebral/basilar artery, and internal carotid artery was 12.9%, 5.5%, and 7.2%, respectively, in the study population, and rose as the age increased (P <0.0001 for all arteries). The prevalence of stenosis of the proximal vertebral artery, distal vertebral/basilar artery, and internal carotid artery was 3.3%, 0.5%, and.1%, respectively, in the asymptomatic group; 8.3%, 2.1%, and 3.7%, respectively, in the minor symptom group; 13.3%, 6.7%, and 6.7%, respectively, in the cardiac group; 19.2%, 7.7%, and 7.7%, respectively, in the hemorrhagic group; 27.3%, 8.3%, and 25.6%, respectively, in the anterior circulation infarct group; and 44.4%, 36.1%, and 16.7%, respectively, in the posterior circulation infarct group. This increasing tendency of stenosis accordingly was statistically significant ( P <0.0001 for all arteries). Conclusion: The prevalence of proximal vertebral artery stenosis was highest, compared with those of the distal vertebral/basilar artery and

  3. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Diffuse Spinal Bone Marrow Infiltration in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

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    Zha, Yunfei; Li, Maojin [Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Yang, Jianyong [the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2010-04-15

    To investigate the significance of the dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters of diffuse spinal bone marrow infiltration in patients with hematological malignancies. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging of the lumbar spine was performed in 26 patients with histologically proven diffuse bone marrow infiltration, including multiple myeloma (n = 6), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 6), acute myeloid leukemia (n = 5), chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 7), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 2). Twenty subjects whose spinal MRI was normal, made up the control group. Peak enhancement percentage (E{sub max}), enhancement slope (ES), and time to peak (TTP) were determined from a time intensity curve (TIC) of lumbar vertebral bone marrow. A comparison between baseline and follow-up MR images and its histological correlation were evaluated in 10 patients. The infiltration grade of hematopoietic marrow with plasma cells was evaluated by a histological assessment of bone marrow. Differences in E{sub max}, ES, and TTP values between the control group and the patients with diffuse bone marrow infiltration were significant (t = -11.51, -9.81 and 3.91, respectively, p < 0.01). E{sub max}, ES, and TTP values were significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 1 and Grade 2 (Z = -2.72, -2.24 and -2.89 respectively, p < 0.05). E{sub max}, ES and TTP values were not significantly different between bone marrow infiltration groups Grade 2 and Grade 3 (Z = -1.57, -1.82 and -1.58 respectively, p > 0.05). A positive correlation was found between E{sub max}, ES values and the histological grade of bone marrow infiltration (r = 0.86 and 0.84 respectively, p < 0.01). A negative correlation was found between the TTP values and bone marrow infiltration histological grade (r = -0.54, p < 0.01). A decrease in the E{sub max} and ES values was observed with increased TTP values after treatment in all of the 10 patients who responded to treatment (t

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of articular and extraarticular synovial structures of the hands in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Barbieri, Francesca; Boesen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), the quantification of enhancement within the synovial membrane and bone by extracting curves using fast T1-weighted sequences during intravenous administration of contrast agent, evaluates synovitis and bone marrow edema in psoriati...... arthritis (PsA). In this pilot study, we looked at possible differences between joint synovitis and tenosynovitis in PsA as compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Spectral embedding based active contour (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agner, Shannon C; Xu, Jun; Madabhushi, Anant

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of breast lesions on dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the first step in lesion diagnosis in a computer-aided diagnosis framework. Because manual segmentation of such lesions is both time consuming and highly susceptible to human error and issues of reproducibility, an automated lesion segmentation method is highly desirable. Traditional automated image segmentation methods such as boundary-based active contour (AC) models require a strong gradient at the lesion boundary. Even when region-based terms are introduced to an AC model, grayscale image intensities often do not allow for clear definition of foreground and background region statistics. Thus, there is a need to find alternative image representations that might provide (1) strong gradients at the margin of the object of interest (OOI); and (2) larger separation between intensity distributions and region statistics for the foreground and background, which are necessary to halt evolution of the AC model upon reaching the border of the OOI. In this paper, the authors introduce a spectral embedding (SE) based AC (SEAC) for lesion segmentation on breast DCE-MRI. SE, a nonlinear dimensionality reduction scheme, is applied to the DCE time series in a voxelwise fashion to reduce several time point images to a single parametric image where every voxel is characterized by the three dominant eigenvectors. This parametric eigenvector image (PrEIm) representation allows for better capture of image region statistics and stronger gradients for use with a hybrid AC model, which is driven by both boundary and region information. They compare SEAC to ACs that employ fuzzy c-means (FCM) and principal component analysis (PCA) as alternative image representations. Segmentation performance was evaluated by boundary and region metrics as well as comparing lesion classification using morphological features from SEAC, PCA+AC, and FCM+AC. On a cohort of 50 breast DCE-MRI studies, Pr

  6. Supra-aortic low-dose contrast-enhanced time-resolved magnetic resonance (MR) angiography at 3 T: comparison with time-of-flight MR angiography and high-resolution contrast-enhanced MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn-Joo; Kim, Bum-soo; Koo, Ja-Sung; Kim, Bom-Yi; Jang, Jinhee; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So-Lyung; Ahn, Kook-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Low-dose, time-resolved, contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance angiography (TR-CEMRA) has been described previously; however, a comparative study between low dose TR-CEMRA and time-of-flight MRA (TOF-MRA) in the diagnosis of supra-aortic arterial stenosis has not yet been published. To demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of low-dose TR-CEMRA compared with TOF-MRA, using high-resolution contrast-enhanced MRA (HR-CEMRA) as the reference standard. This prospective study consisted of 30 consecutive patients. All patients underwent TOF-MRA of the neck and circle of Willis and supra-aortic HR-CEMRA, followed by supra-aortic low-dose TR-CEMRA. Gadoterate meglumine (Gd-DOTA, Dotarem(®), Guerbet, Roissy CdG Cedex, France) was injected at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg for HR-CEMRA, followed by a 0.03 mmol/kg bolus for low-dose TR-CEMRA. Three readers evaluated the assessibility and image quality, and then two readers classified each stenosis into the following categories: normal (0-30%), mild stenosis (31-50%), moderate (51-70%), severe (71-99%), and occlusion. TR-CEMRA and HR-CEMRA showed a greater number of assessable arterial segments than TOF-MRA (P supra-aortic arterial stenosis, and could be more useful option than TOF-MRA. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. Evaluation of pancreatic cancer by multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Xiuzhong; Zeng, Mengsu; Wang, He; Sun, Fei; Rao, Shengxiang; Ji, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the microcirculation in pancreatic cancer by pharmacokinetic analysis of multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 40 healthy volunteers and 40 patients with pancreatic cancer proven by histopathology using an axial three-dimensions fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled-gradient echo sequence at 3.0 T. A two compartment model with T1 correction was used to quantify the transfer constant, the rate constant of backflux from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma and the extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer, obstructive pancreatitis distal to the malignant tumor, adjacent pancreatic tissue proximal to the tumor and normal pancreas. All parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Statistical differences were noticed in both the transfer constant (p = 0.000075) and the rate constant of backflux (p = 0.006) among different tissues. Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in pancreatic cancer were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in obstructive pancreatitis were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). The extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer was statistically lager than that in normal pancreas (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging offers a useful technique to evaluate the microenvironment in pancreatic cancer at 3.0 T. Compared to normal pancreas, pancreatic cancer has lower transfer constant, rate constant of backflux and larger extravascular extracellular space fractional volume.

  8. Evaluation of pancreatic cancer by multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Xiuzhong, E-mail: yao.xiuzhong@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Department of Medical Image, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zeng, Mengsu, E-mail: zengmengsu@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Department of Medical Image, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, He, E-mail: herry258@hotmail.com [Global Applied Science Laboratory of GE Healthcare, No. 1, Huatuo Road, Zhangjiang Hi-tech Park, Pudong District, Shanghai 201203 (China); Sun, Fei, E-mail: fei.sun@med.ge.com [Global Applied Science Laboratory of GE Healthcare, No. 1, Huatuo Road, Zhangjiang Hi-tech Park, Pudong District, Shanghai 201203 (China); Rao, Shengxiang, E-mail: rao.shengxiang@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Department of Medical Image, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ji, Yuan, E-mail: Ji.yuan@zs-hospital.sh.cn [Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, No. 138, Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: To investigate the microcirculation in pancreatic cancer by pharmacokinetic analysis of multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T. Materials and methods: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 40 healthy volunteers and 40 patients with pancreatic cancer proven by histopathology using an axial three-dimensions fat-saturated T1-weighted spoiled-gradient echo sequence at 3.0 T. A two compartment model with T1 correction was used to quantify the transfer constant, the rate constant of backflux from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma and the extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer, obstructive pancreatitis distal to the malignant tumor, adjacent pancreatic tissue proximal to the tumor and normal pancreas. All parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Statistical differences were noticed in both the transfer constant (p = 0.000075) and the rate constant of backflux (p = 0.006) among different tissues. Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in pancreatic cancer were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). Both the transfer constant and the rate constant of backflux in obstructive pancreatitis were statistically lower than those in normal pancreas and adjacent pancreatic tissue (p < 0.05). The extravascular extracellular space fractional volume in pancreatic cancer was statistically lager than that in normal pancreas (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Multiple breath-hold dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging offers a useful technique to evaluate the microenvironment in pancreatic cancer at 3.0 T. Compared to normal pancreas, pancreatic cancer has lower transfer constant, rate constant of backflux and larger extravascular extracellular space fractional volume.

  9. Fat-saturated, contrast-enhanced spin echo sequences in magnetic resonance tomographic diagnosis of peritoneal carcinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricke, J.; Hosten, N.; Stroszczynski, C.; Amthauer, H.; Felix, R.; Sehouli, J.; Buchmann, E.; Rieger, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate contrast-enhanced, fat-saturated spin echo sequences for the detection of peritoneal carcinosis with MRI. Material and Methods: 61 patients, 35 with and 26 without peritoneal carcinosis, were examined with abdominal MRI. Fat-saturated, T 1 -weighted spin echo sequences were performed before and after administration of Gd-DTPA. In addition, 22 patients with peritoneal carcinosis were examined with contrast-enhanced abdominal CT. Results: 32 of 35 patients with peritoneal carcinosis demonstrated contrast enhancement of the visceral and 30 to 35 enhancement of the parietal peritoneum (91 and 86%, respectively). Wall thickening of the intestine or parietal peritoneum were noted in 21 and 20 of 35 patients (60 and 57%, respectively), ascites in 18 of 35 patients (51%). False positive contrast enhancement of the peritoneum was noted in 4 of 26 patients (15%). In the direct comparison of MRI and CT, 22 of 22 patients versus 7 of 22 patients showed contrast enhancement of the visceral peritoneum (100 and 32%, respectively). For other signs of peritoneal carcinosis (e.g., ascites, peritoneal seedings), no differences in diagnostic reliability were demonstrated. Conclusions: The use of fat-saturated, spin echo sequences facilitates the diagnosis of peritoneal carcinosis by artifact reduction and improved detection of peritoneal contrast enhancement. MRI with fat-saturated sequences was superior to CT. (orig.) [de

  10. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  11. Synovitis assessed on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and its association with pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Robert Gabriel Coumine; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury and osteoarthr......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury...

  12. Clinical validation of semi-automated software for volumetric and dynamic contrast enhancement analysis of soft tissue venous malformations on magnetic resonance imaging examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caty, Veronique [Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Universite de Montreal, Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada); Kauffmann, Claude; Giroux, Marie-France; Oliva, Vincent; Therasse, Eric [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Universite de Montreal and Research Centre, CHUM (CRCHUM), Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada); Dubois, Josee [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine et Universite de Montreal, Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada); Mansour, Asmaa [Institut de Cardiologie de Montreal, Heart Institute Coordinating Centre, Montreal, QC (Canada); Piche, Nicolas [Object Research System, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulez, Gilles [Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal (CHUM), Universite de Montreal and Research Centre, CHUM (CRCHUM), Department of Radiology, Montreal, QC (Canada); CHUM - Hopital Notre-Dame, Department of Radiology, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate venous malformation (VM) volume and contrast-enhancement analysis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared with diameter evaluation. Baseline MRI was undertaken in 44 patients, 20 of whom were followed by MRI after sclerotherapy. All patients underwent short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) acquisitions and dynamic contrast assessment. VM diameters in three orthogonal directions were measured to obtain the largest and mean diameters. Volumetric reconstruction of VM was generated from two orthogonal STIR sequences and fused with acquisitions after contrast medium injection. Reproducibility (interclass correlation coefficients [ICCs]) of diameter and volume measurements was estimated. VM size variations in diameter and volume after sclerotherapy and contrast enhancement before sclerotherapy were compared in patients with clinical success or failure. Inter-observer ICCs were similar for diameter and volume measurements at baseline and follow-up (range 0.87-0.99). Higher percentages of size reduction after sclerotherapy were observed with volume (32.6 ± 30.7 %) than with diameter measurements (14.4 ± 21.4 %; P = 0.037). Contrast enhancement values were estimated at 65.3 ± 27.5 % and 84 ± 13 % in patients with clinical failure and success respectively (P = 0.056). Venous malformation volume was as reproducible as diameter measurement and more sensitive in detecting therapeutic responses. Patients with better clinical outcome tend to have stronger malformation enhancement. (orig.)

  13. A Combined Pharmacokinetic and Radiologic Assessment of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Response to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semple, Scott; Harry, Vanessa N. MRCOG.; Parkin, David E.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the combination of pharmacokinetic and radiologic assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an early response indicator in women receiving chemoradiation for advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty women with locally advanced cervical cancer were included in a prospective cohort study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was carried out before chemoradiation, after 2 weeks of therapy, and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Radiologic assessment of uptake parameters was obtained from resultant intensity curves. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a multicompartment model was also performed. General linear modeling was used to combine radiologic and pharmacokinetic parameters and correlated with eventual response as determined by change in MRI tumor size and conventional clinical response. A subgroup of 11 women underwent repeat pretherapy MRI to test pharmacokinetic reproducibility. Results: Pretherapy radiologic parameters and pharmacokinetic K trans correlated with response (p < 0.01). General linear modeling demonstrated that a combination of radiologic and pharmacokinetic assessments before therapy was able to predict more than 88% of variance of response. Reproducibility of pharmacokinetic modeling was confirmed. Conclusions: A combination of radiologic assessment with pharmacokinetic modeling applied to dynamic MRI before the start of chemoradiation improves the predictive power of either by more than 20%. The potential improvements in therapy response prediction using this type of combined analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may aid in the development of more individualized, effective therapy regimens for this patient group.

  14. Early changes in perfusion of glioblastoma during radio- and chemotherapy evaluated by T1-dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Lundemann, Michael; Law, Ian

    2015-01-01

    months post-Tx. DCE-MRI at three Tesla generated maps of blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), permeability (Ki) and volume of distribution (Vd) using a combination of model-free deconvolution and Patlak plots. Regions of interest in contrast enhancing tumor and in normal appearing white matter were...

  15. Visualization of a Small Ventricular Septal Defect at First-pass Contrast-enhanced Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Secchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular septal defect (VSD is a congenital heart disease that accounts for up to 40% of all congenital cardiac malformations. VSD is a connection between right and left ventricle, through the ventricular septum. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI help identify this entity. This case presents a 12-year-old male diagnosed with a small muscular apical VSD of 3 mm in diameter, at echocardiography. Cardiac MRI using first-pass perfusion sequence, combining the right plane of acquisition with a short bolus of contrast material, clearly confirmed the presence of VSD.

  16. Comparison of Accuracy of Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography with Accuracy of Non-Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Evaluation of Local Extension of Base of Tongue Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Rathod

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of base of tongue malignancy can be obtained through clinical examination and biopsy. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and Computed Tomography (CT are used to detect its local extension, nodal spread and distant metastases. The main aim of study was to compare the accuracy of MRI and contrast enhanced CT in determining the local extent of base of tongue malignancy. Twenty five patients, biopsy proven cases of squamous cell carcinoma of base of tongue were taken. 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Unit with T2 weighted axial, coronal image; T1 weighted axial, coronal image; and STIR (Short tau inversion recovery axial and coronal images were used. 16 slice Computed Tomography unit with non-contrast and contrast enhanced images were used. Accuracy of CT to detect midline crossing: 50%; accuracy of MRI to detect midline crossing: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect anterior extension: 92%; accuracy of MRI to detect anterior extension: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect tonsillar fossa invasion: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 83%; accuracy of MRI to detect oro pharyngeal spread: 100%; accuracy of CT to detect bone involvement: 20%; accuracy of MRI to detect bone involvement: 100%. MRI proved to be a better investigation than CT, in terms of evaluation of depth of invasion, presence of bony involvement, extension to opposite side, anterior half of tongue, tonsillar fossa, floor of mouth or oropharynx.

  17. MRI contrast enhancement using Magnetic Carbon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Kangasniemi, Kim; Takahashi, Masaya; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Koymen, Ali R.; Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington Team; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Team

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has become one of the most exciting forefront fields in cancer diagnosis and therapeutics such as drug delivery, thermal therapy and detection of cancer. Here, we report development of core (Fe)-shell (carbon) nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for contrast enhancement in MRI imaging. These new classes of magnetic carbon nanoparticles (MCNPs) are synthesized using a bottom-up approach in various organic solvents, using the electric plasma discharge generated in the cavitation field of an ultrasonic horn. Gradient echo MRI images of well-dispersed MCNP-solutions (in tube) were acquired. For T2 measurements, a multi echo spin echo sequence was performed. From the slope of the 1/T2 versus concentration plot, the R2 value for different CMCNP-samples was measured. Since MCNPs were found to be extremely non-reactive, and highly absorbing in NIR regime, development of carbon-based MRI contrast enhancement will allow its simultaneous use in biomedical applications. We aim to localize the MCNPs in targeted tissue regions by external DC magnetic field, followed by MRI imaging and subsequent photothermal therapy.

  18. Utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for differentiating glioblastoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma and brain metastatic tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shanshan, E-mail: lushan1118@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Gao, Qianqian, E-mail: gaoqian123011@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Jing, E-mail: yujing0303@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Yang, E-mail: yuhao040511@163.com [Department of Pathology,The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Cao, Peng, E-mail: peng.cao@ge.com [GE healthcare, Shanghai (China); Shi, Haibin, E-mail: hbshi346@163.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China); Hong, Xunning, E-mail: hongxunning@sina.com [Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: The study aimed to investigate the use of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived permeability parameters for the differentiation of glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs), primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs), and brain metastatic tumors (MTs). Materials and methods: Seventy-five patients with histopathologically confirmed GBMs (n = 38), PCNSLs (n = 16) and MTs (n = 21) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRIs before surgery. The volume transfer constant K{sup trans}, the flux rate constant between extravascular extracellular space and plasma K{sub ep}, the extravascular extracellular volume V{sub e} and the fractional plasma volume V{sub p} were measured within the entire contrast-enhancing tumor by extended Tofts model. A one-way analysis of variance was used to compare all of the parameters among these three tumors, followed by the post-hoc test. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the permeability parameters. Results: Mean K{sup trans} value and V{sub e} value were significantly higher in PCNSLs than in GBMs (P < 0.001 and P = 0.011) and MTs (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in all of the permeability parameters between GBMs and MTs. According to the receiver operating characteristic analyses, both K{sup trans} and V{sub e} had good diagnostic performance for discriminating between PCNSLs and GBMs (the area under the curve: 0.847 and 0.785, respectively), as well as between PCNSLs and MTs (the area under the curve: 0.851 and 0.884, respectively). Conclusions: The K{sup trans} and V{sub e} derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI facilitate the differentiation of PCNSLs from GBMs and MTs.

  19. Prevalence and signal characteristics of late gadolinium enhancement on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamori, Shiro; Matsuoka, Koji; Onishi, Katsuya

    2012-01-01

    The background of this study was to determine the prevalence and signal intensity (SI) characteristics of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC). Cine, black-blood T2-weighted and LGE MR images were acquired in 23 patients with TC within 72h of onset. Wall motion abnormality (WMA), edema and LGE were evaluated with a 16-segment model. The SI characteristics of LGE were analyzed using SI distribution in remote normal segments as reference. Follow-up MRI was performed 3 months later. Retrospective analysis of LGE MRI was also performed in 10 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) to compare the SI characteristics between TC and AMI. In acute phase, WMA and edema were observed in 236 (64%) and 205 (56%) of 368 segments. LGE was observed in 10 (2.7%) of 368 segments and in 5 (22%) of 23 patients. All LGE lesions in TC exhibited transmural enhancement. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in TC was significantly lower than that of AMI (3.1±0.3 standard deviations (SD) vs. 6.1±1.2 SD, P<0.01), and CNR value of 4 was useful for distinguishing TC from AMI. Both LGE and WMA disappeared within 12 months. Grey myocardial signal on LGE MRI may be observed in patients with TC. However, the extent of LGE is substantially less than that of WMA and edema, and disappears within 12 months. (author)

  20. Distribution of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values in patients receiving contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoji, Keigo; Aoki, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the distribution of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values in patients who underwent gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at different types of hospitals. We retrospectively studied 2,550 patients who underwent MRI at five institutions. We recorded the date and value of each patient's eGFR test. The distribution of eGFR values was compared with that in the general Japanese population. A total of 84.3% of patients had their eGFRs evaluated before GBCA-enhanced MRI. Of these, 84.7% were evaluated within 3 months before the GBCA-enhanced MRI, and 1.3% were evaluated on the day of the GBCA-enhanced MRI. A total of 87.2% of patients tested had an eGFR of ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ; 12.8% had an eGFR of 2 , and no patients had an eGFR of 2 . The rate of renal function evaluation differed among hospitals. The prevalence of low eGFR values was greater in Juntendo Tokyo Koto Geriatric Medical Center than in the other hospitals, and the prevalence of low eGFR values was greater in patients who underwent GBCA-enhanced MRI than in the general Japanese population. (author)

  1. Modifications in Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters After α-Particle-Emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab Therapy of HER2-Expressing Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyerdahl, Helen, E-mail: Helen.Heyerdahl@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital - The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Oncology, Division of Medicine, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel [Department of Research and Development, Algeta ASA, Oslo (Norway); Dahle, Jostein [Nordic Nanovector AS, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm{sup 3} (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Results: Significant increases of k{sub ep}, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (P<.05), and k{sub el,} the rate of clearance of contrast agent from the plasma (P<.01), were seen in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection, compared with the control group. The product of k{sub ep} and the amplitude parameter A, associated with increased vessel permeability and perfusion, was also significantly increased in the radioimmunotherapy group 2 and 3 weeks after injection (P<.01). Conclusions: Pharmacokinetic modeling of MRI contrast-enhancement curves evidenced significant alterations in parameters associated with increased tumor vessel permeability and tumor perfusion after {sup 227}Th-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

  2. Blood Pool Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Correlation to Digital Subtraction Angiography: A Pictorial Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha-Grace Knuttinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA provides noninvasive visualization of the vascular supply of soft tissue masses and vascular pathology, without harmful radiation. This is important for planning an endovascular intervention, and helps to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the treatment. MRA with conventional extracellular contrast agents relies on accurate contrast bolus timing, limiting the imaging window to first-pass arterial phase. The recently introduced blood pool contrast agent (BPCA, gadofosveset trisodium, reversibly binds to human serum albumin, resulting in increased T1 relaxivity and prolonged intravascular retention time, permitting both first-pass and steady-state phase high-resolution imaging. In our practice, high-quality MRA serves as a detailed "roadmap" for the needed endovascular intervention. Cases of aortoiliac occlusive disease, inferior vena cava thrombus, pelvic congestion syndrome, and lower extremity arteriovenous malformation are discussed in this article. MRA was acquired at 1.5 T with an 8-channel phased array coil after intravenous administration of gadofosveset (0.03 mmol/kg body weight, at the first-pass phase. In the steady-state, serial T1-weighted 3D spoiled gradient echo images were obtained with high resolution. All patients underwent digital subtraction angiography (DSA and endovascular treatment. MRA and DSA findings of vascular anatomy and pathology are discussed and correlated. BPCA-enhanced MRA provides high-quality first-pass and steady-state vascular imaging. This could increase the diagnostic accuracy and create a detailed map for pre-intervention planning. Understanding the pharmacokinetics of BPCA and being familiar with the indications and technique of MRA are important for diagnosis and endovascular intervention.

  3. Assessment of renal impairment by non-contrast-enhanced conventional magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison with 99mTc-DTPA renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Fumitaka; Amano, Yasuo; Takahama, Katsuya; Takagi, Ryo; Murakami, Ryusuke; Onozawa, Shiro; Kumita, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect three levels of renal impairment by evaluating the differences and agreement with 99m Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) renography. A total of 28 patients with kidney disease were enrolled in the study. MRI findings, including visual corticomedullary differentiation (CMD) on T1- and T2-weighted imaging (T1WI, T2WI), cortical irregularity, the number of renal cysts, and the volume of the kidney, were evaluated for individual kidneys and pairs of kidneys. The differences and agreement between MRI findings and the three levels of renal impairment based on the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) measured using 99m Tc-DTPA renography were analyzed. All MRI findings except the number of renal cysts in pairs of kidneys were consistent with the patient's classification. The agreement between the patient's classifications based on GFR and that based on the visual CMD on T1WI and T2WI was almost perfect or substantial in both individual kidneys and pairs of kidneys. Non-contrast-enhanced MRI was capable of distinguishing three levels of renal function, including serious renal impairment. (author)

  4. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-15

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  5. Optimal gadolinium dose level for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement of U87-derived tumors in athymic nude rats for the assessment of photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Nathan; Varghai, Davood; Flask, Chris A.; Feyes, Denise K.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2009-02-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of varying gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA) dose on Dynamic Contrast Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) tracking of brain tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT) outcome. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells (derived from human malignant glioma) into the brains of six athymic nude rats. After 9, 12, and 13 days DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 9.4 T micro-MRI scanner before and after administration of 100, 150, or 200 μL of Gd-DTPA. Results: Tumor region normalized DCE-MRI scan enhancement at peak was: 1.217 over baseline (0.018 Standard Error [SE]) at the 100 μL dose, 1.339 (0.013 SE) at the 150 μL dose, and 1.287 (0.014 SE) at the 200 μL dose. DCE-MRI peak tumor enhancement at the 150 μL dose was significantly greater than both the 100 μL dose (p DTPA dose provided the greatest T1 weighted contrast enhancement, while minimizing negative T2* effects, in DCE-MRI scans of U87-derived tumors. Maximizing Gd-DTPA enhancement in DCE-MRI scans may assist development of a clinically robust (i.e., unambiguous) technique for PDT outcome assessment.

  6. Aggressive Angiomyxoma with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Dynamic Contrast Enhancement: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brunelle

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Aggressive angiomyxoma (AA is a rare benign soft tissue tumour usually affecting the pelvis and perineum of young women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is crucial in the management of AA patients for its diagnostic contribution and for the preoperative assessment of the actual tumour extension. Given the current development of less aggressive therapeutics associated with a higher risk of recurrence, close follow-up with MRI is fundamental after treatment. In this context, diffusion-weighted (DW imaging has already shown high efficacy in the detection of early small relapses in prostate or rectal cancer. Case Report: We report here a case of pelvic AA in a 51-year-old woman examined with dynamic contrast enhancement and DW-MRI, including apparent diffusion coefficient mapping and calculation. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first description of DW-MRI in AA reported in the literature. Here, knowledge about imaging features of AA will be reviewed and expanded.

  7. Aggressive angiomyxoma with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast enhancement: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, S; Bertucci, F; Chetaille, B; Lelong, B; Piana, G; Sarran, A

    2013-05-01

    Aggressive angiomyxoma (AA) is a rare benign soft tissue tumour usually affecting the pelvis and perineum of young women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial in the management of AA patients for its diagnostic contribution and for the preoperative assessment of the actual tumour extension. Given the current development of less aggressive therapeutics associated with a higher risk of recurrence, close follow-up with MRI is fundamental after treatment. In this context, diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging has already shown high efficacy in the detection of early small relapses in prostate or rectal cancer. We report here a case of pelvic AA in a 51-year-old woman examined with dynamic contrast enhancement and DW-MRI, including apparent diffusion coefficient mapping and calculation. To our knowledge, this is the first description of DW-MRI in AA reported in the literature. Here, knowledge about imaging features of AA will be reviewed and expanded.

  8. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Alistair D; Hiorns, Melanie P; Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran; Olsen, Oystein E

    2007-04-01

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively (chi2=14.0; Pchildren older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction.

  9. Periodicity in tumor vasculature targeting kinetics of ligand-functionalized nanoparticles studied by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and intravital microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hak, Sjoerd; Cebulla, Jana; Huuse, Else Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the past two decades advances in the development of targeted nanoparticles have facilitated their application as molecular imaging agents and targeted drug delivery vehicles. Nanoparticle-enhanced molecular imaging of the angiogenic tumor vasculature has been of particular interest. Not only...... because angiogenesis plays an important role in various pathologies, but also since endothelial cell surface receptors are directly accessible for relatively large circulating nanoparticles. Typically, nanoparticle targeting towards these receptors is studied by analyzing the contrast distribution...... kinetics. These kinetics will not only depend on nanoparticle characteristics, but also on receptor binding and recycling. In this study, we monitored the in vivo targeting kinetics of αvβ3-integrin specific nanoparticles with intravital microscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging...

  10. Space-time relationship in continuously moving table method for large FOV peripheral contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabati, M; Lauzon, M L; Frayne, R

    2003-01-01

    Data acquisition using a continuously moving table approach is a method capable of generating large field-of-view (FOV) 3D MR angiograms. However, in order to obtain venous contamination-free contrast-enhanced (CE) MR angiograms in the lower limbs, one of the major challenges is to acquire all necessary k-space data during the restricted arterial phase of the contrast agent. Preliminary investigation on the space-time relationship of continuously acquired peripheral angiography is performed in this work. Deterministic and stochastic undersampled hybrid-space (x, k y , k z ) acquisitions are simulated for large FOV peripheral runoff studies. Initial results show the possibility of acquiring isotropic large FOV images of the entire peripheral vascular system. An optimal trade-off between the spatial and temporal sampling properties was found that produced a high-spatial resolution peripheral CE-MR angiogram. The deterministic sampling pattern was capable of reconstructing the global structure of the peripheral arterial tree and showed slightly better global quantitative results than stochastic patterns. Optimal stochastic sampling patterns, on the other hand, enhanced small vessels and had more favourable local quantitative results. These simulations demonstrate the complex spatial-temporal relationship when sampling large FOV peripheral runoff studies. They also suggest that more investigation is required to maximize image quality as a function of hybrid-space coverage, acquisition repetition time and sampling pattern parameters

  11. Combined reading of contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging by using a simple sum score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltzer, Anja [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Dietzel, Matthias [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Neuroradiology, Erlangen (Germany); Kaiser, Clemens G. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany); Baltzer, Pascal A. [Medical University of Vienna (AKH), General Hospital Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    To improve specificity of breast MRI by integrating Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values with contrast enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) using a simple sum score. Retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of patients referred to breast MRI at 1.5 T for further workup of breast lesions. Reading results of CE-MRI were dichotomized into score 1 (suspicious) or 0 (benign). Lesion's ADC-values (in *10-3 mm2/s) were assigned two different scores: ADC{sub 2}: likely malignant (score +1, ADC ≤ 1), indeterminate (score 0, ADC >1- ≤ 1.4) and likely benign (score -1, ADC > 1.4) and ADC{sub 1}: indeterminate (score 0, ADC ≤ 1.4) and likely benign (score -1, ADC > 1.4). Final added CE-MRI and ADC scores >0 were considered suspicious. Reference standard was histology and imaging follow-up of >24 months. Diagnostic parameters were compared using McNemar tests. A total of 150 lesions (73 malignant) were investigated. Reading of CE-MRI showed a sensitivity of 100 % (73/73) and a specificity of 81.8 % (63/77). Additional integration of ADC scores increased specificity (ADC2/ADC1, P = 0.008/0.001) without causing false negative results. Using a simple sum score, ADC-values can be integrated with CE-MRI of the breast, improving specificity. The best approach is using one threshold to exclude cancer. (orig.)

  12. Improving contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging using 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX for high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Junkoh; Kakeda, Shingo; Yoneda, Tetsuya; Ogura, Shun-Ichiro; Shimajiri, Shohei; Tanaka, Tohru; Korogi, Yukunori; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a gadolinium-based contrast agent is the gold standard for high-grade gliomas (HGGs). The compound 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) undergoes a high rate of cellular uptake, particularly in cancer cells. In addition, fluorescence-guided resection with 5-ALA is widely used for imaging HGGs. 5-ALA is water soluble, while protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is water insoluble. It was speculated whether converting from 5-ALA to PpIX may relatively increase intracellular water content, and consequently, might enhance the T2 signal intensity in HGG. The aim of the present study was to assess whether 5-ALA-induced PpIX enhances the T2 signal intensity in patients with HGGs. A total of 4 patients who were candidates for HGG surgical treatment were prospectively analyzed with preoperative MRI. Patients received oral doses of 5-ALA (20 mg/kg) 3 h prior to anesthesia. At 2.5 h post-5-ALA administration, T2-weighted images (T2WIs) were obtained from all patients. Subsequently, tumors were evaluated via fluorescence using a modified operating microscope. Fluorescent tumor tissues were obtained to analyze the accumulation of 5-ALA-induced PpIX within the tumors, which was confirmed quantitatively by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The MRI T2 signal intensity within the tumors was evaluated prior to and following 5-ALA administration. Three glioblastoma multiformes (GBMs) and 1 anaplastic oligodendroglioma (AO) were included in the analysis. Intraoperatively, all GBMs exhibited strong fluorescence of 5-ALA-induced PpIX, whilst no fluorescence was observed in the AO sample. HPLC analysis indicated a higher accumulation of 5-ALA-induced PpIX in the GBM samples compared with the AO sample. In total, 48 regions of interest were identified within the tumors from T2-WIs. In the GBM group, the relative T2 signal intensity value within the tumors following 5-ALA administration was significantly increased compared with the T2 signal

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can assess vascularity within fracture non-unions and predicts good outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoierer, Oliver; Bender, Daniel; Schmidmaier, Gerhard [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg Trauma Research Group, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Bloess, Konstantin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Burkholder, Iris [University of Applied Sciences of the Saarland, Department of Nursing and Health, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To prospectively evaluate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can assess vascularity within non-unions and predicts clinical outcome in combination with the clinical Non-Union Scoring System (NUSS). Fifty-eight patients with non-unions of extremities on CT underwent 3-T DCE MRI. Signal intensity curves obtained from a region-of-interest analysis were subdivided into those with more intense contrast agent uptake within the non-union than in adjacent muscle (vascularised non-union) and those with similar or less contrast uptake. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the Tofts model K{sub trans}, K{sub ep}, iAUC and V{sub e} were correlated with union at CT 1 year later (n = 49). Despite inserted osteosynthetic material, DCE parameters could be evaluated in 57 fractures. The sensitivity/specificity of vascularised non-unions as an indicator of good outcome was 83.9 %/50.0 % compared to 96.8 %/33.3 % using NUSS (n = 49). Logistic regression revealed a significant impact of NUSS on outcome (P = 0.04, odds ratio = 0.93). At first examination, median iAUC (initial area under the enhancement curve) for the ratio non-union/muscle was 10.28 in patients with good outcome compared with 3.77 in non-responders (P = 0.023). K{sub trans}, K{sub ep} and V{sub e} within the non-union were not significantly different initially (n = 57) or 1 year later (n = 19). DCE MRI can assess vascularity in fracture non-unions. A vascularised non-union correlates with good outcome. (orig.)

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease: initial experience with ferumoxytol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhar, Aarti; Khan, Sarah; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Griggs, Rachel; Hall, Theodore R.; Finn, J.P.; Zaritsky, Joshua; Salusky, Isidro

    2016-01-01

    Ferumoxytol is an ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particle that is FDA-approved for parenteral treatment of iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Because of the association between gadolinium-based contrast agents and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe chronic kidney disease, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic role of ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography in children with chronic kidney disease. Twenty children underwent 22 high-resolution ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography examinations at 3.0 T. High-resolution 3-D contrast-enhanced imaging was performed at a minimum of 3 time points following injection of ferumoxytol at a total dose of 4 mg/kg. Two blinded pediatric radiologists independently scored six named veins on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography examinations according to a three-point subjective score, where a score ≥2 was considered diagnostic. Additionally, all relevant venous structures in the included field of view were analyzed for occlusive or non-occlusive thrombosis, compression and presence of collaterals. All patients underwent ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography successfully and without adverse event. The overall scores of the reviewing radiologists for all venous structures were 2.7-2.9. In all cases, the reviewers were confident basing their diagnoses on the ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography findings. In 12 of 22 examinations, findings on follow-up imaging or invasive procedures were available to correlate with the findings on ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography. There was complete concordance between the findings from follow-up imaging and invasive procedures with findings from ferumoxytol-enhanced MR venography. Ferumoxytol holds promise as a powerful alternative to gadolinium-based contrast agents for reliable, high-resolution MR venography in children with chronic kidney disease. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation of malignant from benign orbital masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Ying [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Affiliated to JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Kuai, Xin-Ping [Department of Radiology, Changshu Second People' s Hospital, Jiangsu Province 215500 (China); Department of Radiology, Changzheng Hospital, Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200003 (China); Chen, Xiao-Song [Comprehensive Breast Health Center, Ruijin Hospital Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, 197 Ruijin Er Road, Shanghai 20025 (China); Tao, Xiao-Feng, E-mail: cjr.taoxiaofeng@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, Affiliated to JiaoTong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Objective: Dynamic contrast enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) allows imaging of the physiology of the microcirculation. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic efficacy of time intensity curve (TIC) and DCE parameters for characterization of orbital masses. Methods: Fifty-nine patients with untreated orbital lesions underwent DCE-MRI before surgery. For each lesion, peak height (PH), maximum enhancement ratio (ER{sub max}), time of peak enhancement (T{sub peak}) and maximum rise slope (Slope{sub max}) were plotted and calculated. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was conducted to assess the appropriate cut-off value. Results: All 26 lesions that demonstrated persistent pattern (type-I) TICs were benign. Most of the masses with the washout pattern (type-III) TIC were malignant (10/14), including lymphoma (n = 6) and melanoma (n = 4). The Slope{sub max} of benign lesions was statistically lower than malignant ones, while the ER{sub max} and T{sub peak} values of benign lesions were significantly higher. No statistical difference was found in PH (P = 0.121). The AUC for ER{sub max}, T{sub peak} and Slope{sub max} in differentiating benign orbital lesions from malignant ones were 0.683, 0.837 and 0.738, respectively. In the three DCE parameters, Slope{sub max} cut-off value of 1.10 provided the highest sensitivity of 93.8%; however, the corresponding specificity was low (58.1%). The ER{sub max} cut-off value of 1.37 and T{sub peak} cut-off value of 35.14 respectively offered the best diagnostic performances. Conclusion: DCE-MRI, especially the qualitative TIC pattern and quantitative value of Slope{sub max}, ER{sub max} and T{sub peak}, could be a complementary investigation in distinguishing malignant orbital tumor from benign ones.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can assess vascularity within fracture non-unions and predicts good outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoierer, Oliver; Bender, Daniel; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Bloess, Konstantin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre; Burkholder, Iris

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can assess vascularity within non-unions and predicts clinical outcome in combination with the clinical Non-Union Scoring System (NUSS). Fifty-eight patients with non-unions of extremities on CT underwent 3-T DCE MRI. Signal intensity curves obtained from a region-of-interest analysis were subdivided into those with more intense contrast agent uptake within the non-union than in adjacent muscle (vascularised non-union) and those with similar or less contrast uptake. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the Tofts model K trans , K ep , iAUC and V e were correlated with union at CT 1 year later (n = 49). Despite inserted osteosynthetic material, DCE parameters could be evaluated in 57 fractures. The sensitivity/specificity of vascularised non-unions as an indicator of good outcome was 83.9 %/50.0 % compared to 96.8 %/33.3 % using NUSS (n = 49). Logistic regression revealed a significant impact of NUSS on outcome (P = 0.04, odds ratio = 0.93). At first examination, median iAUC (initial area under the enhancement curve) for the ratio non-union/muscle was 10.28 in patients with good outcome compared with 3.77 in non-responders (P = 0.023). K trans , K ep and V e within the non-union were not significantly different initially (n = 57) or 1 year later (n = 19). DCE MRI can assess vascularity in fracture non-unions. A vascularised non-union correlates with good outcome. (orig.)

  17. Study of optimal flip angle for inversion-recovery gradient echo method in delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Masashi; Matsumura, Yoshio; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a valuable tool for detecting myocardial infarction and assessing myocardial viability. The standard viability MRI technique is the inversion-recovery gradient echo (IR-GRE) method. Several previous studies have demonstrated that this imaging technique provides superior image quality at high magnetic field strengths, e.g., 3.0 T. However, there are numerous possible flip angles. We investigated the optimal flip angle of IR-GRE in delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI. Phantoms were made that modeled infarcted myocardium and normal myocardium after administration of contrast agent. To determine optimal flip angle, we compared the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) among these phantoms and evaluated the degree of artifacts induced by increased flip angle. The flip angle that showed the highest CNR for 2D IR-GRE and 3D IR-GRE was 30deg/15deg at 1.5 T and 25deg/15deg at 3.0 T. The flip angle that showed the highest CNR was independent of R-R interval. Streak artifacts induced by increased flip angle tended to occur more readily at 3.0 T than 1.5 T. The optimal flip angle for 2D IR-GRE and 3D IR-GRE at 1.5 T was 30deg and 15deg, respectively. At 3.0 T, taking into account the results for both CNR and streak artifacts, we concluded the optimal flip angle of 2D IR-GRE to be 15-20deg. (author)

  18. Quantification of synovitis in the cranio-cervical region: Dynamic contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis-A feasibility follow up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeromel, M., E-mail: miran.jeromel@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, Department for Neuroradiology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska cesta 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jevtic, V., E-mail: vladimir.jevtic@mf.uni-lj.si [Medical Faculty Ljubljana, Vrazov trg 2, 1104 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sersa, I., E-mail: igor.sersa@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ambrozic, A., E-mail: ales.ambrozic@mf.uni-lj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tomsic, M., E-mail: matija.tomsic@kclj.si [Department of Rheumatology, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Vodnikova 62, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To test the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCEI) and diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying synovitis of the cranio-cervical (C-C) region in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and neck pain at the beginning and at a six month follow up. Methods: 27 patients with duration of RA of less than 24 months and neck pain were studied with standard qualitative MRI evaluation and two quantitative MRI methods (DCEI and DWI) at the level of atlantoaxial joints. Rate of early enhancement (REE), enhancement gradient (Genh) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were extracted from DCEI and DWI data. MRI was coupled with clinical assessment and radiographic imaging. Results: Using standard qualitative MRI evaluation, unequivocal active synovitis (grade 2 or 3 contrast enhancement) was proved in 16 (59%) patients at baseline and 14 (54%) at follow up. DCEI and DWI measurements confirmed active synovitis in 25 (93%) patients at baseline and 24 (92%) at follow up. Average REE, Genh and ADC values decreased during follow up, however the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both qualitative and quantitative MRI methods confirmed active inflammatory disease in the C-C region following therapy although all clinical criteria showed signs of improvement of the peripheral disease. Conclusions: The study proved the feasibility of DCEI and DWI MRI for quantifying synovitis of the C-C region in patients with early RA and neck pain. Both techniques can be used as additional method for evaluation of synovitis of the C-C region in RA.

  19. Early biomarkers from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to predict the response to antiangiogenic therapy in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piludu, Francesca; Vidiri, Antonello [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Marzi, Simona [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Medical Physics Laboratory, Rome (Italy); Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Neurology Division, Rome (Italy); Fabi, Alessandra [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncology Department, Rome (Italy); Carapella, Carmine Maria [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncologic Surgery Department, Rome (Italy); Terrenato, Irene [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Biostatistics-Scientific Direction, Rome (Italy); Antenucci, Anna [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Clinical Pathology, Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether early changes in tumor volume and perfusion measurements derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may predict response to antiangiogenic therapy in recurrent high-grade gliomas. Twenty-seven patients who received bevacizumab every 3 weeks were enrolled in the study. For each patient, three MRI scans were performed: at baseline, after the first dose, and after the fourth dose of bevacizumab. The entire tumor volume (V{sub tot}), as well as contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced tumor subvolumes (V{sub CE-T1} and V{sub NON-CE-T1}, respectively) were outlined using post-contrast T1-weighted images as a guide for the tumor location. Histogram analysis of normalized IAUGC (nIAUGC) and transfer constant K{sup trans} maps were performed. Each patient was classified as a responder patient if he/she had a partial response or a stable disease or as a nonresponder patient if he/she had progressive disease. Responding patients showed a larger reduction in V{sub NON-CE-T1} after a single dose, compared to nonresponding patients. Tumor subvolumes with increased values of nIAUGC and K{sup trans}, after a single dose, significantly differed between responders and nonresponders. The radiological response was found to be significantly associated to the clinical outcome. After a single dose, V{sub tot} was predictive of overall survival (OS), while V{sub CE-T1} showed a tendency of correlation with OS. Tumor subvolumes with increased nIAUGC and K{sup trans} showed the potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy of DCE. Early assessments of the entire tumor volume, including necrotic areas, may provide complementary information of tumor behavior in response to anti-VEGF therapies and is worth further investigation. (orig.)

  20. Quantification of synovitis in the cranio-cervical region: Dynamic contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis—A feasibility follow up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeromel, M.; Jevtič, V.; Serša, I.; Ambrožič, A.; Tomšič, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To test the feasibility of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCEI) and diffusion weighted (DWI) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying synovitis of the cranio-cervical (C-C) region in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and neck pain at the beginning and at a six month follow up. Methods: 27 patients with duration of RA of less than 24 months and neck pain were studied with standard qualitative MRI evaluation and two quantitative MRI methods (DCEI and DWI) at the level of atlantoaxial joints. Rate of early enhancement (REE), enhancement gradient (Genh) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were extracted from DCEI and DWI data. MRI was coupled with clinical assessment and radiographic imaging. Results: Using standard qualitative MRI evaluation, unequivocal active synovitis (grade 2 or 3 contrast enhancement) was proved in 16 (59%) patients at baseline and 14 (54%) at follow up. DCEI and DWI measurements confirmed active synovitis in 25 (93%) patients at baseline and 24 (92%) at follow up. Average REE, Genh and ADC values decreased during follow up, however the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Both qualitative and quantitative MRI methods confirmed active inflammatory disease in the C-C region following therapy although all clinical criteria showed signs of improvement of the peripheral disease. Conclusions: The study proved the feasibility of DCEI and DWI MRI for quantifying synovitis of the C-C region in patients with early RA and neck pain. Both techniques can be used as additional method for evaluation of synovitis of the C-C region in RA.

  1. Semiautomatic determination of arterial input functions for quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Julius; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Yoo Na; Yi, Chin A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to validate a semiautomatic detection method for the arterial input functions (AIFs) using Kendall coefficient of concordance (KCC) for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in non-small cell lung cancer patients. We prospectively enrolled 28 patients (17 men, 11 women; mean age, 62 years) who had biopsy-proven non-small cell lung cancer. All enrolled patients underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the entire thorax. For the quantitative measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters, K and ve, of the lung cancers, AIFs were determined in 2 different ways: a manual method that involved 3 independent thoracic radiologists selecting a region of interest (ROI) within the aortic arch in the 2D coronal plane and a semiautomatic method that used in-house software to establish a KCC score, which provided a measure of similarity to typical AIF pattern. Three independent readers selected voxel clusters with high KCC scores calculated 3-dimensionally across planes in the data set. K and ve were correlated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Bland-Altman plots were used to examine agreement across methods and reproducibility within a method. Arterial input functions were determined using the data from ROI volumes that were significantly larger in the semiautomatic method (mean ± SD, 3360 ± 768 mm) than in the manual method (677 ± 380 mm) (P < 0.001). K showed very strong agreement (ICC, 0.927) and ve showed moderately strong agreement (ICC, 0.718) between the semiautomatic and manual methods. The reproducibility for K (ICCmanual, 0.813 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.998; P < 0.001) and ve (ICCmanual, 0.455 and ICCsemiautomatic, 0.985, P < 0.001) was significantly better with the semiautomatic method than the manual method. We found semiautomated detection using KCC to be a robust method for determining the AIF. This method allows for larger ROIs specified in 3D across planes

  2. Right and Left Ventricular Function and Mass in Male Elite Master Athletes: A Controlled Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Philipp; Schneider, Günther; Linneweber, Lutz; Rentzsch, Axel; Krämer, Nadine; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Kindermann, Wilfried; Meyer, Tim; Scharhag, Jürgen

    2016-05-17

    It is under debate whether the cumulative effects of intensive endurance exercise induce chronic cardiac damage, mainly involving the right heart. The aim of this study was to examine the cardiac structure and function in long-term elite master endurance athletes with special focus on the right ventricle by contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Thirty-three healthy white competitive elite male master endurance athletes (age range, 30-60 years) with a training history of 29±8 years, and 33 white control subjects pair-matched for age, height, and weight underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, echocardiography including tissue-Doppler imaging and speckle tracking, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Indexed left ventricular mass and right ventricular mass (left ventricular mass/body surface area, 96±13 and 62±10 g/m(2); Pright ventricular mass/body surface area, 36±7 and 24±5 g/m(2); Pleft ventricular end-diastolic volume and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (left ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area, 104±13 and 69±18 mL/m(2); Pright ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area, 110±22 and 66±16 mL/m(2); PRight ventricular ejection fraction did not differ between athletes and control subjects (52±8 and 54±6%; P=0.26). Pathological late enhancement was detected in 1 athlete. No correlations were found for left ventricular and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and high-sensitive troponin was negative in all subjects. Based on our results, chronic right ventricular damage in elite endurance master athletes with lifelong high training volumes seems to be unlikely. Thus, the hypothesis of an exercise-induced arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has to be questioned. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model applied to quantification of cerebral blood flow using dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murase, Kenya; Yamazaki, Youichi; Shinohara, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model for quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in comparison with deconvolution analysis based on singular value decomposition (DA-SVD). Using computer simulations, we generated a time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent in the volume of interest (VOI) from the arterial input function (AIF) modeled as a gamma-variate function under various CBFs, cerebral blood volumes and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) for three different types of residue function (exponential, triangular, and box-shaped). We also considered the effects of delay and dispersion in AIF. The ARMA model and DA-SVD were used to estimate CBF values from the simulated concentration-time curves in the VOI and AIFs, and the estimated values were compared with the assumed values. We found that the CBF value estimated by the ARMA model was more sensitive to the SNR and the delay in AIF than that obtained by DA-SVD. Although the ARMA model considerably overestimated CBF at low SNRs, it estimated the CBF more accurately than did DA-SVD at high SNRs for the exponential or triangular residue function. We believe this study will contribute to an understanding of the usefulness and limitations of the ARMA model when applied to quantification of CBF with DSC-MRI. (author)

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging of bone marrow in healthy individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillengass, Jens (Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Dept. of Hematology, Oncology and Rheumatology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)), e-mail: j.hillengass@dkfz.de; Stieltjes, Bram (Dept. of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)); Baeuerle, Tobias (Dept. of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)) (and others)

    2011-04-15

    Background: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) displays microcirculation and permeability by application of contrast-media and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a tool for quantification of cellularity in the investigated area. Recently published examples cover breast cancer, CNS tumors, head and neck cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, prostate cancer as well as hematologic malignancies. Purpose: To investigated the influence of age, sex, and localization of the investigated region on findings of DCE-MRI and DWI. Material and Methods: DCE-MRI-parameters amplitude A and exchange rate constant kep as well as the DWI-parameter ADC of the bone marrow of the lumbar vertebral column of 30 healthy individuals covering the typical range of age of tumor patients were evaluated. ADC was calculated using b=0 and a maximal b value of either 400 or 750 s/mm2. Results: Amplitude A of DCE-MRI decreased with age (P = 0.01) and amplitude A, exchange rate constant kep as well as ADC based on b = 400 s/mm2 and b = 750 s/mm2, respectively, decreased significantly from the first to the fifth lumbar vertebra with P = 0.02, P = 0.05, P = 0.003, and P = 0.002, respectively. Conclusion: Quantitative parameters of functional imaging techniques in bone marrow are influenced by the age of the examined individual and the anatomical location of the investigated region

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging of bone marrow in healthy individuals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillengass, Jens; Stieltjes, Bram; Baeuerle, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Background: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) displays microcirculation and permeability by application of contrast-media and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a tool for quantification of cellularity in the investigated area. Recently published examples cover breast cancer, CNS tumors, head and neck cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, prostate cancer as well as hematologic malignancies. Purpose: To investigated the influence of age, sex, and localization of the investigated region on findings of DCE-MRI and DWI. Material and Methods: DCE-MRI-parameters amplitude A and exchange rate constant kep as well as the DWI-parameter ADC of the bone marrow of the lumbar vertebral column of 30 healthy individuals covering the typical range of age of tumor patients were evaluated. ADC was calculated using b=0 and a maximal b value of either 400 or 750 s/mm2. Results: Amplitude A of DCE-MRI decreased with age (P = 0.01) and amplitude A, exchange rate constant kep as well as ADC based on b = 400 s/mm 2 and b = 750 s/mm 2 , respectively, decreased significantly from the first to the fifth lumbar vertebra with P = 0.02, P = 0.05, P = 0.003, and P = 0.002, respectively. Conclusion: Quantitative parameters of functional imaging techniques in bone marrow are influenced by the age of the examined individual and the anatomical location of the investigated region

  6. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calder, Alistair D.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Olsen, Oystein E. [Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran [Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively ({chi}{sup 2} = 14.0; P < 0.001). In eight of the nine patients with CRV there was no evidence of intrinsic obstruction at surgery. In the remaining patient there was fibrosis of the upper ureter. CE-MRA is an accurate means of identifying CRV in children older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction. (orig.)

  7. Clinical application of bilateral high temporal and spatial resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, K.; Baltzer, P.; Bernathova, M.; Weber, M.; Leithner, D.; Helbich, T.H. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna (Austria); Bogner, W.; Trattnig, S.; Gruber, S.; Zaric, O. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, MR Centre of Excellence, Vienna (Austria); Abeyakoon, O. [King' s College, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Dubsky, P. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Bago-Horvath, Z. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-04-15

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the clinical application of bilateral high spatial and temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (HR DCE-MRI) of the breast at 7 T. Following institutional review board approval 23 patients with a breast lesion (BIRADS 0, 4-5) were included in our prospective study. All patients underwent bilateral HR DCE-MRI of the breast at 7 T (spatial resolution of 0.7 mm{sup 3} voxel size, temporal resolution of 14 s). Two experienced readers (r1, r2) and one less experienced reader (r3) independently assessed lesions according to BI-RADS registered. Image quality, lesion conspicuity and artefacts were graded from 1 to 5. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were assessed using histopathology as the standard of reference. HR DCE-MRI at 7 T revealed 29 lesions in 23 patients (sensitivity 100 % (19/19); specificity of 90 % (9/10)) resulting in a diagnostic accuracy of 96.6 % (28/29) with an AUC of 0.95. Overall image quality was excellent in the majority of cases (27/29) and examinations were not hampered by artefacts. There was excellent inter-reader agreement for diagnosis and image quality parameters (κ = 0.89-1). Bilateral HR DCE-MRI of the breast at 7 T is feasible with excellent image quality in clinical practice and allows accurate breast cancer diagnosis. (orig.)

  8. String-like lumen in below-the-knee chronic total occlusions on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography predicts intraluminal recanalization and better blood flow restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yue-Qi; Lu, Hai-Tao; Wei, Li-Ming; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhao, Jun-Gong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Fang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-07-15

    To determine whether string-like lumina (SLs) on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) predict better outcomes in diabetic patients with below-the-knee (BTK) chronic total occlusions (CTOs). This study involved 317 long-segment (>5 cm) BTK CTOs of 245 patients that were examined using CE-MRA and treated using endovascular angioplasty. An SL with a CTO was slowly filled with blood on conventional CE-MRA. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of procedural success, recanalisation method and immediate blood flow restoration. The target-lesion patency and limb-salvage rates were assessed. SL-positive CTOs (n = 60) achieved a higher technique success rate, preferred intraluminal angioplasty and better blood flow restoration than SL-negative CTOs (n = 257, P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that lesion length was the independent predictor of procedural success (P = 0.028). SL was a predictor of intraluminal angioplasty (P < 0.001) and good blood-flow restoration (P = 0.004). Kaplan-Meier analyses at 12 months revealed a higher target lesion patency rate (P = 0.04) and limb-salvage rate (P = 0.35) in SL-positive CTOs. In patients with BTK CTOs, SL predicted intraluminal angioplasty and good blood-flow restoration for BTK CTOs. (orig.)

  9. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for the detection of crossing renal vessels in children with symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction: comparison with operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calder, Alistair D.; Hiorns, Melanie P.; Olsen, Oystein E.; Abhyankar, Aruna; Mushtaq, Imran

    2007-01-01

    Crossing renal vessels (CRV) are associated with ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction, particularly when presentation is beyond the neonatal period. Their presence may influence surgical management. To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the identification of CRV in children requiring surgical treatment of symptomatic UPJ obstruction, against a gold standard of laparoscopic or open surgical findings. We reviewed CE-MRA studies (3-D T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and multiphase 3-D spoiled gradient echo following intravenous gadolinium administration) of 14 children, age range 6-15 years, performed prior to surgery for suspected CRV-related UPJ obstruction. Consensus reviews of the CE-MRA studies were compared with surgical findings. CE-MRA demonstrated CRV at the level of the obstruction in nine and no crossing vessels in five children. These were all verified intraoperatively (χ 2 = 14.0; P < 0.001). In eight of the nine patients with CRV there was no evidence of intrinsic obstruction at surgery. In the remaining patient there was fibrosis of the upper ureter. CE-MRA is an accurate means of identifying CRV in children older than 6 years with symptomatic UPJ obstruction. (orig.)

  10. Initial experience of correlating parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Qian-Jun; Zhang, Shui-Xing; Chen, Wen-Bo; Liang, Long; Zhou, Zheng-Gen; Liu, Zai-Yi; Zeng, Qiong-Xin; Liang, Chang-Hong [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Qiu, Qian-Hui [Guangdong General Hospital/Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Department of Otolaryngology, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the correlation between intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters. Thirty-eight newly diagnosed NPC patients were prospectively enrolled. Diffusion-weighted images (DWI) at 13 b-values were acquired using a 3.0-T MRI system. IVIM parameters including the pure molecular diffusion (D), perfusion-related diffusion (D*), perfusion fraction (f), DCE-MRI parameters including maximum slope of increase (MSI), enhancement amplitude (EA) and enhancement ratio (ER) were calculated by two investigators independently. Intra- and interobserver agreement were evaluated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Relationships between IVIM and DCE-MRI parameters were evaluated by calculation of Spearman's correlation coefficient. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility were excellent to relatively good (ICC = 0.887-0.997; narrow width of 95 % limits of agreement). The highest correlation was observed between f and EA (r = 0.633, P < 0.001), with a strong correlation between f and MSI (r = 0.598, P = 0.001). No correlation was observed between f and ER (r = -0.162; P = 0.421) or D* and DCE parameters (r = 0.125-0.307; P > 0.119). This study suggests IVIM perfusion imaging using 3.0-T MRI is feasible in NPC, and f correlates significantly with EA and MSI. (orig.)

  11. Role of high resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (HR CeMRA) in management of arterial complications of the renal transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismaeel, M. Maged; Abdel-Hamid, Azza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Transplant renal artery (RA) stenosis (TRAS) is the most frequent posttransplantation vascular complication. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (CeMRA) angiography has been established as the preferred imaging technique for the evaluation of TRAS because it does not require the use of iodinated contrast material and does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the gold standard in the evaluation of arterial tree of the renal allograft. Aim of the work: This study was carried out to assess the accuracy of CeMRA in the detection of arterial complications after renal transplantation. Patients and methods: Thirty renal transplant patients with suspected arterial complications in which both CeMRA and DSA were performed were included in the study. The HR CeMRA shows 93.7% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 88.2% positive predictive value, 88.9% negative predictive value and 88.5% accuracy. Conclusion: HR CeMRA is an accurate reliable tool in the assessment of arterial complications after renal transplantation. It may replace DSA as a diagnostic modality with reservation of interventional techniques for endovascular treatment of suitable cases.

  12. Role of high resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (HR CeMRA) in management of arterial complications of the renal transplant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismaeel, M. Maged [Suez Canal University (Egypt); Abdel-Hamid, Azza, E-mail: azza4951@hotmail.com [Suez Canal University (Egypt)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: Transplant renal artery (RA) stenosis (TRAS) is the most frequent posttransplantation vascular complication. Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance (CeMRA) angiography has been established as the preferred imaging technique for the evaluation of TRAS because it does not require the use of iodinated contrast material and does not expose the patient to ionizing radiation. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the gold standard in the evaluation of arterial tree of the renal allograft. Aim of the work: This study was carried out to assess the accuracy of CeMRA in the detection of arterial complications after renal transplantation. Patients and methods: Thirty renal transplant patients with suspected arterial complications in which both CeMRA and DSA were performed were included in the study. The HR CeMRA shows 93.7% sensitivity, 80% specificity, 88.2% positive predictive value, 88.9% negative predictive value and 88.5% accuracy. Conclusion: HR CeMRA is an accurate reliable tool in the assessment of arterial complications after renal transplantation. It may replace DSA as a diagnostic modality with reservation of interventional techniques for endovascular treatment of suitable cases.

  13. Contrast-enhanced dynamic and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging at 3.0 T to assess early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Liangping; Liu, Ying

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to assess early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at 3.0 T. A total of 44 patients newly diagnosed with NPC were included in the present study. All patients underwent MR examination at 3.0 T using DCE-MRI and DWI. The volume transfer constant ( K trans ), flux rate constant between extravascular extracellular space and plasma ( K ep ), the volume of extravascular extracellular space per unit volume of tissue ( V e ) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of tumours were investigated. Furthermore, the correlation between clinical stages and ADC value and K trans were analysed. The diagnostic accuracy of K trans and ADC were estimated using receiver operating characteristic curves. NPC stage correlated positively with K trans and negatively with ADC values. Additionally, tumour K trans negatively correlated with ADC value. The sensitivity and accuracy of combined K trans and ADC in distinguishing between stage II and stage III and stage III and IV were higher than the values of either measurement used separately. The present study suggested that K trans and ADC derived from DCE-MRI and DWI may be useful to detect stage early NPC accurately. K trans and ADC in combination were superior than either alone.

  14. Perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in patients with rectal cancer: Correlation with microvascular density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeo Eun; Lim, Joon Seok; Kim, Myeong Jin; Kim, Ki Whang; Choi, Jun Jeong; Kim, Dae Hong; Myoung, Sung Min

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether quantitative perfusion parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) correlate with immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis in rectal cancer. Preoperative DCE-MRI was performed in 63 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma. Transendothelial volume transfer (K trans ) and fractional volume of the extravascular-extracellular space (Ve) were measured by Interactive Data Language software in rectal cancer. After surgery, microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression scores were determined using immunohistochemical staining of rectal cancer specimens. Perfusion parameters (K trans , Ve) of DCE-MRI in rectal cancer were found to be correlated with MVD and VEGF expression scores by Spearman's rank coefficient analysis. T stage and N stage (negative or positive) were correlated with perfusion parameters and MVD. Significant correlation was not found between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and MVD (rs = -0.056 and p 0.662 for K trans ; rs = -0.103 and p = 0.416 for Ve), or between any DCE-MRI perfusion parameters and the VEGF expression score (rs = -0.042, p 0.741 for K trans ; r = 0.086, p = 0.497 for Ve) in rectal cancer. TN stage showed no significant correlation with perfusion parameters or MVD (p > 0.05 for all). DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, K trans and Ve, correlated poorly with MVD and VEGF expression scores in rectal cancer, suggesting that these parameters do not simply denote static histological vascular properties.

  15. Comparison of morphological and kinetic parameters in distinction of benign and malignant breast lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

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    Direnç Özlem Aksoy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the value of qualitative morphologicaland kinetic data and quantitative kinetic data indistinction of malignancy in dynamic contrast enhancedmagnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI of the breast.Methods: DCE-MRIs of 49 subjects were evaluated.Morphological and contrast enhancement parameters of95 lesions were recorded in these subjects. Post-contrastkinetic behavior of these lesions were also investigated.Among the quantitative parameters, relative enhancements(E1, E2, Epeak, time-to-peak (Tpeak, slope ofcurve (Slope, signal enhancement ratio (SER, and maximumintensity time ratio (MITR were calculated. Theseresults were compared with the pathological diagnosis.Results: Spiculated contour (100%, rim enhancement(97.87%, irregular shape (95.74%, and irregular margin(91.49% were the most specific morphological featuresof malignancy in mass lesions. In non-mass lesions, focalzone (91.49% was the most specific feature of malignancy.74.5% of the benign lesions showed type 1, 77.1%of the malignant lesions showed type 2 and 3 curves accordingto the kinetic curve evaluation. All quantitativeparameters except Epeak were found to be statisticallysignificant in distinction of malignancy.Conclusion: None of the morphological features of thebenign lesions were found to be significantly specific.More specific features can be described for malignantlesions. Early behavior of the kinetic curve is not usefulfor diagnosis of malignancy but the intermediate and latebehavior gives useful information. Quantitative data involvedin this study might be promising.Key words: Morphological, kinetic, breast lesions, magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic

  16. Preoperative evaluation of living renal donors: value of contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography and comparison of three rendering algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Hallscheidt, P.J.; Hosch, W.P.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Duex, M.; Ott, R.C.; Wiesel, M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE 3D MRA) in the preoperative assessment of potential living renal donors, and to compare the accuracy for the depiction of the vascular anatomy using three different rendering algorithms. Twenty-three potential living renal donors were examined with CE 3D MRA (TE/TR=1.3 ms/3.7 ms, field of view 260-320 x 350 mm, 384-448 x 512 matrix, slab thickness 9.4 cm, 72 partitions, section thickness 1.3 mm, scan time 24 s, 0.1 mmol/kg body weight gadobenate dimeglumine). Magnetic resonance angiography data sets were processed with maximum intensity projection (MIP), volume rendering (VR), and shaded-surface display (SSD) algorithms. The image analysis was performed independently by three MR-experienced radiologists recording the number of renal arteries, the presence of early branching or vascular pathology. The combination of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and intraoperative findings served as the gold standard for the image analysis. In total, 52 renal arteries were correspondingly observed in 23 patients at DSA and surgery. Other findings were 3 cases of early branching of the renal arteries, 4 cases of arterial stenosis and 1 case of bilateral fibromuscular dysplasia. With MRA source data all 52 renal arteries were correctly identified by all readers, compared with 51 (98.1%), 51-52 (98.1-100%) and 49-50 renal arteries (94.2-96.2%) with the MIP, VR and SSD projections, respectively. Similarly, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy was highest with the MRA source data followed by MIP, VR and SSD. Time requirements were lowest for the MIP reconstructions and highest for the VR reconstructions. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA is a reliable, non-invasive tool for the preoperative evaluation of potential living renal donors. Maximum intensity projection is favourable for the processing of 3D MRA data, as it has minimal time and computational requirements, while having

  17. Preoperative evaluation of living renal donors: value of contrast-enhanced 3D magnetic resonance angiography and comparison of three rendering algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, C. [Abteilung Radiologische Diagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Abteilung Onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hallscheidt, P.J.; Hosch, W.P.; Kauffmann, G.W.; Duex, M. [Abteilung Radiologische Diagnostik, Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ott, R.C.; Wiesel, M. [Abteilung Urologie und Poliklinik, Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography (CE 3D MRA) in the preoperative assessment of potential living renal donors, and to compare the accuracy for the depiction of the vascular anatomy using three different rendering algorithms. Twenty-three potential living renal donors were examined with CE 3D MRA (TE/TR=1.3 ms/3.7 ms, field of view 260-320 x 350 mm, 384-448 x 512 matrix, slab thickness 9.4 cm, 72 partitions, section thickness 1.3 mm, scan time 24 s, 0.1 mmol/kg body weight gadobenate dimeglumine). Magnetic resonance angiography data sets were processed with maximum intensity projection (MIP), volume rendering (VR), and shaded-surface display (SSD) algorithms. The image analysis was performed independently by three MR-experienced radiologists recording the number of renal arteries, the presence of early branching or vascular pathology. The combination of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and intraoperative findings served as the gold standard for the image analysis. In total, 52 renal arteries were correspondingly observed in 23 patients at DSA and surgery. Other findings were 3 cases of early branching of the renal arteries, 4 cases of arterial stenosis and 1 case of bilateral fibromuscular dysplasia. With MRA source data all 52 renal arteries were correctly identified by all readers, compared with 51 (98.1%), 51-52 (98.1-100%) and 49-50 renal arteries (94.2-96.2%) with the MIP, VR and SSD projections, respectively. Similarly, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy was highest with the MRA source data followed by MIP, VR and SSD. Time requirements were lowest for the MIP reconstructions and highest for the VR reconstructions. Contrast-enhanced 3D MRA is a reliable, non-invasive tool for the preoperative evaluation of potential living renal donors. Maximum intensity projection is favourable for the processing of 3D MRA data, as it has minimal time and computational requirements, while having

  18. Voxelwise comparison of perfusion parameters estimated using dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) computed tomography and DCE-magnetic resonance imaging in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallehauge; Jesper; Nielsen, Thomas; Haack, Soeren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging has gained interest as an imaging modality for assessment of tumor characteristics and response to cancer treatment. However, for DCE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue contrast enhancement may vary depending on imaging sequence and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to compare DCE-MRI to DCE-computed tomography (DCE-CT) as the gold standard. Material and methods: Thirteen patients with advanced cervical cancer were scanned once prior to chemo-radiation and during chemo-radiation with DCE-CT and -MRI in immediate succession. A total of 22 paired DCE-CT and -MRI scans were acquired for comparison. Kinetic modeling using the extended Tofts model was applied to both image series. Furthermore the similarity of the spatial distribution was evaluated using a G analysis. The correlation between the two imaging techniques was evaluated using Pe arson's correlation and the parameter means were compared using a Student's t-test (p trans (r = 0.9), flux rate constant k ep (r = 0.77), extracellular volume fraction v e (r = 0.58) and blood plasma volume fraction v p (r = 0.83). All quantitative parameters were found to be significantly different as estimated by DCE-CT and -MRI. The G analysis in normalized maps revealed that 45 % of the voxels failed to find a voxel with the corresponding value allowing for an uncertainty of 3 mm in position and 3 % in value (G 3,3 ). By reducing the criteria, the G-failure rates were: G 3,5 (37 % failure), G 3,10 (26% failure) and at G 3,15 (19 % failure). Conclusion: Good to excellent correlations but significant bias was found between DCE-CT and -MRI. Both the Pearson's correlation and the G analysis proved that the spatial information was similar when analyzing the two sets of DCE data using the extended Tofts model. Improvement of input function sampling is needed to improve kinetic quantification using DCE-MRI

  19. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  20. Is there a role for pre-operative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for radical surgery in malignant pleural mesothelioma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Duncan; Waller, David; Edwards, John; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Entwisle, James

    2003-12-01

    To assess the use of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI) in addition to computed tomography in the pre-operative assessment of patients for radical surgery in malignant pleural mesothelioma. Over a 45-month period, 51 of 76 patients assessed (69 men and seven women), underwent extra-pleural pneumonectomy or radical pleurectomy/decortication. Post-operative pathological stage was correlated with radiological staging, with particular emphasis on tumour resectability. Seventeen (22%) patients were found on CEMRI to have unresectable, but histologically unconfirmed disease, not previously seen on CT. Fifty-one (67%) patients proceeded to radical surgery, but pathological nodal data were incomplete in three, so excluding these patients from further analyses. The median pre-operative interval after CEMRI was 17 days. Two patients were found to have unexpectedly extensive disease at thoracotomy, thus the sensitivity of CEMRI for prediction of resectability was 97%. Using the International Mesothelioma Interest Group system, tumour stage was correctly predicted by CEMRI in 48% of patients, but understaged in 50% of cases, largely due to the underestimation of pericardial involvement, but this did not affect resectability and had no significant effect on prognosis. Nodal stage was correctly identified in 60% of patients. CEMRI was successful in predicting pathological tumour stage T3 or less (sensitivity of 85%; specificity of 100%), but less so in identifying tumour stage T2 or less (sensitivity of 23%; specificity of 96%) or N2 nodal disease (sensitivity 66%; specificity 73%). CEMRI is most useful in the differentiation of T3 and T4 disease and may be unnecessary at earlier stages. Its multiplanar tumour localisation abilities are of value in the assessment of resectability. It is unlikely to contribute significantly to nodal staging, but it remains a valuable adjunct in the selection of patients for radical surgery.

  1. Restoration of myocardial blood flow following percutaneous coronary balloon dilatation and stent implantation: Assessment with qualitative and quantitative contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensky, P.R.; Samani, N.J.; Horsfield, M.A.; Cherryman, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serial use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate regional myocardial perfusion changes following percutaneous coronary angioplasty and stent implantation (PTCA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six patients with single vessel coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent contrast-enhanced first pass MRI immediately prior to (visit A) and within 7 days after (visit B) PTCA. Three sequential short axis slices were obtained after gadodiamide (Gd) bolus (0.025 mmol/kg -1 ) at rest and during adenosine. Each short axis was divided radially into eight regions of interest (ROIs). ROIs were anatomically assigned to a coronary artery territory (CAT). Stress and rest qualitative and quantitative (unidirectional extraction fraction constant (K i ); index of myocardial perfusion reserve (MPRI) = stressK i / restK i ) perfusion parameters were determined for ROI supplied by remote and stenosed/stented vessels for each visit. RESULTS: In stented ROIs the number of ROIs demonstrating normal perfusion, as opposed to reversible perfusion deficits, increased. Qualitative perfusion assessment in remote CATs was unchanged. MPRI in stenotic CATs was lower than in remote CATs at visit A (P < 0.001). Following PTCA, MPRI increased in stented CATs (P < 0.001) but was unchanged in remote CATs. CONCLUSION: Restoration of myocardial perfusion following PTCA can be delineated with qualitative and quantitative perfusion MRI. Although at present the investigation is technically complex and not perfectly sensitive or specific, MRI has the potential to be a valuable tool for patient follow-up and evaluation of revascularization strategy efficacy. Sensky, P.R. et al. (2002)

  2. Usefulness of combining gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound for diagnosing the macroscopic classification of small hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tomoki; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hatooka, Masahiro; Morio, Kei; Morio, Reona; Kan, Hiromi; Fujino, Hatsue; Fukuhara, Takayuki; Masaki, Keiichi; Ohno, Atsushi; Naeshiro, Noriaki; Nakahara, Takashi; Honda, Yohji; Murakami, Eisuke; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Tsuge, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Akira; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Shoichi [Hiroshima University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima (Japan); Chayama, Kazuaki [Hiroshima University Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiroshima University, Liver Research Project Center, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Non-simple nodules in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) correlate with poor prognosis. Therefore, we examined the diagnostic ability of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for diagnosing the macroscopic classification of small HCCs. A total of 85 surgically resected nodules (≤30 mm) were analyzed. HCCs were pathologically classified as simple nodular (SN) and non-SN. By evaluating hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of EOB-MRI and Kupffer phase of CEUS, the diagnostic abilities of both modalities to correctly distinguish between SN and non-SN were compared. Forty-six nodules were diagnosed as SN and the remaining 39 nodules as non-SN. The area under the ROC curve (AUROCs, 95 % confidence interval) for the diagnosis of non-SN were EOB-MRI, 0.786 (0.682-0.890): CEUS, 0.784 (0.679-0.889), in combination, 0.876 (0.792-0.959). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 64.1 %, 95.7 %, and 81.2 % in EOB-MRI, 56.4 %, 97.8 %, and 78.8 % in CEUS, and 84.6 %, 95.7 %, and 90.6 % in combination, respectively. High diagnostic ability was obtained when diagnosed in both modalities combined. The sensitivity was especially statistically significant compared to CEUS. Combined diagnosis by EOB-MRI and CEUS can provide high-quality imaging assessment for determining non-SN in small HCCs. (orig.)

  3. Time-Resolved Three-Dimensional Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography in Patients with Chronic Expanding and Stable Aortic Dissections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Trojan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To prospectively evaluate our hypothesis that three-dimensional time-resolved contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (TR-MRA is able to detect hemodynamic alterations in patients with chronic expanding aortic dissection compared to stable aortic dissections. Materials and Methods. 20 patients with chronic or residual aortic dissection in the descending aorta and patent false lumen underwent TR-MRA of the aorta at 1.5 T and repeated follow-up imaging (mean follow-up 5.4 years. 7 patients showed chronic aortic expansion and 13 patients had stable aortic diameters. Regions of interest were placed in the nondissected ascending aorta and the false lumen of the descending aorta at the level of the diaphragm (FL-diaphragm level resulting in respective time-intensity curves. Results. For the FL-diaphragm level, time-to-peak intensity and full width at half maximum were significantly shorter in the expansion group compared to the stable group (p=0.027 and p=0.003, and upward and downward slopes of time-intensity curves were significantly steeper (p=0.015 and p=0.005. The delay of peak intensity in the FL-diaphragm level compared to the nondissected ascending aorta was significantly shorter in the expansion group compared to the stable group (p=0.01. Conclusions. 3D TR-MRA detects significant alterations of hemodynamics within the patent false lumen of chronic expanding aortic dissections compared to stable aortic dissections.

  4. Neovascularization in Vertebral Artery Atheroma-A Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Comparative Study in Patients with Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Carotid Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Ammara; Yuan, Jianmin; Patterson, Andrew J; Graves, Martin J; Varty, Kevin; Sadat, Umar; Gillard, Jonathan H

    2018-05-24

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease intertwined with neovascularization. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) enables the assessment of plaque neovascularization. This study aimed to explore the systemic nature of atherosclerosis by assessing difference in severity of neovascularization as quantified by DCE-MRI of vertebral arteries (VAs) between patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic carotid artery disease. Ten consecutive patients with asymptomatic VA stenosis and concomitant symptomatic carotid artery disease (group 1) and 10 consecutive patients with asymptomatic VA stenosis and concomitant asymptomatic carotid artery disease (group 2) underwent 3-dimensional DCE-MRI of their cervical segment of VAs. A previously validated pharmacokinetic modeling approach was used for DCE-MRI analysis. K trans was calculated in the adventitia and plaque as a measure of neovessel permeability. Both patient groups were comparable for demographics and comorbidities. Mean luminal stenosis was comparable for both groups (54.4% versus 52.27%, P = .32). Group 1 had higher adventitial K trans and plaque K trans (.08 ± .01 min -1 , .07 ± .01 min -1 ) compared with Group 2 (.06 ± .01 min -1 , .06 ± .01 min -1 ) (P = .004 and .03, respectively). Good correlation was present among the two image analysts (intraclass correlation coefficient = .78). Vertebral Artery atheroma of patients with symptomatic carotid artery disease had increased neovessel permeability compared with the patients with asymptomatic carotid artery disease. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease. The VA atherosclerosis is likely to have increased severity of neovascularization if another arterial territory is symptomatic in the same patient cohort. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Value of Single-Dose Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography Versus Intraarterial Digital Subtraction Angiography in Therapy Indications in Abdominal and Iliac Arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Philipp J.; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Both, Markus; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the study was to prove the value of single-dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography [three-dimensional (3D) ceMRA] in abdominal and iliac arteries versus the reference standard intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (i.a.DSA) when indicating a therapy. Patients suspected of having abdominal or iliac artery stenosis were included in this study. A positive vote of the local Ethics Committee was given. After written informed consent was obtained, 37 patients were enrolled, of which 34 were available for image evaluation. Both 3D ceMRA and i.a. DSA were performed for each patient. The dosage for 3D ceMRA was 0.1 mmol/kg body weight in a 1.5-T scanner with a phased-array coil. The parameters of the 3D-FLASH sequence were as follows: TR/TE 4.6/1.8 ms, effective thickness 3.5 mm, matrix 512 x 200, flip angle 30 o , field of view 420 mm, TA 23 s, coronal scan orientation. Totally, 476 vessel segments were evaluated for stenosis degree by two radiologists in a consensus fashion in a blinded read. For each patient, a therapy was proposed, if clinically indicated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy for stenoses ≥50% were 68%, 92%, 44%, 97%, and 90%, respectively. In 13/34 patients, a discrepancy was found concerning therapy decisions based on MRA findings versus therapy decisions based on the reference standard DSA. The results showed that the used MRA imaging technique of abdominal and iliac arteries is not competitive to i.a. DSA, with a high rate of misinterpretation of the MRAs resulting in incorrect therapies

  6. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging: a non-invasive method to evaluate significant differences between malignant and normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisch, Ansgar; Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner; Zunterer, Hildegard; DeVries, Alexander F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: An ever recurring challenge in diagnostic radiology is the differentiation between non-malignant and malignant tissue. Based on evidence that microcirculation of normal, non-malignant tissue differs from that of malignant tissue, the goal of this study was to assess the reliability of dynamic contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (dcMRI) for differentiating these two entities. Materials and methods: DcMRI data of rectum carcinoma and gluteus maximus muscles were acquired in 41 patients. Using an fast T1-mapping sequence on a 1.5-T whole body scanner, T1-maps were dynamically retrieved before, during and after constant rate i.v. infusion of a contrast medium (CM). On the basis of the acquired data sets, PI-values were calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis. The relevance of spatial heterogeneities of microcirculation was investigated by relative frequency histograms of the PI-values. Results: A statistically significant difference between malignant and normal tissue was found for the mean PI-value (P < 0.001; 8.95 ml/min/100 g ± 2.45 versus 3.56 ml/min/100 g ± 1.20). Additionally relative frequency distributions of PI-values with equal class intervals of 2.5 ml/min/100 g revealed significant differences between the histograms of muscles and rectum carcinoma. Conclusion: We could show that microcirculation differences between malignant and normal, non-malignant tissue can be reliably assessed by non-invasive dcMRI. Therefore, dcMRI holds great promise in the aid of cancer assessment, especially in patients where biopsy is contraindicated

  7. Positive enhancement integral values in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of breast carcinoma: Ductal carcinoma in situ vs. invasive ductal carcinoma

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    Nadrljanski, Mirjan, E-mail: dr.m.nadrljanski@gmail.com [Clinic for Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Maksimović, Ružica [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Plešinac-Karapandžić, Vesna; Nikitović, Marina [Clinic for Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Marković-Vasiljković, Biljana [Center for Radiology and Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Clinical Center of Serbia, Pasterova 2, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Milošević, Zorica [Clinic for Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr Subotića 8, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to contribute to the standardization of the numeric positive enhancement integral (PEI) values in breast parenchyma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) and to evaluate the significance of the difference in PEI values between IDC and parenchyma, DCIS and parenchyma and IDC and DCIS. Materials and Methods: In the prospective trial, we analyzed the dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) of 60 consecutive patients with histologically confirmed unilateral DCIS (n = 30) and IDC (n = 30) and defined the PEI values (range; mean ± SD) for the lesions and the breast parenchyma. Tumor-to-non-tumor (T/NT) ratios were calculated for DCIS and IDC and compared. PEI color maps (PEICM) were created. The differences in PEI values between IDC and parenchyma and between DCIS and parenchyma were tested according to t-test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to test the differences between the mean PEI values of parenchyma, DCIS and IDC. Results: IDC showed highly statistically different PEI numeric values compared to breast parenchyma (748.7 ± 32.2 vs. 74.6 ± 17.0; p < 0.0001). The same applied to the differences in the group of patients with DCIS (428.0 ± 25.0 vs. 66.0 ± 10.6; p < 0.0001). The difference between IDC, DCIS and parenchyma were also considered highly statistically significant (p < 0.0001) and so were the T/NT ratios for IDC and DCIS (10.1 ± 2.4 vs. 6.6 ± 1.4; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: PEI numeric values may contribute to differentiation between invasive and in situ breast carcinoma.

  8. Predictive value of the time-intensity curves on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for lymphatic spreading in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Lee, Chol Joo; Ichikawa, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) has emerged as a promising diagnostic modality in various breast cancer treatments. However, little is known about the correlation between the pattern of time to signal intensity curves (TIC) on the CE-MRI and clinicopathologic features. This study was designed to investigate these correlations and evaluate the predictive value of TIC on CE-MRI in order to identify high-risk patients. Between 2001 and 2003, 101 lesions were evaluated to detect malignancy on CE-MRI in 101 women who were suspected of having breast tumors based on either clinical findings or conventional imaging studies. Moreover, the clinicopathologic findings were compared with the pattern of TIC for the 69 surgically treated malignant lesions. In detecting malignancy, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 78.7%, 88.5%, and 81.2%, respectively, in the 101 breast lesions. Especially for the 69 surgically treated malignant lesions, in comparison with breast cancer tumors with the benign pattern of TIC, the breast cancer tumors with a malignant pattern were found more frequently in lymphatic invasion (P<0.01) and lymph node metastasis (P<0.005), although no statistical correlation regarding the histological type, tumor size, vascular invasion, extensive intraductal component, hormone receptor status, or pathological stage was noted between the two groups. According to a logistic regression model, lymph node metastasis was found to be a significant independent variable. The pattern of TIC could be used to predict lymphatic spreading associated with lymph node metastasis prior to surgery as well as to detect malignancy. Therefore, a more detailed evaluation should be made to identify the presence of lymphatic spreading in patients with a malignant pattern of TIC. (author)

  9. Diagnostic usefulness of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging with dynamic contrast-enhancement in patients with localized prostate cancer. Mapping studies with biopsy specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Samma, Shoji; Joko, Masanori; Akiyama, Tatsuya; Takewa, Megumi; Kitano, Satoru; Okajima, Eigoro

    1999-01-01

    New diagnostic criteria for dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in prostate cancer are presented. The diagnostic usefulness of endorectal MR imaging with dynamic contrast-enhancement in localized prostate cancer and the validity of these criteria were evaluated. Eighteen untreated patients who were suspected of localized prostate cancer were included in the study. They received endorectal dynamic MR imaging before systematic sextant needle biopsy. First, a mapping study with the findings of MR images and histopathology of biopsy specimens was performed in eight patients out of 18 to compare the difference in T2-weighted images with the endorectal coil and the body coil in the same individuals. Second, another mapping study was performed in all 18 patients by analyzing the findings of endorectal dynamic MR images. For the diagnosis of prostate cancer in MR imaging, we offered diagnostic criteria from our experience in addition to those in plain T2-weighted images from the literature. The overall diagnostic rates of endorectal dynamic MR imaging were 88.9% in accuracy, 100% in sensitivity, and 81.8% in specificity. In the comparison of the endorectal and body coils in T2-weighted images in eight patients, there was no difference in the diagnostic rates except for one more histopathologic false positive portion in endorectal MR imaging. In the second mapping study in 18 patients, the diagnostic rates were 92.6% in accuracy, 88.9% in sensitivity and 93.3% in specificity. Endorectal dynamic imaging raised the diagnostic sensitivity from 77.8 to 88.9%. The data demonstrated the validity of this diagnostic criteria and the diagnostic usefulness of endorectal dynamic MR imaging in localized prostate cancer. (author)

  10. Dual contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the liver with superparamagnetic iron oxide followed by gadolinium for lesion detection and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubaska, Samantha; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Saini, Sanjay; Hahn, Peter F.; Halpern, Elkan

    2001-01-01

    AIM: Iron oxide contrast agents are useful for lesion detection, and extracellular gadolinium chelates are advocated for lesion characterization. We undertook a study to determine if dual contrast enhanced liver imaging with sequential use of ferumoxides particles and gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA can be performed in the same imaging protocol. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixteen patients underwent dual contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver for evaluation of known/suspected focal lesions which included, metastases (n = 5), hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC;n = 3), cholangiocharcinoma(n = 1) and focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH;n = 3). Pre- and post-iron oxide T1-weighted gradient recalled echo (GRE) and T2-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) sequences were obtained, followed by post-Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) multi-phase dynamic T1-weighted out-of-phase GRE imaging. Images were analysed in a blinded fashion by three experts using a three-point scoring system for lesion conspicuity on pre- and post-iron oxide T1 images as well as for reader's confidence in characterizing liver lesions on post Gd-DTPA T1 images. RESULTS: No statistically significant difference in lesion conspicuity was observed on pre- and post-iron oxide T1-GRE images in this small study cohort. The presence of iron oxide did not appreciably diminish image quality of post-gadolinium sequences and did not prevent characterization of liver lesions. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that characterization of focal liver lesion with Gd-enhanced liver MRI is still possible following iron oxide enhanced imaging. Kubaska, S. et al. (2001)

  11. Usefulness of combining gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced ultrasound for diagnosing the macroscopic classification of small hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tomoki; Aikata, Hiroshi; Hatooka, Masahiro; Morio, Kei; Morio, Reona; Kan, Hiromi; Fujino, Hatsue; Fukuhara, Takayuki; Masaki, Keiichi; Ohno, Atsushi; Naeshiro, Noriaki; Nakahara, Takashi; Honda, Yohji; Murakami, Eisuke; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Tsuge, Masataka; Hiramatsu, Akira; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Hyogo, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Shoichi; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-11-01

    Non-simple nodules in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) correlate with poor prognosis. Therefore, we examined the diagnostic ability of gadolinium-ethoxybenzyl-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) for diagnosing the macroscopic classification of small HCCs. A total of 85 surgically resected nodules (≤30 mm) were analyzed. HCCs were pathologically classified as simple nodular (SN) and non-SN. By evaluating hepatobiliary phase (HBP) of EOB-MRI and Kupffer phase of CEUS, the diagnostic abilities of both modalities to correctly distinguish between SN and non-SN were compared. Forty-six nodules were diagnosed as SN and the remaining 39 nodules as non-SN. The area under the ROC curve (AUROCs, 95% confidence interval) for the diagnosis of non-SN were EOB-MRI, 0.786 (0.682-0.890): CEUS, 0.784 (0.679-0.889), in combination, 0.876 (0.792-0.959). The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 64.1%, 95.7%, and 81.2% in EOB-MRI, 56.4%, 97.8%, and 78.8% in CEUS, and 84.6%, 95.7%, and 90.6% in combination, respectively. High diagnostic ability was obtained when diagnosed in both modalities combined. The sensitivity was especially statistically significant compared to CEUS. Combined diagnosis by EOB-MRI and CEUS can provide high-quality imaging assessment for determining non-SN in small HCCs. • Non-SN has a higher frequency of MVI and intrahepatic metastasis than SN. • Macroscopic classification is useful to choose the treatment strategy for small HCCs. • Diagnostic ability for macroscopic findings of EOB-MRI and CEUS were statistically equal. • The diagnosis of macroscopic findings by individual modality has limitations. • Combined diagnosis of EOB-MRI and CEUS provides high diagnostic ability.

  12. Clinical utility of eco-color-power Doppler ultrasonography and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for interpretation and quantification of joint synovitis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotti, Marina; Galeazzi, Vittoria; Catucci, Francesca; Zappia, Marcello; Arrigoni, Francesco; Barile, Antonio; Giovagnoni, Andrea

    2018-01-19

    With the introduction of new biologics such as anti-TNF-alpha antibodies and other therapies in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis, capable of halting joint destruction and functional disability, there are new pressures on diagnostic and prognostic imaging. Early demonstration of pre-erosive inflammatory features and monitoring of the long-term effects of treatment are becoming increasingly important. Early detection of synovitis offers advantages in terms of allowing early instigation of therapy and may allow the identification of those patients displaying more aggressive disease who might benefit from early intervention with expensive DMARD therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and allow early diagnosis of inflammatory arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Synovitis represents a potential surrogate measure of disease activity that can be monitored using either MRI or US; the techniques have, generally, focused on monitoring synovial volume or quality as assessed by its vascularity. However to achieve these goals, standardisation and validation of US and MRI are required to ensure accurate diagnosis, reproducibility and reliability. Each modality has different strengths and weaknesses and levels of validation. This article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists and rheumatologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses the role of US and colour or power Doppler sonography (PDUS) in the detection and monitoring of synovitis in inflammatory arthropathies. The second part will look at advanced MR imaging and Dynamic contrast-enhanced

  13. Contrast Enhancement of the Brain by Folate-Conjugated Gadolinium–Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid–Human Serum Albumin Nanoparticles by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huedayi Korkusuz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Different from regular small molecule contrast agents, nanoparticle-based contrast agents have a longer circulation time and can be modified with ligands to confer tissue-specific contrasting properties. We evaluated the tissue distribution of polymeric nanoparticles (NPs prepared from human serum albumin (HSA, loaded with gadolinium–diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA (Gd-HSA-NP, and coated with folic acid (FA (Gd-HSA-NP-FA in mice by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. FA increases the affinity of the Gd-HSA-NP to FA receptor–expressing cells. Clinical 3 T MRI was used to evaluate the signal intensities in the different organs of mice injected with Gd-DTPA, Gd-HSA-NP, or Gd-HSA-NP-FA. Signal intensities were measured and standardized by calculating the signal to noise ratios. In general, the NP-based contrast agents provided stronger contrasting than Gd-DTPA. Gd-HSA-NP-FA provided a significant contrast enhancement (CE in the brain (p = .0032, whereas Gd-DTPA or Gd-HSA-NP did not. All studied MRI contrast agents showed significant CE in the blood, kidney, and liver (p < .05. Gd-HSA-NP-FA elicited significantly higher CE in the blood than Gd-HSA-NP (p = .0069; Gd-HSA-NP and Gd-HSA-NP-FA did not show CE in skeletal muscle and gallbladder; Gd-HSA-NP, but not Gd-HSA-NP-FA, showed CE in the cardiac muscle. Gd-HSA-NP-FA has potential as an MRI contrast agent in the brain.

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography: first-pass arterial enhancement as a function of gadolinium-chelate concentration, and the saline chaser volume and injection rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husarik, Daniela B; Bashir, Mustafa R; Weber, Paul W; Nichols, Eli B; Howle, Laurens E; Merkle, Elmar M; Nelson, Rendon C

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of the contrast medium (CM) concentration and the saline chaser volume and injection rate on first-pass aortic enhancement characteristics in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography using a physiologic flow phantom. Imaging was performed on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance system (MAGNETOM Trio, Siemens Healthcare Solutions, Inc, Erlangen, Germany) using a 2-dimensional fast low angle shot T1-weighted sequence (repetition time, 500 milliseconds; echo time, 1.23 milliseconds; flip angle, 8 degrees; 1 frame/s × 60 seconds). The following CM concentrations injected at 2 mL/s were used with 3 different contrast agents (gadolinium [Gd]-BOPTA, Gd-HP-DO3A, Gd-DTPA): 20 mL of undiluted CM (100%) and 80%, 40%, 20%, 10%, 5%, and 2.5% of the full amount, all diluted in saline to a volume of 20 mL to ensure equal bolus volume. The CM was followed by saline chasers of 20 to 60 mL injected at 2 mL/s and 6 mL/s. Aortic signal intensity (SI) was measured, and normalized SI versus time (SI/Tn) curves were generated. The maximal SI (SI(max)), bolus length, and areas under the SI/Tn curve were calculated. Decreasing the CM concentration from 100% to 40% resulted in a decrease of SI(max) to 86.1% (mean). Further decreasing the CM concentration to 2.5% decreased SI(max) to 5.1% (mean). Altering the saline chaser volume had no significant effect on SI(max). Increasing the saline chaser injection rate had little effect (mean increase, 2.2%) on SI(max) when using ≥40% of CM. There was a larger effect (mean increase, 19.6%) when ≤20% of CM were used. Bolus time length was significantly shorter (P < 0.001), and area under the SI/T(n) curve was significantly smaller (P < 0.01) for the CM protocols followed by a saline chaser injected at 6 mL/s compared with a saline chaser injected at 2 mL/s. With 40% of CM and a fast saline chaser, SImax close to that with undiluted CM can be achieved. An increased saline chaser injection rate has a more pronounced effect on

  15. Serial contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance and magnetization transfer in the study of patients with multiple sclerosis; Resonancia magnetica con contraste y transferencia de magnetizacion en el estudio seriado de pacientes con esclerosis multiple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovira, A; Alonso, J; Cucurella, G; Nos, C; Tintore, M; Pedraza, S; Rio, J; Montalban, X [Hospital General i Universitari Vall d` Hebron. Barcelona (Spain)

    1998-12-31

    To demonstrate the changes in the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) of different demyelinating plaques, correlating them with the baseline values in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) sequences in order to relate them more closely to the underlying disease. The study was based on 33 demyelinating plaques obtained from six patients clinically diagnosed as having remitting-recurring multiple sclerosis (MS). All the patients underwent two MR studies at a 3 to 5-month interval, including contrast-enhanced T1 and T2- weighted sequences and magnetization transfer images. The latter were used to calculate the MTR for each of the demyelinating plaques included in the study. The statistical analysis of the results obtained revealed statistically significant between initial MTR values and those of subsequent T1-weighted sequences. The MTR demonstrate significant differences between plaques according to contrast-enhanced T1-weigh tes sequences, probably indicating variable degrees of edema, demyelination and tissue destruction. These differences should be taken into account to enable the use of T1-weighted sequences to quantify the lesion load in MS patients. (Author) 35 refs.

  16. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, Su-Chin; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Liu, Yi-Jui; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s"−"1) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s"−"1, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  17. Comparison of Power Versus Manual Injection in Bolus Shape and Image Quality on Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography: An Experimental Study in a Swine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboyama, Takahiro; Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare power versus manual injection in bolus shape and image quality on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA). Three types of CE-MRA (head-neck 3-dimensional [3D] MRA with a test-bolus technique, thoracic-abdominal 3D MRA with a bolus-tracking technique, and thoracic-abdominal time-resolved 4-dimensional [4D] MRA) were performed after power and manual injection of gadobutrol (0.1 mmol/kg) at 2 mL/s in 12 pigs (6 sets of power and manual injections for each type of CE-MRA). For the quantitative analysis, the signal-to-noise ratio was measured on ascending aorta, descending aorta, brachiocephalic trunk, common carotid artery, and external carotid artery on the 6 sets of head-neck 3D MRA, and on ascending aorta, descending aorta, brachiocephalic trunk, abdominal aorta, celiac trunk, and renal artery on the 6 sets of thoracic-abdominal 3D MRA. Bolus shapes were evaluated on the 6 sets each of test-bolus scans and 4D MRA. For the qualitative analysis, arterial enhancement, superimposition of nontargeted enhancement, and overall image quality were evaluated on 3D MRA. Visibility of bolus transition was assessed on 4D MRA. Intraindividual comparison between power and manual injection was made by paired t test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and analysis of variance by ranks. Signal-to-noise ratio on 3D MRA was statistically higher with power injection than with manual injection (P < 0.001). Bolus shapes (test-bolus, 4D MRA) were represented by a characteristic standard bolus curve (sharp first-pass peak followed by a gentle recirculation peak) in all the 12 scans with power injection, but only in 1 of the 12 scans with manual injection. Standard deviations of time-to-peak enhancement were smaller in power injection than in manual injection. Qualitatively, although both injection methods achieved diagnostic quality on 3D MRA, power injection exhibited significantly higher image quality than manual injection (P = 0.001) due to

  18. Influence of amplitude-related perfusion parameters in the parotid glands by non-fat-saturated dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Su-Chin [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, Republic of China and Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Cheng-Chieh [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Chang, Hing-Chiu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Hui-Chu [Ph.D. Program of Technology Management, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Jui [Department of Automatic Control Engineering, Feng-Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung, E-mail: peterjuancj@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei 114, Taiwan and Department of Radiology, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei 114, Taiwan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: To verify whether quantification of parotid perfusion is affected by fat signals on non-fat-saturated (NFS) dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and whether the influence of fat is reduced with fat saturation (FS). Methods: This study consisted of three parts. First, a retrospective study analyzed DCE-MRI data previously acquired on different patients using NFS (n = 18) or FS (n = 18) scans. Second, a phantom study simulated the signal enhancements in the presence of gadolinium contrast agent at six concentrations and three fat contents. Finally, a prospective study recruited nine healthy volunteers to investigate the influence of fat suppression on perfusion quantification on the same subjects. Parotid perfusion parameters were derived from NFS and FS DCE-MRI data using both pharmacokinetic model analysis and semiquantitative parametric analysis. T tests and linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: NFS scans showed lower amplitude-related parameters, including parameter A, peak enhancement (PE), and slope than FS scans in the patients (all with P < 0.0167). The relative signal enhancement in the phantoms was proportional to the dose of contrast agent and was lower in NFS scans than in FS scans. The volunteer study showed lower parameter A (6.75 ± 2.38 a.u.), PE (42.12% ± 14.87%), and slope (1.43% ± 0.54% s{sup −1}) in NFS scans as compared to 17.63 ± 8.56 a.u., 104.22% ± 25.15%, and 9.68% ± 1.67% s{sup −1}, respectively, in FS scans (all with P < 0.005). These amplitude-related parameters were negatively associated with the fat content in NFS scans only (all with P < 0.05). Conclusions: On NFS DCE-MRI, quantification of parotid perfusion is adversely affected by the presence of fat signals for all amplitude-related parameters. The influence could be reduced on FS scans.

  19. Is synovitis detected on non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging associated with serum biomarkers and clinical signs of effusion? Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveza, L A; Kraus, V B; Collins, J E; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F W; Nevitt, M C; Hunter, D J

    2017-09-20

    To determine the relationship between synovitis detected on non-contrast-enhanced (non-CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), biochemical markers of inflammation, and clinical assessment of effusion in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). We examined data from the OA Biomarkers Consortium within the Osteoarthritis Initiative (n = 600). Non-CE MRIs were semi-quantitatively scored (grades 0-3) for severity of Hoffa synovitis and effusion synovitis. Serum (s) matrix metalloproteinase-3 (sMMP-3), hyaluronic acid (sHA), and nitrated epitope of the α-helical region of type II collagen (sColl2-1NO2) were quantified. The bulge and patellar tap clinical tests were performed at baseline and performance characteristics were assessed for the detection of effusion synovitis on MRI. Multinomial logistic regression adjusted for covariates was used to assess the association between biochemical and imaging markers at baseline and over 12 and 24 months. At baseline, sHA and sMMP-3 were associated with moderate to large (score ≥ 2, n = 117) effusion synovitis, with odds ratio = 1.35 and 1.30 per 1 standard deviation in biochemical markers (95% confidence intervals 1.07, 1.71 and 1.00, 1.69), c-statistics 0.640 and 0.626, respectively. The c-statistics for the presence of Hoffa synovitis (score ≥ 2) were 0.693, 0.694, and 0.694 for sHA, sMMP-3, and sColl2-1NO2, respectively. There was no significant association between biochemical markers (baseline and 12 and 24 month time-integrated concentrations) and changes in MRI markers. The bulge and patellar tap signs were 22.0% and 4.3% sensitive and 88.8% and 94.8% specific, respectively, for detecting effusion synovitis (score ≥ 1) on MRI. sHA and sMMP-3 were modestly associated with effusion synovitis at baseline. Clinical signs of effusion are insensitive but highly specific for the presence of any effusion synovitis on non-CE MRI.

  20. Absolute quantification of regional renal blood flow in swine by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using a blood pool contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdemann, Lutz; Nafz, Benno; Elsner, Franz; Grosse-Siestrup, Christian; Meissler, Michael; Kaufels, Nicola; Rehbein, Hagen; Persson, Pontus B; Michaely, Henrik J; Lengsfeld, Philipp; Voth, Matthias; Gutberlet, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate for the first time in an animal model the possibility of absolute regional quantification of renal medullary and cortical perfusion by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using a blood pool contrast agent. A total of 18 adult female pigs (age, 16-22 weeks; body weight, 45-65 kg; no dietary restrictions) were investigated by DCE-MRI. Absolute renal blood flow (RBF) measured by an ultrasound transit time flow probe around the renal vein was used as the standard of reference. An inflatable stainless cuff placed around the renal artery near its origin from the abdominal aorta was used to reduce RBF to 60%, 40%, and 20% of the baseline flow. The last measurement was performed with the cuff fully reopened. Absolute RBF values during these 4 perfusion states were compared with the results of DCE-MRI performed on a 1.5-T scanner with an 8-channel phased-array surface coil. All scans were acquired in breath-hold technique in the coronal plane using a field of view of 460 mm.Each dynamic scan commenced with a set of five 3D T1-weighted gradient echo sequences with different flip angles (alpha = 2 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees): TE, 0.88 milliseconds; TR, 2.65 milliseconds; slice thickness, 8.8 mm for 4 slices; acquisition matrix, 128 x 128; and acquisitions, 4. These data served to calculate 3D intrinsic longitudinal relaxation rate maps (R10) and magnetization (M0). Immediately after these images, the dynamic 3D T1-weighted gradient echo images were acquired with the same parameters and a constant alpha = 30 degrees, half Fourier, 1 acquisition, 64 frames, a time interval of 1.65 seconds between each frame, and a total duration of 105.6. Three milliliters of an albumin-binding blood pool contrast agent (0.25 mmol/mL gadofosveset trisodium, Vasovist, Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin, Germany) was injected at a rate of 3 mL/s. Perfusion was calculated using the arterial input function from the aorta, which was

  1. Validation of Perfusion Quantification with 3D Gradient Echo Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using a Blood Pool Contrast Agent in Skeletal Swine Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hindel

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to validate perfusion quantification in a low-perfused tissue by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI with shared k-space sampling using a blood pool contrast agent. Perfusion measurements were performed in a total of seven female pigs. An ultrasonic Doppler probe was attached to the right femoral artery to determine total flow in the hind leg musculature. The femoral artery was catheterized for continuous local administration of adenosine to increase blood flow up to four times the baseline level. Three different stable perfusion levels were induced. The MR protocol included a 3D gradient-echo sequence with a temporal resolution of approximately 1.5 seconds. Before each dynamic sequence, static MR images were acquired with flip angles of 5°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Both static and dynamic images were used to generate relaxation rate and baseline magnetization maps with a flip angle method. 0.1 mL/kg body weight of blood pool contrast medium was injected via a central venous catheter at a flow rate of 5 mL/s. The right hind leg was segmented in 3D into medial, cranial, lateral, and pelvic thigh muscles, lower leg, bones, skin, and fat. The arterial input function (AIF was measured in the aorta. Perfusion of the different anatomic regions was calculated using a one- and a two-compartment model with delay- and dispersion-corrected AIFs. The F-test for model comparison was used to decide whether to use the results of the one- or two-compartment model fit. Total flow was calculated by integrating volume-weighted perfusion values over the whole measured region. The resulting values of delay, dispersion, blood volume, mean transit time, and flow were all in physiologically and physically reasonable ranges. In 107 of 160 ROIs, the blood signal was separated, using a two-compartment model, into a capillary and an arteriolar signal contribution, decided by the F-test. Overall flow in hind leg muscles

  2. Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pelvic Bone Metastases at 3.0 T: Comparison Between 3-dimensional T1-weighted CAIPIRINHA-VIBE Sequence and 2-dimensional T1-weighted Turbo Spin-Echo Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min A; Hong, Suk-Joo; Lee, Kyu-Chong; Lee, Chang Hee

    2018-06-12

    This study aimed to compare 3-dimensional T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence (CAIPIRINHA-volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination [VIBE]) with 2-dimensional T1-weighted turbo spin-echo sequence for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of pelvic bone metastases at 3.0 T. Thirty-one contrast-enhanced MRIs of pelvic bone metastases were included. Two contrast-enhanced sequences were evaluated for the following parameters: overall image quality, sharpness of pelvic bone, iliac vessel clarity, artifact severity, and conspicuity and edge sharpness of the smallest metastases. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of the smallest metastases. Significant differences between the 2 sequences were assessed. CAIPIRINHA-VIBE had higher scores for overall image quality, pelvic bone sharpness, iliac vessel clarity, and edge sharpness of the metastatic lesions, and had less artifacts (all P 0.05). Our results suggest that CAIPIRINHA-VIBE may be superior to turbo spin-echo for contrast-enhanced MRI of pelvic bone metastases at 3.0 T.

  3. Comparison of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography and conventional pulmonary angiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism : a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudkerk, M; van Beek, EJR; Wielopolski, P; van Ooijen, PMA; Brouwers-Kuyper, EMJ; Bongaerts, AHH; Berghout, A

    2002-01-01

    Background Diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism are complex and consist of non-invasive diagnostic tests done to avoid conventional pulmonary angiography as much as possible. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the diagnosis of pulmonary

  4. Rat Tumor Response to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid as Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Plasma 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid Levels, and Tumor Necrosis1

    OpenAIRE

    McPhail, Lesley D; McIntyre, Dominick J O; Ludwig, Christian; Kestell, Philip; Griffiths, John R; Kelland, Lloyd R; Robinson, Simon P

    2006-01-01

    The dose-dependent effects of 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) on rat GH3 prolactinomas were investigated in vivo. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to assess tumor blood flow/permeability pretreatment and 24 hours posttreatment with 0, 100, 200, or 350 mg/kg DMXAA. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using Ktrans and the integrated area under the gadolinium time curve (IAUGC) as response biomarkers. Highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was use...

  5. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography of the aorta and its branches. Clinical applications for a new angiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J. L.; Vilanova, J. C.; Huguet, M.; Delgado, E.; Baquero, M.; Blanch, A.; Aldoma, J.; Capdevila, A.

    1999-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the study of the aorta has developed at an impressive rate in recent years. It is now possible to evaluate the aorta and its branches by means of magnetic resonance (MR) following administration via peripheral vein of a paramagnetic contrast agent. The approach is similar to that of conventional arteriography, but without the risk associated with iodinated contrast media or invasive arterial catheterization. The technique involves the use of a sequence of ultrafast three-dimensional gradient-echo pulses acquired during apnea. This process enables angiographic or volumetric visualization in the desired plane. The objective of the present report is to describe the technique and demonstrate its many clinical applications. (Author) 23 refs

  6. Aggressive Angiomyxoma with Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Dynamic Contrast Enhancement: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    S. Brunelle; F. Bertucci; B. Chetaille; B. Lelong; G. Piana; A. Sarran

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive angiomyxoma (AA) is a rare benign soft tissue tumour usually affecting the pelvis and perineum of young women. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial in the management of AA patients for its diagnostic contribution and for the preoperative assessment of the actual tumour extension. Given the current development of less aggressive therapeutics associated with a higher risk of recurrence, close follow-up with MRI is fundamental after treatment. In this context, dif...

  7. Dynamic-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cirrhotic liver parenchyma: A comparison between gadolinium–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and gadolinium–ethoxybenzyl–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chun-Yi; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chou, Chen-Te; Chen, Ran-Chou

    2015-01-01

    Background: The newly developed magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) hepatocyte-specific contrast agent, gadolinium–ethoxybenzyl–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd–EOB–DTPA), has different excretion pathways from the conventional MRI contrast agent, gadolinium–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd–DTPA). In this study, we compare the enhancement effect of the liver and renal parenchyma between these two contrast agents for patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: We retrospectively inclu...

  8. Extent of myocardium at risk for left anterior descending artery, right coronary artery, and left circumflex artery occlusion depicted by contrast-enhanced steady state free precession and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordlund, David; Heiberg, Einar; Carlsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background - Contrast-enhanced steady state free precession (CE-SSFP) and T2-weighted short tau inversion recovery (T2-STIR) have been clinically validated to estimate myocardium at risk (MaR) by cardiovascular magnetic resonance while using myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed...... tomography as reference standard. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography has been used to describe the coronary perfusion territories during myocardial ischemia. Compared with myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance offers...... to show the main coronary perfusion territories using CE-SSFP and T2-STIR. The good agreement between CE-SSFP and T2-STIR from this study and myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography from previous studies indicates that these 3 methods depict MaR accurately in individual patients...

  9. The Effect of the Degree of Luminal Contrast-Enhancement on CT Measurement of Plaque Size: A Comparison with T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byoung Wook; Hur, Jin; Lee, Hye Jeong; Kim, Young Jin; Choe, Kyu Ok; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2010-01-01

    We studied early and delayed contrast-enhanced CT to determine the effects of the degree of luminal enhancement on the measurement of plaque size compared to T1-weighted MRI. T1-weighted MRI and a two-phase contrast-enhanced CT was performed in 5 New Zealand white rabbits with atherosclerosis. Early-phase images were acquired during an expected peak enhancement period of the lumen; delayed-phase images were acquired 240 sec after administration of the contrast media. Anteroposterior and lateral luminal diameters (APD, LD), luminal area (LA), total vessel area (TVA), and plaque area (PA) of the aorta were measured on MRI and CT, respectively and compared to each other. A total of 78 slices of the aorta were analyzed. PA, measured on T1-weighted MR images, was significantly greater than PA for both early-phase and delayed-phase CT (p 2 (p 2 (p 2 (p = 0.159) for MRI vs. early-phase CT, MRI vs. delayed-phase CT, and early-phase CT vs. delayed-phase CT, respectively. Different luminal densities by contrast enhancement do not affect the CT measurement of plaque area for the detection of obstructive coronary artery disease

  10. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, including evaluation of the contrast-enhancing effect on lesions by Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasunori; Matsuo, Michimasa

    1996-01-01

    Many papers on the MR features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) have been published, but only a few described contrast-enhanced MRI for this disease. In this study, we analyzed serial changes in MR features and the contrast-enhancing effect on lesions in five patients (5 men, 4-19 years old) discharged with the final diagnosis of ADEM. Hyperintense lesions in brain/spinal cord were demonstrated on T2-weighted MR images in all cases, but not all lesions were enhanced by Gd-DTPA. In the follow-up study many lesions disappeared, but some lesions were enlarged and some new lesions were found. These findings suggest that, although ADEM is clinically monophasic, some cases may progress with the coexistence of reducing, vanishing, and new lesions. Some clinically acute lesions were not enhanced. This might be explained by the following reasons; lesions on various phases coexist, the damage to the blood-brain barrier in the lesions is of different degrees even if it is on the same phase, and the duration of acute phase activity is short. Additionally, some hyperintense lesions remained for a long time on T2-weighted images in spite of the absence of clinical manifestation. That hyperintense area might reflect edema caused by incomplete repair of the blood-brain barrier. From our evaluation of these five cases, MRI is not useful for the diagnosis and follow-up study of ADEM. (author)

  11. Magnetic iron oxide for contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlvik, A.K.

    1991-05-01

    The main objective of this experimental work has been to study the biological fate and the contrast enhancing potential of a model preparation of magnetic iron oxide (MSM) after intravenous injection to rodents. This was achieved by: Studying in vitro contrast efficacy of various magnetic iron oxide preparations by relaxation analysis. Studying in vivo contrast efficacy of MSM by relaxation analysis and NMR imaging. Studying the biodistribution and bioelimination of MSM in independent experiments using relaxation analysis, radioactivity studies and histological techniques. Studying interactions of MSM with target cells and target organelles using ex vivo techniques. Based on the presented experimental study, the MSM model preparation of magnetic iron oxide seems to fulfill basic requirements of NMR contrast agents: efficient proton relaxation, specific in vivo distribution, and biological tolerance. 177 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Detection and characteristics of microvascular obstruction in reperfused acute myocardial infarction using an optimized protocol for contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekkers, Sebastiaan C.A.M.; Gorgels, Anton P.M.; Passos, Valeria Lima; Waltenberger, Johannes; Crijns, Harry J.G.M.; Schalla, Simon [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, P. Debyelaan 25, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Backes, Walter H.; Snoep, Gabriel [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P. Debyelaan 25, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kim, Raymond J. [Duke University Medical Center, Duke Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Center, PO Box 3934, Durham, NC (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Several cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) techniques are used to detect microvascular obstruction (MVO) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To determine the prevalence of MVO and gain more insight into the dynamic changes in appearance of MVO, we studied 84 consecutive patients with a reperfused AMI on average 5 and 104 days after admission, using an optimised single breath-hold 3D inversion recovery gradient echo pulse sequence (IR-GRE) protocol. Early MVO (2 min post-contrast) was detected in 53 patients (63%) and late MVO (10 min post-contrast) in 45 patients (54%; p = 0.008). The extent of MVO decreased from early to late imaging (4.3 {+-} 3.2% vs. 1.8 {+-} 1.8%, p < 0.001) and showed a heterogeneous pattern. At baseline, patients without MVO (early and late) had a higher left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) than patients with persistent late MVO (56 {+-} 7% vs. 48 {+-} 7%, p < 0.001) and LVEF was intermediate in patients with early MVO but late MVO disappearance (54 {+-} 6%). During follow-up, LVEF improved in all three subgroups but remained intermediate in patients with late MVO disappearance. This optimised single breath-hold 3D IR-GRE technique for imaging MVO early and late after contrast administration is fast, accurate and allows detection of patients with intermediate remodelling at follow-up. (orig.)

  13. Gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in elderly patients: review of the safety profile from clinical trial, post-marketing surveillance, and pharmacovigilance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endrikat, J; Schwenke, C; Prince, M R

    2015-07-01

    To assess the safety of gadobutrol administration in elderly patients (≥65 years) by comparing the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) following gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures in elderly patients with that in adults aged 18-64 years. Safety data on gadobutrol administration from clinical trials, post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies, and pharmacovigilance reports were collected in three databases. In each dataset, absolute and relative frequencies of ADRs between age groups were analysed, along with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Logistic regression was used to identify significant influencing factors on ADRs in the PMS and pharmacovigilance data. Rates of reported ADRs were lower in elderly patients versus adults aged statistically significant for the clinical trials and pharmacovigilance populations, with a trend in the PMS database. Serious ADRs occurred infrequently in the clinical trials and PMS populations (too low for statistical comparison), and pharmacovigilance data demonstrated a low incidence (<0.005%) in both age groups. This evaluation involving three large databases demonstrated no greater incidence of ADRs following gadobutrol-enhanced MRI in elderly patients (≥65 years) compared with younger adults, with gadobutrol having a favourable safety profile in both age groups. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: the value of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from fast dynamic imaging during initial enhancement in classifying lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, J.; Stoutjesdijk, M.; Mann, R.; Huisman, H.J.; Barentsz, J.O.; Blickman, J.G.; Boetes, C.

    2008-01-01

    The value of pharmacokinetic parameters derived from fast dynamic imaging during initial enhancement in characterizing breast lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was evaluated. Sixty-eight malignant and 34 benign lesions were included. In the scanning protocol, high temporal resolution imaging was combined with high spatial resolution imaging. The high temporal resolution images were recorded every 4.1 s during initial enhancement (fast dynamic analysis). The high spatial resolution images were recorded at a temporal resolution of 86 s (slow dynamic analysis). In the fast dynamic evaluation pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans , V e and k ep ) were evaluated. In the slow dynamic analysis, each lesion was scored according to the BI-RADS classification. Two readers evaluated all data prospectively. ROC and multivariate analysis were performed. The slow dynamic analysis resulted in an AUC of 0.85 and 0.83, respectively. The fast dynamic analysis resulted in an AUC of 0.83 in both readers. The combination of both the slow and fast dynamic analyses resulted in a significant improvement of diagnostic performance with an AUC of 0.93 and 0.90 (P = 0.02). The increased diagnostic performance found when combining both methods demonstrates the additional value of our method in further improving the diagnostic performance of breast MRI. (orig.)

  15. Resting myocardial blood flow quantification using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the presence of stenosis: A computational fluid dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Karsten, E-mail: sommerk@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: Schreiber-L@ukw.de [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz 55131, Germany and Max Planck Graduate Center with the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Mainz 55128 (Germany); Bernat, Dominik; Schmidt, Regine; Breit, Hanns-Christian [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University Medical Center, Mainz 55131 (Germany); Schreiber, Laura M., E-mail: sommerk@uni-mainz.de, E-mail: Schreiber-L@ukw.de [Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, Department of Cardiovascular Imaging, Würzburg University Hospital, Würzburg 97078 (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The extent to which atherosclerotic plaques affect contrast agent (CA) transport in the coronary arteries and, hence, quantification of myocardial blood flow (MBF) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is unclear. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of plaque induced stenosis both on CA transport and on the accuracy of MBF quantification. Methods: Computational fluid dynamics simulations in a high-detailed realistic vascular model were employed to investigate CA bolus transport in the coronary arteries. The impact of atherosclerosis was analyzed by inserting various medium- to high-grade stenoses in the vascular model. The influence of stenosis morphology was examined by varying the stenosis shapes but keeping the area reduction constant. Errors due to CA bolus transport were analyzed using the tracer-kinetic model MMID4. Results: Dispersion of the CA bolus was found in all models and for all outlets, but with a varying magnitude. The impact of stenosis was complex: while high-grade stenoses amplified dispersion, mild stenoses reduced the effect. Morphology was found to have a marked influence on dispersion for a small number of outlets in the post-stenotic region. Despite this marked influence on the concentration–time curves, MBF errors were less affected by stenosis. In total, MBF was underestimated by −7.9% to −44.9%. Conclusions: The presented results reveal that local hemodynamics in the coronary vasculature appears to have a direct impact on CA bolus dispersion. Inclusion of atherosclerotic plaques resulted in a complex alteration of this effect, with both degree of area reduction and stenosis morphology affecting the amount of dispersion. This strong influence of vascular transport effects impairs the accuracy of MRI-based MBF quantification techniques and, potentially, other bolus-based perfusion measurement techniques like computed tomography perfusion imaging.

  16. Major prognostic impact of persistent microvascular obstruction as assessed by contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance in reperfused acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochet, Alexandre A.; Lalande, Alain; Walker, Paul M.; Touzery, Claude; Brunotte, Francois; Lorgis, Luc; Beer, Jean-Claude; Cottin, Yves; Zeller, Marianne; Wolf, Jean-Eric

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prognostic significance of microvascular obstruction (MO) and persistent microvascular obstruction (PMO) as assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). CMR was performed in 184 patients within the week following successfully reperfused first AMI. First-pass images were performed to evaluate extent of MO and late gadolinium-enhanced images to assess PMO and infarct size (IS). Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were collected at 1-year follow-up. MO and PMO were found in 127 (69%) and 87 (47%) patients, respectively. By using univariate logistic regression analysis, high Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.6 [1.8-7.4], p < 0.001), IS greater than 10% (OR [95% CI]: 2.7 [1.1-6.9], p = 0.036), left ventricular ejection fraction less than 40% (OR [95% CI]: 2.4 [1.1-5.2], p = 0.027), presence of MO (OR [95% CI]: 3.1 [1.3-7.3], p = 0.004) and presence of PMO (OR [95% CI]:10 [4.1-23.9], p < 0.001) were shown to be significantly associated with the outcome. By using multivariate analysis, presence of MO (OR [95% CI]: 2.5 [1.0-6.2], p = 0.045) or of PMO (OR [95% CI]: 8.7 [3.6-21.1], p < 0.001), associated with GRACE score, were predictors of MACE. Presence of microvascular obstruction and persistent microvascular obstruction is very common in AMI patients even after successful reperfusion and is associated with a dramatically higher risk of subsequent cardiovascular events, beyond established prognostic markers. Moreover, our data suggest that the prognostic impact of PMO might be superior to MO. (orig.)

  17. Gadobutrol for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in elderly patients: review of the safety profile from clinical trial, post-marketing surveillance, and pharmacovigilance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endrikat, J.; Schwenke, C.; Prince, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the safety of gadobutrol administration in elderly patients (≥65 years) by comparing the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) following gadobutrol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures in elderly patients with that in adults aged 18–64 years. Materials and methods: Safety data on gadobutrol administration from clinical trials, post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies, and pharmacovigilance reports were collected in three databases. In each dataset, absolute and relative frequencies of ADRs between age groups were analysed, along with odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Logistic regression was used to identify significant influencing factors on ADRs in the PMS and pharmacovigilance data. Results: Rates of reported ADRs were lower in elderly patients versus adults aged <65 years due to a reduced incidence of non-serious ADRs; this was statistically significant for the clinical trials and pharmacovigilance populations, with a trend in the PMS database. Serious ADRs occurred infrequently in the clinical trials and PMS populations (too low for statistical comparison), and pharmacovigilance data demonstrated a low incidence (<0.005%) in both age groups. Conclusions: This evaluation involving three large databases demonstrated no greater incidence of ADRs following gadobutrol-enhanced MRI in elderly patients (≥65 years) compared with younger adults, with gadobutrol having a favourable safety profile in both age groups. -- Highlights: •First dedicated safety study of an extracellular contrast agent in the elderly. •Elderly patients experience fewer non-serious ADRs than younger adults. •Gadobutrol has a favourable safety profile in both age groups

  18. Modifications in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging parameters after α-particle-emitting ²²⁷Th-trastuzumab therapy of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyerdahl, Helen; Røe, Kathrine; Brevik, Ellen Mengshoel; Dahle, Jostein

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of α-particle-emitting (227)Th-trastuzumab radioimmunotherapy on tumor vasculature to increase the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of (227)Th-trastuzumab. Human HER2-expressing SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenografts were grown bilaterally in athymic nude mice. Mice with tumor volumes 253 ± 36 mm(3) (mean ± SEM) were treated with a single injection of either (227)Th-trastuzumab at a dose of 1000 kBq/kg body weight (treated group, n=14 tumors) or 0.9% NaCl (control group, n=10 tumors). Dynamic T1-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) was used to study the effect of (227)Th-trastuzumab on tumor vasculature. DCEMRI was performed before treatment and 1, 2, and 3 weeks after therapy. Tumor contrast-enhancement curves were extracted voxel by voxel and fitted to the Brix pharmacokinetic model. Pharmacokinetic parameters for the tumors that underwent radioimmunotherapy were compared with the corresponding parameters of control tumors. Significant increases of kep, the rate constant of diffusion from the extravascular extracellular space to the plasma (PTh-trastuzumab treatment of HER2-expressing ovarian cancer xenografts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayad, Laura M; Mugera, Charles; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron; del Grande, Filippo

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm(2)). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response.

  20. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Liu, Hu; Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin; Wu, Fei-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope max ) and quantitative (K trans , k ep , v e ) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k ep , lower v e , and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K trans , TTP and Slope max . ROC analyses indicated that v e exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k ep (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k ep and v e are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging with Gd-EOB-DTPA for the evaluation of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Bang-Bin; Hsu, Chao-Yu.; Yu, Chih-Wei; Wei, Shwu-Yuan; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Kao, Jia-Horng; Lee, Hsuan-Shu

    2012-01-01

    To develop a non-invasive MRI method for evaluation of liver fibrosis, with histological analysis as the reference standard. The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board for Human Studies of our hospital, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. Seventy-nine subjects who received dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with Gd-EOB-DTPA were divided into three subgroups according to Metavir score: no fibrosis (n = 30), mild fibrosis (n = 34), and advanced fibrosis (n = 15). The DCE-MRI parameters were measured using two models: (1) dual-input single-compartment model for arterial blood flow (F a ), portal venous blood flow, total liver blood flow, arterial fraction (ART), distribution volume, and mean transit time; and (2) curve analysis model for Peak, Slope, and AUC. Statistical analysis was performed with Student's t-test and the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Slope and AUC were two best perfusion parameters to predict the severity of liver fibrosis (>F2 vs. ≤F2). Four significantly different variables were found between non-fibrotic versus mild-fibrotic subgroups: F a , ART, Slope, and AUC; the best predictor for mild fibrosis was F a (AUROC:0.701). DCE-MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA is a noninvasive imaging, by which multiple perfusion parameters can be measured to evaluate the severity of liver fibrosis. (orig.)

  2. Orbital benign and malignant lymphoproliferative disorders: Differentiation using semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiao-Quan [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Liu, Hu [Department of Ophthalmology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Hong, Xun-Ning; Shi, Hai-Bin [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Fei-Yun, E-mail: wfydd_njmu@163.com [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Objectives: To assess the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) in differentiating benign from malignant orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (OLPDs). Methods: Thirty-nine patients with orbital lymphoproliferative disorders (21 malignant and 18 benign) underwent DCE-MRI scan for pre-treatment evaluation from March 2013 to December 2015. Both semi-quantitative (TTP, AUC, Slope{sub max}) and quantitative (K{sup trans}, k{sub ep}, v{sub e}) parameters were calculated, and compared between two groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were used to determine the diagnostic value of each significant parameter. Results: Malignant OLPDs showed significantly higher k{sub ep}, lower v{sub e}, and lower AUC than benign OLPDs, while no significant differences were found on K{sup trans}, TTP and Slope{sub max}. ROC analyses indicated that v{sub e} exhibited the best diagnostic performance in predicting malignant OLPDs (cutoff value, 0.211; area under the curve, 0.896; sensitivity, 76.2%; specificity, 94.9%), followed by k{sub ep} (cutoff value, 0.853; area under the curve, 0.839; sensitivity, 85.7%; specificity, 89.9%). Conclusion: DCE-MRI and specially its derived quantitative parameters of k{sub ep} and v{sub e} are promising metrics for differentiating malignant from benign OLPDs.

  3. Repeatability and response to therapy of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis in a large multicentre trial setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterton, John C. [University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Personalised Healthcare and Biomarkers, AstraZeneca, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Ho, Meilien [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Macclesfield (United Kingdom); Nordenmark, Lars H. [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Moelndal (Sweden); Jenkins, Martin [AstraZeneca, Global Medicines Development, Cambridge (United Kingdom); DiCarlo, Julie; Peterfy, Charles [Spire Sciences Inc, Boca Raton, FL (United States); Guillard, Gwenael; Bowes, Michael A. [Imorphics, Manchester (United Kingdom); Roberts, Caleb; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni [Bioxydyn, Manchester (United Kingdom); Parker, Geoffrey J.M. [University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bioxydyn, Manchester (United Kingdom); Kellner, Herbert [Private Practice and Division of Rheumatology KHI Neuwittelsbach, Muenchen (Germany); Taylor, Peter C. [University of Oxford, Kennedy Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    To determine the repeatability and response to therapy of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI biomarkers of synovitis in the hand and wrist of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and in particular the performance of the transfer constant K{sup trans}, in a multicentre trial setting. DCE-MRI and RA MRI scoring (RAMRIS) were performed with meticulous standardisation at baseline and 6 and 24 weeks in a substudy of fostamatinib monotherapy in reducing synovitis compared with placebo or adalimumab. Analysis employed statistical shape modelling to avoid biased regions-of-interest, kinetic modelling and heuristic analyses. Repeatability was also evaluated. At early study termination, DCE-MRI data had been acquired from 58 patients in 19 imaging centres. K{sup trans} intra-subject coefficient of variation (N = 14) was 30%. K{sup trans} change demonstrated inferiority of fostamatinib (N = 11) relative to adalimumab (N = 10) after 6 weeks (treatment ratio = 1.92, p = 0.003), and failed to distinguish fostamatinib from placebo (N = 10, p = 0.79). RAMRIS showed superiority of fostamatinib relative to placebo at 6 weeks (p = 0.023), and did not distinguish fostamatinib from adalimumab at either 6 (p = 0.175) or 24 (p = 0.230) weeks. This demonstrated repeatability of K{sup trans} and its ability to distinguish treatment groups show that DCE-MRI biomarkers are suitable for use in multicentre RA trials. (orig.)

  4. Technical innovation in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal tumors: an MR angiographic sequence using a sparse k-space sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Laura M.; Mugera, Charles; Grande, Filippo del; Soldatos, Theodoros; Flammang, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the clinical use of an MR angiography sequence performed with sparse k-space sampling (MRA), as a method for dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, and apply it to the assessment of sarcomas for treatment response. Three subjects with sarcomas (2 with osteosarcoma, 1 with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas) underwent MRI after neoadjuvant therapy/prior to surgery, with conventional MRI (T1-weighted, fluid-sensitive, static post-contrast T1-weighted sequences) and DCE-MRI (MRA, time resolution = 7-10 s, TR/TE 2.4/0.9 ms, FOV 40 cm 2 ). Images were reviewed by two observers in consensus who recorded image quality (1 = diagnostic, no significant artifacts, 2 = diagnostic, 75 % with good response, >75 % with poor response). DCE-MRI findings were concordant with histological response (arterial enhancement with poor response, no arterial enhancement with good response). Unlike conventional DCE-MRI sequences, an MRA sequence with sparse k-space sampling is easily integrated into a routine musculoskeletal tumor MRI protocol, with high diagnostic quality. In this preliminary work, tumor enhancement characteristics by DCE-MRI were used to assess treatment response. (orig.)

  5. Efficacy of double inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging for the evaluation of the synovium in the femoro-patellar joint without contrast enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ye Na; Jin, Wook; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Park, Yong Sung; Park, So Young [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Jang Gyu [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Seong Jong [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Aerospace Medical Center, Republic of Korea Air Force, Cheongwon-gun, Chungcheongbuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Seon; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-02-15

    To investigate the efficacy of double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence for evaluating the synovium of the femoro-patellar joint without contrast enhancement (CE). Two radiologists independently evaluated the axial DIR and CE T1-weighted fat-saturated (CET1FS) images of 33 knees for agreement; the visualisation and distribution of the synovium were evaluated using a four-point visual scaling system at each of the five levels of the femoro-patellar joint and the location of the thickest synovium. The maximal synovial thickness at each sequence was measured by consensus. The interobserver agreement was good (κ = 0.736) for the four-point scale, and was excellent for the location of the thickest synovium on DIR and CET1FS (κ = 0.955 and 0.954). The intersequential agreement for the area with the thickest synovium was also excellent (κ = 0.845 and κ = 0.828). The synovial thickness on each sequence showed excellent correlation (r = 0.872). The DIR showed as good a correlation as CET1FS for the evaluation of the synovium at the femoro-patellar joint. DIR may be a useful MR technique for evaluating the synovium without CE. (orig.)

  6. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging as a Predictor of Outcome in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients With Nodal Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Lee, Nancy Y.; Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Thaler, Howard T.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Snehal G.; Moreira, Andre L.; Sherman, Eric; Karimi, Sasan; Wang, Ya; Kraus, Dennis; Shah, Jatin P.; Pfister, David G.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) can provide information regarding tumor perfusion and permeability and has shown prognostic value in certain tumors types. The goal of this study was to assess the prognostic value of pretreatment DCE-MRI in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients with nodal disease undergoing chemoradiation therapy or surgery. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients with histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma and neck nodal metastases were eligible for the study. Pretreatment DCE-MRI was performed on a 1.5T MRI. Clinical follow-up was a minimum of 12 months. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using the Tofts model. DCE-MRI parameters were related to treatment outcome (progression-free survival [PFS] and overall survival [OS]). Patients were grouped as no evidence of disease (NED), alive with disease (AWD), dead with disease (DOD), or dead of other causes (DOC). Prognostic significance was assessed using the log-rank test for single variables and Cox proportional hazards regression for combinations of variables. Results: At last clinical follow-up, for Stage III, all 12 patients were NED. For Stage IV, 43 patients were NED, 4 were AWD, 11 were DOD, and 4 were DOC. K trans is volume transfer constant. In a stepwise Cox regression, skewness of K trans (volume transfer constant) was the strongest predictor for Stage IV patients (PFS and OS: p trans was the strongest predictor of PFS and OS in Stage IV HNSCC patients with nodal disease. This study suggests an important role for pretreatment DCE-MRI parameter K trans as a predictor of outcome in these patients.

  7. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Gd-EOB-DTPA for the Evaluation of Liver Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available To investigate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI with Gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA for detecting liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 in rats.This study was approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Liver fibrosis in rats was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 1 mL/kg 50% CCl4 twice a week for 4-13 weeks. Control rats were injected with saline. Liver fibrosis was graded using the Metaviar score: no fibrosis (F0, mild fibrosis (F1-F2 and advanced fibrosis (F3-F4. DCE-MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA was performed for all rats. Ktrans, Kep, Ve and iAUC of the liver parenchyma were measured. Relative enhancement (RE value of the liver was calculated on T1-weighted images at 15, 20 and 25 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA administration.Thirty-five rats were included: no fibrosis (n=13, mild fibrosis (n=11 and advanced fibrosis (n=11. Ktrans and iAUC values were highest in advanced fibrosis group and lowest in no fibrosis group (P<0.05. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC for fibrosis (stages F1 and greater were 0.773 and 0.882 for Ktrans and iAUC, respectively. AUROC for advanced fibrosis were 0.835 and 0.867 for Ktrans and iAUC, respectively. Kep and RE values were not able to differentiate fibrosis stages (all P>0.05.Ktrans and iAUC obtained from DCE-MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA are useful for the detection and staging of rat liver fibrosis induced by CCl4.

  8. Contrast-enhanced three-dimensional fast-spoiled gradient magnetic resonance angiography of the renal arteries for potential living renal transplant donors: a comparative study with digital subtraction angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Saeed, O.; Sheikh, M.; Al-Khawari, H.; Ismail, M.; Al-Moosawi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Preoperative assessment of the arterial anatomy of prospective renal donors is essential. Various non-invasive techniques are used for such evaluation. We conducted this study using contrast-enhanced 3-D fast-spoiled gradient (CE 3-D FSPGR) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) on a 1.0 Tesla magnet, for preoperative definition of the renal arteries. Forty-five preoperative living renal donors underwent CE 3-D FSPGR MRA of the renal vessels and the results were compared with conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA). The renal vascular anatomy, both normal and with variations, was satisfactorily defined in all 45 cases with CE 3-D FSPGR MRA. Fifteen cases showed an accessory or aberrant arterial supply. A small aneurysm was shown in one case. All cases compared well with conventional DSA. Our study revealed that CE 3-D FSPGR MRA on a lower field strength magnet is accurate in defining the renal vascular anatomy and its variations. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  9. Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [18F]FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Schöder, Heiko; Lee, Nancy Y.; Stambuk, Hilda E.; Wang Ya; Fury, Matthew G.; Patel, Senehal G.; Pfister, David G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A.; Shukla-Dave, Amita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and 18 F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([ 18 F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with 1 H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [ 18 F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among 1 H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K trans ]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v e ]; and redistribution rate constant [k ep ]), and [ 18 F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG (ρ = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v e ) (ρ = −0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k ep ) (ρ = −0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume (ρ = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K trans ) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p 1 H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [ 18 F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [ 18 F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

  10. Rat Tumor Response to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-Acetic Acid as Measured by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Plasma 5-Hydroxyindoleacetic Acid Levels, and Tumor Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley D. McPhail

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The dose-dependent effects of 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA on rat GH3 prolactinomas were investigated in vivo. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI was used to assess tumor blood flow/permeability pretreatment and 24 hours posttreatment with 0, 100, 200, or 350 mg/kg DMXAA. DCE-MRI data were analyzed using Ktrans and the integrated area under the gadolinium time curve (IAUGC as response biomarkers. Highperformance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to determine the plasma concentration of the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA following treatment to provide an index of increased vessel permeability and vascular damage. Finally, tumor necrosis was assessed by grading hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections cut from the same tumors investigated by MRI. Both tumor Ktrans and IAUGC were significantly reduced 24 hours posttreatment with 350 mg/kg DMXAA only, with no evidence of dose response. HPLC demonstrated a significant increase in plasma 5-HIAA 24 hours posttreatment with 200 and 350 mg/kg DMXAA. Histologic analysis revealed some evidence of tumor necrosis following treatment with 100 or 200 mg/kg DMXAA, reaching significance with 350 mg/kg DMXAA. The absence of any reduction in Ktrans or IAUGC following treatment with 200 mg/kg, despite a significant increase in 5-HIAA, raises concerns about the utility of established DCE-MRI biomarkers to assess tumor response to DMXAA.

  11. An Exploratory Study Into the Role of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Perfusion Computed Tomography for Detection of Intratumoral Hypoxia in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newbold, Kate [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom); Castellano, Isabel [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Charles-Edwards, Elizabeth [Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Mears, Dorothy; Sohaib, Aslam [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom); Leach, Martin [Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Rhys-Evans, Peter; Clarke, Peter; Fisher, Cyril [Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin [Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Nutting, Christopher [Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC) is well established and known to cause radiation resistance and treatment failure in the management of HNC. This study examines the role of parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) as surrogate markers of intratumoral hypoxia, defined by using the exogenous marker of hypoxia pimonidazole and the endogenous marker carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9). Methods and Materials: Patients with HNC underwent preoperative DCE-MRI, perfusion CT, and pimonidazole infusion. Imaging parameters were correlated with pimonidazole and CA9 staining. The strength of correlations was tested by using a two-tailed Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Twenty-three regions of interest were analyzed from the 7 patients who completed the DCE-MRI studies. A number of statistically significant correlations were seen between DCE-MRI parameters (volume transfer between blood plasma and extracellular extravascular space [EES], volume of EES, rate constant between EES and blood plasma, time at arrival of contrast inflow, time to peak, average gradient, and time to onset) and areas with a pimonidazole score of 4. In the case of CA9 staining, only a weak correlation was shown with wash-in rate. There were no significant correlations between perfusion CT parameters and pimonidazole staining or CA9 expression. Conclusion: Intratumoral hypoxia in patients with HNC may be predicted by using DCE-MRI; however, perfusion CT requires further investigation.

  12. Left Gastric Vein Visualization with Hepatopetal Flow Information in Healthy Subjects Using Non-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Balanced Steady-State Free-Precession Sequence and Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Ayako; Yamashita, Rikiya; Arizono, Shigeki; Kido, Aki; Sakashita, Naotaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-01-01

    To selectively visualize the left gastric vein (LGV) with hepatopetal flow information by non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography under a hypothesis that change in the LGV flow direction can predict the development of esophageal varices; and to optimize the acquisition protocol in healthy subjects. Respiratory-gated three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession scans were conducted on 31 healthy subjects using two methods (A and B) for visualizing the LGV with hepatopetal flow. In method A, two time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) were placed on the whole abdomen and the area from the gastric fornix to the upper body, excluding the LGV area. In method B, nonselective inversion recovery pulse was used and one Time-SLIP was placed on the esophagogastric junction. The detectability and consistency of LGV were evaluated using the two methods and ultrasonography (US). Left gastric veins by method A, B, and US were detected in 30 (97%), 24 (77%), and 23 (74%) subjects, respectively. LGV flow by US was hepatopetal in 22 subjects and stagnant in one subject. All hepatopetal LGVs by US coincided with the visualized vessels in both methods. One subject with non-visualized LGV in method A showed stagnant LGV by US. Hepatopetal LGV could be selectively visualized by method A in healthy subjects.

  13. Aspectos técnicos da ressonância magnética de mama com meio de contraste: revisão da literatura Technical aspects of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Deus Leopoldino

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Com a difusão do uso de meios de contraste, avanços na tecnologia das bobinas de superfície e desenvolvimento de protocolos rápidos de aquisição de imagens, a ressonância magnética (RM de mama com meio de contraste tem-se mostrado importante modalidade na detecção, diagnóstico e estadiamento do câncer de mama. Apesar desses avanços, existem alguns pontos não consensuais no que diz respeito aos aspectos técnicos e critérios de interpretação de imagem da RM contrastada de mama. Neste artigo fazemos revisão bibliográfica dos parâmetros de interpretação de imagens e aspectos técnicos da RM de mama, incluindo considerações sobre a "performance" do equipamento, bobinas de radiofreqüência dedicadas, modo de utilização de contraste paramagnético, técnicas de supressão de gordura, planos de aquisição, seqüências de pulso e fontes de artefato.With the advances in surface coil technology and the development of new imaging protocols in addition to the increase of the use of contrast agents, contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis and staging of breast cancer. Despite these advances, there are some unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MRI and no standard criteria of interpretation for the evaluation of such studies. In this article, we review the literature and discuss the general requirements and recommendations for contrast agent-enhanced breast MRI, including image interpretation criteria, MR equipment, dedicated radiofrequency coils, use of paramagnetic contrast agents, fat-suppression techniques, planes of acquisition, pulse sequence specifications and artifact sources.

  14. Noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance renal angiography using a repetitive artery and venous labelling technique at 3 T: comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in subjects with normal renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Yoon; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kim, EunJu; Park, Byung Kwan

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NC-MRA) using the repetitive artery and venous labelling (RAVEL) technique to evaluate renal arteries compared to contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Twenty-five subjects with normal renal function underwent NC-MRA using a RAVEL technique and CE-MRA at 3 T. Two independent readers analysed the MRA images. Image quality, number of renal arteries, presence or absence of an early branching vessel, and diameter of the main renal arteries were evaluated. The overall image quality of NC-MRA was fair or greater in 88% of right and 92% of left renal arteries, while it was 96% in both sides with CE-MRA. On NC-MRA, the number of renal arteries in all subjects was perfectly predicted by both readers. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting early branching vessels were 82% and 100% for reader 1 and 82% and 95% for reader 2. Inter-modality agreement for comparing the diameters of main renal arteries was good or excellent at all segments for both readers. Inter-reader agreement was moderate or good at all segments except at the right distal segment on NC-MRA. NC-MRA with the RAVEL technique at 3 T may have comparable diagnostic feasibility for evaluating renal arteries compared to CE-MRA. • Accurate pre-treatment evaluation of renal artery anatomy helps clinical decision-making. • NC-MRA using RAVEL offers acceptable imaging quality for renal artery evaluation. • The 3 T RAVEL technique provides excellent diagnostic performance for renal artery evaluation. • The 3 T RAVEL technique may be an alternative to contrast-enhanced MRA.

  15. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (3-D CE-MRA) in the evaluation of hemodialysis access complications, and the condition of central veins in patients who are candidates for hemodialysis access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksoy, Yahya; Gormus, Niyazi; Tercan, Mehmet Akif

    2004-01-01

    Arteriovenous (AV) fistulas are crucial in patients requiring long-term hemodialysis (HD). Dysfunctions of these fistulas are the most common causes of recurrent hospitalizations. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and usefulness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) in the evaluation of HD fistulas complications, and the condition of the central veins before HD access. This study comprised 30 consecutive patients (15 females, 15 males; age range 25-66 yrs, mean +/- SD 51.2 +/- 9.9 yrs). Of 30 patients, 26 had native AV fistulas and the remaining four patients, who had a history of previous subclavian vein catheterization, were candidates for HD fistulas. Nine patients had a radiocephalic fistula, 15 had a brachiobasilic fistula, one had a saphenous vein graft, and one had brachiobasilic vein transposition. To observe the fistula complications in these cases, three-dimensional (3-D) CE-MRA using gadolinium was performed. The results were considered normal in three patients (10%), who were candidates for AV fistula construction; one patient had central vein occlusion due to previous catheterization. Thirteen patients (43.3%) had venous stenosis or occlusion; three of them (10%) had low CE arteries distal to fistula region, leading to ischemic complications, and six (20%) had stenosis at the fistula region. Seven patients (23.3%) had venous pseudoaneurysms, whereas two of them had both pseudoaneurysms and fistula region stenosis, and one had both venous stenosis and pseudoaneurysm. There were no adverse or allergic-like reactions or heat and taste sensations observed in our series. 3-D CE-MRA is a useful, safe and a practical imaging modality in complicated fistula diagnosis with fewer complications and side-effects in comparison to fistulography.

  16. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA): evaluation of three different contrast agents at two different doses (0.05 and 0.1 mmol/kg) in pigs at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, M.; Vos, B.; Pietsch, H. [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Diagnostic Imaging, Berlin (Germany); Michaely, Henrik J. [University of Heidelberg, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Schwenke, C. [ScoSSiS - Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    To compare the image quality of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the supra-aortic vessels at 0.05 mmol/kg bw and 0.1 mmol/kg bw, between gadobutrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA quantitatively and qualitatively a total of eight pigs were evaluated intraindividually at 1.5 T. Each pig was examined using 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol, Gd-DTPA and Gd-BOPTA on day one and 0.05 mmol/kg on day two. MRA datasets for the carotid artery and the infraorbital artery were qualitatively assessed regarding overall image quality on an ordinal four-point scale (4-excellent, 1-non-diagnostic). The signal-to noise-ratio (SNR) was measured. The qualitative assessment of the carotid artery showed a higher median image quality for the 0.1 mmol dose than for the 0.05 mmol dose for all three compounds. No difference was found for the infraorbital artery. Mean SNR of Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, gadobutrol at 0.05 mmol/kg were 36.0 {+-} 13.4/37.9 {+-} 16.3/43.7 {+-} 0.4 and at 0.1 mmol/kg they were 50.1 {+-} 12.4/46.6 {+-} 6.5 / 54.6 {+-} 10.2. Gd-BOPTA 0.05 revealed a significantly lower SNR than all other agents at normal dose. Full-dose gadolinium MRA results in higher image quality and significantly higher SNR compared with the half dose. Gadobutrol and Gd-BOPTA have similar enhancement properties at full dose but at half dose, gadobutrol appears superior. (orig.)

  17. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for the assessment of Pc 4-sensitized photodynamic therapy of a U87-derived glioma model in the athymic nude rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anka, Ali; Thompson, Paul; Mott, Eric; Sharma, Rahul; Zhang, Ruozhen; Cross, Nathan; Sun, Jiayang; Flask, Chris A.; Oleinick, Nancy L.; Dean, David

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide a means of tracking the outcome of Pc 4-sensitized photodynamic therapy (PDT) in deeply placed lesions (e.g., brain tumors). We previously determined that 150 μL of gadolinium (Gd-DTPA) produces optimal enhancement of U87-derived intracerebral tumors in an athymic nude rat glioma model. We wish to determine how consistently DCE-MRI enhancement will detect an increase in Gd-enhancement of these tumors following Pc 4-PDT. Methods: We injected 2.5 x 105 U87 cells into the brains of 6 athymic nude rats. After 7-8 days pre-Pc 4 PDT peri-tumor DCE-MRI images were acquired on a 7.0T microMRI scanner before and after administration of 150 μL Gd. DCE-MRI scans were repeated on Days 11, 12, and 13 following Pc 4-PDT (Day 8 or 9). Results: Useful DCE-MRI data were obtained for these animals before and after Pc 4- PDT. In the pre-Pc 4-PDT DCE-MRI scans an average normalized peak Gd enhancement was observed in tumor tissue that was 1.297 times greater than baseline (0.035 Standard Error [SE]). The average normalized peak Gd enhancement in the tumor tissue in the scan following PDT (Day 11) was 1.537 times greater than baseline (0.036 SE), a statistically significant increase in enhancement (p = 0.00584) over the pre-PDT level. Discussion: A 150 μL Gd dose appears to provide an unambiguous increase in signal indicating Pc 4-PDT-induced necrosis of the U87-derived tumor. Our DCEMRI protocol may allow the development of a clinically robust, unambiguous, non-invasive technique for the assessment of PDT outcome.

  18. Noncontrast-enhanced magnetic resonance renal angiography using a repetitive artery and venous labelling technique at 3 T: comparison with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in subjects with normal renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Yoon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, EunJu [Philips Healthcare Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-13

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced MR angiography (NC-MRA) using the repetitive artery and venous labelling (RAVEL) technique to evaluate renal arteries compared to contrast-enhanced MR angiography (CE-MRA). Twenty-five subjects with normal renal function underwent NC-MRA using a RAVEL technique and CE-MRA at 3 T. Two independent readers analysed the MRA images. Image quality, number of renal arteries, presence or absence of an early branching vessel, and diameter of the main renal arteries were evaluated. The overall image quality of NC-MRA was fair or greater in 88 % of right and 92 % of left renal arteries, while it was 96 % in both sides with CE-MRA. On NC-MRA, the number of renal arteries in all subjects was perfectly predicted by both readers. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting early branching vessels were 82 % and 100 % for reader 1 and 82 % and 95 % for reader 2. Inter-modality agreement for comparing the diameters of main renal arteries was good or excellent at all segments for both readers. Inter-reader agreement was moderate or good at all segments except at the right distal segment on NC-MRA. NC-MRA with the RAVEL technique at 3 T may have comparable diagnostic feasibility for evaluating renal arteries compared to CE-MRA. (orig.)

  19. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Haesung; Yoon, Dahye; Yun, Mijin; Choi, Ji Soo; Park, Vivian Youngjean; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Joon; Koo, Ja Seung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Suhkmann; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters. Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years) with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1) were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US), 2) were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB) 3) underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and 4) had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER), maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters. In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites showed

  20. Metabolomics of Breast Cancer Using High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Correlations with 18F-FDG Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion-Weighted Imaging MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haesung Yoon

    Full Text Available Our goal in this study was to find correlations between breast cancer metabolites and conventional quantitative imaging parameters using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and to find breast cancer subgroups that show high correlations between metabolites and imaging parameters.Between August 2010 and December 2013, we included 53 female patients (mean age 49.6 years; age range 32-75 years with a total of 53 breast lesions assessed by the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System. They were enrolled under the following criteria: breast lesions larger than 1 cm in diameter which 1 were suspicious for malignancy on mammography or ultrasound (US, 2 were pathologically confirmed to be breast cancer with US-guided core-needle biopsy (CNB 3 underwent 3 Tesla MRI with dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT, and 4 had an attainable immunohistochemistry profile from CNB. We acquired spectral data by HR-MAS MRS with CNB specimens and expressed the data as relative metabolite concentrations. We compared the metabolites with the signal enhancement ratio (SER, maximum standardized FDG uptake value (SUV max, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, and histopathologic prognostic factors for correlation. We calculated Spearman correlations and performed a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA to further classify patient groups into subgroups to find correlation differences between HR-MAS spectroscopic values and conventional imaging parameters.In a multivariate analysis, the PLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MRS metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between high and low SER, SUV, and ADC. In luminal subtype breast cancer, compared to all cases, high SER, ADV, and SUV were more closely clustered by visual assessment. Multiple metabolites were correlated with SER and SUV in all cases. Multiple metabolites

  1. Histogram analysis parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can predict histopathological findings including proliferation potential, cellularity, and nucleic areas in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Leifels, Leonard; Höhn, Anne-Kathrin; Richter, Cindy; Winter, Karsten

    2018-04-20

    Our purpose was to analyze possible associations between histogram analysis parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging DCE MRI and histopathological findings like proliferation index, cell count and nucleic areas in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). 30 patients (mean age 57.0 years) with primary HNSCC were included in the study. In every case, histogram analysis parameters of K trans , V e , and K ep were estimated using a mathlab based software. Tumor proliferation index, cell count, and nucleic areas were estimated on Ki 67 antigen stained specimens. Spearman's non-parametric rank sum correlation coefficients were calculated between DCE and different histopathological parameters. KI 67 correlated with K trans min ( p = -0.386, P = 0.043) and s K trans skewness ( p = 0.382, P = 0.045), V e min ( p = -0.473, P = 0.011), Ve entropy ( p = 0.424, P = 0.025), and K ep entropy ( p = 0.464, P = 0.013). Cell count correlated with K trans kurtosis ( p = 0.40, P = 0.034), V e entropy ( p = 0.475, P = 0.011). Total nucleic area correlated with V e max ( p = 0.386, P = 0.042) and V e entropy ( p = 0.411, P = 0.030). In G1/2 tumors, only K trans entropy correlated well with total ( P =0.78, P =0.013) and average nucleic areas ( p = 0.655, P = 0.006). In G3 tumors, KI 67 correlated with Ve min ( p = -0.552, P = 0.022) and V e entropy ( p = 0.524, P = 0.031). Ve max correlated with total nucleic area ( p = 0.483, P = 0.049). Kep max correlated with total area ( p = -0.51, P = 0.037), and K ep entropy with KI 67 ( p = 0.567, P = 0.018). We concluded that histogram-based parameters skewness, kurtosis and entropy of K trans , V e , and K ep can be used as markers for proliferation activity, cellularity and nucleic content in HNSCC. Tumor grading influences significantly associations between perfusion and histopathological parameters.

  2. 3.0 Tesla high spatial resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) of the pulmonary circulation: initial experience with a 32-channel phased array coil using a high relaxivity contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nael, Kambiz; Fenchel, Michael; Krishnam, Mayil; Finn, J Paul; Laub, Gerhard; Ruehm, Stefan G

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of high spatial resolution contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) with highly accelerated parallel acquisition at 3.0 T using a 32-channel phased array coil, and a high relaxivity contrast agent. Ten adult healthy volunteers (5 men, 5 women, aged 21-66 years) underwent high spatial resolution CE-MRA of the pulmonary circulation. Imaging was performed at 3 T using a 32-channel phase array coil. After intravenous injection of 1 mL of gadobenate dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA) at 1.5 mL/s, a timing bolus was used to measure the transit time from the arm vein to the main pulmonary artery. Subsequently following intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-BOPTA at the same rate, isotropic high spatial resolution data sets (1 x 1 x 1 mm3) CE-MRA of the entire pulmonary circulation were acquired using a fast gradient-recalled echo sequence (TR/TE 3/1.2 milliseconds, FA 18 degrees) and highly accelerated parallel acquisition (GRAPPA x 6) during a 20-second breath hold. The presence of artifact, noise, and image quality of the pulmonary arterial segments were evaluated independently by 2 radiologists. Phantom measurements were performed to assess the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Statistical analysis of data was performed by using Wilcoxon rank sum test and 2-sample Student t test. The interobserver variability was tested by kappa coefficient. All studies were of diagnostic quality as determined by both observers. The pulmonary arteries were routinely identified up to fifth-order branches, with definition in the diagnostic range and excellent interobserver agreement (kappa = 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.77-0.90). Phantom measurements showed significantly lower SNR (P < 0.01) using GRAPPA (17.3 +/- 18.8) compared with measurements without parallel acquisition (58 +/- 49.4). The described 3 T CE-MRA protocol in addition to high T1 relaxivity of Gd-BOPTA provides sufficient SNR to support highly accelerated parallel acquisition

  3. Quantification of myocardium at risk in ST- elevation myocardial infarction: a comparison of contrast-enhanced steady-state free precession cine cardiovascular magnetic resonance with coronary angiographic jeopardy scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, Rodney; Sörensson, Peder; Verouhis, Dinos; Pernow, John; Saleh, Nawzad

    2017-07-27

    Clinical outcome following acute myocardial infarction is predicted by final infarct size evaluated in relation to left ventricular myocardium at risk (MaR). Contrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (CE-SSFP) cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is not widely used for assessing MaR. Evidence of its utility compared to traditional assessment methods and as a surrogate for clinical outcome is needed. Retrospective analysis within a study evaluating post-conditioning during ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with coronary intervention (n = 78). CE-SSFP post-infarction was compared with angiographic jeopardy methods. Differences and variability between CMR and angiographic methods using Bland-Altman analyses were evaluated. Clinical outcomes were compared to MaR and extent of infarction. MaR showed correlation between CE-SSFP, and both BARI and APPROACH scores of 0.83 (p < 0.0001) and 0.84 (p < 0.0001) respectively. Bias between CE-SSFP and BARI was 1.1% (agreement limits -11.4 to +9.1). Bias between CE-SSFP and APPROACH was 1.2% (agreement limits -13 to +10.5). Inter-observer variability for the BARI score was 0.56 ± 2.9; 0.42 ± 2.1 for the APPROACH score; -1.4 ± 3.1% for CE-SSFP. Intra-observer variability was 0.15 ± 1.85 for the BARI score; for the APPROACH score 0.19 ± 1.6; and for CE-SSFP -0.58 ± 2.9%. Quantification of MaR with CE-SSFP imaging following STEMI shows high correlation and low bias compared with angiographic scoring and supports its use as a reliable and practical method to determine myocardial salvage in this patient population. Clinical trial registration information for the parent clinical trial: Karolinska Clinical Trial Registration (2008) Unique identifier: CT20080014. Registered 04 th January 2008.

  4. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) Combined with Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and Video-Electroencephalography (VEEG) Have Excellent Diagnostic Value in Preoperative Localization of Epileptic Foci in Children with Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Bin; Long, Wei; Li, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Guang-Yin; Lu, Ji-Xiang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effect that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has on surgical decision making relative to video-electroencephalography (VEEG) and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT), and if the differences in these variables translates to differences in surgical outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 166 children with epilepsy undergoing preoperative DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT examinations, surgical resection of epileptic foci, and intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) monitoring were enrolled. All children were followed up for 12 months and grouped by Engles prognostic classification for epilepsy. Based on intraoperative ECoG as gold standard, the diagnostic values of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and combined application of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT in preoperative localization for epileptic foci were evaluated. RESULTS The sensitivity of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 59.64%, 76.51%, and 93.98%, respectively; the accuracy of DCE-MRI, VEEG, PET-CT, DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, and DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT was 57.58%, 67.72%, 91.03%, 91.23%, and 96.49%, respectively. Localization accuracy rate of the combination of DCE-MRI, VEEG, and PET-CT was 98.25% (56/57), which was higher than that of DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and of DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT. No statistical difference was found in the accuracy rate of localization between these three combined techniques. During the 12-month follow-up, children were grouped into Engles grade I (n=106), II (n=31), III (n=21), and IV (n=8) according to postoperative conditions. CONCLUSIONS All DCE-MRI combined with VEEG, DCE-MRI combined with PET-CT, and DCE-MRI combined with VEEG and PET-CT examinations have excellent accuracy in preoperative localization of epileptic foci and present excellent postoperative efficiency, suggesting that these combined imaging methods are suitable for serving as the

  5. Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadjian, V.

    1987-01-01

    The origine of nuclear magnetic resonance signal is reminded and different ways for contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging are presented, especially, modifications of tissus relaxation times. Investigations have focused on development of agents incorporating either paramagnetic ions or stable free radicals. Pharmacological and toxicological aspects are developed. The diagnostic potential of these substances is illustrated by the example of gadolinium complexes [fr

  6. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  7. Dual-energy contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniaux, Martin; De Zordo, Tobias; Santner, Wolfram; Amort, Birgit; Koppelstätter, Florian; Jaschke, Werner; Dromain, Clarisse; Oberaigner, Willi; Hubalek, Michael; Marth, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography is one of the latest developments in breast care. Imaging with contrast agents in breast cancer was already known from previous magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography studies. However, high costs, limited availability-or high radiation dose-led to the development of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM). We reviewed the current literature, present our experience, discuss the advantages and drawbacks of CESM and look at the future of this innovative technique.

  8. Magnetic resonance angiography for the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschenbach, R.; Esser, D.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance angiography is a noninvasive method in vascular imaging using noncontrast- enhanced and contrast-enhanced techniques. The contrast media used in contrast- enhanced magnetic resonance angiography are different from the X-ray contrast media and do not affect the thyroid gland or renal function. In detecting hypervascularized lesions in the head and neck, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography is the method of choice, which provides an acceptable quality in comparison to digital subtraction angiography. Future developments in magnetic resonance imaging techniques will cause a wider use of magnetic resonance angiography, especially in head and neck imaging. Digital subtraction angiography should therefore only be used in problem cases and for preoperative embolization [de

  9. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  10. Evaluation of femoral perfusion in a rabbit model of steroid-induced osteonecrosis by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI with a high magnetic field MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shigeki; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Saito, Masazumi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Ishida, Masashi; Kuribayashi, Masaaki; Ikegami, Akira; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate perfusion during the early phase after steroid administration in vivo using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) with a high magnetic field MRI system. The main pathogenesis of steroid-induced osteonecrosis is considered to be ischemia. A single dose of methylprednisolone (MPSL) was injected into nine rabbits. DCE-MRI was performed for these rabbits before MPSL administration and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after administration. Time-signal intensity curves were created for each femur based on the signal intensity to evaluate perfusion. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were calculated and the value before MPSL administration and the minimal value after administration were compared statistically. ER, IS, and AUC values after MPSL administration significantly decreased (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01, respectively). All of them decreased by the 5th day in 56% of the femora and by the 14th day in 83%, and some femora even showed a decrease from the 1st day. In this study, decreased perfusion in the femora after steroid administration was proven. Additionally, we could show that it occurred from the early days after steroid administration. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The 'humble' bubble: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, Gill; Sykes, Anne; Berry, Jonathan; Jonker, Leon

    2011-01-01

    The use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is increasing within the field of medical imaging. Ultrasonic contrast agent (UCA) contain gas microbubbles similar in size to red corpuscles which provide highly reflective interfaces, enabling dynamic demonstration of echogenic streams of the contrast within the anatomical area of interest on real-time grey scale ultrasound. Longevity of the microbubbles has been improved by changing their composition. The application of CEUS in the UK continues to grow, bringing it into territories historically occupied by computerised tomography (CT) scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Hence, the role of CEUS may be of interest to all diagnostic imaging practitioners. Here we summarise the mode of action and use of CEUS, and its role within a range of applications. The potential risks of CEUS are compared to other contrast-enhanced imaging techniques. The benefits of CEUS and its implications for diagnostic imaging practice are also covered.

  12. Contrast Enhanced Spectral Mammography: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavika K; Lobbes, M B I; Lewin, John

    2018-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) provides low-energy 2D mammographic images comparable to standard digital mammography and a post-contrast recombined image to assess tumor neovascularity similar to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The utilization of CESM in the United States is currently low but could increase rapidly given many potential indications for clinical use. This article discusses historical background and literature review of indications and diagnostic accuracy of CESM to date. CESM is a growing technique for breast cancer detection and diagnosis that has levels of sensitivity and specificity on par with contrast-enhanced breast MRI. Because of its similar performance and ease of implementation, CESM is being adopted for multiple indications previously reserved for MRI, such as problem-solving, disease extent in newly diagnosed patients, and evaluating the treatment response of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Vessel diameter measurements in gadolinium contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MRA of peripheral arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenberg, J.J.M.; Geest, van der R.J.; Wasser, M.N.J.M.; Linden, van der E.L.; Walsum, van T.; Assen, van H.C.; Roos, de A.; Vanderschoot, J.; Reiber, J.H.C.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the possibilities for quantification of vessel diameters of peripheral arteries in gadolinium contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (Gd CE MRA) were evaluated. Absolute vessel diameter measurements were assessed objectively and semi-automatically in maximum intensity

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging findings in tuberculous meningoencephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pui, M.H.; Memon, W.A. [Aga Khan Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Karachi (Pakistan)

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for distinguishing tuberculosis from other types of meningoencephalitis. MRIs of 100 patients with tuberculous (50), pyogenic (33), viral (14), or fungal (3) meningoencephalitis were analyzed independently by 2 radiologists. Number, size, location, signal characteristics, surrounding edema, and contrast enhancement pattern of nodular lesions; location and pattern of meningeal enhancement; extent of infarct or encephalitis and hydrocephalus were evaluated. Contrast-enhancing nodular lesions were detected in patients with tuberculous (43 of 50 patients), pyogenic (9 of 33), and fungal (3 of 3) infections. No nodules were detected in patients with viral meningoencephalitis. Using the criteria of 1 or more solid rim or homogeneously enhancing nodules smaller than 2 cm, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing tuberculous meningitis were 86.0%, 90.0% and 88.0%, respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in distinguishing tuberculous from pyogenic, viral and fungal meningoencephalitis. (author)

  15. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, Andrew; Merrilees, Stephen; Mitchell, Nicola; Hill, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of popliteal artery pathologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Andrew [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: andrewh@adhb.govt.nz; Merrilees, Stephen [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: smerrilees@adhb.govt.nz; Mitchell, Nicola [Department of Radiology, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: nmit010@ec.auckland.ac.nz; Hill, Andrew [Department of Vascular Surgery, Auckland City Hospital, Park Road, Grafton, Auckland 9 (New Zealand)], E-mail: ahill@adhb.govt.nz

    2008-07-15

    This paper illustrates examples of popliteal artery pathologies imaged with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at a single tertiary referral centre. Popliteal artery pathologies were identified in 1710 patients referred over a 6-year period with symptoms suggesting lower limb arterial occlusive disease. Common pathologies such as atherosclerotic occlusive disease, thromboemboli and aneurysm disease are discussed as well as unusual pathologies such as cystic adventitial disease, mycotic aneurysm and arterial entrapment. The combination of CE-MRA and the excellent soft tissue resolution of MRI allow detailed evaluation of arterial and peri-arterial pathologies, and facilitate appropriate management decisions.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  19. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  20. Sequential contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, K; De Mouy, E H; Lee, B E

    1994-04-01

    To determine the enhancement patterns of the penis at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Sequential contrast material-enhanced MR images of the penis in a flaccid state were obtained in 16 volunteers (12 with normal penile function and four with erectile dysfunction). Subjects with normal erectile function showed gradual and centrifugal enhancement of the corpora cavernosa, while those with erectile dysfunction showed poor enhancement with abnormal progression. Sequential contrast-enhanced MR imaging provides additional morphologic information for the evaluation of erectile dysfunction.

  1. Evaluation of sacroiliitis: contrast-enhanced MRI with subtraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algin, Oktay; Gokalp, Gokhan; Baran, Bulent; Ocakoglu, Gokhan; Yazici, Zeynep [Uludag University, Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced MRI using the subtraction technique in the detection of active sacroiliitis. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 8 asymptomatic volunteers and 50 patients with clinically suspected active sacroiliitis. On precontrast MR images, T1-weighted spin-echo images with and without fat saturation (T1WFS and T1W), STIR and 3D-FLASH images with fat saturation were obtained in the semicoronal plane using a 1.5 Tesla imager. Postcontrast MRI was performed using the same T1WFS sequence as before contrast injection for all volunteers and patients. Postcontrast images were subtracted from fat-suppressed precontrast images. Enhancement within the joint space and bone marrow was considered to demonstrate active sacroiliitis. In 50 patients (100 sacroiliac joints [SIJs]), 40 (76 SIJs) were considered to have active sacroiliitis based on MR images. Bone marrow edema was present in 33 patients (62 SIJs) on STIR images. Routine MRI allowed identification of contrast enhancement in SIJs on postcontrast T1WFS images in 31 patients (49 SIJs). Contrast enhancement was observed in 40 patients (76 SIJs) who were examined by MRI using the subtraction technique. Contrast enhancement was significantly more conspicuous on subtraction images than on non-subtracted postcontrast T1WFS images (Mann-Whitney U test, p<0.001). Contrast-enhanced MRI with subtraction technique may be useful for early detection of active sacroiliitis. (orig.)

  2. Semi-parametric arterial input functions for quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taxt, T.; Reed, R. K.; Pavlin, T.; Rygh, C. B.; Andersen, E.; Jiřík, Radovan

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 46, FEB (2018), s. 10-20 ISSN 0730-725X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-13830S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : DCE-MRI * blind deconvolution * arterial input function Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.225, year: 2016

  3. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Use of Delayed Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Bessa, Luiz Gustavo Pignataro; Junqueira, Flávia Pegado; Bandeira, Marcelo Luiz da Silva; Garcia, Marcelo Iorio; Xavier, Sérgio Salles; Lavall, Guilherme; Torres, Diego; Waetge, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    FUNDAMENTO: A hipertensão arterial pulmonar é uma doença grave e progressiva. O maior desafio clínico é seu diagnóstico precoce. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a presença e a extensão do realce tardio miocárdico pela ressonância magnética cardíaca bem como verificar se o percentual da massa de fibrose miocárdica é indicador de gravidade. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal com 30 pacientes com hipertensão arterial pulmonar dos grupos I e IV, submetidos às avaliações clínica, funcional e hemodinâmica, e à ressonân...

  4. An open source software for analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images: UMMPerfusion revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zöllner, Frank G; Daab, Markus; Sourbron, Steven P; Schad, Lothar R; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Weisser, Gerald

    2016-01-14

    Perfusion imaging has become an important image based tool to derive the physiological information in various applications, like tumor diagnostics and therapy, stroke, (cardio-) vascular diseases, or functional assessment of organs. However, even after 20 years of intense research in this field, perfusion imaging still remains a research tool without a broad clinical usage. One problem is the lack of standardization in technical aspects which have to be considered for successful quantitative evaluation; the second problem is a lack of tools that allow a direct integration into the diagnostic workflow in radiology. Five compartment models, namely, a one compartment model (1CP), a two compartment exchange (2CXM), a two compartment uptake model (2CUM), a two compartment filtration model (2FM) and eventually the extended Toft's model (ETM) were implemented as plugin for the DICOM workstation OsiriX. Moreover, the plugin has a clean graphical user interface and provides means for quality management during the perfusion data analysis. Based on reference test data, the implementation was validated against a reference implementation. No differences were found in the calculated parameters. We developed open source software to analyse DCE-MRI perfusion data. The software is designed as plugin for the DICOM Workstation OsiriX. It features a clean GUI and provides a simple workflow for data analysis while it could also be seen as a toolbox providing an implementation of several recent compartment models to be applied in research tasks. Integration into the infrastructure of a radiology department is given via OsiriX. Results can be saved automatically and reports generated automatically during data analysis ensure certain quality control.

  5. An open source software for analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance images: UMMPerfusion revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zöllner, Frank G.; Daab, Markus; Sourbron, Steven P.; Schad, Lothar R.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Weisser, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Perfusion imaging has become an important image based tool to derive the physiological information in various applications, like tumor diagnostics and therapy, stroke, (cardio-) vascular diseases, or functional assessment of organs. However, even after 20 years of intense research in this field, perfusion imaging still remains a research tool without a broad clinical usage. One problem is the lack of standardization in technical aspects which have to be considered for successful quantitative evaluation; the second problem is a lack of tools that allow a direct integration into the diagnostic workflow in radiology. Five compartment models, namely, a one compartment model (1CP), a two compartment exchange (2CXM), a two compartment uptake model (2CUM), a two compartment filtration model (2FM) and eventually the extended Toft’s model (ETM) were implemented as plugin for the DICOM workstation OsiriX. Moreover, the plugin has a clean graphical user interface and provides means for quality management during the perfusion data analysis. Based on reference test data, the implementation was validated against a reference implementation. No differences were found in the calculated parameters. We developed open source software to analyse DCE-MRI perfusion data. The software is designed as plugin for the DICOM Workstation OsiriX. It features a clean GUI and provides a simple workflow for data analysis while it could also be seen as a toolbox providing an implementation of several recent compartment models to be applied in research tasks. Integration into the infrastructure of a radiology department is given via OsiriX. Results can be saved automatically and reports generated automatically during data analysis ensure certain quality control

  6. Prognostic aspects of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in synchronous distant metastatic rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jing; Xu, Qing; Song, Jia-Cheng; Li, Yan; Xu, Lu-Lu; Shi, Hai-Bin [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, Nanjing (China); Huang, Dong-Ya [First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Department of General Surgery, Nanjing (China)

    2017-05-15

    To explore the correlations between DCE-MRI quantitative parameters and synchronous distant metastasis and the clinicopathological factors in rectal cancers. Sixty-three patients with rectal cancer (synchronous distant metastasis, n = 31; non-metastasis, n = 32) were enrolled in this study. Student's t test and ANOVA were used to compare DCE-MRI parameters (K{sup trans}, K{sub ep} and V{sub e}). The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to find the reasonable threshold of DCE-MRI parameters to differentiate lesions with synchronous distant metastasis from those without metastasis. The K{sup trans}, K{sub ep}, and V{sub e} value were significantly higher in the lesions with distant metastasis than in the lesions without distant metastasis (0.536 ± 0.242 vs. 0.299 ± 0.118 min{sup -1}, p < 0.001; 1.598 ± 0.477 vs. 1.341 ± 0.390 min{sup -1}, p = 0.022; and 0.324 ± 0.173 vs. 0.249 ± 0.091, p = 0.034; respectively). The K{sup trans} showed the highest AUCs of 0.788 (p < 0.001), with sensitivity of 61.29 % and specificity of 87.5 %, respectively. DCE-MRI parameters may represent a prognostic indicator for synchronous distant metastases in patients with rectal cancer. (orig.)

  7. Detection of treatment success after photodynamic therapy using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, Tom J.L.; Jacobs, Igor; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2017-01-01

    Early evaluation of response to therapy is crucial for selecting the optimal therapeutic follow-up strategy for cancer patients. PDT is a photochemistry-based treatment modality that induces tumor tissue damage by cytotoxic oxygen radicals, generated by a pre-injected photosensitive drug upon light

  8. Targeted gadolinium-loaded dendrimer nanoparticles for tumor-specific magnetic resonance contrast enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Swanson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scott D Swanson1, Jolanta F Kukowska-Latallo2, Anil K Patri5, Chunyan Chen6, Song Ge4, Zhengyi Cao3, Alina Kotlyar3, Andrea T East7, James R Baker31Department of Radiology, The University of Michigan Medical School, 2Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Michigan Medical School, 3Michigan Nanotechnology Institute for Medicine and Biological Sciences, The University of Michigan, 4Applied Physics, The University of Michigan, MD, USA; 5Present address: National Cancer Institute at Frederick (Contractor, MD, USA; 6Present address: Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ, USA; 7Present address: Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, ILL, USAAbstract: A target-specific MRI contrast agent for tumor cells expressing high affinity folate receptor was synthesized using generation five (G5 of polyamidoamine (PAMAM dendrimer. Surface modified dendrimer was functionalized for targeting with folic acid (FA and the remaining terminal primary amines of the dendrimer were conjugated with the bifunctional NCS-DOTA chelator that forms stable complexes with gadolinium (Gd III. Dendrimer-DOTA conjugates were then complexed with GdCl3, followed by ICP-OES as well as MRI measurement of their longitudinal relaxivity (T1 s−1 mM−1 of water. In xenograft tumors established in immunodeficient (SCID mice with KB human epithelial cancer cells expressing folate receptor (FAR, the 3D MRI results showed specific and statistically significant signal enhancement in tumors generated with targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5-FA compared with signal generated by non-targeted Gd(III-DOTA-G5 contrast nanoparticle. The targeted dendrimer contrast nanoparticles infiltrated tumor and were retained in tumor cells up to 48 hours post-injection of targeted contrast nanoparticle. The presence of folic acid on the dendrimer resulted in specific delivery of the nanoparticle to tissues and xenograft tumor cells expressing folate receptor in vivo. We present the specificity of the dendrimer nanoparticles for targeted cancer imaging with the prolonged clearance time compared with the current clinically approved gadodiamide (OmniscanTM contrast agent. Potential application of this approach may include determination of the folate receptor status of tumors and monitoring of drug therapy.Keywords: dendrimer, DOTA, gadolinium, MRI, folate receptor

  9. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles in magnetic resonance imaging and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rümenapp, Christine; Gleich, Bernhard; Haase, Axel

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles are useful as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Paramagnetic contrast agents have been used for a long time, but more recently superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have been discovered to influence MRI contrast as well. In contrast to paramagnetic contrast agents, SPIOs can be functionalized and size-tailored in order to adapt to various kinds of soft tissues. Although both types of contrast agents have a inducible magnetization, their mechanisms of influence on spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation of protons are different. A special emphasis on the basic magnetism of nanoparticles and their structures as well as on the principle of nuclear magnetic resonance is made. Examples of different contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images are given. The potential use of magnetic nanoparticles as diagnostic tracers is explored. Additionally, SPIOs can be used in diagnostic magnetic resonance, since the spin relaxation time of water protons differs, whether magnetic nanoparticles are bound to a target or not.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ethier, R.; Melanson, D.; Peters, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Ten years following computerized tomography, a new technique called nuclear magnetic resonance revolutionizes the field of diagnostic imaging. A major advantage of nuclear magnetic resonance is that the danger of radiation is non-existent as compared to computerized tomography. When parts of the human body are subject to radio-frequencies while in a fixed magnetic field, its most detailed structures are revealed. The quality of images, the applications, as well as the indications are forever increasing. Images obtained at the level of the brain and spinal cord through nuclear magnetic resonance supercede those obtained through computerized tomography. Hence, it is most likely that myelography, along with pneumoencephalography will be eliminated as a diagnostic means. It is without a doubt that nuclear magnetic resonance is tomorrow's computerized tomography [fr

  12. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Flavia Martins; Setti, Marcela; Vianna, Evandro Miguelote; Domingues, Romulo Cortes; Meohas, Walter; Rezende, Jose Francisco; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the role of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. Materials And Methods: Fifty-five patients with musculoskeletal tumors (27 malignant and 28 benign) were studied. The examinations were performed in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance scanner with standard protocol, and single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with 135 msec echo time. The dynamic contrast study was performed using T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence after intravenous gadolinium injection. Time signal intensity curves and slope values were calculated. The statistical analysis was performed with the Levene's test, followed by a Student's t-test, besides the Pearson's chi-squared and Fischer's exact tests. Results: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, respectively, 87.5%, 92.3% and 90.9% (p < 0.0001). Statistically significant difference was observed in the slope (%/min) between benign (mean, 27.5%/min) and malignant (mean, 110.9%/min) lesions (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The time-intensity curve and slope values using dynamic-enhanced perfusion magnetic resonance imaging in association with the presence of choline peak demonstrated by single voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy study are useful in the differentiation between malignant and benign musculoskeletal tumors. (author)

  13. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  14. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  15. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Morris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance finds countless applications, from spectroscopy to imaging, routinely in almost all research and medical institutions across the globe. It is also becoming more frequently used for specific applications in which the whole instrument and system is designed for a dedicated application. With beginnings in borehole logging for the petro-chemical industry Magnetic Resonance sensors have been applied to fields as varied as online process monitoring for food manufacture and medical point of care diagnostics. This great diversity is seeing exciting developments in magnetic resonance sensing technology published in application specific journals where they are often not seen by the wider sensor community. It is clear that there is enormous interest in magnetic resonance sensors which represents a significant growth area. The aim of this special edition of Sensors was to address the wide distribution of relevant articles by providing a forum to disseminate cutting edge research in this field in a single open source publication.[...

  17. Magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Saunders; 2015:chap 17. Litt H, Carpenter JP. Magnetic resonance imaging. In: Cronenwett JL, Johnston KW, eds. Rutherford's Vascular Surgery . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  18. MRCP. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography; MRCP. Magnetresonanzcholangiopankreatografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinner, Sonja [Wisconsin-Madison Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Lauenstein, Thomas [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Duesseldorf (Germany). Radiologie

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is a special MR technique to display and analyze the biliary tract and pancreatic ducts. MRCP sequences are equivalent to endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for diagnostic purposes due to technical developments of the classical T2 weighted MRCP sequences and the availability of contrast enhanced T1 weighted sequences. Therefore, MRCP plays a fundamental role in the diagnoses of hepatobliary and pancreatic diseases, which are presented in this review article as are technical details of sequence acquisitions and the underlying anatomy.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Angus

    1990-01-01

    An assessment is made of the clinical benefits of expensive diagnostic technology, such as the magnetic resonance imaging. It is concluded that to most radiologists, magnetic resonance imaging has a definite place in the diagnostic scenario, especially for demonstrating central nervous system lesions in multiple sclerosis. While it is recognized that medical and financial resources are limited, it is emphasised that the cost to society must be balanced against the patient benefit. 17 refs

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance gyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, B.C.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance gyro using two nuclear magnetic resonance gases, preferably xenon 129 and xenon 131, together with two alkaline metal vapors, preferably rubidium, potassium or cesium, one of the two alkaline metal vapors being pumped by light which has the wavelength of that alkaline metal vapor, and the other alkaline vapor being illuminated by light which has the wavelength of that other alkaline vapor

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    In a method of imaging a body in which nuclear magnetic resonance is excited in a region including part of the body, and the free induction decay signal is measured, a known quantity of a material of known nuclear magnetic resonance properties, for example a bag of water, is included in the region so as to enhance the measured free induction decay signal. This then reduces the generation of noise during subsequent processing of the signal. (author)

  2. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  3. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and innovative technique that affords anatomic images in multiple planes and that may provide information about tissue characterization. The magnetic resonance images are obtained by placing the patient or the area of interest within a powerful, highly uniform, static magnetic field. Magnetized protons (hydrogen nuclei) within the patient align like small magnets in this field. Radiofrequency pulses are then used to create an oscillating magnetic field perpendicular to the main field. Magnetic resonance images differ from those produced by x-rays: the latter are associated with absorption of x-ray energy while magnetic resonance images are based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. Proton characteristics vary according to the tissue under examination and reflect its physical and chemical properties. To resolve issues regarding safety and efficacy, the Warren Grant Magnuson Clinical Center and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a consensus conference about MRI Oct 26 through 28, 1987. At the NIH, the Consensus Development Conference brings together investigators in the biomedical sciences, clinical investigators, practicing physicians, and consumer and special interest groups to make a scientific assessment of technologies, including drugs, devices, and procedures, and to seek agreement on their safety and effectiveness

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to include the effect of a magnetic object in a subject under investigation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) apparatus is operable at more than one radio frequency (RF) frequency. The apparatus allows normal practice as far as obtaining an NMR response or image from a given nuclear species is concerned, but, in addition, interrogates the nuclear spin system at a frequency which is different from the resonance frequency normally used for the given nuclear species, as determined from the applied magnetic field. The magnetic field close to a magnetised or magnetisable object is modified and the given nuclear species gives a response at the different frequency. Thus detection of a signal at the frequency indicates the presence of the chosen nuclei close to the magnetised or magnetisable object. Applications include validation of an object detection or automatic shape inspection system in the presence of magnetic impurities, and the detection of magnetic particles which affect measurement of liquid flow in a pipe. (author)

  6. Nuclear magnetic resonance scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus is described including a magnet system which is capable of providing a steady magnetic field along an axis, and is constructed so as to define a plurality of regions along the axis in each of which the field is substantially homogeneous so that in each region an imaging operation may be separately carried out. Iron shields increase the field homogeneity. In use, each patient lies on a wheeled trolley which is provided with magnetic field gradient coils and an RF coil system, some of the coils being movable to facilitate positioning of the patient, and there are terminals for connection to a common computing and control facility. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This book features reviews of high-resolution MRI of the knee, MRI of the normal and ischmeic hip, MRI of the heart, and temporomandibular joint imaging, as well as thorough discussion on artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging. Contributors consider the clinical applications of gadolinium-DTPA in magnetic resonance imaging and the clinical use of partial saturation and saturation recovery sequences. Timely reports assess the current status of rapid MRI and describe a new rapid gated cine MRI technique. Also included is an analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow effects during MRI of the central nervous system

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  9. Imaging by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duroure, J.F.; Serpolay, H.; Vallens, D.

    1995-01-01

    Here are described the advanced technology for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging: reduction of acquisition times, and rebuilding times, images quality improvement. The tendency is to open the machines at low and middle field, on a market being at 10% of NMR I sales, with economical, scientifical and ergonomic reasons broadly developed by constructors

  10. Magnetic resonance fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dan; Gulani, Vikas; Seiberlich, Nicole; Liu, Kecheng; Sunshine, Jeffrey L; Duerk, Jeffrey L; Griswold, Mark A

    2013-03-14

    Magnetic resonance is an exceptionally powerful and versatile measurement technique. The basic structure of a magnetic resonance experiment has remained largely unchanged for almost 50 years, being mainly restricted to the qualitative probing of only a limited set of the properties that can in principle be accessed by this technique. Here we introduce an approach to data acquisition, post-processing and visualization--which we term 'magnetic resonance fingerprinting' (MRF)--that permits the simultaneous non-invasive quantification of multiple important properties of a material or tissue. MRF thus provides an alternative way to quantitatively detect and analyse complex changes that can represent physical alterations of a substance or early indicators of disease. MRF can also be used to identify the presence of a specific target material or tissue, which will increase the sensitivity, specificity and speed of a magnetic resonance study, and potentially lead to new diagnostic testing methodologies. When paired with an appropriate pattern-recognition algorithm, MRF inherently suppresses measurement errors and can thus improve measurement accuracy.

  11. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarises the aspects of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI) considered by the National Health Technology Advisory Panel and makes recommendations on its introduction in Australia with particular regard to the need for thorough evaluation of its cost effectiveness. Topics covered are: principles of the technique, equipment required, installation, costs, reliability, performance parameters, clinical indications, training and staff requirements, and safety considerations

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others : American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining ...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  17. Breast dynamic contrast enhanced MRI: fibrocystic changes presenting as a non-mass enhancement mimicking malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milosevic Zorica C.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to analyse the morphokinetic features of breast fibrocystic changes (nonproliferative lesions, proliferative lesions without atypia and proliferative lesions with atypia presenting as a non-mass enhancement (NMEin dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI examination.

  18. Magnetic resonance of phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J; Farach, Horacio A

    1979-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance of Phase Transitions shows how the effects of phase transitions are manifested in the magnetic resonance data. The book discusses the basic concepts of structural phase and magnetic resonance; various types of magnetic resonances and their underlying principles; and the radiofrequency methods of nuclear magnetic resonance. The text also describes quadrupole methods; the microwave technique of electron spin resonance; and the Mössbauer effect. Phase transitions in various systems such as fluids, liquid crystals, and crystals, including paramagnets and ferroelectrics, are also

  19. Caroli's disease: magnetic resonance imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, France; Cognet, Francois; Dranssart, Marie; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Conciatori, Laurent; Krause, Denis [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Dijon Le Bocage University Hospital, 2 Blvd. Marechal de Lattre de Tassigny, BP 1542, 21034 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the main aspects of MR imaging in Caroli's disease. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study was performed in nine patients with Caroli's disease. Bile duct abnormalities, lithiasis, dot signs, hepatic enhancement, renal abnormalities, and evidence of portal hypertension were evaluated. Three MR imaging patterns of Caroli's disease were found. In all but two patients, MR imaging findings were sufficient to confirm the diagnosis. Moreover, MR imaging provided information about the severity, location, and extent of liver involvement. This information was useful in planning the best therapeutic strategy. Magnetic resonance cholangiography with a dynamic contrast-enhanced study is a good screening tool for Caroli's disease. Direct cholangiography should be reserved for confirming doubtful cases. (orig.)

  20. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging ( ... the limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ...

  5. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head uses a powerful ... the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  6. Magnetic resonance instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR), while opening new vistas to diagnostic medicine, utilizes equipment that is unfamiliar to most clinicians. Beyond learning to cope with new terms, such as spin-echo, T1, T2, and spin density, health care professionals are faced with the inclusion of magnetic and radiofrequency effects in their facilities produced by a complex array of devices. It is the purpose of this chapter to outline the components of an MR imaging system, to discuss their functions, and to note the variations in equipment commercially available

  7. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, magnetization transfer spin echo, and fat-saturation T1-weighted sequences in infectious meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azad, Rajiv; Tayal, Mohit; Azad, Sheenam; Sharma, Garima; Srivastava, Rajendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    To compare the contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR), the CE T1-weighted (CE-T1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and magnetization transfer (MT) for early detection and characterization of infectious meningitis. Fifty patients and 10 control subjects were evaluated with the CE-FLAIR and the CE-T1W sequences with FS and MT. Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence and grading of abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. Quantitative assessment included computation of net meningeal enhancement, using single pixel signal intensity software. A newly devised FLAIR based scoring system, based on certain imaging features including ventricular dilatation, ependymal enhancement, infarcts and subdural effusions was used to indicate the etiology. Data were analysed using the Student's t test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, the intraclass correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test with Bonferroni correction as the post hoc test. The CE-FLAIR sequence demonstrated a better sensitivity (100%), diagnostic accuracy (95%), and a stronger correlation with the cerebrospinal fluid, total leukocyte count (r = 0.75), protein (r = 0.77), adenosine deaminase (r = 0.81) and blood glucose (r = -0.6) values compared to the CE-T1W sequences. Qualitative grades and quantitative meningeal enhancement on the CE-FLAIR sequence were also significantly greater than those on the other sequences. The FLAIR based scoring system yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 91.6% and a sensitivity of 96%. A strong inverse Pearson's correlation (r = -0.95) was found between the assigned score and patient's Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of admission. The CE-FLAIR sequence is better suited for evaluating infectious meningitis and could be included as a part of the routine MR imaging protocol

  8. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, magnetization transfer spin echo, and fat-saturation T1-weighted sequences in infectious meningitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azad, Rajiv; Tayal, Mohit; Azad, Sheenam; Sharma, Garima; Srivastava, Rajendra Kumar [SGRR Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Patel Nagar, Dehradun (India)

    2017-11-15

    To compare the contrast-enhanced fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (CE-FLAIR), the CE T1-weighted (CE-T1W) sequence with fat suppression (FS) and magnetization transfer (MT) for early detection and characterization of infectious meningitis. Fifty patients and 10 control subjects were evaluated with the CE-FLAIR and the CE-T1W sequences with FS and MT. Qualitative assessment was done by two observers for presence and grading of abnormal leptomeningeal enhancement. Quantitative assessment included computation of net meningeal enhancement, using single pixel signal intensity software. A newly devised FLAIR based scoring system, based on certain imaging features including ventricular dilatation, ependymal enhancement, infarcts and subdural effusions was used to indicate the etiology. Data were analysed using the Student's t test, Cohen's Kappa coefficient, Pearson's correlation coefficient, the intraclass correlation coefficient, one way analysis of variance, and Fisher's exact test with Bonferroni correction as the post hoc test. The CE-FLAIR sequence demonstrated a better sensitivity (100%), diagnostic accuracy (95%), and a stronger correlation with the cerebrospinal fluid, total leukocyte count (r = 0.75), protein (r = 0.77), adenosine deaminase (r = 0.81) and blood glucose (r = -0.6) values compared to the CE-T1W sequences. Qualitative grades and quantitative meningeal enhancement on the CE-FLAIR sequence were also significantly greater than those on the other sequences. The FLAIR based scoring system yielded a diagnostic accuracy of 91.6% and a sensitivity of 96%. A strong inverse Pearson's correlation (r = -0.95) was found between the assigned score and patient's Glasgow Coma Scale at the time of admission. The CE-FLAIR sequence is better suited for evaluating infectious meningitis and could be included as a part of the routine MR imaging protocol.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.

    1988-01-01

    This book is an introduction to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The basic principles for the interpretation of MR images are developed. The book is divided into five chapters: introduction, tissue, parameters, acquisition parameters, contribution to diagnosis, and practical management of an MR examination. Eight exercises allow the reader to test the knowledge he has acquired. Signal localization and MR artefacts are reviewed in an appendix

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takavar A

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I, a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D. factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Takavar A

    1993-01-01

    Basic physical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (N.M.R.I), a nonionizing medical imaging technique, are described. Principles of NMRI with other conventional imaging methods, ie, isotope scanning, ultrasonography and radiography have been compared. T1 and T2 and spin density (S.D.) factors and different image construction techniques based on their different combinations is discussed and at the end physical properties of some N.M.R images is mentioned.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha [The Catholic Univ., College of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Ji Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Jung, Youn Ju; Cha, Eun Suk; Park, Joung Mi; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    To describe the findings of magnetic resonance imaging in infectious myositis and to determine their value for differentiation between ruberculous and bacterial myositis. Magnetic resonance images of ten proven cases of infectious myositis (five tuberculous and five bacterial) were retrospectively reviewed in the light of clinical and laboratory findings. On the basis of magnetic resonance images, signal intensity of the mass, the presence or absence of an abscess, signal intensity of the peripheral wall, patterns of contrast enhancement, and associated findings were evaluated. Compared with those of bacterial myositis, the symptoms of tuberculous myositis lasted longer but there were no difinite local inflammatory signs. In three of five cases of bacterial myositis there were specific medical records;trauma in two cases and systemic lupus erythematosus in one. All tuberculous myositis cases involved a single muscle, but bacterial myositis affected multipe muscles in three cases(60%). All but one case showed a mass in the involved muscles. In one bacterial case, there was diffuse swelling in the involved muscle. On T1-weighted images, eight infectious cases showed low signal intensity;two, of the bactrerial type, showed subtle increased signal intensity. all cases demonstrated high signal intensity on t2-weighted images. The signal intensity of peripheral wall was slightly increased on T1-weighted images, but low on T2-weighted. In four cases there was associated cellulitis, and in one case each, adjacent joint effusion and deep vein thrombosis were seen. After gadolinium infusion, peripheral rim enhancement was noted in nine cases and heterogeneous enhancement in one. After magnetic resonance imaging of infectious myositis, the characteristic finding was an abscessed lesion, with the peripheral wall showing high signal intensity on T1-weighted images and low signal intensity on T2 weighted. Although we found it difficult to differentiate bacterial from tuberculous

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field, radio waves and a computer to produce detailed ... problems, medications, recent surgeries and allergies. The magnetic field is not harmful, but it may cause some ...

  15. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonzi, Roberto [Marie Curie Research Wing, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom)], E-mail: robertoalonzi@btinternet.com; Padhani, Anwar R. [Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Rickmansworth Road, Northwood, Middlesex, HA6 2RN (United Kingdom); Synarc Inc. 575 Market Street, San Francisco, CA 94105 (United States)], E-mail: anwar.padhani@paulstrickland-scannercentre.org.uk; Allen, Clare [Department of Imaging, University College Hospital, London, 235 Euston Road, NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.allen@uclh.nhs.uk

    2007-09-15

    Angiogenesis is an integral part of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is associated with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and is key to the growth and for metastasis of prostate cancer. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) using small molecular weight gadolinium chelates enables non-invasive imaging characterization of tissue vascularity. Depending on the technique used, data reflecting tissue perfusion, microvessel permeability surface area product, and extracellular leakage space can be obtained. Two dynamic MRI techniques (T{sub 2}*-weighted or susceptibility based and T{sub 1}-weighted or relaxivity enhanced methods) for prostate gland evaluations are discussed in this review with reference to biological basis of observations, data acquisition and analysis methods, technical limitations and validation. Established clinical roles of T{sub 1}-weighted imaging evaluations will be discussed including lesion detection and localisation, for tumour staging and for the detection of suspected tumour recurrence. Limitations include inadequate lesion characterisation particularly differentiating prostatitis from cancer, and in distinguishing between BPH and central gland tumours.

  16. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for extrahepatic lesions: preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorelius, Lars E-mail: lars@thorelius.com

    2004-06-01

    Ultrasound imaging (US) is a convenient, inexpensive and non-invasive investigation. Its use is limited by low sensitivity in the detection of a number of parenchymal lesions, especially those produced by trauma, such as infarctions. Contrast enhancement with SonoVue{sup [reg]} improves the sensitivity of ultrasound in the detection and characterization of focal liver lesions to such an extent, that it may replace computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Preliminary experience suggests that SonoVue-enhanced sonography may be useful in the detection of lesions in which blood flow is severely reduced as compared to surrounding parenchyma, such as infarctions, lacerations, hematomas, necrotic tissue and non-vascular cysts, especially in the spleen, kidney and pancreas. This technique can also rule out occlusion of the superior mesenteric, splenic and portal veins, and dilation of the biliary tree. Clinical trials comparing contrast-enhanced sonography with contrast-enhanced computed tomography are warranted to establish the role of this inexpensive and non-invasive technique in the routine work-up of patients with abdominal trauma or presenting with sudden flank pain.

  17. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  18. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T

    2001-11-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  19. Introduction lecture to magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, J.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture deals with all that is common either to electron paramagnetic resonance (E.P.R.) or to nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). It will present, in an as elementary form as possible, the main concepts used in magnetic resonance emphasizing some aspects, specific for interface science. (orig./BHO)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Neuromyelitis Optica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Sun Kyung; Song, Chang June; Park, Woon Ju; Lee, In Ho; Son, Eun Hee

    2013-01-01

    To report the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of the spinal cord and brain in patients of neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Between January 2001 and March 2010, the MR images (spinal cord, brain, and orbit) and the clinical and serologic findings of 11 NMO patients were retrospectively reviewed. The contrast-enhancement of the spinal cord was performed (20/23). The presence and pattern of the contrast-enhancement in the spinal cord were classified into 5 types. Acute myelitis was monophasic in 8 patients (8/11, 72.7%); and optic neuritis preceded acute myelitis in most patients. Longitudinally extensive cord lesion (average, 7.3 vertebral segments) was involved. The most common type was the diffuse and subtle enhancement of the spinal cord with a multifocal nodular, linear or segmental intense enhancement (45%). Most of the brain lesions (5/11, 10 lesions) were located in the brain stem, thalamus and callososeptal interphase. Anti-Ro autoantibody was positive in 2 patients, and they showed a high relapse rate of acute myelitis. Anti-NMO IgG was positive in 4 patients (4/7, 66.7%). The imaging findings of acute myelitis in NMO may helpful in making an early diagnosis of NMO which can result in a severe damage to the spinal cord, and to make a differential diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and inflammatory diseases of the spinal cord such as toxocariasis.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of nasopharyngeal malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakakihara, Junji; Kanoh, Naoyuki; Hayakawa, Katsumi.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used in the examination of three patients with nasopharyngeal malignant tumor and cranial nerve symptoms. Coronal and saggital sections were very useful for determining skull base invasion. Its high contrast resolution enabled us to visualize several cranial nerves directly. Differentiation between tumor and effusion in the paranasal sinuses was easy especially in T2 weighted images. Bone destruction could also be detected as bone marrow replacement by tumor or as interruption of the black line of compact bone. Local relationships of tumor and large blood vessels were visualized by MRI without invasive contrast enhancing methods. Despite such advantages, in one patient whose symptoms were highly suggestive of cranial invasion, no cranial invasion was detected by CT or MRI. (author)

  3. Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso, Diego A.

    2014-01-01

    Transparencias en inglés de la asignatura "Resonancia Magnética Nuclear Avanzada" (Advanced Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) (36643) que se imparte en el Máster de Química Médica como asignatura optativa de 3 créditos ECTS. En esta asignatura se completa el estudio iniciado en la asignatura de quinto curso de la licenciatura en Química "Determinación estructural" (7448) y en la del Grado de Química de tercer curso "Determinación estructural de los compuestos orgánicos" (26030) en lo referente a té...

  4. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elster, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging is comprehensive, well structured, and well written. The material is current and well referenced. The illustrations are good and complement the text well. The overall quality of publication is above average. The greatest attribute of the book is its readability. The author demonstrates ample skill in making complex subjects, such as MR physics and imaging of cerebral hemorrhage, easy to understand. The book closes with a detailed atlas on the anatomic appearance of the brain on MR images in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes

  5. Dental magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Haehnel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Growing distribution and utilization of digital volume tomography (DVT) extend the spectrum of clinical dental imaging. Additional diagnostic value, however, comes along with an increasing amount of radiation. In contrast, magnetic resonance imaging is a radiation free imaging technique. Furthermore, it offers a high soft tissue contrast. Morphological and numerical dental anomalies, differentiation of periapical lesions and exclusion of complications of dental diseases are field of applications for dental MRI. In addition, detection of caries and periodontal lesions and injury of inferior alveolar nerve are promising application areas in the future.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of cerebellar Schistosomiasis mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Bruno Perocco; Costa Junior, Leodante Batista da; Lambertucci, Jose Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a history of headache, dizziness, vomiting and double vision that started two weeks before. His parents denied any previous disease. During clinical examination he presented diplopia on lateral gaze to the left and horizontal nystagmus. No major neurological dysfunction was detected. He was well built, mentally responsive and perceptive. Laboratory findings revealed a leukocyte count of 10,000/mL, a normal red blood cell count and no eosinophilia. The magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the brain showed a left cerebellar lesion with mass effect compressing the surrounding tissues. Contrast-enhanced images showed a mass like structure and punctate nodules (Figures A and B: axial and coronal contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR images showed the nodular - yellow arrows - enhancement pattern of a left cerebellar intraxial lesion). The lesion extended to the vermis and brachium pons and compressed the medulla. There was no hydrocephalus. He was taken to the operating room with the presumptive diagnosis of a neuroglial tumor, and submitted to a lateral suboccipital craniectomy. A brown, brittle tumoral mass without a clearly defined margin with the cerebellar tissue was removed. Microscopic examination revealed schistosomal granulomas in the productive phase in the cerebellum (Figure C). After surgery, treatment with praziquantel (50 mg/kg/dia, single dose) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) was offered and the patient improved quickly. Thirty days later he was seen again at the outpatient clinic: he was asymptomatic and with no neurological impairment. This is the eighth case of cerebellar involvement in schistosomiasis mansoni and the second report of a tumoral form of cerebellar schistosomiasis documented by magnetic resonance images. (author)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremin, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    Recent advances in diagnostic imaging, have been the medical application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It's been used to study the structure of various compounds in chemistry and physics, and in the mid-1970 to produce images of rabbits and eventually of the human hand and head. The images are produced by making use of the nuclear magnetization of the hydrogen ion, or proton, that is present in biological material to record the density distribution of protons in cellular water and lipids. An exploration of the end-results of complicated free induction decay signals, that have been digitized and frequency-analysed by mathematical computerized techniques to produce an image of tissue density, is given. At present NMR produces images comparable to those of early computed tomography

  8. Contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct in MR imaging: its frequency and clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, T.; Naganawa, S.; Fukatsu, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Ishigaki, T.; Aoki, I.; Ninomiya, A.; Nakashima, T.

    2003-01-01

    There have been no previous reports on contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct in magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and significance of this finding. Thirty-one patients (15 men and 16 women; age range 18-81 years) with otologic symptoms (sudden sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo, or tinnitus) were examined using contrast-enhanced imaging on a 1.5-T MR scanner. The normal ear served as the control. Two radiologists evaluated contrast enhancement in the area of the cochlear aqueduct. Forty-eight of 62 ears (77.4%) showed contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct, but no significant differences in the frequency of contrast enhancement were observed between patients with and patients without vertigo, tinnitus, sensorineural hearing loss, cerebellopontine angle tumors, or a high-riding jugular bulb. In addition, no gender- or age-related differences were noted. Contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct was frequently observed, but the frequency of enhancement in symptomatic ears was not significantly higher than in control ears. The results of this study may prove helpful in avoiding unnecessary examinations and potential diagnostic confusion. (orig.)

  9. Contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct in MR imaging: its frequency and clinical significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T; Naganawa, S; Fukatsu, H; Sakurai, Y; Ishigaki, T [Department of Radiology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, 466-8550, Shouwa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Aoki, I; Ninomiya, A [Medical Systems Company, Toshiba Corporation, Nasu Operations, Otawara-shi, Tochigi (Japan); Nakashima, T [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Shouwa-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    There have been no previous reports on contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct in magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the frequency and significance of this finding. Thirty-one patients (15 men and 16 women; age range 18-81 years) with otologic symptoms (sudden sensorineural hearing loss, vertigo, or tinnitus) were examined using contrast-enhanced imaging on a 1.5-T MR scanner. The normal ear served as the control. Two radiologists evaluated contrast enhancement in the area of the cochlear aqueduct. Forty-eight of 62 ears (77.4%) showed contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct, but no significant differences in the frequency of contrast enhancement were observed between patients with and patients without vertigo, tinnitus, sensorineural hearing loss, cerebellopontine angle tumors, or a high-riding jugular bulb. In addition, no gender- or age-related differences were noted. Contrast enhancement of the cochlear aqueduct was frequently observed, but the frequency of enhancement in symptomatic ears was not significantly higher than in control ears. The results of this study may prove helpful in avoiding unnecessary examinations and potential diagnostic confusion. (orig.)

  10. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jevtic, V. [Inst. of Radiology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Watt, I. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Bristol Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom); Rozman, B. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kos-Golja, M. [Dept. of Rheumatology, Univ. Medical Centre, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Demsar, F. [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jarh, O. [Inst. Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1995-07-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter`s syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter`s syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  11. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevtic, V.; Watt, I.; Rozman, B.; Kos-Golja, M.; Demsar, F.; Jarh, O.

    1995-01-01

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter's syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  12. Advances in magnetic resonance 11

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 11, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters and begins with a discussion of the principles and applications of dynamic nuclear polarization, with emphasis on molecular motions and collisions, intermolecular couplings, and chemical interactions. Subsequent chapters focus on the assessment of a proposed broadband decoupling method and studies of time-domain (or Fourier transform) multiple-quantum nuclear magnetic resonance.

  13. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part II: magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sudoł-Szopińska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plain radiography reveals specific, yet late changes of advanced psoriatic arthritis. Early inflammatory changes are seen both on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound within peripheral joints (arthritis, synovitis, tendons sheaths (tenosynovitis, tendovaginitis and entheses (enthesitis, enthesopathy. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging enables the assessment of inflammatory features in the sacroiliac joints (sacroiliitis, and the spine (spondylitis. In this article, we review current opinions on the diagnostics of some selective, and distinctive features of psoriatic arthritis concerning magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound and present some hypotheses on psoriatic arthritis etiopathogenesis, which have been studied with the use of magnetic resonance imaging. The following elements of the psoriatic arthritis are discussed: enthesitis, extracapsular inflammation, dactylitis, distal interphalangeal joint and nail disease, and the ability of magnetic resonance imaging to differentiate undifferentiated arthritis, the value of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Guo, W.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the most widely used instrumental methods, with applications ranging from the characterization of pure compounds by high-resolution NMR to the diagnosis of disease by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). To give some idea of the wide-spread use of NMR, a computer search for the period 1985-1987 turned up over 500 books and review articles and over 7000 literature citations, not including papers in which NMR was used together with other spectroscopic methods for the routine identification of organic compounds. Consequently, they have by necessity been somewhat selective in the topics they have chosen to cover and in the articles they have cited. In this review, which covers the published literature for the approximate period Sept 1985-Aug 1987, they have focused on new developments and applications of interest to the chemist. First they review recent developments in instrumentation and techniques. Although there have not been any major break-throughs in NMR instrumentation during the past two years, significant refinements have been reported which optimize instrumentation for the demanding multiple pulse experiments in routine use today. Next they review new developments in methods for processing NMR data, followed by reviews of one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR experiments

  15. Advances in magnetic resonance 6

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 6 focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of applying magnetic resonance methods to various problems in physical chemistry, emphasizing the different aspects of the exegesis of these problems. This book discusses the gas phase magnetic resonance of electronically excited molecules; techniques for observing excited electronic states; NMR studies in liquids at high pressure; and effect of pressure on self-diffusion in liquids. The nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of organic free radicals; measurement of proton coupling constants by NMR; an

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... immediately after the exam. A few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea and local ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ...

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Tumor Treatment Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Alzheimer's Disease Head Injury Brain Tumors Images related to Magnetic ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  19. Contrast enhancement CT by iopamidol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Masaki; Makita, Nobue; Yanai, Kyoko

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the contrast enhancement effect and safety of iopamidol (IOP) in CT examination, IOP was compared with angiographin (AG). In the liver and abdominal aorta, peak CT values were obtained earlier and were higher in the group with AG than in the group with IOP. However, CT values in the group with IOP decreased a little more slowly than those in the group with AG. There was no significant difference in the effect on contrast enhancement between the groups. Intravenous injection of IOP caused lower degree of burning sensation than that of AG, and some of the patients with IOP did not feel burning sensation at all. Changes in clinical laboratory values were slight before and after intravenous injection of IOP. These results suggest that IOP is satisfactory in terms of safety and effect on contrast enhancement in CT examination. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinck, P.A.; Muller, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r 1 and r 2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T 1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R 1 = 1/T 1 and R 2 = 1/T 2 ) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields. (orig.)

  1. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A. de; Doornbos, J.; Laarse, A. van der; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.; Rossum, A.C. van

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate he usefulness of the paramagnetic contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) in Magnetic Resonance. Imaging of acute myocardial infarction, we studied a total of 45 patients with a first acute myocardial infarction by ECG-gated magnetic resonance imaging before and after intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg Gadolinium-DTPA. All patients received thrombolytic treatment by intravenous streptokinase. The magnetic resonance imaging studies were preformed after a meam of 88 h (range 15-241) after the acute onset of acute myocardial infarction. Five patients without evidence of cardiac disease served as controls. Spin-echo measurements (TE 30 ms) were made using a Philips Gyroscan (0.5 Tesla) or a Teslacon II (0.6 Tesla). The 45 patients were divided into four groups of patients. In Group I( patients) Gadolinium-DTPA improved the detection of myocardial infarction by Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group II (20 patients) the magnetic resonance imaging procedure was repeated every 10 min for up to 40 min following administration of Gadolinium-DTPA. Optimal contrast enhancement was obtained 20-25 min after Gadolinium-DTPA. In Group III (27 patients) signal intensities were significantly higher in the patients who underwent the magnetic resonance imaging study more than 72 h (mean 120) after the acute event, suggesting increased acculumation of Gadolinium-DTPA in a more advanced stage of the infarction process. In Group IV (45 patients) Gadolinium-DTPA was administered in an attempt to distinguish between reperfused and nonreperfused myocardial areas after thrombolytic treatment for acute myocardial infarction. The signal intensities did not differ, but reperfused areas showed a more homogeneous aspect whereas nonreperfused areas were visualized as a more heterogeneous contrast enhancement. It is concluded that magnetic resonance imaging using the contrast agent Gadolinium-DTPA significantly improves the detection of infarcted myocardial areas

  2. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerhoff, D.J.; Weiner, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    A major function of the liver is regulation of carbohydrate, lipid, and nitrogen metabolism. Food is absorbed by the intestines and transported to the liver by the portal circulation. Substrates are metabolized and stored in the liver to maintain optimal blood concentrations of glucose and lipids. Ammonia generated in the gastrointestinal tract is converted to urea in the liver by the urea cycle. Various forms of liver disease are associated with disorders of carbohydrate, fat, and nitrogen metabolism. Therefore the ability to characterize liver metabolism noninvasively is of potential diagnostic value. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides information about tissue metabolism by measuring concentrations of metabolites. However, to determine the anatomic location from which spectroscopic signals are derived, MRS could be performed in conjunction with MRI. This paper summarizes the current experience with spectroscopy ion animal models of human disease and reviews the clinical experience with hepatic MRS to date

  3. Magnetic resonance in neuroborreliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustymowicz, A.; Zajkowska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is commonly used in diagnosing infections of the central nervous system. The aim of the study is to evaluate central nervous system changes in neuroborreliosis patients. MR examinations were performed in 44 patients with clinical symptoms, epidemiology and laboratory tests results of neuroborreliosis. Abnormalities were detected in 22 patients. Most of them presented cortico-subcortical atrophy (86%). In 9 cases foci of increased signal in T2-weighted and FLAIR images were observed in white matter. They were single or multiple, located subcorticaly and paraventriculary. In 2 subjects areas of increased signal were found in the brain stem. Central nervous system abnormalities detected with MR are not specific for Lyme disease. They can suggest demyelinating lesions and/or gliosis observed in many nervous system disorders (SM, ADEM, lacunar infarcts). (author)

  4. Cine magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.; Sechtem, U.P.; Pflugfelder, P.

    1987-01-01

    Cine magnetic resonance (MR) is a fast MR imaging process with referencing of the imaging data to the electrocardiogram (ECG) so that images corresponding to 21-msec segments of the cardiac cycle are acquired. A series of such images, each corresponding to a 21-msec segment of the cardiac cycle, can be laced together for viewing in the cine format at a framing rate of 20 to 40 frames per second. Since cine angiograms of the heart are usually done at 30 frames per second, this technique achieves a temporal resolution adequate for the evluation of central cardiovascular function. The major application of this technique is to depict central cardiovascular function and blood flow

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful ... for an MRI exam contains a metal called gadolinium . Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... work? Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. Instead, ... Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety Contrast Materials Children ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses ... identify and accurately characterize diseases than other imaging methods. This detail makes MRI an invaluable tool in ...

  8. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  10. Advances in magnetic resonance 12

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 12, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of diffusion and self-diffusion measurements by nuclear magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on spin-lattice relaxation time in hydrogen isotope mixtures; the principles of optical detection of nuclear spin alignment and nuclear quadropole resonance; and the spin-1 behavior, including the relaxation of the quasi-invariants of the motion of a system of pairs of dipolar coupled spin-1/2 nu

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur-Melnyk, Andrea (ed.) [Klinikum der Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2013-08-01

    The first book devoted to MRI of the bone marrow. Describes the MRI appearances of normal bone marrows and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Discusses the role of advanced MRI techniques and contrast enhancement. On account of its unrivalled imaging capabilities and sensitivity, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is considered the modality of choice for the investigation of physiologic and pathologic processes affecting the bone marrow. This book describes the MRI appearances of both the normal bone marrow, including variants, and the full range of bone marrow disorders. Detailed discussion is devoted to malignancies, including multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, leukemia, and bone metastases. Among the other conditions covered are benign and malignant compression fractures, osteonecrosis, hemolytic anemia, Gaucher's disease, bone marrow edema syndrome, trauma, and infective and non-infective inflammatory disease. Further chapters address the role of MRI in assessing treatment response, the use of contrast media, and advanced MRI techniques. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Bone Marrow represents an ideal reference for both novice and experienced practitioners.

  13. Gadolinium enhancement of spinal subdural collection on magnetic resonance imaging after lumbar puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teksam, Mehmet; Casey, Sean O.; McKinney, Alexander; Michel, Eduard; Truwit, Charles L.

    2003-01-01

    We report a 35-year-old male with an unusual contrast-enhancing sterile spinal subdural collection on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), apparently occurring as a complication of lumbar puncture. Follow-up MRI after 4 weeks demonstrated spontaneous resolution of the collection without intervening treatment. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging-based detection of glial brain tumors in mice after antiangiogenic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claes, A.; Gambarota, G.; Hamans, B.C.; Tellingen, O. van; Wesseling, P.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Proper delineation of gliomas using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) poses a problem in neuro-oncology. The blood brain barrier (BBB) in areas of diffuse-infiltrative growth may be intact, precluding extravasation and subsequent MR-based detection of the contrast agent

  15. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Discriminating Low-Grade From High-Grade Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, E.K.; Kobus, T.; Litjens, G.J.S.; Hambrock, T.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Barentsz, J.O.; Maas, M.C.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and validate the optimal combination of parameters derived from 3-T diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, and magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic imaging for discriminating low-grade from high-grade prostate cancer (PCa).The study was

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Ewald; Stadlbauer, Andreas; Windischberger, Christian; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods are non-invasive techniques to provide detailed, multi-parametric information on human anatomy, function and metabolism. Sensitivity, specificity, spatial and temporal resolution may, however, vary depending on hardware (e.g., field strength, gradient strength and speed) and software (optimised measurement protocols and parameters for the various techniques). Furthermore, multi-modality imaging may enhance specificity to better characterise complex disease patterns. Positron emission tomography (PET) is an interesting, largely complementary modality, which might be combined with MR. Despite obvious advantages, combining these rather different physical methods may also pose challenging problems. At this early stage, it seems that PET quality may be preserved in the magnetic field and, if an adequate detector material is used for the PET, MR sensitivity should not be significantly degraded. Again, this may vary for the different MR techniques, whereby functional and metabolic MR is more susceptible than standard anatomical imaging. Here we provide a short introduction to MR basics and MR techniques, also discussing advantages, artefacts and problems when MR hardware and PET detectors are combined. In addition to references for more detailed descriptions of MR fundamentals and applications, we provide an early outlook on this novel and exciting multi-modality approach to PET/MR. (orig.)

  17. Delayed contrast-enhanced MRI: use in myocardial viability assessment and other cardiac pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogaert, J.; Dymarkowski, S.

    2005-01-01

    As in other organs, tissue characterization is important for many cardiac diseases. For example, in ischemic heart disease, differentiation between reversibly and irreversibly damaged myocardium in patients with a prior myocardial infarction is crucial in determining disease severity, functional recovery and patient outcome. With the recent advent of the single inversion-recovery contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence (delayed contrast-enhanced MRI), contrast between normal and abnormal tissues could be significantly enhanced compared with the conventional cardiac MRI sequences, enabling even subtle abnormalities to be visualized. Together with other advances in cardiac MRI (e.g. functional imaging, coronary artery imaging), MRI has become one of the preferred non-invasive modalities to study cardiac diseases. In this paper an overview of the versatility of delayed contrast-enhanced MRI for investigating cardiac diseases is given. (orig.)

  18. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  19. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography vs. mammography and MRI - clinical performance in a multi-reader evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Schmitzberger, F.F.; Amer, H.; Ingold-Heppner, B.; Balleyguier, C.; Diekmann, F.; Engelken, F.; Mann, R.M.; Renz, D.M.; Bick, U.; Hamm, B.; Dromain, C.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) to digital mammography (MG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a prospective two-centre, multi-reader study. METHODS: One hundred seventy-eight women (mean age 53 years) with invasive breast

  20. Accurate determination of blood–brain barrier permeability using dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is increasingly used to estimate permeability in situations with subtle blood-brain barrier (BBB) leakage. However, the method's ability to differentiate such low values from zero is unknown, and no consensus exists on optimal selection...

  1. Multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings of adult mesoblastic nephroma: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqin Ding

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoblastic nephroma (MN presenting in an adult is extremely rare. The computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI features of this tumor in adulthood have not been widely reported. We present two additional cases of adult MN and describe the multiphasic contrast-enhanced CT and MRI findings.

  2. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncica, Ana Maria; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...

  3. Parallel magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larkman, David J; Nunes, Rita G

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging has been the single biggest innovation in magnetic resonance imaging in the last decade. The use of multiple receiver coils to augment the time consuming Fourier encoding has reduced acquisition times significantly. This increase in speed comes at a time when other approaches to acquisition time reduction were reaching engineering and human limits. A brief summary of spatial encoding in MRI is followed by an introduction to the problem parallel imaging is designed to solve. There are a large number of parallel reconstruction algorithms; this article reviews a cross-section, SENSE, SMASH, g-SMASH and GRAPPA, selected to demonstrate the different approaches. Theoretical (the g-factor) and practical (coil design) limits to acquisition speed are reviewed. The practical implementation of parallel imaging is also discussed, in particular coil calibration. How to recognize potential failure modes and their associated artefacts are shown. Well-established applications including angiography, cardiac imaging and applications using echo planar imaging are reviewed and we discuss what makes a good application for parallel imaging. Finally, active research areas where parallel imaging is being used to improve data quality by repairing artefacted images are also reviewed. (invited topical review)

  4. Noncontrast Magnetic Resonance Lymphography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivé, Lionel; Derhy, Sarah; El Mouhadi, Sanaâ; Monnier-Cholley, Laurence; Menu, Yves; Becker, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Different imaging techniques have been used for the investigation of the lymphatic channels and lymph glands. Noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) lymphography has significant advantages in comparison with other imaging modalities. Noncontrast MR lymphography uses very heavily T2-weighted fast spin echo sequences which obtain a nearly complete signal loss in tissue background and specific display of lymphatic vessels with a long T2 relaxation time. The raw data can be processed with different algorithms such as maximum intensity projection algorithm to obtain an anatomic representation. Standard T2-weighted MR images easily demonstrate the location of edema. It appears as subcutaneous infiltration of soft tissue with a classical honeycomb pattern. True collection around the muscular area may be demonstrated in case of severe lymphedema. Lymph nodes may be normal in size, number, and signal intensity; in other cases, lymph nodes may be smaller in size or number of lymph nodes may be restricted. MR lymphography allows a classification of lymphedema in aplasia (no collecting vessels demonstrated); hypoplasia (a small number of lymphatic vessels), and numerical hyperplasia or hyperplasia (with an increased number of lymphatic vessels of greater and abnormal diameter). Noncontrast MR lymphography is a unique noninvasive imaging modality for the diagnosis of lymphedema. It can be used for positive diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and specific evaluation of lymphedema severity. It may also be used for follow-up evaluation after treatment. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, E.E. van der; Roos, A.A. de; Doornbos, J.; Dijkman, P.R.M. van; Matheijssen, N.A.A.; Laarse, A. van der; Krauss, X.H.; Blokland, J.A.k.; Manger Cats, V.; Voorthuisen, A.E. van; Bruschke, A.V.G.

    1991-01-01

    The cardiovascular applications of MRI in coronary artery disease have considerably increased in recent years. Although many applications overlap those of other more cost-effective techniques, such as echocardiography, radionuclide angiography, and CT, MRI offers unique features not shared by the conventional techniques. Technical advantages are the excellent spatial resolution, the characterization of myocardial tissue, and the potential for three-dimensional imaging. This allows the accurate assessment of left ventricular mass and volume, the differentiation of infarcted tissue from normal myocardial tissue, and the determination of systolic wall thickening and regional wall motion abnormalities. Also inducible myocardial ischemia using pharmacological stress (dipyramidole or dobutamine) may be assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Future technical developments include real-time imaging and noninvasive visualization of the coronary arteries. These advantages will have a major impact on the application of MRI in coronary artery disease, potentially unsurpassed by other techniques and certainly justifying the expenses. Consequently, the clinical use of MRI for the detection of coronary artery disease largely depends on the progress of technical developments. (author). 134 refs.; 10 figs.; 2 tabs

  6. Advances in magnetic resonance 9

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 9 describes the magnetic resonance in split constants and dipolar relaxation. This book discusses the temperature-dependent splitting constants in the ESR spectra of organic free radicals; temperature-dependent splittings in ion pairs; and magnetic resonance induced by electrons. The electron impact excitation of atoms and molecules; intramolecular dipolar relaxation in multi-spin systems; and dipolar cross-correlation problem are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the NMR studies of molecules oriented in thermotropic liquid crystals and diffusion

  7. Advances in magnetic resonance 1

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 1, discusses developments in various areas of magnetic resonance. The subject matter ranges from original theoretical contributions through syntheses of points of view toward series of phenomena to critical and painstaking tabulations of experimental data. The book contains six chapters and begins with a discussion of the theory of relaxation processes. This is followed by separate chapters on the development of magnetic resonance techniques for studying rate processes in chemistry and the application of these techniques to various problems; the geometri

  8. Improvement of Fuzzy Image Contrast Enhancement Using Simulated Ergodic Fuzzy Markov Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Fathi-Vajargah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel fuzzy enhancement technique using simulated ergodic fuzzy Markov chains for low contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The fuzzy image contrast enhancement is proposed by weighted fuzzy expected value. The membership values are then modified to enhance the image using ergodic fuzzy Markov chains. The qualitative performance of the proposed method is compared to another method in which ergodic fuzzy Markov chains are not considered. The proposed method produces better quality image.

  9. Three-dimensional black-blood contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi in patients with acute ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hwang, Seung Bae

    2018-03-19

    This study evaluated the utility of three-dimensional (3D), black-blood (BB), contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the detection of intraluminal thrombi in acute stroke patients. Forty-seven patients with acute stroke involving the anterior circulation underwent MRI examination within 6 h of clinical onset. Cerebral angiography was used as the reference standard. In a blinded manner, two neuroradiologists interpreted the following three data sets: (1) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) + 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI; (2) DWI + susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI); (3) DWI + 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI + SWI. Of these patients, 47 had clots in the middle cerebral artery and four had clots in the anterior cerebral artery. For both observers, the area under the curve (Az) for data sets 1 and 3, which included 3D BB contrast-enhanced MRI, was significantly greater than it was for data set 2, which did not include 3D BB contrast-enhanced MR imaging (observer 1, 0.988 vs 0.904, p = 0.001; observer 2, 0.988 vs 0.894, p = 0.000). Three-dimensional BB contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi compared to conventional MRI methods in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. • BB contrast-enhanced MRI helps clinicians to assess the intraluminal clot • BB contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of intraluminal thrombi • BB contrast-enhanced MRI for clot detection has a higher sensitivity.

  10. Medial tibial pain: a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, K T; Komu, M E; Dahlström, S; Koskinen, S K; Heikkilä, J

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences to depict periosteal edema in patients with medial tibial pain. Additionally, we evaluated the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCES) to depict possible temporal alterations in muscular perfusion within compartments of the leg. Fifteen patients with medial tibial pain were examined with MRI. T1-, T2-weighted, proton density axial images and dynamic and static phase post-contrast images were compared in ability to depict periosteal edema. STIR was used in seven cases to depict bone marrow edema. Images were analyzed to detect signs of compartment edema. Region-of-interest measurements in compartments were performed during DCES and compared with controls. In detecting periosteal edema, post-contrast T1-weighted images were better than spin echo T2-weighted and proton density images or STIR images, but STIR depicted the bone marrow edema best. DCES best demonstrated the gradually enhancing periostitis. Four subjects with severe periosteal edema had visually detectable pathologic enhancement during DCES in the deep posterior compartment of the leg. Percentage enhancement in the deep posterior compartment of the leg was greater in patients than in controls. The fast enhancement phase in the deep posterior compartment began slightly slower in patients than in controls, but it continued longer. We believe that periosteal edema in bone stress reaction can cause impairment of venous flow in the deep posterior compartment. MRI can depict both these conditions. In patients with medial tibial pain, MR imaging protocol should include axial STIR images (to depict bone pathology) with T1-weighted axial pre and post-contrast images, and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging to show periosteal edema and abnormal contrast enhancement within a compartment.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not harmful, but it may cause some medical devices to malfunction. Most orthopedic implants pose no ... Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. ...

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging ( ... brain) in routine clinical practice. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? MR ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist prepping patient for magnetic resonance ...

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View ...

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or thyroid problems. Any of these conditions may influence the decision on whether contrast material will be ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the technologist or scheduler before the exam. ... patient for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... Image Gallery Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... necessary in trauma situations. Although there is no reason to believe that magnetic resonance imaging harms the ...

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinides, Christakis

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a rapidly developing field in basic applied science and clinical practice. Research efforts in this area have already been recognized with five Nobel prizes awarded to seven Nobel laureates in the past 70 years. Based on courses taught at The Johns Hopkins University, Magnetic Resonance Imaging: The Basics provides a solid introduction to this powerful technology. The book begins with a general description of the phenomenon of magnetic resonance and a brief summary of Fourier transformations in two dimensions. It examines the fundamental principles of physics for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal formation and image construction and provides a detailed explanation of the mathematical formulation of MRI. Numerous image quantitative indices are discussed, including (among others) signal, noise, signal-to-noise, contrast, and resolution. The second part of the book examines the hardware and electronics of an MRI scanner and the typical measurements and simulations of m...

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal pulmonary hila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.; Stark, D.D.; Moore, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hila were reviewed in 25 normal subjects and 12 patients with unilateral or bilateral hilar masses. On spin echo MR images in normal patients, collections of soft tissue large enough to be confused with an abnormally enlarged lymph node were seen in three locations. In patients with a hilar mass, the mass was differentiated from hilar vasculature more easily using MR than contrast-enhanced CT. However, because the spatial resolution of MR is inferior to that of CT, bronchi were difficult to evaulate using MR. Electrocardiographic-gated images showed better resolution of hilar structures but may not be necessary for large masses

  4. Parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis: findings of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Clecia Santos; Pellini, Marcos; Boasquevisque, Edson; Souza, Luis Alberto M. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective: to determine the frequency and localization of parenchymal abnormalities in cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography as well as their correlation with the territory and affected venous drainage. Materials and methods: retrospective analysis (1996 to 2004) of 21 patients (3 male and 18 female) age range between 3 and 82 years (mean 40 years, median 36 years) with clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral venous thrombosis on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography in 2D PC, 3D PC and contrast-enhanced 3D TOF sequences. The statistical analysis was performed with the qui-square test. Four patients had follow-up exams and three patients underwent digital subtraction angiography. Results: main predisposing factors were: infection, use of oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and collagenosis. Predominant symptoms included: focal deficit, headache, alteration of consciousness level and seizures. Most frequent parenchymal manifestations were: cortical/subcortical edema or infarct, venous congestion and collateral circulation, meningeal enhancement and thalamic and basal ganglia edema or infarct. Occlusion occurred mainly in superior sagittal, left transverse, left sigmoid and straight sinuses. Cavernous sinus and cortical veins thrombosis are uncommon events. Conclusion: cerebral venous thrombosis is an uncommon cause of stroke, with favorable prognosis because of its reversibility. Diagnosis is highly dependent on the radiologist capacity to recognize the presentations of this disease, principally in cases where the diagnosis is suggested by parenchymal abnormalities rather than necessarily by visualization of the thrombus itself. An accurate and rapid diagnosis allows an immediate treatment, reducing the morbidity and mortality rates. (author)

  5. Quantitative perfusion imaging in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, F.G.; Gaa, T.; Zimmer, F.; Ong, M.M.; Riffel, P.; Hausmann, D.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Weis, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recognized for its superior tissue contrast while being non-invasive and free of ionizing radiation. Due to the development of new scanner hardware and fast imaging techniques during the last decades, access to tissue and organ functions became possible. One of these functional imaging techniques is perfusion imaging with which tissue perfusion and capillary permeability can be determined from dynamic imaging data. Perfusion imaging by MRI can be performed by two approaches, arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI. While the first method uses magnetically labelled water protons in arterial blood as an endogenous tracer, the latter involves the injection of a contrast agent, usually gadolinium (Gd), as a tracer for calculating hemodynamic parameters. Studies have demonstrated the potential of perfusion MRI for diagnostics and also for therapy monitoring. The utilization and application of perfusion MRI are still restricted to specialized centers, such as university hospitals. A broad application of the technique has not yet been implemented. The MRI perfusion technique is a valuable tool that might come broadly available after implementation of standards on European and international levels. Such efforts are being promoted by the respective professional bodies. (orig.) [de

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Chapter 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M. O. [The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    In Chapter 14, the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance were presented, along with an introduction to image forming processes. In this chapter, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be reviewed, beginning with the hardware needed and its impact on image quality. The acquisition processes and image reconstruction will be discussed, as well as the artefacts that are possible, with discussion of the important area of safety and bioeffects completing the chapter.

  7. The nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyer, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    The spectroscopy of nuclear magnetic resonance constitutes a major analytical technique in biological and organic analysis. This technique appears now in the programme of preparatory classes and its teaching is developed in the second year of DEUG. The following article reviews on the nuclear magnetic resonance and on the possibilities it offers to bring to the fore the physico-chemical properties of molecules. (N.C.)

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 2

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 2, features a mixture of experimental and theoretical contributions. The book contains four chapters and begins with an ambitious and general treatment of the problem of signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance. This is followed by separate chapters on the interpretation of nuclear relaxation in fluids, with special reference to hydrogen; and various aspects of molecular theory of importance in NMR.

  9. Characterisation of focal liver lesions with contrast enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (USCA) have improved the detection rate of liver tumours in recent years. Conventional ultrasound has been reported to be relatively unreliable in the characterisation of liver tumours. SonoVue [reg] (Bracco Imaging Spa) has been shown to be particularly advantageous in the differentiation of benign and malignant liver tumours and, therefore, possibly represents a new cost-effective competitive alternative to other liver imaging modalities (e.g. computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging), thus allowing these important technologies to be available for other indications (e.g. brain, thorax). More detailed and specific liver tumour characterisation is possible in about 80% of liver tumours due to typical vascularity and perfusion patterns. The role of USCA for better characterisation, which is possible through the analysis of flow characteristics in real time, places a particular emphasis on agent use. Contrast enhanced real-time imaging techniques with SonoVue [reg] allow real-time analysis of tumour perfusion in patients with liver lesions. Liver tumours known to be hyperperfused in the arterial phase (e.g. focal nodular hyperplasia, hepatocellular adenoma and carcinoma, and hyperperfused metastases) can be better detected and characterised. Hypoperfused tumours (e.g. liver metastases of the gastrointestinal tract) can be recognised in the portal venous phase as less perfused 'black spots'. In this article we discuss liver tumour characterisation by contrast enhanced ultrasonography

  10. Characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy on delayed contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Chaowu; Zhao Shihua; Li Hua; Jiang Shiliang; Lu Minjie; Zhang Yan; Wei Yunqing; Ling Jian; Fang Wei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the characteristics of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) on delayed contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). Methods: All patients underwent delayed contrast-enhanced CMRI. The left ventricle was divided into 9 segments to assess the location, extent and function of the hypertrophic segments. The t test was applied for the statistics. Results: Of 154 patients, delayed enhancement of' hypertrophic segment was found in 95 cases and non-delayed enhancement in 59 cases. The thickness and number of hypertrophic segment in patients with delayed enhancement were larger than those with non-delayed enhancement [(24.8±5.5) mm vs (20.4± 3.8) mm, t=3.82, P<0.05; (3.3±1.9) vs (2.4±1.7), t=2.26, P<0.05], and the age was younger [(46.0±15.2) years vs (55.0±11.9) years, t=-3.67, P<0.05]. The diffuse enhancement was found in 62 patients, and confluent enhancement in 33 patients. Confluent enhancement was found in all 14 patients after the alcohol ablation procedure. Conclusion: The age, thickness and number of hypertrophic segments in patients with delayed enhancement are different from those with non-delayed enhancement. (authors)

  11. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography in Crohn's Disease Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białecki, Marcin; Białecka, Agnieszka; Laskowska, Katarzyna; Liebert, Ariel; Kłopocka, Maria; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    The chronic nature of Crohn's disease (CD) implicates necessity of multiple control assessments throughout patient's life. It is accepted that in patients with CD requiring disease monitoring, magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and computed tomography enterography (CTE) are--apart from endoscopy--imaging studies of first choice. In practice, diagnostic imaging of patients with CD is troublesome, since MRE is an expensive and complicated study, and CTE exposes patients to high doses of ionizing radiation. Therefore, there is a need for new, both non-invasive and effective, methods of imaging in CD. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography (CEUS) is a relatively new method using gas-filled microbubbles serving as contrast agent. It allows for detailed assessment of blood perfusion within intestine wall and peri-intestinal tissues, which enables detection and monitoring of inflammation and its qualitative assessment. The purpose of this paper is to describe CEUS examination technique and its clinical applications in patients with Crohn's disease.

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance diagnostic apparatus including a coil for generating a gradient field in a plane perpendicular to a static magnetic field, means for controlling the operation of the coil to rotationally shift in angular steps the gradient direction of the gradient field at an angle pitch of some multiple of the unit index angle through a plurality of rotations to assume all the shift positions of the gradient direction, a rough image reconstructor for reconstructing a rough tomographic image on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance signals acquired during a rotation of the second gradient magnetic field, a rough image display for depicting the rough tomographic image, a final image reconstructor for reconstructing a final tomographic image on the basis of all nuclear magnetic resonance signals corresponding to all of the expected rotation shift positions acquired during a plurality of rotations and a final image display for depicting the final tomographic image

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Permanent cosmetics or tattoos Dentures/teeth with magnetic keepers Other implants that involve magnets Medication patch (i. ... or longer. You’ll be told ahead of time just how long your scan is expected to ...

  15. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  16. Measurements of pericardial adipose tissue using contrast enhanced cardiac multidetector computed tomography—comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Marie Bayer; Lønborg, Jacob; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    and CMRI scans were performed. The optimal fit for measuring PAT using contrast MDCT was developed and validated by the corresponding measures on CMRI. The median for PAT volume in patients was 175 ml (SD 68) and 153 ml (SD 60) measured by MDCT and CMRI respectively. Four different attenuation values were...... tested, and the smallest difference in PAT was noted when -30 to -190 HU were used in MDCT measures. The median difference between MDCT and CMRI for the assessment of PAT was 9 ml (SD 50) suggesting a reasonable robust method for the assessment of PAT in a large-scale study. Pericardial adipose tissue...

  17. Multivariate modelling of prostate cancer combining magnetic resonance derived T2, diffusion, dynamic contrast-enhanced and spectroscopic parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riches, S.F.; Payne, G.S.; Morgan, V.A.; DeSouza, N.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, CRUK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, D. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Urology and Department of Academic Radiotherapy, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, S. [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre and the University of Ottawa, Division of Radiation Oncology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Partridge, M. [The Institute of Cancer Research, Section of Radiotherapy and Imaging, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, The Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Livni, N. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Chelsea, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom); Ogden, C. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Chelsea, Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    The objectives are determine the optimal combination of MR parameters for discriminating tumour within the prostate using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and to compare model accuracy with that of an experienced radiologist. Multiparameter MRIs in 24 patients before prostatectomy were acquired. Tumour outlines from whole-mount histology, T{sub 2}-defined peripheral zone (PZ), and central gland (CG) were superimposed onto slice-matched parametric maps. T{sub 2,} Apparent Diffusion Coefficient, initial area under the gadolinium curve, vascular parameters (K{sup trans},K{sub ep},V{sub e}), and (choline+polyamines+creatine)/citrate were compared between tumour and non-tumour tissues. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determined sensitivity and specificity at spectroscopic voxel resolution and per lesion, and LDA determined the optimal multiparametric model for identifying tumours. Accuracy was compared with an expert observer. Tumours were significantly different from PZ and CG for all parameters (all p < 0.001). Area under the ROC curve for discriminating tumour from non-tumour was significantly greater (p < 0.001) for the multiparametric model than for individual parameters; at 90 % specificity, sensitivity was 41 % (MRSI voxel resolution) and 59 % per lesion. At this specificity, an expert observer achieved 28 % and 49 % sensitivity, respectively. The model was more accurate when parameters from all techniques were included and performed better than an expert observer evaluating these data. (orig.)

  18. The benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for predicting vascular access surgery outcome : a coomputer model perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merkx, M.A.G.; Huberts, W.; Bosboom, E.M.H.; Bode, A.S.; Bescos, J.O.; Tordoir, J.H.M.; Breeuwer, M.; Vosse, van de F.N.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Vascular access (VA) surgery, a prerequisite for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal-disease (ESRD) patients, is hampered by complication rates, which are frequently related to flow enhancement. To assist in VA surgery planning, a patient-specific computer model for postoperative

  19. Evaluation of heart perfusion in patients with acute myocardial infarction using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte; Hansen, Thomas Fritz; Dirks, Christina G

    2004-01-01

    with acute transmural myocardial infarction were studied using a Turbo-fast low angle shot (FLASH) MRI sequence to monitor the first pass of an extravascular contrast agent (CA), gadolinium diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). Quantitation of perfusion, expressed as Ki (mL/100 g/minute), in five...

  20. Prebiopsy magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Jagannathan, N.R.; Thulkar, S.; Kumar, R.

    2012-01-01

    Existing screening investigations for the diagnosis of early prostate cancer lack specificity, resulting in a high negative biopsy rate. There is increasing interest in the use of various magnetic resonance methods for improving the yield of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies of the prostate in men suspected to have prostate cancer. We review the existing status of such investigations. A literature search was carried out using the Pubmed database to identify articles related to magnetic resonance methods for diagnosing prostate cancer. References from these articles were also extracted and reviewed. Recent studies have focused on prebiopsy magnetic resonance investigations using conventional magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, magnetization transfer imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the prostate. This marks a shift from the earlier strategy of carrying out postbiopsy magnetic resonance investigations. Prebiopsy magnetic resonance investigations has been useful in identifying patients who are more likely to have a biopsy positive for malignancy. Prebiopsy magnetic resonance investigations has a potential role in increasing specificity of screening for early prostate cancer. It has a role in the targeting of biopsy sites, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and predicting the outcome of biopsies. (author)

  1. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncică, Ana Maria; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...... cancers and visualization of the portal venous system and esophageal varices. In addition, contrast agents can be used to differentiate pancreatic lesions. The use of color Doppler further increases the ability to diagnose and differentiate various pancreatic malignancies. The sensitivity of power Doppler...

  2. Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geick, R.

    1981-01-01

    This review starts with the basic principles of resonance phenomena in physical systems. Especially, the connection is shown between the properties of these systems and Fourier transforms. Next, we discuss the principles of nuclear magnetic resonance. Starting from the general properties of physical systems showing resonance phenomena and from the special properties of nuclear spin systems, the main part of this paper reviews pulse and Fourier methods in nuclear magnetic resonance. Among pulse methods, an introduction will be given to spin echoes, and, apart from the principle of Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, an introduction to the technical problems of this method, e.g. resolution in the frequency domain, aliasing, phase and intensity errors, stationary state of the spin systems for repetitive measurements, proton decoupling, and application of Fourier methods to systems in a nonequilibrium state. The last section is devoted to special applications of Fourier methods and recent developments, e.g. measurement of relaxation times, solvent peak suppression, 'rapid scan'-method, methods for suppressing the effects of dipolar coupling in solids, two-dimensional Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance, and spin mapping or zeugmatography. (author)

  3. Magnetic resonance and porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, P.; Strange, J.

    1998-01-01

    Mention the words magnetic resonance to your medical advisor and he or she will immediately think of a multi-million pound scanner that peers deep into the brain. A chemist, on the other hand, will imagine a machine that costs several hundred thousand pounds and produces high-resolution spectra for chemical analysis. Food technologists will probably think of a bench-top instrument for determining moisture content, while an oil prospector will envisage a device that can be operated several kilometres down an oil well. To a physicist the term is more likely to conjure up a mental picture of nuclear spins precessing in a magnetic field. These examples illustrate the diverse aspects of a phenomenon discovered by physicists over 50 years ago. Electron spin resonance was first discovered by Russian scientists, and nuclear magnetic resonance was discovered in the US shortly afterwards by Ed Purcell at Harvard University and Felix Bloch at Stanford University. Today, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the most widely used technique. Modern NMR machines are making it possible to probe microstructure and molecular movement in materials as diverse as polymers, cements, rocks, soil and foods. NMR allows the distribution of different components in a material to be determined with a resolution approaching 1μm, although the signal can be sensitive to even smaller lengthscales. In this article the authors describe how physicists are still developing magnetic resonance to exploit a range of new applications. (UK)

  4. GHz nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, T.A.; Drobny, G.; Trewhella, J.

    1994-12-01

    For the past dozen years, 500- and 600-MHz spectrometers have become available in many laboratories. The first 600-MHz NMR spectrometer (at Carnegie Mellon University) was commissioned more than 15 years ago and, until 1994, represented the highest field available for high-resolution NMR. This year, we have witnessed unprecedented progress in the development of very high field magnets for NMR spectroscopy, including the delivery of the first commercial 750-MHz NMR spectrometers. In addition, NMR signals have been obtained from 20-Tesla magnets (850 MHz for {sup 1}H`s) at both Los Alamos National Laboratory and Florida State University in the NHMFL (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory). These preliminary experiments have been performed in magnets with 100-ppm homogeneity, but a 20-Tesla magnet developed for the NHMFL will be brought to field this year with a projected homogeneity of 0.1 ppm over a 1-cm-diam spherical volume.

  5. Principles of magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mlynarik, V.; Tkac, I.; Srbecky, M.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe and explain the basic principles of magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of the text is devoted to the phenomenon of magnetic resonance (the interaction of RF magnetic field with the set of magnetic moments in the homogeneous magnetic field) and to relaxation processes. Then, the creation of MR image is described (slice selection, phase and frequency encoding of spatial information). The basic and the most frequently used techniques are explained (spin echo, gradient echo). The way the repetition and echo times influence the image quality and contrast (T1 or T2 weighing) is described. The part with the technical description of the MR equipment is included in the review. The MR imagination examination are compared with X-ray computer tomography technique

  6. Segmentation of neuroanatomy in magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Andrew; Arridge, Simon R.; Barker, G. J.; Tofts, Paul S.

    1992-06-01

    Segmentation in neurological magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is necessary for feature extraction, volume measurement and for the three-dimensional display of neuroanatomy. Automated and semi-automated methods offer considerable advantages over manual methods because of their lack of subjectivity, their data reduction capabilities, and the time savings they give. We have used dual echo multi-slice spin-echo data sets which take advantage of the intrinsically multispectral nature of MRI. As a pre-processing step, a rf non-uniformity correction is applied and if the data is noisy the images are smoothed using a non-isotropic blurring method. Edge-based processing is used to identify the skin (the major outer contour) and the eyes. Edge-focusing has been used to significantly simplify edge images and thus allow simple postprocessing to pick out the brain contour in each slice of the data set. Edge- focusing is a technique which locates significant edges using a high degree of smoothing at a coarse level and tracks these edges to a fine level where the edges can be determined with high positional accuracy. Both 2-D and 3-D edge-detection methods have been compared. Once isolated, the brain is further processed to identify CSF, and, depending upon the MR pulse sequence used, the brain itself may be sub-divided into gray matter and white matter using semi-automatic contrast enhancement and clustering methods.

  7. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M., E-mail: t_vasilevs@mail.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation); Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy 42, 432017 Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  8. Bifurcation magnetic resonance in films magnetized along hard magnetization axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskaya, Tatiana M.; Sementsov, Dmitriy I.; Shutyi, Anatoliy M.

    2012-01-01

    We study low-frequency ferromagnetic resonance in a thin film magnetized along the hard magnetization axis performing an analysis of magnetization precession dynamics equations and numerical simulation. Two types of films are considered: polycrystalline uniaxial films and single-crystal films with cubic magnetic anisotropy. An additional (bifurcation) resonance initiated by the bistability, i.e. appearance of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states is registered. The modification of dynamic modes provoked by variation of the frequency, amplitude, and magnetic bias value of the ac field is studied. Both steady and chaotic magnetization precession modes are registered in the bifurcation resonance range. - Highlights: ► An additional bifurcation resonance arises in a case of a thin film magnetized along HMA. ► Bifurcation resonance occurs due to the presence of two closely spaced equilibrium magnetization states. ► Both regular and chaotic precession modes are realized within bifurcation resonance range. ► Appearance of dynamic bistability is typical for bifurcation resonance.

  9. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  10. Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI at 7 Tesla utilizing a single-loop coil: a feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umutlu, Lale; Maderwald, Stefan; Kraff, Oliver; Theysohn, Jens M; Kuemmel, Sherko; Hauth, Elke A; Forsting, Michael; Antoch, Gerald; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultra-high-field breast imaging at 7 Tesla. A total of 15 subjects, including 5 patients with histologically proven breast cancer, were examined on a 7 Tesla whole-body magnetic resonance imaging system using a unilateral linearly polarized single-loop coil. Subjects were placed in prone position on a biopsy support system, with the coil placed directly below the region of interest. The examination protocol included the following sequences: 1) T2-weighted turbo spin echo sequence; 2) six dynamic T1-weighted spoiled gradient-echo sequences; and 3) subtraction imaging. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging at 7 Tesla could be obtained at high spatial resolution with short acquisition times, providing good image accuracy and a conclusively good delineation of small anatomical and pathological structures. T2-weighted imaging could be obtained with high spatial resolution at adequate acquisition times. Because of coil limitations, four high-field magnetic resonance examinations showed decreased diagnostic value. This first scientific approach of dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla demonstrates the complexity of ultra-high-field breast magnetic resonance imaging and countenances the implementation of further advanced bilateral coil concepts to circumvent current limitations from the coil and ultra-high-field magnetic strength. 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in local staging of endometrial carcinoma: diagnostic performance, pitfalls, and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandrino, Franco; La Paglia, Ernesto; Musante, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in local staging of endometrial carcinoma, and to review the results and pitfalls described in the literature. Thirty women with a histological diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Unenhanced T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced Ti-weighted sequences were obtained. Hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy was performed in all patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated for the detection of deep myometrial and cervical infiltration. For deep myometrial infiltration T2-weighted sequences reached a sensitivity of 85%, specificity of 76%, PPV of 73%, NVP of 87%, and accuracy of 80%, while contrast-enhanced scans reached a sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 80%, PPV of 82%, NPV of 89%, and accuracy of 85%. For cervical infiltration T2-weighted sequences reached a sensitivity of 75%, specificity of 88%, PPV of 50%, NPV of 96%, and accuracy of 87%, while contrast-enhanced scans reached a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 94%, PPV of 75%, NPV of 100%, and accuracy of 95%. Unenhanced and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance allows accurate assessment of myometrial and cervical infiltration. Information provided by magnetic resonance imaging can define prognosis and management.

  12. [Injection Pressure Evaluation of the New Venous Catheter with Side Holes for Contrast-enhanced CT/MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Junya; Arai, Keisuke; Miyazawa, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Kyouko; Nakamura, Junpei; Suto, Takayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2018-01-01

    The simulation study was conducted for the new venous catheter with side holes of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the infusion pressure on four contrast media and several injection speeds. All infusion pressure of the new venous catheter with side holes were less than 15 kg/cm 2 as limitation of extension tube and also reduced the infusion pressure by 15% at the maximum compared to the catheter with single hole. The results suggest that the new venous catheter with side holes can reduce the infusion pressure by power injection of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI.

  13. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  14. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound features of hepatocellular carcinoma not detected during the screening procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Mao, Feng; Dietrich, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Aim  The aim of this retrospective study is to report on the characteristics of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) of primarily not detected hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during the screening procedure of patients at risk. Methods  Sixty-four patients with a finally solitary and histologically proven HCC not detected HCC during the screening procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Most of HCC lesions (90.6 %, 58/64) measured < 20 mm in diameter. All HCC lesions were not detected during the initial screening procedure but suspected using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. The final gold standard was biopsy or surgery with histological examination. Results  On CEUS, 62/64 (96.8 %) of HCC were characterized as an obviously hyperenhanced lesion in arterial phase, and 41/64 (64.1 %) of HCC were characterized as hypoenhancing lesions in the portal venous and late phases. During the arterial phase of CEUS, 96.8 % of HCC displayed homogeneous hyperenhancement. Knowing the CEUS and magnetic resonance imaging findings, 45/64 (70.3 %) could have been detected using B-mode ultrasound (BMUS). Conclusion  BMUS as a screening procedure is generally accepted. Contrast-enhanced imaging modalities have improved detection and characterization of HCC. Homogeneous hyperenhancement during the arterial phase and mild washout are indicative for HCC in liver cirrhosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Medical Image Visual Appearance Improvement Using Bihistogram Bezier Curve Contrast Enhancement: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Hong-Seng; Swee, Tan Tian; Abdul Karim, Ahmad Helmy; Sayuti, Khairil Amir; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Tham, Weng-Kit; Wong, Liang-Xuan; Chaudhary, Kashif T.; Yupapin, Preecha P.

    2014-01-01

    Well-defined image can assist user to identify region of interest during segmentation. However, complex medical image is usually characterized by poor tissue contrast and low background luminance. The contrast improvement can lift image visual quality, but the fundamental contrast enhancement methods often overlook the sudden jump problem. In this work, the proposed bihistogram Bezier curve contrast enhancement introduces the concept of “adequate contrast enhancement” to overcome sudden jump problem in knee magnetic resonance image. Since every image produces its own intensity distribution, the adequate contrast enhancement checks on the image's maximum intensity distortion and uses intensity discrepancy reduction to generate Bezier transform curve. The proposed method improves tissue contrast and preserves pertinent knee features without compromising natural image appearance. Besides, statistical results from Fisher's Least Significant Difference test and the Duncan test have consistently indicated that the proposed method outperforms fundamental contrast enhancement methods to exalt image visual quality. As the study is limited to relatively small image database, future works will include a larger dataset with osteoarthritic images to assess the clinical effectiveness of the proposed method to facilitate the image inspection. PMID:24977191

  17. Medical Image Visual Appearance Improvement Using Bihistogram Bezier Curve Contrast Enhancement: Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Seng Gan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-defined image can assist user to identify region of interest during segmentation. However, complex medical image is usually characterized by poor tissue contrast and low background luminance. The contrast improvement can lift image visual quality, but the fundamental contrast enhancement methods often overlook the sudden jump problem. In this work, the proposed bihistogram Bezier curve contrast enhancement introduces the concept of “adequate contrast enhancement” to overcome sudden jump problem in knee magnetic resonance image. Since every image produces its own intensity distribution, the adequate contrast enhancement checks on the image’s maximum intensity distortion and uses intensity discrepancy reduction to generate Bezier transform curve. The proposed method improves tissue contrast and preserves pertinent knee features without compromising natural image appearance. Besides, statistical results from Fisher’s Least Significant Difference test and the Duncan test have consistently indicated that the proposed method outperforms fundamental contrast enhancement methods to exalt image visual quality. As the study is limited to relatively small image database, future works will include a larger dataset with osteoarthritic images to assess the clinical effectiveness of the proposed method to facilitate the image inspection.

  18. Avascular necrosis of femoral head: findings of contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yong Moon; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Chu Wan; Kim, Hee Joong; Kim, Young Min

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the findings and the role of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in avascular necrosis of femoral head. Sixteen patients with avascular necorsis of femoral head were examined with MRI. T1-weighted and T2-weighted image and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained. Enhancing characteristics of the necrotic area and synovium were determined. Also a change of the disease extent after enhancement was assessed. Twenty seven avascular necrosis of the femoral head including 11 cases of bilateral lesion were detected. Fifteen cases revealed collapse of the femoral head. The portions of the lesion with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images showed contrast enhancement in 15 cases. However, the potions with low signal intensities both on T1 and T2-weighted images showed enhancement in one case. There was no significant change of the disease extent after enhancement. Synovium showed enhancement in 18 cases, and joint effusion was detected in 23 cases. Contrast enhanced MR images may be helpful in predicting histopathologic findings of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, but not useful for evaluating the extent of disease

  19. Avascular necrosis of femoral head: findings of contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yong Moon; Kang, Heung Sik; Kim, Chu Wan; Kim, Hee Joong; Kim, Young Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate the findings and the role of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in avascular necrosis of femoral head. Sixteen patients with avascular necorsis of femoral head were examined with MRI. T1-weighted and T2-weighted image and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images were obtained. Enhancing characteristics of the necrotic area and synovium were determined. Also a change of the disease extent after enhancement was assessed. Twenty seven avascular necrosis of the femoral head including 11 cases of bilateral lesion were detected. Fifteen cases revealed collapse of the femoral head. The portions of the lesion with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images showed contrast enhancement in 15 cases. However, the potions with low signal intensities both on T1 and T2-weighted images showed enhancement in one case. There was no significant change of the disease extent after enhancement. Synovium showed enhancement in 18 cases, and joint effusion was detected in 23 cases. Contrast enhanced MR images may be helpful in predicting histopathologic findings of avascular necrosis of the femoral head, but not useful for evaluating the extent of disease.

  20. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: mvmfonte@uol.com.br; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Reed, Umbertina Conti [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Neurologia; Rosemberg, Sergio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Patologia

    2008-11-15

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  1. Medulloblastoma: correlation among findings of conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonte, Mariana Vieira de Melo da; Otaduy, Maria Concepcion Garcia; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Leite, Claudia da Costa; Costa, Maria Olivia Rodrigues; Amaral, Raquel Portugal Guimaraes; Reed, Umbertina Conti; Rosemberg, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    To correlate imaging findings of medulloblastomas at conventional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, comparing them with data in the literature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging studies of nine pediatric patients with histologically confirmed medulloblastomas (eight desmoplastic medulloblastoma, and one giant cell medulloblastoma) were retrospectively reviewed, considering demographics as well as tumors characteristics such as localization, morphology, signal intensity, contrast-enhancement, dissemination, and diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy findings. In most of cases the tumors were centered in the cerebellar vermis (77.8%), predominantly solid (88.9%), hypointense on T 1-weighted images and intermediate/hyperintense on T 2-FLAIR-weighted images, with heterogeneous enhancement (100%), tumor dissemination/extension (77.8%) and limited water molecule mobility (100%). Proton spectroscopy acquired with STEAM technique (n = 6) demonstrated decreased Na a / Cr ratio (83.3%) and increased Co/Cr (100%) and ml/Cr (66.7%) ratios; and with PRESS technique (n = 7) demonstrated lactate peak (57.1%). Macroscopic magnetic resonance imaging findings in association with biochemical features of medulloblastomas have been useful in the differentiation among the most frequent posterior fossa tumors. (author)

  2. Evanescent Waves Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halidi, El Mohamed; Nativel, Eric; Akel, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy and imaging can be classified as inductive techniques working in the near- to far-field regimes. We investigate an alternative capacitive detection with the use of micrometer sized probes positioned at sub wavelength distances of the sample in order...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that physicians use to diagnose medical conditions. MRI ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... structures of the brain and can also provide functional information (fMRI) in selected cases. MR images of ... Articles and Media MR Angiography (MRA) Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Brain ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images ... Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) - Brain Children's ( ...

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of olfactory neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Mitsuhiro; Homma, Akihiro; Furuta, Yasushi; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma is an uncommon intranasal tumor originating from olfactory neuroepithelium. Despite the development of electron microscopy and immunohistochemical testing, the pathological diagnosis of this tumor is still difficult because of the wide range of histological features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR) of this tumor and the pattern of contrast enhancement have not been well described. The purpose of this report was to analyze the MR characteristics of olfactory neuroblastomas. The MR signal, pattern of contrast enhancement, and correlation with high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging were examined. Seventeen patients with olfactory neuroblastoma were treated at Hokkaido University Hospital and a related hospital during the past 25 years. MR images taken in 12 patients and CT images taken in 9 patients with histologically confirmed olfactory neuroblastoma were retrospectively reviewed. Compared with brain gray matter, 11 tumors were hypointense on T1-weighted images, 9 homogeneously and 2 heterogeneously. Eight tumors were hyperintense on T2-weighted images, 3 homogeneously and 5 heterogeneously, although their appearance was less intense than that of sinusitis. Gadolinium enhancement was moderate in one case and marked in 10 of the 11 cases, 9 homogeneously and 2 heterogeneously. Nine of the 11 tumors showed smooth regular shaped margins; 2 of these tumors exhibited irregular infiltrating margins on gadolinium-enhanced images, compared to the pre-contrast T1-weighted images. Eight of the 11 tumors had clearly demarcated margins, while 3 of the 11 tumors did not exhibit gadolinium enhancement. Six of the 12 cases (50%) exhibited intracranial cysts on the gadolinium-enhanced images. T2-weighted or gadolinium-enhanced images successfully distinguished sinusitis from tumors in 4 cases whereas the CT images failed. Gadolinium enhancement, particularly in the tangential plane, demonstrated intracranial extension not apparent on the CT images

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth / For Parents / Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain What's in this article? What ...

  12. Advances in magnetic and optical resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Warren S

    1997-01-01

    Since 1965, Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance has provided researchers with timely expositions of fundamental new developments in the theory of, experimentation with, and application of magnetic and optical resonance.

  13. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR of the prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: correlation with angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Xinchu; Shen Junkang; Lu Zhian; Zhou Lijuan; Yang Xiaochun; Wang Guanzhong; Zhang Caiyuan; Wang Shuizhen; Qian Minghui; Chan Yuxi; Qian Nong; Xiang Jianpo; Pan Changjie; Rong Weiliang; Chen Jianguo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnose of prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and to determine the correlation between dynamic MRI findings with angiogenesis. Methods: Thirty-two cases of prostatic cancer and 40 cases of BPH underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. All the patients in this study were diagnosed by histopathology. The results of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI were evaluated by early-phase enhancement parameters and time-signal intensity curves (SI-T curves), and the curves were classified according to their shapes as type I, which had steady enhancement; type II, plateau of signal intensity; and type III, washout of signal intensity. The pathologic specimens of region of interest (ROI ) were obtained, and HE staining, immunohistochemical vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and microvessel density (MVD) measurements were performed. The relationships among dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI features, VEGF, and MVD expression were analyzed. Results: In the early-phase enhancement parameters of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, onset time, maximum signal intensity, and early-phase enhancement rate differed between prostatic cancer and BPH (P<0.01, 0.05, 0.01), but there were some overlaps between them. The intermediate and late post-contrast periods were characterized with the lesion SI-T curves. The SI-T curve of prostatic cancer was mainly type III (21 cases). Type II could be seen in both prostatic cancer (8 cases) and BPH (19 cases). Type I most appeared in BPH (18 cases). The distributions proved to have significant difference (P<0.001). The mean VEGF and MVD level of 32 prostatic cancer patients were significantly higher than those of 40 BPH patients (P<0.001). MVD level of prostatic cancer and BPH showed an association with VEGF level (P<0.01). The maximum signal intensity and early-phase enhancement rate in both prostatic cancer and BPH showed an association

  14. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal infectious processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, K.L.; Li, K.C.P.; Bergman, G.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides diagnostic information beyond that given by nonenhanced imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infectious processes and whether it can be used for differentiating infectious from noninfectious inflammatory lesions. Magnetic resonance images performed with and without intravenous gadolinium-DTPA in 34 cases in which musculoskeletal infection had been clinically suspected were reviewed. Infectious lesions-including osteomyelitis, pyarthrosis, abscess, and cellulitis-were confirmed in a total of 22 cases: in 15 by biopsy or drainage and in 7 by clinical course. Our results show that gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI is a highly sensitive technique in diagnosing musculoskeletal infectious lesions. It is especially useful in distinguishing abscesses from surrounding cellulitis/myositis. Lack of contrast enhancement rules out infection with a high degree of certainty. However, contrast enhancement cannot be used to reliably distinguish infectious from noninfectious inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  15. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal infectious processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, K.L. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Li, K.C.P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States); Bergman, G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides diagnostic information beyond that given by nonenhanced imaging in the evaluation of musculoskeletal infectious processes and whether it can be used for differentiating infectious from noninfectious inflammatory lesions. Magnetic resonance images performed with and without intravenous gadolinium-DTPA in 34 cases in which musculoskeletal infection had been clinically suspected were reviewed. Infectious lesions-including osteomyelitis, pyarthrosis, abscess, and cellulitis-were confirmed in a total of 22 cases: in 15 by biopsy or drainage and in 7 by clinical course. Our results show that gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced MRI is a highly sensitive technique in diagnosing musculoskeletal infectious lesions. It is especially useful in distinguishing abscesses from surrounding cellulitis/myositis. Lack of contrast enhancement rules out infection with a high degree of certainty. However, contrast enhancement cannot be used to reliably distinguish infectious from noninfectious inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  16. Magnetic resonance for wireless power transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, SYR

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance has been a cornerstone of nonradiative wireless power transfer (WPT) since the late 19th century. However, some researchers have the misconception that magnetic resonance for WPT was developed recently. This article traces some early work of Tesla and other researchers related to the use of magnetic resonance in WPT. Included are some examples of magnetic resonance-based WPT projects conducted by researchers in the biomedical and power electronics communities over the last ...

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents: Overview and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guoping; Robinson, Leslie; Hogg, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive clinical imaging modality, which has become widely used in the diagnosis and/or staging of human diseases around the world. Some MRI examinations include the use of contrast agents. The categorizations of currently available contrast agents have been described according to their effect on the image, magnetic behavior and biodistribution in the body, respectively. In this field, superparamagnetic iron oxide particles and soluble paramagnetic metal chelates are two main classes of contrast agents for MRI. This review outlines the research and development of MRI contrast agents. In future, the ideal MRI contrast agent will be focused on the neutral tissue- or organ-targeting materials with high relaxivity and specificity, low toxicity and side effects, suitable long intravascular duration and excretion time, high contrast enhancement with low dose in vivo, and with minimal cost

  18. Local ablation therapy with contrast-enhanced ultrasonography for hepatocellular carcinoma: a practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyoung Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A successful program for local ablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC requires extensive imaging support for diagnosis and localization of HCC, imaging guidance for the ablation procedures, and post-treatment monitoring. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS has several advantages over computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI, including real-time imaging capability, sensitive detection of arterial-phase hypervascularity and washout, no renal excretion, no ionizing radiation, repeatability, excellent patient compliance, and relatively low cost. CEUS is useful for image guidance for isoechoic lesions. While contrast-enhanced CT/MRI is the standard method for the diagnosis of HCC and post-ablation monitoring, CEUS is useful when CT/MRI findings are indeterminate or CT/MRI is contraindicated. This article provides a practical review of the role of CEUS in imaging algorithms for pre- and post-ablation therapy for HCC.

  19. Contrast-enhanced MR venography of the head using magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo imaging. Comparison between head and body radiofrequency transmitter coil systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunobu, Satosi; Amanuma, Makoto; Tsukuda, Shunji

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the image quality and vascular selectivity of MR venography of the head using an magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo (MP-RAGE) technique when obtained with a body radiofrequency transmitter coil system. A total of 24 patients were imaged with a head or body radiofrequency (RF) transmission system. Subtraction MR angiography (MRA) was processed with 0.1 mmol Gd-DTPA administration, and signal-to-noise ratios of the vascular system were measured. Venous demonstration and selectivity were also assessed. MP-RAGE MR venography with a body transmission system showed almost the same signal intensity for the venous and arterial systems, resulting in nonspecific vascular demonstration, while the head transmission system showed semi-selective venograms owing to inflow-induced high signal on precontrast images. However, MRA with a body transmission system provided a 1.5- to 2.5-fold higher signal-to-noise ratios based on higher gradient performance and excellent demonstration of the head veins, especially those below the skull base. Although selective venography was difficult, MRA with a body transmission coil provided excellent vascular images of the brain. (author)

  20. Synthese und Charakterisierung amphiphiler Porphyrinoide als Kontrastmittel für das Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a diagnostic tool, which is commonly used in visualization of internal procedures in the living tissue. Used in visualizing procedures, MRI shows an increased contrast-enhancing effect in soft tissue in contrast to other techniques like computer tomography (CT). MRI does not need any ionizing radiation and provides three dimensional tomographic shots. One of the first commonly used porphyrin-based contrast agents was Gadophrin-2, which has a high affinity t...

  1. Kaposi sarcoma related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: hepatic findings on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Daniel Nobrega da; Viana, Publio Cesar Cavalcante; Maciel, Rosangela Pereira; Rocha, Manoel de Souza; Gebrim, Eloisa Maria Mello Santiago [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Inst. de Radiologia]. E-mail: dnobrega@gmail.com

    2008-03-15

    Kaposi sarcoma is a neoplasm associated with immunosuppressive conditions, and involving blood and lymphatic vessels. It is the most frequent intrahepatic neoplasm in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrate multiple small nodules, prominence and contrast-enhancement of periportal branches due to the presence of the neoplastic tissue. The authors report a case of a 47-year-old male patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome presenting disseminated Kaposi sarcoma. (author)

  2. Neurilemmoma of the glans penis: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dae Chul; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Sung Il; Kim, Sun Ho; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2006-01-01

    Neurilemmoma of the glans penis is rare, and no imaging findings have been reported. A case of neurilemmoma of the glans penis is presented. Ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a well-defined small mass in the glans penis. The mass appeared hypoechoic on gray-scale US and hypervascular on color Doppler US. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed high signal intensity of the mass on a T2-weighted image and strong enhancement on a contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image.

  3. Contrast-enhanced MR enterography as a stand-alone tool to evaluate Crohn's disease in a paediatric population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spieler, B.; Hindman, N.; Levy, J.; Zabrieski, K.; Sahlein, D.; Seuss, C.; Kim, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the performance of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone in the evaluation of Crohn's disease in comparison to all magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) imaging sequences together in an attempt to suggest limitation of the number of overall unenhanced sequences need for the follow-up evaluation. Materials and methods: Twenty-five paediatric patients (mean age 14.1 ± 3.7 years, male = 12, female = 13) underwent MRE at 1.5 T for evaluation of Crohn's disease. Two radiologists reviewed only contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in consensus on the first session. Whole images including unenhanced (steady-state free precession, single-shot fast spin-echo (HASTE), fat-suppressed T2-weighted) and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted sequences were reviewed in consensus during the second session with a 1 month interval, which was used as a reference standard. The readers evaluated the presence or absence of disease in 10 bowel segments in each patient. For the abnormal bowel segments, the readers then evaluated for active versus inactive disease and for the presence or absence of abscess. Sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy were calculated for detecting active inflammation. Results: There were 53/250 bowel segments with active inflammation using the reference standard imaging method. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for diagnosing active inflammation using contrast-enhanced images alone were 83.3%, 86.9%, and 84.9%. In five of the false-positive cases of detecting abscess from contrast-enhanced imaging alone, absence of abscesses was confirmed on the non-fat-suppressed HASTE images. Conclusion: The number of MRE sequences in paediatric Crohn's patients can be decreased while maintaining diagnostic accuracy using contrast-enhanced T1 and non-fat-suppressed HASTE images

  4. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cervical Cancers: Temporal Percentile Screening of Contrast Enhancement Identifies Parameters for Prediction of Chemoradioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Erlend K.F.; Hole, Knut Håkon; Lund, Kjersti V.; Sundfør, Kolbein; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi; Malinen, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically screen the tumor contrast enhancement of locally advanced cervical cancers to assess the prognostic value of two descriptive parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Methods and Materials: This study included a prospectively collected cohort of 81 patients who underwent DCE-MRI with gadopentetate dimeglumine before chemoradiotherapy. The following descriptive DCE-MRI parameters were extracted voxel by voxel and presented as histograms for each time point in the dynamic series: normalized relative signal increase (nRSI) and normalized area under the curve (nAUC). The first to 100th percentiles of the histograms were included in a log-rank survival test, resulting in p value and relative risk maps of all percentile–time intervals for each DCE-MRI parameter. The maps were used to evaluate the robustness of the individual percentile–time pairs and to construct prognostic parameters. Clinical endpoints were locoregional control and progression-free survival. The study was approved by the institutional ethics committee. Results: The p value maps of nRSI and nAUC showed a large continuous region of percentile–time pairs that were significantly associated with locoregional control (p < 0.05). These parameters had prognostic impact independent of tumor stage, volume, and lymph node status on multivariate analysis. Only a small percentile–time interval of nRSI was associated with progression-free survival. Conclusions: The percentile–time screening identified DCE-MRI parameters that predict long-term locoregional control after chemoradiotherapy of cervical cancer.

  5. Magnetic resonance tomography in syringomyelia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, D.; Treisch, J.; Hertel, G.; Schoerner, W.; Fiegler, W.; Staedtisches Rudolf-Virchow Krankenhaus, Berlin

    1985-01-01

    Thirteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of syringomyelia were examined by nuclear tomography (0.35 T magnet) in the spin-echo mode. In all thirteen patients, the T1 images (Se 400/35) showed a longitudinal cavity with a signal intensity of CSF. The shape and extent of the syrinx could be adequately demonstrated in 12 of the 13 examinations. Downward displacement of the cerebellar tonsils was seen in eight cases. The examination took between half and one hour. Advantages of magnetic resonance tomography (nuclear tomography) include the absence of artifacts, images in the line of the lesion and its non-invasiveness. (orig.) [de

  6. Limits to magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, Paul; Mansfield, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The last quarter of the twentieth century saw the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grow from a laboratory demonstration to a multi-billion dollar worldwide industry. There is a clinical body scanner in almost every hospital of the developed nations. The field of magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM), after mostly being abandoned by researchers in the first decade of MRI, has become an established branch of the science. This paper reviews the development of MRM over the last decade with an emphasis on the current state of the art. The fundamental principles of imaging and signal detection are examined to determine the physical principles which limit the available resolution. The limits are discussed with reference to liquid, solid and gas phase microscopy. In each area, the novel approaches employed by researchers to push back the limits of resolution are discussed. Although the limits to resolution are well known, the developments and applications of MRM have not reached their limit. (author)

  7. Centrifugal (inside-out) enhancement of liver hemangiomas: A possible atypical appearance on contrast-enhanced US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartolotta, Tommaso Vincenzo; Taibbi, Adele; Galia, Massimo; Lo Re, Giuseppe; La Grutta, Ludovico; Grassi, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To report the prevalence and to describe the atypical centrifugal (inside-out) appearance of contrast-enhancement of liver hemangiomas on contrast-enhanced sonography. Materials and methods: Baseline and SonoVue-enhanced ultrasonography of 92 patients with 158 liver hemangiomas - considered atypical at grey-scale examination and confirmed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound follow-up - were reviewed in consensus by two experienced radiologists, who evaluated baseline echogenicity and the dynamic enhancement pattern of each lesion looking for the presence of central enhancing foci in the arterial phase followed by a centrifugal (inside-out) enhancement in the portal-venous and late phases. Results: After administration of SonoVue, 12/158 hemangiomas (7.6%) (size range: 1-7 cm; mean: 3.2 cm) in seven patients (5 women, 2 men; age range: 34-71 years, mean: 50.8 years) showed a central enhancing focus in the arterial phase followed by a centrifugal enhancement in the portal-venous and late phases. In all cases centrifugal enhancement was incomplete at contrast-enhanced sonography, whereas computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging were able to depict a complete and homogeneous fill-in. Conclusion: Radiologist should be aware that centrifugal (inside-out) appearance on contrast-enhanced sonography is a rare but possible feature of liver hemangioma

  8. Centrifugal (inside-out) enhancement of liver hemangiomas: A possible atypical appearance on contrast-enhanced US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolotta, Tommaso Vincenzo [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, Via Del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: tv.bartolotta@unipa.it; Taibbi, Adele [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, Via Del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: taibbi_adele@yahoo.it; Galia, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, Via Del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: mgalia@yahoo.com; Lo Re, Giuseppe [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, Via Del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: giuseppe.lore12@tin.it; La Grutta, Ludovico [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, Via Del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: lagrutta@mbox.infcom.it; Grassi, Roberto [Institute of Radiology, Second University of Naples, Piazza Miraglia, 80138 Naples (Italy)], E-mail: roberto.grassi@libero.it; Midiri, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of Palermo, Via Del Vespro 127, 90127 Palermo (Italy)], E-mail: mmidiri@hotmail.com

    2007-12-15

    Objective: To report the prevalence and to describe the atypical centrifugal (inside-out) appearance of contrast-enhancement of liver hemangiomas on contrast-enhanced sonography. Materials and methods: Baseline and SonoVue-enhanced ultrasonography of 92 patients with 158 liver hemangiomas - considered atypical at grey-scale examination and confirmed by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound follow-up - were reviewed in consensus by two experienced radiologists, who evaluated baseline echogenicity and the dynamic enhancement pattern of each lesion looking for the presence of central enhancing foci in the arterial phase followed by a centrifugal (inside-out) enhancement in the portal-venous and late phases. Results: After administration of SonoVue, 12/158 hemangiomas (7.6%) (size range: 1-7 cm; mean: 3.2 cm) in seven patients (5 women, 2 men; age range: 34-71 years, mean: 50.8 years) showed a central enhancing focus in the arterial phase followed by a centrifugal enhancement in the portal-venous and late phases. In all cases centrifugal enhancement was incomplete at contrast-enhanced sonography, whereas computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging were able to depict a complete and homogeneous fill-in. Conclusion: Radiologist should be aware that centrifugal (inside-out) appearance on contrast-enhanced sonography is a rare but possible feature of liver hemangioma.

  9. Magnetic resonance and its applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chizhik, Vladimir I; Donets, Alexey V; Frolov, Vyacheslav V; Komolkin, Andrei V; Shelyapina, Marina G

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a basic understanding of the underlying theory, fundamentals and applications of magnetic resonance The book implies a few levels of the consideration (from simple to complex) of phenomena, that can be useful for different groups of readers The introductory chapter provides the necessary underpinning knowledge for newcomers to the methods The exposition of theoretical materials goes from initial to final formulas through detailed intermediate expressions.

  10. Model-based, semiquantitative and time intensity curve shape analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a comparison in patients undergoing antiangiogenic treatment for recurrent glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavini, Cristina; Verhoeff, Joost J. C.; Majoie, Charles B.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Richel, Dick J.; Maas, Mario

    2011-01-01

    To compare time intensity curve (TIC)-shape analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) data with model-based analysis and semiquantitative analysis in patients with high-grade glioma treated with the antiangiogenic drug bevacizumab. Fifteen patients had a pretreatment

  11. Textural analysis of early-phase spatiotemporal changes in contrast enhancement of breast lesions imaged with an ultrafast DCE-MRI protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milenkovic, J.; Dalmis, M.U.; Zgajnar, J.; Platel, B.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: New ultrafast view-sharing sequences have enabled breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to be performed at high spatial and temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of textural features that quantify the

  12. Advantages of time-resolved contrast-enhanced 4D MR angiography in splenic arterial steal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obmann, Verena C; Chalian, Majid; Mansoori, Bahar; Sanchez, Edmund; Gulani, Vikas

    2018-03-07

    Splenic artery steal syndrome (SASS) is a severe complication affecting up to 10% of orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) patients. In this case report, we present a 35-year-old male with OLT secondary to liver failure due to hemochromatosis, who developed SASS. We describe potential application of different imaging techniques for diagnosis of SASS with focus on the value of time-resolved contrast enhanced 4D magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. What do we know about brain contrast enhancement patterns in neuromyelitis optica?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekcevik, Yeliz; Orman, Gunes; Lee, In Ho; Mealy, Maureen A.; Levy, Michael; Izbudak, Izlem

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system that usually presents with acute myelitis and/or optic neuritis. Recently, some brain magnetic resonance imaging findings have been described in NMO that are important in the differential diagnosis. Pencil-thin, leptomeningeal, and cloud-like enhancement may be specific to NMO. These patterns are usually seen during relapses. Recognizing these lesions and enhancement patterns may expedite the diagnosis and allows early effective treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the latest knowledge and to share our experience with the contrast enhancement patterns of NMO brain lesions. PMID:26615899

  14. Modeling Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Data with a Constrained Local AIF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Chong; Kallehauge, Jesper F.; Pérez-Torres, Carlos J

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aims to develop a constrained local arterial input function (cL-AIF) to improve quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data by accounting for the contrast-agent bolus amplitude error in the voxel-specific AIF. PROCEDURES....... RESULTS: When the data model included the cL-AIF, tracer kinetic parameters were correctly estimated from in silico data under contrast-to-noise conditions typical of clinical DCE-MRI experiments. Considering the clinical cervical cancer data, Bayesian model selection was performed for all tumor voxels...

  15. Ewing's sarcoma recurrence vs radiation necrosis in dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Khadrawy, A.M.; Hoffer, F.A.; Reddick, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose. We report a case of Ewing's sarcoma in the right distal femur in a 6-year-old male to demonstrate how dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DEMRI) findings predicted histopathology. Materials and methods. DEMRI was performed at presentation and during and after completion of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Histopathologic studies were done at presentation, at 77 weeks (20 weeks after a pathological fracture), and from the en bloc resection at 104 weeks. Results. DEMRI predicted the early tumor response, absence of tumor recurrence, presence of necrosis and lack of fracture healing, confirmed by histopathology. Conclusion. DEMRI is a clinically useful tool in managing Ewing's sarcoma. (orig.)

  16. Prospective Heart Tracking for Whole-heart Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghari, Mehdi H.; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop a prospective respiratory-gating technique (Heart-NAV) for use with contrast-enhanced 3D inversion recovery (IR) whole-heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) acquisitions that directly tracks heart motion without creating image inflow artifact. Methods With Heart-NAV, 1 of the startup pulses for the whole-heart steady-state free precession MRA sequence is used to collect the centerline of k-space, and its 1-dimensional reconstruction is fed into the standard diaphragm-navigator (NAV) signal analysis process to prospectively gate and track respiratory-induced heart displacement. Ten healthy volunteers underwent non-contrast whole-heart MRA acquisitions using the conventional diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with 5 and 10 mm acceptance windows in a 1.5T scanner. Five patients underwent contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA using a diaphragm-NAV and Heart-NAV with a 5 mm acceptance window. Results For non-contrast whole-heart MRA with both the 5 and 10 mm acceptance windows, Heart-NAV yielded coronary artery vessel sharpness and subjective visual scores that were not significantly different than those using a conventional diaphragm-NAV. Scan time for Heart-NAV was 10% shorter (p<0.05). In patients undergoing contrast-enhanced IR whole-heart MRA, inflow artifact was seen with the diaphragm-NAV but not with Heart-NAV. Conclusion Compared to a conventional diaphragm-NAV, Heart-NAV achieves similar image quality in a slightly shorter scan time and eliminates inflow artifact. PMID:26843458

  17. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Yousef W; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2012-01-01

    MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic......-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged...... intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, S.A.; Lerski, R.A.; Purdie, C.A.; Jordan, L.B.; Vinnicombe, S.; Martin, P.; Thompson, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75 %, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5 %, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U). IHC classifications using COM features were also similar for training and test data (training: 57.2 %, AUROC = 0.754; test: 57.0 %, AUROC = 0.750). Hormone receptor positive and negative cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. (orig.)

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis classification of primary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, S.A.; Lerski, R.A. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Medical Physics, Dundee (United Kingdom); Purdie, C.A.; Jordan, L.B. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Pathology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Vinnicombe, S. [University of Dundee, Division of Imaging and Technology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee (United Kingdom); Martin, P. [Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Department of Clinical Radiology, Dundee (United Kingdom); Thompson, A.M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Patient-tailored treatments for breast cancer are based on histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) may be useful in non-invasive lesion subtype classification. Women with newly diagnosed primary breast cancer underwent pre-treatment dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI. TA was performed using co-occurrence matrix (COM) features, by creating a model on retrospective training data, then prospectively applying to a test set. Analyses were blinded to breast pathology. Subtype classifications were performed using a cross-validated k-nearest-neighbour (k = 3) technique, with accuracy relative to pathology assessed and receiver operator curve (AUROC) calculated. Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to assess raw entropy feature values. Histological subtype classifications were similar across training (n = 148 cancers) and test sets (n = 73 lesions) using all COM features (training: 75 %, AUROC = 0.816; test: 72.5 %, AUROC = 0.823). Entropy features were significantly different between lobular and ductal cancers (p < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U). IHC classifications using COM features were also similar for training and test data (training: 57.2 %, AUROC = 0.754; test: 57.0 %, AUROC = 0.750). Hormone receptor positive and negative cancers demonstrated significantly different entropy features. Entropy features alone were unable to create a robust classification model. Textural differences on contrast-enhanced MR images may reflect underlying lesion subtypes, which merits testing against treatment response. (orig.)

  20. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R.P.; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K.; Dueber, Christoph [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, Claus-Peter [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Chest Clinic at University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberle, Balthasar [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Anesthesiology, Mainz (Germany); Inselspital, Department of Anesthesiology, Bern (Switzerland); Mayer, Eckhard [Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Department of Heart, Thorax and Vascular Surgery, Mainz (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH. (orig.)

  1. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension - assessment by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Kunz, R.P.; Oberholzer, Katja; Neeb, Daniel; Gast, Klaus K.; Dueber, Christoph; Ley, Sebastian; Heussel, Claus-Peter; Eberle, Balthasar; Mayer, Eckhard; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a severe disease that has been ignored for a long time. However, with the development of improved therapeutic modalities, cardiologists and thoracic surgeons have shown increasing interest in the diagnostic work-up of this entity. The diagnosis and management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension require a multidisciplinary approach involving the specialties of pulmonary medicine, cardiology, radiology, anesthesiology and thoracic surgery. With this approach, pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) can be performed with an acceptable mortality rate. This review article describes the developments in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques for the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Techniques include contrast-enhanced MR angiography (ce-MRA), MR perfusion imaging, phase-contrast imaging of the great vessels, cine imaging of the heart and combined perfusion-ventilation MR imaging with hyperpolarized noble gases. It is anticipated that MR imaging will play a central role in the initial diagnosis and follow-up of patients with CTEPH. (orig.)

  2. Comparison between breast MRI and contrast-enhanced spectral mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Heinze-Paluchowska, Sylwia; Hendrick, Edward; Dyczek, Sonia; Ryś, Janusz; Herman, Krzysztof; Blecharz, Paweł; Jakubowicz, Jerzy

    2015-05-12

    The main goal of this study was to compare contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with histopathological results and to compare the sensitivity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive values for both imaging modalities. After ethics approval, CESM and MRI examinations were performed in 102 patients who had suspicious lesions described in conventional mammography. All visible lesions were evaluated independently by 2 experienced radiologists using BI-RADS classifications (scale 1-5). Dimensions of lesions measured with each modality were compared to postoperative histopathology results. There were 102 patients entered into CESM/MRI studies and 118 lesions were identified by the combination of CESM and breast MRI. Histopathology confirmed that 81 of 118 lesions were malignant and 37 were benign. Of the 81 malignant lesions, 72 were invasive cancers and 9 were in situ cancers. Sensitivity was 100% with CESM and 93% with breast MRI. Accuracy was 79% with CESM and 73% with breast MRI. ROC curve areas based on BI-RADS were 0.83 for CESM and 0.84 for breast MRI. Lesion size estimates on CESM and breast MRI were similar, both slightly larger than those from histopathology. Our results indicate that CESM has the potential to be a valuable diagnostic method that enables accurate detection of malignant breast lesions, has high negative predictive value, and a false-positive rate similar to that of breast MRI.

  3. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography in patients with MRI contraindications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Vivien; Hatterman, Valerie; Preibsch, Heike; Bahrs, Sonja D; Hahn, Markus; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Wiesinger, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is a novel breast imaging technique providing comparable diagnostic accuracy to breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Purpose To show that CESM in patients with MRI contraindications is feasible, accurate, and useful as a problem-solving tool, and to highlight its limitations. Material and Methods A total of 118 patients with MRI contraindications were examined by CESM. Histology was obtained in 94 lesions and used as gold standard for diagnostic accuracy calculations. Imaging data were reviewed retrospectively for feasibility, accuracy, and technical problems. The diagnostic yield of CESM as a problem-solving tool and for therapy response evaluation was reviewed separately. Results CESM was more accurate than mammography (MG) for lesion categorization (r = 0.731, P < 0.0001 vs. r = 0.279, P = 0.006) and for lesion size estimation (r = 0.738 vs. r = 0.689, P < 0.0001). Negative predictive value of CESM was significantly higher than of MG (85.71% vs. 30.77%, P < 0.0001). When used for problem-solving, CESM changed patient management in 2/8 (25%) cases. Superposition artifacts and timing problems affected diagnostic utility in 3/118 (2.5%) patients. Conclusion CESM is a feasible and accurate alternative for patients with MRI contraindications, but it is necessary to be aware of the method's technical limitations.

  4. The nuclear magnetic resonance well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yumin; Shen Huitang

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the characteristic of the nuclear magnetic resonance logging is described at first. Then its development and its principle is presented. Compared with the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, the magnet techniques is the first question that we must solve in the manufacture of the NMR well logging

  5. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beemster, P.; Pes, P.L.; Wijkstra, H.

    2009-01-01

    Several imaging techniques can be used for visualization of the kidneys dependent on the indication. Ultrasound (US), computerized tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are most commonly used. US is a safe, relatively inexpensive, noninvasive, and widely available imaging method. It

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging at Rikshospitalet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.J.

    1990-01-01

    During the first 18 months of operations of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) unit at Rikshospitalet, 1453 NMR examinations have been performed on 1431 patients. 64% of the time has been devoted to examinations of the central nervous system and spine in children and adults, 9% of the time has been used on non-neuroradiology pediatric patients, while the rest of the time has been spent equally on ear, nose and throat, thoracic (including cardiac) and abdominal examinations in adult patients. The indications for doing NMR at Rikshospitalet are listed and discussed, and it is concluded that NMR has proved to be useful at several conditions in most organ systems. 15 refs

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging in psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.

    1993-01-01

    Diagnosis and research in psychiatry are increasingly availing themselves of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In comparison to computed tomography (CT), this offers the combined benefits of no exposure to radiation, high resolution, artefact-free display of structures near bone, and a sharp contrast between the grey and white brain matter, with freedom to select the section. With the exception of very anxious patients, MRI will gradually replace CT scans for a wide range of differential diagnostic investigations. Its superiority in systematic studies of psychiatric patients with discrete cerebral parenchyma lesions is already considered proven. This is illustrated on the basis of research into schizophrenia and alcoholism. (orig.) [de

  8. Advances in magnetic resonance 3

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 3, describes a number of important developments which are finding increasing application by chemists. The book contains five chapters and begins with a discussion of how the properties of random molecular rotations reflect themselves in NMR and how they show up, often differently, in other kinds of experiments. This is followed by separate chapters on the Kubo method, showing its equivalence to the Redfield approach in the cases of most general interest; the current state of dynamic nuclear polarization measurements in solutions and what they tell us abou

  9. Resonant and nonresonant magnetic scattering (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhan, D.B.; Hastings, J.B.; Kao, C.; Siddons, D.P.

    1992-01-01

    The tunability and the polarization of synchrotron radiation open up new possibilities for the study of magnetism. Studies on magnetic materials performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source are reviewed, and they fall into four areas: structure, evolution of magnetic order, separation of L and S, and resonance effects. In the vicinity of atomic absorption edges, the Faraday effect, magnetic circular dichroism, and resonant magnetic scattering are all related resonance effects which measure the spin-polarized density of states. The production and analysis of polarized beams are discussed in the context of the study of magnetism with synchrotron radiation

  10. Tunable Magnetic Resonance in Microwave Spintronics Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunpeng; Fan, Xin; Xie, Yunsong; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Tao; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Chui, Sui-Tat; Xiao, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance is one of the key properties of magnetic materials for the application of microwave spintronics devices. The conventional method for tuning magnetic resonance is to use an electromagnet, which provides very limited tuning range. Hence, the quest for enhancing the magnetic resonance tuning range without using an electromagnet has attracted tremendous attention. In this paper, we exploit the huge exchange coupling field between magnetic interlayers, which is on the order of 4000 Oe and also the high frequency modes of coupled oscillators to enhance the tuning range. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new scheme to control the magnetic resonance frequency. Moreover, we report a shift in the magnetic resonance frequency as high as 20 GHz in CoFe based tunable microwave spintronics devices, which is 10X higher than conventional methods.

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the prostate. Comparison of two different post-processing algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyersdorff, Dirk; Franiel, T.; Luedemann, L.; Dietz, E.; Galler, D.; Marchot, P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a commercially available post-processing software tool for detecting prostate cancer on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to compare the results to those obtained with a custom-made post-processing algorithm already tested under clinical conditions. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight patients with proven prostate cancer were examined by standard MRI supplemented by dynamic contrast-enhanced dual susceptibility contrast (DCE-DSC) MRI prior to prostatectomy. A custom-made post-processing algorithm was used to analyze the MRI data sets and the results were compared to those obtained using a post-processing algorithm from Invivo Corporation (Dyna CAD for Prostate) applied to dynamic T 1-weighted images. Histology was used as the gold standard. Results: The sensitivity for prostate cancer detection was 78 % for the custom-made algorithm and 60 % for the commercial algorithm and the specificity was 79 % and 82 %, respectively. The accuracy was 79 % for our algorithm and 77.5 % for the commercial software tool. The chi-square test (McNemar-Bowker test) yielded no significant differences between the two tools (p = 0.06). Conclusion: The two investigated post-processing algorithms did not differ in terms of prostate cancer detection. The commercially available software tool allows reliable and fast analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for the detection of prostate cancer. (orig.)

  12. Morphological image processing for quantitative shape analysis of biomedical structures: effective contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimori, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    A contrast enhancement approach utilizing a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing is introduced. The method is quantitatively evaluated and then applied to some medical images. Image processing methods significantly contribute to visualization of images captured by biomedical modalities (such as mammography, X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and light and electron microscopy). Quantitative interpretation of the deluge of complicated biomedical images, however, poses many research challenges, one of which is to enhance structural features that are scarcely perceptible to the human eye. This study introduces a contrast enhancement approach based on a new type of mathematical morphology called rotational morphological processing. The proposed method is applied to medical images for the enhancement of structural features. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated quantitatively by the contrast improvement ratio (CIR). The CIR of the proposed method is 12.1, versus 4.7 and 0.1 for two conventional contrast enhancement methods, clearly indicating the high contrasting capability of the method

  13. Leptomeningeal Contrast Enhancement Is Associated with Disability Progression and Grey Matter Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Makshakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal contrast enhancement (LMCE on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a newly recognized possible biomarker in multiple sclerosis (MS, associated with MS progression and cortical atrophy. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of LMCE foci and their impact on neurodegeneration and disability. Materials. 54 patients with MS were included in the study. LMCE were detected with a 3 Tesla scanner on postcontrast fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR sequence. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, number of relapses during 5 years from MS onset, and number of contrast-enhancing lesions on T1 weighted MRI were counted. Results. LMCE was detected in 41% (22/54 of patients. LMCE-positive patients had longer disease duration (p=0,0098 and higher EDSS score (p=0,039, but not a higher relapse rate (p=0,091. No association of LMCE with higher frequency of contrast-enhancing lesions on T1-weighted images was detected (p=0,3842. Analysis of covariates, adjusted for age, sex, and disease duration, revealed a significant effect of LMCE on the cortex volume (p=0.043, F=2.529, the total grey matter volume (p=0.043, F=2.54, and total ventricular volume (p=0.039, F=2.605. Conclusions. LMCE was shown to be an independent and significant biomarker of grey matter atrophy and disability in MS.

  14. Contrast-enhanced NMR imaging: animal studies using gadolinium-DTPA complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasch, R.C.; Weinmann, H.J.; Wesbey, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-DTPA complex was assessed as a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) contrast-enhancing agent by experimentally imaging normal and diseased animals. After intravenous injection, Gd-DTPA, a strongly paramagnetic complex by virtue of unpaired electrons, was rapidly excreted into the urine of rats, producing an easily observable contrast enhancement on NMR images in kidney parenchyma and urine. Sterile soft-tissue abscesses demonstrated an obvious rim pattern of enhancement. A focus of radiation-induced brain damage in a canine model was only faintly detectable on spin-echo NMR images before contrast administration; after 0.5 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA administration, the lesion intensity increased from 3867 to 5590. In comparison, the normal brain with an intact blood-brain barrier remained unchanged in NMR characterization. Gd-DTPA is a promising new NMR contrast enhancer for the clinical assessment of renal function, of inflammatory lesions, and of focal disruption of the blood-brain barrier

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Eiichiro; Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro.

    1989-01-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author)

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukai, Eiichiro [National Hospital of Nagoya (Japan); Makino, Naoki; Fujishiro, Kenichiro

    1989-06-01

    We have analyzed magnetic resonance images in 33 patients; 18 patients with Parkinson's disease, 1 patient with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia, 1 patient with pure akinesia, 6 patients with multiple system atrophy, 1 patient with flunarizine induced parkinsonism, and 4 patients with unclassified parkinsonism. The MR images were obtained using a 1.5-T GE MR System. A spin-echo pulse sequence was used with a TE of 30 msec and 80 msec and a TR of 2000 msec. No signal abnormalities were seen in any patient with Parkinson's disease but 3 showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Patients with diurnally fluctuating progressive dystonia and pure akinesia evidensed no abnormal findings. All six patients with multiple system atrophy demonstrated decreased signal intensity of the putamen, particularly along their lateral and posterior portions, and an enlarged substantia nigra. Atrophy of the pons and cerebellum was detected in all cases with multiple system atrophy. One case of flunarizine induced parkinsonism showed slightly decreased signal intensity of the putamen. Four cases of unclassified parkinsonism showed decreased signal in the putamen on T2-weighted sequences. Magnetic resonance imaging has the potential to become a useful diagnostic tool in the management of parkinsonism. (author).

  17. Migraine and magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Hougaard, Anders; Vestergaard, Mark B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation in the meth......Purpose of review: To present an updated and streamlined overview of the metabolic and biochemical aspect of the migraine pathophysiology based on findings from phosphorous (31P) and hydrogen (1H) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies. Recent findings: Despite of the variation...... in the methodology and quality of the MRS migraine studies over time, some results were consistent and reproducible. 31P-MRS studies suggested reduced availability of neuronal energy and implied a mitochondrial dysfunction in the migraine brain. 1H-MRS studies reported interictal abnormalities in the excitatory...... and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting persistent altered excitability in migraine patients. N-Acetylaspartate levels were decreased in migraine, probably due to a mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal energy metabolism. The reported abnormalities may increase...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Melanie M

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been recognized as one of the most important tools in medical diagnosis and research. However, MRI is also well placed to image chemical reactions and processes, determine the concentration of chemical species, and look at how chemistry couples with environmental factors, such as flow and heterogeneous media. This tutorial review will explain how magnetic resonance imaging works, reviewing its application in chemistry and its ability to directly visualise chemical processes. It will give information on what resolution and contrast are possible, and what chemical and physical parameters can be measured. It will provide examples of the use of MRI to study chemical systems, its application in chemical engineering and the identification of contrast agents for non-clinical applications. A number of studies are presented including investigation of chemical conversion and selectivity in fixed-bed reactors, temperature probes for catalyst pellets, ion mobility during tablet dissolution, solvent dynamics and ion transport in Nafion polymers and the formation of chemical waves and patterns.

  19. The Future of Contrast-Enhanced Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, Matthew F; Pizzitola, Victor J; Lorans, Roxanne; Pockaj, Barbara A; Northfelt, Donald W; Appleton, Catherine M; Patel, Bhavika K

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss facilitators of and barriers to future implementation of contrast-enhanced mammography (CEM) in the United States. CEM provides low-energy 2D mammographic images analogous to digital mammography and contrast-enhanced recombined images that allow assessment of neovascularity similar to that offered by MRI. The utilization of CEM in the United States is currently low but could increase rapidly given the many potential indications for its clinical use.

  20. Contrast Enhanced US in the Abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Ki Whang

    2012-01-01

    Contrast enhanced ultrasound, which was introduced in 1996, has been widely used in Europe and Eastern Asia. Ultrasound contrast agent can be classified as first generation and second generation, depending on the gas within the microbubble. With the first generation contrast agent, the high MI technique was used, and only intermittent scanning was possible due to destruction of the microbubble during scanning. Use of the second generation contrast agent with the low MI technique makes continuous scanning possible. Contrast enhanced US can be used in detection and differentiation of focal liver lesions. It is also helpful for monitoring of radiofrequency ablation and for targeting of US guided biopsy. Currently, because morphologic criteria alone may not reflect the response of the tumor to treatment, new criteria are needed for treatment evaluation after administration of anti-angiogenic agents. Contrast enhanced US could provide quantitative markers for evaluation of the response to treatment via use of dynamic contrast enhanced US. Due to cost-effectiveness, contrast enhanced US is not yet widely used in Korea; however, considering recent issues regarding contrast agent related adverse reaction, such as contrast induced nephropathy and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and radiation exposure, contrast enhanced US might be more widely used in Korea, as an alternative imaging modality in the future.

  1. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging: hazard, risk and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, Pradeep; Suri, S.; Singh, P.

    2001-01-01

    The hazard and risk associated with magnetic resonance imaging is a matter of concern. In 1982, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), USA issued guidelines to Hospital's Investigational Review Board (IRBs) in 'Guidelines for Evaluating Electromagnetic Exposure Risks for Trials of Clinical Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)'. In 1997, the Berufsgenossenschaft (BG), professional association for precision engineering and electronics of Germany, in their preliminary proposal for safety limits extended their concerns on static magnetic field. Owing to both time varying and static magnetic fields applied in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) this became of immediate concern to user community to assess the potential hazard and risk associated with the NMR system

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of Parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yusaku; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Akaneya, Yukio; Mitui, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Hisashi

    1991-01-01

    We studied eighteen patients affected by Parkinsonism with symptoms of tremor, bradykinesia, or rigidity using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients ranged in age from 34 to 80 years (mean 62.8±11.6 years), and the duration of their disease had been 3.8±3.2 years. MRI examinations were performed with Shimazu and Siemens superconducting magnets, operating at 0.5 and 1.5 T magnetic fields, respectively. Both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted spin echo (SE) pulse sequences were used. In eight patients (44.4%), MRI demonstrated bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia. The most common abnormality identified was multiple, bilateral lacunar infarcts in the lateral portion of the putamen. The average size of the lacunar infarction of the putamen was less than half that of the entire putamen. Patients with multiple lacunar infarction were significantly older than the other patients and had lower Yahr's scores. The clinical symptoms of patients with bilateral multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia were compatible with the diagnosis of arteriosclerotic Parkinsonism of akinetic rigid type. It has been suggested that multiple lacunar infarction of the basal ganglia may have led to Parkinsonism in these patients. (author)

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.; MacDonald, J.; Hutchison, S.; Eastwood, L.M.; Redpath, T.W.T.; Mallard, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    A method of deriving three dimensional image information from an object using nuclear magnetic resonance signals comprises subjecting the object to a continuous, static magnetic field and carrying out the following set of sequential steps: 1) exciting nuclear spins in a selected volume (90deg pulse); 2) applying non-aligned first, second and third gradients of the magnetic field; 3) causing the spins to rephase periodically by reversal of the first gradient to produce spin echoes, and applying pulses of the second gradient prior to every read-out of an echo signal from the object, to differently encode the spin in the second gradient direction for each read-out signal. The above steps 1-3 are then successively repeated with different values of gradient of the third gradient, there being a recovery interval between the repetition of successive sets of steps. Alternate echoes only are read out, the other echoes being time-reversed and ignored for convenience. The resulting signals are appropriately sampled, set out in an array and subjected to three dimensional Fourier transformation. (author)

  5. Detection of cavernous transformation of the portal vein by contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Misun; Thimm, Matthew A; Guerrerio, Anthony L

    2018-06-01

    Cavernous transformation of the portal vein can be missed on color Doppler exam or arterial phase cross-sectional imaging due to their slow flow and delayed enhancement. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offers many advantages over other imaging techniques and can be used to successfully detect cavernous transformations of the portal vein. A 10-month-old female was followed for repeat episodes of hematemesis. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arteriogram (MRA) and portal venography were performed. Color Doppler exam of the portal vein was performed followed by administration of Lumason, a microbubble US contrast agent. Magnetic resonance arteriogram, CTA, and color Doppler exam at the time of initial presentation was unremarkable without obvious vascular malformation within the limits of motion degraded exam. At 8-month follow-up, esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a vascular malformation in the distal esophagus which was sclerosed. At 6 month after sclerosis of the lesion, portal venography revealed occlusion of the portal vein with extensive collateralization. Color Doppler revealed subtle hyperarterialization and periportal collaterals. CEUS following color Doppler exam demonstrated extensive enhancement of periportal collaterals. Repeat color Doppler after contrast administration demonstrated extensive Doppler signal in the collateral vessels, suggestive of cavernous transformation. We describe a case of cavernous transformation of the portal vein missed on initial color Doppler, CTA and MRA, but detected with contrast-enhanced ultrasound technique.

  6. Healing of the Achilles tendon in rabbits--evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wilson Campos; de Castro, Ubiratam Brum; Paulino, Eduardo; Vasconcellos, Leonardo de Souza; Madureira, Ana Paula; Magalhães, Maria Angélica Baron; Mendes, Daniel Victor Moreira; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Resende, Vivian

    2014-12-12

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could provide valuable findings for tendon regeneration. A non-invasive image method that can effectively evaluate the quality of the scar tissue has not yet been employed. Thirteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into two groups: group 1--non-treated control (n = 4); group 2--surgical intervention (n = 9). The central portion of the Achilles tendon was resected, and after 30 days, DCE-MRI was performed. Contrast enhancement methods were applied using the region of interest (ROI) technique. In the medium third of the Achilles tendon, the intra-substantial signal intensity and the presence of hyper-intense intra-tendon focus points and of signal heterogeneity were evaluated. Antero-posterior and transversal diameters of the tendon were measured. The Achilles tendon was removed and dissected free from other tissues. Sections from the central part of the tendon were stained for histological analysis. The difference between the contrast enhancement curves of the control and surgical groups (p tendon sheath, which presented irregular contours and intense contrast enhancement. On histology, the Achilles tendon presented diffuse widening of the tendon sheath and wedge-shaped areas with scarring tissue rich in disordered collagen fibres. These findings were related to alteration in the intra-substantial signal intensity, with hyper-signal focus points in the DCE-MRI. MRI with perfusion could be a useful technique for evaluating tissue and fibrous scarring in tendons.

  7. Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid enhanced magnetic resonance imagings in cardiomyopathic hamsters. Histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aso, Hiroko

    1995-01-01

    To assess the significance of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, the findings were correlated with histopathological findings in cardiomyopathic hamsters (Bio 14.6). In hamsters given 1 mBq of Gd-DTPA, autoradiography revealed uptake of Gd-DTPA corresponding to the fibrotic tissue. According to the degree of fibrosis and inflammation, the tissue was graded into three. The ratio of contrast enhancement in the fibrotic area to that in the normal area was significantly higher in grade 1 than grades 2 and 3, and in grade 2 than grade 3. Next, hamsters in various age groups were given 0.2 mmol/kg intravenously. In the age group of 2-5 month, contrast enhancement was homogeneously observed in the entire myocardium. In the age group of 8-10 years, it was entirely observed, partly with heterogeneous enhancement. In the age group of 11-12 years, contrast enhancement was not different from that in the normal hamsters. Histological examination revealed that fibrosis changed from grade 1 through grade 3 with advancing age. In conclusion, MR imaging for myocardiopathy showed signal intensity reflecting the fibrotic tissue. Contrast enhancement of MR imaging was stronger when much more inflammatory cells were involved and fibrotic tissues were filled with much more blood vessels. Thus MR imaging may be a promising tool for evaluating the severity of myocardiopathy. (N.K.)

  8. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Yousef W.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  9. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for perfusion quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Irene Klærke

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging, during bolus passage of a paramagnetic contrast agent, is used world-wide to obtain parameters that reflect the pathological state of tissue. Abnormal perfusion occurs in diseases such as stoke and tumour. Consequently, perfusion quantication could have signi cant...... clinical value both in diagnosis and treatment of such pathologies. One approach for perfusion quanti cation involves using the contrast mechanism that a ects the transverse relaxation rates of the magnetization, R2 or R 2 , since this provides the most pronounced effect. However, the linearity between...

  10. Contrast-enhanced MR 3D angiography in the assessment of brain AVMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unlu, Ercument; Temizoz, Osman; Albayram, Sait; Genchellac, Hakan; Hamamcioglu, M. Kemal; Kurt, Imran; Demir, M. Kemal

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the current reference standard for the diagnosis, assessment, and management of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic utility of three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and contrast-enhanced 3D MRA in patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in different sizes and locations. The AVM diagnosis was proved via DSA and almost half of the patients had also hematoma. Materials and methods: Two radiologists, experienced on neurovascular imaging and independent from each other, retrospectively reviewed two MRA techniques and DSA with regard to the assessment of feeding arteries, AVM nidus, and venous drainage patterns on 20 patients with 23 examinations by scoring system. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: An excellent agreement between contrast-enhanced MRA and DSA was found in order to assess the numbers of arterial feeders and draining veins (Spearman r = 0.913, P < 0.001). The average scores in contrast-enhanced MRA for feeders, nidi, and drainers were respectively 2.26, 2.69, and 2.48, while in TOF-MRA they are 1.96, 1.35, and 0.89, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to TOF-MRA, 3D contrast-enhanced MRA is useful for visualization by subtraction technique of malformation components presented by hematoma or by haem product. On the other hand, for the cases presented by slow or complex flow that is especially in around or nidi or around the venous portion is also advantageous because of the independence from flow-related enhancement. Therapeutic effects were clearly demonstrated in three follow-up patients. A major limitation of this technique is the low spatial resolution. Since there is such a limitation, arterial feeder of a case with micro-AVM is not detected by contrast-enhanced MRA and nidus for the same case was observed retrospectively. In this respect, we

  11. Contrast-enhanced MR 3D angiography in the assessment of brain AVMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unlu, Ercument [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey)]. E-mail: drercument@yahoo.com; Temizoz, Osman [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Albayram, Sait [Department of Radiology, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medicine School, Istanbul (Turkey); Genchellac, Hakan [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Hamamcioglu, M. Kemal [Department of Neurosurgery, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Kurt, Imran [Department of Biostatistics, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey); Demir, M. Kemal [Department of Radiology, Trakya University Medicine School, Edirne (Turkey)

    2006-12-15

    Background and purpose: Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is the current reference standard for the diagnosis, assessment, and management of brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic utility of three-dimensional (3D) time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and contrast-enhanced 3D MRA in patients with intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in different sizes and locations. The AVM diagnosis was proved via DSA and almost half of the patients had also hematoma. Materials and methods: Two radiologists, experienced on neurovascular imaging and independent from each other, retrospectively reviewed two MRA techniques and DSA with regard to the assessment of feeding arteries, AVM nidus, and venous drainage patterns on 20 patients with 23 examinations by scoring system. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: An excellent agreement between contrast-enhanced MRA and DSA was found in order to assess the numbers of arterial feeders and draining veins (Spearman r = 0.913, P < 0.001). The average scores in contrast-enhanced MRA for feeders, nidi, and drainers were respectively 2.26, 2.69, and 2.48, while in TOF-MRA they are 1.96, 1.35, and 0.89, respectively. Conclusion: Compared to TOF-MRA, 3D contrast-enhanced MRA is useful for visualization by subtraction technique of malformation components presented by hematoma or by haem product. On the other hand, for the cases presented by slow or complex flow that is especially in around or nidi or around the venous portion is also advantageous because of the independence from flow-related enhancement. Therapeutic effects were clearly demonstrated in three follow-up patients. A major limitation of this technique is the low spatial resolution. Since there is such a limitation, arterial feeder of a case with micro-AVM is not detected by contrast-enhanced MRA and nidus for the same case was observed retrospectively. In this respect, we

  12. Added value of contrast-enhanced CISS imaging in relation to conventional MR images for the evaluation of intracavernous cranial nerve lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, Akiko; Takahashi, Ayako; Morita, Hideo; Amanuma, Makoto; Endo, Keigo [Gunma University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nucle