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Sample records for contrast knee arthrography

  1. Radiologic findings of double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hye Ran; Ahn, Byeong Yeob; Kim, Mi Young; Lee, So Hyun; Suh, Chang Hae; Chung, Won Kyun

    1990-01-01

    The double contrast arthrography of the knee is a highly accurate diagnostic modality in wide rage of the clinical disorders of the knee. It allows radiological assessment of the menisci, the articular cartilages, the synovium and the ligaments. The double contrast knee arthrography was performed in 356 cases at Inha hospital for about 3 years from June 1986 to June 1989. Among them, 115 cases were abnormal, and were analyzed clinically and radiologically with the back ground of the operative finding. The results were as follows ; 1. Of the 115 cases, male were 77 and female 38. Male exceeds female in the ratio of 2 : 1. 2. The age group of 20 - 39 years was commonly involved (60%). 3. The right knee was more commonly involved than the left and the medial meniscus tear was more common (61%). The posterior horn of the meniscus was more frequently torn than the other parts of the meniscus (42%). 4. The incidence of the bucket-handle tear was the most frequent (33%). 5. The cases of the popliteal cyst were 16 (13.9%), and the combined meniscus tears were in 4 cases (25%). 6. The numbers of the discoid meniscus were 9 (7.8%), and all were present in the lateral meniscus, and combined tears were in 4 cases (44.4%). 7. The diagnostic accuracy of the double contrast knee arthrogram was 82.7% compared with operative finding. The false positive examination were 17.3%

  2. Epinephrine inhanced double contrast knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Mun; Choi, Byung Ihn

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that double contrast knee arthrography is useful in diagnosis of meniscal lesions and other knee pathology. But intra-articular structures become less well delineated shortly after injection into the knee joint with water soluble contrast media because of rapid absorption and dilution of the injected media. This limits the time when sharply detailed arthrograms are obtainable and precludes repeat delayed arthrogram without reinjection of contrast media. In order to overcome this major disadvantage, the authors used epinephrine which has vasoconstrictive effect and is expected to reduce fluid movement across the synovial membrane temporarily. The authors attempted to compare epinephrine inhanced double contrast arthrographic group, epinephrine(+) group, to the double contrast arthrographic group without epinephrine, epinephrine(-) group, by statistical evaluation. Each group consisted of 35 cases and 7 lateral films of knee joint were taken sequentially 2, 6, 10, 15, 20, 30, and 60 minutes after injection of contrast media, and were assessed by 5 certified radiologists. The results were as follows: 1. The difference of mean score of quality between epinephrine(+) group and epinephrine(-) group was statistically significant at every time interval (ρ value < 0.01 at 2 minutes, ρ < 0.001 at all other time intervals). Epinephrine(+) group was superior to the epinephrine(-) group in quality of film. 2. Numbers of cases above score of 2 which was considered to be of diagnostic quality in evaluating meniscal lesions were larger in epinephrine(+) group than epinephrine(-) group at every time interval. And the difference between two groups was highly significant statistically (ρ < 0.001). 3. Only 43% of cases was above score of 2 at 10 minutes in epinephrine(-) group, but 97% at 10 minutes and 80% at 20 minutes respectively in epinephrine(+) group. Therefore duration for adequate study of arthrogram is prolonged more than two times in epinephrine(+) group

  3. Knee arthrography today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, H.; Kallenberger, R.

    1987-01-01

    The role of knee arthrography today is demonstrated and technical problems are discussed. Among a lot of variants the position of the patient and the choice of contrast media play a great part concerning the result of the examination. Mild complications occur in 0.25% of the examinations, severe and live threatening complications are extremely rare. Diagnosis of meniscal lesions is most important for knee arthrography; arthroscopy and arthrography are complementary examinations and not mutually exclusive, they achieve combined an accuracy of 97-98%. In the same way arthrography is able to evaluate the condropathy of the femoro-tibial joint, whereas accuracy of arthroscopy in the diagnosis of patellar chondropathy is much higher. There is a great reliability of arthrography regarding the evaluation of lesions of the capsule, but accuracy in lesions of the cruciate ligaments is low. Arthrography is very suitable for evaluation of Baker-cysts, since indications for almost occuring internal derangement of the knee are even available. Knee arthrography is a complex and safe procedure with very less discomfort for the patient; it has a central position in the evaluation of lesions of the knee. (orig.) [de

  4. Value of knee joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzsa, Gyoergy; Kiss Toth, Peter

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the literature and the analysis of 204 examinations, the method and clinical application of knee joint arthrography are reviewed. 50 out of the 54 operated cases were perfectly diagnosed. The double contrast knee joint arthrography can be applied to detect meniscus changes, popliteal cysts, synovial disorders and chondral defects. The effectiveness of arthrography and arthroscopy was compared and the introduction of the former in each county seat is suggested. (author)

  5. Combined nuclear and digital subtraction contrast arthrography in painful knee prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namasivayam, J.; Forrester, A.; Poon, F.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; McKillop, J.H.; Bryan, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    The evaluation of a painful knee prosthesis remains a difficult problem for both orthopaedic surgeons and radiologists. We have compared digital subtraction arthrography with nuclear-arthrography in 7 patients with a painful knee prosthesis. Three patients showed a loose tibial component, demonstrated by both digital subtraction and nuclear arthrography. All 3 underwent revision of their prosthesis. One patient had an equivocal digital subtraction arthrogram and negative nuclear arthrogram, while both studies were negative in the 3 remaining patients. Nuclear arthrography is a simple procedure and can provide useful additional information when combined with digital subtraction arthrography. (orig.)

  6. Clinical and radiological analysis on the double contrast arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol, Chang Hyo; Lee, Suck Hong; Moon, Tae Yong; Kim, Byung Soo

    1980-01-01

    The author has performed double contrast arthrography of knee in 96 cases at Busan National University Hospital for about 4 years from May 1976 to April 1980. The 31 cases of them were analyzed both clinically and radiographycally with the background of definite diagnosis confirmed by operation. The results are as follows. 1. Of the 31 cases, 25 cases were male (80.6%), and 6 cases were female (19.4%). Male exceeded female in ratio of 5 : 1. 2. 22 cases (70.1%) were distributed from 15 to 26 years of age. 3. The left knee joint was a more prevalent site. The ratio of left to right was 16 : 14. One case was bilateral. 4. In 17 cases (45.2%) of the 31 cases, there was a positive history of trauma. 14 cases had no specific history (54.8%). 5. The operative findings showed lateral meniscus lesion in 25 cases (80.6%): medical meniscus lesion in 2 cases (6.5%); discoid meniscus in 2 cases (6.5%); lateral menisectomy in 1 cases (3.2%); and lateral meniscus lesion with medial collateral ligament tearing in 1 case (3.2%). 6. In 25 cases of the 31 cases, the radiologic abnormal findings corresponded to the operative findings. 5 cases revealed somewhat different features with the operative findings. One case which showed no abnormal roentgenographic findings was found to have abnormality at operation. As a result, the diagnostic accuracy of arthrography was 96.8%

  7. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.; Engel, A. Jr.; Stiglbauer, R. Jr.; Prayer, L. Jr.; Hajek, P. Jr.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the diagnostic value of MR arthrography in the assessment of cartilaginous lesions, including osteochondritis dissecans. One hundred thirty-two knees of 125 patients were examined with MR arthrography performed on a 1.5-T magnet with a knee resonator. T1-weighted spin-echo and T2*-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequences were obtained after intraarticular administration of 40 mL of 2-mmol GD-DTPA solution. Seventy-five patients were also imaged without contrast agent. The description of the articular surface was classified into four types: I, normal cartilage surface and thickness; II, surface normal or slightly irregular; III, severe surface irregularities and cartilage defects; and IV, extensive cartilage defects, scar formation. MR findings were correlated with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy (n = 75)

  8. Accuracy of double-contrast arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Only in the diagnosis of medial meniscal lesions is double contrast arthrography superior to arthroscopy, provided that arthroscopy is carried out only from the anterolateral side (94% against 81% positive correlations). The rates in diagnosing lateral meniscal lesions are respectively 90% and 94.5%, in patellar chondropathy 55% and 99.5% respectively, and in diagnosting cruciate ligament lesions 69% and 97% respectively

  9. Accuracy of double-contrast arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thijn, C.J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Only in the diagnosis of medial meniscal lesions is double contrast arthrography superior to arthroscopy, provided that arthroscopy is carried out only from the anterolateral side (94% against 81% positive correlations). The rates in diagnosing lateral meniscal lesions are respectively 90% and 94.5%, in patellar chondropathy 55% and 99.5% respectively, and in diagnosting cruciate ligament lesions 69% and 97% respectively. (orig.)

  10. Value and limits of knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischedick, O.

    1981-01-01

    In the view of modern knowledges of biomechanic of the knee and the introduce of arthroscopy, the possibilities of arthrography will be discussed. The value of arthrography is not reduced, especially for the cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopy should follow arthrography in uncertain cases. (orig.) [de

  11. Anterior approach for knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurlo, J.V.; Towers, J.D.; Golla, S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To develop a new method of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) of the knee using an anterior approach analogous to the portals used for knee arthroscopy.Design. An anterior approach to the knee joint was devised mimicking anterior portals used for knee arthroscopy. Seven patients scheduled for routine knee MRA were placed in a decubitus position and under fluoroscopic guidance a needle was advanced from a position adjacent to the patellar tendon into the knee joint. After confirmation of the needle tip location, a dilute gadolinium solution was injected.Results and conclusion. All the arthrograms were technically successful. The anterior approach to knee MRA has greater technical ease than the traditional approach with little patient discomfort. (orig.)

  12. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J. Jr.; Engel, A. Jr.; Stiglbauer, R.; Prayer, L. Jr.; Hajek, P. Jr.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging which has gained increasing importance as a diagnostic instrument in orthopedics. The key to joint diagnostics - the evaluation of hyaline articular cartilage - however, has not been touched sufficiently by this development. Fundamental studies were done and 140 patients were examined with MR imaging after intraarticular administration of contrast agent. Hyaline cartilage, cruciate ligaments, and menisci were assessed before and after injection of a 2-mmol/L Gd-DTPA solution, and the results were compared with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy. MR arthrography provided superior image quality compared with plain MR imaging. This resulted in an improved delineation of intraarticular structures, especially of cartilage defects

  13. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real- ... methods of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast ...

  14. Scatter radiation exposure during knee arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, M.C.; Molloi, S.Y.; Yandow, D.R.; Ranallo, F.N.

    1987-01-01

    Knee arthrography, as performed at the authors' institution, was simulated and scattered radiation exposure to a radiologist's gonads, thyroid, and eye lens was measured with a sensitive ionization chamber. Results show that radiologists who regularly conduct knee arthrography examinations can incur doses to the gonads that are less than 6% of the U.S. limits, and to the thyroid and eye that are approximately 10% of the U.S. limits. Since the scatter radiation from overhead imaging of stress views constituted most (greater than or equal to 60%) of the dose to the lens of the eye and the thyroid, spot imaging was evaluated as a substitute for overhead imaging in the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament. This substitution resulted in no loss of clinical information and has now completely replaced overhead imaging of stress views at this institution

  15. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... felt to be inadequate in assessing a joint abnormality. There are several methods to perform direct arthrography. ... The procedure is most often used to identify abnormalities within the: shoulder elbow wrist hip knee ankle ...

  16. Arthrography in sport injuries of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, H

    1983-09-01

    The arthrography is one of the most important diagnostic methods of sport injuries of the knee joint. The examination must give an exact information to the surgeon; a good technique and standard X-rays are an absolute postulate. The submitted examinations are based on 6687 arthrographies during a period of 5 years. The arthrography should not be carried out before the acute symptomatology has ceased, usually after an interval of 2-3 weeks. Most frequent are the meniscus injuries by rotary traumas of the knee-joint. Football as the most popular sport is responsible for more than 50% of the injuries, followed by skiing, handball and jogging.

  17. Arthrography in sport injuries of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1983-01-01

    The arthrography is one of the most important diagnostic methods of sport injuries of the knee joint. The examination must give an exact information to the surgeon; a good technique and standard X-rays are an absolute postulate. The submitted examinations are based on 6687 arthrographies during a period of 5 years. The arthrography should not be carried out before the acute symptomatology has ceased, usually after an interval of 2-3 weeks. Most frequently are the meniscus injuries by rotary traumas of the knee-joint. Football as the most popular sport is responsible for more than 50% of the injuries, followed by skiing, handball and jogging. (orig.)

  18. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... No special preparation is necessary before direct arthrography. Food and fluid intake do not need to be ... to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or environmental agents. However, the contrast material used ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... the joint and appears on the MR images. As in conventional direct arthrography, the contrast material outlines the structures within the joint, such as cartilage, ligaments and bones, and allows them to ...

  20. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... conventional direct arthrography and may be supplemented by air to produce a double contrast CT arthrogram. CT ... tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... injected into the joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – ... also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast material injection into the joint. ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... injected into the joint. Arthrography may use computed tomography (CT) scanning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a ... also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast material injection into the joint. An ...

  3. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... thus allowing for enhanced imaging of small internal structures. This leads to improved evaluation of diseases or ... conventional direct arthrography, the contrast material outlines the structures within the joint, such as cartilage, ligaments and ...

  4. Clinical arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, R.; Horns, J.W.; Gold, R.H.; Blaschke, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This book deals with the method and interpretation of arthrography of the shoulder, knee, ankle, elbow, hip, wrist, and metacarpophalangeal, interphalangeal, and temporomandibular joints. The emphasis is on orthopaedic disorders, usually of traumatic origin, which is in keeping with the application of arthrography in clinical practice. Other conditions, such as inflammatory and degenerative diseases, congenital disorders and, in the case of the hip, arthrography of reconstructive joint surgery, are included. Each chapter is devoted to one joint and provides a comprehensive discussion on the method of arthrography, including single and double contrast techniques where applicable, normal radiographic anatomy, and finally, the interpretation of the normal and the abnormal arthrogram

  5. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is a type of medical imaging ... are the limitations of Direct Arthrography? What is Direct Arthrography? Arthrography is medical imaging to evaluate conditions ...

  6. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is a type of medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint conditions ... Direct Arthrography? What is Direct Arthrography? Arthrography is medical imaging to evaluate conditions of joints. It can either ...

  7. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... processes the imaging information is located in a separate room from the scanner. Other equipment necessary for performing arthrography include a variety of needles, syringes and a water-soluble contrast material. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ...

  8. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Direct Arthrography? What is Direct Arthrography? Arthrography is medical imaging to ... a computer using x-rays. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Arthrographic ...

  9. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, J.M.Z.; Fallon, M.; Breidahl, W.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Traditional plain film arthrography can achieve reasonable accuracy and is an accepted method of investigation of patients with knee pain and possible meniscal tear. Multi-detector CT can potentially provide a more detailed and accurate examination due to its high-resolution crosssectional and multi-planar capabilities. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of our technique. All patients who underwent a multi-detector CT knee arthrogram in an initial 8 month period were identified. Initially the referring clinician was contacted. If the patient was referred to an orthopaedic surgeon the outcome of orthopaedic review was recorded using clinical, arthroscopic and / or MRI follow-up of the patient population. One hundred and twelve patients had a Multi-detector CT knee arthrogram performed within and 8 month period. Follow-up information was received in 69.7% of patients. Of these 68.9% had orthopaedic assessment - of which 69.2% underwent a knee arthroscopy.There was total agreement of findings in 67%, agreement of meniscal findings in 67% and chondral findings in 100%. Overall, orthopaedic opinion agreed with CT findings in 76.9%. At this stage, all meniscal tears not described in the initial CT arthrogram report have in retrospect been visible. Multi-detector CT knee arthrography is an accurate and elegant technique for investigation of knee pain, providing information in a format familiar to those reporting knee MRI. There is an initial learning curve. The technique is particularly useful in chondral assessment. It is accurate for meniscal pathology, although caution and recognition of potential pitfalls is required. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  10. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... large film sheets (much like a large photographic negative). Today, most images are digital files that are ... limitations of arthrography? The limitations of arthrography include: Partial tears of the rotator cuff may not be ...

  11. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Z Direct Arthrography Arthrography is a type of medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies – especially ...

  12. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x- ... of arthrography? The limitations of arthrography include: Partial tears of the rotator cuff may not be detected ...

  13. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Your preparation may vary depending on which imaging method your exam will use. Tell your doctor if ... in assessing a joint abnormality. There are several methods to perform direct arthrography. Conventional direct arthrography of ...

  14. Mediopatellar phase of the knee: Comparative evaluation by arthrography and arthroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schouman-Claeys, E.; Dupont, J.Y.; Frija, G.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred consecutive knees were examined by arthrography and arthroscopy in a prospective study to determine the diagnostic value of arthrography in the detection and characterization of mediopatellar phase (nonpathalogic vs. pathologic). Statistical tests show that there are only two significant signs for the diagnosis of pathologic mediopatellar phase: length and thickness, No method is significantly superior for determining the pathologic character of the phase. This study demonstrated that compared to arthroscopy, arthrography has good sensitivity (86%) and excellent specificity (99%) for the detection of mediopatellar phase. The authors conclude that arthrography is as efficient as arthroscopy for the evaluation of the mediopatellar phase syndrome

  15. Accuracy of 3-Tesla MR and MR arthrography in diagnosis of meniscal retear in the post-operative knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magee, Thomas [NSI, Merritt Island, FL (United States); University of Central Florida School of Medicine, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2014-08-15

    This study assesses the accuracy of 3-Tesla (3-T) conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography in the diagnosis of meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The study also assess whether there are false-negative cases in which injected contrast does not extend into the meniscus despite a meniscal retear being seen on arthroscopy. One hundred consecutive knee MR arthrograms performed on patients with previous knee surgery were reviewed retrospectively. 3-T conventional MR imaging, 3-T MR arthrography, and the combined use of conventional MR and MR arthrography were assessed for meniscal retears as compared with arthroscopy. The criterion used to diagnose a meniscal retear on MR arthrogram was injected contrast tracking into the meniscus. All patients underwent second-look arthroscopy. Seventy-four patients had conventional MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear. In 83 of the 100 patients, intraarticular contrast helped in demonstrating a retear. In ten patients, there were MR findings consistent with a meniscal retear despite intra-articular contrast not tracking into the meniscus. Ninety-four of the 100 patients had meniscal retears on second-look arthroscopy. Three-Tesla conventional MR examination was 78 % sensitive and 75 % specific, MR arthrogram examination was 88 % sensitive and 100 % specific, and the combined use of MR and MR arthrogram imaging was 98 % sensitive and 75 % specific in the diagnosis of a meniscal retear. The combined use of 3-T MR and MR arthrography allows for high sensitivity and specificity in meniscal retear detection. In some patients, intraarticular contrast will not track into a meniscal retear. When MR findings are consistent with a meniscal retear but contrast does not extend into the meniscus, a meniscal retear is likely. (orig.)

  16. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... may be used to guide the procedure. Alternate methods of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following ...

  17. Double-contrast arthrography in recurrent dislocation of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faletti, C.; Vassoney, P.F.; Indemini, E.; Clerico, P.

    1988-01-01

    One hundred and ninety-three shoulder arthrographies were performed between 1979 and 1985 on patients affected by recurrent dislocations. The diagnostic doubt was cleared up in 162 cases (83%). Athrographic diagnosis was confirmed by pathological findings in 92% of the patients who underwent surgery. The double-contrast technique under local anaesthesia with anterior access is suggested, since it allows several arthrograms in different projections. Thus, an analytic study of the articular damage can be carried out. The patterns of each projection are briefly shown. Revision of case histories points out that: a) the use of arthrography should always be assessed on a clinical-radiological basis for each patients; b) there is no doubt as to the usefulness of this examination as a direct means of exploration, as far as the articular damage is concerned, not only as an aid to future surgery, but also in the follow-up of the results of the treatment in the long run

  18. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... a table on which the patient lies. The traditional MRI unit is a large cylinder-shaped tube ... MRI) - Shoulder X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Direct Arthrography Videos ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... preparation is necessary before direct arthrography. Food and fluid intake do not need to be restricted, unless ... a syringe to drain (or aspirate) the joint fluid, which may be sent to a laboratory for ...

  20. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... others nearby harm. These items include: jewelry, watches, credit cards and hearing aids, all of which can ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... guide the procedure. Alternate methods of direct arthrography examinations may also use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or ... the injection is typically monitored by fluoroscopy, the examination also commonly involves taking radiographs for documentation. These ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... CT arthrography and have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your ... and sometimes air are injected into the joint space while the radiologist observes with fluoroscopy or ultrasound. ...

  3. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... and possibly hear gurgling when the joint is moved. If your arthrography exam involves MR imaging: It is normal for the area of your body being imaged to feel slightly warm, but if it ...

  4. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... medical imaging to evaluate conditions of joints. It can either be direct or indirect. Indirect arthrography is ... virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor connected ...

  5. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... have MR or CT arthrography and have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want ... physician and technologist if they may be pregnant. Children younger than 13 may need to be sedated ...

  6. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... top of page How should I prepare? No special preparation is necessary before direct arthrography. Food and fluid intake do not need to be restricted, unless a sedative will be ...

  7. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... Videos related to Direct Arthrography Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  8. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... by the interpreting radiologist. Frequently, the differentiation of abnormal (diseased) tissue from normal tissues is better with ... Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting disease of the structures within the joints such as ...

  9. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the ... or copied to CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). CT direct arthrography uses the same ...

  10. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting disease ... cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit of an accurate diagnosis far outweighs the risk. ...

  11. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of ... or copied to CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). CT direct arthrography uses the ...

  12. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting ... used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries ...

  13. The failed postoperative shoulder: Role of double contrast CT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singson, R.D.; Feldman, F.; Bigliani, L.

    1986-01-01

    Various types of reparative and corrective operations on the shoulder joint are being increasingly undertaken. Defining residual, new, or acutely acquired pathology in the postoperative period is exceedingly difficult because of extensive surgical alterations. Since patients may be symptomatic or recurrently symptomatic postoperatively, judgments must be made regarding the failure of the initial repair, or new superimposed insults. CT double-contrast arthrography, performed in a series of symptomatic patients after shoulder arthroplasty for instability, successfully demonstrated responsible residual or recurrent pathologic processes, including persistent Bankart lesions, glenoid rim fractures, improper hardware placement, and migration of metallic hardware. These and other examples of pathology are illustrated and discussed

  14. Double contrast arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparini, D.

    1991-01-01

    From 1980 to 1989 the author performed 481 double-contrast arthrographic examinations of the shoulder (DCSA). A hundred and forty-two complete and 46 partial rotator cuff tears were demonstrated; 68 of them underwent surgical exploration. Results confirmed DCSA capabilities in detecting both their location (100%) and size (95%). Moreover, thickness (89%) and erosions (94%) in tendon edges and surfaces were demonstrated - that is, all the qualitative information needed to depict degenerative processes. Such evidence may also affect treatment planning

  15. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... your procedure. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for this examination consists of a ... in a separate room from the scanner. Other equipment necessary for performing arthrography include a variety of ...

  16. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... may help your physician determine the cause of chronic joint pain and what therapies may be effective. ... Benefits Direct arthrography is particularly effective for detecting disease ... Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries a risk of infection. The ...

  17. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... to Direct Arthrography Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  18. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. top of page What are the limitations of arthrography? The limitations of ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... copied to CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). CT direct arthrography uses the same type ... remains in a patient's body after an x-ray examination. X-rays usually have no side effects in the ...

  20. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... related pain or inflammation and provide physicians additional information about possible sources of pain. top of page How should I prepare? No special preparation is necessary before direct arthrography. Food and fluid intake do not need to be restricted, unless a sedative will be ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... The images can then be examined on a computer monitor connected to an image archive (PACS system) or printed or copied to CD. MRI does not use ionizing radiation (x-rays). CT direct arthrography uses the same type of ... by a computer using x-rays. top of page What are ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... be asked to wear a gown. What is Direct Arthrography? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  3. Single and double contrast arthrography in lesions of the glenohumeral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahovuo, J.

    1984-01-01

    One hundred and forty-five arthrograms from single and double contrast arthrography were compared with respect to their accuracy in revealing lesions of the glenohumeral joint. Total and partial rotator cuff tears were accurately delineated by both single and double contrast arthrography. The size of the tear did not correlate with surgical findings with either technique. The volume of the injected contrast medium was larger in full-thickness rotator cuff tears than in normal arthrograms (p 2 test). No difference in filling frequency of the sheath could be observed between single and double contrast arthrography. This study did not reveal any major advantages of double contrast arthrography over single contrast examinations in lesions of the rotator cuff and those of the tendon of the long head of the biceps brachii. (orig.)

  4. Spiral CT arthrography of the knee: technique and value in the assessment of internal derangement of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Vande B.C.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J. [Department of Radiology, Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium); Poilvache, P. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires St. Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)

    2002-07-01

    Computed tomography imaging has achieved excellent multiplanar capability and submillimeter spatial resolution due to the development of the spiral acquisition mode and multidetector row technology. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography (CTA) yields valuable information for the assessment of internal derangement of the joints. This article focuses on the value of spiral CTA of the knee in the assessment of the meniscus, anterior cruciate ligament, and hyaline cartilage lesions. Advantages and disadvantages of spiral CTA with respect to MR imaging are presented. (orig.)

  5. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... to identify abnormalities within the: shoulder elbow wrist hip knee ankle The procedure is often used to ... the setting of shoulder dislocation and in the hip, wrist and elbow. Exams involving x-ray imaging: ...

  6. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... identify abnormalities within the: shoulder elbow wrist hip knee ankle The procedure is often used to help diagnose persistent, unexplained joint pain or discomfort. In some cases, local anesthetic medications ...

  7. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... the possible need for treatment, including arthroscopy, open surgery or joint replacement. The procedure is most often used to identify abnormalities within the: shoulder elbow wrist hip knee ankle The procedure is ...

  8. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Kramer, J.; Stiglbauer, R.; Hajek, P.C.; Imhof, H.

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  9. Articular cartilage defect detectability in human knees with MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, A. [Orthopaedic Clinic, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Kramer, J. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Stiglbauer, R. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hajek, P.C. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [MR-Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    1993-04-01

    One hundred and thirteen knee joints were examined, of which 48 showed damage of the hyaline cartilage in one or more locations. For the evaluation of the magnetic resonance (MR) arthrographic images we used the macroscopic staging according to Outerbridge, the defect staging according to Bauer, as well as a new MR-arthrographic staging. The results of the evaluation were compared with the surgical findings in 61 knee joints. This revealed a sensitivity of 86 %, a specificity of 100 % and accuracy of 90 %. All lesions that could not be classified on MR-arthrography were of stage-I chondromalacia. (orig.)

  10. Shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography needle placement using fluoroscopic guidance: practice patterns of musculoskeletal radiologists in North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, Conor P.; Morrison, William B.; Deely, Diane M.; Gopez, Angela G.; Zoga, Adam C.; Roberts, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the range of techniques used by radiologists performing shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography using fluoroscopic guidance. Questionnaires on shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography were distributed to radiologists at a national radiology meeting. We enquired regarding years of experience, preferred approaches, needle gauge, gadolinium dilution, and volume injected. For each approach, the radiologist was asked their starting and end needle position based on a numbered and lettered grid superimposed on a radiograph. Sixty-eight questionnaires were returned. Sixty-eight radiologists performed shoulder and hip arthrography, and 65 performed knee arthrograms. Mean experience was 13.5 and 12.8 years, respectively. For magnetic resonance arthrography, a gadolinium dilution of 1/200 was used by 69-71%. For shoulder arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 65/68 (96%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and posterior approaches, was immediately lateral to the humeral cortex. A 22-gauge needle was used by 46/66 (70%). Mean injected volume was 12.7 ml (5-30). For hip arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 51/68 (75%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and lateral approaches, was along the lateral femoral head/neck junction. A 22-gauge needle was used by 53/68 (78%). Mean injected volume was 11.5 ml (5-20). For knee arthrography, a lateral approach was preferred by 41/64 (64%). The most common site of needle end position, for lateral and medial approaches, was mid-patellofemoral joint level. A 22-gauge needle was used by 36/65 (56%). Mean injected volume was 28.2 ml (5-60). Arthrographic approaches for the shoulder, hip, and knee vary among radiologists over a wide range of experience levels. (orig.)

  11. Shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography needle placement using fluoroscopic guidance: practice patterns of musculoskeletal radiologists in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shortt, Conor P. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Morrison, William B.; Deely, Diane M.; Gopez, Angela G.; Zoga, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Roberts, Catherine C. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the range of techniques used by radiologists performing shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography using fluoroscopic guidance. Questionnaires on shoulder, hip, and knee arthrography were distributed to radiologists at a national radiology meeting. We enquired regarding years of experience, preferred approaches, needle gauge, gadolinium dilution, and volume injected. For each approach, the radiologist was asked their starting and end needle position based on a numbered and lettered grid superimposed on a radiograph. Sixty-eight questionnaires were returned. Sixty-eight radiologists performed shoulder and hip arthrography, and 65 performed knee arthrograms. Mean experience was 13.5 and 12.8 years, respectively. For magnetic resonance arthrography, a gadolinium dilution of 1/200 was used by 69-71%. For shoulder arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 65/68 (96%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and posterior approaches, was immediately lateral to the humeral cortex. A 22-gauge needle was used by 46/66 (70%). Mean injected volume was 12.7 ml (5-30). For hip arthrography, an anterior approach was preferred by 51/68 (75%). The most common site of needle end position, for anterior and lateral approaches, was along the lateral femoral head/neck junction. A 22-gauge needle was used by 53/68 (78%). Mean injected volume was 11.5 ml (5-20). For knee arthrography, a lateral approach was preferred by 41/64 (64%). The most common site of needle end position, for lateral and medial approaches, was mid-patellofemoral joint level. A 22-gauge needle was used by 36/65 (56%). Mean injected volume was 28.2 ml (5-60). Arthrographic approaches for the shoulder, hip, and knee vary among radiologists over a wide range of experience levels. (orig.)

  12. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... the area being examined by making it appear dark (or by electronically reversing the image contrast to ... On very rare occasions, a few patients experience side effects from the contrast material, including nausea, headache ...

  13. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or environmental agents. However, the contrast material used for an ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ...

  14. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... allergy to iodine or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or environmental agents. However, the contrast material ... are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses ...

  15. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... ray called fluoroscopy to guide and evaluate the injection of iodine contrast material directly into the joint. ... MRI) or computed tomography (CT) following contrast material injection into the joint. An x-ray (radiograph) is ...

  16. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... illnesses, medical conditions, medications you’re taking, and allergies – especially to contrast materials. Leave jewelry at home ... and if you have any kidney problems or allergies, especially to iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast materials. ...

  17. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... fluoroscopy to guide and evaluate the injection of iodine contrast material directly into the joint. In some ... joints and internal organs in real time. When iodine contrast is injected into the joint, it fills ...

  18. Shoulder arthrography: comparison of morbidity after use of various contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, F.M.; Goldberg, R.P.; Wyshak, G.; Kilcoyne, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    This prospective study compares immediate and delayed patient discomfort in 177 patients following shoulder arthrography using intraarticular combinations of metrizamide, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, meglumine diatrizoate, lidocaine, epinephrine, and air. Patients receiving conventional ionic monomeric positive contrast media had a 60% (90/150) incidence of moderate or severe delayed exacerbation of their baseline symptoms; only 14% (3/21) of patients receiving metrizamide, a nonionic contrast medium had similar levels of postprocedural discomfort. Morbidity was somewhat diminished with the use of double-contrast (45%, 34/75) rather than single-contrast (75%, 56/75) examinations, and with avoidance of sodium-containing contrast agents or epinephrine. Nonionic or monovalent polymeric contrast media, despite their present high cost, may be the agents of choice if single-contrast arthrography is performed in joints associated with a high incidence of postprocedural pain

  19. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection for MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Soo Jin; Lee, Jong Min; Kang, Duck Sick

    2005-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography. Between June 2002 and October 2004, 132 patients (29 female, 103 male: mean age, 33.6 years) underwent ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast media injection (40 ml saline + 10 ml 2% lidocaine + 0.2 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine + 0.4 ml epinephrine) for MR arthrography. The patients were classified into four groups, viz. the no leakage group, the minor leakage with successful intraarticular injection group, the major leakage with unsuccessful intraarticular injection group, and the injection failure group. The 'no leakage' and 'minor leakage' groups were considered to be technical successes, while the 'major leakage' and 'injection failure' groups were regarded as technical failures. The technical success rate of ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR Arthrography was 99.2% (131/132 patients) and one patients 0.7% (1/132 patients) was included in the 'major leakage' group. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular contrast injection using the posterior approach for MR arthrography was feasible with a high success rate

  20. Arthrography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... might be obscured by bone with other imaging methods. The contrast material used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast materials used for conventional x-rays and CT scanning. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated carries ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... or x-ray contrast material, drugs, food, or environmental agents. However, the contrast material used for an MRI exam, called gadolinium, does not contain iodine and is less likely to cause side effects or an allergic reaction. Tell the radiologist if ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... re taking, and allergies – especially to contrast materials. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... and help to determine the possible need for treatment, including arthroscopy, open surgery or joint replacement. The ...

  3. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... re taking, and allergies – especially to contrast materials. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... and help to determine the possible need for treatment, including arthroscopy, ... work pens, pocket knives and eyeglasses body piercings ...

  4. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... pressure or even pain when the needle is advanced into the joint. Inform the radiologist performing the ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a ...

  5. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... from that used for x-ray; it contains gadolinium, which affects the local magnetic field within the ... kidney problems or allergies, especially to iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast materials. Also, inform your doctor about ...

  6. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... include a variety of needles, syringes and a water-soluble contrast material. top of page How does ... the setting of shoulder dislocation and in the hip, wrist and elbow. Exams involving x-ray imaging: ...

  7. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... examination also commonly involves taking radiographs for documentation. These images are most often stored and viewed electronically. ... into the joint along with the contrast material. These medications may temporarily decrease joint-related pain or ...

  8. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... one or two x-ray tubes and a television-like monitor that is located in the examining ... that are projected onto a fluorescent screen, or television-like monitor. When used with a contrast material, ...

  9. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... joint thus allowing for enhanced imaging of small internal structures. This leads to improved evaluation of diseases ... makes it possible to see bones, joints and internal organs in real time. When iodine contrast is ...

  10. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... the area being examined by making it appear dark (or by electronically reversing the image contrast to ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  11. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Musculoskeletal Radiation Dose in X-Ray and CT Exams Contrast Materials Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Shoulder X-ray, ...

  12. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... used in MRI exams is less likely to produce an allergic reaction than the iodine-based contrast ...

  13. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... evaluate and diagnose joint conditions and unexplained pain. It is very effective at detecting disease within the ligaments, tendons and cartilage. It may be indirect, where contrast material is injected ...

  14. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... problems or allergies, especially to iodinated or gadolinium-based contrast materials. Also, inform your doctor about recent ... and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced ...

  15. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray. Your preparation may vary depending on ... see bones, joints and internal organs in real time. When iodine contrast is injected into the joint, ...

  16. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... at detecting disease within the ligaments, tendons and cartilage. It may be indirect, where contrast material is ... outlines the structures within the joint, such as cartilage, ligaments and bones, and allows them to be ...

  17. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... which contrast material is injected into the blood stream and eventually absorbs into the joint. With direct ... your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ...

  18. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help you pass the time. In some cases, intravenous injection of contrast material ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a contrast injection minimizes the risk of this very rare complication. There is a ...

  20. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... of irritation of your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic taste in their mouth after the contrast injection. If you do not ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... the area being examined by making it appear dark (or by electronically reversing the image contrast to ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

  2. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... allergies – especially to contrast materials. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be ... Jewelry and other accessories should be left at home, if possible, or removed prior to the MRI ...

  3. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... to numb the joint area. You may feel pressure or even pain when the needle is advanced ... believed to be caused by the injection of high doses of gadolinium-based contrast material in patients ...

  4. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... contrast material in patients with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a ...

  5. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... pass through them. As a result, bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up ... or by electronically reversing the image contrast to white), this special x-ray technique makes it possible ...

  6. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given MRI or CT arthrogram contrast material. If ... you may want to ask your physician about being sedated prior to the scheduled examination. Jewelry and ...

  7. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray. Your preparation may vary depending on ... to see bones, joints and internal organs in real time. When iodine contrast is injected into the joint, ...

  8. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... recently had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given MRI or ... with very poor kidney function. Careful assessment of kidney function before considering a contrast ... be used for any purpose other than this referral.

  9. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... include a variety of needles, syringes and a water-soluble contrast material. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part ...

  10. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... electronically reversing the image contrast to white), this special x-ray technique makes it possible for the physician to view joints or internal organs in motion. Still images or movies are also captured and stored electronically on a ...

  11. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... include a variety of needles, syringes and a water-soluble contrast material. top of page How does ... physician will be available for immediate assistance. A Word About ... of the cartilage, which can be found inside and along the edges of some joints, ...

  12. Infrapatellar plica of the knee: Revisited with MR arthrographies undertaken in the knee flexion position mimicking operative arthroscopic posture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Han; Song, Ho-Taek; Kim, Sungjun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Jae [Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Arthroscopic Surgery Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To describe the appearance of the infrapatellar plica (IPP) on magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) taken in 70° knee flexion, corresponding to the arthroscopic posture. Materials and methods: Twenty-two patients (23 knee joints) who underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion were enrolled. All patients underwent MRA with 70° knee flexion to simulate operative arthroscopy. The images included fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin echo axial, sagittal, and coronal images. The visualization and morphology of the IPP were retrospectively assessed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Results: The IPP was demonstrated in 78.3% (n = 18/23) and was best visualized on the sagittal section through the intercondylar notch. The IPP manifested as a linear hypointense structure with variable thicknesses. The intercondylar component was delineated clearly, arising from the anterior intercondylar notch in parallel with the ACL and curving gently downward to attach to the infrapatellar fat pad. On the other hand, the Hoffa's fat pad component was not depicted clearly. The morphology of the IPP was either a separate type (60.9%) or a split type (17.4%). Conclusion: The IPPs can be visualized with a high rate of detection and various morphologic appearances must be appreciated under the review of a flexed knee MRA.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of positive contrast and nuclear arthrography in patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swan, J.S.; Braunstein, E.M.; Capello, W.; Wellman, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have compared the cost effectiveness of contrast arthrography (CA) and nuclear arthrography (NA), in which In-111 chloride is injected with the contrast material, of total hip arthroplasties. Their series included 48 cases of surgically proved loose femoral components. The cost per true-positive result was obtained by taking the total cost of the examinations in surgically proved cases and dividing by the number of true-position cases. The cost of CA was $297 and the cost of NA was $335. For CA, the cost per true positive was $1,018, and for the NA the cost per true positive was $946. In spite of higher initial cost, NA is more cost effective than CA on a cost per true-positive case basis. NA is cost effective in evaluating hip arthroplasties in which there is suspicion of a loose femoral component

  14. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin-Wook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Kim, Seok-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2004-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Thirty-eight consecutive patients sho underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3%-96.7%, respectively and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3%-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities

  15. A radiological study of the patella and the cartilage of patella by computed tomography following double-contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh

    1987-01-01

    Recurrent subluxation or dislocation of the patella is a painful condition that frequently leads to chondromalacia or arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint. A radiographic evaluation of the patella and patella cartilage is important in the diagnosis of chondromalacia and mal alignment. Authors performed the patellofemoral joint CT following the double contrast arthrography in 53 patients with knee joint pains who had visited to Capital Armed Forces General Hospital from July to December, 1986. Authors analysed the shape and position of patella and the shape of patella cartilage. The results were as follows; 1. shape of patella:The most common types are type II/III (14 cases) and type III (14 cases). type III → IV-9 cases, type I-5 cases, type IV-5 cases, other type-4 cases, type II-2 cases, no type V. 2. position of patella:Only 2 cases showed subluxation and external rotation of patella. 3. shape of patella cartilage:a)congruous cartilage-21 cases (39.6%) b)regular cartilage-22 cases (41.5%) c)irregular cartilage-10 cases (18.9%) irregular imbibition of contrast media-7 cases localized loss of cartilage or erosion-2 cases thinning of cartilage-1 case 4. Fissure and erosions of cartilages in 3 cases were confirmed by operation and knee arthroscopy

  16. A radiological study of the patella and the cartilage of patella by computed tomography following double-contrast arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Joon; Yang, Seoung Oh [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-04-15

    Recurrent subluxation or dislocation of the patella is a painful condition that frequently leads to chondromalacia or arthrosis of the patellofemoral joint. A radiographic evaluation of the patella and patella cartilage is important in the diagnosis of chondromalacia and mal alignment. Authors performed the patellofemoral joint CT following the double contrast arthrography in 53 patients with knee joint pains who had visited to Capital Armed Forces General Hospital from July to December, 1986. Authors analysed the shape and position of patella and the shape of patella cartilage. The results were as follows; 1. shape of patella:The most common types are type II/III (14 cases) and type III (14 cases). type III {yields} IV-9 cases, type I-5 cases, type IV-5 cases, other type-4 cases, type II-2 cases, no type V. 2. position of patella:Only 2 cases showed subluxation and external rotation of patella. 3. shape of patella cartilage:a)congruous cartilage-21 cases (39.6%) b)regular cartilage-22 cases (41.5%) c)irregular cartilage-10 cases (18.9%) irregular imbibition of contrast media-7 cases localized loss of cartilage or erosion-2 cases thinning of cartilage-1 case 4. Fissure and erosions of cartilages in 3 cases were confirmed by operation and knee arthroscopy.

  17. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important

  18. MR arthrography: how I do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankaoglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging has to rely on improving new various sequences and techniques and to get the best imaging quality so magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is one of the most important technique in the assessment of selected musculoskeletal disorders. It is now widely utilized and considered by most musculoskeletal radiologists and some orthopedists to be an integral part of their clinical practice. The technique include: desired degree of joint distension with contrast medium; markedly improved imaging quality of intra-articular structures with the direct delineation so improved detection of pathology with MRI. As appliance and technique of MR arthrography is completely based on traditional arthrography of X ray. In MR arthrography additional very little amount of Gadolinium based contrast agent is added to the desired mixture of contrast material injected to the joint. As in conventional radiography MR arthrography is used to get extra information for conventional MRI . Practically any joint that can be accessed by a needle can be imaged using MR arthrography but it has been applied to limited number of joints to compare with the traditional arthrography so shoulder, knee, wrist, elbow, ankle, and hip are mostly subjects to do in MR arthrography. The procedure is also less invasive and expensive rather than diagnostic arthroscopy and should carefully indicated because it is not completely noninvasive technique so previous imaging modalities and MRI of the patients should be completed and evaluated well. During or after the procedure there has been no major complication reported by so far but more than two third of patients are known to complain some degree of pain right after or several times later than the procedure. As it is more than twenty years now it has been widely accepted helpful for diagnosis and adds some extra sensitivity to conventional MRI . Up to this time MR arthrography has proven to increase sensitivity of conventional MRI in

  19. Positive contrast shoulder arthrography in dogs with uropolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goranov, N.; Philipov, J.; Stamoulis, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Positive contrast radiography of both shoulder joints with different concentrations of Uropolin (containing 1.6 g sodium amidotrizoate and 10.4 g meglumine amidotrizoate in 20 ml ampules; Polfa, Poland) has been performed in six dogs, divided into 3 groups. The first group was injected with 20% Uropolin, the second - with 30% Uropolin and the third - with 30% Uropolin and 0.2 ml 0.1% adrenaline hydrochloride. Shoulder radiographs were performed 2, 5 and 10 min after the injection of the contrast medium in mediolateral and craniocaudal views. The quality of radiographs was assessed visually using a four score system for five independent parameters in both views. The results showed a better quality of mediolateral radiographs 5 minutes after injection of 30% Uropolin (average score 12.5) compared to 20% Uropolin (average score 8.5), at p<0.05. The addition of 0.1% adrenaline hydrochloride to 30% Uropolin resulted in a better quality of arthrographs up to 10 minutes following the administration (average score 10 compared to 8.5 in the group with independent application, p<0.01)

  20. [Double-contrast arthrography in chondropathia patellae--clinical and experimental study on pathogenesis and diagnosis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, A; Hehne, H J; Rau, W S; Schlageter, M

    1979-10-01

    This study is based on the evaluation of 250 arthrographies of the patellofemoral joint ("défilé" arthrographs in Ficat's terminology) which were performed because of clinical suspicion of chondropathia patellae and which could be controlled intraoperatively in 30 cases, as well as on examinations employing an etching paste as used in metallurgy and performed on 20 knee-joints of corpses. 46% of the arthrographies showed a ridge-shaped cartilaginous thickening which was not pre-modelled in the osseous structure and which separated the medial facette into a paramedian and a marginal segment and correlated with chondromalacia to a greater degree than patellar dysplasias or secondary osseous changes. This variant, which could not be detected by plain roentgenography, must be considered as a pre-arthrotic deformity on account of the high point-shaped pressure load on the ridge. The findings were fully confirmed by macroscopic examination of the postmortem material.

  1. Optimization of the Contrast Mixture Ratio for Simultaneous Direct MR and CT Arthrography: an in Vitro Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ja Young; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kim, Na Ra; Jun, Woo Sun; Moon, Sung Gyu; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo; Choi, Jung Ah

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimal mixture ratio of gadolinium and iodinated contrast agent for simultaneous direct MR arthrography and CT arthrography. An in vitro study was performed utilizing mixtures of gadolinium at six different concentrations (0.625, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, 10 and 20 mmol/L) and iodinated contrast agent at seven different concentrations (0, 12.5, 25, 37.5, 50, 75 and 92-99.9%). These mixtures were placed in tissue culture plates, and were then imaged with CT and MR (with T1-weighted sequences, proton-density sequences and T2-weighted sequences). CT numbers and signal intensities were measured. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to assess the correlations between the gadolinium/iodinated contrast agent mixtures and the CT numbers/MR signal intensities. Scatter diagrams were plotted for all gadolinium/iodinated contrast agent combinations and two radiologists in consensus identified the mixtures that yielded the optimal CT numbers and MR signal intensities. The CT numbers showed significant correlation with iodinated contrast concentrations (r = 0.976, p < 0.001), whereas the signal intensities as measured on MR images showed a significant correlation with both gadolinium and iodinated contrast agent concentrations (r = -484 to -0.719, p < 0.001). A review of the CT and MR images, graphs, and scatter diagram of 42 combinations of the contrast agent showed that a concentration of 1.25 mmol/L gadolinium and 25% iodinated contrast agent was the best combination for simultaneous CT and MR imaging. A mixture of 1.25 mmol/L gadolinium and 25% iodinated contrast agent was found to be optimal for simultaneous direct MR arthrography and CT arthrography

  2. MR appearance of cartilage defects of the knee: preliminary results of a spiral CT arthrography-guided analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine signal intensity patterns of cartilage defects at MR imaging. The MR imaging (3-mm-thick fat-suppressed intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo images) was obtained in 31 knees (21 male and 10 female patients; mean age 45.5 years) blindly selected from a series of 252 consecutive knees investigated by dual-detector spiral CT arthrography. Two radiologists determined in consensus the MR signal intensity of the cartilage areas where cartilage defects had been demonstrated on the corresponding reformatted CT arthrographic images. There were 83 cartilage defects at spiral CT arthrography. In 52 (63%) lesion areas, the MR signal intensity was higher than that of adjacent normal cartilage with signal intensity equivalent to (n=31) or lower than (n=21) that of articular fluid. The MR signal intensity was equivalent to that of adjacent normal cartilage in 17 (20%) lesion areas and lower than that of adjacent cartilage in 8 (10%) lesion areas. In 6 (7%) lesion areas, mixed low and high signal intensity was observed. The MR signal intensity of cartilage defects demonstrated on spiral CT arthrographic images varies from low to high on fat-suppressed intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo MR images obtained with our equipment and MR parameters. (orig.)

  3. Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: A Prospective Randomized Study of Anterior and Posterior Ultrasonography-Guided Contrast Injections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, M.P.; Mustonen, A.O.T. (Dept. of Radiology, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-10-15

    Background: Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography is an accurate imaging method for internal shoulder derangements and rotator cuff pathologies. Both anterior and posterior contrast injection techniques, under palpatory, fluoroscopic, or ultrasonographic guidance have been described in the literature. However, clinical comparisons of the injection techniques remain few. Purpose: To compare the performance of anterior and posterior ultrasonography (US)-guided arthrography injections of the shoulder regarding patient discomfort and influence on diagnostic MR reading, and to illustrate the typical artifacts resulting from contrast leakage in the respective techniques. Material and Methods: 43 MR arthrographies were prospectively randomized into anterior and posterior US-guided contrast injections and performed by two radiologists, with the study of artifacts from contrast leakage. Pain from the injections was assessed by a survey utilizing a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: Of the 23 anterior injections, nine caused contrast artifacts in the subscapular tendon, and in three the leakage extended further anteriorly. Of the 20 posterior injections, 12 showed injection artifacts of the rotator cuff, extending outside the cuff in seven. Two of the anterior and none of the posterior artifacts compromised diagnostic quality. In posterior injections, the leakage regularly occurred at the caudal edge of the infraspinatus muscle and was easily distinguishable from rotator cuff tears. All patients completed the pain survey. Mean VAS scores were 25.0 (median 18, SD 22) for anterior, and 25.4 (median 16, SD 25) for posterior injections. The two radiologists achieved different mean VAS scores but closely agreed as to anterior and posterior VAS scores. Conclusion: Arthrography injections were fairly simple to perform under US guidance. Patient discomfort for anterior and posterior injections was equally minor. A tailored approach utilizing anterior or posterior injections

  4. Effects of iodinated contrast agent, xylocaine and gadolinium concentration on the signal emitted in magnetic resonance arthrography: a samples study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvana Lopes Pinheiro da Silva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of dilution of paramagnetic contrast agent with iodinated contrast and xylocaine on the signal intensity during magnetic resonance arthrography, and to improve the paramagnetic contrast agent concentration utilized in this imaging modality. Materials and Methods: Samples specially prepared for the study with three different concentrations of paramagnetic contrast agent diluted in saline, iodinated contrast agent and xylocaine were imaged with fast spin echo T1-weighted sequences with fat saturation. The samples were placed into flasks and graphical analysis of the signal intensity was performed as a function of the paramagnetic contrast concentration. Results: As compared with samples of equal concentrations diluted only with saline, the authors have observed an average signal intensity decrease of 20.67% for iodinated contrast agent, and of 28.34% for xylocaine. However, the increased gadolinium concentration in the samples caused decrease in signal intensity with all the dilutions. Conclusion: Minimizing the use of iodinated contrast media and xylocaine and/or the use of a gadolinium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L diluted in saline will improve the sensitivity of magnetic resonance arthrography.

  5. Normal anatomy and pathological changes of the infrapatellar pad of fat in double contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehnke, E.

    1980-01-01

    The diagnostic validity of double-contrast angiography in patients with Hoffa's disease was studied by re-evaluation of 1566 arthrographs without knowing the surgical findings. In order to obtain more information on the anatomy and pathology of the intrapatellar pad of fat, so knee joints of corpses were dissected who had died at different stages of life. As the studies showed, the decisive diagnostic factors in Hoffa's disease are the clinical complaints and an enlarged pad of fat in the arthrographic picture. (orig.) [de

  6. The significance of arthrography and arthroscopy in the diagnosis of meniscus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, H.; Linder, J.; Petzold, M.V.; Meyne, K.; Doerges, J.; Evangelisches Krankenhaus Goettingen

    1981-01-01

    The article reports on 364 double-contrast arthrographics and 185 arthroscopies.The results obtained in 126 patients in whom both arthrography and arthroscopy had been conducted, were compared. It became evident that arthrography is of high informative value in the diagnosis of lesions of the meniscus, so that preference may well be given to this method in non-specific knee-joint complaints where meniscopathy is suspected. Arthroscopies are indicated in cases of clinico-arthrographic coubt. Trial arthrotomy for clarifying doubtful meniscus lesions without previous exploitation of all arthrographic/arthroscopic possibilities is no longer justified and should be abandoned. Arthroscopy is definitely superior to arthrography in the diagnosis of, in particular, cartilage structures, of the synovia and of the retropatellar space. It is here where arthrography has its narrow limitations - now and in the future - for methodical reasons. (orig.) [de

  7. Chondromalacia of the knee: evaluation with a fat-suppression three-dimensional SPGR imaging after intravenous contrast injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, J S; Cho, J H; Shin, K H; Kim, S J

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-one MRI studies with a fat-suppression three-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled echo in a steady state (3D SPGR) pulse sequence after intravenous contrast injection were evaluated to assess the accuracy in depicting chondromalacia of the knee. On the basis of MR images, chondromalacia and its grade were determined in each of five articular cartilage regions (total, 105 regions) and then the results were compared to arthroscopic findings. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MRI were 70%, 99%, and 93%, respectively. MR images depicted 7 of 11 lesions of arthroscopic grade 1 or 2 chondromalacia, and seven of nine lesions of arthroscopic grade 3 or 4 chondromalacia. The cartilage abnormalities in all cases appeared as focal lesions with high signal intensity. Intravenous contrast-injection, fat-suppression 3D SPGR imaging showed high specificity in excluding cartilage abnormalities and may be considered as an alternative to intra-articular MR arthrography when chondromalacia is suspected.

  8. Conventional angiography in comparison with magnetic resonance tomography and arthroscopy for the diagnosis of knee joint lesion - specific indications?; Die konventionelle Arthrographie im Vergleich zu Magnetresonanztomographie und Arthroskopie bei Kniegelenkbinnenlaesionen: Verbleiben Indikationen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Steglitz, Radiologische Klinik, Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin, FU Berlin (Germany); Andresen, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Steglitz, Radiologische Klinik, Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin, FU Berlin (Germany); Radmer, S. [Orthopaedisches Institut, Berlin (Germany); Schmidt, M. [Krankenhaus Moabit, Roentgenabteilung, Berlin (Germany); Wolf, K.J. [Universitaetsklinikum Steglitz, Radiologische Klinik, Abt. fuer Roentgendiagnostik und Nuklearmedizin, FU Berlin (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Twenty-one patients with suspected internal knee joint lesions were examined prospectively. In all patients an MRI was carried out first and was followed within two weeks by an arthrography and an arthrocopy. Lesions of the menisci, cruciate ligaments, hyaline cartilage, and synovial tissues were evaluated. Arthroscopy findings were defined as the `gold standard`. MRI achieved an accuracy of 96.4%, a sensitivity of 93.6%, and a specifity of 92.5%, whereas arthrography achieved an accuracy of 67.8%, a sensitivity of 66.6%, and a specifity of 71.4%. These statistical data as well as the single findings revealed no special indications for arthrography in suspected knee joint lesions. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer prospektiven Studie wurden insgesamt 21 Patienten mit suspekten Kniegelenksbinnenlaesionen untersucht. Bei allen Patienten erfolgte zunaechst eine Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT), anschliessend innerhalb von zwei Wochen eine Arthrographie und Arthroskopie des Kniegelenks. Beurteilt wurden Laesionen der Meniski, der Kreuzbaender, des hyalinen Gelenkknorpels und des Synovialgewebes. Bezogen auf den Arthroskopiebefund als `Gold-Standard` erreichte die MRT eine Treffsicherheit von 96,4%, eine Sensitivitaet von 93,6% und eine Spezifitaet von 92,5%; dagegen die Arthrographie eine Treffsicherheit von 67,8%, eine Sensitivitaet von 66,6% und eine Spezifitaet von 71,4%. Sowohl eine Uebersicht als auch die Auswertung der Einzelbefunde ergaben keine speziellen Indikationen zur Durchfuehrung einer Kniegelenksarthrographie bei suspekten Binnenlaesionen. (orig.)

  9. The clinical and radiological importance of extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle MR arthrography in patients with OCD and anterolateral impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogul, Hayri, E-mail: drhogul@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Guzel, Yunus [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Medical Faculty, Ordu University, Ordu (Turkey); Pirimoglu, Berhan [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Tuncer, Kutsi [Department of Orthopedic, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Polat, Gokhan; Ergun, Fatih; Sade, Recep; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Yuce, Ihsan; Kantarci, Mecit [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tibiotalar joint capacity and the localisation, frequency and amount of extravasation in patients with extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. Materials and methods: Sites of extravasation were determined in the ankle MR arthrograms of 69 patients. Thirty-four patients without extraarticular contrast material leakage into locations unrelated to the injection path were included as a control group. Volumetric measurements of extraarticular contrast material leakage and the tibiotalar joint capacity were performed on a three dimensional (3D) volume measurement workstation. Results: Extravasation of contrast material occurred through the anterior, posterior, and anterolateral recesses of the tibiotalar joint. The most common site of extravasation was along the flexor hallucis longus tendon synovium (24.6%). The amount of extravasation was significantly higher in patients with ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) than in patients with a different diagnosis (p = 0.039). Loose bodies were detected in all OCD’s patients with insufficient tibiotalar joint distention. Conclusions: Connections between the ankle joint and neighboring synovial compartments can decrease the diagnostic value of ankle MR arthrography examinations due to inadequate joint distention. Large injection volumes should be used for ankle MR arthrography of patients with OCD (especially OCD’s patients with loose body) and impingement syndrome.

  10. The clinical and radiological importance of extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle MR arthrography in patients with OCD and anterolateral impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogul, Hayri; Guzel, Yunus; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Tuncer, Kutsi; Polat, Gokhan; Ergun, Fatih; Sade, Recep; Bayraktutan, Ummugulsum; Yuce, Ihsan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the tibiotalar joint capacity and the localisation, frequency and amount of extravasation in patients with extraarticular contrast material leakage into adjacent synovial compartments on ankle magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography. Materials and methods: Sites of extravasation were determined in the ankle MR arthrograms of 69 patients. Thirty-four patients without extraarticular contrast material leakage into locations unrelated to the injection path were included as a control group. Volumetric measurements of extraarticular contrast material leakage and the tibiotalar joint capacity were performed on a three dimensional (3D) volume measurement workstation. Results: Extravasation of contrast material occurred through the anterior, posterior, and anterolateral recesses of the tibiotalar joint. The most common site of extravasation was along the flexor hallucis longus tendon synovium (24.6%). The amount of extravasation was significantly higher in patients with ankle osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) than in patients with a different diagnosis (p = 0.039). Loose bodies were detected in all OCD’s patients with insufficient tibiotalar joint distention. Conclusions: Connections between the ankle joint and neighboring synovial compartments can decrease the diagnostic value of ankle MR arthrography examinations due to inadequate joint distention. Large injection volumes should be used for ankle MR arthrography of patients with OCD (especially OCD’s patients with loose body) and impingement syndrome.

  11. Frequency and topography of lesions of the femoro-tibial cartilage at spiral CT arthrography of the knee: a study in patients with normal knee radiographs and without history of trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vande Berg, B.C.; Lecouvet, F.E.; Malghem, J.

    2002-01-01

    To determine the frequency and topography of cartilage lesions involving the femoro-tibial joints in patients with normal knee radiographs and without a remembered history of trauma.Design and patients. A radiologist retrospectively reviewed the dual-detector spiral CT knee arthrograms performed in 209 consecutive patients (mean age 37.6 years) with normal knee radiographs. Images were analyzed for the presence, grade (Noyes classification system) and location of cartilage lesions, the location being designated by dividing each articular surface into a grid of 16 parts.Results. Fifty-three percent of knees had cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher that involved articular surfaces to a variable extent: lateral tibial plateau (31%), medial femoral condyle (27%), medial tibial plateau (14%) and lateral femoral condyle (5%). Areas of the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau and of the inner half of the medial femoral condyle were statistically more frequently involved than their counterparts (P<0.0001). The bare area of the medial tibial plateau, but not that of the lateral tibial plateau, was more frequently involved than the corresponding meniscus-covered area (P<0.0001).Conclusion. Cartilage lesions of grade 2A or higher, detected at spiral CT arthrography in 53% of the knees, predominantly involved the posterior half of the lateral tibial plateau, the inner half of the medial femoral condyle and the bare area of the medial tibial plateau. (orig.)

  12. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Guelden; Demirtas, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established

  13. An overview of MR arthrography with emphasis on the current technique and applicational hints and tips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Guelden [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: gsahin@medicine.ankara.edu.tr; Demirtas, Mehmet [Department of Hand Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Samanpazari, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-06-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography has been investigated in every major peripheral joint of the body, and has been proven to be effective in determining the integrity of intraarticular ligamentous and fibrocartilaginous structures and in the detection or assessment of osteochondral lesions and loose bodies in selected cases. Several methods could be used to create arthrogram effect during MR imaging, however, direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent is the most commonly used technique and is the most reliable of all. MR arthrography is useful for demonstrating labrocapsular-ligamentous abnormalities and distinguishing partial thickness rotator cuff tears from focal full thickness tears in the shoulder, identifying or excluding recurrent tears following meniscal operations in the knee, demonstrating perforations of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) and ligaments in the wrist, showing labral tears in the hip, diagnosing ligament tears in the ankle and identifying osteochondral lesions or loose bodies in any of the aforementioned joints. In this article, an overview of techniques of MR arthrography is provided with emphasis on direct MR arthrography using diluted gadolinium as the contrast agent. The current applications of the technique in major peripheral joints are reviewed, with emphasis given to the shoulder joint where the role of this technique has become well established.

  14. Radiography, radionuclide imaging, and asthrography in the evaluation of total hip and knee replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelman, M.I.; Coleman, R.E.; Stevens, P.M.; Davey, B.W.

    1978-01-01

    Twenty patients with 21 total joint replacements including 17 hips and 4 knees were studied by plain film radiography, radionuclide imaging, and subtraction arthrography to evaluate these procedures for assessing prosthetic complications. Surgery was performed in 14 patients and confirmed loosening of 8 femoral and 7 acetabular hip prosthesis components and 1 femoral and 4 tibial knee prosthesis components. Plain films suggested loosening of only 9 hip components and no knee components. In contrast, radionuclide imaging and subtraction arthrography were considerably more effective in demonstrating loosening as well as other causes of the painful total joint prosthesis

  15. MR arthrography: Basics, technique, and first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, P.C.; Engel, A.; Kramer, J.; Imhof, H.

    1988-01-01

    Following evidence that intraarticular Gd-DTPA does not induce synovitis and is not stored in normal or chondropathic joint cartilage, the authors injected various concentrations of Gd-DTPA into 40 cadaveric and 40 in vivo knees. All in vivo knees underwent total prosthetic knee replacement, followed by a histologic workup. Results showed that MR arthrography greatly enhances the visibility of normal and pathologic structures and is a safe procedure. Moreover, MR arthrography seems to allow correct assessment and staging of various types of chondropathies

  16. Radiography, radionuclide imaging, and asthrography in the evaluation of total hip and knee replacement. [/sup 99m/Tc-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelman, M.I.; Coleman, R.E.; Stevens, P.M.; Davey, B.W.

    1978-09-01

    Twenty patients with 21 total joint replacements including 17 hips and 4 knees were studied by plain film radiography, radionuclide imaging, and subtraction arthrography to evaluate these procedures for assessing prosthetic complications. Surgery was performed in 14 patients and confirmed loosening of 8 femoral and 7 acetabular hip prosthesis components and 1 femoral and 4 tibial knee prosthesis components. Plain films suggested loosening of only 9 hip components and no knee components. In contrast, radionuclide imaging and subtraction arthrography were considerably more effective in demonstrating loosening as well as other causes of the painful total joint prosthesis.

  17. Ultrasound guidance to perform intra-articular injection of gadolinium-based contrast material for magnetic resonance arthrography as an alternative to fluoroscopy: the time is now

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Banfi, Giuseppe [IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi, Milano (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Aliprandi, Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Mauri, Giovanni [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Unita di Radiologia Interventistica, Milano (Italy); Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, Milano (Italy); IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Servizio di Radiologia, San Donato, Milanese (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been definitively established as the reference standard in the evaluation of joints in the body. Similarly, magnetic resonance arthrography has emerged as a technique that has been proven to increase significantly the diagnostic performance if compared with conventional MR imaging, especially when dealing with fibrocartilage and articular cartilage abnormalities. Diluted gadolinium can be injected in the joint space using different approaches: under palpation using anatomic landmarks or using an imaging guidance, such as fluoroscopy, computed tomography, or ultrasound. Fluoroscopy has been traditionally used, but the involvement of ionizing radiation should represent a remarkable limitation of this modality. Conversely, ultrasound has emerged as a feasible, cheap, quick, and radiation-free modality that can be used to inject joints, with comparable accuracy of fluoroscopy. In the present paper, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using fluoroscopy or ultrasound in injecting gadolinium-based contrast agents in joints to perform magnetic resonance arthrography, also in view of the new EuroSAFE Imaging initiative promoted by the European Society of Radiology and the recent updates to the European Atomic Energy Community 2013/59 directive on the medical use of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  18. Arthrography of the equine shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, A.J.; Spencer, C.P.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques and normal radiographic anatomy for positive and double contrast shoulder arthrography in horses were evaluated. General anaesthesia was used for most radiographic projections of the shoulder. The mediolateral projection provided the most information during arthrography, although the supinated mediolateral view occasionally allowed better definition of the cartilage surfaces on the medial aspects of the humeral head. The craniocaudal mediolateral oblique and caudocranial projections provided limited additional information. Water soluble non-ionic contrast agents, such as metrizamide and iohexol, were suitable for shoulder arthrography; iohexol resulted in less synovitis and lameness. Arthrography in cases of osteochondrosis and osteochondritis dissecans allowed better evaluation of cartilage attachment to subchondral bone, better evaluation of the length and depth of cartilage lesions and more accurately defined the site and shape of osteocartilaginous free bodies. Cartilage thickening without detachment from the subchondral bone could only be determined by arthrography. Although these thick cartilage regions may later dissect from the subchondral bone, most cases where the cartilage was firmly adherent were not candidates for surgical debridement and carried a favourable prognosis. The determination of a free flap by arthrography indicated the need for surgery. Extensive humeral and glenoid cavity lesions were better defined by arthrography, allowing a rational decision between surgical debridement or euthanasia. Using arthrography, evaluation of the size and patency of the communicating canal to a subchondral cystic defect better separated cases with long, narrow and poorly patent canals for conservative rather than surgical therapy

  19. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  20. Wrist arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    1993-03-01

    The ligaments of the proximal row of carpal bones and the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) strongly influence the function and stability of the wrist. Injury to the ligaments may result in chronic wrist pain or instability. Wrist arthrography is valuable in the investigation of such damage when surgical intervention is considered and plain radiography is unrewarding. There are also several technical modifications of the standard radiocarpal arthrography available. Owing to the possibility of congential perforations and degenerative changes in these ligaments the arthrographic findings should be related to the clinical signs and the age of the patient. CT has less diagnostic importance in this respect while MR imaging is an alternative and may become the method of choice. Both these methods have great potential in the evaluation of soft tissues of the wrist other than the TFC. (orig.).

  1. Optimization of contrast of MR images in imaging of knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyblinski, K.; Bacic, G.

    1994-01-01

    The work describes the method of contrast optimization in magnetic resonance imaging. Computer program presented in the report allows analysis of contrast in selected tissues as a function of experiment parameters. Application to imaging of knee joint is presented

  2. Detection and staging of chondromalacia patellae: relative efficacies of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, J A; Chung, E M; Chandnani, V P; Kesling, K L; Christensen, K P; Null, R N; Radvany, M G; Hansen, M F

    1994-09-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a condition characterized by softening, fraying, and ulceration of patellar articular cartilage. We compare the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography in detecting and staging this abnormality. Twenty-seven patients with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with MR imaging, including T1-weighted (650/16), proton density-weighted (2000/20), T2-weighted (2000/80), and spoiled two-dimensional gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR/)/35 degrees (51/10) with fat saturation pulse sequences. All were also examined with T1-weighted MR imaging after intraarticular injection of dilute gadopentetate dimeglumine and with double-contrast CT arthrography. Each imaging technique was evaluated independently by two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation. The signal characteristics of cartilage on MR images and contour abnormalities noted with all imaging techniques were evaluated and graded according to a modification of the classification of Shahriaree. Twenty-six of the 54 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of chondromalacia patellae were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 28 facets were normal. Grade 1 chondromalacia patellae was diagnosed only with MR and CT arthrography in two (29%) of seven facets. Intermediate (grade 2 or 3) chondromalacia patellae was detected in two (13%) of 15 facets with T1-weighted and SPGR MR imaging, in three (20%) of 15 facets with proton density-weighted MR imaging, in seven (47%) of 15 facets with T2-weighted MR imaging, in 11 (73%) of 15 facets with CT arthrography, and in 12 (80%) of 15 facets with MR arthrography. Grade 4 was detected in three (75%) of four facets with T1-, proton

  3. Postprocedural pain in shoulder arthrography: differences between using preservative-free normal saline and normal saline with benzyl alcohol as an intraarticular contrast diluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Troy F; Gilbride, George; Clifford, Kelly

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the effect of benzyl alcohol, a common preservative in normal saline, on postprocedural pain after intraarticular injection for direct shoulder MR arthrography. From April 2011 through January 2013, 138 patients underwent direct shoulder MR arthrography. Using the Wong-Baker Faces Pain Scale, patients were asked to report their shoulder pain level immediately before and immediately after the procedure and then were contacted by telephone 6, 24, and 48 hours after the procedure. Fourteen patients did not receive the prescribed amount of contrast agent for diagnostic reasons or did not complete follow-up. Sixty-two patients received an intraarticular solution including preservative-free normal saline (control group) and 62 patients received an intraarticular solution including normal saline with 0.9% benzyl alcohol as a contrast diluent (test group). Patients were randomized as to which intraarticular diluent they received. Fluoroscopic and MR images were reviewed for extracapsular contrast agent administration or extravasation, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and adhesive capsulitis. The effect of preservative versus control on pain level was estimated with multiple regression, which included time after procedure as the covariate and accounted for repeated measures over patients. Pain scale scores were significantly (p = 0.0382) higher (0.79 units; 95% CI, 0.034-1.154) with benzyl alcohol preservative compared with control (saline). In both study arms, the pain scale scores decreased slightly after the procedure, increased by roughly 1 unit over baseline for the test group and 0.3 unit over baseline for the control group by 6 hours after the procedure, were 0.50 unit over baseline for the test group and 0.12 unit over baseline for the control group at 24 hours, then fell to be slightly greater than baseline at 48 hours with benzyl alcohol and slightly less than baseline without benzyl alcohol. These trends

  4. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)], E-mail: frederic.lecouvet@uclouvain.be; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile [Departments of Radiology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Hippocrate Avenue 10/2942, 1200 Brussels (Belgium)

    2008-10-15

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings.

  5. Multidetector spiral CT arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecouvet, Frederic E.; Simoni, Paolo; Koutaissoff, Sophie; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Dubuc, Jean-Emile

    2008-01-01

    Although MR imaging and MR arthrography are the first choice modalities for shoulder imaging, CT arthrography (CTA) may be used successfully to address many clinical questions. The advent of submillimeter multiple detector CT technology and subsequent excellent three-plane resolution has considerably increased the quality of CTA examinations and has propelled this technique to the forefront in a growing number of indications. The combined use of iodinated contrast material for fluoroscopic confirmation of the articular position of the needle before injection of gadolinium chelates for MR arthrography offers the unique opportunity to compare CTA and MRA findings in carefully selected cases. This paper illustrates capabilities and limits of CTA for the study of rotator cuff tears, shoulder instability, cartilage lesions, anatomical variants and abnormalities of the glenoid labrum, with correlations to MR arthrography and surgical findings

  6. CT of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghelman, B.

    1987-01-01

    CT can be combined with arthrography of the knee to study the following abnormalities: meniscal tears and cysts, synovial plicae, chondromalacia patellae, and osteochondritis dissecans. The CT-arthrogram images present abnormalities in a manner that resembles the ''in situ'' surgical findings, allowing management decisions to be made with greater confidence. The CT techniques for imaging the knee after arthrography are discussed, as is the use of plain CT

  7. Synovial folds in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1987-01-01

    Stimulated by arthroscopic insight into central abnormalities of the knee joint and by the large number of unexplained case of 'anterior knee pain', we have studied the synovia in more than 2000 contrast examinations of the joint. Surprisingly, and contrary to the views expressed in the literature, the clinically significant plica parapatellaris medialis was seen as frequently during pneumo-arthrography as during more complex procedures. Abnormalities in the synovial fold emerged as a discreet disease identified as the 'medial shelf syndrome' and should be included in the differential diagnosis of causes of pain round the lower end of the femur and patella. (orig.) [de

  8. Synovitis assessed on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and its association with pain in knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Robert Gabriel Coumine; Gudbergsen, Henrik; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury and osteoarthr......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between pain and peripatellar-synovitis on static and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional setting, knee synovitis was assessed using 3-Tesla MRI and correlated with pain using the knee injury...

  9. Diagnostic value of MRI in meniscus injury. Comparison of MRI and arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iso, Yoshinori; Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Emoto, Mari; Miyairi, Taro; Hirata, Aya; Hirasawa, Seiichi; Suguro, Toru; Igata, Atsuomi; Kudo, Yukihiko.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthrography were performed on 90 knees to compare the diagnostic value for meniscus injury with these techniques. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI and arthrography was 89.1% and 87.1%, respectively. Imaging of the medial meniscus was somewhat better with arthrography, and delineation of the lateral meniscus was somewhat better with MRI. MRI was superior in diagnoses of horizontal and degenerative lacerations, but showed the shape of the injuries less clearly than arthrography. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI decreased with the age of the patients and was inferior to arthrography for patients in their forties or older. In conclusion, MRI is a less invasive approach with high diagnostic accuracy for meniscus injury and is a promising substitute for arthrography. (author)

  10. Magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging of the knee at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Onaya, Hiroaki; Niitsu, Mamoru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji; Nishimura, Hiroshi; Kajiyama, Koji; Masuda, Tomonori; Nakajima, Kotaro.

    1994-01-01

    It has been reported that magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) images were effective in evaluating the articular cartilage. However, only one in vivo study of the articular cartilage in the knee has been demonstrated at 1.5T. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the optimal off-resonance MTC pulse at 0.3T MR imager and assess its clinical usefulness. Five normal volunteers and eleven patients with suspected knee injuries were investigated using off-resonance sinc, gaussian, constant shaped irradiation pulses. All MTC images revealed higher contrast and contrast-to-noise (C/N) ratio between articular cartilage and external reference (saline) in the normal volunteers' knee than conventional gradient recalled echo images. MTC images with the gaussian or sinc shaped pulse were judged superior to those with constant wave pulse because the former images showed a fewer artifact with lower specific absorption rate than the latter images. The sinc MTC images were performed with the lowest SAR. The gaussian MTC images revealed better contrast and C/N between articular cartilage and joint fluid than the sinc MTC images in patients. 3D MTC images using Guassian pulse were also performed within a clinically tolerable imaging time (13 min 39 sec). Thus, MTC images in the knee at 0.3T using off-resonance pulse may be effective to assess knee injury due to better contrast between articular cartilage and joint fluid. (author)

  11. Double-compartment wrist arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Pittman, C.; Belsole, R.; Greene, T.L.; Rayhack, J.; Clark, R.A.; King, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventy patients with clinical wrist problems were studied with double-compartment wrist arthrography. Midcarpal and radiocarpal compartment arthrograms were obtained in all patients. Digital subtraction technique was used to subtract out contrast from the first compartmental injection. Digital technique also allowed a dynamic record of each injection, which helped determine sites of intercompartmental communication. Postarthrography exercises recorded on videotape were performed after each injection. There were 34 normal studies. Abnormalities in the other 36 patients included: scapholunate communication (n = 9), lunatotriquetral communication (n = 6), communication with tendon sheaths (n = 4), communication with distal radioulnar compartment (n = 14), abnormal synovium process (n = 9), and communication through the radial or ulnar collateral ligament (n = 3). Double-compartment wrist arthrography may provide additional information for complex problems of the wrist

  12. C1-2 arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevrot, A [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Cermakova, E [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Vallee, C [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Chancelier, M D [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Chemla, N [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Rousselin, B [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Langer-Cherbit, A [Service de Radiologie B, Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-08-01

    One hundred patients with the following conditions were studied: cervical pain or neuralgia without radiographic changes, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylarthritis and diverse conditions. The technique consists of lateral puncture of the posterior aspect of the C1-2 joint with a 20-gauge needle under fluoroscopic control, arthrography using 1 ml contrast medium, and a 1-ml long-acting steroid injection subsequently. The articular cavity has an anterior and a posterior recess. Sometimes the posterior recess is large. In 18% of cases the contralateral joint also opacifies. C1-2 arthrography appears to be an efficient and safe technique for the treatment of upper cervical pain due to C1-2 articular disorders. (orig.)

  13. C1-2 arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrot, A.; Cermakova, E.; Vallee, C.; Chancelier, M.D.; Chemla, N.; Rousselin, B.; Langer-Cherbit, A.

    1995-01-01

    One hundred patients with the following conditions were studied: cervical pain or neuralgia without radiographic changes, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylarthritis and diverse conditions. The technique consists of lateral puncture of the posterior aspect of the C1-2 joint with a 20-gauge needle under fluoroscopic control, arthrography using 1 ml contrast medium, and a 1-ml long-acting steroid injection subsequently. The articular cavity has an anterior and a posterior recess. Sometimes the posterior recess is large. In 18% of cases the contralateral joint also opacifies. C1-2 arthrography appears to be an efficient and safe technique for the treatment of upper cervical pain due to C1-2 articular disorders. (orig.)

  14. Radiologic evaluation of wrist arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Hee; Seong, Hyeun Lim; Yang, Jae Beom; Park, Chan Sup; Lee, Sang Seun

    1991-01-01

    Wrist arthrography allows direct visualization of the cartilage and synovial structure not seen in plain film. Arthrography of the wrist is valuable in evaluating patients with persistent wrist pain and limitation of motion after trauma. Wrist arthrography was performed in the evaluation of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (2 cases), ganglions (12 cases), and wrist trauma (16 cases), and contrast media was injected in radiocarpal joint. The arthrographic findings were analyzed, and the results were as follows: In 16 patients with wrist trauma, 12 cases (75%) of compartment communication was seen including communication with distal radioulnar joint (44%), midcarpal joint (69%), and common carpometacarpal joint (63%). Of the total 30 patients, the pisiform-triquetral joint communicated with the radio carpal joint in 9 cases (30%). In 16 patients with trauma, the findings of post-traumatic arthritis included tendon communication (50%), irregular synovium (31%), and rupture of the joint capsule (25%). There was no lymphatic filling. Of 3 scaphoid fracture patients without bony callus formation, fibrous union was verified in one patient and nouncion in 2. O 12 patients with ganglion, communication between the ganglion and radiocarpal joint was seen in 2 cases and no communication in 10 cases

  15. How invasive is TMJ double-contrast arthrography in combination with cinematography? Patient discomfort versus known diagnostic gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, W; Mommaerts, M

    1990-04-01

    There is no doubt that double-contrast TMJ fluoroscopic tomography enables a differential diagnosis and treatment in internal derangement pathosis. Its indication is, apart from the expected diagnostic gain, also determined by the degree of its invasiveness, and other alternative diagnostics being available (nuclear magnetic resonance). Data on patient discomfort and complications were gathered in 63 arthrotomographies; pain sensations and mandibular mobility, during and after the procedure in particular, were studied. We consider, along with Westesson, the procedure to be less invasive than commonly considered, once the surgeon-radiologist has gained enough experience.

  16. A study on usefulness of CT arthrography for the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Shumei [Osaka Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1992-06-01

    In the field of orthopedics, CT arthrography has been utilized for the shoulder and the knee joints diagnosis. In this study, CT arthrography was applied to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the usefulness of this method was evaluated experimentally and clinically. In the experimental study, CT, CT arthrography and arthrotomogtaphy were compared each other with serial section from human autopsy specimen. It was confirmed that arthrography was indispensable for diagnosis of the location and configuration of the articular disk. In the sagittal section, CT arthrography was almost equal to arthrotomography. But in the coronal section, CT arthrography proved to be advantageous to arthrotomography, because there were various blur images on the arthrotomographic images from the complex bony structures of the skull. In the clinical study, coronal CT arthrography was applied for the patients with internal derangements of the TMJ. The mesio-lateral displacement of the disk (62%), perforation of the attachment (23%), and the intra-articular adhesion (70%) could be diagnosed. BY CT arthrography, the mesio-lateral displacement of the disk was more clearly diagnosed and the intra-articular adhesions were proved with higher rate than by the arthrotomography. From this study, it was concluded that CT arthrography has an important role in diagnosis of the TMJ soft tissue. (author) 51 refs.

  17. Technical errors in MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodler, Juerg

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses potential technical problems of MR arthrography. It starts with contraindications, followed by problems relating to injection technique, contrast material and MR imaging technique. For some of the aspects discussed, there is only little published evidence. Therefore, the article is based on the personal experience of the author and on local standards of procedures. Such standards, as well as medico-legal considerations, may vary from country to country. Contraindications for MR arthrography include pre-existing infection, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and possibly bleeding disorders, avascular necrosis and known allergy to contrast media. Errors in injection technique may lead to extra-articular collection of contrast agent or to contrast agent leaking from the joint space, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Incorrect concentrations of contrast material influence image quality and may also lead to non-diagnostic examinations. Errors relating to MR imaging include delays between injection and imaging and inadequate choice of sequences. Potential solutions to the various possible errors are presented. (orig.)

  18. Technical errors in MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital of Balgrist, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-01-15

    This article discusses potential technical problems of MR arthrography. It starts with contraindications, followed by problems relating to injection technique, contrast material and MR imaging technique. For some of the aspects discussed, there is only little published evidence. Therefore, the article is based on the personal experience of the author and on local standards of procedures. Such standards, as well as medico-legal considerations, may vary from country to country. Contraindications for MR arthrography include pre-existing infection, reflex sympathetic dystrophy and possibly bleeding disorders, avascular necrosis and known allergy to contrast media. Errors in injection technique may lead to extra-articular collection of contrast agent or to contrast agent leaking from the joint space, which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Incorrect concentrations of contrast material influence image quality and may also lead to non-diagnostic examinations. Errors relating to MR imaging include delays between injection and imaging and inadequate choice of sequences. Potential solutions to the various possible errors are presented. (orig.)

  19. Arthrography of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholmer, E.; Foged, N.; Jensen, J. Th.

    1978-01-01

    Arthrography was performed in 105 cases with freshly sprained ankles and signs of rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament. They were subsequently operated upon. The arthrographic films were examined retrospectively to assess the value of different criteria for the differential diagnosis between rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament and combined rupture of this and the calcaneofibular ligament. The diagnostic value of arthrography was found to be high in isolated rupture of the anterior talofibular ligament, and is acceptable in the combined ruptures. (Auth.)

  20. T2 values of femoral cartilage of the knee joint: Comparison between pre-contrast and post-contrast images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Young Cheol; Choe, Bong Keun

    2014-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the relationship between T2 values of pre- and post-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) images of femoral cartilage in patients with varying degrees of osteoarthritis. A total of 19 patients underwent delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage. Six regions of interest for T2 value measurement were obtained from pre- and post-contrast T2-weighted, sagittal, multi-slice, multi-echo, source images in each subject. Regions with modified Noyes classification grade 2B and 3 were excluded. Comparison of T2 values between pre- and post-contrast images and T2 values among regions with the grade 0, 1 and 2A groups were statistically analyzed. Of a total of 114 regions, 79 regions showing grade 0 (n = 46), 1 (n = 18), or 2A (n = 15) were analyzed. The overall and individual T2 values of post-contrast images were significantly lower than those of pre-contrast images (overall, 35.3 ± 9.2 [mean ± SD] vs. 29.9 ± 8.2, p < 0.01; range of individual, 28.9-37.6 vs. 27.1-36.4, p < 0.01). Pearson correlation coefficients showed a strong positive correlation between pre- and post-contrast images (rho-Pearson = 0.712-0.905). T2 values of pre- and post-contrast images of the grade 0 group were significantly lower than those of the grade 1/2A group (pre T2, p = 0.003; post T2, p = 0.006). T2 values of the femoral cartilage of the knee joint are significantly lower on post-contrast images than on pre-contrast images. Furthermore, these T2 values have a strong positive correlation between pre- and post-contrast images.

  1. T2 values of femoral cartilage of the knee joint: Comparison between pre-contrast and post-contrast images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Young Cheol [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong Keun [Department of Preventive Medicine, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the relationship between T2 values of pre- and post-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) images of femoral cartilage in patients with varying degrees of osteoarthritis. A total of 19 patients underwent delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage. Six regions of interest for T2 value measurement were obtained from pre- and post-contrast T2-weighted, sagittal, multi-slice, multi-echo, source images in each subject. Regions with modified Noyes classification grade 2B and 3 were excluded. Comparison of T2 values between pre- and post-contrast images and T2 values among regions with the grade 0, 1 and 2A groups were statistically analyzed. Of a total of 114 regions, 79 regions showing grade 0 (n = 46), 1 (n = 18), or 2A (n = 15) were analyzed. The overall and individual T2 values of post-contrast images were significantly lower than those of pre-contrast images (overall, 35.3 ± 9.2 [mean ± SD] vs. 29.9 ± 8.2, p < 0.01; range of individual, 28.9-37.6 vs. 27.1-36.4, p < 0.01). Pearson correlation coefficients showed a strong positive correlation between pre- and post-contrast images (rho-Pearson = 0.712-0.905). T2 values of pre- and post-contrast images of the grade 0 group were significantly lower than those of the grade 1/2A group (pre T2, p = 0.003; post T2, p = 0.006). T2 values of the femoral cartilage of the knee joint are significantly lower on post-contrast images than on pre-contrast images. Furthermore, these T2 values have a strong positive correlation between pre- and post-contrast images.

  2. Dual joint space arthrography in temporomandibular joint disorders: Comparison with single inferior joint space arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Chang, Duk Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Woo Sun; Sung, Jung Ho; Jun, Young Hwan [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    The temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is really a complex of two synovial space separated by fibrocartilaginous disc. Single inferior joint space arthrography is commonly performed for evaluation of TMJ disorders, which is known to be superior in demonstrating joint dynamics. But it reveals only the inferior surface of the disc. Therefore, dual space arthrography is superior to demonstrate the soft tissue anatomic feature of the joint such as disc position and shape. Authors performed 83 TMJ arthrograms in TMJ problems. Initially, the inferior joint space was done and then the superior space was sequentially contrasted. The follow results were noted: 1. In all cases, dual space arthrography revealed accurate disc shape and positions. 2. Concordant findings between the two techniques: 68 cases (82%). Discordance between the two techniques: 15 cases (18%) 3. Possible causes of discordance between inferior and dual space arthrography. a) Normal varians of anterior recess: 3 cases b) Posterior disc displacement: 4 cases c) Influence of the patient's head position change :4 cases d) False perforation: 2 cases e) Reduction change: 2 cases 4. In 5 cases with anterior displacement, dual space arthrography gave additional findings such as adhesion within the superior space, which could not be evaluated by single inferior space.

  3. Arthrography of the biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahovuo, J.; Linden, H.; Hovi, I.; Paavolainen, P.; Bjoerkenheim, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the factors having an influence on the arthrographic imaging of the biceps tendon. The study comprised 174 patients suffering from chronic shoulder pain. They underwent conventional shoulder arthrography with sodium meglumine metrizoate or metrizamide as a contrast medium. In the patients with a full-thickness tear of the rotator cuff, the biceps tendon sheath failed to fill with contrast medium more often than in those with an intact tendinous cuff. Metrizamide filled the biceps tendon sheath more readily than sodium meglumine metrizoate in patients with a full-thickness tear of the ortator cuff. The volume of the contrast medium injected had no influence on the imaging of the biceps tendon. (orig.)

  4. The Usefulness of Dynamic Cine-Arthrography for Wrist Instability as Correlated with Arthroscopic Palmer Classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim TaeYeon; Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Cha, Sang Hoon [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    To introduce dynamic cine-arthrography and compare it with MR arthrography in the diagnosis of intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, based on arthroscopic findings. A total of thirty-eight wrists of 38 patients who had undergone both dynamic cine-arthrography and MR arthrography were enrolled. Dynamic cinearthrography was performed after puncture of the radiocarpal joint by slow injection of contrast under continuous fluoroscopic guidance during passive wrist exercise. We obtained 1.5- or 3-T MR arthrography with fat-suppressed T1-weighted coronal and axial images. We evaluated scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears according to the Palmer classification system. Based on the arthroscopic findings, we compared the diagnostic values between the two examinations using Kappa values. The overall sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of intrinsic ligament tears was similar between dynamic cine-arthrography and MR arthrography (scapholunate ligament: sensitivity 66.7% vs. 80%, specificity 100% vs. 95.7%, lunotriquetral ligament: sensitivity 75.0% vs. 75.0%, specificity 94.1% vs. 91.2%). For triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, all diagnostic values were the same (sensitivity 96.4%, specificity 100%). The inter-examination agreement was substantial to perfect (kappa value 1.000). Dynamic cine-arthrography is valuable in the diagnosis of intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears compared to MR arthrography.

  5. Effects of intraarticular contrast media on synovial membrane and cartilage: An electron microscopic evaluation in rabbit knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, N.; Inan, U.; Omeroglu, H.; Seber, S.; Baycu, C.; Omeroglu, H.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the histological and ultrastructural alterations in rabbit knee joint cartilage and synovia induced by intraarticular injections of 2 water soluble contrast agents. The study was conducted at the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Medical Faculty, Osmangazi University, Eskisehir, Turkey in January 2002. To examine the effect of contrast agents on articular cartilage and synovial membrane, rabbit model was used. Specimens from 62 knee joints were examined by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy one hour, one day, one week and 2 weeks after intraarticular administration of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, iopromide or saline. In the knees injected with saline, light microscopic changes of the synovium consisted of edema only. Edema and hyperemia were seen in contrast agent injected knees. Ultrastructurally, numerous and large pinocytotic vesicles in A cells of the synovial membrane were seen in contrast agent injected groups. In the knees injected with saline the cartilage were ultrastructurally normal but contrast agent injected knees showed increased activation of chondrocytes with increase of dense glycogen accumulation, large lipid vacuoles and matrix material. There were very rare pycnotic cells in these samples. The rating scale has been used and the means of the total scores were determined for the groups. The effects of contrast agents reduced gradually on the cartilage and synovium in general but did not become completely normal in the observation period. (author)

  6. MR-guided direct arthrography of the glenohumeral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, E.; Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Graves, M.J.; Black, R.; Lomas, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided direct arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with a 1.5 T MR system, performing the entire procedure in a single MR examination. Materials and methods: MR-guided direct arthrography was performed on 11 patients. MR imaging guidance and interactive MR fluoroscopy, with in-room control and display system, were used for needle placement and contrast medium injection. The outcome measures were success or failure of joint puncture, the time taken for introduction of contrast medium, and the diagnostic quality of the subsequent MR arthrography images. Results: Contrast medium was successfully instilled into the joint and diagnostic quality MR arthrography images were obtained in all cases. The median time from initial placement of the skin marker to introduction of the contrast medium was 17 min (range 11-29 min). There were no immediate post-procedure complications. Conclusion: Accurate needle placement is feasible in a single MR examination on a commercial 1.5 T closed-bore MR system, using an in-room control and display system together with interactive fluoroscopic imaging, and this was used to provide direct MR arthrography in this study

  7. The posterior transtriceps approach for elbow arthrography: a forgotten technique?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohman, M.; Borrero, C.; Casagranda, B.; Rafiee, B.; Towers, J.

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the technical feasibility of performing elbow MR arthrography via a posterior approach through the triceps. The images of 19 patients with elbow MR arthrography via a posterior transtriceps approach were retrospectively studied. The injections were performed by four musculoskeletal radiologists, using fluoroscopic guidance and a 22- or 25-gauge needle. The fluoroscopic and subsequent MR images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists and evaluated for adequacy of joint capsular distention, degree and location of contrast leakage, and presence of gas bubbles. The injection was diagnostic in all 19 patients, with a sufficient amount of contrast agent seen in the elbow joint. No significant contrast leakage occurred in 12 patients who received injections of 8 cc or less of contrast agent, but moderate contrast leakage occurred in 6/7 patients who received injections of greater than 8 cc. Contrast leakage generally occurred within the triceps myotendinous junction. No gas bubbles were identified in the injected joints. Patients often present for MR arthrography of the elbow with medial or lateral elbow pain. Contrast leakage during a radiocapitellar approach may complicate evaluation of the lateral collateral ligament or the common extensor tendon origin. Transtriceps MR arthrography offers an alternative to the more commonly used radiocapitellar approach. With injected volumes not exceeding 8 cc, the risk of significant contrast leakage is small. An advantage of the transtriceps injection is that contrast leakage through the posterior needle tract does not interfere with evaluation of the lateral structures. (orig.)

  8. Optimization of contrast of MR images in imaging of knee joint; Optymalizacja kontrastu obrazow MR na przykladzie obrazow stawu kolanowego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szyblinski, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Bacic, G. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The work describes the method of contrast optimization in magnetic resonance imaging. Computer program presented in the report allows analysis of contrast in selected tissues as a function of experiment parameters. Application to imaging of knee joint is presented. 2 refs, 4 figs.

  9. [Technique and value of direct MR arthrography applying articular distraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becce, Fabio; Wettstein, Michael; Guntern, Daniel; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Palhais, Nuno; Theumann, Nicolas

    2010-02-24

    Direct MR arthrography has a better diagnostic accuracy than MR imaging alone. However, contrast material is not always homogeneously distributed in the articular space. Lesions of cartilage surfaces or intra-articular soft tissues can thus be misdiagnosed. Concomitant application of axial traction during MR arthrography leads to articular distraction. This enables better distribution of contrast material in the joint and better delineation of intra-articular structures. Therefore, this technique improves detection of cartilage lesions. Moreover, the axial stress applied on articular structures may reveal lesions invisible on MR images without traction. Based on our clinical experience, we believe that this relatively unknown technique is promising and should be further developed.

  10. Arthrography of the hip in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loennerholm, T.

    1980-01-01

    A method by which bilateral hip arthrography was performed under general anaesthesia in 130 infants and children 1 month to 7 years of age is described. Significant contractures of the adductor muscles had been corrected before the examination. Most of the children were girls with unilateral congenital idiopathic hip instability detected before the age of one year. From films exposed in standardized projections valuable information was obtained about the configuration of the joint cavity and the size and shape of the femoral head. Criteria for normal appearance in infants of ages 2 to 12 months are presented. More reliable details on the relation between the articular surfaces, the radiographic anatomy of the acetabulum and the distribution of the contrast medium were yielded by stereoradiography. Closed reduction was usually accomplished successfully during the arthrography, which made beginning of definitive treatment under the same anaesthesia possible. (Auth.)

  11. Feasibility and preliminary results of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Klaus [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Kantonsspital Luzern, Roentgeninstitut/Nuklearmedizin, Luzern (Switzerland); Steurer-Dober, Isabelle; Huellner, Martin W.; Sol Perez Lago, Maria del; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Tornquist, Katharina [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Silva, Angela J. da [Advanced Molecular Imaging, Philips Healthcare, San Jose, CA (United States); Bodmer, Elvira; Wartburg, Urs von; Hug, Urs [Lucerne Cantonal Hospital, Division of Hand and Plastic Surgery, Lucerne (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of SPECT/CT arthrography of the wrist in comparison with MR arthrography in patients with suspected ulnocarpal impaction. This prospective study included 28 wrists of 27 patients evaluated with SPECT/CT arthrography and MR arthrography. Iodine contrast medium and gadolinium were injected into the distal radioulnar and midcarpal joints. Late-phase SPECT/CT was performed 3.5 h after intravenous injection of approximately 650 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DPD. MR and SPECT/CT images were separately reviewed in relation to bone marrow oedema, radionuclide uptake, and tears in the scapholunate (SL) and lunotriquetral (LT) ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), and an overall diagnosis of ulnar impaction. MR, CT and SPECT/CT imaging findings were compared with each other, with the surgical findings in 12 patients and with clinical follow-up. The quality of MR arthrography and SPECT/CT arthrography images was fully diagnostic in 23 of 28 wrists (82 %) and 25 of 28 wrists (89 %), respectively. SPECT/CT arthrography was not diagnostic for ligament lesions due to insufficient intraarticular contrast in one wrist. MR and SPECT/CT images showed concordant findings regarding TFCC lesions in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %), SL ligament in 22 of 27 wrists (81 %) and LT ligament in 23 of 27 wrists (85 %). Bone marrow oedema on MR images and scintigraphic uptake were concordant in 21 of 28 wrists (75 %). MR images showed partial TFCC defects in four patients with normal SPECT/CT images. MR images showed bone marrow oedema in 4 of 28 wrists (14 %) without scintigraphic uptake, and scintigraphic uptake was present without MR bone marrow oedema in three wrists (11 %). Regarding diagnosis of ulnar impaction the concordance rate between CT and SPECT/CT was 100 % and reached 96 % (27 of 28) between MR and SPECT/CT arthrography. The sensitivity and specificity of MR, CT and SPECT/CT arthrography were 93 %, 100 % and 100 %, and 93 %, 93 % and 93

  12. Arthrography of the TMJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jend, H.H.; Triebel, H.J.; Jend-Rossmann, I.; Hamburg Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Articular dysfunction of the TMJ with anterior displacement of the disc ('internal derangement') is an entity which has been separated from other types of the 'myofascial pain syndromes' and which can be treated conservatively or by surgery. Arthrography of the TMJ has contributed greatly to an understanding of normal and abnormal function and, in many cases, it can provide a diagnosis. On the basis of our experience with 80 investigations we discuss technical problems and the clinical indications. The indications for arthrography are in the pre-operative diagnosis, when clinical findings are uncertain, in order to demonstrate perforation, in order to confirm a suspected diagnosis and to assist in prosthetic treatment. (orig.) [de

  13. Role of arthrography in the management of dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, A.M.W.; Blane, C.E.; Kling, T.F. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica can be diagnosed on plain radiographs of the affected areas. However, double contrast arthrography in three new cases provided additional information. The cartilaginous portions of the lesion at the articular surface of the bone were precisely demonstrated, aiding the orthopedic surgeon in deciding which patients should have surgery and planning the extent of operation necessary.

  14. Initial study of magnetization transfer contrast MR imaging of the knee at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Echigo, Junko; Niitsu, Mamoru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu; Sato, Hiroshi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuji

    1998-10-01

    It has been reported that various image sequences, including magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) were effective in evaluating articular cartilage. It is difficult to identify cartilaginous structures, however, using conventional MR imaging because of low spatial resolution and low signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the optimal imaging sequences with MTC pulse at 3 T and to assess the feasibility of the clinical application thereof. Five porcine knees were studied using varying imaging parameters (frequency offset, flip angle (FA) and echo time (TE)) combined with off-resonance sinc radiation pulses. The effect of MTC was analyzed by dividing the signal intensity of MTC GRE images by that of conventional GRE images (Ms/Mo). MTC images were obtained with a low specific absorption rate (SAR). With an offset frequency of 1.5 kHz (repetition time/TE/FA=60 ms/8 ms/30 degrees), the mean Ms/Mo of articular cartilage and meniscus was 0.70 and 0.65, respectively. An FA of 20 to 30 degrees and a TE of 11 to 12 ms appear to be optimal parameters at 3 T with MTC pulse because of the higher S/N ratio of cartilage and higher contrast-to-noise ratio of cartilage relative to that of distilled water. These findings suggest that MTC at 3 T may be feasible and effective for assessment of cartilage and meniscus in clinical applications. (author)

  15. Contrast-enhanced MRI findings of the knee in healthy children; establishing normal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nusman, Charlotte M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis (OLVG), Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gulik, E.C. van; Barendregt, Anouk M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis (OLVG), Department of Pediatrics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-03-15

    To define normative standards for the knee in healthy children using contrast-enhanced MRI, focusing on normal synovial membrane thickness. Secondly, presence of joint fluid and bone marrow oedema was evaluated. For this study, children without disorders potentially resulting in (accompanying) arthritis were included. Patients underwent clinical assessments, followed by contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI features were evaluated in consensus using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring (JAMRIS) system. Additionally, the presence of joint fluid was evaluated. No cartilage lesions or bone abnormalities were observed. We included 57 healthy children. The overall mean thickness of the normal synovial membrane was 0.4 mm (min-max; 0.0-1.8mm). The synovium was thickest around the cruciate ligaments and retropatellar and suprapatellar regions. The mean overall diameter of the largest pocket of joint fluid was 2.8 mm (min-max; 0.9-8.0mm). Bone marrow changes were observed in three children (all in the apex patellae). The normal synovial membrane was maximally 1.8 mm thick, indicating that the JAMRIS cut-off value of 2 mm can be considered a valid measure for evaluating synovial hypertrophy. Some joint fluid and bone marrow changes suggestive of bone marrow oedema in the apex patellae can be seen in healthy children. (orig.)

  16. Contrast-enhanced MRI findings of the knee in healthy children; establishing normal values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemke, Robert; Maas, Mario; Berg, J.M. van den; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Nusman, Charlotte M.; Gulik, E.C. van; Barendregt, Anouk M.; Dolman, Koert M.

    2018-01-01

    To define normative standards for the knee in healthy children using contrast-enhanced MRI, focusing on normal synovial membrane thickness. Secondly, presence of joint fluid and bone marrow oedema was evaluated. For this study, children without disorders potentially resulting in (accompanying) arthritis were included. Patients underwent clinical assessments, followed by contrast-enhanced MRI. MRI features were evaluated in consensus using the Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring (JAMRIS) system. Additionally, the presence of joint fluid was evaluated. No cartilage lesions or bone abnormalities were observed. We included 57 healthy children. The overall mean thickness of the normal synovial membrane was 0.4 mm (min-max; 0.0-1.8mm). The synovium was thickest around the cruciate ligaments and retropatellar and suprapatellar regions. The mean overall diameter of the largest pocket of joint fluid was 2.8 mm (min-max; 0.9-8.0mm). Bone marrow changes were observed in three children (all in the apex patellae). The normal synovial membrane was maximally 1.8 mm thick, indicating that the JAMRIS cut-off value of 2 mm can be considered a valid measure for evaluating synovial hypertrophy. Some joint fluid and bone marrow changes suggestive of bone marrow oedema in the apex patellae can be seen in healthy children. (orig.)

  17. Wrist arthrography: a simple method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, Juan D.; Reus, Manuel; Alonso, Jose [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Radiology, El Palmar (Murcia) (Spain); Martinez, Francisco; Domenech-Ratto, Gines [University of Murcia, Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Murcia (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    A technique of wrist arthrography is presented using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates to identify precisely sites for puncture arthrography of the wrist and to obviate the need for fluoroscopic guidance. Radiocarpal joint arthrography was performed successfully in all 24 cases, 14 in the cadaveric wrists and 10 in the live patients. The arthrographic procedure described in this study is simple, safe, and rapid, and has the advantage of precise localisation of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.)

  18. Arthrography of the ankle sprains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Moon Hee

    1985-01-01

    Ankle arthrography, by direct puncture of joint cavity, is considered to be a simple and accurate diagnostic method for a precise evaluation of ligamentous injury. Forty-seven cases of ankle arthrography were successively performed in the patients of acute ankle sprains. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how ankle arthrography can delineate the pathologic anatomy in such cases. The results are as follows: 1. Thirty cases among forty seven revealed the findings of ligament tears. 2. For better diagnostic accuracy, the arthrography should be performed within 72 hrs. after injury. 3. The anterior talofibular ligament tears were the most common (twenty-nine cases) of all and seventeen of them revealed tears without association of any other ligament tears. 4. There were ten cases of calcaneofibular ligament tears and nine of them were associated with anterior talofibular ligament tears. 5. Three cases of anterior tibiofibular and one deltoid ligament tears were demonstrated

  19. Efficacy of ultrasonography-guided shoulder MR arthrography using a posterior approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Yazici, Zeynep [Uludag University Medical Faculty, Goeruekle Kampusu, Department of Radiology, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-06-15

    Shoulder MR arthrography has an important role in the assessment of rotator cuff lesions, labral tears, glenohumeral ligaments, rotator interval lesions, and postoperative shoulder status. Injection in direct MR arthrography can be performed with palpation, fluoroscopy, ultrasonography (US), or MRI. Recently, the posterior approach is the preferred method due to the presence of fewer stabilizers, absence of important articular structures and less extravasation, has been advocated. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of US-guided MR arthrography via a posterior approach on the glenohumeral joint. Thirty MR arthrographies were performed on 29 patients. Ultrasonography (Xario, Toshiba) examinations were conducted by a wide-band 5-12 Mhz linear array transducer set to muscle-skeleton. Diluted contrast medium (1 ml gadolinium chelate and 100 ml saline, approximately 15 ml) was delivered into the glenohumeral joint space from between the humeral head and posterior labrum with a 20-gauge spinal needle. MRI examination was conducted by a 1.5 T scanner. Fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo was applied on coronal, axial, and sagittal planes within the first 30 min after contrast material injection. One (3.3%) arthrography was not successful due to technical reasons associated with obesity. Contrast extravasation around the infraspinatus and teres minoer muscles was depicted in twelve examinations. One (3.3%) patient developed vasovagal collapse. Ultrasonography-guided posterior approach is an easy, reliable, fast, and comfortable method in experienced hands. It may be an alternative for fluoroscopy-guided shoulder MR arthrography. (orig.)

  20. Efficacy of ultrasonography-guided shoulder MR arthrography using a posterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, Gokhan; Dusak, Abdurrahim; Yazici, Zeynep

    2010-01-01

    Shoulder MR arthrography has an important role in the assessment of rotator cuff lesions, labral tears, glenohumeral ligaments, rotator interval lesions, and postoperative shoulder status. Injection in direct MR arthrography can be performed with palpation, fluoroscopy, ultrasonography (US), or MRI. Recently, the posterior approach is the preferred method due to the presence of fewer stabilizers, absence of important articular structures and less extravasation, has been advocated. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of US-guided MR arthrography via a posterior approach on the glenohumeral joint. Thirty MR arthrographies were performed on 29 patients. Ultrasonography (Xario, Toshiba) examinations were conducted by a wide-band 5-12 Mhz linear array transducer set to muscle-skeleton. Diluted contrast medium (1 ml gadolinium chelate and 100 ml saline, approximately 15 ml) was delivered into the glenohumeral joint space from between the humeral head and posterior labrum with a 20-gauge spinal needle. MRI examination was conducted by a 1.5 T scanner. Fat-saturated T1-weighted spin echo was applied on coronal, axial, and sagittal planes within the first 30 min after contrast material injection. One (3.3%) arthrography was not successful due to technical reasons associated with obesity. Contrast extravasation around the infraspinatus and teres minoer muscles was depicted in twelve examinations. One (3.3%) patient developed vasovagal collapse. Ultrasonography-guided posterior approach is an easy, reliable, fast, and comfortable method in experienced hands. It may be an alternative for fluoroscopy-guided shoulder MR arthrography. (orig.)

  1. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-01-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma. (orig.) [de

  2. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Francesco S.; Governi, Simone; Burresi, Francesca; Vigni, Francesco; Stefani, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Surgical findings were used as the gold standard in detecting tears. A total of 44 patients were assessed with transverse and longitudinal US scans with respect to the long axis of the rotator cuff tendons and then examined with MR arthrography. This technique involved free-hand injection of contrast medium into the shoulder joint. At surgery 20 incomplete and 24 complete tears were observed. Ultrasound offered good results for the large tears, but its sensitivity decreased proportionally with the size of the tears. Magnetic resonance arthrography correctly diagnosed 43 tears, whereas only one false-negative diagnosis of tendinosis was made for a partial tear on the bursal side. Since it improves the diagnosis of small tears, MR arthrography must be performed on all patients for whom surgical repair is necessary in order to restore normal functions. (orig.)

  3. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, Francesco S.; Governi, Simone; Burresi, Francesca; Vigni, Francesco; Stefani, Paolo [Department of Radiologic and Orthopaedic-Rehabilitative Sciences, University Hospital Siena (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears. Surgical findings were used as the gold standard in detecting tears. A total of 44 patients were assessed with transverse and longitudinal US scans with respect to the long axis of the rotator cuff tendons and then examined with MR arthrography. This technique involved free-hand injection of contrast medium into the shoulder joint. At surgery 20 incomplete and 24 complete tears were observed. Ultrasound offered good results for the large tears, but its sensitivity decreased proportionally with the size of the tears. Magnetic resonance arthrography correctly diagnosed 43 tears, whereas only one false-negative diagnosis of tendinosis was made for a partial tear on the bursal side. Since it improves the diagnosis of small tears, MR arthrography must be performed on all patients for whom surgical repair is necessary in order to restore normal functions. (orig.)

  4. Contrast-enhanced MRI of subchondral cysts in patients with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis: The MOST study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, M.D.; Roemer, F.W.; Marra, M.D.; Niu, J.; Lynch, J.A.; Felson, D.T.; Guermazi, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was (1) to evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of subchondral cysts on magnetic resonance imaging and (2) to discuss possible radiological explanations of cyst enhancement based on existing theories of subchondral cyst formation in osteoarthritis. Materials and methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a NIH-funded longitudinal observational study for individuals who have or are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. All subjects with available non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI were included. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were divided in 14 subregions. The presence and size of subchondral cysts and bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMLs) were scored semiquantitatively in each subregion on non-contrast-enhanced MRI from 0 to 3. Enhancement of subchondral cysts was evaluated on contrast-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (absent), grade 1 (partial enhancement), or grade 2 (full enhancement). The adjacent articular cartilage was scored in each subregion on non-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (intact), grade 1 (partial thickness loss), or grade 2 (full thickness loss). Results: Four hundred knees were included (1 knee per person, 5600 subregions). Subchondral cysts were detected in 260 subregions (4.6%). After intravenous contrast administration, 245 cysts (94.2%) showed full enhancement, 12 (4.6%) showed partial enhancement and 3 (1.2%) showed no enhancement. Enhancing BMLs were found in 237 (91.2%) subregions containing cysts, which were located adjacent or in the middle of BMLs. In 121 subregions (46.5%) having cysts, no adjacent full thickness cartilage loss was detected. Conclusion: Most subchondral cysts demonstrated full or partial contrast enhancement, and were located adjacent or in the midst of enhancing BMLs. As pure cystic lesions are not expected to enhance on MRI, the term 'subchondral cyst-like bone marrow lesion' might be appropriate to describe these lesions.

  5. Contrast-enhanced MRI of subchondral cysts in patients with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis: The MOST study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crema, M.D., E-mail: michelcrema@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Roemer, F.W., E-mail: frank.roemer@klinikum-augsburg.d [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Klinikum Augsburg, Stenglinstrasse 2, Augsburg 86156 (Germany); Marra, M.D., E-mail: monicadiasmarra@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, J., E-mail: niujp@bu.ed [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, X Building, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Lynch, J.A., E-mail: jlynch@psg.ucsf.ed [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California at San Francisco, 185 Berry Street, Lobby 5, Suite 5700, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States); Felson, D.T., E-mail: dfelson@bu.ed [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, X Building, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Guermazi, A., E-mail: ali.guermazi@bmc.or [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Ave, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Objective: The aim of the study was (1) to evaluate contrast enhancement patterns of subchondral cysts on magnetic resonance imaging and (2) to discuss possible radiological explanations of cyst enhancement based on existing theories of subchondral cyst formation in osteoarthritis. Materials and methods: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) is a NIH-funded longitudinal observational study for individuals who have or are at high risk for knee osteoarthritis. All subjects with available non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced MRI were included. The tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints were divided in 14 subregions. The presence and size of subchondral cysts and bone marrow edema-like lesions (BMLs) were scored semiquantitatively in each subregion on non-contrast-enhanced MRI from 0 to 3. Enhancement of subchondral cysts was evaluated on contrast-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (absent), grade 1 (partial enhancement), or grade 2 (full enhancement). The adjacent articular cartilage was scored in each subregion on non-enhanced MRI as grade 0 (intact), grade 1 (partial thickness loss), or grade 2 (full thickness loss). Results: Four hundred knees were included (1 knee per person, 5600 subregions). Subchondral cysts were detected in 260 subregions (4.6%). After intravenous contrast administration, 245 cysts (94.2%) showed full enhancement, 12 (4.6%) showed partial enhancement and 3 (1.2%) showed no enhancement. Enhancing BMLs were found in 237 (91.2%) subregions containing cysts, which were located adjacent or in the middle of BMLs. In 121 subregions (46.5%) having cysts, no adjacent full thickness cartilage loss was detected. Conclusion: Most subchondral cysts demonstrated full or partial contrast enhancement, and were located adjacent or in the midst of enhancing BMLs. As pure cystic lesions are not expected to enhance on MRI, the term 'subchondral cyst-like bone marrow lesion' might be appropriate to describe these lesions.

  6. Contrast visibility for indirect MR arthrography with different protein contents and agent relaxivities at different field strengths: An in vitro model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, M.R.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Ragatte, Ravinder R.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Protein binding and relaxivity are major determinants of the relative effectiveness of an MR arthrographic contrast agent. We sought to evaluate the optimal concentrations of high and usual relaxivity agents in two different proteinous environments at variable field strength for two MR contrast agents of different relaxivities. Materials and methods: At 1.5, 3.0 and 7.0 T, gadobenate dimeglumine (Multihance) with high-relaxivity in proteinous environment and gadoteridol (Prohance) with more typical behavior were studied at 1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10 mmol in 1.7 g/dL and 3 g/dL albumin (mimicking protein content of normal and inflammatory synovial fluids, respectively) vs. pure normal saline, as a control. Analysis of image signal intensity (SI) and relaxivity values was done. Results: In our study a change in concentration had no significant effect on T1 SI. In contrast, nearly every change in concentration led to a significant change in T2 SI. In 1.25 mmol concentration, there was no effect on T1 SI of either protein concentrations while higher concentrations showed significant decreased SI in either protein carrier compared to saline. The SI of Gadoteridol was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) than that of gadobenate at each of 3 T and 7 T, but was significantly lower (p < 0.001) at 1.5 T in saline solution while this was not significant for either protein carrier. Both protein carriers had significant effect on T1 (p = 0.0124) and T2 (p = 0.0118) relaxivities. Also solution concentration significantly (p < 0.01) affected both T1 and T2 relaxivities. Field strength did not affect T1 relaxivity (p = 0.02511) while it significantly affected T2 relaxivity (p < 0.001). This was significant (p = 0.035) in case of gadoteridol at 3 T. Conclusion: 1.25 mmol concentration of both gadoteridol and gadobenate solutions yields the best diagnostic T1 SI specially in higher fields (3 T and 7 T) and avoid the deleterious effect of increasing concentration on T2 SI

  7. The role of pubic symphyseal CT arthrography in the imaging of athletic pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Tatum A; Narducci, Carl A; Lopez-Ben, Robert R

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the results of pubic symphyseal CT arthrography compared with MRI in patients with suspected athletic pubalgia. In this study, two musculoskeletal radiologists retrospectively searched our department's PACS to identify patients who had undergone CT-guided injection with concurrent pubic symphyseal CT arthrography for evaluation and treatment of groin pain, sports hernia, or athletic pubalgia over a 5.5-year period (January 1, 2007-July 1, 2012). The MR and CT arthrography images and reports, clinical findings at presentation, pain response to injection, and operative findings were reviewed using the electronic medical record. Twelve patients underwent CT-guided injection and pubic symphyseal CT arthrography at our institution during the 5.5-year study period. Nine of the 12 patients had undergone MRI before the procedure. In two of the three patients who had not undergone MRI, CT arthrography revealed secondary clefts. Three of four patients who had secondary clefts on MRI had contrast extravasation reproducing the cleft at CT. Three patients had MRI findings suggestive of athletic pubalgia without MRI evidence of a secondary cleft; in all three of these patients, CT arthrography showed a secondary cleft. In four patients, CT arthrography revealed tendon tears at the adductor origin that were not apparent on MRI. All 12 patients reported decreased groin pain after injection. Pubic symphyseal CT arthrography is a useful technique for the diagnosis and short-term pain relief of athletic pubalgia. It can be used to identify secondary clefts and to detect tendon tears that can potentially be overlooked on MRI.

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Synovial Vascularity Using Contrast-Enhanced Power Doppler Ultrasonography: Correlation with Histologic Findings and MR Imaging Findings in Arthritic Rabbit Knee Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Seong Moon; Kim, Namkug; Suh, Sang Hyun; Suh, Jin Suck

    2008-01-01

    To validate contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography (PD US) for the evaluation of synovial vascularity in an arthritic rabbit knee model in correlation with MR and histological findings. Power Doppler ultrasonography was performed for carrageenin-induced arthritic left knee and control right knee of 13 rabbits, first without and then with sonic contrast agent enhancement (Levovist, Schering, Berlin Germany), followed by gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging. Synovial vascularity was quantitatively assessed by calculating the color pixel area in power Doppler sonography using a computer-aided image analysis program and by grading the enhancement on MR images: grade 1, enhancement of knee joint is less than one-third of the area; grade 2, one-third to two-thirds enhancement; and grade 3, more than two-thirds enhancement. Microvessel density (MVD) was measured on slides stained immunohistochemically for CD31 antigen for histological assessment. The mean area of color pixels in PD US changed from 4.37 to 16.42 mm 2 in the arthritic knee after enhancement (p 2 in the control knee (p 0.05). Sonic contrast-enhanced PD US improves the visualization of synovial vascularity and allows quantitative measurement in experimentally induced rabbit arthritic knees

  9. Diagnosis of chondromalacia patellae using CT arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.; Karpf, P.M.; Bernett, P.

    1982-08-01

    Using anatomical specimens for experimental investigations, the physical-technical prerequisites for proper demonstration of the femoro-patellar articulation were determined and the following results obtained: hyaline cartilage possesses an attenuation value of 25-35 HU; artificial lesions from 1 mm. deep and 2 mm. wide minimum can be visualized; the use of positive contrast medium is best suited for demonstration of chondral lesions. In clinical practice we found that the various stages of cartilaginous degeneration peculiar to chondromalacia (Fruend I to III) are clearly demonstrated by CT arthrography. In CT the predisposing changes in the morphology of the patella and the femoro-patellar articulation are more precisely defined than in conventional tangential roentgenograms. In 69 cases the CT arthrographic findings could be verified at operation. However, the extent and severity of the lesions was, at times, underestimated.

  10. Indirect MR arthrography of the shoulder in detection of rotator cuff ruptures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagci, B.; Manisali, M.; Yilmaz, E.; Oezaksoy, D.; Kovanlikaya, I.; Oezkan, M.; Ekin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of indirect MR arthrography images obtained following intravenous contrast injection and conventional MR imaging in the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Twenty-four patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff disease were examined. Conventional MR images and post-contrast indirect MR arthrography images were obtained. All images were evaluated in a blinded fashion by two musculoskeletal radiologist. Results were than analyzed depending on surgical output. The correlation coefficient (Spearman rank correlation test) and the kappa values for agreement between surgery and imaging techniques were calculated. The correlation coefficients between indirect MR arthrography and surgery for reader 1 and reader 2 were 0.9137 and 0.9773, respectively. Whereas the agreement between conventional MR imaging and surgery was moderate (κ=0.383-0.571), the agreement between indirect MR arthrography and surgery was excellent (κ=0.873-0.936). We suggest the use of indirect MR arthrography technique when conventional MR images are equivocal in diagnosis of rotator cuff disease. (orig.)

  11. Cartilage lesions in the ankle joint: comparison of MR arthrography and CT arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, M.R.; Pfirrmann, C.W.A.; Hodler, J.; Zanetti, M.; Vienne, P.

    2003-01-01

    To compare MR arthrography and CT arthrography for the evaluation of cartilage lesions in the ankle joint.Design and patients Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinically suspected cartilage lesions were prospectively included in the study. A 1:1 mixture of diluted gadoteridol (4 mmol/l) and iopamidol (300 mg iodine/ml) was injected. The articular cartilages of the talus, tibia, and fibula were analyzed separately by two musculoskeletal radiologists. A review panel consisting of two musculoskeletal radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon represented the standard of reference. For reader 1 accuracy of MR arthrography in the talus/tibia/fibula (88%/88%/94%) was slightly inferior to CT arthrography (90%/94%/92%). For reader 2, the accuracy was 76%/78%/83% for MR arthrography, and 92%/93%/92% for CT arthrography, respectively. Interobserver agreement for MR arthrography was 79%/74%/89% (kappa 0.47/0.34/0.27), while interobserver agreement for CT arthrography was 89%/90%/89% (kappa 0.69/0.54/0.54). CT arthrography appears to be more reliable than MR arthrography for the detection of cartilage lesions in the ankle joint. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of radiographic and radionuclide hip arthrography in determination of femoral component loosening of hip arthroplasties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capello, W.N.; Uri, B.G.; Wellman, H.N.; Robb, J.A.; Stiver, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic examination of a patient experiencing pain following total hip arthroplasty is an important step in the systematic approach to evaluating component loosening, even though the information yielded is often equivocal and nondiagnostic in assessing component loosening. The radiographic criteria for loosening are especially difficult to assess following revision surgery, for radiolucent lines frequently exist at the bone-cement interface immediately following implantation. The advent of noncemented hip prostheses poses another problem: the routinely noted disruption of bone-cement of prosthesis-cement interfaces is not present with uncemented prostheses. As the criteria for loosening of the noncemented prostheses are still evolving, plain radiographic examination is frequently nondiagnostic. Femoral component loosening is difficult to detect with standard contrast arthrography because the bone, metal, surrounding radiopaque cement and contrast agents have similar or identical radiographic appearances. In contrast arthrography, if the prosthesis is loose the injected agent opacifies the radiolucent zone encircling the prosthesis or cement mangle. Because of the similarity in the appearances of these agents and the surrounding structures on x-ray films, interpretation is difficult. The inclusion of subtraction techniques in routine contrast arthrography has improved its accuracy; however, these techniques require special equipment and demand precise patient positioning. The purpose of this study is to introduce a new form of hip arthrography using a radionuclide agent in place of the contrast agent. A comparison of the results using these two techniques is presented

  13. Discrepancy between fluoroscopic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with arthroscopically confirmed supraspinatus tendon tears: The additional benefit of cine fluoroscopic arthrography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Seok; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck

    2016-01-01

    To determine the additional diagnostic benefits of fluoroscopic arthrography (FA) in patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by comparing FA images with magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images. This study included FA and MRA images of 53 patients who were confirmed to have full-thickness SST tears by arthroscopy. In the FA analysis, the presence of contrast leakage into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was recorded. In the MRA analysis, contrast leakage, retraction of a torn tendon, width and length of the tear, and supraspinatus atrophy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the concordant group or the discordant group based on the presence of contrast leakage to compare the characteristics of SST tears. We used Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test for the comparison. Of the 53 patients, 34 were included in the concordant group and 19 were included in the discordant group. In the concordant group, the grades of retraction were higher than those in the discordant group; the width and length of the tears were larger. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the concordant group. A full-thickness SST tear did not always exhibit contrast leakage on FA, particularly small SST tears or tears with low-grade retraction. FA can provide diagnostic information regarding the severity of full-thickness SST tears by itself

  14. Discrepancy between fluoroscopic arthrography and magnetic resonance arthrography in patients with arthroscopically confirmed supraspinatus tendon tears: The additional benefit of cine fluoroscopic arthrography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Seok; Lee, Young Han; Suh, Jin Suck [Dept. Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Medical Convergence Research Institute, and Severance Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To determine the additional diagnostic benefits of fluoroscopic arthrography (FA) in patients with full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tears by comparing FA images with magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) images. This study included FA and MRA images of 53 patients who were confirmed to have full-thickness SST tears by arthroscopy. In the FA analysis, the presence of contrast leakage into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was recorded. In the MRA analysis, contrast leakage, retraction of a torn tendon, width and length of the tear, and supraspinatus atrophy were evaluated. Patients were divided into the concordant group or the discordant group based on the presence of contrast leakage to compare the characteristics of SST tears. We used Fisher's exact test and two-sample t-test for the comparison. Of the 53 patients, 34 were included in the concordant group and 19 were included in the discordant group. In the concordant group, the grades of retraction were higher than those in the discordant group; the width and length of the tears were larger. Muscle atrophy was more severe in the concordant group. A full-thickness SST tear did not always exhibit contrast leakage on FA, particularly small SST tears or tears with low-grade retraction. FA can provide diagnostic information regarding the severity of full-thickness SST tears by itself.

  15. Radiographic anatomy and technique for arthrography of the cubital joint in clinically normal dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowry, J.E.; Carpenter, L.G.; Park, R.D.; Steyn, P.F.; Schwarz, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    A technique for arthrography of the cubital joint in clinically normal large-breed dogs was developed with the objective of improving visualization of the articular margin of the medial coronoid process. A lateral approach to the cubital joint for injection of contrast medium was selected. Arthrography of 24 cubital joints was performed by using 14 dogs. Twelve combinations of iodinated contrast medium, consisting of various concentrations (3) and volumes (4), were used. Two sets of arthrograms for each of the 12 combinations of contrast medium were obtained. Five radiographic views were used for each set. All arthrograms were examined by 3 evaluators, and each articular surface received a numerical rating for how well it could be seen in each view. Results of the evaluation indicated that low volumes of contrast medium were preferable to high volumes, with 2 ml providing the best visualization. Concentration of iodine seemed less important than did volume. The numerical ratings also indicated that the articular margin of the coronoid process was clearly observed a maximum of only 24% of the time on a slightly supinated mediolateral projection. The articular margins of the head of the radius, trochlea humeri, and trochlear notch were well visualized > 90% of the time. Arthrography of the cubital joint was technically easy to perform, and complications were not encountered, but arthrographic anatomy of the cubital joint is complex. Potential uses for arthrography of the cubital joint include diagnosis of osteochondrosis, intraarticular fragments, and joint capsule ruptures

  16. Meniscus tears of the knee: Postarthrogram high resolution CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Do, Young Soo; You, Jin Jong; Gong, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1990-01-01

    Thirty-eight knees with clinically suspected meniscal tears were examined with high resolution computed tomography(HRCT) immediately following double contrast arthrography. All subsequently underwent arthroscopy. The findings of postarthrogram HRCT and arthroscopy were compared to evaluated the usefulness of postarthrogram HRCT in diagnosis of the meniscal tears. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of HRCT were 96.2%. 83.3% and 92.1% respectively. The anatomic details of the meniscal tears were clearly visible on the HRCT scans. Sagittal and coronal reformation views well visualized the horizontal tears and the relationship of torn meniscal fragments, and well differential the peripheral tears from the synovial recess. Our result indicate that postarthrogram HRCT not only is a sensitive and effective method for the detection and characterization of the meniscal tears, but also provides arthroscopists with the appropriate surgical plans

  17. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzik, Jean-François, E-mail: Budzik.jean-francois@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); PMOI Physiopathology of Inflammatory Bone Diseases, EA 4490, Lille (France); Ding, Juliette, E-mail: Ding.juliette@gmail.com [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Norberciak, Laurène, E-mail: Norberciak.Laurene@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Biostatistics Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Pascart, Tristan, E-mail: Pascart.tristan@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Rheumatology Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Toumi, Hechmi, E-mail: hechmi.toumi@univ-orleans.fr [EA4708 I3MTO, Orleans Regional Hospital, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Verclytte, Sébastien, E-mail: Verclytte.Sebastien@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Imaging Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France); Coursier, Raphaël, E-mail: Coursier.Raphael@ghicl.net [Lille Catholic Hospitals, Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Lille Catholic University, Lille (France)

    2017-03-15

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  18. Perfusion of subchondral bone marrow in knee osteoarthritis: A dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzik, Jean-François; Ding, Juliette; Norberciak, Laurène; Pascart, Tristan; Toumi, Hechmi; Verclytte, Sébastien; Coursier, Raphaël

    2017-01-01

    The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis is being given major interest, and inflammation is closely linked with vascularization. It was recently demonstrated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could identify the subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes occurring in osteoarthritis in animals. These changes appeared before cartilage lesions were visible and were correlated with osteoarthritis severity. Thus the opportunity to obtain an objective assessment of bone vascularization in non-invasive conditions in humans might help better understanding osteoarthritis pathophysiology and finding new biomarkers. We hypothesized that, as in animals, DCE-MRI has the ability to identify subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes in human osteoarthritis. We performed knee MRI in 19 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. We assessed subchondral bone marrow vascularization in medial and lateral femorotibial compartments with DCE-MRI and graded osteoarthritis lesions on MR images. Statistical analysis assessed intra- and inter-observer agreement, compared DCE-MRI values between the different subchondral zones, and sought for an influence of age, sex, body mass index, and osteoarthritis garde on these values. The intra- and inter-observer agreement for DCE-MRI values were excellent. These values were significantly higher in the femorotibial compartment the most affected by osteoarthritis, both in femur and tibia (p < 0.0001) and were significantly and positively correlated with cartilage lesions (p = 0.02) and bone marrow oedema grade (p < 0.0001) after adjustment. We concluded that, as in animals, subchondral bone marrow vascularization changes assessed with DCE-MRI were correlated with osteoarthritis severity in humans.

  19. Shoulder distention arthrography as a treatment modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Sang Bum

    1987-01-01

    18 patients with painful stiff shoulder joint were underwent shoulder distension arthrography as a treatment modality, followed by physical therapy. Range of motion of shoulder joint was evaluated at 1 week and 4 weeks after arthrography. The results were as follows; 1. Arthrographic findings were decreased volume of joint cavity, obliteration of axillary recess, small subscapularis bursa, serrated capsular margin and non-filling of biceps tendon sheath. In 3 cases, rotator cuff tear was found. 2. Range of motion of shoulder joint was improved after distension arthrography. 3. In 3 patients have rotator cuff tear, range of motion was not improved

  20. Value of arthrography in the evaluation of sacroiliac pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobechko, P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors attempted to assess the sacroiliac joint as a source of low back pain by using arthrography with a local anesthetic injection. Intraarticular injection of contrast agent and local anesthetic was attempted in 29 patients (35 joints), aged 24-69 years. The intraarticular injection was successful in 24 cases (68.5%). Periarticular infiltration of anesthetic was done in the remaining 11 cases. Pain relief was obtained in 19 cases, of which 13 involved intraarticular and six involved periarticular injections. On the basis of these results, patients were treated by surgical fusion, medication, or conservative management. Referring physicians found that the results obtained were valuable and helpful in assessing these patients

  1. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Han, Tae Il; Lee, Kwang Won; Choi, Youn Seon; Kim, Dae Hong; Han, Hyun Young; Song, Mun Kab; Kwon, Soon Tae

    2001-01-01

    Adhesive capsulitis is a clinical syndrome involving pain and decreased joint motion caused by thickening and contraction of the joint capsule. The purpose of this study is to describe the MR arthrographic findings of this syndrome. Twenty-nine sets of MR arthrographic images were included in the study. Fourteen patients had adhesive capsulitis diagnosed by physical examination and arthrography, and their MR arthrographic findings were compared with those of 15 subjects in the control group. The images were retrospectively reviewed with specific attention to the thickness of the joint capsule, volume of the axillary pouch (length, width, height(depth)), thinkness of the coracohumeral ligament, presence of extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrst filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Mean capsular thickness measured at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch was 4.1 mm in patients with adhesive capsulitis and 1.5 mm in the control group. The mean width of the axillary pouch was 2.5 mm in patients and 9.5 mm in controls. In patients, the capsule was significantly thicker and the axillary pouch significantly narrower than in controls (p<0.05). Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch (sensitivity 93%, specificity 80%) and a pouch narrower than 3.5 mm (sensitivity 93%, specificity 100%) were useful criteria for the diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis. In patients with this condition, extra-articular contrast extravasation was noted in six patients (43%) and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa in three (21%). The MR arthrographic findings of adhesive capsulitis are capsular thickening, a low-volume axillary pouch, extra-articular contrast extravasation, and contrast filling of the subcoracoid bursa. Capsule thickness greater than 2.5 mm at the inferior portion of the axillary pouch and a pouch width of less than 3.5 mm are useful diagnostic imaging characteristics

  2. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Maas, Mario

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  3. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared to clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Benninga, Marc A.; Kindermann, Angelika [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Berg, J.M. van den; Kuijpers, Taco W. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Disease, Emma Children' s Hospital AMC, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reade, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate enhancing synovial thickness upon contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee in children unaffected by clinical arthritis compared with clinically active juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. A secondary objective was optimization of the scoring method based on maximizing differences on MRI between these groups. Twenty-five children without history of joint complaints nor any clinical signs of joint inflammation were age/sex-matched with 25 clinically active JIA patients with arthritis of at least one knee. Two trained radiologists, blinded for clinical status, independently evaluated location and extent of enhancing synovial thickness with the validated Juvenile Arthritis MRI Scoring system (JAMRIS) on contrast-enhanced axial fat-saturated T1-weighted MRI of the knee. Enhancing synovium (≥2 mm) was present in 13 (52 %) unaffected children. Using the total JAMRIS score for synovial thickening, no significant difference was found between unaffected children and active JIA patients (p = 0.091). Additional weighting of synovial thickening at the JIA-specific locations enabled more sensitive discrimination (p = 0.011). Mild synovial thickening is commonly present in the knee of children unaffected by clinical arthritis. The infrapatellar and cruciate ligament synovial involvement were specific for JIA, which - in a revised JAMRIS - increases the ability to discriminate between JIA and unaffected children. (orig.)

  4. Ankle ligamints : comparison of MR arthrography with conventional MR imaging in amputated feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Chung, Kyung Ho; Kim, CHong Soo

    2001-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with conventional MR imaging in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Eight freshly amputated human feet underwent conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography. For the former, 1.5-T magnets in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were used, and T1-weighted sequences were obtained. Following the injection of 6-10 ml of diluted contrast media (Gd-DTPA 1:250), T1-weighted images were obtained in the same positions as conventional MR images. Paired conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography of each ankle ligament were rated on a five-point scale, and to reflect inter-group differences a Wilcoxon singed-rank test was used to compare the different measurements (p<0.05). In two ankles, MR images of the ligaments were correlated with ankle dissection. Anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments were more clearly revealed by MR arthrography than by conventional MR imaging, while calcaneofibular ligaments showed no difference between these two modalities. With regard to deltoid ligaments, visualization of the anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament was much improved when contrast material was used to outline the ligament's articular aspect. Visualization of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament and inferior transverse ligament were also improved when the use of contrast material provided delineation of the articular side of the ligaments and separated them from adjacent bone. In addition, MR arthography was very useful for indentification of the posterior intermalleolar ligament, though its use did not enhance visualization of the calcaneofibular, tibiocalcaneal, spring or tibiospring ligaments. MR arthrography accurately revealed the anatomic details of ankle ligaments, and may therefore be more useful than conventional Mr imaging for evaluation of these structures

  5. Indirect MR arthrography in the evaluation of tears of the glenoid labrum; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie in der Diagnostik von Laesionen des Labrum glenoidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Vahlensieck, M.; Lutterbey, G.; Pauleit, D.; Kreft, B.; Keller, E.; Schild, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Wallny, T. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Steuer, K.; Golombek, V. [Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that intravenous administration of contrast media produces an MR arthrographic effect without the need for intraarticular injection. This is the first study evaluating this new technique of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of glenoid labrum tears. Methods: 28 patients with clinically suspected labral injuries were prospectively investigated (1.5 Tesla, flexible surface coil). A plain MR examination of the shoulder (transverse and oblique-coronal orientation, T{sub 1}-weighted spin- [T{sub E}/T{sub R} 15/675], proton density- and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient echo [T{sub E}/T{sub R}/Flip 14,32/600/30 ] sequences) and indirect MR arthrography (transverse and oblique-coronal orientation, fat-suppressed T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo sequences [T{sub E}/T{sub R} 15/675], intravenous injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine [0.1 mmol/kg], followed by 10-15 min of joint movement) were performed. Results were confirmed by arthroscopy and/or open surgery. Results: Indirect MR arthrography significantly improved delineation of the glenoid labrum and hyaline cartilage (p<0.05). Sensitivity and specificity of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of labral injuries were 90% and 89%, compared to 79% and 67% of the native MR examination. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is a promising non-invasive technique in the evaluation of the glenoid labrum. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: In frueheren Studien wurde gezeigt, dass die intravenoese Injektion gadoliniumhaltiger Kontrastmittel zur Signalintensitaetssteigerung im Gelenkkavum fuehrt. In dieser Studie wurde erstmals diese Technik der indirekten MR-Arthrographie am Schultergelenk in der Diagnostik von Labrumlaesionen evaluiert. Methode: 28 Patienten mit klinischem Verdacht auf eine Verletzung des Labrum glenoidale und/oder der Rotatorenmanschette wurden prospektiv nach folgendem Protokoll an einem 1,5-Tesla-System mit einer Oberflaechen-Ringspule untersucht: 1. Native MR-Standard-Untersuchung mit

  6. In-Plane Ultrasound-Guided Knee Injection Through a Lateral Suprapatellar Approach: A Safe Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco A; Taneja, Atul K; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello H

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to describe a technique for in-plane ultrasound-guided knee arthrography through a lateral suprapatellar approach, reporting its accuracy and related complications. A retrospective search was performed for computed tomography and magnetic resonance reports from June 2013 through June 2015. Imaging studies, puncture descriptions, and guided-procedure images were reviewed along with clinical and surgical history. A fellowship-trained musculoskeletal radiologist performed all procedures under sterile technique and ultrasound guidance with the probe in oblique position on the lateral suprapatellar recess after local anesthesia with the patient on dorsal decubitus, hip in neutral rotation, and 30 to 45 degrees of knee flexion. A total of 86 consecutive subjects were evaluated (mean, 55 years). All subjects underwent intra-articular injection of contrast, which was successfully reached in the first attempt in 94.2% of the procedures (81/86), and in the second attempt in 5.8% (5/86) after needle repositioning without a second puncture. There were no postprocedural reports of regional complications at the puncture site, such as significant pain, bleeding, or vascular lesions. Our study demonstrates that in-plane ultrasound-guided injection of the knee in semiflexion approaching the lateral suprapatellar recess is a safe and useful technique to administer intra-articular contrast solution, as an alternative method without radiation exposure.

  7. MR-guided MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratting, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Pretterklieber, M.; Kontaxis, G.; Rand, T.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR-guided technique for joint puncture in MR arthrography of the shoulder and to confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip by visualization of the flow of contrast media into the joint. Materials and methods: Three unfixed human shoulder joint specimens were examined on a 1.0 T unit. The optimal point of entrance and depth for joint puncture were estimated by means of MR-compatible markers on the skin. Needle orientation and localization of the needle tip (MR-compatible 22-gauge needle) in the shoulder joint were monitored by rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences in two orthogonal planes. To confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip, diluted gadolinium-DTPA was administered via a long connecting tube and the flow of contrast media into the joint was viewed directly on an LCD screen using real-time MR imaging (local look technique). Results: The MR-compatible markers on the skin allowed determination of the optimal point of entrance and estimation of the depth for joint puncture. Passive visualization of the MR-compatible needle due to spin dephasing and signal loss provided adequate localization of the intra-articular needle tip position in all specimens, although significant artefacts were present on rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences with an increase in width of the apparent needle shaft. Real-time MR imaging of the flow of contrast media was possible using the local look technique and the LCD screen of the MR unit and allowed confirmation of the intracapsular position. Conclusion: MR-guided joint puncture and real-time MR-assisted contrast media application results in improved MR arthrography and may replace conventional fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.) [de

  8. Computed tomography of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Byung Won; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Park, Sung Hak; Kim, Tae Hun; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Yong Joo; Kang, Duk Sik; Kwon, Sae Hong

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosis of knee joint pathology has been mainly dependent on clinical manifestations and invasive procedures such as arthrography and arthroscopy etc. However, these procedures are invasive. Arthroscopy is performed under general anesthesia. Recently, with development of high resolution CT with thin slices and multiplanar reconstructions capability, CT could be used to verify the internal structures of knee joint in noninvasive or less invasive way. From June to December 1985, authors have experienced 19 cases of the knee joint CT. Among them, 13 cases were operated and confirmed. We concluded as follows. 1. The diagnostic accuracy of the knee CT was 100% in lateral meniscal tearing, 92.3% in medial mensical tearing, 92.3% in detachment of lateral collateral ligament, 92.3% in medial collateral ligament, 100% in tearing of cruciate ligaments. 2. CT could be considered as a primary diagnostic procedure in the knee pathology rather than more invasive arthroscopy or arthrography. 3. For the accurate diagnosis of knee joint pathology, CT, which can obtain thin slies, high resolution, multiplanar reconstructions, is indispensable.

  9. MRI monitoring of autologous hyaline cartilage grafts in the knee joint: a follow-up study over 12 months; MRT-Monitoring autologer Chondrozytentransplantate im Kniegelenk: Eine Verlaufsstudie ueber 12 Monate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Horvat, C.; Schick, F.; Claussen, C.D.; Groenewaeller, E. [Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of different MR sequences for monitoring the stage of maturation of hyaline cartilage grafts in the knee joint and the early detection of complications like hypertrophy. In addition, it was analyzed whether indirect MR arthrography can indicate debonding of the graft. Materials and Methods: MRI examinations were performed in 19 patients, aged 17-43 years, with autologous transplantation of a hyaline cartilage tissue graft after knee trauma. Examination dates were prior to transplantation to localize the defect, and 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months after transplantation to control morphology and maturation of the autologous graft. Standard T2- and protondensity-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences and T1-weighted spin echo (SE) sequences were used, as well as gradient echo (GRE) sequences with and without magnetization transfer (MT) prepulses. In some cases, indirect MR arthrography was performed. Results: Cartilage defect and the hyaline cartilage graft could be detected in all 19 patients. Hypertrophy of the graft could be found early in 3 patients and debonding in 1 patient. For depicting the graft a short time after surgery. T2-weighted TSE-sequences showed the best results. Six and 12 months after transplantation, spoiled 3D-GRE-sequences like FLASH3D (fast low angle shot) showed reduced artifacts due to magnetic residues from the surgery. Difference images from GRE-sequences with and without MT pulse provided high contrast between cartilage and surrounding tissue. The quantification of the MT effect showed an assimilation of the graft to the original cartilage within 12 months. Indirect MR arthrography showed subchondral contrast medium even 12 months after transplantation in 3 patients. (orig.)

  10. Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee: clinical and MR imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M.G.; Cho, W.H.; Kim, B.H.; Choi, J.A.; Lee, N.J.; Chung, K.B.; Choi, Y.S.; Cho, S.B.; Lim, H.C.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present clinical and MR imaging features of intra-articular ganglion cysts of the knee. Retrospective review of 1685 consecutive medical records and MR examinations of the knee performed at three imaging centers allowed identification of 20 patients (13 men and 7 women; mean age 35 years), in whom evidence of intra-articular ganglion cyst was seen. Of the 20 ganglion cysts, 5 were found in the infrapatellar fat pad, 10 arose from the posterior cruciate ligament, and 5 from the anterior cruciate ligament. Three of five patients with ganglion cyst in the infrapatellar fat pad had a palpable mass. In 7 of 15 patients with ganglion cyst in the intercondylar notch, exacerbation of pain occurred in a squatting position. On four MR arthrographies, ganglion cysts were an intra-articular round, lobulated, low signal intensity lesion. Five cases of fat-suppressed contrast-enhanced T1-weighted SE images demonstrated peripheral thin rim enhancement. The clinical presentation of intra-articular ganglion cyst is varied according to its intra-articular location. The MR appearance of intra-articular ganglion cyst is characteristic and usually associated with the cruciate ligament or the infrapatellar fat pad. Magnetic resonance arthrography has no definite advantage over conventional MR in the evaluation of the lesion. For intra-articular ganglion cyst in the infrapatellar fat pad, fat-suppressed contrast-enhanced MR imaging could be useful, because a thin, rim-enhancing feature of intra-articular ganglion cyst allows it to be distinguished from synovial hemangioma and synovial sarcoma. (orig.)

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    Full Text Available ... your procedure. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for this ... which may be sent to a laboratory for analysis. Aspiration is typically performed when an infection is ...

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    Full Text Available ... before the procedure and realize that there are food and drink restrictions that may be required prior to sedation. You should plan to have a relative or friend drive you home after your procedure. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically ...

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    Full Text Available ... of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying but encourage linking ...

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    Full Text Available ... and have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician about ... physician and technologist if they may be pregnant. Children younger than 13 may need to be sedated ...

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or pulsed x-ray ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

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    Full Text Available ... the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ... Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not ...

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    Full Text Available ... or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Do ... Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From (your name): Your e-mail ...

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ... signals that are detected by the coils. The electric current does not come in contact with the ...

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    Full Text Available ... risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If sedation is used, there are ... protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems ...

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    Full Text Available ... the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x-rays ... amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body tissue from which they come. The ...

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    Full Text Available ... pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to ... See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. Though MRI does not use ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

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    Full Text Available ... of small internal structures. This leads to improved evaluation of diseases or conditions within the joint. It ... joint which becomes clearly visible during x-ray evaluation, allowing the radiologist to assess the anatomy and ...

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    Full Text Available ... attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring it to your exam in case the radiologist or technologist has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... ionizing radiation. Instead, radiofrequency pulses re-align hydrogen atoms that naturally exist within the body while you ... chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return to their usual alignment, they emit different ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... unexplained pain. It is very effective at detecting disease within the ligaments, tendons and cartilage. It may ...

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    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

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    Full Text Available ... to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The images can then be examined on a computer monitor connected to an image archive (PACS system) or printed or copied to CD. MRI does not use ...

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with expertise ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | ...

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    Full Text Available ... frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or ... usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Exams involving MR imaging: ...

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    Full Text Available ... usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam. Exams involving MR imaging: ... imaging: There is always a slight chance of cancer from excessive exposure to radiation. However, the benefit ...

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    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that ...

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    Full Text Available ... of which shows a thin slice of the body. The images can then be studied from different angles by ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media ... Videos related to Direct ...

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    Full Text Available ... care is taken during x-ray examinations to use the lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for evaluation. National and international radiology protection organizations continually review ...

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    Full Text Available ... material. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... Exams involving MRI may take more than one hour. top of page What will I experience during ...

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    Full Text Available ... performed? This examination is usually done on an outpatient basis. The patient is positioned on the examination ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician , who will discuss the results ...

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    Full Text Available ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones during the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ...

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    Full Text Available ... computer monitor connected to an image archive (PACS system) or printed or copied to CD. MRI does ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

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    Full Text Available ... are also captured and stored electronically on a computer. Unlike conventional x-ray examinations and computed tomography (CT) scans, MRI does not utilize ionizing radiation. ...

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    Full Text Available ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned based on this information. The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. ...

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... injection. If you do not require sedation, no recovery period is necessary. You may resume your usual ...

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    Full Text Available ... physician and technologist if they may be pregnant. Children younger than 13 may need to be sedated ... also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

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    Full Text Available ... be present in your body due to prior accidents. Foreign bodies near and especially lodged in the ... you are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the ... will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

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    Full Text Available ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of time after placement (usually six weeks) ... center of the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet ...

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    Full Text Available ... bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Musculoskeletal Radiation Dose in ... the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | ...

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    Full Text Available ... inflammation and provide physicians additional information about possible sources of pain. top of page How should I ... or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines are open on the sides (open MRI). Open units are ...

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    Full Text Available ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures that those parts of a patient's body not being imaged receive minimal radiation exposure. ...

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    Full Text Available ... ankle arthrogram. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - ...

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    Full Text Available ... in order to hold still for the procedure. Parents should ask about sedation before the procedure and ... part of the body being imaged, send and receive radio waves, producing signals that are detected by ...

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    Full Text Available ... is particularly true for the shoulder in the setting of shoulder dislocation and in the hip, wrist ... protection organizations continually review and update the technique standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems ...

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    Full Text Available ... related pain or inflammation and provide physicians additional information about possible sources of pain. top of page ... the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x-rays. Though MRI does ...

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    Full Text Available ... it contains gadolinium, which affects the local magnetic field within the joint and appears on the MR ... images are produced. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radiofrequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed ...

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    Full Text Available ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

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    Full Text Available ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician , who will discuss the results ... assistance. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken during x-ray examinations to use ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... they may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and ...

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    Full Text Available ... You will experience a slight pinprick and may feel a momentary burning if a local anesthesia is used to numb the joint area. You may feel pressure or even pain when the needle is ...

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index ...

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    Full Text Available ... the exam as there is a slight increased risk of dislocation after your procedure. Typically, if an arthrogram is performed on a joint, you will be asked to minimize activity using that joint for about 24 hours after ...

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    Full Text Available ... doctor if there’s a possibility that you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications ... if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI) or fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray. Your preparation may vary depending on which imaging ... a joint often uses a special form of x-ray called fluoroscopy to guide and evaluate the injection ...

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    Full Text Available ... the technologist if you have medical or electronic devices in your body. These objects may interfere with ... the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining the MRI risks ...

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    Full Text Available ... ear) implant some types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within ... may distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about ...

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    Full Text Available ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ... which they come. The MR scanner captures this energy and creates a picture of the tissues scanned ...

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    Full Text Available ... involve exposure to ionizing radiation. MRI enables the discovery of abnormalities that might be obscured by bone ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ...

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... fluoroscopic images to plan an ankle arthrogram. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

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    Full Text Available ... rays. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Arthrographic images help physicians evaluate ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

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    Full Text Available ... that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... rays. Though MRI does not use ionizing radiation, women should still inform their physician and technologist if ...

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    Full Text Available ... ray evaluation, allowing the radiologist to assess the anatomy and function of the joint. Although the injection ... you are taking and if you have any kidney problems or allergies, especially to iodinated or gadolinium- ...

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    Full Text Available ... and have claustrophobia (fear of enclosed spaces) or anxiety, you may want to ask your physician about ... the magnet. Some MRI units, called short-bore systems , are designed so that the magnet does not ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones to help ... the cause of chronic joint pain and what therapies may be effective. It is also recommended that ...

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    Full Text Available ... you are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms ... material and experience hives, itchy eyes or other reactions. If you experience allergic symptoms, notify the technologist. ...

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    Full Text Available ... computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures. The ... absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more ...

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    Full Text Available ... iodine and is less likely to cause side effects or an allergic reaction. Tell the radiologist if ... the area. After the local anesthetic has taken effect, a longer needle is then inserted into the ...

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or pulsed x-ray ... joint area. You may feel pressure or even pain when the needle is advanced into the joint. ...

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    Full Text Available ... radiologist or technologist may ask if you have asthma, or allergies of any kind, such as an ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... may move during the scan, possibly causing blindness. Dyes used in tattoos may contain iron and could ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ...

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    Full Text Available ... up in shades of gray and air appears black. Until recently, x-ray images were maintained on ... mild nausea to severe cardiovascular complications may result. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

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    Full Text Available ... inflammation and provide physicians additional information about possible sources of pain. top of page How should I ... their usual alignment, they emit different amounts of energy that vary according to the type of body ...

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    Full Text Available ... Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or ... to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or pulsed x- ...

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    Full Text Available ... material. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Magnetic Resonance ...

  6. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... some bruising. There is also a very small chance of irritation of your skin at the site ... is penetrated carries a risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be ...

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    Full Text Available ... The magnetic field is produced by passing an electric current through wire coils in most MRI units. Other coils, located in the machine and in some cases, placed around the part ...

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    Full Text Available ... no: Thank you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. ( ...

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    Full Text Available ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ... and send a signed report to your primary care or referring physician , who will discuss the results ...

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    Full Text Available ... navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z ... is a type of medical imaging used to help evaluate and diagnose joint conditions and unexplained pain. It is very effective at ...

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... minimize radiation exposure to the baby. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x- ...

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or pulsed x-ray ... are in the scanner without causing any chemical changes in the tissues. As the hydrogen atoms return ...

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    Full Text Available ... an indirect arthrogram. The radiologist or technologist may ask if you have asthma, or allergies of any kind, such as an allergy to iodine or x- ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and ... has any questions. Some implanted devices require a short period of ...

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    Full Text Available ... reviewed on April 01, 2017 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

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    Full Text Available ... you are taking and if you have any kidney problems or allergies, especially to iodinated or gadolinium- ... recently had surgery. Some conditions, such as severe kidney disease, may prevent you from being given MRI ...

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    Full Text Available ... of the radiation while soft tissue, such as muscle, fat and organs, allow more of the x- ... standards used by radiology professionals. Modern x-ray systems have very controlled x-ray beams and dose ...

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    Full Text Available ... claustrophobia. Newer open MRI units provide very high quality images for many types of exams. Older open MRI units may not provide this same image quality. Certain types of exams cannot be performed using ...

  19. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... information, consult your radiologist. The computer workstation that processes the imaging information is located in a separate ... in contact with the patient. A computer then processes the signals and generates a series of images, ...

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    Full Text Available ... Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise in several radiologic ... Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate ...

  1. Arthrography

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    Full Text Available ... material. top of page How does the procedure work? X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an ...

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    Full Text Available ... MRI examination poses almost no risk to the average patient when appropriate safety guidelines are followed. If ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

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    Full Text Available ... examinations. Examples include but are not limited to: artificial heart valves implanted drug infusion ports artificial limbs or metallic joint prostheses implanted nerve stimulators ...

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    Full Text Available ... allowing the radiologist to assess the anatomy and function of the joint. Although the injection is typically ... images help physicians evaluate alterations in structure and function of a joint and help to determine the ...

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    Full Text Available ... a slight pinprick and may feel a momentary burning if a local anesthesia is used to numb ... geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, the medical facility staff ...

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    Full Text Available ... used in tattoos may contain iron and could heat up during an MRI scan, but this is ... joint area. You may feel pressure or even pain when the needle is advanced into the joint. ...

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. In some cases, additional medications, such as anti-inflammatory steroids, may be injected into the joint along ... risk of infection. The chance of infection requiring antibiotic treatment appears to be less than one in ...

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    Full Text Available ... physician will be available for immediate assistance. A Word About Minimizing Radiation Exposure Special care is taken ... including defects of the cartilage, which can be found inside and along the edges of some joints, ...

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    Full Text Available ... The physician will sometimes use a syringe to drain (or aspirate) the joint fluid, which may be ... your skin at the site of the IV tube insertion. Some patients may sense a temporary metallic ...

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    Full Text Available ... have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Musculoskeletal radiologist using fluoroscopic images to plan an ankle arthrogram. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

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    Full Text Available ... intercom. Many MRI centers allow a friend or parent to stay in the room as long as they are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or headphones ...

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    Full Text Available ... clothing that might interfere with the x-ray images. Women should always inform their physician and x-ray ... lowest radiation dose possible while producing the best images for ... organizations continually review and update the technique standards used ...

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    Full Text Available ... current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management. Fluoroscopy uses a continuous or pulsed x-ray ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

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    Full Text Available ... are also screened for safety in the magnetic environment. Children will be given appropriately sized earplugs or ... have very controlled x-ray beams and dose control methods to minimize stray (scatter) radiation. This ensures ...

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    Full Text Available ... it is useful to bring that to the attention of the scheduler before the exam and bring ... bore which can be more comfortable for larger size patients or patients with claustrophobia. Other MRI machines ...

  18. Diagnosis of SLAP lesions with Grashey-view arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H. Edmund; Van Raalte, Vanessa; Malian, Vartan

    2003-01-01

    To examine the accuracy of Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography in the diagnosis of clinically relevant superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. Grashey views obtained during diagnostic arthrography (conventional and MR) were used to examine the superior labrum. Twenty-eight of 118 shoulder arthrograms obtained during a 27-month period fulfilled study criteria and were correlated for accuracy using arthroscopically confirmed grade 2-4 SLAP lesions as the standard of reference. Arthrograms were graded using the consensus method. Prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 21%, 50%, 86%, and 79%. The appearance of the superior labrum on the Grashey view was compared subjectively with MR arthrography. Sources of errors were analyzed. Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography can diagnose clinically relevant SLAP lesions with moderately high specificity, moderate accuracy, and limited sensitivity. Findings on the Grashey view closely resemble those seen on coronal oblique MR arthrography. Grashey views should be considered in patients undergoing shoulder arthrography. (orig.)

  19. Diagnosis of SLAP lesions with Grashey-view arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. Edmund [Radiological Associates of Sacramento Medical Group, Inc., 1500 Expo Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95815 (United States); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States); Van Raalte, Vanessa; Malian, Vartan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, UC Davis Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Suite 3100, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States)

    2003-07-01

    To examine the accuracy of Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography in the diagnosis of clinically relevant superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. Grashey views obtained during diagnostic arthrography (conventional and MR) were used to examine the superior labrum. Twenty-eight of 118 shoulder arthrograms obtained during a 27-month period fulfilled study criteria and were correlated for accuracy using arthroscopically confirmed grade 2-4 SLAP lesions as the standard of reference. Arthrograms were graded using the consensus method. Prevalence, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 21%, 50%, 86%, and 79%. The appearance of the superior labrum on the Grashey view was compared subjectively with MR arthrography. Sources of errors were analyzed. Grashey views obtained during shoulder arthrography can diagnose clinically relevant SLAP lesions with moderately high specificity, moderate accuracy, and limited sensitivity. Findings on the Grashey view closely resemble those seen on coronal oblique MR arthrography. Grashey views should be considered in patients undergoing shoulder arthrography. (orig.)

  20. Paralabral cysts in the hip joint: findings at MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerkurth, Olaf; Jacobson, Jon A.; Girish, Gandikota; Kalume Brigido, Monica; Fessell, David; Bedi, Asheesh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to retrospectively characterize paralabral cysts of the hip as seen at MR arthrography. After Institutional Review Board approval, 704 patients who had MR arthrography were identified over a 3-year period and 40 patients were identified as having a cyst or fluid collection at the hip by MR report. MR images from these 40 patients were retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists where 18 were found to have a paralabral cyst, which were characterized as follows: location, configuration, contrast filling, size of the cyst, extent, direction, and whether associated osseous changes were present. In addition, the acetabular labrum was assessed for tears and, if present, the location and pattern were characterized. Paralabral cysts were located anterosuperiorly in 56%, anteriorly in 22%, posterosuperiorly in 17%, and anteroinferiorly in 6% of cases. The vast majority (94%) were multilocular and filled with intra-articular contrast medium. The average dimensions were 8 x 7 x 11 mm. The paralabral cyst demonstrated extracapsular extension in 72% of cases, with 39% located between the ilium and gluteus minimus, and 22% between the ilium and iliopsoas. Remodeling of the ilium adjacent to the cyst was observed in 50% of these cases. A labral tear was at the base of the labrum adjacent to the cyst in 78% of cases, while the tear was isolated to the body of the labrum in 22%. Tears were most commonly anterosuperior (55%) or anterior (28%) in location. Our results show that paralabral cysts of the hip are most commonly located anterosuperiorly, are multilocular, fill with intra-articular contrast medium, have average dimensions up to 11 mm, and often extend extracapsularly between muscle and bone where they may remodel the adjacent ilium. (orig.)

  1. Advanced imaging of the musculoskeletal system: Standard, three-dimensional, and contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging, and quantitative bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This course reviews the application of advanced imaging techniques to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders. The indications for and utility of standard CT in both the axial and the appendicular skeleton is explored. The combined use of CT with air and contrast arthrography at sites including the hip, knee, and shoulder is discussed. A summary of the proved and potential applications of MR imaging in osseous, articular, bone marrow, and soft-tissue disorders is provided. The utility of intraarticular contrast agents in enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MR imaging for disorders of hyaline cartilage and and fibrocartilage is demonstrated. The advantages of multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional image reconstruction of cross-sectional imaging data are described in conjunction with the fundamental technological principles of these strategies. Accepted methods as well as investigative techniques for the diagnosis and follow-up of metabolic bone disease are contrasted with regard to relative indications, advantages, and limitations

  2. Wrist arthrography: The value of the three compartment injection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Coren, A.B.; Palmer, A.K.; Zinberg, E.

    1987-10-01

    Arthrography of the wrist was performed on 50 consecutive patients with obscure post-traumatic wrist pain by injecting contrast separately into the radiocarpal joint, midcarpal compartment, and distal radioulnar joint. When distal radioulnar joint and midcarpal compartment injections were added to the standard radiocarpal injection, many significant unsuspected abnormalities were identified. Of the 25 triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities identified, six (24%) were found only with the distal radioulnar joint injection. Of the 29 abnormal communications between the midcarpal compartment and the radiocarpal joint, ten (35%) were found only with the midcarpal injection. Similarly, five of 29 (17%) of the abnormal radiocarpal-midcarpal communications would have been missed if a midcarpal injection alone had been performed. These findings indicate that separate injections into the radiocarpal joint, midcarpal compartment, and distal radioulnar joint are needed to identify a large number of abnormalities not seen with injections into one compartment alone.

  3. Fluoroscopically-Guided Posterior Approach for Shoulder Magnetic Resonance Arthrography: Comparison with Conventional Anterior Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Koun J.; Ha, Doo Hoe; Lee, Sang Min

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the usefulness of the fluoroscopically-guided posterior approach compared with the anterior approach for shoulder magnetic resonance(MR) arthrography. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Among 60 shoulder MR arthrographies performed on 59 patients with symptomatic shoulders, an intra-articular injection was performed (30 cases using the anterior approach and 30 using the posterior approach). Procedure-related pain was assessed by using a 5 score visual analogue scale (VAS). Depth of the puncture and standardized depth of puncture by body mass index (BMI) were recorded. The contrast leakage along the course of the puncture was evaluated by reviewing the MR. The statistical analyses included the Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis test. There was no significant difference in VAS scores between the anterior and posterior groups (1.77 ± 1.10 vs. 1.80 ± 0.96). Depth of puncture and standardized depth of puncture by BMI were significantly shorter in the posterior group than those in the anterior group (4.4 ± 0.8 cm and 1.8 ± 0.3 cm vs. 6.6 ± 0.9 cm and 2.8 ± 0.4 cm, p < 0.001), respectively. The incidence of contrast leakage was more frequent in the posterior group (p = 0.003). The posterior approach will be useful in shoulder MR arthrography with a suspected anterior pathology, a postoperative follow-up study or obese patient.

  4. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M., E-mail: anacresporodriguez@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C., E-mail: jclucasv@hotmail.com [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel, E-mail: m.pastrana@telefonica.net [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Hualde-Juvera, Ana, E-mail: ana.hualdej@salud.madrid.org [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Méndez-Alonso, Santiago, E-mail: smendez.sma@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, c/ Joaquín Rodrigo 2, Majadahonda 28222, Madrid (Spain); Padron, Mario, E-mail: mario.padron@clinicacemtro.com [Department of Radiology, Clínica Cemtro, Avda Ventisquero de la Condesa 42 Madrid 28035, Madrid (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • High resolution sequences at 3-T MRI extend accuracy in hip assessment without any need for intra-articular injection of contrast media. • As compared to 1.5-T MRA, 3-T non-contrast MRI of the hip improves the patient experience and avoids the potential risks of an invasive procedure and contrast media. • Avoiding the need for arthrographic procedures in the Radiology Department improves patient throughput and reduces costs. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Subjects and methods: Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. Results: The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Conclusion: Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast

  5. The diagnostic performance of non-contrast 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3-T MRI) versus 1.5-Tesla magnetic resonance arthrography (1.5-T MRA) in femoro-acetabular impingement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo-Rodríguez, Ana M.; De Lucas-Villarrubia, Jose C.; Pastrana-Ledesma, Miguel; Hualde-Juvera, Ana; Méndez-Alonso, Santiago; Padron, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • High resolution sequences at 3-T MRI extend accuracy in hip assessment without any need for intra-articular injection of contrast media. • As compared to 1.5-T MRA, 3-T non-contrast MRI of the hip improves the patient experience and avoids the potential risks of an invasive procedure and contrast media. • Avoiding the need for arthrographic procedures in the Radiology Department improves patient throughput and reduces costs. - Abstract: Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of 3-T non-contrast MRI versus 1.5-T MRA for assessing labrum and articular cartilage lesions in patients with clinical suspicion of femoro-acetabular impingement (FAI). Subjects and methods: Fifty patients (thirty men and twenty women, mean age 42.5 years) underwent 1.5-T MRA, 3-T MRI and arthroscopy on the same hip. An optimized high-resolution proton density spin echo pulse sequence was included in the 3-T non-contrast MRI protocol. Results: The 3-T non-contrast MRI identified forty-two of the forty-three arthroscopically proven tears at the labral-chondral transitional zone (sensitivity, 97.7%; specificity, 100%; positive predictive value (PPV), 100%; negative predictive value (NPV), 87.5%; accuracy 98%). With 1.5-T MRA, forty-four tears were diagnosed. However, there was one false positive (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 85.7%; PPV, 97.7%; NPV, 100%; accuracy 98%). Agreement between arthroscopy and MRI, whether 3-T non-contrast MRI or 1.5-T MRA, as to the degree of chondral lesion in the acetabulum was reached in half of the patients and in the femur in 76% of patients. Conclusion: Non-invasive assessment of the hip is possible with 3-T MR magnet. 3-T non-contrast MRI could replace MRA as the workhorse technique for assessing hip internal damage. MRA would then be reserved for young adults with a strong clinical suspicion of FAI but normal findings on 3-T non-contrast MRI. When compared with 1.5-T MRA, optimized sequences with 3-T non-contrast

  6. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Dietrich, Tobias J. [Balgrist University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Business Area Advanced Therapies, Forchheim (Germany); Le Corroller, Thomas [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, ISM UMR 7287, Marseille (France); Radiology Department, APHM, Marseille (France)

    2017-02-15

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  7. C-arm flat-panel CT arthrography of the shoulder: Radiation dose considerations and preliminary data on diagnostic performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guggenberger, Roman; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Kaelin, Pascal; Pfammatter, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem; Andreisek, Gustav; Dietrich, Tobias J.; Scholz, Rosemarie; Koehler, Christoph; Elsaesser, Thilo; Le Corroller, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    To investigate radiation dose and diagnostic performance of C-arm flat-panel CT (FPCT) versus standard multi-detector CT (MDCT) shoulder arthrography using MRI-arthrography as reference standard. Radiation dose of two different FPCT acquisitions (5 and 20 s) and standard MDCT of the shoulder were assessed using phantoms and thermoluminescence dosimetry. FPCT arthrographies were performed in 34 patients (mean age 44 ± 15 years). Different joint structures were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed by two independent radiologists. Inter-reader agreement and diagnostic performance were calculated. Effective radiation dose was markedly lower in FPCT 5 s (0.6 mSv) compared to MDCT (1.7 mSv) and FPCT 20 s (3.4 mSv). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in FPCT 20-s versus 5-s protocols. Inter-reader agreements of qualitative ratings ranged between κ = 0.47-1.0. Sensitivities for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies were low for FPCT 5-s (40 % and 20 %) and moderate for FPCT 20-s protocols (75 % and 73 %). FPCT showed high sensitivity (81-86 % and 89-99 %) for bone and acromioclavicular-joint pathologies. Using a 5-s protocol FPCT shoulder arthrography provides lower radiation dose compared to MDCT but poor sensitivity for cartilage and rotator cuff pathologies. FPCT 20-s protocol is moderately sensitive for cartilage and rotator cuff tendon pathology with markedly higher radiation dose compared to MDCT. (orig.)

  8. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S.; Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  9. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.radlbauer@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Lomoschitz, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.lomoschitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Salomonowitz, Erich, E-mail: erich.salomonowitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut E., E-mail: info@mrt-kompetenzzentrum.d [MRT Competence Center Schloss Werneck, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 2, 97440 Werneck (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  10. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf; Lomoschitz, Friedrich; Salomonowitz, Erich; Eberhardt, Knut E.; Stadlbauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  11. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Although assessment of internal derangements of the knee begins with clinical evaluation including careful physical examination, imaging is fundamental to accurate diagnosis of many of these derangements. MRI has become a valuable diagnostic modality for the evaluation of neoplastic, traumatic, and inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. MRI not only depicts osseous lesions, but provides information on the cartilage, menisci, ligaments and surrounding soft-tissues. The menisci of the knee are composed of fibrocartilage. Advanced degeneration is observed during aging, although it is difficult to determine which changes are age-related alone and which are caused by prior overuse of trauma. Although meniscal tears may be discovered incidentally, they may have a variety of clinical manifestations. Two categories of meniscal tears commonly are identified: traumatic and degenerative. This categorization generally is based on analysis of the clinical history, the age of the patients, and the gross morphology of the meniscus at the time of arthroscopy. Sometimes torn meniscal fragments may be displaced and lead to restriction of movement in the knee joint. MRI is the method of choice in the preoperative diagnosis of meniscal injuries of the knee. Sensitivities and specificities for meniscal tears above 95% with a negative predictive value of almost 100% are reported. In the evaluation of postoperative menisci, however, the above mentioned criteria have proved more problematic if diagnosis is uncertain, therefore, MR-arthrography seems to be a reasonable alternative to repeat arthroscopy in patients who have had surgical treatment of meniscal tears. MR imaging diagnosis of injuries to the anterior acruciate ligament is based on direct signs and abnormalities in the surrounding structures (indirect or secondary signs). The two major alterations occurring within the ligament itself are changes in this morphology or courses and changes in its signal

  12. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitner, K.F.; Grebe, P.; Kersjes, W.; Runkel, M.; Kirschner, P.; Schild, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.) [de

  13. A Simple Technique for Shoulder Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, J.D.; Redondo, M.V.; Martinez, F.; Reus, M.; Alonso, J.; Parrilla, A.; Campos, P.A. [Virgen de la Arrixaca Univ. Hospital, El Palmar, Murcia (Spain). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To present a systematic approach to teaching a technique for arthrography of the shoulder. Using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates, precise sites for puncture can be identified and the need for fluoroscopic guidance obviated. Material and Methods: Forty-six glenohumeral arthrograms were performed in 45 patients; in 1 case involving examination of both shoulders. The stages of the technique are described in detail, as are the fundamental aspects of achieving an effective glenohumeral injection. Pain intensity was measured in all patients using a verbal description scale. Results: Shoulder arthrography was successful in all cases. Average time taken for the procedure was 7 min, with no difference in the respective times required by an experienced radiologist and a resident. The procedure was well tolerated by most patients, with slight discomfort being observed in a very few cases. Conclusion: The arthrographic technique used in this study is simple, safe, rapid, and reproducible, and has the advantage of precise localization of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. The procedure described in this study can be of help in teaching residents and can reduce the learning curve for radiologists with no experience in arthrographic methods. It also reduces the time of exposure to fluoroscopy Keywords: Arthrography, joint, shoulder.

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Degenerative Cartilage and Subchondral Bony Lesions in a Preserved Cadaveric Knee: Propagation-Based Phase-Contrast CT Versus Conventional MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geith, Tobias; Brun, Emmanuel; Mittone, Alberto; Gasilov, Sergei; Weber, Loriane; Adam-Neumair, Silvia; Bravin, Alberto; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola; Horng, Annie

    2018-04-09

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone conditions in a fully preserved cadaveric human knee joint using high-resolution x-ray propagation-based phase-contrast imaging (PBI) CT and to compare the performance of the new technique with conventional CT and MRI. A cadaveric human knee was examined using an x-ray beam of 60 keV, a detector with a 90-mm 2 FOV, and a pixel size of 46 × 46 μm 2 . PBI CT images were reconstructed with both the filtered back projection algorithm and the equally sloped tomography method. Conventional 3-T MRI and CT were also performed. Measurements of cartilage thickness, cartilage lesions, International Cartilage Repair Society scoring, and detection of subchondral bone changes were evaluated. Visual inspection of the specimen akin to arthroscopy was conducted and served as a standard of reference for lesion detection. Loss of cartilage height was visible on PBI CT and MRI. Quantification of cartilage thickness showed a strong correlation between the two modalities. Cartilage lesions appeared darker than the adjacent cartilage on PBI CT. PBI CT showed similar agreement to MRI for depicting cartilage substance defects or lesions compared with the visual inspection. The assessment of subchondral bone cysts showed moderate to strong agreement between PBI CT and CT. In contrast to the standard clinical methods of MRI and CT, PBI CT is able to simultaneously depict cartilage and bony changes at high resolution. Though still an experimental technique, PBI CT is a promising high-resolution imaging method to evaluate comprehensive changes of osteoarthritic disease in a clinical setting.

  15. Sport injuries of the knee in young people

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainz, L; Brezina, K

    1981-12-01

    The largest number of injuries of the knee occurrs in athletes. The portion of girls has reached 30%. More than 50% of all injuries regard the ligaments and the menisci. Especially in these cases and in combined lesions, arthrography gives good results. All possibilities of investigations should be used for acutely injured sportsmen because of the specific risks and the dissimulation of young sportspeople and because of the danger of late established diagnosis and within those of late damages.

  16. Diagnosis of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury using arthrography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kiyonobu; Soejima, Osamu; Naito, Masatoshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Twenty patients (twenty-one wrists) with chronic ulnar wrist pain who had undergone radiocarpal arthrography and MRI before arthroscopic examination were evaluated to determine the usefulness of these preoperative diagnostic procedures (arthrogrphy and MRI) for the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury. Based on the arthroscopic findings, the sensitivity and specificity of arthrography were 63% and 100% respectively for detecting TFCC lesions, while they were 68% and 50% respectively for MRI. Although no significant superiority was observed between arthrography and MRI in this study, further improrumchts in the preoperative diagnostic procedures are still needed in order to more accurately detect TFCC injuries. (author)

  17. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Knee Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Knee Injuries What's in ... can do to protect them. What's in a Knee? The knee is a joint , actually the largest ...

  18. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  19. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Do we need local anesthesia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spick, Claudio; Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Reittner, Pia; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess pain intensity with and without subcutaneous local anesthesia prior to intraarticular administration of contrast medium for magnetic resonance arthrography (MRa) of the shoulder. Materials and methods: This single-center study was conducted after an IRB waiver of authorization, between January 2010 and December 2012. All patients provided written, informed consent for the procedure. Our prospectively populated institutional database was searched, based on our inclusion criteria. There were 249 outpatients (178 men and 71 women; mean age, 44.4 years ± 14.6; range, 15–79) who underwent MRa and were enrolled in this study. Patients were excluded if they had received surgery of the shoulder before MRa, had undergone repeated MRa of the same shoulder, and/or had undergone MRa of both shoulders on the same day. Patients were randomly assigned into one of three groups. Patients in group A (n = 61) received skin infiltration with local anesthesia. Patients in control group B (n = 92) and group C (n = 96) did not receive local anesthesia. Pain levels were immediately assessed after the injection for MRa using a horizontal visual analog scale (VAS) that ranged from 0 to 10. To compare the pain scores of the three groups for male and female patients, a two-way analysis of variance was used. A p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was considered to indicate a significant result. Results: Patients who received local anesthesia (group A) showed a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.3. In patients who did not receive local anesthetics (groups B and C), a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.2 and 2.7 ± 2.4 were detected, respectively. Between the three groups, no statistically significant difference in pain intensity was detected (p = .960). There were significant differences in subjective pain perception between men and women (p = .009). Moreover, the sex difference in all three groups was equal (p = .934). Conclusion: Local anesthesia is not required to

  20. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Do we need local anesthesia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spick, Claudio, E-mail: claudio.spick@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Medical University of Vienna (AKH), Waehringer-Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Szolar, Dieter H.M.; Reittner, Pia; Preidler, Klaus W.; Tillich, Manfred [Diagnostikum Graz-Südwest, Weblinger Guertel 25, 8054 Graz (Austria)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To assess pain intensity with and without subcutaneous local anesthesia prior to intraarticular administration of contrast medium for magnetic resonance arthrography (MRa) of the shoulder. Materials and methods: This single-center study was conducted after an IRB waiver of authorization, between January 2010 and December 2012. All patients provided written, informed consent for the procedure. Our prospectively populated institutional database was searched, based on our inclusion criteria. There were 249 outpatients (178 men and 71 women; mean age, 44.4 years ± 14.6; range, 15–79) who underwent MRa and were enrolled in this study. Patients were excluded if they had received surgery of the shoulder before MRa, had undergone repeated MRa of the same shoulder, and/or had undergone MRa of both shoulders on the same day. Patients were randomly assigned into one of three groups. Patients in group A (n = 61) received skin infiltration with local anesthesia. Patients in control group B (n = 92) and group C (n = 96) did not receive local anesthesia. Pain levels were immediately assessed after the injection for MRa using a horizontal visual analog scale (VAS) that ranged from 0 to 10. To compare the pain scores of the three groups for male and female patients, a two-way analysis of variance was used. A p-value equal to or less than 0.05 was considered to indicate a significant result. Results: Patients who received local anesthesia (group A) showed a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.3. In patients who did not receive local anesthetics (groups B and C), a mean pain level on the VAS of 2.6 ± 2.2 and 2.7 ± 2.4 were detected, respectively. Between the three groups, no statistically significant difference in pain intensity was detected (p = .960). There were significant differences in subjective pain perception between men and women (p = .009). Moreover, the sex difference in all three groups was equal (p = .934). Conclusion: Local anesthesia is not required to

  1. Bicipital tenosynovitis in the dog: evaluation with positive contrast arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthez, P.Y.; Morgan, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes seven dogs with traumatic bicipital tenosynovitis in which complete clinical, radiographic, and surgical evaluations were performed. All were adult dogs of medium to large breed and were presented with a chronic front limb lameness of several months' duration and shoulder muscle atrophy. Survey radiographs of the scapulohumeral joint showed new bone production almost exclusively in the region of the biceps tendon, i.e., the intertubercular groove and the supraglenoid tuberosity. Arthrograms in six of seven dogs revealed difficulty in filling or irregular filling of the bicipital tendon sheath, best seen on the mediolateral view of the shoulder. On surgical exploration, macroscopic lesions of the tendon and/or the sheath were observed in all dogs and included adhesions, fibrosis, scar tissue, edema, and thickening. Partial tear of the tendon was observed in three dogs

  2. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability.

  3. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability. (orig.)

  4. Rotator cuff ruptures of the shoulder joint, sonography - arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triebel, H.J.; Wening, V.; Witte, G.; Hamburg Univ.

    1986-01-01

    47 patients suspected of rutpure of the rotator cuff were sonographed and arthrographed. Rupture of the rotator cuff was diagnosed in 12 cases, both diagnostic methods yielding the same result. In 29 patients sonography and arthrography did not reveal any abnormal findings. Six ruptures evident in sonography were not confirmed by arthrography and were considered false positive. Direct pointers towards rupture of the cuff would be: echoless defects, cuff cannot be visualised fully or in part and irregularities of movement during dynamic examination. Echoless 'cystic' areas in the periarticular soft parts must be considered an indirect pointer. Echorich focal findings in the echopoor cuff represent a differential diagnostic problem and we cannot give a final assessment as yet. Shoulder sonography is justified as a screening method in suspicion of rotator cuff rupture before initiating arthrography. If sonography reveals no abnormal findings, shoulder arthrography need not be performed. (orig.) [de

  5. The significance of preoperative shoulder arthrography in painful arc patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myllylae, V.; Jalovaara, P.; Pyhtinen, J.; Oulu Univ.

    1984-01-01

    Preoperative shoulder arthrography was performed on 34 patients with painful arc syndromes. Rotator cuff rupture was diagnosed in 20 cases. Out of these the arthrography correctly showed rupture in 17 cases, while in one case rupture was not seen and two examinations were unsuccessful. Rotator cuff rupture was found in 14 cases at operation. Of these, arthrography had been negative in eight cases and in six cases the rupture had merely been suspected. Sensitivity of shoulder arthrography in showing rotator cuff rupture was thus 85%, specificity 57% and accuracy 74%. The biceps tendon was intact in all cases with rotator cuff rupture. S-called ''bicipital leakage'' was seen in four cases, but its significance remains unclear. (orig.) [de

  6. Micro-CT Arthrographic Analysis of Monosodium Iodoacetate- Induced Osteoarthritis in Rat Knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Jong Won; Kang, Heung Sik; Hong, Sung Hwan

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the arthrographic findings of MIA-induced osteoarthritis in rat knees using the micro-CT arthrography. Intra-articular monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) injection-induced arthritis was induced in the right knees of twelve rats; their left knees served as the control group. Eight weeks after MIA injection, micro-CT arthrography was performed on each knee. We measured the thickness of retro-patellar cartilages, the distances of tibio-femoral joint space, subchondral bone plate thickness, tibial epiphyseal height, and transverse patellar diameter. Subchondral trabecular bone indices were measured in the tibial lateral condylar epiphysis. The data were analyzed statistically using a paired t-test. The retro-patellar articular cartilage showed thinning on the right side that had been induced to develop osteoarthritis. The right knees showed a significant reduction in the distance of the tibio-femoral joint space, prominent patellar osteophytes, and the resorption of subchondral bone. Among the subchondral trabecular bone indices, percent bone volume, and trabecular thickness was reduced on the right side. The articular cartilage thickness of MIA-induced arthritis model could be measured using micro- CT arthrography. It was possible to evaluate the osteoarthritic findings including the change in subchondral bone plate thickness, osteophyte formation, and subchondral bone resorption, as well as quantitatively analyze the trabecular bone indices

  7. Micro-CT Arthrographic Analysis of Monosodium Iodoacetate- Induced Osteoarthritis in Rat Knees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    To evaluate the arthrographic findings of MIA-induced osteoarthritis in rat knees using the micro-CT arthrography. Intra-articular monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) injection-induced arthritis was induced in the right knees of twelve rats; their left knees served as the control group. Eight weeks after MIA injection, micro-CT arthrography was performed on each knee. We measured the thickness of retro-patellar cartilages, the distances of tibio-femoral joint space, subchondral bone plate thickness, tibial epiphyseal height, and transverse patellar diameter. Subchondral trabecular bone indices were measured in the tibial lateral condylar epiphysis. The data were analyzed statistically using a paired t-test. The retro-patellar articular cartilage showed thinning on the right side that had been induced to develop osteoarthritis. The right knees showed a significant reduction in the distance of the tibio-femoral joint space, prominent patellar osteophytes, and the resorption of subchondral bone. Among the subchondral trabecular bone indices, percent bone volume, and trabecular thickness was reduced on the right side. The articular cartilage thickness of MIA-induced arthritis model could be measured using micro- CT arthrography. It was possible to evaluate the osteoarthritic findings including the change in subchondral bone plate thickness, osteophyte formation, and subchondral bone resorption, as well as quantitatively analyze the trabecular bone indices.

  8. String-like lumen in below-the-knee chronic total occlusions on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography predicts intraluminal recanalization and better blood flow restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yue-Qi; Lu, Hai-Tao; Wei, Li-Ming; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhao, Jun-Gong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Fang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-07-15

    To determine whether string-like lumina (SLs) on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) predict better outcomes in diabetic patients with below-the-knee (BTK) chronic total occlusions (CTOs). This study involved 317 long-segment (>5 cm) BTK CTOs of 245 patients that were examined using CE-MRA and treated using endovascular angioplasty. An SL with a CTO was slowly filled with blood on conventional CE-MRA. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of procedural success, recanalisation method and immediate blood flow restoration. The target-lesion patency and limb-salvage rates were assessed. SL-positive CTOs (n = 60) achieved a higher technique success rate, preferred intraluminal angioplasty and better blood flow restoration than SL-negative CTOs (n = 257, P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that lesion length was the independent predictor of procedural success (P = 0.028). SL was a predictor of intraluminal angioplasty (P < 0.001) and good blood-flow restoration (P = 0.004). Kaplan-Meier analyses at 12 months revealed a higher target lesion patency rate (P = 0.04) and limb-salvage rate (P = 0.35) in SL-positive CTOs. In patients with BTK CTOs, SL predicted intraluminal angioplasty and good blood-flow restoration for BTK CTOs. (orig.)

  9. Wrist ligament injuries: value of post-arthrography computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Schnyder, P.; Meuli, R. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Favarger, N. [Clinique Longeraie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-02-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of post-arthrography high-resolution computed tomography in wrist ligament injuries.Design and patients: Thirty-six consecutive patients who had a history and clinical findings suggestive of ligamentous injuries of the wrist were prospectively studied. The findings of three-compartment arthrography and post-arthrography computed tomography (arthro-CT) were compared with those of arthroscopy. The evaluation concentrates on the detection and precise localization of ligament lesions in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC), the scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL).Results: For TFC, SLL and LTL lesions, standard arthrography responded with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 85% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively, while arthro-CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 100% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively. The precise localization of the lesions was possible only with arthro-CT.Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity of standard arthrography and arthro-CT are similar, although the latter shows the site of tears or perforation with greater precision, while conventional arthrography demonstrates them indirectly. This precision is essential and may have clinical implications for the success of treatment procedures. (orig.)

  10. Indirect MR-arthography in the fellow up of autologous osteochondral transplantation; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie zur Verlaufskontrolle nach autologer osteochondraler Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herber, S.; Pitton, M.B.; Kalden, P.; Thelen, M.; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie

    2003-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following autologous osteochondral transplantation. Patients and Methods: 10 patients with autogenous osteochondral homografts underwent indirect MR-arthrography at three, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The MR protocol at 1.5T comprised unenhanced imagings with PD- and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequences with and without fat-suppression as well as T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed SE-sequences before and after iv. contrast administration and after active joint exercise. Image analysis was done by two radiologists in conference and comprised the evaluation of signal intensity (SI) and integrity of the osseous plug and the cartilage surface, as well as the presence of joint effusion or bone marrow edema. Results: At three months, all cases demonstrated a significant bone marrow edema at the recipient and donor site that corresponded to a significant enhancement after iv. contrast administration. The interface between the transplant and the normal bone showed an increased SI at three and 6 months in T{sub 2}-weighted images as well as in indirect MR-arthrography. The marrow signal normalized in most cases after 6 to 12 months, indicating vitality and healing of the transplanted osteochondral graft. The SI of the interface decreased in the same period, demonstrating the stability of the homograft at the recipient site. The osteochondral plugs were well-seated in 9/10 cases. Indirect MR-arthrography was superior to unenhanced imaging in the assessment of the cartilage surface. Cartilage coverage was complete in every case. The transplanted hyaline cartilage as well as the original cartilage showed a significant increase of the SI in indirect MR-arthrography, that did not change in follow up studies. There were no pathological alterations of signal and thickness alterations of the transplanted cartilage in follow up investigations. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool

  11. MR arthrography of the shoulder: possible indications for clinical use; Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie bei Erkrankungen des Schultergelenkes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Grebe, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Kersjes, W. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie; Kirschner, P. [Elisabeth-Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Abt. fuer Unfall- und Wiederherstellungschirurgie St. Vincenz; Schild, H.H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik mit Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    1994-02-01

    In a prospective study possible indications for MR arthrography of the shoulder were evaluated. 37 patients were examined before and after intraarticular administration of a 2-mmolar solution of Gd-DTPA. MR arthrography was performed if there was no joint effusion and/or an uncertain finding concerning the rotator cuff or the capsulolabral complex on plain MR images. MR arthrography leads to a better demonstration of labrum pathology in 11/22 patients and to a superior delineation of the capsuloligamentous apparatus in 20/22 cases. In 9/15 patients with impingement lesions MR arthrography allowed a differentiation of severe tendinitis from partial and small full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff. MR arthrography of the shoulder joint enhances the accuracy of MR in case of an uncertain finding on plain MR images. (orig.) [Deutsch] In einer prospektiven Studie sollten Einsatzmoeglichkeiten der MR-Arthrographie bei Erkrankungen des Schultergelenkes herausgearbeitet werden. 37 Patienten wurden sowohl nativ als auch nach intraartikulaerer Gabe einer 2mmolaren Gd-DTPA-Loesung untersucht. Voraussetzungen fuer die KM-Gabe waren ein fehlender Gelenkerguss und/oder ein unklarer Befund des Labrum-Kapsel-Komplexes oder der Rotatorenmanschette in der Nativuntersuchung. Durch die MR-Arthrographie wurde bei 11/22 Patienten eine verbesserte Darstellung der Labrumpathologie erzielt; in 20/22 Faellen ergabe sich eine zuverlaessige Beurteilung der Gelenkkapsel. Bei 9/15 Patienten mit Erkrankungen der Rotatorenmanschette konnten Tendinitiden von partiellen und kleinen kompletten Rotatorenmanschettenrupturen sicher differenziert werden. Die MR-Arthrographie des Schultergelenkes fuehrt bei nicht eindeutigen Befunden in der Nativuntersuchung zu einer verbesserten Treffsicherheit der MR-Diagnostik. (orig.)

  12. The preliminary application of magnetic resonance arthrography in the diagnosis of acetabular labrale tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Wen; Zhang Xuezhe; Wang Wu; Yue Debo; Wang Weiguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the application value of MR arthrography (MRA) in the diagnosis of acetabular lab ral tears. Methods: Fifteen patients with a high degree of suspected acetabular lab ral tears received fluoroscope-guided injection of the contrast media into the hip joint (hip arthrography) and fat-saturated spin-echo T 1 -weighted images were obtained in the coronal, sagittal, oblique-axial and radial planes. Hip arthroscopy was performed on 12 of them. Results: Lab ral tears which were diagnosed in 11 patients by hip MRA were confirmed at hip arthroscopy. One patient showed no MRA indication of lab ral tear, also showed normal on arthroscopy. Tear in the anterior-superior quadrant 10 cases of 12 joints (12/13), posterior-superior quadrant 1 case of a joint (1/13). In 11 patients who underwent arthroscopy, hip MRA diagnosed 3 (3/13) joints labrale tears in coronal planes, 10 (10/13) joints in sagittal planes and 13 (13/13) labrale tears in axial-oblique and radial planes. In 15 patients with 20 hip joints, 5 cases 6 joints (6/20) with normal acetabular sublabral sulcus were performed. Conclusions: MR arthrography of hip is a reliable method in the diagnosis of acetabular labrale tears. Scanning method should be included fat-saturated spin-echo T 1 -weighted images in sagittal and oblique-axial planes or sagittal plus radial planes. The diagnosis of torn posterior-inferior quadrant should pay attention to the existence of a normal variation. (authors)

  13. Direct magnetic resonance arthrography of the canine elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yauheni Zhalniarovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compares the effects of four dilutions of the gadolinium-containing contrast media (1:100; 1:400; 1:800; 1:1,200 administered to the elbow on the quality of magnetic resonance images. All the examined dilutions had a positive effect on image quality, and 1:800 was regarded as the optimal dilution of gadolinium for viewing the elbow because it imparted good contrast to the joint cavity without obliterating the contours of articular surfaces. Transverse, sagittal, and dorsal low-field magnetic resonance images were obtained in 24 canine cadaver front limbs. The musculus biceps brachii, m. triceps brachii, m. extensor carpi radialis, m. flexor carpi ulnaris, the articular surfaces, the medial coronoid process and the anconeal process of the ulna were well visualized by High Resolution Gradient Echo, XBONE T2 and Spin Echo T1 sequences in the sagittal plane. The biceps brachii, pronator teres, flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, extensor carpi radialis, deltoid muscle and the articular surface of the medial condyle of the humerus were very well visualized by 3D SST1 and XBONE T2 sequences in the transverse plane. The triceps brachii muscle, extensor digitorum lateralis muscle, superficial digital flexor, deep digital flexor and the medial condyle of the humerus were very well visualized by the Spin Echo T1 sequence in the dorsal plane. This article describes for the first time the use of the gadolinium contrast agent administered to the canine elbow joint during magnetic resonance modality. Magnetic resonance arthrography can be a helpful visualization technique in treating canine soft tissue elbow injury.

  14. Knee arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... debridement; Meniscus repair; Lateral release; Knee surgery; Meniscus - arthroscopy; Collateral ligament - arthroscopy ... pain relief (anesthesia) may be used for knee arthroscopy surgery: Local anesthesia. Your knee may be numbed ...

  15. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Carloni, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures [it

  16. Cross-Sectional Contrast Between Individuals With Foot/Ankle vs Knee Osteoarthritis for Obesity and Low Education on Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruccio, Anthony V; Gandhi, Rajiv; Lau, Johnny T C; Syed, Khalid A; Mahomed, Nizar N; Rampersaud, Y Raja

    2016-01-01

    Improving health-related quality of life (HRQoL) necessitates an understanding of the influence of patient characteristics on, and interrelationship among, HRQoL domains. In osteoarthritis (OA), these associations have predominantly been examined in hip/knee populations. We investigated whether there were differences in these associations between foot/ankle and knee OA samples. Individuals seeking orthopedic care for foot/ankle or knee OA completed a questionnaire pre-consultation, including HRQoL domains (bodily pain [BP], physical [PF] and social functioning [SF], and mental [MH] and general health [GH]), obesity, comorbidity, and sociodemographic characteristics. Associations were examined via stratified path analysis (foot/ankle vs knee). Foot/ankle: n = 180, mean age = 55 (range: 25 to 82), 52% female. Knee: n = 253, mean age = 62 (range: 26 to 92), 51% female. The interrelationship among HRQoL domains was generally similar between groups. However, the influence of patient characteristics differed. Low educational status was associated with worse scores for GH, MH, and SF in the foot/ankle group, whereas no significant effects were found in the knee group. Obesity was associated with worse scores for SF, BP, and GH in the foot/ankle compared to the knee group. Patient characteristics explained considerably more of the variation in domain scores in the foot/ankle group. There are significant differences in the impact of patient characteristics on HRQoL domains in foot/ankle versus knee OA patients. Therefore, a universal approach to patient education/intervention to improve HRQoL in lower-extremity OA is not likely to achieve optimal results. Based on these findings, we recommend joint-specific patient education, with a particular emphasis on patient characteristics among the foot/ankle OA population. Level III, retrospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Value of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijk, C.N. van; Tol, J.L.; Marti, R.K. [Acad. Med. Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surg.; Molenaar, A.H.M. [Department of Radiology, Canisius Ziekenhuis, Weg door Jonkerbos 100, 6532 SZ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Cohen, R.H. [Department of Radiology, Stichting Ziekenhuis Amstelveen, Laan van de Helende Meesters 8, 1186 AM Amstelveen (Netherlands); Bossuyt, P.M.M. [Department of Epidemiology, Academic Medical Centre, P.O. Box 22700, 1100 DE Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1998-05-01

    Objective. To investigate the merits of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle. Design and patients. In a group of 160 consecutive patients operative exploration was performed in cases where arthrography and/or a delayed physical examination showed positive findings. In all patients arthrography was performed within 48 h after trauma. To determine interobserver agreement, all arthrograms were independently evaluated by two radiologists, both ignorant of the first assessment. Results. The prevalence of an ankle ligament lesion was found to be 76%. Of the 122 patients with a rupture of one or more ankle ligaments, 52% had an isolated anterior talofibular ligament lesion, 3% had an isolated calcaneofibular ligament lesion, and 45% had combined lesions. The site of the lesion was predominantly intraligamentous. In the determination of the presence or absence of an ankle ligament lesion, the specificity and sensitivity of the ankle arthrogram were 71% and 96% respectively. Interobserver agreement on the arthrogram was very good ({kappa} 0.9). In 1% of patients a clear diagnosis was not possible by means of arthrography. Conclusion. Arthrography provides information of high diagnostic quality with excellent interobserver agreement and therefore remains the gold standard for early diagnosis (within 48 h) of a lateral ankle ligament rupture. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 tabs., 24 refs.

  18. Value of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, C.N. van; Tol, J.L.; Marti, R.K.; Cohen, R.H.; Bossuyt, P.M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the merits of arthrography after supination trauma of the ankle. Design and patients. In a group of 160 consecutive patients operative exploration was performed in cases where arthrography and/or a delayed physical examination showed positive findings. In all patients arthrography was performed within 48 h after trauma. To determine interobserver agreement, all arthrograms were independently evaluated by two radiologists, both ignorant of the first assessment. Results. The prevalence of an ankle ligament lesion was found to be 76%. Of the 122 patients with a rupture of one or more ankle ligaments, 52% had an isolated anterior talofibular ligament lesion, 3% had an isolated calcaneofibular ligament lesion, and 45% had combined lesions. The site of the lesion was predominantly intraligamentous. In the determination of the presence or absence of an ankle ligament lesion, the specificity and sensitivity of the ankle arthrogram were 71% and 96% respectively. Interobserver agreement on the arthrogram was very good (κ 0.9). In 1% of patients a clear diagnosis was not possible by means of arthrography. Conclusion. Arthrography provides information of high diagnostic quality with excellent interobserver agreement and therefore remains the gold standard for early diagnosis (within 48 h) of a lateral ankle ligament rupture. (orig.)

  19. Glenohumeral position during CT arthrography with arthroscopic correlation: optimization of diagnostic yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Gill, Corey M.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield of two acquisitions of single-contrast CT arthrography (CTA) of the shoulder in internal, neutral, or external glenohumeral rotation with arthroscopic correlation. The CT study was obtained using two acquisitions (first the humerus positioned in maximum tolerated external rotation with the arm along the body and the second with the humerus in internal rotation with the palm placed flat on the table). Two independent readers blinded to the arthroscopic results evaluated the CTA images for labral tears, glenoid bone loss/fractures, and cartilage loss. For each CTA acquisition, sensitivity and specificity for detection of the aforementioned pathology were assessed. Inter-reader agreement was quantified by weighted k statistics. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting anteroinferior or posterior labral tears was highest with neutral rotation (sensitivity 91-100%, specificity 61-100%). For glenoid fracture, sensitivity (67%) was highest with external rotation and specificity (100%) was highest with internal rotation. For cartilage loss, sensitivity (64%) and specificity (89%) was highest with external rotation and neutral rotation, respectively. Neutral rotation showed high sensitivity and specificity for glenoid fractures and cartilage loss. Inter-reader agreement ranged from fair to very good. Neutral glenohumeral position in shoulder CT arthrography was adequately sensitive and specific for the detection of intra-articular pathology, avoiding the use of more than one acquisition. (orig.)

  20. MR arthrography: pharmacology, efficacy and safety in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Gebhard, M.; Wohlgemuth, W.A.; Fischer, W.; Zentner, J.; Bohndorf, K.; Wegener, R.; Balzer, T.

    2003-01-01

    A meta-analysis was carried out of clinical trials published between 1987 and 2001 in respect of the clinical pharmacology and safety as well as the diagnostic efficacy of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) for direct intra-articular injection before MRI examination.Design. Scientific papers (clinical, postmortem and experimental studies) and information from the manufacturer regarding intra-articular injection of Gd-DTPA that addressed questions of mode of action, optimal concentration and dose, elimination and safety were reviewed. Clinical studies were classified according to their study design. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR arthrography (MRA) were compared with a ''gold standard'' (arthroscopy, arthrotomy) and other radiological evidence for different joints.Results. Fifty-two clinical studies of the overall 112 studies addressed aspects of diagnostic efficacy of MRA in patients or in healthy volunteers. The shoulder was the most assessed joint (29 of 52 studies). Good (>80%) or even excellent (90-100%) sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were found for MRA in most indications, especially for the shoulder and knee joints and induced extension of rotator cuff lesions, labrum abnormalities and postoperative meniscal tears. Two millimoles per liter has proven to be the best concentration for intra-articular administration of Gd-DTPA. After passive complete diffusion from the joint within 6-24 h, complete and rapid renal elimination takes place after intra-articular injection. Local safety proved to be excellent after intra-articular administration of Gd-DTPA. Regarding systemic tolerance almost no side effects have been reported, but the same safety considerations apply for intra-articular administration of Gd-DTPA as for intravenous injection.Conclusions. The diagnostic efficacy of intra-articular MRA in most clinical conditions affecting major joints is greater than that of plain MRI. In some diagnostic problems MRA achieves almost the same

  1. Shoulder arthrography: A study for the correlation of anatomy and radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. J.; Kim, I. Y.; Park, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    Shoulder arthrogram and dissection in cadaver were performed for clinical application. Puncture site for contrast injection was studied. The results were as follows: 1. Shoulder joints is located above the axillar and arthrography of shoulder is a simple, safe and easily interpreted. 2. The land mark for injection is a point 1.5 cm below the tip of coracoid process and very slightly medial to it. 3. There were contrast material leak from subscapular recess and distal end of the synovial sheath surrounding the long head of the biceps tendon in normal shoulder arthrogram. 4. Synoviad cavity margin show smoothness and no abnormal filling defect. 5. There were no communication between synovial cavity and subdeltoid bursa. 6. There were no specific anatomic variation in shoulder joint

  2. [Arthrography of the temporomandibular joint. Indications, technic and interpretation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jend, H H; Triebel, H J; Jend-Rossmann, I

    1986-09-01

    Articular dysfunction of the TMJ with anterior displacement of the disc ("internal derangement") is an entity which has been separated from other types of the "myofascial pain syndromes" and which can be treated conservatively or by surgery. Arthrography of the TMJ has contributed greatly to an understanding of normal and abnormal function and, in many cases, it can provide a diagnosis. On the basis of our experience with 80 investigations we discuss technical problems and the clinical indications. The indications for arthrography are in the pre-operative diagnosis, when clinical findings are uncertain, in order to demonstrate perforation, in order to confirm a suspected diagnosis and to assist in prosthetic treatment.

  3. Shoulder instability syndrome: comparison of CT, arthrography and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, L.; Alcaraz, M.; Preciados, J.L.G.; Garcia Alvarez, A.; Castello, J.

    1995-01-01

    Currently, the two most reliable explorations for diagnosing the lesions that produce shoulder instability are computerized tomography with arthrography and magnetic resonance following intraarticular injection of gadolinium. Dynamic CT arthrography is considered the best method to assess these lesions; MR is a similar procedure but involves certain drawbacks, among them, its cost. The techniques applied in these explorations are reviewed, as are the anatomy of the different components of this joint and the radiological findings leading to a diagnosis of the pathology underlying its instability. (Author)

  4. Effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain early after total knee arthroplasty: a randomized cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Bente; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik; Bandholm, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the acute effect of knee joint icing on knee extension strength and knee pain in patients shortly after total knee arthroplasty. A prospective, single-blinded, randomized, cross-over study. A fast-track orthopaedic arthroplasty unit at a university hospital. Twenty patients (mean age 66 years; 10 women) scheduled for primary unilateral total knee arthroplasty. The patients were treated on two days (day 7 and day 10) postoperatively. On one day they received 30 minutes of knee icing (active treatment) and on the other day they received 30 minutes of elbow icing (control treatment). The order of treatments was randomized. Maximal knee extension strength (primary outcome), knee pain at rest and knee pain during the maximal knee extensions were measured 2-5 minutes before and 2-5 minutes after both treatments by an assessor blinded for active or control treatment. The change in knee extension strength associated with knee icing was not significantly different from that of elbow icing (knee icing change (mean (1 SD)) -0.01 (0.07) Nm/kg, elbow icing change -0.02 (0.07) Nm/kg, P = 0.493). Likewise, the changes in knee pain at rest (P = 0.475), or knee pain during the knee extension strength measurements (P = 0.422) were not different between treatments. In contrast to observations in experimental knee effusion models and inflamed knee joints, knee joint icing for 30 minutes shortly after total knee arthroplasty had no acute effect on knee extension strength or knee pain.

  5. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Can Monitor the Very Early Inflammatory Treatment Response upon Intra-Articular Steroid Injection in the Knee Joint: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Kubassova, Olga; Cimmino, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in inflammatory arthritis, especially in conjunction with computer-aided analysis using appropriate dedicated software, seems to be a highly sensitive tool for monitoring the early inflammatory treatment response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This paper give...... a review of the current knowledge of the emerging technique. The potential of the technique is demonstrated and discussed in the context of a case report following the early effect of an intra-articular steroid injection in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis flare in the knee....

  6. MRI and arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Kobayakawa, Takafumi.

    1991-01-01

    Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a noninfectious, noninflammatory condition characterized by joint pain, noise (clicking) and abnormal motion. It contains various disease processes, such as abnormalities in the menisci or masticating muscles, subluxation of the condyle and degenerative joint disease. Analysis of the morphology and dynamics of TMJ by means of imaging modalities has become highly advanced since the development of arthrography in the late 1970s. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of TMJ owing to the development of surface coils. We retrospectively studied MRI and inferior joint compartment arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. Nineteen joints of 14 patients included 15 with internal derangement, two with osteoarthrosis and two normal joints. Sagittal MR images were routinely obtained in a resting position and in positions with the mouth half open, and also with the mouth fully open on balanced images. Although perforation of the menisci was difficult to evaluate, MRI and arthrography were equally useful in identifying the shape and position of the meniscus. However, MRI was more reliable in depicting TMJ abnormalities than arthrography. MRI is considered to be the modality of choice in screening arthrosis of TMJ, making the definitive diagnosis of internal derangement and monitoring conservative therapy for arthrosis. (author)

  7. Cerebral air embolism after arthrography of the ankle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Marcella C. A.; Lagarde, Sjoerd M.; Germans, Menno R.; Juffermans, Nicole P.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The accidental migration of air from the venous circulation into the systemic arterial circulation is called paradoxical air embolism. This is a potential disastrous complication after diagnostic and surgical procedures. Arthrography has been a useful technique in joint imaging for the

  8. MRI and arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu (Iwate Medical Univ., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine); Kobayakawa, Takafumi

    1991-08-01

    Arthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a noninfectious, noninflammatory condition characterized by joint pain, noise (clicking) and abnormal motion. It contains various disease processes, such as abnormalities in the menisci or masticating muscles, subluxation of the condyle and degenerative joint disease. Analysis of the morphology and dynamics of TMJ by means of imaging modalities has become highly advanced since the development of arthrography in the late 1970s. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the modality of choice in the evaluation of TMJ owing to the development of surface coils. We retrospectively studied MRI and inferior joint compartment arthrography in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. Nineteen joints of 14 patients included 15 with internal derangement, two with osteoarthrosis and two normal joints. Sagittal MR images were routinely obtained in a resting position and in positions with the mouth half open, and also with the mouth fully open on balanced images. Although perforation of the menisci was difficult to evaluate, MRI and arthrography were equally useful in identifying the shape and position of the meniscus. However, MRI was more reliable in depicting TMJ abnormalities than arthrography. MRI is considered to be the modality of choice in screening arthrosis of TMJ, making the definitive diagnosis of internal derangement and monitoring conservative therapy for arthrosis. (author).

  9. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Chenona (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain.

  10. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl; Yu, Pil Mun

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain

  11. Temporomandibular joint arthrography: normal anatomy and technique of examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvoisin, B.; Schnyder, P.; Klaus, E.; Jacques, B.

    1990-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is common. This entity is most often consecutive to internal derangements of the TMJ, which are not recognizable on plain films and tomograms. TMJ arthrography has proved a valuable tool in diagnosing these abnormalities. The technique of examination and normal arthrographic anatomy are reviewed. (author) [pt

  12. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... require a lot of knee bending, such as biking, jumping, or skiing. Runner's knee happens when the ... is out of alignment, activities like running or biking can wear down the cartilage of the kneecap ( ...

  13. Sport injuries of the knee in young people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, L.; Brezina, K.

    1981-01-01

    The biggest number of injuries of the knee are in highly result interested sportsmen. The portion of girls has reached 30%. More than 50% of all injuries regard the ligaments and the menisci. Especially in these cases and in combined lesions gives the arthrography good results. All possibilities of investigations should be used for acute injured sportsmen, because of the specific readiness of risks and the dissimulation of young sportspeople and because of the danger of too late established diagnosis and within those of late damages. (orig.) [de

  14. Anterior knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patellofemoral syndrome; Chondromalacia patella; Runner's knee; Patellar tendinitis; Jumper's knee ... kneecap (patella) sits over the front of your knee joint. As you bend or straighten your knee, ...

  15. Indirect MR-arthrography in osteochondral autograft and crushed bone graft with a collagen membrane-Correlation with histology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streitparth, F. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Schoettle, P.; Schell, H. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Lehmkuhl, L.; Madej, T.; Wieners, G. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Duda, G.N. [Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany); Schroeder, R.J. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    Objective: To analyze the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following osteochondral autograft transfer system (OATS) and crushed bone graft using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring and grading system in relation to histology as the standard of reference. Materials and methods: Iatrogenic lesions were set at ovine condylar facets (n = 6/group), treated with OATS or crushed bone graft. 1.5 T MRI was performed 6 months after surgery using PD-weighted (w fat saturated (fs) fast spin echo (FSE), T1-w 2D, and 3D fs gradient echo (GE) sequences 30 min. after i.v. Gd-DTPA administration and passive joint exercise. The repair tissue was evaluated by two independent radiologists. The MR findings were compared to histology. Results: In all cases, MRI and histologic grading correlated well and showed significant superior repair in OATS at 6 months (p < 0.05), reproducing the original articular contour and a good subchondral restoration. FsT1-w3DGE proved most appropriate identifying characteristic post-operative findings: the OATS group demonstrated bone marrow edema at the donor site and the graft/host interface showed significant enhancement in indirect MR-arthrography, indicating fibrocartilage. After crushed bone graft, we found an irregular structure and significant contrast uptake, consistent with remnants of bone grafts surrounded by inflammatory tissue. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is an accurate, non-invasive monitoring tool following OATS and crushed bone graft as the MRI scoring and grading system allows a reliable evaluation of normal and pathological osteochondral repair with a high histologic correlation.

  16. Influence of delayed gadolinium enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC) protocol on T2-mapping: is it possible to comprehensively assess knee cartilage composition in one post-contrast MR examination at 3 Tesla?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschueren, J; van Tiel, J; Reijman, M; Bron, E E; Klein, S; Verhaar, J A N; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Krestin, G P; Wielopolski, P A; Oei, E H G

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the possibility of assessing knee cartilage with T2-mapping and delayed gadolinium enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cartilage (dGEMRIC) in one post-contrast MR examination at 3 Tesla (T). T2 mapping was performed in 10 healthy volunteers at baseline; directly after baseline; after 10 min of cycling; and after 90 min delay, and in 16 osteoarthritis patients before and after intravenous administration of a double dose gadolinium dimeglumine contrast agent, reflecting key dGEMRIC protocol elements. Differences in T2 relaxation times between each timepoint and baseline were calculated for 6 cartilage regions using paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests and the smallest detectable change (SDC). After cycling, a significant change in T2 relaxation times was found in the lateral weight-bearing tibial plateau (+1.0 ms, P = 0.04). After 90 min delay, significant changes were found in the lateral weight-bearing femoral condyle (+1.2 ms, P = 0.03) and the lateral weight-bearing tibial plateau (+1.3 ms, P = 0.01). In these regions of interests (ROIs), absolute differences were small and lower than the corresponding SDCs. T2-mapping after contrast administration only showed statistically significantly lower T2 relaxation times in the medial posterior femoral condyle (-2.4 ms, P T2 relaxation times that were not consistent and lower than the SDC in the majority of regions, our results suggest that T2-mapping and dGEMRIC can be performed reliably in a single imaging session to assess cartilage biochemical composition in knee osteoarthritis (OA) at 3 T. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CT-guided puncture for direct MR-arthrography of the shoulder: Description of possible techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauth E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following report describes the possible techniques of CT-guided puncture for direct magnetic resonance (MR arthrography of the shoulder. CT-guided puncture can be regarded as an alternative technique to fluoroscopic- or ultrasound-guided puncture for MR-arthrography of the shoulder with high efficiency, low dose and extremely low complication rate.

  18. Usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Woong; Hong, Suk Ju; Suh, San Il; Yong, Hwan Suk; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Park, Cheol Min; Suh, Won Hyuck; Kim, Myung Gyu

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of sono-guided needle puncture for MR arthrography of the shoulder to locate the path of access and to control the correct placement of the needle into the shoulder. Fifteen patients with suspicion of shoulder pathology were included in this study. Patients were laid in supine positions with the arm extended and slightly abducted, the palm of the hand facing upward. A sonographic unit with a high resolution transducer with 7.5 MHz linear array was used. Axial images in the anterior aspect of the shoulder were obtained to localize the coracoid process and the anteromedical portion of the humerus. Using an aseptic technique, a 21-guage needle was advanced into the shoulder joint under ultrasonographic guidance. When the needle made contract with the articular cartilage of the humeral head, the needle was tiled to position is point in the articular cavity. Solution of 0.1 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine in 25 ml of normal saline was prepared and 12-16 ml was injected into the joint cavity. The intra-articular position of the needle and the compete distension of the shoulder joint were again confirmed by sonography. The needle was accurately placed in 14 out of 15 patients without damage to neighboring structures. It took 10 to 15 minutes to complete the procedure in 14 patients. No side effects attributable to gadopentetate dimeglumine were found. Sono-guided needle puncture for the shoulder MR arthrography can be a substitutable method for fluoroscopic guidance, with easy access, advantages of lacking radiation hazard and eliminating the need for iodized contrast agents.

  19. Arthrography of the TMJ. Indications, technique and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jend, H.H.; Triebel, H.J.; Jend-Rossmann, I.

    1986-09-01

    Articular dysfunction of the TMJ with anterior displacement of the disc ('internal derangement') is an entity which has been separated from other types of the 'myofascial pain syndromes' and which can be treated conservatively or by surgery. Arthrography of the TMJ has contributed greatly to an understanding of normal and abnormal function and, in many cases, it can provide a diagnosis. On the basis of our experience with 80 investigations we discuss technical problems and the clinical indications. The indications for arthrography are in the pre-operative diagnosis, when clinical findings are uncertain, in order to demonstrate perforation, in order to confirm a suspected diagnosis and to assist in prosthetic treatment.

  20. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jee Young [Chungang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chungang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jae Chul [Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  1. Rotator cuff tears noncontrast MRI compared to MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Young Cheol; Jung, Jee Young; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2015-01-01

    To compare the accuracy of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography and noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging for diagnosing rotator cuff tears. In total, 333 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging or indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were included retrospectively. Two musculoskeletal radiologists evaluated the images for the presence of supraspinatus-infraspinatus and subscapularis tendon tears. The overall diagnostic performance was calculated using the arthroscopic findings as the reference standard. Statistical differences between the diagnostic performances of the two methods were analyzed. Ninety-six and 237 patients who underwent noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging and indirect magnetic resonance arthrography were assigned into groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity for diagnosing articular-surface partial-thickness supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon tear was slightly higher in group B than in group A. Statistical significance was confirmed by multivariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation (p = 0.046). The specificity for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear (85 % vs. 68 %, p = 0.012) and grading accuracy (57 % vs. 40 %, p = 0.005) was higher in group B than in group A; the differences were statistically significant for one out of two readers. Univariate analysis using the generalized estimating equation showed that the accuracy for diagnosing subscapularis tendon tear in group B was higher than in group A (p = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences between the diagnostic performances of both methods for any other parameters. Indirect magnetic resonance arthrography may facilitate more accurate diagnosis and grading of subscapularis tendon tears compared with noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  2. Ultrasound-guided intraarticular injection for MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaeffeler, Christoph; Bruegel, M.; Waldt, S.; Rummeny, E.J.; Woertler, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate ultrasound guidance for intraarticular contrast injection via an anterolateral approach in comparison with fluoroscopic guidance. Materials and Methods: Contrast agent injection was performed in 40 consecutive patients, 20 under sonographic guidance and 20 under fluoroscopic guidance. None of the patients had previous shoulder surgery. The procedure time was measured and the efficiency of joint distension, incidence of extravasation and intraarticular air on the consecutive MR arthrograms were assessed by three blinded radiologists with musculoskeletal radiology experience. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Intraarticular contrast injection was successfully accomplished in all 40 patients. Subsequent MR arthrograms did not show any significant difference between sonographic and fluoroscopic guidance with respect to diagnostic quality, joint distension (p = 0.6665), intraarticular air bubbles (p = 0.1567) and occurrence of contrast extravasation (p = 0.8565). The mean duration of ultrasound-guided injection was 7:30 min compared to a shorter procedure time of 4:15 min for fluoroscopic guidance. In both groups, no procedural complications were observed. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided injection for MR arthrography of the shoulder via an anterolateral approach represents a simple, safe, and effective technique which yields comparable results to those of injection under fluoroscopic guidance, but is slightly more time-consuming. (orig.)

  3. Comparison study of indirect MR arthrography and direct MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Yi, Sang-Kyu; Yoo, Jaechul; Choe, Bong-Keun

    2009-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic value of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (I-MRA) with that of direct MR arthrography (D-MRA) for labral tears, rotator cuff tears, and long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) tears using a 3-T MR unit. Institutional review board approval was given; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. From November 2005 to June 2006, 19 patients (eight men and 11 women; mean age, 51 years) who had undergone both I-MRA and D-MRA underwent arthroscopic surgery. Both methods were performed in fat-saturated axial, coronal oblique, and sagittal oblique T1-weighted sequences, as well as axial and coronal oblique T2-weighted sequences. Two radiologists independently and retrospectively evaluated two sets of MRA for the diagnosis of superior and anterior labral tears, subscapularis tendon (SSC), and supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon (SSP-ISP) tears, and LHBT tears. With the arthroscopic finding as a gold standard, we analyzed statistical differences of sensitivities and specificities between two sets of MRA and inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the kappa value. The sensitivity and specificity of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 1 were 79/80% and 71/80%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/100% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/75% and 64/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 100/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 67/100% and 78/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. Those of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 2 were 86/80% and 71/100%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/83% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/88% and 82/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 92/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 78/90% and 89/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. No significant differences were found between the methods. Inter-observer agreements were higher than moderate (κ > 0.41) with both methods. Based on a relatively small number of patients, no significant

  4. Comparison study of indirect MR arthrography and direct MR arthrography of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jee Young; Yoon, Young Cheol [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Yi, Sang-Kyu [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Sekye Radiologic Clinic, Daejeon (Korea); Yoo, Jaechul [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Choe, Bong-Keun [Kyung Hee University, Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-07-15

    To compare the diagnostic value of indirect magnetic resonance arthrography (I-MRA) with that of direct MR arthrography (D-MRA) for labral tears, rotator cuff tears, and long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) tears using a 3-T MR unit. Institutional review board approval was given; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. From November 2005 to June 2006, 19 patients (eight men and 11 women; mean age, 51 years) who had undergone both I-MRA and D-MRA underwent arthroscopic surgery. Both methods were performed in fat-saturated axial, coronal oblique, and sagittal oblique T1-weighted sequences, as well as axial and coronal oblique T2-weighted sequences. Two radiologists independently and retrospectively evaluated two sets of MRA for the diagnosis of superior and anterior labral tears, subscapularis tendon (SSC), and supraspinatus-infraspinatus tendon (SSP-ISP) tears, and LHBT tears. With the arthroscopic finding as a gold standard, we analyzed statistical differences of sensitivities and specificities between two sets of MRA and inter-observer agreement was evaluated using the kappa value. The sensitivity and specificity of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 1 were 79/80% and 71/80%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/100% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/75% and 64/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 100/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 67/100% and 78/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. Those of I-MRA and D-MRA for reader 2 were 86/80% and 71/100%, respectively, for superior labral tears; 100/83% and 100/100%, respectively, for anterior labral tears; 64/88% and 82/100%, respectively, for SSC tears; 92/86% and 100/100%, respectively, for SSP-ISP tears; and 78/90% and 89/100%, respectively, for LHBT tears. No significant differences were found between the methods. Inter-observer agreements were higher than moderate ({kappa} > 0.41) with both methods. Based on a relatively small number of patients, no significant

  5. Partial knee replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good range of motion in your knee. The ligaments in your knee are stable. However, most people with knee arthritis have a surgery called a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Knee replacement is most often done in people age 60 ...

  6. Jumper's Knee (Patellar Tendonitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Jumper's Knee KidsHealth / For Teens / Jumper's Knee What's in this ... continued damage to the knee. How Does the Knee Work? To understand how jumper's knee happens, it ...

  7. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain; Theumann, Nicolas; Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent; Richarme, Delphine; Meuli, Reto; Becce, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥ 0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 3-T direct MR arthrography of the wrist: Value of finger trap distraction to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerny, Milena; Marlois, Romain [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Theumann, Nicolas [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bollmann, Christof; Wehrli, Laurent [Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Clinique Longeraie and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Avenue de la Gare 9, 1003 Lausanne (Switzerland); Richarme, Delphine [Institute of Radiology, Clinique Hirslanden Bois-Cerf, Avenue d’Ouchy 31, 1006 Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Becce, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.becce@chuv.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, University of Lausanne, Rue du Bugnon 46, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the value of applying finger trap distraction during direct MR arthrography of the wrist to assess intrinsic ligament and triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) tears. Materials and methods: Twenty consecutive patients were prospectively investigated by three-compartment wrist MR arthrography. Imaging was performed with 3-T scanners using a three-dimensional isotropic (0.4 mm) T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo sequence, with and without finger trap distraction (4 kg). In a blind and independent fashion, two musculoskeletal radiologists measured the width of the scapholunate (SL), lunotriquetral (LT) and ulna-TFC (UTFC) joint spaces. They evaluated the amount of contrast medium within these spaces using a four-point scale, and assessed SL, LT and TFCC tears, as well as the disruption of Gilula's carpal arcs. Results: With finger trap distraction, both readers found a significant increase in width of the SL space (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≤ 0.040), and noticed more contrast medium therein (p ≤ 0.035). In contrast, the differences in width of the LT (mean Δ = +0.1 mm, p ≥ 0.057) and UTFC (mean Δ = 0 mm, p ≥ 0.728) spaces, as well as the amount of contrast material within these spaces were not statistically significant (p = 0.607 and ≥0.157, respectively). Both readers detected more SL (Δ = +1, p = 0.157) and LT (Δ = +2, p = 0.223) tears, although statistical significance was not reached, and Gilula's carpal arcs were more frequently disrupted during finger trap distraction (Δ = +5, p = 0.025). Conclusion: The application of finger trap distraction during direct wrist MR arthrography may enhance both detection and characterisation of SL and LT ligament tears by widening the SL space and increasing the amount of contrast within the SL and LT joint spaces.

  9. CT arthrography of the wrist using a novel, mobile, dedicated extremity cone-beam CT (CBCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki University Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Haapamaeki, Ville V.; Kortesniemi, Mika [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Radiology, HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki (Finland); Salo, Jari [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, UEF, Department of Orthopedics, Traumatology and Hand Surgery, Kuopio (Finland); Lindfors, Nina C. [Helsinki University Central Hospital, Department of Orthopedic and Hand Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Seppaelae, Lauri [Planmed Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Mattila, Kimmo T. [Turku University Central Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Turku (Finland)

    2013-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and intra- and interobserver agreement of CBCT arthrography of wrist ligaments, triangular fibrocartilaginous complex (TFCC), and to assess the sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP), accuracy (ACC), and positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) of CBCT arthrography in the diagnosis of scapholunate (SLL) and lunotriquetral (LTL) ligament tears, TFCC, and cartilage abnormalities of the scaphoid and lunate with their corresponding radial surfaces (scaphoid and lunate fossa) using a novel, mobile, dedicated extremity CBCT scanner. Fifty-two consecutively enrolled subjects (26 M, 26 F, mean age 38 years, range 18-66 years) with suspected wrist ligament tears underwent CBCT-arthrography before normally scheduled MR arthrography.An extremity CBCT was used for imaging with isotropic voxel size of 0.4 x 0.4 x 0.4 mm{sup 3}. Subsequent routine 1.5 T MRI was performed using a dedicated wrist coil.Two observers reviewed the anonymized CBCT images twice for contrast enhancement (CE) and technical details (TD), for tears of the SLL, LTL, and TFCC. Also, cartilage abnormalities of the scaphoid and lunate with their corresponding radial surfaces (scaphoid and lunate fossa) were evaluated. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was determined using weighted kappa statistics. Since no surgery was performed, MRI served as a reference standard, and SE and SP, ACC, PPV, and NPV were calculated. Intra- and interobserver kappa values for both readers (reader 1/reader 2; first reading/second reading) with 95 % confidence limits were: CE 0.54 (0.08-1.00)/ 0.75 (0.46-1.00); 0.73 (0.29-1.00)/ 0.45 (0.07-0.83), TD 0.53 (0.30-0.88)/ 0.86 (0.60-1.00); 0.56 (0.22-0.91)/ 0.67 (0.37-0.98), SLL 0.59 (0.25-0.93)/ 0.66 (0.42-0.91); 0.31 (0.06-0.56)/ 0.49 (0.26-0.73), LTL 0.83 (0.66-1.00)/ 0.68 (0.46-0.91); 0.90 (0.79-1.00)/ 0.48 (0.22-0.74); TFCC (0.72-1.00)/ (0.79-1.00); 0.65 (0.43-0.87)/ 0.59 (0.35-0.83), radius (scaphoid fossa) 0.45 (0.12-0.77)/ 0.64 (0.31-0.96); 0

  10. Comparison between conventional MR arthrograhphy and abduction and external rotation MR arthrography in revealing tears of the antero-inferior glenoid labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Ah; Suh, Sang Il; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Myung Gyu; Lee, Ki Yeol; Lee, Chang Hee

    2001-01-01

    To compare, in terms of their demonstration of tears of the anterior glenoid labrum, oblique axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's shoulder in the abduction and external rotation (ABER) position, with conventional axial MR arthrography obtained with the patient's arm in the neutral position. MR arthrography of the shoulder, including additional oblique axial sequences with the patient in the ABER position, was performed in 30 patients with a clinical history of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. The degree of anterior glenoid labral tear or defect was evaluated in both the conventional axial and the ABER position by two radiologists. Decisions were reached by consensus, and a three-point scale was used: grade 1=normal; grade 2=probable tear, diagnosed when subtle increased signal intensity in the labrum was apparent; grade 3=definite tear/defect, when a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim or deficient labrum was present. The scores for each imaging sequence were averaged and to compare conventional axial and ABER position scans, Student's t test was performed. In 21 (70%) of 30 patients, the same degree of anterior instability was revealed by both imaging sequences. Eight (27%) had a lower grade in the axial position than in the ABER position, while one (3%) had a higher grade in the axial position. Three whose axial scan was grade 1 showed only equivocal evidence of tearing, but their ABER-position scan, in which a contrast material-filled gap between the labrum and the glenoid rim was present, was grade 3. The average grade was 2.5 (SD=0.73) for axial scans and 2.8 (SD=0.46) for the ABER position. The difference between axial and ABER-position scans was statistically significant (p<0.05). MR arthrography with the patient's shoulder in the ABER position is more efficient than conventional axial scanning in revealing the degree of tear or defect of the anterior glenoid labrum. When equivocal features are seen at

  11. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Henninger, Benjamin; Kogler, Michael; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried; Forstner, Thomas; Reichkendler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  12. Diagnostic performance of direct traction MR arthrography of the hip: detection of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmaranzer, Florian; Klauser, Andrea; Henninger, Benjamin [Medical University Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Kogler, Michael; Schmaranzer, Ehrenfried [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Radiology, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria); Forstner, Thomas [Johannes Keppler University, Department for Applied Systems Research and Statistics, Linz (Austria); Reichkendler, Markus [District Hospital St. Johann in Tyrol, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, St. Johann in Tyrol (Austria)

    2015-06-01

    To assess diagnostic performance of traction MR arthrography of the hip in detection and grading of chondral and labral lesions with arthroscopic comparison. Seventy-five MR arthrograms obtained ± traction of 73 consecutive patients (mean age, 34.5 years; range, 14-54 years) who underwent arthroscopy were included. Traction technique included weight-adapted traction (15-23 kg), a supporting plate for the contralateral leg, and intra-articular injection of 18-27 ml (local anaesthetic and contrast agent). Patients reported on neuropraxia and on pain. Two blinded readers independently assessed femoroacetabular cartilage and labrum lesions which were correlated with arthroscopy. Interobserver agreement was calculated using κ values. Joint distraction ± traction was evaluated in consensus. No procedure had to be stopped. There were no cases of neuropraxia. Accuracy for detection of labral lesions was 92 %/93 %, 91 %/83 % for acetabular lesions, and 92 %/88 % for femoral cartilage lesions for reader 1/reader 2, respectively. Interobserver agreement was moderate (κ = 0.58) for grading of labrum lesions and substantial (κ = 0.7, κ = 0.68) for grading of acetabular and femoral cartilage lesions. Joint distraction was achieved in 72/75 and 14/75 hips with/without traction, respectively. Traction MR arthrography safely enabled accurate detection and grading of labral and chondral lesions. (orig.)

  13. Humeral avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizing structures after anterior shoulder dislocation: demonstration by MRI and MR arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirman, P.F.J.; Steinbach, L.S.; Feller, J.F.; Stauffer, A.E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the MRI findings of an anterior shoulder capsular avulsion from the humerus, with or without subscapularis rupture, after anterior dislocation or severe abduction external rotation injury. Design and patients. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI and MR arthrographic examinations of seven patients who were identified at surgery with avulsion of the anterior shoulder stabilizers from the humerus. MRI was correlated with clinical history and surgical results. Results. MRI findings included: inhomogeneity or frank disruption of the anterior capsule at the humeral insertion (all), fluid intensity anterior to the shoulder (six patients), tear of the subscapularis tendon (six patients), dislocation of the biceps tendon (four patients), and a Hill-Sachs deformity (four patients). MR arthrography additionally found extravasation of contrast through the capsular defect (two patients). Conclusions. Our findings suggest that MRI is helpful for diagnosing humeral avulsion of the anterior glenohumeral capsule, especially when a tear of the subscapularis tendon insertion is present. MR arthrography may be of benefit for diagnosing capsular avulsion without associated subscapularis tendon abnormality. (orig.). With 4 figs

  14. Direct MR Arthrography of the wrist in comparison with Arthroscopy: A prospective study on 125 patients; Direkte MR-Arthrographie des Handgelenks im Vergleich zur Arthroskopie: Eine prospektive Studie an 125 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, R.; Christopoulos, G.; Coblenz, G.; Froehner, S. [Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie der Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Meier, R.; Lanz, U.; Krimmer, H. [Klinik fuer Handchirurgie GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Objective: In literature the diagnostic value of MRI for detecting lesions of the carpal ligaments and the TFCC is judged controversially. The aim of the following study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of direct MR arthrography for depicting and staging of intraarticular lesions of the wrist. Material and methods: One day before undergoing arthroscopy, 125 patients suffering from wrist pain were examined with direct MR arthrography in a prospective and blinded study. A mixture of contrast medium (iodine-containing contrast medium and gadopentetate in relation 200:1) was injected into both radiocarpal and midcarpal joints. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5T scanner: coronal T1-weighted SE, coronal fat-saturated T1-weighted SE, coronal T1-/T2*-DESS-3D, and sagittal T2*-weighted MEDIC. MRI results were compared with arthroscopic findings using statistical analysis (SEN=sensitivity, SPE=specificity, PPV=positive predictive value, NPV=negative predictive value, ACC=accuracy). Results: In comparison to arthroscopy as the accepted diagnostic gold standard, the following results were found for MR arthrography. Detection of TFCC lesions: SEN 97.1%, SPE 96.4%, PPV 97.1%, NPV 96.4%, ACC 96.8%. Detection of complete tears of the scapholunate ligament: SEN 91.7%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 99.1%, ACC 99.2%. Detection of partial tears: SEN 62.5%, SPE 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 94.8%, ACC 95.2%. Detection of cartilage defects: SEN 84.2%, SPE 96.2%, PPV 80%, NPV 97.1%, ACC 94.4%. In total, only three lesions of the lunotriquetral ligament were present. Conclusion: Direct MR arthrographic imaging is well suited for detecting intraarticular lesions of the wrist. The presented diagnostic results of MR arthrography are superior to the results of unenhanced MRI reported in the literature. Direct MR arthrography as a reliable diagnostic tool is strongly recommended if lesions of the scapholunate ligament and the triangular fibrocartilage complex are suspected. In contrast, an

  15. Ultra-high resolution C-Arm CT arthrography of the wrist: Radiation dose and image quality compared to conventional multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werncke, Thomas, E-mail: Werncke.Thomas@mh-hannover.de [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Sonnow, Lena; Meyer, Bernhard C. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Lüpke, Matthias [University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Institute for General Radiology and Medical Physics, Bischofsholer Damm 15, 30173 Hannover (Germany); Hinrichs, Jan; Wacker, Frank K.; Falck, Christian von [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Objective: Objective of this phantom and cadaveric study was to compare the effective radiation dose (ED) and image quality (IQ) between C-arm computed tomography (CACT) using an ultra-high resolution 1 × 1 binning with a standard 16-slice CT (MDCT) arthrography of the wrist. Methods: ED was determined with thermoluminescence dosimetry using an anthropomorphic phantom and different patient positions. Imaging was conducted in 10 human cadaveric wrists after tri-compartmental injection of diluted iodinated contrast material and a wire phantom. IQ of MDCT was compared with CACT reconstructed with a soft (CACT1) and sharp (CACT2) kernel. High and low contrast resolution was determined. Three radiologists assessed IQ of wrist structures and occurrence of image artifacts using a 5-point Likert scale. Results: ED of MDCT was comparable to standard CACT (4.3 μSv/3.7 μSv). High contrast resolution was best for CACT2, decreased to CACT1 and MDCT. Low contrast resolution increased between CACT2 and MDCT (P < 0.001). IQ was best for CACT2 (1.3 ± 0.5), decreased to CACT1 (1.9 ± 0.6) and MDCT (3.5 ± 0.6). Non-compromising artifacts were only reported for CACT. Conclusions: The results of this phantom and cadaveric study indicate that ultra-high resolution C-Arm CT arthrography of the wrist bears the potential to outperform MDCT arthrography in terms of image quality and workflow at the cost of mildly increasing image artifacts while radiation dose to the patient is comparably low for both, MDCT and C-Arm CT.

  16. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days. Medications prescribed by your doctor should help control pain. During the hospital stay, you'll be encouraged to move your ... exercise your new knee. After you leave the hospital, you'll continue physical ... mobility and a better quality of life. And most knee replacements can be ...

  17. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part I. Normal anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, Mahvash

    2004-01-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  18. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part II. Glenohumeral instability and labrum tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, Mahvash

    2004-01-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  19. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part I. Normal anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, Mahvash [NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2004-10-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  20. Non-contrast MR imaging of the glenohumeral joint. Part II. Glenohumeral instability and labrum tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, Mahvash [NYU School of Medicine, NYU Medical Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    MR imaging of the shoulder without contrast is frequently used for evaluation of glenohumeral instability in spite of the popularity of MR arthrography. With proper imaging technique, familiarity with normal anatomy and variants as well as knowledge of the expected pathologic findings high diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. (orig.)

  1. A comparison of MRI and wrist arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoya, Kaori; Nakamura, Ryogo; Imaeda, Toshihiko [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Branch Hospital; Tsunoda, Kenji; Makino, Naoki

    1995-08-01

    The present study compared the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and wrist arthrography in triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injuries. The subjects were 102 wrists with arthroscopically confirmed presence or absence of TFC perforation. TFC perforation was present in 35 and 47 wrists and absent in the other 67 and 55 wrists on arthrography and MRI, respectively. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, arthrography for the detection of TFC perforation had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%. All 6 false negative cases on arthrography had scarring adhesions of the TFC in the wrist. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 73% and 72%, respectively. An accuracy was 94% for arthrography and 73% for MRI. It was difficult to detect qualitative TFC injury and the presence or absence of TFC perforation on MRI. Arthrography is thus superior to MRI in both sensitivity and specificity. The complementary use of arthrography and MRI is considered to increase the diagnostic accuracy. (S.Y.).

  2. Evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tears by arthrography and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Makoto; Shibata, Yasushi [Hokkaido Kin-i-kyou Central Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Takahata, Naoji

    1995-08-01

    Arthroscopic or open surgical findings in 21 wrists with chronic ulnar painful lesion were compared both with arthrography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging results to evaluate the accuracy of the two diagnostic procedures in the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions. Arthrography investigations were performed for the 20 wrists but one that had allergy for iodine and MR imagings were performed for the recent 12 wrists. Arthrography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were almost equally useful for the detection of the TFCC injury and their injury sites. (author).

  3. Knee pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fracture of the kneecap or other bones. Iliotibial band syndrome . Injury to the thick band that runs from your hip to the outside ... of your knee pain. When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your provider if: You cannot bear ...

  4. Knee Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your knee joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and fluid. Muscles and tendons help the knee joint move. When any of these structures is hurt or diseased, you have knee problems. Knee problems can cause pain and difficulty ...

  5. Anatomy of the distal knee joint and pyarthrosis following external fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, J; Moore, T

    1999-05-01

    To determine the limits of the distal synovial reflection of the human knee joint. Six paired knees studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluoroscopic arthrography, and gross dissection. The right knees of five patients with chronic idiopathic knee effusions were studied by MRI. Cadaveric knees were injected with saline prior to MRI. The joint capsules were dissected to visualize local anatomy and check for capsular tears. In each modality (MRI, fluoroscopy, and dissection), the most distal extent of knee synovial fluid was measured. The right versus left agreement for paired specimens was generally two to three millimeters. Some specimens showed asymmetric capsular reflection. Medial fluid was identified at distances greater than forty-nine millimeters from the subchondral bone in seven knees and less than fifteen millimeters in four knees (range 0 to 70 millimeters, mean thirty-three millimeters). Laterally, the range was ten to thirty-five millimeters (mean twenty-three millimeters). In six of the twelve cadaveric specimens, there was evidence of a communication between the knee joint and the proximal tibiofibularjoint. In the knees of volunteers, joint fluid tracked medially to a range of ten to fifty millimeters and laterally to a range of six to fifteen millimeters, with means of twenty-six and eleven millimeters, respectively. The knees of the volunteers had no evidence of tibiofibular joint communication with the knee. Insertion of external fixation pins within sixty to seventy millimeters of the proximal articular surface of the tibia is associated with a high probability of synovial penetration and possibly provides a conduit for the introduction of bacteria, which may be etiologic in iatrogenic pyarthrosis.

  6. Imaging of the knee joint with emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, M.F. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ., Bonn (Germany); Vahlensieck, M. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ., Bonn (Germany); Schueller, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Univ., Bonn (Germany)

    1992-04-01

    The knee joint is frequently affected by trauma as well as degenerative and inflammatory disorders, involving the internal structures (i.e. ligaments, menisci, cartilage, synovial membrane) and the adjacent bones. Plain radiographs represent an indispensable basis for diagnosis. For further analysis magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice, and has widely replaced computed tomography, arthrography and stress examinations. Extensive experience has been accumulated in MRI of the knee joint in recent years. In addition, advances in MRI technology have had a major impact on diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, diagnosis of various lesions of the knee joint, such as meniscal and ligamental injuries, aseptic necrosis, lesions of the hyaline cartilage, occult fractures and inflammatory lesions will be discussed. (orig.)

  7. MR and MR arthrography to identify degenerative and posttraumatic diseases in the shoulder joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shi-Uk; Lang, Philipp

    2000-01-01

    MR imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of a wide spectrum of both intraarticular and extraarticular pathology of the shoulder. MR imaging enables the detection or exclusion of degenerative and posttraumatic diseases of the shoulder with a reasonable accuracy. MR arthrography is useful in the visualization of subtle anatomic details and further improves the differentiation. In this article, findings of MR imaging and MR arthrography of degenerative and posttraumatic shoulder diseases (impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tears, and glenohumeral instability) has been reviewed

  8. Evaluation of TFC tears with magnetic resonance imaging; Comparison with arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushida, Manabu; Imamura, Koutaro; Sumi, Mitsuhiro; Uetani, Masataka (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Nagatani, Yoshifumi

    1993-09-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of tears of the trianglar fibrocartilage (TFC). Eighteen patients with chronic pain in the ulnar side of their wrist were examined by MRI and arthrography. Compared with arthrography, MRI was effective in the evaluation of TFC tears with a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 67%, and an accuracy of 83%. (author).

  9. Feasibility of ultrasonography and MR arthrography during evaluation of rotator cuff injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Jin Guang; Lee, Jong Min; Ryeom, Hun Kyu

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of MR arthrography and ultrasonography in evaluating shoulder pain. The subject group consisted of all patients who visited our institute complaining of shoulder pain or instability form June 2002 to December 2004. There were a total of 92 patients with an mean age of 48. On the basis of arthroscopic results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of ultrasonography and MR arthrography were evaluated by comparing them with each other. In the diagnosis of separateness tendon tears, ultrasonography had sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 64%, respectively, whereas MR arthrography had sensitivity and specificity of 80% and 94%, respectively. Ultrasonography also had high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of subscapularis tendon tears (100% and 90%). MR arthrography was appropriate for identifying glenoid labral abnormalities (sensitivity, 95% and specificity, 61%). Similar results from ultrasonography and MR arthrography were obtained in the diagnosis of subscapular tendon tears or full-thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendons (kappa value, 0.644 and 0.911). While evaluating rotator cuff abnormalities, ultrasonography was appropriate for screening, whereas MR arthrography was useful to confirm the results of the ultrasonography

  10. How does knee pain affect trunk and knee motion during badminton forehand lunges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming-Tung; Lee, Hsing-Hsan; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Liao, Jen-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Badminton requires extensive lower extremity movement and a precise coordination of the upper extremity and trunk movements. Accordingly, this study investigated motions of the trunk and the knee, control of dynamic stability and muscle activation patterns of individuals with and without knee pain. Seventeen participants with chronic knee pain and 17 healthy participants participated in the study and performed forehand forward and backward diagonal lunges. This study showed that those with knee pain exhibited smaller knee motions in frontal and horizontal planes during forward lunge but greater knee motions in sagittal plane during backward lunge. By contrast, in both tasks, the injured group showed a smaller value on the activation level of the paraspinal muscles in pre-impact phase, hip-shoulder separation angle, trunk forward inclination range and peak centre of mass (COM) velocity. Badminton players with knee pain adopt a more conservative movement pattern of the knee to minimise recurrence of knee pain. The healthy group exhibit better weight-shifting ability due to a greater control of the trunk and knee muscles. Training programmes for badminton players with knee pain should be designed to improve both the neuromuscular control and muscle strength of the core muscles and the knee extensor with focus on the backward lunge motion.

  11. MR arthrography in chondromalacia patellae diagnosis on a low-field open magnet system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Mustafa; Ipeksoy, Umit; Dogan, Ali; Arslan, Halil; Etlik, Omer

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy conventional MRI and MR arthrography (MRA) in the diagnosis of chondromalacia patella (CP) on a low-field open magnet system (LFOMS), correlated with arthroscopy. Forty-two patients (50 knees) with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with LFOMS, including T1-weighted, proton density-weighted and T2-weighted sequences. All were also examined T1-weighted MRI after intraarticular injection of dilue gadopentetate dimeglumine. Two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation, evaluated each imaging technique independently. Thirty-six of the 50 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of CP were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 16 facets were normal. Four (30%) of 13 grade 1 lesions were detected with T1. Four lesions (30%) with T2 and three lesions (23%) with proton-weighted images were detected. Seven (53%) of 13 grade 1 lesions were detected with MRA. Grade 2 abnormalities were diagnosed in two (33%) of six facets with proton density-weighted pulse sequences, two (33%) of six facets with T1-weighted pulse sequences, in three (50%) of six facets with T2-weighted pulse sequences, in five (83%) of six facets with MRA sequences. Grade 3 abnormalities were diagnosed in three (71%) of seven facets with proton density- and T1-weighted images, five (71%) of seven facets with T2-weighted pulse sequences, six (85%) of seven facets with MRA sequences. Grade 4 CP was detected with equal sensitivity with T1-, proton density- and T2-weighted pulse sequences, all showing seven (87%) of the eight lesions. MRA again showed these findings in all eight patients. All imaging techniques were insensitive to grade 1 lesions and highly sensitive to grade 4 lesion, so that no

  12. Quantifying dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the knee in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis using an arterial input function (AIF) extracted from popliteal artery enhancement, and the effect of the choice of the AIF on the kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workie, Dagnachew W; Dardzinski, Bernard J

    2005-09-01

    Quantification of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI based on pharmacokinetic modeling requires specification of the arterial input function (AIF). A full representation of the plasma concentration data, including the initial rise and decay parts, considering the delay and dispersion of the bolus contrast is important. This work deals with modeling of DCE-MRI data from the knees of children with a history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) by using an AIF extracted from the signal enhancement data from the nearby popliteal artery. Three models for the AIFs were considered: a triexponential (AIF1), a gamma-variate plus a biexponential (AIF2), and a biexponential (AIF3). The pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from the model were Ktrans', kep, and V'p. The results from AIF1 and AIF2 showed no statistically significant difference. However, some statistically significant differences were seen with AIF3, particularly for parameters Ktrans' and V'p in the synovium (SNVM). These results suggest the importance of obtaining an appropriate AIF representation in pharmacokinetic modeling of JRA. Specifically, the initial rising part of the AIF should be incorporated for optimal pharmacokinetic modeling results. The pharmacokinetic parameters (mean+/-SD) derived from AIF1, using the average plasma concentration data, were as follows: SNVM Ktrans'(min-1)=0.52+/-0.34, kep(min-1)=0.71+/-0.39, and V'p=0.33+/-0.16, and for the distal femoral physis (DFP) Ktrans'(min-1)=1.83+/-1.78, kep(min-1)=2.65+/-1.80, and V'p=0.46+/-0.31. The pharmacokinetic parameters in the SNVM may be useful for investigating activity and therapeutic efficacy in studies of JRA. Longitudinal studies are necessary to find or demonstrate the parameter that is more sensitive to disease activity. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der; Willems, W.J.; Bipat, Shandra

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  14. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, W.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Orthopaedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [University of Amsterdam (NL). Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  15. SLAP tears: diagnosis using 3-T shoulder MR arthrography with the 3D isotropic turbo spin-echo space sequence versus conventional 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Joon-Yong; Jee, Won-Hee; Park, Michael Yong [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, So-Yeon [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yang-Soo [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of shoulder magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with three-dimensional (3D) isotropic intermediate-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) sampling perfection with application-optimised contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) in the diagnosis of superior labrum anterior-to-posterior (SLAP) lesions compared with two-dimensional (2D) TSE at 3.0 T. MR arthrograms, including 2D TSE and 3D TSE-SPACE, in 87 patients who underwent arthroscopy were retrospectively analysed by two reviewers for the presence and type of SLAP lesions. Sensitivity and specificity were compared using McNemar's test, and inter-observer agreement was calculated using Cohen's kappa. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. The mean sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 90%, 85% and 86% for 2D TSE, and 81%, 86% and 85% for 3D TSE-SPACE respectively, with no statistically significant differences. Inter-observer agreements were substantial in 2D TSE ({kappa} = 0.76) and 3D TSE-SPACE ({kappa} = 0.68). The areas under the ROC curves were 0.92 for 2D TSE and 0.90 for 3D TSE-SPACE, which were not significantly different. MR arthrography with 3D TSE-SPACE showed comparable accuracy and substantial inter-observer agreement for the diagnosis of SLAP lesions circle MR arthrography is regarded as the definitive method of shoulder imaging circle Different MR sequences are evolving for SLAP lesions circle 3D TSE-SPACE demonstrated comparable overall accuracy to 2D TSE for SLAP lesions. (orig.)

  16. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Sam Soo; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Oh, Yu-Whan; Jeong, Woong-Kyo; Kim, Baek Hyun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small ( 3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  17. Supraspinatus tendon tears: comparison of 3D US and MR arthrography with surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea); Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kangwon-do (Korea); Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Kim, Yun Hwan; Oh, Yu-Whan [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jeong, Woong-Kyo [Korea University Anam Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Orthopaedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Baek Hyun [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan City (Korea)

    2009-11-15

    The objective of the study was to compare the diagnostic reliability of 3D US with MR arthrography in diagnosing supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopic findings used as the standard. In a prospective study 50 patients who later underwent arthroscopic surgery of the rotator cuff were examined pre-operatively by 3D US with MR arthrography. The presence or absence of a full- or partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear and the tear size as demonstrated by each imaging and arthroscopy was recorded. The tear size was divided into three grades: small (<1 cm), medium (1-3 cm), and large (>3 cm). The arthroscopic diagnosis was a full-thickness tear in 40 patients, partial-thickness tears in 5, and intact supraspinatus tendon in 5. 3D US correctly diagnosed 35 out of 40 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 39 out of 40 full-thickness tears. Regarding partial-thickness tears, 3D US underestimated 2 cases as no tear and overestimated 1 case as a full-thickness tear. MR arthrography underestimated 1 case as a partial-thickness tear and overestimated 2 cases as full-thickness and partial-thickness tears respectively. 3D US and MR arthrography yield a sensitivity for full-thickness tears of 87.5% and 97.5% with specificity of 90.0% and 90.0%. Based on the grading system, 3D US measurements correctly predicted the tear size of 23 (65.7%) of the 35 full-thickness tears and MR arthrography 30 (75.0%) of the 39 full-thickness tears. Three-dimensional ultrasound seems to be a promising imaging modality comparable to MR arthrography for the assessment of the supraspinatus tendon tears. (orig.)

  18. Uncommon observation of bifocal giant subchondral cysts in the hip. Diagnostic role of CT arthrography and MRI, with pathological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Espino, Pauline; Cauter, Maite van; Gossing, Louis [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Galant, Christine C. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Pathology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Acid, Souad; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Institut de Recherche Experimentale et Clinique (IREC), Cliniques Universitaires Saint Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2018-04-15

    Subchondral cysts (or geodes) are common in osteoarthritis (OA), usually in association with other typical signs, i.e., joint space narrowing, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophytosis. However, large lesions without the typical signs of OA or lesions located outside the weight-bearing areas are unusual and may be confused for other conditions, in particular, those of tumoral origin. We report the findings in a 48-year-old man who had been complaining of left buttock pain for 3 years, getting worse over the last year, and an evolutive limited range of motion of the hip. The pain was increased by weight-bearing and was not relieved by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Radiographs and CT showed a large multilocular lytic lesion within the femoral head and a large lytic lesion in the left ilio-ischiatic ramus, raising the question of bifocal tumoral involvement. On MRI, the lesions had low signal intensity on T1- and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MR images, with subtle peripheral enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. CT arthrography, by demonstrating a communication between the femoral head and ischiatic cysts and the joint space allowed us to definitively rule out malignant conditions and to make the diagnosis of subchondral bone cysts. Total hip arthroplasty was performed. Pathological analysis of the resected femoral head and of material obtained at curettage of the ischiatic lesion confirmed the diagnosis of degenerative geodes. This case illustrates an atypical bifocal location of giant subchondral cysts in the hip joint mimicking lytic tumors, in the absence of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, and highlights the role of CT arthrography in identifying this condition. (orig.)

  19. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-11-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis.

  20. Examination of the sprained ankle: Anterior drawer test or arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laehde, S.; Putkonen, M.; Puranen, J.; Raatikainen, T.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of the anterior drawer test for the diagnosis of recent lateral ligament tears in the ankle was evaluated in a series of 192 patients using surgical or arthrographic findings for reference. Considerable overlapping of results was obtained in ankles with and without ligament tear. Twenty-eight per cent of the anterior talofibular ligament tears, and 38% of the combined anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular tears were not detected, and single and combined tears could not be differentiated. It is concluded that the anterior drawer test is too unreliable as a basis for any decision regarding surgical treatment of a recent sprain. Therefore, arthrography is recommended as the method of choice in such cases of recent ankle sprain, where the need of surgery has to be supported by X-ray analysis. (orig.)