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Sample records for contrast gain control

  1. Contrast Gain Control Model Fits Masking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Solomon, Joshua A.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We studied the fit of a contrast gain control model to data of Foley (JOSA 1994), consisting of thresholds for a Gabor patch masked by gratings of various orientations, or by compounds of two orientations. Our general model includes models of Foley and Teo & Heeger (IEEE 1994). Our specific model used a bank of Gabor filters with octave bandwidths at 8 orientations. Excitatory and inhibitory nonlinearities were power functions with exponents of 2.4 and 2. Inhibitory pooling was broad in orientation, but narrow in spatial frequency and space. Minkowski pooling used an exponent of 4. All of the data for observer KMF were well fit by the model. We have developed a contrast gain control model that fits masking data. Unlike Foley's, our model accepts images as inputs. Unlike Teo & Heeger's, our model did not require multiple channels for different dynamic ranges.

  2. Temporal adaptation enhances efficient contrast gain control on natural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Sinz

    Full Text Available Divisive normalization in primary visual cortex has been linked to adaptation to natural image statistics in accordance to Barlow's redundancy reduction hypothesis. Using recent advances in natural image modeling, we show that the previously studied static model of divisive normalization is rather inefficient in reducing local contrast correlations, but that a simple temporal contrast adaptation mechanism of the half-saturation constant can substantially increase its efficiency. Our findings reveal the experimentally observed temporal dynamics of divisive normalization to be critical for redundancy reduction.

  3. Contrast gain control in first- and second-order motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z L; Sperling, G

    1996-12-01

    A novel pedestal-plus-test paradigm is used to determine the nonlinear gain-control properties of the first-order (luminance) and the second-order (texture-contrast) motion systems, that is, how these systems' responses to motion stimuli are reduced by pedestals and other masking stimuli. Motion-direction thresholds were measured for test stimuli consisting of drifting luminance and texture-contrast-modulation stimuli superimposed on pedestals of various amplitudes. (A pedestal is a static sine-wave grating of the same type and same spatial frequency as the moving test grating.) It was found that first-order motion-direction thresholds are unaffected by small pedestals, but at pedestal contrasts above 1-2% (5-10 x pedestal threshold), motion thresholds increase proportionally to pedestal amplitude (a Weber law). For first-order stimuli, pedestal masking is specific to the spatial frequency of the test. On the other hand, motion-direction thresholds for texture-contrast stimuli are independent of pedestal amplitude (no gain control whatever) throughout the accessible pedestal amplitude range (from 0 to 40%). However, when baseline carrier contrast increases (with constant pedestal modulation amplitude), motion thresholds increase, showing that gain control in second-order motion is determined not by the modulator (as in first-order motion) but by the carrier. Note that baseline contrast of the carrier is inherently independent of spatial frequency of the modulator. The drastically different gain-control properties of the two motion systems and prior observations of motion masking and motion saturation are all encompassed in a functional theory. The stimulus inputs to both first- and second-order motion process are normalized by feedforward, shunting gain control. The different properties arise because the modulator is used to control the first-order gain and the carrier is used to control the second-order gain.

  4. Binocular contrast-gain control for natural scenes: Image structure and phase alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pi-Chun; Dai, Yu-Ming

    2018-05-01

    In the context of natural scenes, we applied the pattern-masking paradigm to investigate how image structure and phase alignment affect contrast-gain control in binocular vision. We measured the discrimination thresholds of bandpass-filtered natural-scene images (targets) under various types of pedestals. Our first experiment had four pedestal types: bandpass-filtered pedestals, unfiltered pedestals, notch-filtered pedestals (which enabled removal of the spatial frequency), and misaligned pedestals (which involved rotation of unfiltered pedestals). Our second experiment featured six types of pedestals: bandpass-filtered, unfiltered, and notch-filtered pedestals, and the corresponding phase-scrambled pedestals. The thresholds were compared for monocular, binocular, and dichoptic viewing configurations. The bandpass-filtered pedestal and unfiltered pedestals showed classic dipper shapes; the dipper shapes of the notch-filtered, misaligned, and phase-scrambled pedestals were weak. We adopted a two-stage binocular contrast-gain control model to describe our results. We deduced that the phase-alignment information influenced the contrast-gain control mechanism before the binocular summation stage and that the phase-alignment information and structural misalignment information caused relatively strong divisive inhibition in the monocular and interocular suppression stages. When the pedestals were phase-scrambled, the elimination of the interocular suppression processing was the most convincing explanation of the results. Thus, our results indicated that both phase-alignment information and similar image structures cause strong interocular suppression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  6. Gaining control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enden, van der E.; Laan, van der R.

    2008-01-01

    The article reports on the efforts of companies to find a solution for tax risk management, tax accounting and being in control. In trying to find a solution, companies work towards an integrated tax control framework (TCF), a tax risk management and control environment embedded in the internal

  7. Commutated automatic gain control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A commutated automatic gain control (AGC) system was designed and built for a prototype Loran C receiver. The receiver uses a microcomputer to control a memory aided phase-locked loop (MAPLL). The microcomputer also controls the input/output, latitude/longitude conversion, and the recently added AGC system. The circuit designed for the AGC is described, and bench and flight test results are presented. The AGC circuit described actually samples starting at a point 40 microseconds after a zero crossing determined by the software lock pulse ultimately generated by a 30 microsecond delay and add network in the receiver front end envelope detector.

  8. Temporal dynamics of contrast gain in single cells of the cat striate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, A B

    1991-03-01

    The response amplitude of cat striate cortical cells is usually reduced after exposure to high-contrast stimuli. The temporal characteristics and contrast sensitivity of this phenomenon were explored by stimulating cortical cells with drifting gratings in which contrast sequentially incremented and decremented in stepwise fashion over time. All responses showed a clear hysteresis, in which contrast gain dropped on average 0.36 log unit and then returned to baseline values within 60 s. Noticeable gain adjustments were seen in as little as 3 s and with peak contrasts as low as 3%. Contrast adaptation was absent in responses from LGN cells. Adaptation was found to depend on temporal frequency of stimulation, with greater and more rapid adaptation at higher temporal frequencies. Two different tests showed that the mechanism controlling response reduction was influenced primarily by stimulus contrast rather than response amplitude. These results support the existence of a rapid and sensitive cortically based system that normalizes the output of cortical cells as a function of local mean contrast. Control of the adaptation appears to arise at least in part across a population of cells, which is consistent with the idea that the gain control serves to limit the information converging from many cells onto subsequent processing areas.

  9. Gaining and sustaining schistosomiasis control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezeamama, Amara E.; He, Chun-La; Shen, Ye

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Schistosomiasis Consortium for Operational Research and Evaluation (SCORE) was established in 2008 to answer strategic questions about schistosomiasis control. For programme managers, a high-priority question is: what are the most cost-effective strategies for delivering preventiv...

  10. Gain control mechanisms in spinal motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael David Johnson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons provide the only conduit for motor commands to reach muscles. For many years, motoneurons were in fact considered to be little more than passive wires. Systematic studies in the past 25 years however have clearly demonstrated that the intrinsic electrical properties of motoneurons are under strong neuromodulatory control via multiple sources. The discovery of potent neuromodulation from the brainstem and its ability to change the gain of motoneurons shows that the passive view of the motor output stage is no longer tenable. A mechanism for gain control at the motor output stage makes good functional sense considering our capability of generating an enormous range of forces, from very delicate (e.g. putting in a contact lens to highly forceful (emergency reactions. Just as sensory systems need gain control to deal with a wide dynamic range of inputs, so to might motor output need gain control to deal with the wide dynamic range of the normal movement repertoire. Two problems emerge from the potential use of the brainstem monoaminergic projection to motoneurons for gain control. First, the projection is highly diffuse anatomically, so that independent control of the gains of different motor pools is not feasible. In fact, the system is so diffuse that gain for all the motor pools in a limb likely increases in concert. Second, if there is a system that increases gain, probably a system to reduce gain is also needed. In this review, we summarize recent studies that show local inhibitory circuits within the spinal cord, especially reciprocal and recurrent inhibition, have the potential to solve both of these problems as well as constitute another source of gain modulation.

  11. Controlling gain one photon at a time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Gregory W; Rieke, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation is a salient property of sensory processing. All adaptational or gain control mechanisms face the challenge of obtaining a reliable estimate of the property of the input to be adapted to and obtaining this estimate sufficiently rapidly to be useful. Here, we explore how the primate retina balances the need to change gain rapidly and reliably when photons arrive rarely at individual rod photoreceptors. We find that the weakest backgrounds that decrease the gain of the retinal output signals are similar to those that increase human behavioral threshold, and identify a novel site of gain control in the retinal circuitry. Thus, surprisingly, the gain of retinal signals begins to decrease essentially as soon as background lights are detectable; under these conditions, gain control does not rely on a highly averaged estimate of the photon count, but instead signals from individual photon absorptions trigger changes in gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00467.001 PMID:23682314

  12. When size matters: attention affects performance by contrast or response gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Katrin; Montaser-Kouhsari, Leila; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2010-12-01

    Covert attention, the selective processing of visual information in the absence of eye movements, improves behavioral performance. We found that attention, both exogenous (involuntary) and endogenous (voluntary), can affect performance by contrast or response gain changes, depending on the stimulus size and the relative size of the attention field. These two variables were manipulated in a cueing task while stimulus contrast was varied. We observed a change in behavioral performance consonant with a change in contrast gain for small stimuli paired with spatial uncertainty and a change in response gain for large stimuli presented at one location (no uncertainty) and surrounded by irrelevant flanking distracters. A complementary neuroimaging experiment revealed that observers' attention fields were wider with than without spatial uncertainty. Our results support important predictions of the normalization model of attention and reconcile previous, seemingly contradictory findings on the effects of visual attention.

  13. Predictive Variable Gain Iterative Learning Control for PMSM

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    Huimin Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A predictive variable gain strategy in iterative learning control (ILC is introduced. Predictive variable gain iterative learning control is constructed to improve the performance of trajectory tracking. A scheme based on predictive variable gain iterative learning control for eliminating undesirable vibrations of PMSM system is proposed. The basic idea is that undesirable vibrations of PMSM system are eliminated from two aspects of iterative domain and time domain. The predictive method is utilized to determine the learning gain in the ILC algorithm. Compression mapping principle is used to prove the convergence of the algorithm. Simulation results demonstrate that the predictive variable gain is superior to constant gain and other variable gains.

  14. Central gain control in tinnitus and hyperacusis

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    Benjamin D Auerbach

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensorineural hearing loss induced by noise or ototoxic drug exposure reduces the neural activity transmitted from the cochlea to the central auditory system. Despite a reduced cochlear output, neural activity from more central auditory structures is paradoxically enhanced at suprathreshold intensities. This compensatory increase in the central auditory activity in response to the loss of sensory input is referred to as central gain enhancement. Enhanced central gain is hypothesized to be a potential mechanism that gives rise to hyperacusis and tinnitus, two debilitating auditory perceptual disorders that afflict millions of individuals. This review will examine the evidence for gain enhancement in the central auditory system in response to cochlear damage. Further, it will address the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this enhancement and discuss the contribution of central gain enhancement to tinnitus and hyperacusis. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms with distinct temporal and spectral profiles are likely to contribute to central gain enhancement. Dissecting the contributions of these different mechanisms at different levels of the central auditory system is essential for elucidating the role of central gain enhancement in tinnitus and hyperacusis and, most importantly, the development of novel treatments for these disorders.

  15. Central Gain Control in Tinnitus and Hyperacusis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Benjamin D.; Rodrigues, Paulo V.; Salvi, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss induced by noise or ototoxic drug exposure reduces the neural activity transmitted from the cochlea to the central auditory system. Despite a reduced cochlear output, neural activity from more central auditory structures is paradoxically enhanced at suprathreshold intensities. This compensatory increase in the central auditory activity in response to the loss of sensory input is referred to as central gain enhancement. Enhanced central gain is hypothesized to be a potential mechanism that gives rise to hyperacusis and tinnitus, two debilitating auditory perceptual disorders that afflict millions of individuals. This review will examine the evidence for gain enhancement in the central auditory system in response to cochlear damage. Further, it will address the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this enhancement and discuss the contribution of central gain enhancement to tinnitus and hyperacusis. Current evidence suggests that multiple mechanisms with distinct temporal and spectral profiles are likely to contribute to central gain enhancement. Dissecting the contributions of these different mechanisms at different levels of the central auditory system is essential for elucidating the role of central gain enhancement in tinnitus and hyperacusis and, most importantly, the development of novel treatments for these disorders. PMID:25386157

  16. Contrasting losses and gains increases the predictability of behavior by frontal EEG asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telpaz, Ariel; Yechiam, Eldad

    2014-01-01

    Frontal asymmetry measured at rest using EEG is considered a stable marker of approach-avoidance behaviors and risk taking. We examined whether without salient cues of attention in the form of losses, predictability is reduced. Fifty-seven participants performed an experiential decision task in a gain-only, loss-only, and mixed (gains and losses) condition. Increased risk taking on the part of individuals with relatively high left frontal activation, as denoted by the Alpha band, was only observed in the task involving both gains and losses. Event-related potential analysis sheds light on the processes leading to this pattern. Left-frontal dominant individuals had increased fronto-central P300 activation following risky compared to safe outcomes, while right-frontal dominant individuals did not show a P300 difference following safe and risky outcomes. This interaction also only emerged when losses were contrasted with gains. The findings highlight the sensitivity of behavioral predictability to cues of valence. PMID:24817845

  17. Gain scheduling controller for pitch control of a TRMS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagyalakshmi, R.; Rashmi, GP; Jaganatha Pandian, B.

    2017-11-01

    Gain scheduling is a control technique which is applied for the control of non-linear systems by using a family of linear controllers at different operating points so as to increase the range of operation of the process. The dynamics of any nonlinear system changes with respect to operating points. These operating points are characterized by one or more variables known as scheduling variables. In such cases, we linearize the system at different equilibrium points. Due to the high amount of non-linearities and complexity in the aerodynamic design, modelling of other unmanned aerial vehicles have been replaced here with twin rotor system. The linearized system is then controlled by using PID controllers which are designed with respect to the obtained operating points. Linearizing of the non-linear system, designing and tuning of PID are being implemented using different MATLAB functions.

  18. A wide range and high speed automatic gain control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacconi, E.; Christiansen, C.

    1993-05-01

    Automatic gain control (AGC) techniques have been largely used since the beginning of electronics, but in most of the applications the dynamic response is slow compared with the carrier frequency. The problem of developing an automatic gain control with high dynamic response and wide control range simultaneously is analyzed in this work. An ideal gain control law, with the property that the total loop gain remains constant independent of the carrier amplitude, is obtained. The resulting AGC behavior is compared by computer simulations with a linear multiplier AGC. The ideal gain control law can be approximated using a transconductance amplifier. A practical circuit that has been used at CERN in the radio frequency loops of the Booster Synchrotron is presented. The circuit has high speed and 80-dB gain control range

  19. Bumpless Transfer between Observer-based Gain Scheduled Controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Stoustrup, Jakob; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with bumpless transfer between a number of observer-based controllers in a gain scheduling architecture. Linear observer-based controllers are designed for a number of linear approximations of a nonlinear system in a set of operating points, and gain scheduling control can...

  20. Gain scheduled linear quadratic control for quadcopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, M.; Shah, J.; Fauzi, W.; Hanouf, Z.

    2017-12-01

    This study exploits the dynamics and control of quadcopters using Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control approach. The quadcopter’s mathematical model is derived using the Newton-Euler method. It is a highly manoeuvrable, nonlinear, coupled with six degrees of freedom (DOF) model, which includes aerodynamics and detailed gyroscopic moments that are often ignored in many literatures. The linearized model is obtained and characterized by the heading angle (i.e. yaw angle) of the quadcopter. The adopted control approach utilizes LQR method to track several reference trajectories including circle and helix curves with significant variation in the yaw angle. The controller is modified to overcome difficulties related to the continuous changes in the operating points and eliminate chattering and discontinuity that is observed in the control input signal. Numerical non-linear simulations are performed using MATLAB and Simulink to illustrate to accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  1. L2-gain and passivity techniques in nonlinear control

    CERN Document Server

    van der Schaft, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    This standard text gives a unified treatment of passivity and L2-gain theory for nonlinear state space systems, preceded by a compact treatment of classical passivity and small-gain theorems for nonlinear input-output maps. The synthesis between passivity and L2-gain theory is provided by the theory of dissipative systems. Specifically, the small-gain and passivity theorems and their implications for nonlinear stability and stabilization are discussed from this standpoint. The connection between L2-gain and passivity via scattering is detailed. Feedback equivalence to a passive system and resulting stabilization strategies are discussed. The passivity concepts are enriched by a generalised Hamiltonian formalism, emphasising the close relations with physical modeling and control by interconnection, and leading to novel control methodologies going beyond passivity. The potential of L2-gain techniques in nonlinear control, including a theory of all-pass factorizations of nonlinear systems, and of parametrization...

  2. An output amplitude configurable wideband automatic gain control with high gain step accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaofeng; Ye Tianchun; Mo Taishan; Ma Chengyan

    2012-01-01

    An output amplitude configurable wideband automatic gain control (AGC) with high gain step accuracy for the GNSS receiver is presented. The amplitude of an AGC is configurable in order to cooperate with baseband chips to achieve interference suppression and be compatible with different full range ADCs. And what's more, the gain-boosting technology is introduced and the circuit is improved to increase the step accuracy. A zero, which is composed by the source feedback resistance and the source capacity, is introduced to compensate for the pole. The AGC is fabricated in a 0.18 μm CMOS process. The AGC shows a 62 dB gain control range by 1 dB each step with a gain error of less than 0.2 dB. The AGC provides 3 dB bandwidth larger than 80 MHz and the overall power consumption is less than 1.8 mA, and the die area is 800 × 300 μm 2 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Gain Scheduling for the Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Sara J.; Restrepo, Carolina I.; Madsen, Jennifer M.; Medina, Edgar A.; Proud, Ryan W.; Whitley, Ryan J.

    2011-01-01

    One of NASAs challenges for the Orion vehicle is the control system design for the Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV), which is required to abort safely at any time during the atmospheric ascent portion of ight. The focus of this paper is the gain design and scheduling process for a controller that covers the wide range of vehicle configurations and flight conditions experienced during the full envelope of potential abort trajectories from the pad to exo-atmospheric flight. Several factors are taken into account in the automation process for tuning the gains including the abort effectors, the environmental changes and the autopilot modes. Gain scheduling is accomplished using a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) approach for the decoupled, simplified linear model throughout the operational envelope in time, altitude and Mach number. The derived gains are then implemented into the full linear model for controller requirement validation. Finally, the gains are tested and evaluated in a non-linear simulation using the vehicles ight software to ensure performance requirements are met. An overview of the LAV controller design and a description of the linear plant models are presented. Examples of the most significant challenges with the automation of the gain tuning process are then discussed. In conclusion, the paper will consider the lessons learned through out the process, especially in regards to automation, and examine the usefulness of the gain scheduling tool and process developed as applicable to non-Orion vehicles.

  4. Gain Scheduling Control based on Closed-Loop System Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    the first and a second operating point is identified in closed-loop using system identification methods with open-loop properties. Next, a linear controller is designed for this linearised model, and gain scheduling control can subsequently be achieved by interpolating between each controller...

  5. Gain Scheduling of Observer-Based Controllers with Integral Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangbæk, Klaus; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2006-01-01

     This paper presents a method for continuous gain scheduling of  observer-based controllers with integral action. Given two stabilising controllers for a given system, explicit state space formulae are presented, allowing to change gradually from one  controller to the other while preserving...

  6. Perception of gain in U.S.-Soviet arms control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Anieri, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    Most current work in the field of international cooperation focuses on the resolution of the 'prisoners dilemma.' Such work begins by assuming that the issues under consideration are defined by absolute gains, where both sides can gain simultaneously. But the realist strand of international relations literature holds that this assumption is suspect - that international relations are usually characterized by relative gains, where gain for one side comes only at the others expense. The model developed here uses the question of absolute versus relative gains not as a theoretical assumption, but as a variable to be measured empirically. The hypothesis is that whether or not the US and the Soviet Union cooperate to limit arms competition is largely determined by whether the two sides define the issue in question as one of absolute or relative gains. The 'perception of gain' hypothesis is compared to explanations at the levels of the international system (rational choice), domestic politics, and individual belief systems. Three case studies are used to compare the strengths and weaknesses of each hypothesis. The findings confirmed that perception of gain is an important independent variable affecting arms control outcomes, but none of the theories were completely supported or rejected

  7. Robust Optimal Adaptive Control Method with Large Adaptive Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2009-01-01

    In the presence of large uncertainties, a control system needs to be able to adapt rapidly to regain performance. Fast adaptation is referred to the implementation of adaptive control with a large adaptive gain to reduce the tracking error rapidly. However, a large adaptive gain can lead to high-frequency oscillations which can adversely affect robustness of an adaptive control law. A new adaptive control modification is presented that can achieve robust adaptation with a large adaptive gain without incurring high-frequency oscillations as with the standard model-reference adaptive control. The modification is based on the minimization of the Y2 norm of the tracking error, which is formulated as an optimal control problem. The optimality condition is used to derive the modification using the gradient method. The optimal control modification results in a stable adaptation and allows a large adaptive gain to be used for better tracking while providing sufficient stability robustness. Simulations were conducted for a damaged generic transport aircraft with both standard adaptive control and the adaptive optimal control modification technique. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed modification in tracking a reference model while maintaining a sufficient time delay margin.

  8. Design of Gain Scheduling Control Using State Derivative Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Ismael Hardy Llins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the study of systems subject to time-varying parameters has awakened the interest of many researchers. The gain scheduling control strategy guarantees a good performance for systems of this type and also is considered as the simplest to deal with problems of this nature. Moreover, the class of systems in which the state derivative signals are easier to obtain than the state signals, such as in the control for reducing vibrations in a mechanical system, has gained an important hole in control theory. Considering those ideas, we propose sufficient conditions via LMI for designing a gain scheduling controller using state derivative feedback. The D-stability methodology was used for improving the performance of the transitory response. Practical implementation in an active suspension system and comparison with other methods validates the efficiency of the proposed strategy.

  9. Application of gain scheduling to the control of batch bioreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardello, Ralph; San, Ka-Yiu

    1987-01-01

    The implementation of control algorithms to batch bioreactors is often complicated by the inherent variations in process dynamics during the course of fermentation. Such a wide operating range may render the performance of fixed gain PID controllers unsatisfactory. In this work, a detailed study on the control of batch fermentation is performed. Furthermore, a simple batch controller design is proposed which incorporates the concept of gain-scheduling, a subclass of adaptive control, with oxygen uptake rate as an auxiliary variable. The control of oxygen tension in the biorector is used as a vehicle to convey the proposed idea, analysis and results. Simulation experiments indicate significant improvement in controller performance can be achieved by the proposed approach even in the presence of measurement noise.

  10. Gain-assisted control of the Goos-Haenchen shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziauddin,; Qamar, Sajid [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-11-15

    A gain-assisted model is considered to study the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift behavior in the reflected and transmitted light. In this model, a probe light is incident on a cavity containing three-level dilute gaseous atomic medium. The atom-field interaction follows two-photon Raman transitions, and the dielectric susceptibility of the medium exhibits dispersion and gain properties [L. J. Wang, A. Kuzmich, and A. Dogariu, Nature (London) 406, 227 (2000)]. Under appropriate conditions, two gain peaks are observed with anomalous dispersion between the peaks, whereas normal dispersion can be observed at and around the gain maxima. The manipulation of the detuning associated with the probe light field which interacts with the intracavity medium during its propagation through the cavity can lead to a control over negative and positive GH shift in the reflected and transmitted light beam via the anomalous and normal dispersion of the medium.

  11. Gain control network conditions in early sensory coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Serrano

    Full Text Available Gain control is essential for the proper function of any sensory system. However, the precise mechanisms for achieving effective gain control in the brain are unknown. Based on our understanding of the existence and strength of connections in the insect olfactory system, we analyze the conditions that lead to controlled gain in a randomly connected network of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We consider two scenarios for the variation of input into the system. In the first case, the intensity of the sensory input controls the input currents to a fixed proportion of neurons of the excitatory and inhibitory populations. In the second case, increasing intensity of the sensory stimulus will both, recruit an increasing number of neurons that receive input and change the input current that they receive. Using a mean field approximation for the network activity we derive relationships between the parameters of the network that ensure that the overall level of activity of the excitatory population remains unchanged for increasing intensity of the external stimulation. We find that, first, the main parameters that regulate network gain are the probabilities of connections from the inhibitory population to the excitatory population and of the connections within the inhibitory population. Second, we show that strict gain control is not achievable in a random network in the second case, when the input recruits an increasing number of neurons. Finally, we confirm that the gain control conditions derived from the mean field approximation are valid in simulations of firing rate models and Hodgkin-Huxley conductance based models.

  12. Adaptive Gain Scheduled Semiactive Vibration Control Using a Neural Network

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    Kazuhiko Hiramoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an adaptive gain scheduled semiactive control method using an artificial neural network for structural systems subject to earthquake disturbance. In order to design a semiactive control system with high control performance against earthquakes with different time and/or frequency properties, multiple semiactive control laws with high performance for each of multiple earthquake disturbances are scheduled with an adaptive manner. Each semiactive control law to be scheduled is designed based on the output emulation approach that has been proposed by the authors. As the adaptive gain scheduling mechanism, we introduce an artificial neural network (ANN. Input signals of the ANN are the measured earthquake disturbance itself, for example, the acceleration, velocity, and displacement. The output of the ANN is the parameter for the scheduling of multiple semiactive control laws each of which has been optimized for a single disturbance. Parameters such as weight and bias in the ANN are optimized by the genetic algorithm (GA. The proposed design method is applied to semiactive control design of a base-isolated building with a semiactive damper. With simulation study, the proposed adaptive gain scheduling method realizes control performance exceeding single semiactive control optimizing the average of the control performance subject to various earthquake disturbances.

  13. A Gain-Scheduling PI Control Based on Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Tronci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a gain-scheduling design technique that relies upon neural models to approximate plant behaviour. The controller design is based on generic model control (GMC formalisms and linearization of the neural model of the process. As a result, a PI controller action is obtained, where the gain depends on the state of the system and is adapted instantaneously on-line. The algorithm is tested on a nonisothermal continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR, considering both single-input single-output (SISO and multi-input multi-output (MIMO control problems. Simulation results show that the proposed controller provides satisfactory performance during set-point changes and disturbance rejection.

  14. Controlled mass pollination in loblolly pine to increase genetic gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.E. Bridgwater; D.L. Bramlett; T.D. Byram; W.J. Lowe

    1998-01-01

    Controlled mass pollination (CMP) is one way to increase genetic gains from traditional wind-pollinated seed orchards. Methodology is under development by several forestry companies in the southern USA. Costs of CMP depend on the efficient installation, pollination, and removal of inexpensive paper bags. Even in pilot-scale studies these costs seem reasonable. Net...

  15. How invasive is TMJ double-contrast arthrography in combination with cinematography? Patient discomfort versus known diagnostic gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelke, W; Mommaerts, M

    1990-04-01

    There is no doubt that double-contrast TMJ fluoroscopic tomography enables a differential diagnosis and treatment in internal derangement pathosis. Its indication is, apart from the expected diagnostic gain, also determined by the degree of its invasiveness, and other alternative diagnostics being available (nuclear magnetic resonance). Data on patient discomfort and complications were gathered in 63 arthrotomographies; pain sensations and mandibular mobility, during and after the procedure in particular, were studied. We consider, along with Westesson, the procedure to be less invasive than commonly considered, once the surgeon-radiologist has gained enough experience.

  16. Divisive gain modulation of motoneurons by inhibition optimizes muscular control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Berg, Rune W.

    2015-01-01

    unclear whether the motoneuron gain, i.e., the slope of the transformation between synaptic input and spiking output, is also modulated to reduce variability in force. To address this issue, we use turtle hindlimb scratching as a model for fine motor control, since this behavior involves precise limb...... movement to rub the location of somatic nuisance touch. We recorded intracellularly from motoneurons in a reduced preparation where the limbs were removed to increase mechanical stability and the motor nerve activity served as a surrogate for muscle force. We found that not only is the gain of motoneurons...

  17. Coherence and interlimb force control: Effects of visual gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nyeonju; Cauraugh, James H

    2018-03-06

    Neural coupling across hemispheres and homologous muscles often appears during bimanual motor control. Force coupling in a specific frequency domain may indicate specific bimanual force coordination patterns. This study investigated coherence on pairs of bimanual isometric index finger force while manipulating visual gain and task asymmetry conditions. We used two visual gain conditions (low and high gain = 8 and 512 pixels/N), and created task asymmetry by manipulating coefficient ratios imposed on the left and right index finger forces (0.4:1.6; 1:1; 1.6:0.4, respectively). Unequal coefficient ratios required different contributions from each hand to the bimanual force task resulting in force asymmetry. Fourteen healthy young adults performed bimanual isometric force control at 20% of their maximal level of the summed force of both fingers. We quantified peak coherence and relative phase angle between hands at 0-4, 4-8, and 8-12 Hz, and estimated a signal-to-noise ratio of bimanual forces. The findings revealed higher peak coherence and relative phase angle at 0-4 Hz than at 4-8 and 8-12 Hz for both visual gain conditions. Further, peak coherence and relative phase angle values at 0-4 Hz were larger at the high gain than at the low gain. At the high gain, higher peak coherence at 0-4 Hz collapsed across task asymmetry conditions significantly predicted greater signal-to-noise ratio. These findings indicate that a greater level of visual information facilitates bimanual force coupling at a specific frequency range related to sensorimotor processing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gain Scheduling of PID Controller Based on Fuzzy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to utilize fuzzy rules and reasoning to determine the controller parameters and the PID controller generates the control signal. The objective of this study is to simulate the proposed scheme on various processes and arrive at results providing better response of the system when compared with best industrial auto-tuning technique: Ziegler-Nichols. The proposed scheme is based upon the Ultimate Gain (Ku and the Period (Tu of the system. The error and rate of change in error gains are tuned manually to get the desired response using LabVIEW. This can also be done with various optimization techniques. A thumb rule for choosing the ranges for Kc, Kd and Ki has been obtained experimentally.

  19. Humanoid Walking Robot: Modeling, Inverse Dynamics, and Gain Scheduling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvedin Kljuno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents reference-model-based control design for a 10 degree-of-freedom bipedal walking robot, using nonlinear gain scheduling. The main goal is to show concentrated mass models can be used for prediction of the required joint torques for a bipedal walking robot. Relatively complicated architecture, high DOF, and balancing requirements make the control task of these robots difficult. Although linear control techniques can be used to control bipedal robots, nonlinear control is necessary for better performance. The emphasis of this work is to show that the reference model can be a bipedal walking model with concentrated mass at the center of gravity, which removes the problems related to design of a pseudo-inverse system. Another significance of this approach is the reduced calculation requirements due to the simplified procedure of nominal joint torques calculation. Kinematic and dynamic analysis is discussed including results for joint torques and ground force necessary to implement a prescribed walking motion. This analysis is accompanied by a comparison with experimental data. An inverse plant and a tracking error linearization-based controller design approach is described. We propose a novel combination of a nonlinear gain scheduling with a concentrated mass model for the MIMO bipedal robot system.

  20. Structured, Gain-Scheduled Control of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher

    2013-01-01

    Improvements in cost-effectiveness and reliability of wind turbines is a constant in the industry. This requires new knowledge and systematic methods for analyzing and designing the interaction of structural dynamics, aerodynamics, and controllers. This thesis presents novel methods and theoretical....... Robustness and fault-tolerance capabilities are also important properties, which should be considered in the design process. Novel gain-scheduling and robust control methods that adapt to variations in the operational conditions of the wind turbine are proposed under the linear parameter-varying (LPV...... intuitive and physical specifications for vibration control, such as minimum damping and decay rate of aeroelastic modes. Moreover, the number of weighting functions and consequently the order of the final controller is reduced. Inspired by this application, theoretical control developments are presented...

  1. Automatic gain control of neural coupling during cooperative hand movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, F A; Dietz, V; Schrafl-Altermatt, M

    2018-04-13

    Cooperative hand movements (e.g. opening a bottle) are controlled by a task-specific neural coupling, reflected in EMG reflex responses contralateral to the stimulation site. In this study the contralateral reflex responses in forearm extensor muscles to ipsilateral ulnar nerve stimulation was analyzed at various resistance and velocities of cooperative hand movements. The size of contralateral reflex responses was closely related to the level of forearm muscle activation required to accomplish the various cooperative hand movement tasks. This indicates an automatic gain control of neural coupling that allows a rapid matching of corrective forces exerted at both sides of an object with the goal 'two hands one action'.

  2. A low power automatic gain control loop for a receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guofeng; Geng Zhiqing; Wu Nanjian, E-mail: nanjian@red.semi.ac.c [State Key Laboratory for Super lattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-09-15

    This paper proposes a new structure to lower the power consumption of a variable gain amplifier (VGA) and keep the linearity of the VGA unchanged. The structure is used in a high rate amplitude-shift keying (ASK) based IF-stage. It includes an automatic gain control (AGC) loop and ASK demodulator. The AGC mainly consists of six-stage VGAs. The IF-stage is realized in 0.18 {mu}m CMOS technology. The measurement results show that the power consumption of the whole system is very low. The system consumes 730 {mu}A while operating at 1.8 V. The minimum ASK signal the system could detect is 0.7 mV (peak to peak amplitude). (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  3. Gain Scheduling Control of an Islanded Microgrid Voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haritza Camblong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research study has been to design a gain scheduling (GS digital controller in order to control the voltage of an islanded microgrid in the presence of fast varying loads (FVLs, and to compare it to a robust controller. The inverter which feeds the microgrid is connected to it through an inductance-capacitor-inductance (LCL filter. The oscillatory and nonlinear behaviour of the plant is analyzed in the whole operating zone. Afterwards, the design of the controllers which contain two loops in cascade are described. The first loop concerns the current control, while the second is linked to the voltage regulation. Two controllers, one defined as Robust and another one as GS controller, are designed for the two loops, emphasizing in their robustness and their ability to damp the oscillatory plant behaviour. To finish, some simulations are carried out to study and compare the two kinds of controllers in different operating points. The results show that both controllers damp the oscillatory behaviour of the plant in closed loop (CL, and that the GS controller ensures a better rejection of current disturbances from FVLs.

  4. Robust, Gain-Scheduled Control of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck

    Wind turbines are today large and efficient machines, which are combined into wind farms operating on par with conventional power plants. When looking back, this is significantly different from the status only a few years ago, when wind turbines were sold mainly to private people. This change...... in turbine owners has resulted in a new focus on operational reliability instead of turbine size. This research deals with investigating model-based gain-scheduling control of wind turbines by use of linear parameter varying (LPV) methods. The numerical challenges grow quickly with the model size...

  5. Gaining control room habitability margin at the Palisades Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harden, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The bounding design-basis accident for control room habitability is the loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). At Palisades, very little margin existed between the calculated control room operator thyroid dose and the 0.3-Sv (30-rem) limit of Standard Review Plan (SRP) 6.4. Also, a low rate of unfiltered air leakage into the control room during the emergency mode of operation, 5.5 x 10 -3 m 3 /s (11.6 ft 3 /min), was accounted for in the control room habitability analysis. The control room heating, ventilating and air-conditioning system at Palisades has louvered isolation dampers for the normal air intake that are exposed to a negative pressure. Considering the small margin to the thyroid dose limits and the leakage characteristics of louvered dampers, a low allowable rate of unfiltered air in-leakage raised some concern. A significant effort has been initiated to alleviate control room habitability concerns at Palisades. The first step in this effort was to evaluate the calculational models for control room habitability and gain margin through updated analytical methods. To accomplish this, a new radiological consequence analysis for the LOCA was completed

  6. LPV gain-scheduled control of SCR aftertreatment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisami-Azad, Mona; Mohammadpour, Javad; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.; Harold, Michael P.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and some of other polluting emissions produced by diesel engines are usually lower than those produced by gasoline engines. While great strides have been made in the exhaust aftertreatment of vehicular pollutants, the elimination of nitrogen oxide (NO x ) from diesel vehicles is still a challenge. The primary reason is that diesel combustion is a fuel-lean process, and hence there is significant unreacted oxygen in the exhaust. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a well-developed technology for power plants and has been recently employed for reducing NO x emissions from automotive sources and in particular, heavy-duty diesel engines. In this article, we develop a linear parameter-varying (LPV) feedforward/feedback control design method for the SCR aftertreatment system to decrease NO x emissions while keeping ammonia slippage to a desired low level downstream the catalyst. The performance of the closed-loop system obtained from the interconnection of the SCR system and the output feedback LPV control strategy is then compared with other control design methods including sliding mode, and observer-based static state-feedback parameter-varying control. To reduce the computational complexity involved in the control design process, the number of LPV parameters in the developed quasi-LPV (qLPV) model is reduced by applying the principal component analysis technique. An LPV feedback/feedforward controller is then designed for the qLPV model with reduced number of scheduling parameters. The designed full-order controller is further simplified to a first-order transfer function with a parameter-varying gain and pole. Finally, simulation results using both a low-order model and a high-fidelity and high-order model of SCR reactions in GT-POWER interfaced with MATLAB/SIMULINK illustrate the high NO x conversion efficiency of the closed-loop SCR system using the proposed parameter-varying control law.

  7. Control of gain in conjugated polymers and perylene dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, A.

    2001-03-01

    This thesis presents an investigation into the factors which control the gain and amplification properties in conjugated materials. Conjugated polymers and perylene dyes are highly fluorescent, are easy to process into thin films, and exhibit strong amplification over a broad gain bandwidth making them ideal for use in lasers and amplifiers. The stimulated emission created when thin films of the red emitting polymer poly(2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylenvinylene) (MEH-PPV) were photoexcited with high energy laser pulses was investigated. This was characterised by a dramatic narrowing of the emission spectrum which has been assigned to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE). The emission was found to have a gaussian profile and the gain coefficient was found to be 4 cm -1 . The temperature dependence of the absorption, photoluminescence and ASE of films of MEH-PPV was measured. The effect of film morphology on the photophysical properties was investigated by using films cast from two spinning solvents, chlorobenzene (CB) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). Film morphology was found to greatly affect the temperature dependence. A particularly important property is the spectral position of the ASE and the factors which affect it. By controlling the film thickness close to the cut-off thickness for waveguiding in the polymer film it was shown that the peak position of the ASE could be tuned by 31 nm. Modelling of the waveguide modes in the polymer films was used to explain this effect. The cut-off wavelength for each film was measured and good agreement with the theory was found. In order to investigate ways in which energy transfer could be used to control the emission, two perylene dyes were used as a donor-acceptor pair in a host matrix of poly methymethacralate (PMMA). The position of the ASE was found to depend on the acceptor concentration. Measurements of the photoluminescence quantum yield and time-resolved luminescence measurements showed that the energy transfer

  8. Phase and gain control policies for robust active vibration control of flexible structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, K; Ichchou, M N; Scorletti, G; Mieyeville, F

    2013-01-01

    The interest of this paper is to develop a general and systematic robust control methodology for active vibration control of flexible structures. For this purpose, first phase and gain control policies are proposed to impose qualitative frequency-dependent requirements on the controller to consider a complete set of control objectives. Then the proposed control methodology is developed by employing phase and gain control policies in the dynamic output feedback H ∞  control: according to the set of control objectives, phase and gain control policies incorporate necessary weighting functions and determine them in a rational and systematic way; on the other hand, with the appropriate weighting functions efficient H ∞  control algorithms can automatically realize phase and gain control policies and generate a satisfactory H ∞  controller. The proposed control methodology can be used for both SISO and MIMO systems with collocated or non-collocated sensors and actuators. In this paper, it is validated on a non-collocated piezoelectric cantilever beam. Both numerical simulations and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control methodology. (paper)

  9. Fuzzy gain scheduling of velocity PI controller with intelligent learning algorithm for reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yun; Seong, Poong Hyun

    1996-01-01

    In this study, we proposed a fuzzy gain scheduler with intelligent learning algorithm for a reactor control. In the proposed algorithm, we used the gradient descent method to learn the rule bases of a fuzzy algorithm. These rule bases are learned toward minimizing an objective function, which is called a performance cost function. The objective of fuzzy gain scheduler with intelligent learning algorithm is the generation of adequate gains, which minimize the error of system. The condition of every plant is generally changed as time gose. That is, the initial gains obtained through the analysis of system are no longer suitable for the changed plant. And we need to set new gains, which minimize the error stemmed from changing the condition of a plant. In this paper, we applied this strategy for reactor control of nuclear power plant (NPP), and the results were compared with those of a simple PI controller, which has fixed gains. As a result, it was shown that the proposed algorithm was superior to the simple PI controller

  10. Fuzzy gain scheduling of velocity PI controller with intelligent learning algorithm for reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yun Kim; Poong Hyun Seong; .

    1997-01-01

    In this research, we propose a fuzzy gain scheduler (FGS) with an intelligent learning algorithm for a reactor control. In the proposed algorithm, the gradient descent method is used in order to generate the rule bases of a fuzzy algorithm by learning. These rule bases are obtained by minimizing an objective function, which is called a performance cost function. The objective of the FGS with an intelligent learning algorithm is to generate gains, which minimize the error of system. The proposed algorithm can reduce the time and effort required for obtaining the fuzzy rules through the intelligent learning function. It is applied to reactor control of nuclear power plant (NPP), and the results are compared with those of a conventional PI controller with fixed gains. As a result, it is shown that the proposed algorithm is superior to the conventional PI controller. (author)

  11. Reward-driven modulation of adaptive control: How prospective monetary gains interact with unpredictable control demands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marien, Hans; Aarts, Henk; Custers, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    Shifting attention is an effortful control process and incurs a cost on the cognitive system. Previous research suggests that rewards, such as monetary gains, will selectively enhance the ability to shift attention when this demand for control is explicitly cued. Here, we hypothesized that

  12. High contrast sensitivity for visually guided flight control in bumblebees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Aravin; Kelber, Almut; Baird, Emily; Dacke, Marie

    2017-12-01

    Many insects rely on vision to find food, to return to their nest and to carefully control their flight between these two locations. The amount of information available to support these tasks is, in part, dictated by the spatial resolution and contrast sensitivity of their visual systems. Here, we investigate the absolute limits of these visual properties for visually guided position and speed control in Bombus terrestris. Our results indicate that the limit of spatial vision in the translational motion detection system of B. terrestris lies at 0.21 cycles deg -1 with a peak contrast sensitivity of at least 33. In the perspective of earlier findings, these results indicate that bumblebees have higher contrast sensitivity in the motion detection system underlying position control than in their object discrimination system. This suggests that bumblebees, and most likely also other insects, have different visual thresholds depending on the behavioral context.

  13. The inhibitory microcircuit of the substantia nigra provides feedback gain control of the basal ganglia output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer; Pan, Wei-Xing; Dudman, Joshua Tate

    2014-05-21

    Dysfunction of the basal ganglia produces severe deficits in the timing, initiation, and vigor of movement. These diverse impairments suggest a control system gone awry. In engineered systems, feedback is critical for control. By contrast, models of the basal ganglia highlight feedforward circuitry and ignore intrinsic feedback circuits. In this study, we show that feedback via axon collaterals of substantia nigra projection neurons control the gain of the basal ganglia output. Through a combination of physiology, optogenetics, anatomy, and circuit mapping, we elaborate a general circuit mechanism for gain control in a microcircuit lacking interneurons. Our data suggest that diverse tonic firing rates, weak unitary connections and a spatially diffuse collateral circuit with distinct topography and kinetics from feedforward input is sufficient to implement divisive feedback inhibition. The importance of feedback for engineered systems implies that the intranigral microcircuit, despite its absence from canonical models, could be essential to basal ganglia function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02397.001. Copyright © 2014, Brown et al.

  14. Fuzzy gain scheduling of velocity PI controller with intelligent learning algorithm for reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Yun

    1997-02-01

    In this research, we propose a fuzzy gain scheduler (FGS) with an intelligent learning algorithm for a reactor control. In the proposed algorithm, the gradient descent method is used in order to generate the rule bases of a fuzzy algorithm by learning. These rule bases are obtained by minimizing an objective function, which is called a performance cost function. The objective of the FGS with an intelligent learning algorithm is to generate adequate gains, which minimize the error of system. The proposed algorithm can reduce the time and efforts required for obtaining the fuzzy rules through the intelligent learning function. The evolutionary programming algorithm is modified and adopted as the method in order to find the optimal gains which are used as the initial gains of FGS with learning function. It is applied to reactor control of nuclear power plant (NPP), and the results are compared with those of a conventional PI controller with fixed gains. As a result, it is shown that the proposed algorithm is superior to the conventional PI controller

  15. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal planeregion extending from 14 D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. TheVNC is a hybrid interferometriccoronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stopefficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential futureNASA flight telescopes. NASAGoddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNCand its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and itsenabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry tounprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a W configurationto accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters.We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, criticaltechnologies and null sensing and control.

  16. High contrast vacuum nuller testbed (VNT) contrast, performance, and null control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-09-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal plane region extending from 1 - 4 λ/D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. The VNC is a hybrid interferometric/coronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stop efficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential future NASA flight telescopes. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNC and its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and its enabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry to unprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a “W” configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, critical technologies and null sensing and control.

  17. Synthesis of results of randomized controlled trials of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnison, M.L.; Powe, N.R.; Steinberg, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors review 100 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that examine the safety or efficacy of new low-osmolality contrast media (LOM) and focus on the 43 RCTs judged to be of the highest quality. These RCTs showed no consistent differences in nephrotoxicity between high- and low-osmolality contrast media. Certain cardiovascular parameters were altered less with low-osmolality agents during intracardiac injection, but the clinical significance of these differences in unclear. Heat and pain sensations occurred less often with low-osmolality contrast media. No differences were noted in the incidence of nausea, vomiting, urticaria, or bronchospasm. Even with numerous RCTs comparing these media, physicians still must make economically significant choices about contrast media without sufficient data about their relative safety

  18. Mode control in a high-gain relativistic klystron amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Hong; Ju, Bing-Quan; Su, Chang; Wu, Yang

    2010-05-01

    Middle cavities between the input and output cavity can be used to decrease the required input RF power for the relativistic klystron amplifier. Meanwhile higher modes, which affect the working mode, are also easy to excite in a device with more middle cavities. In order for the positive feedback process for higher modes to be excited, a special measure is taken to increase the threshold current for such modes. Higher modes' excitation will be avoided when the threshold current is significantly larger than the beam current. So a high-gain S-band relativistic klystron amplifier is designed for the beam of current 5 kA and beam voltage 600 kV. Particle in cell simulations show that the gain is 1.6 × 105 with the input RF power of 6.8 kW, and that the output RF power reaches 1.1 GW.

  19. Optical coherent control in semiconductors: Fringe contrast and inhomogeneous broadening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Vadim, Lyssenko; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    in the interplay between the homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadenings are measured. Based on these experiments, a coherent control model describing the optical fringe contrast using different detection schemes, such as photoluminescence or four-wave mixing, is established. Significant spectral modulation...

  20. Gain-Scheduled Control of a Fossil-Fired Power Plant Boiler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangstrup, M.; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    1999-01-01

    -scheduling which interpolates between unstable controllers is not allowed using traditional schemes. The results show that a considerable optimization of the conventional controlled system is obtainable. Also the gain-scheduled optimizing controller is seen to have a superior performance compared to the fixed LTI......In this paper the objective is to optimize the control of a coal fired 250 MW power plant boiler. The conventional control system is supplemented with a multivariable optimizing controller operating in parallel with the conventional control system. Due to the strong dependence of the gains...... and dynamics upon the load, it is beneficial to consider a gain-scheduling control approach. Optimization using complex mu synthesis results in unstable LTI controllers in some operating points of the boiler. A recent gain-scheduling approach allowing for unstable fixed LTI controllers is applied. Gain...

  1. Decentralized controller gain scheduling using PSO for power ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For this reason, in this study the P and I control parameters are tuned based on Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm for a better Load-Frequency Control in a Two-Area Two-Unit Thermal Reheat Power System (TATURIPS) with step load perturbation. To exemplify the optimum parameter search PSO is used as it is ...

  2. Color and Contrast Enhancement by Controlled Piecewise Affine Histogram Equalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose-Luis Lisani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simple contrast enhancement algorithm based on histogram equalization (HE. The proposed algorithm performs a piecewise affine transform of the intensity levels of a digital image such that the new cumulative distribution function will be approximately uniform (as with HE, but where the stretching of the range is locally controlled to avoid brutal noise enhancement. We call this algorithm Piecewise Affine Equalization (PAE. Several experiments show that, in general, the new algorithm improves HE results.

  3. Intelligent control of diesel generators using gain-scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Christian; Jepsen, Kasper; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    The development of an intelligent control solution for a wide range of diesel generators is discussed. Compared with most existing solutions, the advantages of the proposed solution lie in two folds: (i) The proposed control has the plug-and-play capability which is reflected by an automatic...... recognition procedure when it is plugged into a specific diesel generator, such that some extensive manual-tuning of the installed controller can be significantly reduced; (ii) The proposed control has an real-time adaptability by using the online external load estimation, such that the integrated system can...... keep a consistent performance for a wide range of operating conditions. Technically, a general nonlinear dynamic model is firstly developed based on fundamental principles of diesel generators. Then, the system parameters of this model can be identified experimentally or partially retrieved from...

  4. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Jorge F; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry-also known as "open-loop feedback"-, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves) via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain.

  5. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F Mejias

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry — also known as ’open-loop feedback’ —, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: subtractive, divisive, and non-monotonic. Subtractive gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain.

  6. Fighting for and losing or gaining control in life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theorell, T

    1997-01-01

    In JP Henry's work, fighting for and losing control were important concepts in the interpretation of energy mobilization in psychosocial conditions. Attachment and support were important protective and salutogenic factors. These concepts have been applied in a series of epidemiological and psychophysiological real life studies. Job conditions which force the worker to mobilize energy and concomitantly inhibit anabolism could be identified at least partly by means of the demand-control-support model originally proposed by Karasek. The most adverse conditions at work arise when psychological demands are high and at the same time the decision latitude is low. This combination is associated with changes in the regulation of endocrine parameters as well as with increased morbidity--heart disease, functional gastrointestinal symptoms and musculoskeletal disorders. Examples of studies of physiological correlates of psychosocial processes leading to fight for control are also described from outside work activities.

  7. Time Difference Amplifier with Robust Gain Using Closed-Loop Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakura, Toru; Mandai, Shingo; Ikeda, Makoto; Asada, Kunihiro

    This paper presents a Time Difference Amplifier (TDA) that amplifies the input time difference into the output time difference. Cross coupled chains of variable delay cells with the same number of stages are applicable for TDA, and the gain is adjusted via the closed-loop control. The TDA was fabricated using 65nm CMOS and the measurement results show that the time difference gain is 4.78 at a nominal power supply while the designed gain is 4.0. The gain is stable enough to be less than 1.4% gain shift under ±10% power supply voltage fluctuation.

  8. Vector Control Algorithm for Electric Vehicle AC Induction Motor Based on Improved Variable Gain PID Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration performance of EV, which affects a lot of performances of EV such as start-up, overtaking, driving safety, and ride comfort, has become increasingly popular in recent researches. An improved variable gain PID control algorithm to improve the acceleration performance is proposed in this paper. The results of simulation with Matlab/Simulink demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm through the control performance of motor velocity, motor torque, and three-phase current of motor. Moreover, it is investigated that the proposed controller is valid by comparison with the other PID controllers. Furthermore, the AC induction motor experiment set is constructed to verify the effect of proposed controller.

  9. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  10. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahodne, Laura B; Meyer, Oanh L; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L; Willis, Sherry L; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L; Rebok, George W; Parisi, Jeanine M

    2015-09-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Switched-Observer-Based Adaptive Neural Control of MIMO Switched Nonlinear Systems With Unknown Control Gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Lijun; Zhao, Jun

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the problem of adaptive neural output-feedback control is addressed for a class of multi-input multioutput (MIMO) switched uncertain nonlinear systems with unknown control gains. Neural networks (NNs) are used to approximate unknown nonlinear functions. In order to avoid the conservativeness caused by adoption of a common observer for all subsystems, an MIMO NN switched observer is designed to estimate unmeasurable states. A new switched observer-based adaptive neural control technique for the problem studied is then provided by exploiting the classical average dwell time (ADT) method and the backstepping method and the Nussbaum gain technique. It effectively handles the obstacle about the coexistence of multiple Nussbaum-type function terms, and improves the classical ADT method, since the exponential decline property of Lyapunov functions for individual subsystems is no longer satisfied. It is shown that the technique proposed is able to guarantee semiglobal uniformly ultimately boundedness of all the signals in the closed-loop system under a class of switching signals with ADT, and the tracking errors converge to a small neighborhood of the origin. The effectiveness of the approach proposed is illustrated by its application to a two inverted pendulum system.

  12. Comparison of gradient methods for gain tuning of a PD controller applied on a quadrotor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Wilkerson, Stephen A.; Gadsden, S. Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Many mechanical and electrical systems have utilized the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control strategy. The concept of PID control is a classical approach but it is easy to implement and yields a very good tracking performance. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are currently experiencing a significant growth in popularity. Due to the advantages of PID controllers, UAVs are implementing PID controllers for improved stability and performance. An important consideration for the system is the selection of PID gain values in order to achieve a safe flight and successful mission. There are a number of different algorithms that can be used for real-time tuning of gains. This paper presents two algorithms for gain tuning, and are based on the method of steepest descent and Newton's minimization of an objective function. This paper compares the results of applying these two gain tuning algorithms in conjunction with a PD controller on a quadrotor system.

  13. Mechanisms of Gain Control by Voltage-Gated Channels in Intrinsically-Firing Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X.; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Gain modulation is a key feature of neural information processing, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In single neurons, gain can be measured as the slope of the current-frequency (input-output) relationship over any given range of inputs. While much work has focused on the control of basal firing rates and spike rate adaptation, gain control has been relatively unstudied. Of the limited studies on gain control, some have examined the roles of synaptic noise and passive somatic currents, but the roles of voltage-gated channels present ubiquitously in neurons have been less explored. Here, we systematically examined the relationship between gain and voltage-gated ion channels in a conductance-based, tonically-active, model neuron. Changes in expression (conductance density) of voltage-gated channels increased (Ca2+ channel), reduced (K+ channels), or produced little effect (h-type channel) on gain. We found that the gain-controlling ability of channels increased exponentially with the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window (voltage range associated with firing). For depolarization-activated channels, this produced a greater channel current per action potential at higher firing rates. This allowed these channels to modulate gain by contributing to firing preferentially at states of higher excitation. A finer analysis of the current-voltage relationship during tonic firing identified narrow voltage windows at which the gain-modulating channels exerted their effects. As a proof of concept, we show that h-type channels can be tuned to modulate gain by changing the steepness of their activation within the dynamic voltage window. These results show how the impact of an ion channel on gain can be predicted from the relationship between channel kinetics and the membrane potential during firing. This is potentially relevant to understanding input-output scaling in a wide class of neurons found throughout the brain and other nervous systems

  14. Interval type-2 fuzzy gain-adaptive controller of a Doubly Fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Gain Adaptive IP (IT2FGAIP) controller and a conventional IP controller ... and an adaptive IP controller is proposed for the speed control of DFIM in the presence of ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  15. Asynchronous L1-gain control of uncertain switched positive linear systems with dwell time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Hongbin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, dwell time (DT) stability, L 1 -gain performance analysis and asynchronous L 1 -gain controller design problems of uncertain switched positive linear systems (SPLSs) are investigated. Via a time-scheduled multiple linear co-positive Lyapunov function (TSMLCLF) approach, convex sufficient conditions of DT stability and L 1 -gain performance of SPLSs with interval and polytopic uncertainties are presented. Furthermore, by utilizing the feature that the TSMLCLF keeps decreasing even if the controller is running asynchronously with the system, the asynchronous L 1 -gain controller design problem of SPLSs with interval and polytopic uncertainties is investigated. Convex sufficient conditions of the existence of time-varying asynchronous state-feedback controller which can ensure the closed-loop system's positivity, stability and L 1 -gain performance are established, and the controller gain matrices can be calculated instantaneously online. The obtained L 1 -gain in the paper is standard. All the results are presented in terms of linear programming. A practical example is provided to show the effectiveness of the results. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An application of gain-scheduled control using state-space interpolation to hydroactive gas bearings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane; Camino, Juan F.; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2016-01-01

    with a gain-scheduling strategy using state-space interpolation, which avoids both the performance loss and the increase of controller order associated to the Youla parametrisation. The proposed state-space interpolation for gain-scheduling is applied for mass imbalance rejection for a controllable gas...... bearing scheduled in two parameters. Comparisons against the Youla-based scheduling demonstrate the superiority of the state-space interpolation....

  17. Learning to walk with an adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller for a robotic ankle exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Jeffrey R; Jacobs, Daniel A; Ferris, Daniel P; Remy, C David

    2015-11-04

    Robotic ankle exoskeletons can provide assistance to users and reduce metabolic power during walking. Our research group has investigated the use of proportional myoelectric control for controlling robotic ankle exoskeletons. Previously, these controllers have relied on a constant gain to map user's muscle activity to actuation control signals. A constant gain may act as a constraint on the user, so we designed a controller that dynamically adapts the gain to the user's myoelectric amplitude. We hypothesized that an adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller would reduce metabolic energy expenditure compared to walking with the ankle exoskeleton unpowered because users could choose their preferred control gain. We tested eight healthy subjects walking with the adaptive gain proportional myoelectric controller with bilateral ankle exoskeletons. The adaptive gain was updated each stride such that on average the user's peak muscle activity was mapped to maximal power output of the exoskeleton. All subjects participated in three identical training sessions where they walked on a treadmill for 50 minutes (30 minutes of which the exoskeleton was powered) at 1.2 ms(-1). We calculated and analyzed metabolic energy consumption, muscle recruitment, inverse kinematics, inverse dynamics, and exoskeleton mechanics. Using our controller, subjects achieved a metabolic reduction similar to that seen in previous work in about a third of the training time. The resulting controller gain was lower than that seen in previous work (β=1.50±0.14 versus a constant β=2). The adapted gain allowed users more total ankle joint power than that of unassisted walking, increasing ankle power in exchange for a decrease in hip power. Our findings indicate that humans prefer to walk with greater ankle mechanical power output than their unassisted gait when provided with an ankle exoskeleton using an adaptive controller. This suggests that robotic assistance from an exoskeleton can allow

  18. A Uniform Voltage Gain Control for Alignment Robustness in Wireless EV Charging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yabiao Gao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of wireless power transfer is sensitive to the horizontal and vertical distances between the transmitter and receiver coils due to the magnetic coupling change. To address the output voltage variation and efficiency drop caused by misalignment, a uniform voltage gain frequency control is implemented to improve the power delivery and efficiency of wireless power transfer under misalignment. The frequency is tuned according to the amplitude and phase-frequency characteristics of coupling variations in order to maintain a uniform output voltage in the receiver coil. Experimental comparison of three control methods, including fixed frequency control, resonant frequency control, and the proposed uniform gain control was conducted and demonstrated that the uniform voltage gain control is the most robust method for managing misalignment in wireless charging applications.

  19. Gain-scheduled Linear Quadratic Control of Wind Turbines Operating at High Wind Speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kasper Zinck; Stoustrup, Jakob; Brath, Per

    2007-01-01

    This paper addresses state estimation and linear quadratic (LQ) control of variable speed variable pitch wind turbines. On the basis of a nonlinear model of a wind turbine, a set of operating conditions is identified and a LQ controller is designed for each operating point. The controller gains...... are then interpolated linearly to get a control law for the entire operating envelope. A nonlinear state estimator is designed as a combination of two unscented Kalman filters and a linear disturbance estimator. The gain-scheduling variable (wind speed) is then calculated from the output of these state estimators...

  20. Imaging contrast and tip-sample interaction of non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy with Q -control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Shuai; Guo, Dan; Luo, Jianbin

    2017-01-01

    Active quality factor ( Q ) exhibits many promising properties in dynamic atomic force microscopy. Energy dissipation and image contrasts are investigated in the non-contact amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM) with an active Q -control circuit in the ambient air environment. Dissipated power and virial were calculated to compare the highly nonlinear interaction of tip-sample and image contrasts with different Q gain values. Greater free amplitudes and lower effective Q values show better contrasts for the same setpoint ratio. Active quality factor also can be employed to change tip-sample interaction force in non-contact regime. It is meaningful that non-destructive and better contrast images can be realized in non-contact AM-AFM by applying an active Q -control to the dynamic system. (paper)

  1. Gain-Scheduled Model Predictive Control of Wind Turbines using Laguerre Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Wisniewski, Rafal; Larsen, Lars Finn Sloth

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach to design gain-scheduled predictive controllers for wind turbines. The predictive control law is based on Laguerre functions to parameterize control signals and a parameter-dependent cost function that is analytically determined from turbine data....... These properties facilitate the design of speed controllers by placement of the closed-loop poles (when constraints are not active) and systematic adaptation towards changes in the operating point. Vibration control of undamped modes is achieved by imposing a certain degree of stability to the closed-loop system....... The approach can be utilized to the design of new controllers and to represent existing gain-scheduled controllers as predictive controllers. The numerical example and simulations illustrate the design of a speed controller augmented with active damping of the tower fore-aft displacement....

  2. The design of programme-controlled gain and linear pulse amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Xuemei; Chen Chunkai; Northeast Normal Univ., Changchun; Qiao Shuang; Zhou Chuansheng

    2006-01-01

    The authors have designed a kind of new-style programme-controlled gain and linear pulse amplifier with accurate gausses of CR-RC-CR shaping circuit structure. The use of non-volatile digital electric potential device and accurate operational amplifier makes the circuit structure simple greatly, makes the ability stronger that resists assault. It can realize multistage gain in succession and make the drift of temperature low and make the linearity of pulse well. (authors)

  3. Motivation by potential gains and losses affects control processes via different mechanisms in the attentional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Lena M; Walter, Henrik; Steimke, Rosa; Ludwig, Vera U; Gaschler, Robert; Schubert, Torsten; Stelzel, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Attentional control in demanding cognitive tasks can be improved by manipulating the motivational state. Motivation to obtain gains and motivation to avoid losses both usually result in faster reaction times and stronger activation in relevant brain areas such as the prefrontal cortex, but little is known about differences in the underlying neurocognitive mechanisms of these types of motivation in an attentional control context. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we tested whether potential gain and loss as motivating incentives lead to overlapping or distinct neural effects in the attentional network, and whether one of these conditions is more effective than the other. A Flanker task with word stimuli as targets and distracters was performed by 115 healthy participants. Using a mixed blocked and event-related design allowed us to investigate transient and sustained motivation-related effects. Participants could either gain money (potential gain) or avoid losing money (potential loss) in different task blocks. Participants showed a congruency effect with increased reaction times for incongruent compared to congruent trials. Potential gain led to generally faster responses compared to the neutral condition and to stronger improvements than potential loss. Potential loss also led to shorter response times compared to the neutral condition, but participants improved mainly during incongruent and not during congruent trials. The event-related fMRI data revealed a main effect of congruency with increased activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and inferior frontal junction area (IFJ), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), bilateral insula, intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and visual word form area (VWFA). While potential gain led to increased activity in a cluster of the IFJ and the VWFA only during incongruent trials, potential loss was linked to activity increases in these regions during incongruent and congruent trials. The

  4. Adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control for the chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motor using Nussbaum gain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Shaohua [School of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China and College of Mechanical Engineering, Hunan University of Arts and Science, Hunan 415000 (China)

    2014-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of adaptive fuzzy dynamic surface control (DSC) for the permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system with chaotic behavior, disturbance and unknown control gain and parameters. Nussbaum gain is adopted to cope with the situation that the control gain is unknown. And the unknown items can be estimated by fuzzy logic system. The proposed controller guarantees that all the signals in the closed-loop system are bounded and the system output eventually converges to a small neighborhood of the desired reference signal. Finally, the numerical simulations indicate that the proposed scheme can suppress the chaos of PMSM and show the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method.

  5. Reliable gain-scheduled control of discrete-time systems and its application to CSTR model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, R.; Selvi, S.; Mathiyalagan, K.; Shi, Y.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is focused on reliable gain-scheduled controller design for a class of discrete-time systems with randomly occurring nonlinearities and actuator fault. Further, the nonlinearity in the system model is assumed to occur randomly according to a Bernoulli distribution with measurable time-varying probability in real time. The main purpose of this paper is to design a gain-scheduled controller by implementing a probability-dependent Lyapunov function and linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach such that the closed-loop discrete-time system is stochastically stable for all admissible randomly occurring nonlinearities. The existence conditions for the reliable controller is formulated in terms of LMI constraints. Finally, the proposed reliable gain-scheduled control scheme is applied on continuously stirred tank reactor model to demonstrate the effectiveness and applicability of the proposed design technique.

  6. Subtractive, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays

    OpenAIRE

    Mejias, Jorge F.; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2014-01-01

    The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry—also known as “open-loop feedback”—, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different...

  7. Adaptive Fuzzy Robust Control for a Class of Nonlinear Systems via Small Gain Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Practical nonlinear systems can usually be represented by partly linearizable models with unknown nonlinearities and external disturbances. Based on this consideration, we propose a novel adaptive fuzzy robust control (AFRC algorithm for such systems. The AFRC effectively combines techniques of adaptive control and fuzzy control, and it improves the performance by retaining the advantages of both methods. The linearizable part will be linearly parameterized with unknown but constant parameters, and the discontinuous-projection-based adaptive control law is used to compensate these parts. The Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic systems are used to approximate unknown nonlinearities. Robust control law ensures the robustness of closed-loop control system. A systematic design procedure of the AFRC algorithm by combining the backstepping technique and small-gain approach is presented. Then the closed-loop stability is studied by using small gain theorem, and the result indicates that the closed-loop system is semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded.

  8. Controlling the gain contribution of background emitters in few-quantum-dot microlasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, F.; Segnon, M.; von Helversen, M.; Hopfmann, C.; Heindel, T.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Kamp, M.; Musiał, A.; Porte, X.; Gies, C.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2018-02-01

    We provide experimental and theoretical insight into single-emitter lasing effects in a quantum dot (QD)-microlaser under controlled variation of background gain provided by off-resonant discrete gain centers. For that purpose, we apply an advanced two-color excitation concept where the background gain contribution of off-resonant QDs can be continuously tuned by precisely balancing the relative excitation power of two lasers emitting at different wavelengths. In this way, by selectively exciting a single resonant QD and off-resonant QDs, we identify distinct single-QD signatures in the lasing characteristics and distinguish between gain contributions of a single resonant emitter and a countable number of off-resonant background emitters to the optical output of the microlaser. Our work addresses the important question whether single-QD lasing is feasible in experimentally accessible systems and shows that, for the investigated microlaser, the single-QD gain needs to be supported by the background gain contribution of off-resonant QDs to reach the transition to lasing. Interestingly, while a single QD cannot drive the investigated micropillar into lasing, its relative contribution to the emission can be as high as 70% and it dominates the statistics of emitted photons in the intermediate excitation regime below threshold.

  9. Online Dynamic Balance Technology for High Speed Spindle Based on Gain Parameter Adaption and Scheduling Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihai Zhang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Unbalance vibration is one of the main vibration forms of a high speed machine tool spindle. The overlarge unbalance vibration will have some adverse effects on the working life of the spindle system and the surface quality of the work-piece. In order to reduce the unbalance of a high speed spindle system, a pneumatic online dynamic balance device and its control system are presented in the paper. To improve the balance accuracy and adaptation of the balance system, the gain parameter adaption and scheduling control method are proposed first, and then the different balance effects of the influence coefficient method and the gain scheduling control method are compared through many dynamic balance experiments of the high speed spindle. The experimental results indicate that the gain parameters can be changed timely according to the transformation of the speed and kinetic parameters of the spindle system. The balance accuracy can be improved for a high speed spindle with time-varying characteristics, based on the adaptive gain scheduling control method.

  10. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Based Gain Controller for Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YUCEL, M.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFA must have a flat gain profile which is a very important parameter such as wavelength division multiplexing (WDM and dense WDM (DWDM applications for long-haul optical communication systems and networks. For this reason, it is crucial to hold a stable signal power per optical channel. For the purpose of overcoming performance decline of optical networks and long-haul optical systems, the gain of the EDFA must be controlled for it to be fixed at a high speed. In this study, due to the signal power attenuation in long-haul fiber optic communication systems and non-equal signal amplification in each channel, an automatic gain controller (AGC is designed based on the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS for EDFAs. The intelligent gain controller is implemented and the performance of this new electronic control method is demonstrated. The proposed ANFIS-based AGC-EDFA uses the experimental dataset to produce the ANFIS-based sets and the rule base. Laser diode currents are predicted within the accuracy rating over 98 percent with the proposed ANFIS-based system. Upon comparing ANFIS-based AGC-EDFA and experimental results, they were found to be very close and compatible.

  11. Engine Torque Control of Spark Ignition Engine using Fuzzy Gain Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Aris Triwiyatno

    2012-01-01

    In the spark ignition engine system, driver convenience is very dependent on satisfying engine torque appropriate with the throttle position given by the driver. Unfortunately, sometimes the fulfillment of engine torque is not in line with fuel saving efforts. This requires the development of high performance and robust power train controllers. One way to potentially meet these performance requirements is to introduce a method of controlling engine torque using fuzzy gain scheduling. By using...

  12. Time-optimal control of nuclear reactor power with adaptive proportional- integral-feedforward gains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ghu; Cho, Nam Zin

    1993-01-01

    A time-optimal control method which consists of coarse and fine control stages is described here. During the coarse control stage, the maximum control effort (time-optimal) is used to direct the system toward the switching boundary which is set near the desired power level. At this boundary, the controller is switched to the fine control stage in which an adaptive proportional-integral-feedforward (PIF) controller is used to compensate for any unmodeled reactivity feedback effects. This fine control is also introduced to obtain a constructive method for determining the (adaptive) feedback gains against the sampling effect. The feedforward control term is included to suppress the over-or undershoot. The estimation and feedback of the temperature-induced reactivity is also discussed

  13. Modeling and distributed gain scheduling strategy for load frequency control in smart grids with communication topology changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shichao; Liu, Xiaoping P; El Saddik, Abdulmotaleb

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the modeling and distributed control problems for the load frequency control (LFC) in a smart grid. In contrast with existing works, we consider more practical and real scenarios, where the communication topology of the smart grid changes because of either link failures or packet losses. These topology changes are modeled as a time-varying communication topology matrix. By using this matrix, a new closed-loop power system model is proposed to integrate the communication topology changes into the dynamics of a physical power system. The globally asymptotical stability of this closed-loop power system is analyzed. A distributed gain scheduling LFC strategy is proposed to compensate for the potential degradation of dynamic performance (mean square errors of state vectors) of the power system under communication topology changes. In comparison to conventional centralized control approaches, the proposed method can improve the robustness of the smart grid to the variation of the communication network as well as to reduce computation load. Simulation results show that the proposed distributed gain scheduling approach is capable to improve the robustness of the smart grid to communication topology changes. © 2013 ISA. Published by ISA. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaural Level Difference Dependent Gain Control and Synaptic Scaling Underlying Binaural Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Liang, Feixue; Li, Haifu; Mesik, Lukas; Zhang, Ke K.; Polley, Daniel B.; Tao, Huizhong W.; Xiao, Zhongju; Zhang, Li I.

    2013-01-01

    Binaural integration in the central nucleus of inferior colliculus (ICC) plays a critical role in sound localization. However, its arithmetic nature and underlying synaptic mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we showed in mouse ICC neurons that the contralateral dominance is created by a “push-pull”-like mechanism, with contralaterally dominant excitation and more bilaterally balanced inhibition. Importantly, binaural spiking response is generated apparently from an ipsilaterally-mediated scaling of contralateral response, leaving frequency tuning unchanged. This scaling effect is attributed to a divisive attenuation of contralaterally-evoked synaptic excitation onto ICC neurons with their inhibition largely unaffected. Thus, a gain control mediates the linear transformation from monaural to binaural spike responses. The gain value is modulated by interaural level difference (ILD) primarily through scaling excitation to different levels. The ILD-dependent synaptic scaling and gain adjustment allow ICC neurons to dynamically encode interaural sound localization cues while maintaining an invariant representation of other independent sound attributes. PMID:23972599

  15. Application of automatic gain control for radiometer diagnostic in SST-1 tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, Foram R; Siju, Varsha; Edappala, Praveenlal; Pathak, S K

    2017-12-01

    This paper describes the characterisation of a negative feedback type of automatic gain control (AGC) circuit that will be an integral part of the heterodyne radiometer system operating at a frequency range of 75-86 GHz at SST-1 tokamak. The developed AGC circuit is a combination of variable gain amplifier and log amplifier which provides both gain and attenuation typically up to 15 dB and 45 dB, respectively, at a fixed set point voltage and it has been explored for the first time in tokamak radiometry application. The other important characteristics are that it exhibits a very fast response time of 390 ns to understand the fast dynamics of electron cyclotron emission and can operate at very wide input RF power dynamic range of around 60 dB that ensures signal level within the dynamic range of the detection system.

  16. Nonlinear model-based robust control of a nuclear reactor using adaptive PIF gains and variable structure controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ghu; Cho, Nam Zin

    1993-01-01

    A Nonlinear model-based Hybrid Controller (NHC) is developed which consists of the adaptive proportional-integral-feedforward (PIF) gains and variable structure controller. The controller has the robustness against modeling uncertainty and is applied to the trajectory tracking control of single-input, single-output nonlinear systems. The essence of the scheme is to divide the control into four different terms. Namely, the adaptive P-I-F gains and variable structure controller are used to accomplish the specific control actions by each terms. The robustness of the controller is guaranteed by the feedback of estimated uncertainty and the performance specification given by the adaptation of PIF gains using the second method of Lyapunov. The variable structure controller is incorporated to regulate the initial peak of the tracking error during the parameter adaptation is not settled yet. The newly developed NHC method is applied to the power tracking control of a nuclear reactor and the simulation results show great improvement in tracking performance compared with the conventional model-based control methods. (Author)

  17. Design and evaluation of controls for drift, video gain, and color balance in spaceborne facsimile cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Kelly, W. L., IV; Rowland, C. W.; Burcher, E. E.

    1973-01-01

    The facsimile camera is an optical-mechanical scanning device which has become an attractive candidate as an imaging system for planetary landers and rovers. This paper presents electronic techniques which permit the acquisition and reconstruction of high quality images with this device, even under varying lighting conditions. These techniques include a control for low frequency noise and drift, an automatic gain control, a pulse-duration light modulation scheme, and a relative spectral gain control. Taken together, these techniques allow the reconstruction of radiometrically accurate and properly balanced color images from facsimile camera video data. These techniques have been incorporated into a facsimile camera and reproduction system, and experimental results are presented for each technique and for the complete system.

  18. A novel analog/digital reconfigurable automatic gain control with a novel DC offset cancellation circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He Xiaofeng; Ye Tianchun [Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100029 (China); Mo Taishan; Ma Chengyan, E-mail: hexiaofeng@casic.ac.cn [Hangzhou Zhongke Microelectronics Co, Ltd, Hangzhou 310053 (China)

    2011-02-15

    An analog/digital reconfigurable automatic gain control (AGC) circuit with a novel DC offset cancellation circuit for a direct-conversion receiver is presented. The AGC is analog/digital reconfigurable in order to be compatible with different baseband chips. What's more, a novel DC offset cancellation (DCOC) circuit with an HPCF (high pass cutoff frequency) less than 10 kHz is proposed. The AGC is fabricated by a 0.18 {mu}m CMOS process. Under analog control mode, the AGC achieves a 70 dB dynamic range with a 3 dB-bandwidth larger than 60 MHz. Under digital control mode, through a 5-bit digital control word, the AGC shows a 64 dB gain control range by 2 dB each step with a gain error of less than 0.3 dB. The DC offset cancellation circuits can suppress the output DC offset voltage to be less than 1.5 mV, while the offset voltage of 40 mV is introduced into the input. The overall power consumption is less than 3.5 mA, and the die area is 800 x 300 {mu}m{sup 2}. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  19. Robust control for spacecraft rendezvous system with actuator unsymmetrical saturation: a gain scheduling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Xue, Anke

    2018-06-01

    This paper has proposed a robust control for the spacecraft rendezvous system by considering the parameter uncertainties and actuator unsymmetrical saturation based on the discrete gain scheduling approach. By changing of variables, we transform the actuator unsymmetrical saturation control problem into a symmetrical one. The main advantage of the proposed method is improving the dynamic performance of the closed-loop system with a region of attraction as large as possible. By the Lyapunov approach and the scheduling technology, the existence conditions for the admissible controller are formulated in the form of linear matrix inequalities. The numerical simulation illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. dc SQUID electronics based on adaptive noise cancellation and a high open-loop gain controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppae, H.

    1992-01-01

    A low-noise SQUID readout electronics with a high slew rate and an automatic gain control feature has been developed. Flux noise levels of 5x10 -7 Φ 0 /√Hz at 1 kHz and 2x10 -6 Φ 0 /√Hz at 1 Hz have been measured with this readout scheme. The system tolerates sinusoidal disturbances having amplitudes up to 140 Φ 0 at 1 kHz without loosing lock. The electronics utilizes a cooled GaAs FET to control the cancellation of the voltage noise of the room temperature amplifier, a PI 3/2 controller to provide a high open-loop gain at low frequencies, and a square-wave flux and offset voltage modulation to enable automatic control of the noise reduction. The cutoff frequency of the flux-locked-loop is 300 kHz and the feedback gain is more than 130 dB at 10 Hz. (orig.)

  1. Elearning approaches to prevent weight gain in young adults: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Charoula Konstantia; Hankey, Catherine Ruth; Lean, Michael Ernest John

    2015-12-01

    Preventing obesity among young adults should be a preferred public health approach given the limited efficacy of treatment interventions. This study examined whether weight gain can be prevented by online approaches using two different behavioral models, one overtly directed at obesity and the other covertly. A three-group parallel randomized controlled intervention was conducted in 2012-2013; 20,975 young adults were allocated a priori to one control and two "treatment" groups. Two treatment groups were offered online courses over 19 weeks on (1) personal weight control ("Not the Ice Cream Van," NTICV) and, (2) political, environmental, and social issues around food ("Goddess Demetra," "GD"). Control group received no contact. The primary outcome was weight change over 40 weeks. Within-group 40-week weight changes were different between groups (P < 0.001): Control (n = 2,134): +2.0 kg (95% CI = 1.5, 2.3 kg); NTICV (n = 1,810): -1.0 kg (95% CI = -1.3, -0.5); and GD (n = 2,057): -1.35 kg (95% CI = -1.4 to -0.7). Relative risks for weight gain vs. NTICV = 0.13 kg (95% CI = 0.10, 0.15), P < 0.0001; GD = 0.07 kg (95% CI = 0.05, 0.10), P < 0.0001. Both interventions were associated with prevention of the weight gain observed among control subjects. This low-cost intervention could be widely transferable as one tool against the obesity epidemic. Outside the randomized controlled trial setting, it could be enhanced using supporting advertising and social media. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  2. Preventing Weight Gain in Women in Rural Communities: A Cluster Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Lombard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in both developed and developing countries. Even modest weight gain increases the risk for chronic illness, yet evidence-based interventions to prevent weight gain are rare. This trial will determine if a simple low-intensity intervention can prevent weight gain in women compared to general health information.We conducted a 1-yr pragmatic, cluster randomised controlled trial in 41 Australian towns (clusters randomised using a computer-generated randomisation list for intervention (n = 21 or control (n = 20. Women aged 18 to 50 yr were recruited from the general population to receive a 1-yr self-management lifestyle intervention (HeLP-her consisting of one group session, monthly SMS text messages, one phone coaching session, and a program manual, or to a control group receiving one general women's health education session. From October 2012 to April 2014 we studied 649 women, mean age 39.6 yr (+/- SD 6.7 and BMI of 28.8 kg/m(2 (+/- SD 6.9 with the primary outcome weight change between groups at 1 yr. The mean change in the control was +0.44 kg (95% CI -0.09 to 0.97 and in the intervention group -0.48 kg (95% CI -0.99 to 0.03 with an unadjusted between group difference of -0.92 kg (95% CI -1.67 to -0.16 or -0.87 kg (95% CI -1.62 to -0.13 adjusted for baseline values and clustering. Secondary outcomes included improved diet quality and greater self-management behaviours. The intervention appeared to be equally efficacious across all age, BMI, income, and education subgroups. Loss to follow-up included 23.8% in the intervention group and 21.8% in the control group and was within the anticipated range. Limitations include lack of sensitive tools to measure the small changes to energy intake and physical activity. Those who gained weight may have been less inclined to return for 1 yr weight measures.A low intensity lifestyle program can prevent the persistent weight gain observed in women. Key features included

  3. New Gain Controllable Resistor-less Current-mode First Order Allpass Filter and its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jaikla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available New first order allpass filter (APF in current mode, constructed from 2 CCCCTAs and grounded capacitor, is presented. The current gain and phase shift can be electronically /orthogonally controlled. Low input and high output impedances are achieved which make the circuit to be easily cascaded to the current-mode circuit without additional current buffers. The operation of the proposed filter has been verified through simulation results which confirm the theoretical analysis. The application example as current-mode quadrature oscillator with non-interactive current control for both of oscillation condition and oscillation frequency is included to show the usability of the proposed filter.

  4. Frequency domain design of gain scheduling control for large wind systems in full-load region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlibaşa, A.; Ceangă, E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A large wind energy system, operating under full-load regime, is considered. • According to its particularities in frequency domain, control law design is provided. • These particularities are influenced by the interactions of wind–tower–blade ensemble. • Control low, within gain scheduling strategy, is achieved imposing stability reserve. • Supplementary a criterion, aimed at reducing mechanical loads, is imposed. - Abstract: The paper presents the issue of power control law synthesis, in the case of a large wind system that operates under full-load regime, based on dynamic properties details in frequency domain. Solving this problem involves two phases: the establishment of a linearized model as faithfully as possible in various operating points of the full-load region, and synthesis of the power controller, considered with classic structure, taking into account frequency particularities of the obtained linearized model. Obtained linear model of the controlled process is of order 16 and encloses subsystems for tower fore-aft oscillations damping, and for drive-train torsion oscillations damping. The designed controller contains a PI component and a lag compensator for dynamic correction at high frequencies. It is known that the main features of wind system dynamics generated by the interaction of wind–tower–blade ensemble cause a gap in the gain characteristic of the model and complex conjugate zeros, which can move between right and left half-planes, depending on the average wind speed value. Consequently, for control law synthesis an interactive frequency solution is adopted. This is “transparent” in relation to particularities induced by wind–tower–blade interaction. This solution allows evaluation of the extent to which control law is affected by the subsystem for tower oscillations damping. Given the strong dependence between the model and the mean wind speed value, a gain scheduling control law is designed. At

  5. Two nonlinear control schemes contrasted on a hydrodynamiclike model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Laurence R.

    1993-01-01

    The principles of two flow control strategies, those of Huebler (Luescher and Huebler, 1989) and of Ott et al. (1990) are discussed, and the two schemes are compared for their ability to control shear flow, using fully developed and transitional solutions of the Ginzburg-Landau equation as models for such flows. It was found that the effectiveness of both methods in obtaining control of fully developed flows depended strongly on the 'distance' in state space between the uncontrolled flow and goal dynamics. There were conceptual difficulties in applying the Ott et al. method to transitional convectively unstable flows. On the other hand, the Huebler method worked well, within certain limitations, although at a large cost in energy terms.

  6. WGC Based Robust and Gain Scheduling PI Controller Design for Condensing Boilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Onat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the water temperature PI control in condensing domestic boilers. The main challenge of this process under the controller design perspective is the fact that the dynamics of condensing boilers are strongly affected by the demanded water flow rate. First, a robust PI controller based on weighted geometrical center method is designed that stabilizes and achieves good performance for closed-loop system for a wide range of the water flow rate. Then, it is shown that if the water flow rate information is used to update the controller gains, through a technique known as gain scheduled control, the performance can be significantly improved. Important characteristics of these PI design approaches are that the resulting parameters are calculated numerically without using any graphical method or iterative optimization process and that it guarantees the stability of the closed-loop. Significantly, simulation results have demonstrated that the proposed tuning techniques can perform better for set point changes and load disturbance than other available methods in the literature.

  7. Determinants of rapid weight gain during infancy: baseline results from the NOURISH randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihrshahi Seema

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid weight gain in infancy is an important predictor of obesity in later childhood. Our aim was to determine which modifiable variables are associated with rapid weight gain in early life. Methods Subjects were healthy infants enrolled in NOURISH, a randomised, controlled trial evaluating an intervention to promote positive early feeding practices. This analysis used the birth and baseline data for NOURISH. Birthweight was collected from hospital records and infants were also weighed at baseline assessment when they were aged 4-7 months and before randomisation. Infant feeding practices and demographic variables were collected from the mother using a self administered questionnaire. Rapid weight gain was defined as an increase in weight-for-age Z-score (using WHO standards above 0.67 SD from birth to baseline assessment, which is interpreted clinically as crossing centile lines on a growth chart. Variables associated with rapid weight gain were evaluated using a multivariable logistic regression model. Results Complete data were available for 612 infants (88% of the total sample recruited with a mean (SD age of 4.3 (1.0 months at baseline assessment. After adjusting for mother's age, smoking in pregnancy, BMI, and education and infant birthweight, age, gender and introduction of solid foods, the only two modifiable factors associated with rapid weight gain to attain statistical significance were formula feeding [OR = 1.72 (95%CI 1.01-2.94, P = 0.047] and feeding on schedule [OR = 2.29 (95%CI 1.14-4.61, P = 0.020]. Male gender and lower birthweight were non-modifiable factors associated with rapid weight gain. Conclusions This analysis supports the contention that there is an association between formula feeding, feeding to schedule and weight gain in the first months of life. Mechanisms may include the actual content of formula milk (e.g. higher protein intake or differences in feeding styles, such as feeding to schedule

  8. Gain transient control for wavelength division multiplexed access networks using semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Kjær, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Gain transients can severely hamper the upstream network performance in wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) access networks featuring erbium doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) or Raman amplification. We experimentally demonstrate for the first time using 10 Gb/s fiber transmission bit error rate...... measurements how a near-saturated semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) can be used to control these gain transients. An SOA is shown to reduce the penalty of transients originating in an EDFA from 2.3 dB to 0.2 dB for 10 Gb/s transmission over standard single mode fiber using a 231-1 PRBS pattern. The results...... suggest that a single SOA integrated within a WDM receiver at the metro node could offer a convenient all-optical solution for upstream transient controlin WDM access networks....

  9. The effects of control-display gain on performance of race car drivers in an isometric braking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, J C F; de Groot, S

    2012-12-01

    To minimise lap times during car racing, it is important to build up brake forces rapidly and maintain precise control. We examined the effect of the amplification factor (gain) between brake pedal force and a visually represented output value on a driver's ability to track a target value. The test setup was a formula racing car cockpit fitted with an isometric brake pedal. Thirteen racing drivers performed tracking tasks with four control-display gains and two target functions: a step function (35 trials per gain) and a multisine function (15 trials per gain). The control-display gain had only minor effects on root mean-squared error between output value and target value, but it had large effects on build-up speed, overshoot, within-participants variability, and self-reported physical load. The results confirm the hypothesis that choosing an optimum gain involves balancing stability against physical effort.

  10. How does a specific learning and memory system in the mammalian brain gain control of behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert J; Hong, Nancy S

    2013-11-01

    This review addresses a fundamental, yet poorly understood set of issues in systems neuroscience. The issues revolve around conceptualizations of the organization of learning and memory in the mammalian brain. One intriguing, and somewhat popular, conceptualization is the idea that there are multiple learning and memory systems in the mammalian brain and they interact in different ways to influence and/or control behavior. This approach has generated interesting empirical and theoretical work supporting this view. One issue that needs to be addressed is how these systems influence or gain control of voluntary behavior. To address this issue, we clearly specify what we mean by a learning and memory system. We then review two types of processes that might influence which memory system gains control of behavior. One set of processes are external factors that can affect which system controls behavior in a given situation including task parameters like the kind of information available to the subject, types of training experience, and amount of training. The second set of processes are brain mechanisms that might influence what memory system controls behavior in a given situation including executive functions mediated by the prefrontal cortex; switching mechanisms mediated by ascending neurotransmitter systems, the unique role of the hippocampus during learning. The issue of trait differences in control of different learning and memory systems will also be considered in which trait differences in learning and memory function are thought to potentially emerge from differences in level of prefrontal influence, differences in plasticity processes, differences in ascending neurotransmitter control, differential access to effector systems like motivational and motor systems. Finally, we present scenarios in which different mechanisms might interact. This review was conceived to become a jumping off point for new work directed at understanding these issues. The outcome of

  11. An Improved Adaptive-Torque-Gain MPPT Control for Direct-Driven PMSG Wind Turbines Considering Wind Farm Turbulences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolian Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Maximum power point tracking (MPPT plays an important role in increasing the efficiency of a wind energy conversion system (WECS. In this paper, three conventional MPPT methods are reviewed: power signal feedback (PSF control, decreased torque gain (DTG control, and adaptive torque gain (ATG control, and their potential challenges are investigated. It is found out that the conventional MPPT method ignores the effect of wind turbine inertia and wind speed fluctuations, which lowers WECS efficiency. Accordingly, an improved adaptive torque gain (IATG method is proposed, which customizes adaptive torque gains and enhances MPPT performances. Specifically, the IATG control considers wind farm turbulences and works out the relationship between the optimal torque gains and the wind speed characteristics, which has not been reported in the literature. The IATG control is promising, especially under the ongoing trend of building wind farms with large-scale wind turbines and at low and medium wind speed sites.

  12. Voluntary Fasting to Control Post-Ramadan Weight Gain among Overweight and Obese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriani Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of an Islamic voluntary fasting intervention to control post-Ramadan weight gain. Methods: This study was conducted between July and November 2011. Two weight loss intervention programmes were developed and implemented among groups of overweight or obese Malay women living in the Malaysian cities of Putrajaya and Seremban: a standard programme promoting control of food intake according to national dietary guidelines (group B and a faith-based programme promoting voluntary fasting in addition to the standard programme (group A. Participants’ dietary practices (i.e., voluntary fasting practices, frequency of fruit/vegetable consumption per week and quantity of carbohydrates/protein consumed per day, body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, fasting blood high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and total cholesterol (TC:HDL-C ratio were assessed before Ramadan and three months post-Ramadan. Results: Voluntary fasting practices increased only in group A (P <0.01. Additionally, the quantity of protein/carbohydrates consumed per day, mean diastolic pressure and TC:HDL-C ratio decreased only in group A (P <0.01, 0.05, 0.02 and <0.01, respectively. Frequency of fruit/vegetable consumption per week, as well as HDL-C levels, increased only in group A (P = 0.03 and <0.01, respectively. Although changes in BMI between the groups was not significant (P = 0.08, BMI decrease among participants in group A was significant (P <0.01. Conclusion: Control of post-Ramadan weight gain was more evident in the faith-based intervention group. Healthcare providers should consider faith-based interventions to encourage weight loss during Ramadan and to prevent post-Ramadan weight gain among patients.

  13. Voluntary Fasting to Control Post-Ramadan Weight Gain among Overweight and Obese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Suriani; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Latiff, Khalib A.; Saad, Hazizi A.; Majid, Latifah A.; Othman, Fadlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of an Islamic voluntary fasting intervention to control post-Ramadan weight gain. Methods: This study was conducted between July and November 2011. Two weight loss intervention programmes were developed and implemented among groups of overweight or obese Malay women living in the Malaysian cities of Putrajaya and Seremban: a standard programme promoting control of food intake according to national dietary guidelines (group B) and a faith-based programme promoting voluntary fasting in addition to the standard programme (group A). Participants’ dietary practices (i.e., voluntary fasting practices, frequency of fruit/vegetable consumption per week and quantity of carbohydrates/protein consumed per day), body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting blood high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and total cholesterol (TC):HDL-C ratio were assessed before Ramadan and three months post-Ramadan. Results: Voluntary fasting practices increased only in group A (P <0.01). Additionally, the quantity of protein/carbohydrates consumed per day, mean diastolic pressure and TC:HDL-C ratio decreased only in group A (P <0.01, 0.05, 0.02 and <0.01, respectively). Frequency of fruit/vegetable consumption per week, as well as HDL-C levels, increased only in group A (P = 0.03 and <0.01, respectively). Although changes in BMI between the groups was not significant (P = 0.08), BMI decrease among participants in group A was significant (P <0.01). Conclusion: Control of post-Ramadan weight gain was more evident in the faith-based intervention group. Healthcare providers should consider faith-based interventions to encourage weight loss during Ramadan and to prevent post-Ramadan weight gain among patients. PMID:25685394

  14. Quinine controls body weight gain without affecting food intake in male C57BL6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cettour-Rose Philippe

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quinine is a natural molecule commonly used as a flavouring agent in tonic water. Diet supplementation with quinine leads to decreased body weight and food intake in rats. Quinine is an in vitro inhibitor of Trpm5, a cation channel expressed in taste bud cells, the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. The objective of this work is to determine the effect of diet supplementation with quinine on body weight and body composition in male mice, to investigate its mechanism of action, and whether the effect is mediated through Trpm5. Results Compared with mice consuming AIN, a regular balanced diet, mice consuming AIN diet supplemented with 0.1% quinine gained less weight (2.89 ± 0.30 g vs 5.39 ± 0.50 g and less fat mass (2.22 ± 0.26 g vs 4.33 ± 0.43 g after 13 weeks of diet, and had lower blood glucose and plasma triglycerides. There was no difference in food intake between the mice consuming quinine supplemented diet and those consuming control diet. Trpm5 knockout mice gained less fat mass than wild-type mice. There was a trend for a diet-genotype interaction for body weight and body weight gain, with the effect of quinine less pronounced in the Trpm5 KO than in the WT background. Faecal weight, energy and lipid contents were higher in quinine fed mice compared to regular AIN fed mice and in Trpm5 KO mice compared to wild type mice. Conclusion Quinine contributes to weight control in male C57BL6 mice without affecting food intake. A partial contribution of Trpm5 to quinine dependent body weight control is suggested.

  15. Redesign of a Variable-Gain Output Feedback Longitudinal Controller Flown on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroff, Aaron J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a redesigned longitudinal controller that flew on the High-Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) during calendar years (CY) 1995 and 1996. Linear models are developed for both the modified controller and a baseline controller that was flown in CY 1994. The modified controller was developed with three gain sets for flight evaluation, and several linear analysis results are shown comparing the gain sets. A Neal-Smith flying qualities analysis shows that performance for the low- and medium-gain sets is near the level 1 boundary, depending upon the bandwidth assumed, whereas the high-gain set indicates a sensitivity problem. A newly developed high-alpha Bode envelope criterion indicates that the control system gains may be slightly high, even for the low-gain set. A large motion-base simulator in the United Kingdom was used to evaluate the various controllers. Desired performance, which appeared to be satisfactory for flight, was generally met with both the low- and medium-gain sets. Both the high-gain set and the baseline controller were very sensitive, and it was easy to generate pilot-induced oscillation (PIO) in some of the target-tracking maneuvers. Flight target-tracking results varied from level 1 to level 3 and from no sensitivity to PIO. These results were related to pilot technique and whether actuator rate saturation was encountered.

  16. Application of particle swarm optimization in gas turbine engine fuel controller gain tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri-Gh, M.; Jafari, S.; Ilkhani, M. R.

    2012-02-01

    This article presents the application of particle swarm optimization (PSO) for gain tuning of the gas turbine engine (GTE) fuel controller. For this purpose, the structure of a fuel controller is firstly designed based on the GTE control requirements and constraints. The controller gains are then tuned by PSO where the tuning process is formulated as an engineering optimization problem. In this study, the response time during engine acceleration and deceleration as well as the engine fuel consumption are considered as the objective functions. A computer simulation is also developed to evaluate the objective values for a single spool GTE. The GTE model employed for the simulation is a Wiener model, the parameters of which are extracted from experimental tests. In addition, the effect of neighbour acceleration on PSO results is studied. The results show that the neighbour acceleration factor has a considerable effect on the convergence rate of the PSO process. The PSO results are also compared with the results obtained through a genetic algorithm (GA) to show the relative merits of PSO. Moreover, the PSO results are compared with the results obtained from the dynamic programming (DP) method in order to illustrate the ability of proposed method in finding the global optimal solution. Furthermore, the objective function is also defined in multi-objective manner and the multi-objective particle swarm optimization (MOPSO) is applied to find the Pareto-front for the problem. Finally, the results obtained from the simulation of the optimized controller confirm the effectiveness of the proposed approach to design an optimal fuel controller resulting in an improved GTE performance as well as protection against the physical limitations.

  17. Reward value-based gain control: divisive normalization in parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Kenway; Grattan, Lauren E; Glimcher, Paul W

    2011-07-20

    The representation of value is a critical component of decision making. Rational choice theory assumes that options are assigned absolute values, independent of the value or existence of other alternatives. However, context-dependent choice behavior in both animals and humans violates this assumption, suggesting that biological decision processes rely on comparative evaluation. Here we show that neurons in the monkey lateral intraparietal cortex encode a relative form of saccadic value, explicitly dependent on the values of the other available alternatives. Analogous to extra-classical receptive field effects in visual cortex, this relative representation incorporates target values outside the response field and is observed in both stimulus-driven activity and baseline firing rates. This context-dependent modulation is precisely described by divisive normalization, indicating that this standard form of sensory gain control may be a general mechanism of cortical computation. Such normalization in decision circuits effectively implements an adaptive gain control for value coding and provides a possible mechanistic basis for behavioral context-dependent violations of rationality.

  18. Analysis of sensorless control of brushless DC motor using unknown input observer with different gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astik, Mitesh B.; Bhatt, Praghnesh; Bhalja, Bhavesh R.

    2017-03-01

    A sensorless control scheme based on an unknown input observer is presented in this paper in which back EMF of the Brushless DC Motor (BLDC) is continuously estimated from available line voltages and currents. During negative rotation of motor, actual and estimated speed fail to track the reference speed and if the corrective action is not taken by the observer, the motor goes into saturation. To overcome this problem, the speed estimation algorithm has been implemented in this paper to control the dynamic behavior of the motor during negative rotation. The Ackermans method was used to calculate the gains of an unknown input observer which is based on the appropriate choice of the eigenvalues in advance. The criteria to choose eigenvalue is to obtain a balance between faster convergence rate and the least noise level. Simulations have been carried out for different disturbances such as step changes in motor reference speed and load torque. The comparative simulation results clearly depict that the disturbance effects in actual and estimated responses minimizes as observer gain setting increases.

  19. Robust Model Predictive Control of a Nonlinear System with Known Scheduling Variable and Uncertain Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Robust model predictive control (RMPC) of a class of nonlinear systems is considered in this paper. We will use Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) model of the nonlinear system. By taking the advantage of having future values of the scheduling variable, we will simplify state prediction. Because...... of the special structure of the problem, uncertainty is only in the B matrix (gain) of the state space model. Therefore by taking advantage of this structure, we formulate a tractable minimax optimization problem to solve robust model predictive control problem. Wind turbine is chosen as the case study and we...... choose wind speed as the scheduling variable. Wind speed is measurable ahead of the turbine, therefore the scheduling variable is known for the entire prediction horizon....

  20. Continuity of midwifery care and gestational weight gain in obese women: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson Denise

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increased prevalence of obesity in pregnant women in Australia and other developed countries is a significant public health concern. Obese women are at increased risk of serious perinatal complications and guidelines recommend weight gain restriction and additional care. There is limited evidence to support the effectiveness of dietary and physical activity lifestyle interventions in preventing adverse perinatal outcomes and new strategies need to be evaluated. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the effect of continuity of midwifery care on restricting gestational weight gain in obese women to the recommended range. The secondary aims of the study are to assess the impact of continuity of midwifery care on: women's experience of pregnancy care; women's satisfaction with care and a range of psychological factors. Methods/Design A two arm randomised controlled trial (RCT will be conducted with primigravid women recruited from maternity services in Victoria, Australia. Participants will be primigravid women, with a BMI≥30 who are less than 17 weeks gestation. Women allocated to the intervention arm will be cared for in a midwifery continuity of care model and receive an informational leaflet on managing weight gain in pregnancy. Women allocated to the control group will receive routine care in addition to the same informational leaflet. Weight gain during pregnancy, standards of care, medical and obstetric information will be extracted from medical records. Data collected at recruitment (self administered survey and at 36 weeks by postal survey will include socio-demographic information and the use of validated scales to measure secondary outcomes. Discussion Continuity of midwifery care models are well aligned with current Victorian, Australian and many international government policies on maternity care. Increasingly, midwifery continuity models of care are being introduced in low risk maternity care, and

  1. Gain control through divisive inhibition prevents abrupt transition to chaos in a neural mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavvas, Christoforos A.; Wang, Yujiang; Trevelyan, Andrew J.; Kaiser, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Experimental results suggest that there are two distinct mechanisms of inhibition in cortical neuronal networks: subtractive and divisive inhibition. They modulate the input-output function of their target neurons either by increasing the input that is needed to reach maximum output or by reducing the gain and the value of maximum output itself, respectively. However, the role of these mechanisms on the dynamics of the network is poorly understood. We introduce a novel population model and numerically investigate the influence of divisive inhibition on network dynamics. Specifically, we focus on the transitions from a state of regular oscillations to a state of chaotic dynamics via period-doubling bifurcations. The model with divisive inhibition exhibits a universal transition rate to chaos (Feigenbaum behavior). In contrast, in an equivalent model without divisive inhibition, transition rates to chaos are not bounded by the universal constant (non-Feigenbaum behavior). This non-Feigenbaum behavior, when only subtractive inhibition is present, is linked to the interaction of bifurcation curves in the parameter space. Indeed, searching the parameter space showed that such interactions are impossible when divisive inhibition is included. Therefore, divisive inhibition prevents non-Feigenbaum behavior and, consequently, any abrupt transition to chaos. The results suggest that the divisive inhibition in neuronal networks could play a crucial role in keeping the states of order and chaos well separated and in preventing the onset of pathological neural dynamics. PMID:26465514

  2. Gain control through divisive inhibition prevents abrupt transition to chaos in a neural mass model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavvas, Christoforos A; Wang, Yujiang; Trevelyan, Andrew J; Kaiser, Marcus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental results suggest that there are two distinct mechanisms of inhibition in cortical neuronal networks: subtractive and divisive inhibition. They modulate the input-output function of their target neurons either by increasing the input that is needed to reach maximum output or by reducing the gain and the value of maximum output itself, respectively. However, the role of these mechanisms on the dynamics of the network is poorly understood. We introduce a novel population model and numerically investigate the influence of divisive inhibition on network dynamics. Specifically, we focus on the transitions from a state of regular oscillations to a state of chaotic dynamics via period-doubling bifurcations. The model with divisive inhibition exhibits a universal transition rate to chaos (Feigenbaum behavior). In contrast, in an equivalent model without divisive inhibition, transition rates to chaos are not bounded by the universal constant (non-Feigenbaum behavior). This non-Feigenbaum behavior, when only subtractive inhibition is present, is linked to the interaction of bifurcation curves in the parameter space. Indeed, searching the parameter space showed that such interactions are impossible when divisive inhibition is included. Therefore, divisive inhibition prevents non-Feigenbaum behavior and, consequently, any abrupt transition to chaos. The results suggest that the divisive inhibition in neuronal networks could play a crucial role in keeping the states of order and chaos well separated and in preventing the onset of pathological neural dynamics.

  3. Seeing conflict and engaging control: Experience with contrastive language benefits executive function in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doebel, Sabine; Zelazo, Philip David

    2016-12-01

    Engaging executive function often requires overriding a prepotent response in favor of a conflicting but adaptive one. Language may play a key role in this ability by supporting integrated representations of conflicting rules. We tested whether experience with contrastive language that could support such representations benefits executive function in 3-year-old children. Children who received brief experience with language highlighting contrast between objects, attributes, and actions showed greater executive function on two of three 'conflict' executive function tasks than children who received experience with contrasting stimuli only and children who read storybooks with the experimenter, controlling for baseline executive function. Experience with contrasting stimuli did not benefit executive function relative to reading books with the experimenter, indicating experience with contrastive language, rather than experience with contrast generally, was key. Experience with contrastive language also boosted spontaneous attention to contrast, consistent with improvements in representing contrast. These findings indicate a role for language in executive function that is consistent with the Cognitive Complexity and Control theory's key claim that coordinating conflicting rules is critical to overcoming perseveration, and suggest new ideas for testing theories of executive function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sibutramine for clozapine-associated weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, D C; Fan, X; Copeland, P M; Borba, C P; Daley, T B; Nguyen, D D; Zhang, H; Hayden, D; Freudenreich, O; Cather, C; Evins, A E; Goff, D C

    2007-02-01

    This study sought to examine the effectiveness of sibutramine, a weight loss agent, on clozapine-associated weight gain. This was a 12-week double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial of sibutramine for weight loss in obese clozapine-treated schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder subjects. Ten patients were enrolled into the placebo group and 11 patients into the sibutramine group. There were no significant baseline differences between the two groups on age, gender, education, ethnicity, diagnosis, weight, body mass index (BMI), and blood pressure. At week 12, there were no significant differences in changes in weight, BMI, abdominal and waist circumferences, Hba1c, fasting glucose, or cholesterol levels. Sibutramine treatment did not show significant weight loss compared with placebo in clozapine-treated patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Further research with a larger sample size and longer follow-up duration is warranted.

  5. Almost output regulation of LFT systems via gain-scheduling control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chengzhi; Duan, Chang; Wu, Fen

    2018-05-01

    Output regulation of general uncertain systems is a meaningful yet challenging problem. In spite of the rich literature in the field, the problem has not yet been addressed adequately due to the lack of an effective design mechanism. In this paper, we propose a new design framework for almost output regulation of uncertain systems described in the general form of linear fractional transformation (LFT) with time-varying parametric uncertainties and unknown external perturbations. A novel semi-LFT gain-scheduling output regulator structure is proposed, such that the associated control synthesis conditions guaranteeing both output regulation and ? disturbance attenuation performance are formulated as a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) plus parameter-dependent linear matrix equations, which can be solved separately. A numerical example has been used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  6. Engineering studies related to Skylab program. [assessment of automatic gain control data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, G. S.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship between the S-193 Automatic Gain Control data and the magnitude of received signal power was studied in order to characterize performance parameters for Skylab equipment. The r-factor was used for the assessment and is defined to be less than unity, and a function of off-nadir angle, ocean surface roughness, and receiver signal to noise ratio. A digital computer simulation was also used to assess to additive receiver, or white noise. The system model for the digital simulation is described, along with intermediate frequency and video impulse response functions used, details of the input waveforms, and results to date. Specific discussion of the digital computer programs used is also provided.

  7. Analysis of Non-Uniform Gain for Control of a Deformable Mirror in an Adaptive-Optics System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vitayaudom, Kevin P

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and experimentally verify the use of spatially varying gain maps on the servo-loop controller of a deformable mirror for improvements in the performance...

  8. Comparing and contrasting Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis mechanosensitive channels (MscL) - New gain of function mutations in the loop region

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Joshua A.; Elmore, Donald E.; Lester, Henry A.; Dougherty, Dennis A.

    2000-01-01

    Sequence analysis of 35 putative MscL homologues was used to develop an optimal alignment for Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis MscL and to place these homologues into sequence subfamilies. By using this alignment, previously identified E. coli MscL mutants that displayed severe and very severe gain of function phenotypes were mapped onto the M. tuberculosis MscL sequence. Not all of the resulting M. tuberculosis mutants displayed a gain of function phenotype; for instance, norm...

  9. Health coaching to prevent excessive gestational weight gain: A randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouteris, Helen; McPhie, Skye; Hill, Briony; McCabe, Marita; Milgrom, Jeannette; Kent, Bridie; Bruce, Lauren; Herring, Sharon; Gale, Janette; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Shih, Sophy; Teale, Glyn; Lachal, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of a health coaching (HC) intervention designed to prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG), and promote positive psychosocial and motivational outcomes in comparison with an Education Alone (EA) group. Randomized-controlled trial. Two hundred and sixty-one women who were <18 weeks pregnant consented to take part. Those allocated to the HC group received a tailored HC intervention delivered by a Health Coach, whilst those in the EA group attended two education sessions. Women completed measures, including motivation, psychosocial variables, sleep quality, and knowledge, beliefs and expectations concerning GWG, at 15 weeks of gestation (Time 1) and 33 weeks of gestation (Time 2). Post-birth data were also collected at 2 months post-partum (Time 3). There was no intervention effect in relation to weight gained during pregnancy, rate of excessive GWG or birth outcomes. The only differences between HC and EA women were higher readiness (b = 0.29, 95% CIs = 0.03-0.55, p < .05) and the importance to achieve a healthy GWG (b = 0.27, 95% CIs = 0.02-0.52, p < .05), improved sleep quality (b = -0.22, 95% CIs = -0.44 to -0.03, p < .05), and increased knowledge for an appropriate amount of GWG that would be best for their baby's health (b = -1.75, 95% CI = -3.26 to -0.24, p < .05) reported by the HC at Time 2. Whilst the HC intervention was not successful in preventing excessive GWG, several implications for the design of future GWG interventions were identified, including the burden of the intervention commitment and the use of weight monitoring. What is already known on the subject? Designing interventions to address gestational weight gain (GWG) continues to be a challenge. To date, health behaviour change factors have not been the focus of GWG interventions. What does this study add? Our health coaching (HC) intervention did not reduce GWG more so than education alone (EA). There was an intervention effect

  10. Enhancement tuning and control for high dynamic range images in multi-scale locally adaptive contrast enhancement algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, Sascha D.; Schirris, Johan; de With, Peter H. N.

    2009-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, visibility of details is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. If we display High Dynamic-Range (HDR) scenes whose contrast spans four or more orders of magnitude on a conventional monitor without additional processing, results are unacceptable. Compression of the dynamic range is therefore a compulsory part of any high-end video processing chain because standard monitors are inherently Low- Dynamic Range (LDR) devices with maximally two orders of display dynamic range. In real-time camera processing, many complex scenes are improved with local contrast enhancements, bringing details to the best possible visibility. In this paper, we show how a multi-scale high-frequency enhancement scheme, in which gain is a non-linear function of the detail energy, can be used for the dynamic range compression of HDR real-time video camera signals. We also show the connection of our enhancement scheme to the processing way of the Human Visual System (HVS). Our algorithm simultaneously controls perceived sharpness, ringing ("halo") artifacts (contrast) and noise, resulting in a good balance between visibility of details and non-disturbance of artifacts. The overall quality enhancement, suitable for both HDR and LDR scenes, is based on a careful selection of the filter types for the multi-band decomposition and a detailed analysis of the signal per frequency band.

  11. A current mode feed-forward gain control system for a 0.8 V CMOS hearing aid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Fanyang; Yang Haigang; Liu Fei; Yin Tao, E-mail: yanghg@mail.ie.ac.cn [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2011-06-15

    A current mode feed-forward gain control (CMFGC) technique is presented, which is applied in the front-end system of a hearing aid chip. Compared with conventional automatic gain control (AGC), CMFGC significantly improves the total harmonic distortion (THD) by digital gain control. To attain the digital gain control codes according to the extremely weak output signal from the microphone, a rectifier and a state controller implemented in current mode are proposed. A prototype chip has been designed based on a 0.13 {mu}m standard CMOS process. The measurement results show that the supply voltage can be as low as 0.6 V. And with the 0.8 V supply voltage, the THD is improved and below 0.06% (-64 dB) at the output level of 500 mV{sub p-p}, yet the power consumption is limited to 40 {mu}W. In addition, the input referred noise is only 4 {mu}V{sub rms} and the maximum gain is maintained at 33 dB. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  12. A current mode feed-forward gain control system for a 0.8 V CMOS hearing aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fanyang; Yang Haigang; Liu Fei; Yin Tao

    2011-01-01

    A current mode feed-forward gain control (CMFGC) technique is presented, which is applied in the front-end system of a hearing aid chip. Compared with conventional automatic gain control (AGC), CMFGC significantly improves the total harmonic distortion (THD) by digital gain control. To attain the digital gain control codes according to the extremely weak output signal from the microphone, a rectifier and a state controller implemented in current mode are proposed. A prototype chip has been designed based on a 0.13 μm standard CMOS process. The measurement results show that the supply voltage can be as low as 0.6 V. And with the 0.8 V supply voltage, the THD is improved and below 0.06% (-64 dB) at the output level of 500 mV p-p , yet the power consumption is limited to 40 μW. In addition, the input referred noise is only 4 μV rms and the maximum gain is maintained at 33 dB. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  13. A randomized, placebo-controlled study of zonisamide to prevent olanzapine-associated weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Susan L; Winstanley, Erin; Mori, Nicole; Martens, Brian; McCoy, Jessica; Moeller, Dianna; Guerdjikova, Anna I; Keck, Paul E

    2012-04-01

    Weight gain is commonly observed with olanzapine treatment. Zonisamide is an antiepileptic drug associated with weight loss. This study examined the effectiveness of zonisamide in preventing weight gain in 42 patients beginning olanzapine for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Each patient had a body mass index of 22 mg/kg or greater and was randomized to taking olanzapine with either zonisamide (n = 20) or placebo (n = 22) for 16 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in body weight in kilograms from baseline. In the primary analysis using longitudinal regression, patients who received zonisamide had a significantly slower rate of weight gain and increase in body mass index than those who received placebo. The patients treated with zonisamide gained a mean (SD) of 0.9 (3.3) kg, whereas those treated with placebo gained a mean (SD) of 5.0 (5.5) kg; P = 0.01. None of the patients in the zonisamide group, compared with 7 patients (33%) in the placebo group, gained 7% of body weight or greater from baseline (Fisher exact test, P = 0.009). The zonisamide group, however, reported significantly more cognitive impairment as an adverse event than the placebo group (25% vs 0, respectively; P = 0.02). Zonisamide was effective for mitigating weight gain in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia initiating treatment with olanzapine but was associated with cognitive impairment as an adverse event.

  14. Exercise Training and Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial (ETIP Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Krohn Garnæs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of exercise training for preventing excessive gestational weight gain (GWG and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is still uncertain. As maternal obesity is associated with both GWG and GDM, there is a special need to assess whether prenatal exercise training programs provided to obese women reduce the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Our primary aim was to assess whether regular supervised exercise training in pregnancy could reduce GWG in women with prepregnancy overweight/obesity. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of exercise in pregnancy on 30 outcomes including GDM incidence, blood pressure, blood measurements, skinfold thickness, and body composition.This was a single-center study where we randomized (1:1 91 pregnant women with a prepregnancy body mass index (BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2 to exercise training (n = 46 or control (standard maternity care (n = 45. Assessments were done at baseline (pregnancy week 12-18 and in late pregnancy (week 34-37, as well as at delivery. The exercise group was offered thrice weekly supervised sessions of 35 min of moderate intensity endurance exercise and 25 min of strength training. Seventeen women were lost to follow-up (eight in the exercise group and nine in the control group. Our primary endpoint was GWG from baseline testing to delivery. The principal analyses were done as intention-to-treat analyses, with supplementary per protocol analyses where we assessed outcomes in the women who adhered to the exercise program (n = 19 compared to the control group. Mean GWG from baseline to delivery was 10.5 kg in the exercise group and 9.2 kg in the control group, with a mean difference of 0.92 kg (95% CI -1.35, 3.18; p = 0.43. Among the 30 secondary outcomes in late pregnancy, an apparent reduction was recorded in the incidence of GDM (2009 WHO definition in the exercise group (2 cases; 6.1% compared to the control group (9 cases; 27.3%, with an odds ratio of 0.1 (95% CI 0.02, 0.95; p = 0

  15. Sliding mode controller gain adaptation and chattering reduction techniques for DSP-based PM DC motor drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal, Mehmet; Teodorescu, Remus

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve and maintain the prospective benefits of sliding mode control (SMC) methodology, the phenomenon known as “chattering”, the main obstacle encountered in real-time applications, has to be suppressed. In this study, two promising switching control gain adaptation and chattering...... reduction techniques are investigated, and the effectiveness of chattering suppression for current regulation of PM DC drives is tested. The sampling rate was also examined to determine how it affects the amplitude of chattering. This paper concentrates on various combinations of observer-based methods...... in order to find the best solution for chattering reduction. To find a practical solution a tunable low-pass filter (LPF) was used to average the discontinuous control term. The validity of the existing conditions for the gain adaptation methods are examined and observer gain value was determined through...

  16. Dynamic Sliding Mode Evolution PWM Controller for a Novel High-Gain Interleaved DC-DC Converter in PV System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taizhou Bei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the disadvantages of the traditional high-gain DC-DC converter such as big size, high voltage stress of switches, and large input current ripple, a novel high-gain interleaved boost converter with coupled-inductor and switched-capacitor was proposed correspondingly and the operation principle together with the steady-state analysis of this converter was also described. Besides, a new control approach-dynamic sliding mode evolution PWM controller (DSME PWM for the novel topological converter based on both dynamic evolution and sliding mode control was also presented. From the simulation results and experimental validation the proposed converter can fulfill high-gain boost, low ripple of both the input current and the output voltage. Furthermore, MPPT technique can be also achieved in a short time by simulation. The efficiency and stability of the converter proposed in this paper can be improved.

  17. Solutions to the cocktail party problem in insects: selective filters, spatial release from masking and gain control in tropical crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne K D Schmidt

    Full Text Available Insects often communicate by sound in mixed species choruses; like humans and many vertebrates in crowded social environments they thus have to solve cocktail-party-like problems in order to ensure successful communication with conspecifics. This is even more a problem in species-rich environments like tropical rainforests, where background noise levels of up to 60 dB SPL have been measured.Using neurophysiological methods we investigated the effect of natural background noise (masker on signal detection thresholds in two tropical cricket species Paroecanthus podagrosus and Diatrypa sp., both in the laboratory and outdoors. We identified three 'bottom-up' mechanisms which contribute to an excellent neuronal representation of conspecific signals despite the masking background. First, the sharply tuned frequency selectivity of the receiver reduces the amount of masking energy around the species-specific calling song frequency. Laboratory experiments yielded an average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of -8 dB, when masker and signal were broadcast from the same side. Secondly, displacing the masker by 180° from the signal improved SNRs by further 6 to 9 dB, a phenomenon known as spatial release from masking. Surprisingly, experiments carried out directly in the nocturnal rainforest yielded SNRs of about -23 dB compared with those in the laboratory with the same masker, where SNRs reached only -14.5 and -16 dB in both species. Finally, a neuronal gain control mechanism enhances the contrast between the responses to signals and the masker, by inhibition of neuronal activity in interstimulus intervals.Thus, conventional speaker playbacks in the lab apparently do not properly reconstruct the masking noise situation in a spatially realistic manner, since under real world conditions multiple sound sources are spatially distributed in space. Our results also indicate that without knowledge of the receiver properties and the spatial release mechanisms the

  18. Effects of gain-scheduling methods in a classical wind turbine controller on wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaldi, Carlo; Henriksen, Lars Christian; Hansen, Morten Hartvig

    2014-01-01

    The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account the chan......The eects of dierent gain-scheduling methods for a classical wind turbine controller, operating in full load region, on the wind turbine aeroservoelastic modes and loads are investigated in this work. The dierent techniques are derived looking at the physical problem to take into account...

  19. Tuning and performance evaluation of PID controller for superheater steam temperature control of 200 MW boiler using gain phase assignment algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, A. Yasmine; Gireesh, N.

    2018-04-01

    In superheater, steam temperature is controlled in a cascade control loop. The cascade control loop consists of PI and PID controllers. To improve the superheater steam temperature control the controller's gains in a cascade control loop has to be tuned efficiently. The mathematical model of the superheater is derived by sets of nonlinear partial differential equations. The tuning methods taken for study here are designed for delay plus first order transfer function model. Hence from the dynamical model of the superheater, a FOPTD model is derived using frequency response method. Then by using Chien-Hrones-Reswick Tuning Algorithm and Gain-Phase Assignment Algorithm optimum controller gains has been found out based on the least value of integral time weighted absolute error.

  20. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  1. New results on the robust stability of PID controllers with gain and phase margins for UFOPTD processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Q B; Liu, Q; Huang, B

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers the problem of determining all the robust PID (proportional-integral-derivative) controllers in terms of the gain and phase margins (GPM) for open-loop unstable first order plus time delay (UFOPTD) processes. It is the first time that the feasible ranges of the GPM specifications provided by a PID controller are given for UFOPTD processes. A gain and phase margin tester is used to modify the original model, and the ranges of the margin specifications are derived such that the modified model can be stabilized by a stabilizing PID controller based on Hermite-Biehlers Theorem. Furthermore, we obtain all the controllers satisfying a given margin specification. Simulation studies show how to use the results to design a robust PID controller. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Time domain acoustic contrast control implementation of sound zones for low-frequency input signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellekens, Daan H. M.; Møller, Martin Bo; Olsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Sound zones are two or more regions within a listening space where listeners are provided with personal audio. Acoustic contrast control (ACC) is a sound zoning method that maximizes the average squared sound pressure in one zone constrained to constant pressure in other zones. State......-of-the-art time domain broadband acoustic contrast control (BACC) methods are designed for anechoic environments. These methods are not able to realize a flat frequency response in a limited frequency range within a reverberant environment. Sound field control in a limited frequency range is a requirement...... to accommodate the effective working range of the loudspeakers. In this paper, a new BACC method is proposed which results in an implementation realizing a flat frequency response in the target zone. This method is applied in a bandlimited low-frequency scenario where the loudspeaker layout surrounds two...

  3. Faster, more intense! The relation between electrophysiological reflections of attentional orienting, sensory gain control, and speed of responding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, D.; Mulckhuyse, Manon; Slagter, Heleen A.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Selective visual attention is thought to facilitate goal-directed behavior by biasing the system in advance to favor certain stimuli over others, resulting in their selective processing. The aim of the present study was to gain more insight into the link between control processes that induce a

  4. Effects of lifestyle intervention in obese pregnant women on gestational weight gain and mental health : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerts, A.F.L.; Devlieger, R.; Nuyts, E.; Witters, I.; Gyselaers, W.; Van den Bergh, B.R.H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Lifestyle intervention could help obese pregnant women to limit their weight gain during pregnancy and improve their psychological comfort, but has not yet been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. We evaluated whether a targeted antenatal lifestyle intervention programme for obese

  5. 3D printing X-Ray Quality Control Phantoms. A Low Contrast Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, I.; Fountos, G.; Michail, C.; Valais, I.; Kalyvas, N.

    2017-11-01

    Current 3D printing technology products may be usable in various biomedical applications. Such an application is the creation of X-ray quality control phantoms. In this work a self-assembled 3D printer (geeetech i3) was used for the design of a simple low contrast phantom. The printing material was Polylactic Acid (PLA) (100% printing density). Low contrast scheme was achieved by creating air-holes with different diameters and thicknesses, ranging from 1mm to 9mm. The phantom was irradiated at a Philips Diagnost 93 fluoroscopic installation at 40kV-70kV with the semi-automatic mode. The images were recorded with an Agfa cr30-x CR system and assessed with ImageJ software. The best contrast value observed was approximately 33%. In low contrast detectability check it was found that the 1mm diameter hole was always visible, for thickness larger or equal to 4mm. A reason for not being able to distinguish 1mm in smaller thicknesses might be the presence of printing patterns on the final image, which increased the structure noise. In conclusion the construction of a contrast resolution phantom with a 3D printer is feasible. The quality of the final product depends upon the printer accuracy and the material characteristics.

  6. Mode control in a high gain relativistic klystron amplifier with 3 GW output power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Xie, Hong-Quan; Xu, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Higher mode excitation is very serious in the relativistic klystron amplifier, especially for the high gain relativistic amplifier working at tens of kilo-amperes. The mechanism of higher mode excitation is explored in the PIC simulation and it is shown that insufficient separation of adjacent cavities is the main cause of higher mode excitation. So RF lossy material mounted on the drift tube wall is adopted to suppress higher mode excitation. A high gain S-band relativistic klystron amplifier is designed for the beam current of 13 kA and the voltage of 1 MV. PIC simulation shows that the output power is 3.2 GW when the input power is only 2.8 kW.

  7. Gain assisted coherent control of microwave pulse in a one dimensional array of artificial atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waqas, Mohsin; Ayaz, M. Q.; Waseem, M.; Qamar, Sajid; Qamar, Shahid

    2018-06-01

    We study the coherent propagation of a microwave pulse through a one-dimensional array of artificial atoms. The scheme is based upon gain assisted propagation of the pulse using two-photon Raman transition in a three-level superconducting artificial atoms (SAAs) coupled to a microwave transmission line. Our results show that the group velocity can be significantly reduced by increasing the Rabi frequency of the pump fields which in turn can lead to an efficient storage of the pulse inside a 1D array of SAAs. Further, the intensity of the transmitted pulse increases with the number of artificial atoms owing to the gain associated with the two-photon Raman transition. Our results also show that the window width decreases for both scattering and negligible scattering cases with the increase in the number of SAAs. The fidelity of the system also remains high even after the passage of the pulse through a large number of SAAs.

  8. Matching Automatic Gain Control Across Devices in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veugen, Lidwien C E; Chalupper, Josef; Snik, Ad F M; Opstal, A John van; Mens, Lucas H M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve bimodal benefit in listeners using a cochlear implant (CI) and a hearing aid (HA) in contralateral ears, by matching the time constants and the number of compression channels of the automatic gain control (AGC) of the HA to the CI. Equivalent AGC was hypothesized to support a balanced loudness for dynamically changing signals like speech and improve bimodal benefit for speech understanding in quiet and with noise presented from the side(s) at 90 degree. Fifteen subjects participated in the study, all using the same Advanced Bionics Harmony CI processor and HA (Phonak Naida S IX UP). In a 3-visit crossover design with 4 weeks between sessions, performance was measured using a HA with a standard AGC (syllabic multichannel compression with 1 ms attack time and 50 ms release time) or an AGC that was adjusted to match that of the CI processor (dual AGC broadband compression, 3 and 240 msec attack time, 80 and 1500 msec release time). In all devices, the AGC was activated above the threshold of 63 dB SPL. The authors balanced loudness across the devices for soft and loud input sounds in 3 frequency bands (0 to 548, 548 to 1000, and >1000 Hz). Speech understanding was tested in free field in quiet and in noise for three spatial speaker configurations, with target speech always presented from the front. Single-talker noise was either presented from the CI side or the HA side, or uncorrelated stationary speech-weighted noise or single-talker noise was presented from both sides. Questionnaires were administered to assess differences in perception between the two bimodal fittings. Significant bimodal benefit over the CI alone was only found for the AGC-matched HA for the speech tests with single-talker noise. Compared with the standard HA, matched AGC characteristics significantly improved speech understanding in single-talker noise by 1.9 dB when noise was presented from the HA side. AGC matching increased bimodal benefit

  9. Metformin for treatment of antipsychotic-induced weight gain: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man; Tong, Jian-hua; Zhu, Gang; Liang, Guang-ming; Yan, Hong-fei; Wang, Xiu-zhen

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of metformin for treatment of antipsychotic-induced weight gain. Seventy-two patients with first-episode schizophrenia who gained more than 7% of their predrug weight were randomly assigned to receive 1000 mg/d of metformin or placebo in addition to their ongoing treatment for 12 weeks using a double-blind study design. The primary outcome was change in body weight. The secondary outcomes included changes in body mass index, fasting glucose and insulin, and insulin resistance index. Of the 72 patients who were randomly assigned, 66 (91.6%) completed treatments. The body weight, body mass index, fasting insulin and insulin resistance index decreased significantly in the metformin group, but increased in the placebo group during the 12-week follow-up period. Significantly more patients in the metformin group lost their baseline weight by more than 7%, which was the cutoff for clinically meaningful weight loss. Metformin was tolerated well by majority patients. Metformin was effective and safe in attenuating antipsychotic-induced weight gain and insulin resistance in first-episode schizophrenia patients. Patients displayed good adherence to metformin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A temperature-dependent gain control system for improving the stability of Si-PM-based PET systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Satomi, Junkichi; Watabe, Tadashi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu

    2011-01-01

    The silicon-photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector for the development of new PET systems due to its small size, high gain and relatively low sensitivity to the static magnetic field. One drawback of the Si-PM is that it has significant temperature-dependent gain that poses a problem for the stability of the Si-PM-based PET system. To reduce this problem, we developed and tested a temperature-dependent gain control system for the Si-PM-based PET system. The system consists of a thermometer, analog-to-digital converter, personal computer, digital-to-analog converter and variable gain amplifiers in the weight summing board of the PET system. Temperature characteristics of the Si-PM array are measured and the calculated correction factor is sent to the variable gain amplifier. Without this correction, the temperature-dependent peak channel shifts of the block detector were -55% from 20 deg. C to 35 deg.C. With the correction, the peak channel variations were corrected within ±8%. The coincidence count rate of the Si-PM-based PET system was measured using a Na-22 point source while monitoring the room temperature. Without the correction, the count rate inversely changed with the room temperature by 10% for 1.5 deg. C temperature changes. With the correction, the count rate variation was reduced to within 3.7%. These results indicate that the developed temperature-dependent gain control system can contribute to improving the stability of Si-PM-based PET systems.

  11. A Technology-Mediated Behavioral Weight Gain Prevention Intervention for College Students: Controlled, Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Delia Smith; Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Sundstrom, Beth; Larsen, Chelsea; Magradey, Karen; Wilcox, Sara; Brandt, Heather M

    2016-06-13

    Both men and women are vulnerable to weight gain during the college years, and this phenomenon is linked to an increased risk of several chronic diseases and mortality. Technology represents an attractive medium for the delivery of weight control interventions focused on college students, given its reach and appeal among this population. However, few technology-mediated weight gain prevention interventions have been evaluated for college students. This study examined a new technology-based, social media-facilitated weight gain prevention intervention for college students. Undergraduates (n =58) in two sections of a public university course were allocated to either a behavioral weight gain prevention intervention (Healthy Weight, HW; N=29) or a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination awareness intervention (control; N=29). All students were enrolled, regardless of initial body weight or expressed interest in weight management. The interventions delivered 8 lessons via electronic newsletters and Facebook postings over 9 weeks, which were designed to foster social support and introduce relevant educational content. The HW intervention targeted behavioral strategies to prevent weight gain and provided participants with a Wi-Fi-enabled scale and an electronic physical activity tracker to facilitate weight regulation. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was conducted to examine within- and between-group differences in measures of self-reported weight control practices and objectively measured weight. Use of each intervention medium and device was objectively tracked, and intervention satisfaction measures were obtained. Students remained weight stable (HW: -0.48+1.9 kg; control: -0.45+1.4 kg), with no significant difference between groups over 9 weeks (P =.94). However, HW students reported a significantly greater increase in the number of appropriate weight control strategies than did controls (2.1+4.5 vs -1.1+3.4, respectively; P =.003) and there was no increase in

  12. Reason's Enemy Is Not Emotion: Engagement of Cognitive Control Networks Explains Biases in Gain/Loss Framing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In the classic gain/loss framing effect, describing a gamble as a potential gain or loss biases people to make risk-averse or risk-seeking decisions, respectively. The canonical explanation for this effect is that frames differentially modulate emotional processes, which in turn leads to irrational choice behavior. Here, we evaluate the source of framing biases by integrating functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 143 human participants performing a gain/loss framing task with meta-analytic data from >8000 neuroimaging studies. We found that activation during choices consistent with the framing effect were most correlated with activation associated with the resting or default brain, while activation during choices inconsistent with the framing effect was most correlated with the task-engaged brain. Our findings argue against the common interpretation of gain/loss framing as a competition between emotion and control. Instead, our study indicates that this effect results from differential cognitive engagement across decision frames. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The biases frequently exhibited by human decision makers have often been attributed to the presence of emotion. Using a large fMRI sample and analysis of whole-brain networks defined with the meta-analytic tool Neurosynth, we find that neural activity during frame-biased decisions was more significantly associated with default behaviors (and the absence of executive control) than with emotion. These findings point to a role for neuroscience in shaping long-standing psychological theories in decision science. PMID:28264981

  13. Controlling morphology and chain aggregation in semiconducting conjugated polymers: the role of solvent on optical gain in MEH-PPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Zach E; Reynolds, C Lewis; Papanikolas, John M; Aboelfotoh, M Osama

    2012-10-25

    We report the results of a detailed investigation that addresses the influence of polymer morphology and chain aggregation, as controlled by the chemical nature of the solvent, on the optical gain properties of the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-p-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV). Using the variable stripe length technique in the picosecond regime, we have extensively studied the optical gain performance of asymmetric planar waveguides formed with thin MEH-PPV films spin-cast from concentrated chlorobenzene (CB) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solutions onto thermally oxidized silicon substrates. CB and THF solvents were chosen based on their known ability to promote and effectively limit aggregate formation, respectively. Very large net gain coefficients are demonstrated, reaching values of 330 and 365 cm(-1), respectively, when optically pumping the waveguides with a maximum energy density of 85 μJ/cm(2). Our results clearly demonstrate that polymer morphology, and hence, the chain conformation dependence of the degree of aggregation in the films as controlled by the solvent, has minimal impact on the net gain. Moreover, the waveguides exhibit low loss coefficients of 10-20 cm(-1) at the ASE wavelength. These results question the importance of polymer morphology and aggregate formation in polymer-based optical devices operating at high excitation densities in the stimulated emission regime as would be characteristic of lasers and optical amplifiers.

  14. A novel heart rate control model provides insights linking LF-HRV behavior to the open-loop gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvir, Hila; Bobrovsky, Ben Zion; Gabbay, Uri

    2013-09-20

    Low-frequency heart rate variability (LF-HRV) at rest has already been successfully modeled as self-sustained oscillations in a nonlinear control loop, but these models fail to simulate LF-HRV decreases either during aerobic exercise or in heart failure patients. Following control engineering practices, we assume the existence of a biological excitation (dither) within the heart rate control loop that softens the nonlinearity and studied LF-HRV behavior in a dither-embedded model. We adopted the Ottesen model with some revisions and induced a dither of high-frequency stochastic perturbations. We simulated scenarios of a healthy subject at rest and during aerobic exercise (by decreasing peripheral vascular resistance) and a heart failure patient (by decreasing stroke volume). The simulations resembled physiological LF-HRV behavior, i.e., LF-HRV decreased during aerobic exercise and in the heart failure patient. The simulations exhibited LF-HRV dependency on the open-loop gain, which is related to the product of the feedback gain and the feed forward gain. We are the first to demonstrate that LF-HRV may be dependent on the open-loop gain. Accordingly, reduced open-loop gain results in decreased LF-HRV, and vice versa. Our findings explain a well-known but unexplained observed phenomenon of reduced LF-HRV both in heart failure patients and in healthy subjects performing aerobic exercise. These findings have implications on how changes in LF-HRV can be interpreted physiologically, a necessary step towards the clinical utilization of LF-HRV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental knee joint pain during strength training and muscle strength gain in healthy subjects: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, T J; Langberg, H; Hodges, P W; Bliddal, H; Henriksen, M

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint pain and reduced quadriceps strength are cardinal symptoms in many knee pathologies. In people with painful knee pathologies, quadriceps exercise reduces pain, improves physical function, and increases muscle strength. A general assumption is that pain compromises muscle function and thus may prevent effective rehabilitation. This study evaluated the effects of experimental knee joint pain during quadriceps strength training on muscle strength gain in healthy individuals. Twenty-seven healthy untrained volunteers participated in a randomized controlled trial of quadriceps strengthening (3 times per week for 8 weeks). Participants were randomized to perform resistance training either during pain induced by injections of painful hypertonic saline (pain group, n = 13) or during a nonpainful control condition with injection of isotonic saline (control group, n = 14) into the infrapatellar fat pad. The primary outcome measure was change in maximal isokinetic muscle strength in knee extension/flexion (60, 120, and 180 degrees/second). The group who exercised with pain had a significantly larger improvement in isokinetic muscle strength at all angular velocities of knee extension compared to the control group. In knee flexion there were improvements in isokinetic muscle strength in both groups with no between-group differences. Experimental knee joint pain improved the training-induced gain in muscle strength following 8 weeks of quadriceps training. It remains to be studied whether knee joint pain has a positive effect on strength gain in patients with knee pathology. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Optimizing Gestational Weight Gain With the Eating4Two Smartphone App: Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Deborah; Davey, Rachel; Williams, Lauren T; Foureur, Maralyn; Nohr, Ellen; Knight-Agarwal, Catherine; Lawlis, Tanya; Oats, Jeremy; Skouteris, Helen; Fuller-Tyszkiewicz, Matthew

    2018-05-30

    Approximately 50% of women gain excessive weight in pregnancy. Optimizing gestational weight gain is important for the short- and long-term health of the childbearing woman and her baby. Despite this, there is no recommendation for routine weighing in pregnancy, and weight is a topic that many maternity care providers avoid. Resource-intensive interventions have mainly targeted overweight and obese women with variable results. Few studies have examined the way that socioeconomic status might influence the effectiveness or acceptability of an intervention to participants. Given the scale of the problem of maternal weight gain, maternity services will be unlikely to sustain resource intensive interventions; therefore, innovative strategies are required to assist women to manage weight gain in pregnancy. The primary aim of the trial was to examine the effectiveness of the Eating4Two smartphone app in assisting women of all body mass index categories to optimize gestational weight gain. Secondary aims include comparing childbirth outcomes and satisfaction with antenatal care and examining the way that relative advantage and disadvantage might influence engagement with and acceptability of the intervention. This randomized controlled trial will randomize 1330 women to control or intervention groups in 3 regions of different socioeconomic status. Women will be recruited from clinical and social media sites. The intervention group will be provided with access to the Eating4Two mobile phone app which provides nutrition and dietary information specifically tailored for pregnancy, advice on food serving sizes, and a graph that illustrates women's weight change in relation to the range recommended by the Institute of Medicine. Women will be encouraged to use the app to prompt conversations with their maternity care providers about weight gain in pregnancy. The control group will receive routine antenatal care. Recruitment has commenced though the recruitment rate is slower

  17. Improved synthetic-heterodyne Michelson interferometer vibrometer using phase and gain control feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeti, José Henrique; Kitano, Cláudio; Connelly, Michael J

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic-heterodyne demodulation is a useful technique for dynamic displacement and velocity measurement using interferometric sensors as it can provide an output signal which is immune to interferometric drift. With the advent of cost effective, high-speed real-time signal processing systems and software, processing of the complex signals encountered in interferometry has become more feasible. In conventional synthetic-heterodyne demodulation schemes, to obtain the dynamic displacement or vibration of the object under test requires knowledge of the interferometer visibility and also the argument of two Bessel functions. In this paper, a new synthetic-heterodyne demodulation method is described leading to an expression for the dynamic displacement and velocity of the object under test that is significantly less sensitive to the received optical power. In addition, the application of two independent phase and gain feedback loops is used to compensate for the nonideal gain and phase response of the anti-aliasing filter required for the signal acquisition of the received wideband interferometer signal. The efficacy of the improved system is demonstrated by measuring the displacement sensitivity frequency response and linearity of a Piezoelectric Mirror-Shifter (PMS) over a range of 200 Hz-9 kHz. In addition, the system is used to measure the response of the PMS to triangular and impulse type stimuli. The experimental results show excellent agreement with measurements taken using two independent industry standard calibration methods.

  18. Locus of Control, Psychopathology, and Weight Gain in Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Based on a hypothesized disturbance in personal control and efficacy in anorexia nervosa, locus of control score in female adolescents with anorexia nervosa was compared to scores obtained from depressed and conduct-disordered controls and to adolescent female standardization norms. (Author/CL)

  19. Weight Gain Prevention among Midlife Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Address Needs Related to the Physical and Social Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney D. Perry

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Women tend to gain weight at midlife (40–60 years increasing risk of obesity-related chronic diseases. Within specific eating occasions, needs related to the physical and social environment may result in less healthy eating behavior, which can lead to weight gain over time. The purpose of this study was to determine if a dietitian-delivered nutrition counseling intervention tailored to eating occasion needs could improve diet and prevent weight gain among midlife women over two years. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with healthy midlife women (n = 354 in one U.S. metropolitan area. The intervention group (n = 185 received ten hours of individual nutrition counseling from dietitians over six months, while women in a control group (n = 169 received no counseling. Measured height, weight and waist circumference, and dietary intakes were collected at baseline and every six months over two years. Mixed linear models were used to test for intervention effect on change in outcome variables over time. Dietary intakes of fruit, reduced/low-fat dairy foods and refined grains were significantly improved over time in the intervention compared to control group. However, the intervention had no effect on weight over time (p = 0.48. Nutrition counseling tailored to address eating occasion needs improved self-reported diet but did not significantly affect weight change.

  20. Heliostat-field gain-scheduling control applied to a two-step solar hydrogen production plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, Lidia; Calle, Alberto de la; Yebra, Luis J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A control system is proposed for a solar reactor system which produces hydrogen. ► The controller chooses which heliostats from the solar field must be focused. ► A gain scheduling scheme is included to deal with different system dynamics. ► The scheme is tested and tunned in simulation. ► Real experiments show the promising results of this work. -- Abstract: This article describes a temperature control structure designed for the interior of a solar hydrogen reactor based on a two-step ferrite-redox technology. Until now, this temperature has been controlled by manual selection of the heliostats to be focused on the receiver targets. However, the strong system dependency on operating conditions suggests that the procedure be automated in order to ensure the desired setpoint change response. The aims are to maintain the desired temperatures and to make the setpoint switch as fast as possible, keeping plant conditions within the margins of safety. The scheme proposed includes a procedure for selecting the heliostats to be focused on the reactor by using a simple model of the solar field and a gain scheduling control system which changes the control tuning parameters to deal with the varying dynamics observed during the process. Real experiments show the promising results of this work.

  1. Controlling cavitation-based image contrast in focused ultrasound histotripsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Steven P; Hall, Timothy L; Cain, Charles A; Hernandez-Garcia, Luis

    2015-01-01

    To develop MRI feedback for cavitation-based, focused ultrasound, tissue erosion surgery (histotripsy), we investigate image contrast generated by transient cavitation events. Changes in GRE image intensity are observed while balanced pairs of field gradients are varied in the presence of an acoustically driven cavitation event. The amplitude of the acoustic pulse and the timing between a cavitation event and the start of these gradient waveforms are also varied. The magnitudes and phases of the cavitation site are compared with those of control images. An echo-planar sequence is used to evaluate histotripsy lesions in ex vivo tissue. Cavitation events in water cause localized attenuation when acoustic pulses exceed a pressure threshold. Attenuation increases with increasing gradient amplitude and gradient lobe separation times and is isotropic with gradient direction. This attenuation also depends upon the relative timing between the cavitation event and the start of the balanced gradients. These factors can be used to control the appearance of attenuation while imaging ex vivo tissue. By controlling the timing between cavitation events and the imaging gradients, MR images can be made alternately sensitive or insensitive to cavitation. During therapy, these images can be used to isolate contrast generated by cavitation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An analytical method for PID controller tuning with specified gain and phase margins for integral plus time delay processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wuhua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Li, Xiumin

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, an analytical method is proposed for proportional-integral/proportional-derivative/proportional-integral-derivative (PI/PD/PID) controller tuning with specified gain and phase margins (GPMs) for integral plus time delay (IPTD) processes. Explicit formulas are also obtained for estimating the GPMs resulting from given PI/PD/PID controllers. The proposed method indicates a general form of the PID parameters and unifies a large number of existing rules as PI/PD/PID controller tuning with various GPM specifications. The GPMs realized by existing PID tuning rules are computed and documented as a reference for control engineers to tune the PID controllers. Copyright © 2011 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gain-scheduling control of a monocular vision-based human-following robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burke, Michael G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available , R. and Zisserman, A. (2004). Multiple View Geometry in Computer Vision. Cambridge University Press, 2nd edition. Hutchinson, S., Hager, G., and Corke, P. (1996). A tutorial on visual servo control. IEEE Trans. on Robotics and Automation, 12... environment, in a passive manner, at relatively high speeds and low cost. The control of mobile robots using vision in the feed- back loop falls into the well-studied field of visual servo control. Two primary approaches are used: image-based visual...

  4. Intelligent Control of Diesel Generators Using Gain-Scheduling Based on Online External-Load Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Christian; Jepsen, Kasper Lund; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    The development of an intelligent control solution for a wide range of diesel generators is discussed. Compared with most existing solutions, the advantages of the proposed solution lie in two folds: (i) The proposed control has the plug-and-play capability which is reflected by an automatic...... recognition procedure when it is plugged into a specific diesel generator, such that some extensive manual-tuning of the installed controller can be significantly reduced; (ii) The proposed control has an real-time adaptability by using the online external load estimation, such that the integrated system can...... keep a consistent performance for a wide range of operating conditions. Technically, a general nonlinear dynamic model is firstly developed based on fundamental principles of diesel generators. Then, the system parameters of this model can be identified experimentally or partially retrieved from...

  5. LMI-based gain scheduled controller synthesis for a class of linear parameter varying systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Anderson, Brian; Lanzon, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for constructing controllers for a class of single-input multiple-output (SIMO) linear parameter varying (LPV) systems. This class of systems encompasses many physical systems, in particular systems where individual components vary with time, and is therefore...... of significant practical relevance to control designers. The control design presented in this paper has the properties that the system matrix of the closed loop is multi-affine in the various scalar parameters, and that the resulting controller ensures a certain degree of stability for the closed loop even when...... as a standard linear time-invariant (LTI) design combined with a set of linear matrix inequalities, which can be solved efficiently with software tools. The design procedure is illustrated by a numerical example....

  6. High-contrast controllable switching based on polystyrene nonlinear cavities in 2D hole-type photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paghousi, Roohollah; Fasihi, Kiazand

    2018-05-01

    We present a new high-contrast controllable switch, which is based on a polystyrene nonlinear cavity, and is implemented in a two dimensional (2D) hole-type photonic crystal (PC). We show that by applying a control signal, the input power can be transmitted to the output waveguide with a high contrast ratio. The operation of the proposed device is investigated through the use of coupled-mode theory (CMT) and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The contrast ratio of the proposed device varies between 18 and 23, which is higher than the corresponding value in the previous investigations. Based on the simulation results, with increasing the control power the range of operating power will be increased, while the contrast ratio will be decreased. It has been shown that in a modified structure, at the expense of the range of operating power and the contrast ratio, the control power can be decreased, considerably.

  7. Reason's Enemy Is Not Emotion: Engagement of Cognitive Control Networks Explains Biases in Gain/Loss Framing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rosa; Smith, David V; Clithero, John A; Venkatraman, Vinod; Carter, R McKell; Huettel, Scott A

    2017-03-29

    In the classic gain/loss framing effect, describing a gamble as a potential gain or loss biases people to make risk-averse or risk-seeking decisions, respectively. The canonical explanation for this effect is that frames differentially modulate emotional processes, which in turn leads to irrational choice behavior. Here, we evaluate the source of framing biases by integrating functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 143 human participants performing a gain/loss framing task with meta-analytic data from >8000 neuroimaging studies. We found that activation during choices consistent with the framing effect were most correlated with activation associated with the resting or default brain, while activation during choices inconsistent with the framing effect was most correlated with the task-engaged brain. Our findings argue against the common interpretation of gain/loss framing as a competition between emotion and control. Instead, our study indicates that this effect results from differential cognitive engagement across decision frames. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The biases frequently exhibited by human decision makers have often been attributed to the presence of emotion. Using a large fMRI sample and analysis of whole-brain networks defined with the meta-analytic tool Neurosynth, we find that neural activity during frame-biased decisions was more significantly associated with default behaviors (and the absence of executive control) than with emotion. These findings point to a role for neuroscience in shaping long-standing psychological theories in decision science. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/373588-11$15.00/0.

  8. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled proof of concept study to evaluate samidorphan in the prevention of olanzapine-induced weight gain in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Bernard L; Martin, William; Memisoglu, Asli; DiPetrillo, Lauren; Correll, Christoph U; Kane, John M

    2017-11-17

    Antipsychotic medications are associated with weight gain and adverse metabolic effects that complicate the treatment and management of schizophrenia. Olanzapine (OLZ) in particular is associated with significant weight gain and adverse metabolic effects. The present Phase 1, proof of concept, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the safety and effect on weight of a combination of OLZ (10mg) and the opioid modulator samidorphan (SAM; 5mg) in comparison to OLZ alone in healthy, male normal weight volunteers. Altogether, 106 male subjects with stable body weight and BMI 18-25kg/m 2 were randomized to OLZ alone, OLZ+SAM, SAM alone, or placebo in a 2:2:1:1 ratio. The primary efficacy endpoint, mean (SD) body weight change from baseline to last assessment in the 3-week treatment period, was significantly less for OLZ+SAM vs. OLZ alone subjects [+2.2 (1.4) kg vs. +3.1 (1.9) kg; respectively; p=0.02]. In contrast, there was no significant difference in weight from baseline for either SAM or placebo [+0.1 (1.0) kg and +0.8 (1.4) kg, respectively]; p=0.09. Overall, OLZ+SAM compared to OLZ alone had similar safety and tolerability. In addition, less nausea was observed in subjects given OLZ+SAM compared to SAM alone. Thus, OLZ+SAM may offer effective treatment of schizophrenia with less weight gain and metabolic risk. Additional research exploring additional doses over longer durations in psychiatric populations is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Stability and performance of variable gain controllers with application to a dvd storage drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heertjes, M.F.; Steinbuch, M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the control design for optical storage drives. A nonlinear design is suggested to overcome the tradeoff between disturbance rejection, in the sense of tracking error reduction during low-frequency shock and vibration, and playability, in the sense of sensor noise tracking

  10. Operating gains achieved by a new generation of remotely controlled manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djedidi, A.; Selliez-Vandernotte, C.; Malcolm, F.

    2014-01-01

    A high performance remotely controlled mechanical master slave arm with direct transmission via cable and transmission rods has been converted to a new generation manipulator with electrical master slave arm and motion module with integrated software. The redesigned powered manipulator with software control improves efficiency and ergonomics while increasing operating field space. The mechanical master arm has been replaced by an electrical robotic master arm using haptic technology. The movements initiated by the operator are transmitted in real time to the slave arm via the servo-motors inside the motion module. The mechanical link between master and slave is eliminated and some mechanical constraints have been replaced by software applications. The operator benefits from an improved working position and vibration filtering plus full range high performance force feedback with reduced effort requirement. (authors)

  11. Controlled intracellular self-assembly of gadolinium nanoparticles as smart molecular MR contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chun-Yan; Shen, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jian-Dong; Li, Li; Liang, Gao-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Herein we developed a new "smart" Gd-based MR contrast agent (i.e., 1) which is susceptive to furin, a protease overexpressed in tumor. Under the action of furin, 1 condenses to form dimers (1-Ds) and the latter self-assemble into gadolinium nanparticles (Gd-NPs). Relaxivity of 1-D is more than 2 folds of those of 1 and magnevist at 1.5 T, and 1.4 folds of that of 1 at 3 T. Intracellular condensation of 1 in furin-overexpressed MDA-MB-468 cells was proven with direct two-photon laser microscopy (TPLM) fluorescence imaging of the cells incubated with the europium analog of 1 (i.e., 2). Intracellular Gd-NPs of 1 were uncovered and characterized for the first time. MRI of MDA-MB-468 tumors showed that 1 has enhanced MR contrast within the tumors than that of its scrambled control 1-Scr.

  12. A model-based gain scheduling approach for controlling the common-rail system for GDI engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Gaeta, Alessandro; Montanaro, Umberto; Fiengo, Giovanni; Palladino, Angelo; Giglio, Veniero

    2012-04-01

    The progressive reduction in vehicle emission requirements have forced the automotive industry to invest in research for developing alternative and more efficient control strategies. All control features and resources are permanently active in an electronic control unit (ECU), ensuring the best performance with respect to emissions, fuel economy, driveability and diagnostics, independently from engine working point. In this article, a considerable step forward has been achieved by the common-rail technology which has made possible to vary the injection pressure over the entire engine speed range. As a consequence, the injection of a fixed amount of fuel is more precise and multiple injections in a combustion cycle can be made. In this article, a novel gain scheduling pressure controller for gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine is designed to stabilise the mean fuel pressure into the rail and to track demanded pressure trajectories. By exploiting a simple control-oriented model describing the mean pressure dynamics in the rail, the control structure turns to be simple enough to be effectively implemented in commercial ECUs. Experimental results in a wide range of operating points confirm the effectiveness of the proposed control method to tame efficiently the mean value pressure dynamics of the plant showing a good accuracy and robustness with respect to unavoidable parameters uncertainties, unmodelled dynamics, and hidden coupling terms.

  13. A Sigma-Delta ADC with Decimation and Gain Control Function for a Bluetooth Receiver in 130 nm Digital CMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Jinseok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a discrete-time second-order multibit sigma-delta ADC that filters and decimates by two the input data samples. At the same time it provides gain control function in its input sampling stage. A 4-tap FIR switched capacitor (SC architecture was chosen for antialiasing filtering. The decimation-by-two function is realized using divided-by-two clock signals in the antialiasing filter. Antialiasing, gain control, and sampling functions are merged in the sampling network using SC techniques. This compact architecture allows operating the preceding blocks at twice the ADC's clock frequency, thus improving the noise performance of the wireless receiver channel and relaxing settling requirements of the analog building blocks. The presented approach has been validated and incorporated in a commercial single-chip Bluetooth radio realized in a 1.5 V 130 nm digital CMOS process. The measured antialiasing filtering shows better than 75 dB suppression at the folding frequency band edge. A 67 dB dynamic range was measured with a sampling frequency of 37.5MHz.

  14. Active flow control insight gained from a modified integral boundary layer equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Avraham

    2016-11-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) can alter the development of boundary layers with applications (e.g., reducing drag by separation delay or separating the boundary layers and enhancing vortex shedding to increase drag). Historically, significant effects of steady AFC methods were observed. Unsteady actuation is significantly more efficient than steady. Full-scale AFC tests were conducted with varying levels of success. While clearly relevant to industry, AFC implementation relies on expert knowledge with proven intuition and or costly and lengthy computational efforts. This situation hinders the use of AFC while simple, quick and reliable design method is absent. An updated form of the unsteady integral boundary layer (UIBL) equations, that include AFC terms (unsteady wall transpiration and body forces) can be used to assist in AFC analysis and design. With these equations and given a family of suitable velocity profiles, the momentum thickness can be calculated and matched with an outer, potential flow solution in 2D and 3D manner to create an AFC design tool, parallel to proven tools for airfoil design. Limiting cases of the UIBL equation can be used to analyze candidate AFC concepts in terms of their capability to modify the boundary layers development and system performance.

  15. Remote Ischemic Preconditioning To Reduce Contrast-Induced Nephropathy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menting, T.P.; Sterenborg, T.B.; Waal, Y.R. de; Donders, R.; Wever, K.E.; Lemson, M.S.; Vliet, J.A. van der; Wetzels, J.F.M.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Warle, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the increasing use of pre- and post-hydration protocols and low osmolar instead of high osmolar iodine containing contrast media, the incidence of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN) is still significant. There is evidence that contrast media cause ischemia reperfusion injury of

  16. Online Energy Management of City Cars with Multi-Objective Linear Parameter-Varying L2-Gain Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boe-Shong Hong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at online regulating transient current out of the batteries of small-sized electric cars that transport people and goods around cities. In a city with heavy traffic, transient current dominates the energy economy and propulsion capability, which are in opposition to each other. In order to manage the trade-off between energy consumption per distance and propulsion capability in transience, the authors improve on previous work on multi-objective linear parameter-varying (LPV L2-gain control. The observer embedded into this multi-objective controller no longer assumes Kalman-filtering structure, and structural conservatism is thus removed. A full-spectrum set of experiments is performed. The results reveal that the feedback design significantly improves energy-motion management.

  17. Feasibility of a controlled trial aiming to prevent excessive pregnancy-related weight gain in primary health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiderpass Elisabete

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive gestational weight gain and postpartum weight retention may predispose women to long-term overweight and other health problems. Intervention studies aiming at preventing excessive pregnancy-related weight gain are needed. The feasibility of implementing such a study protocol in primary health care setting was evaluated in this pilot study. Methods A non-randomized controlled trial was conducted in three intervention and three control maternity and child health clinics in primary health care in Finland. Altogether, 132 pregnant and 92 postpartum women and 23 public health nurses (PHN participated in the study. The intervention consisted of individual counselling on physical activity and diet at five routine visits to a PHN and of an option for supervised group exercise until 37 weeks' gestation or ten months postpartum. The control clinics continued their usual care. The components of the feasibility evaluation were 1 recruitment and participation, 2 completion of data collection, 3 realization of the intervention and 4 the public health nurses' experiences. Results 1 The recruitment rate was slower than expected and the recruitment period had to be prolonged from the initially planned three months to six months. The average participation rate of eligible women at study enrolment was 77% and the drop-out rate 15%. 2 In total, 99% of the data on weight, physical activity and diet and 96% of the blood samples were obtained. 3 In the intervention clinics, 98% of the counselling sessions were realized, their contents and average durations were as intended, 87% of participants regularly completed the weekly records for physical activity and diet, and the average participation percentage in the group exercise sessions was 45%. 4 The PHNs regarded the extra training as a major advantage and the high additional workload as a disadvantage of the study. Conclusion The study protocol was mostly feasible to implement, which

  18. Visual working memory capacity increases between ages 3 and 8 years, controlling for gains in attention, perception, and executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailian, Hrag; Libertus, Melissa E; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2016-08-01

    Research in adults has aimed to characterize constraints on the capacity of Visual Working Memory (VWM), in part because of the system's broader impacts throughout cognition. However, less is known about how VWM develops in childhood. Existing work has reached conflicting conclusions as to whether VWM storage capacity increases after infancy, and if so, when and by how much. One challenge is that previous studies did not control for developmental changes in attention and executive processing, which also may undergo improvement. We investigated the development of VWM storage capacity in children from 3 to 8 years of age, and in adults, while controlling for developmental change in exogenous and endogenous attention and executive control. Our results reveal that, when controlling for improvements in these abilities, VWM storage capacity increases across development and approaches adult-like levels between ages 6 and 8 years. More generally, this work highlights the value of estimating working memory, attention, perception, and decision-making components together.

  19. Distributed cerebellar plasticity implements adaptable gain control in a manipulation task: a closed-loop robotic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Garrido Alcazar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptable gain regulation is at the core of the forward controller operation performed by the cerebro-cerebellar loops and it allows the intensity of motor acts to be finely tuned in a predictive manner. In order to learn and store information about body-object dynamics and to generate an internal model of movement, the cerebellum is thought to employ long-term synaptic plasticity. LTD at the PF-PC synapse has classically been assumed to subserve this function (Marr, 1969. However, this plasticity alone cannot account for the broad dynamic ranges and time scales of cerebellar adaptation. We therefore tested the role of plasticity distributed over multiple synaptic sites (Gao et al., 2012; Hansel et al., 2001 by generating an analog cerebellar model embedded into a control loop connected to a robotic simulator. The robot used a three-joint arm and performed repetitive fast manipulations with different masses along an 8-shape trajectory. In accordance with biological evidence, the cerebellum model was endowed with both LTD and LTP at the PF-PC, MF-DCN and PC-DCN synapses. This resulted in a network scheme whose effectiveness was extended considerably compared to one including just PF-PC synaptic plasticity. Indeed, the system including distributed plasticity reliably self-adapted to manipulate different masses and to learn the arm-object dynamics over a time course that included fast learning and consolidation, along the lines of what has been observed in behavioral tests. In particular, PF-PC plasticity operated as a time correlator between the actual input state and the system error, while MF-DCN and PC-DCN plasticity played a key role in generating the gain controller. This model suggests that distributed synaptic plasticity allows generation of the complex learning properties of the cerebellum. The incorporation of further plasticity mechanisms and of spiking signal processing will allow this concept to be extended in a more realistic

  20. Weight gain is associated with improved glycaemic control but with adverse changes in plasma lipids and blood pressure isn Type 1 diabetes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferriss, J B

    2012-02-03

    AIMS: To assess the effects of weight gain on metabolic control, plasma lipids and blood pressure in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Patients in the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study (n = 3250) were examined at baseline and 1800 (55%) were re-examined a mean of 7.3 years later. Patients had Type 1 diabetes, defined as a diagnosis made before age 36 years and with a need for continuous insulin therapy within a year of diagnosis. Patients were aged 15-60 years at baseline and were stratified for age, sex and duration of diabetes. RESULTS: The change in HbA(1c) from baseline to follow-up examination was significantly more favourable in those who gained 5 kg or more during follow-up (\\'marked weight gain\\') than in patients who gained less or no weight or lost weight (\\'less or no weight gain\\'). In those with marked weight gain, there was a significantly greater rise in plasma triglycerides and total cholesterol and significantly less favourable changes in low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with those with less or no weight gain, with or without adjustment for HbA(1c). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure also rose significantly more in the group with marked weight gain. CONCLUSION: Weight gain in patients with Type 1 diabetes has adverse effects on plasma lipids and blood pressure, despite a small improvement in glycaemic control.

  1. Development of Digital Hysteresis Current Control with PLL Loop Gain Compensation Strategy for PWM Inverters with Constant Switching Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Belhaouchet

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Hysteresis current control is one of the simplest techniques used to control the magnitude and phase angle of motor current for motor drives systems. However, this technique presents several disadvantages such as operation at variable switching frequency which can reveal problems of filtering, interference between the phases in the case of the three-phase systems with insulated neutral connection or delta connection, and irregularity of the modulation pulses which especially causes an acoustic noise on the level of the machine for the high power drive. In this paper, a new technique is proposed for a variable-hysteresis-band controller based on dead beat control applied to three phase voltage source PWM inverters feeding AC motors. Its main aim is firstly ensure a constant switching frequency and secondly the synchronization of modulation pulses using the phase-locked-loop with loop gain compensation in order to ensure a better stability. The behavior of the proposed technique is verified by simulation.

  2. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... harm people too. Try to use pest management methods that pose less of a risk. Keep counters, sinks, tables and floors clean and ... with pest challenges in your home and other environments. [EPA ... pests while reducing pesticide risks; roaches are often asthma triggers and shouldn’t ...

  3. Contrasting controls on arsenic and lead budgets for a degraded peatland catchment in Northern England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, James J.; Taylor, Kevin G.; Evans, Martin G.; Allott, Timothy E.H.

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition of trace metals and metalloids from anthropogenic sources has led to the contamination of many European peatlands. To assess the fate and behaviour of previously deposited arsenic and lead, we constructed catchment-scale mass budgets for a degraded peatland in Northern England. Our results show a large net export of both lead and arsenic via runoff (282 ± 21.3 gPb ha -1 y -1 and 60.4 ± 10.5 gAs ha -1 y -1 ), but contrasting controls on this release. Suspended particulates account for the majority of lead export, whereas the aqueous phase dominates arsenic export. Lead release is driven by geomorphological processes and is a primary effect of erosion. Arsenic release is driven by the formation of a redox-dynamic zone in the peat associated with water table drawdown, a secondary effect of gully erosion. Degradation of peatland environments by natural and anthropogenic processes has the potential to release the accumulated pool of legacy contaminants to surface waters. - Highlights: → The fluvial outputs of arsenic and lead in the degraded peatland are an order-of-magnitude greater than atmospheric inputs. → The particulate phase dominates fluvial lead export, whereas the aqueous phase dominates fluvial arsenic export. → Lead export is a primary effect of peat erosion, whereas arsenic export is a secondary effect of peat erosion. - Degraded peatlands can be significant sources of previously deposited arsenic and lead

  4. Technology consumption and cognitive control: Contrasting action video game experience with media multitasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso-Leite, Pedro; Kludt, Rachel; Vignola, Gianluca; Ma, Wei Ji; Green, C Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    Technology has the potential to impact cognition in many ways. Here we contrast two forms of technology usage: (1) media multitasking (i.e., the simultaneous consumption of multiple streams of media, such a texting while watching TV) and (2) playing action video games (a particular subtype of video games). Previous work has outlined an association between high levels of media multitasking and specific deficits in handling distracting information, whereas playing action video games has been associated with enhanced attentional control. Because these two factors are linked with reasonably opposing effects, failing to take them jointly into account may result in inappropriate conclusions as to the impacts of technology use on attention. Across four tasks (AX-continuous performance, N-back, task-switching, and filter tasks), testing different aspects of attention and cognition, we showed that heavy media multitaskers perform worse than light media multitaskers. Contrary to previous reports, though, the performance deficit was not specifically tied to distractors, but was instead more global in nature. Interestingly, participants with intermediate levels of media multitasking sometimes performed better than both light and heavy media multitaskers, suggesting that the effects of increasing media multitasking are not monotonic. Action video game players, as expected, outperformed non-video-game players on all tasks. However, surprisingly, this was true only for participants with intermediate levels of media multitasking, suggesting that playing action video games does not protect against the deleterious effect of heavy media multitasking. Taken together, these findings show that media consumption can have complex and counterintuitive effects on attentional control.

  5. Effect of two contrasting interventions on upper limb chronic pain and disability: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D; Andersen, Christoffer H; Jay, Kenneth; Persson, Roger; Aagaard, Per; Andersen, Lars L

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain and disability of the arm, shoulder, and hand severely affect labor market participation. Ergonomic training and education is the default strategy to reduce physical exposure and thereby prevent aggravation of pain. An alternative strategy could be to increase physical capacity of the worker by physical conditioning. To investigate the effect of 2 contrasting interventions, conventional ergonomic training (usual care) versus resistance training, on pain and disability in individuals with upper limb chronic pain exposed to highly repetitive and forceful manual work. Examiner-blinded, parallel-group randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment. Slaughterhouses located in Denmark, Europe. Sixty-six adults with chronic pain in the shoulder, elbow/forearm, or hand/wrist and work disability were randomly allocated to 10 weeks of specific resistance training for the shoulder, arm, and hand muscles for 3 x 10 minutes per week, or ergonomic training and education (usual care control group). Pain intensity (average of shoulder, arm, and hand, scale 0 - 10) was the primary outcome, and disability (Work module of DASH questionnaire) as well as isometric shoulder and wrist muscle strength were secondary outcomes. Pain intensity, disability, and muscle strength improved more following resistance training than usual care (P effect size of 0.91 (Cohen's d). Blinding of participants is not possible in behavioral interventions. However, at baseline outcome expectations of the 2 interventions were similar. Resistance training at the workplace results in clinical relevant improvements in pain, disability, and muscle strength in adults with upper limb chronic pain exposed to highly repetitive and forceful manual work. NCT01671267.

  6. Studies of the effects of control bandwidth and dark-hole size on the HCIT contrast performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Cady, Eric

    2015-09-01

    We have carried out both theoretical and experimental studies of the sensitivity of dark hole contrast to the control bandwidth and dark-hole dimensions in high-contrast broadband stellar coronagraphy. We have evaluated the performance of DM actuator solutions in the presence of occulting mask defects using one to five 2%-wide bands spanning a 10% bandpass. We have also investigated the dependence of the HCIT contrast performance on the size of dark-hole area including large dark holes formed at the Nyquist limit of the DM.

  7. Non-severe hypoglycaemia is associated with weight gain in patients with type 1 diabetes: Results from the Diabetes Control and Complication Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbu, Anisoara; Moutairou, Abdul; Matar, Odette; Fumeron, Frédéric; Velho, Gilberto; Riveline, Jean-Pierre; Gautier, Jean-François; Marre, Michel; Roussel, Ronan; Potier, Louis

    2018-05-01

    It is unclear whether the frequent non-severe episodes of hypoglycaemia observed during intensive glucose control in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are associated with subsequent weight gain. We analysed the association between non-severe hypoglycaemia and weight gain in 1441 Diabetes Control and Complication Trial (DCCT) participants. Non-severe hypoglycaemia was assessed by hypo-score (ie, number of blood glucose values gain. The annual weight gain by hypo-score tertiles was 0.8 ± 1.2 (T1), 1.3 ± 1.5 (T2) and 1.4 ± 1.3 kg/y (T3), P gain of 1.8 kg/y was 2.14 (95% CI, 1.56-2.93) for T2, and 2.53 (95%CI, 1.85-3.45) for T3 vs T1. These differences in weight gain and in risk of weight gain remained significant after adjustment for sex, age, duration of diabetes, HbA1c at baseline and treatment arms. In conclusion, our analysis shows a significant association between non-severe hypoglycaemia and weight gain in individuals with T1D from the DCCT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Fuzzy-Logic-Based Gain-Scheduling Control for State-of-Charge Balance of Distributed Energy Storage Systems for DC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Nelson Leonardo Diaz; Dragicevic, Tomislav; Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    -charge or deep-discharge in one of the energy storage units. Primary control in a microgrid is responsible for power sharing among units; and droop control is typically used in this stage. This paper proposes a modular and decentralized gain-scheduling control strategy based on fuzzy logic that ensures balanced...

  9. Effects of lifestyle intervention in obese pregnant women on gestational weight gain and mental health: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaerts, A F L; Devlieger, R; Nuyts, E; Witters, I; Gyselaers, W; Van den Bergh, B R H

    2013-06-01

    Lifestyle intervention could help obese pregnant women to limit their weight gain during pregnancy and improve their psychological comfort, but has not yet been evaluated in randomized controlled trials. We evaluated whether a targeted antenatal lifestyle intervention programme for obese pregnant women influences gestational weight gain (GWG) and levels of anxiety or depressed mood. This study used a longitudinal interventional design. Of the 235 eligible obese pregnant women, 205 (mean age (years): 29±4.5; body mass index (BMI, kg m(-)(2)): 34.7±4.6) were randomized to a control group, a brochure group receiving written information on healthy lifestyle and an experimental group receiving an additional four antenatal lifestyle intervention sessions by a midwife trained in motivational lifestyle intervention. Anxiety (State and Trait Anxiety Inventory) and feelings of depression (Edinburgh Depression Scale) were measured during the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Socio-demographical, behavioural, psychological and medical variables were used for controlling and correcting outcome variables. We found a significant reduction of GWG in the brochure (9.5 kg) and lifestyle intervention (10.6 kg) group compared with normal care group (13.5 kg) (P=0.007). Furthermore, levels of anxiety significantly decreased in the lifestyle intervention group and increased in the normal care group during pregnancy (P=0.02); no differences were demonstrated in the brochure group. Pre-pregnancy BMI was positively related to levels of anxiety. Obese pregnant women who stopped smoking recently showed a significant higher GWG (β=3.04; P=0.01); those with concurrent gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) (β=3.54; P=0.03) and those who consumed alcohol on a regular base (β=3.69; P=0.04) showed significant higher levels of state anxiety. No differences in depressed mood or obstetrical/neonatal outcomes were observed between the three groups. A targeted lifestyle

  10. Analysis of reactor power behaviour using estimation of period for the gain adaptation in a state feedback controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez R, J.S.; Perez C, J.H.; Rivero G, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a novel procedure for power regulation in a TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor is presented. The control scheme combines state variable feedback with a first order predictor, which is incorporated to speed up the power response of the reactor without exceeding the safety requirement imposed by the reactor period. The simulation results using the proposed control strategy attains different values of steady-state power from different values of initial power in short time, complying at all times with the safety restriction imposed on the reactor period. The predictor, derived from the theory of first order numerical integration, produces very good results during the ascent of power. These results include a fast response and independence of the wide variety of potential operating conditions something not easy and even impossible to obtain with other procedures. By using this control scheme, the reactor period is maintained within safety limits during the start up of the reactor, which is normally the operating condition where an occurrence of a period scram is common. However, the predictor can not be used when the power is reaching the desired power level because the instantaneous power increases far above the desired level. Thus, when the power increases above certain power level, the state feedback gain is set constant to a predefined value. This causes some oscillations that decrease in a few seconds. Afterwards, the power response smoothly approaches, with a small overshoot, the desired power. This constraint on the use of the predictor prevents the unbounded increase of the neutron power. The control law proposed requires all the system's state variables. Since only the neutron power is available, it is necessary the estimation of the non measurable states. The key issue of the existence of a solution to this problem has been previously considered. One of the conclusions is that the point kinetic equations are observable under certain restrictions on

  11. Vildagliptin added to sulfonylurea improves glycemic control without hypoglycemia and weight gain in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenying; Xing, Xiaoping; Lv, Xiaofeng; Li, Yiming; Ma, Jianhua; Yuan, Guoyue; Sun, Feifei; Wang, Wei; Woloschak, Michael; Lukashevich, Valentina; Kozlovski, Plamen; Kothny, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin as add-on to sulfonylurea therapy in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled on sulfonylurea monotherapy. The 24-week randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study compared vildagliptin 50 mg, q.d., with placebo as add-on to glimepiride in T2DM patients who were inadequately controlled (HbA1c 7.5%-11.0% [58-97 mmol/mol]) on a stable dose of sulfonylurea for ≥12 weeks before study entry. In all, 279 patients were randomized to receive either vildagliptin (n = 143) or placebo (n = 136). At baseline, overall mean age was 58.5 years, body weight 68.1 kg, duration of diabetes 6.9 years and daily glimepiride dose 3.3 mg. After 24 weeks, the adjusted mean change (AMΔ) in HbA1c was -0.7% (-8 mmol/mol; baseline 8.6%, 70 mmol/mol) in the vildagliptin group and -0.2% (-2 mmol/mol; baseline 8.7%, 72 mmol/mol) in the placebo group, with a treatment difference of -0.5% (-5 mmol/mol; P vildagliptin and placebo groups reported low and comparable incidences of adverse events (14.0% vs. 17.8%) and serious adverse events (0.7% in each group). Vildagliptin 50 mg, q.d., added to sulfonylurea monotherapy is effective in Chinese patients with T2DM, without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominiarek, Michelle A; Peaceman, Alan M

    2017-12-01

    Prenatal care providers are advised to evaluate maternal weight at each regularly scheduled prenatal visit, monitor progress toward meeting weight gain goals, and provide individualized counseling if significant deviations from a woman's goals occur. Today, nearly 50% of women exceed their weight gain goals with overweight and obese women having the highest prevalence of excessive weight gain. Risks of inadequate weight gain include low birthweight and failure to initiate breast-feeding whereas the risks of excessive weight gain include cesarean deliveries and postpartum weight retention for the mother and large-for-gestational-age infants, macrosomia, and childhood overweight or obesity for the offspring. Prenatal care providers have many resources and tools to incorporate weight and other health behavior counseling into routine prenatal practices. Because many women are motivated to improve health behaviors, pregnancy is often considered the optimal time to intervene for issues related to eating habits and physical activity to prevent excessive weight gain. Gestational weight gain is a potentially modifiable risk factor for a number of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials report that diet or exercise interventions during pregnancy can help reduce excessive weight gain. However, health behavior interventions for gestational weight gain have not significantly improved other maternal and neonatal outcomes and have limited effectiveness in overweight and obese women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of dual-time-constant and fast-acting automatic gain control (AGC) systems in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patrick J; Büchner, Andreas; Stone, Michael A; Lenarz, Thomas; Moore, Brian C J

    2009-04-01

    Cochlear implants usually employ an automatic gain control (AGC) system as a first stage of processing. AGC1 was a fast-acting (syllabic) compressor. AGC2 was a dual-time-constant system; it usually performed as a slow-acting compressor, but incorporated an additional fast-acting system to provide protection from sudden increases in sound level. Six experienced cochlear-implant users were tested in a counterbalanced order, receiving one-month of experience with a given AGC type before switching to the other type. Performance was evaluated shortly after provision of a given AGC type and after one-month of experience with that AGC type. Questionnaires, mainly relating to listening in quiet situations, did not reveal significant differences between the two AGC types. However, fixed-level and roving-level tests of sentence identification in noise both revealed significantly better performance for AGC2. It is suggested that the poorer performance for AGC1 occurred because AGC1 introduced cross-modulation between the target speech and background noise, which made perceptual separation of the target and background more difficult.

  14. Regulation of Blood Glucose Concentration in Type 1 Diabetics Using Single Order Sliding Mode Control Combined with Fuzzy On-line Tunable Gain, a Simulation Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dinani, Soudabeh Taghian; Zekri, Maryam; Kamali, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is considered as a global affecting disease with an increasing contribution to both mortality rate and cost damage in the society. Therefore, tight control of blood glucose levels has gained significant attention over the decades. This paper proposes a method for blood glucose level regulation in type 1 diabetics. The control strategy is based on combining the fuzzy logic theory and single order sliding mode control (SOSMC) to improve the properties of sliding mode control method and...

  15. A System for Controlled Presentation of the Arden Contrast Sensitivity Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    and Woo,1978); I.?glaucoma (Atkin, et al,1979); amblyopia (Hess,1979); retinal degeneration (Woo and Long,1979); multiple sclerosis (Regan, et al...decrease, contrast sensitivity diminishes, and imaging L shifts to an area covering 12 -15 of the peripheral macula . The theoretical threshold grid

  16. Transformation of CLF to ISS-CLF for Nonlinear Systems with Disturbance and Construction of Nonlinear Robust Controller with L2 Gain Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keizo Okano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new nonlinear control law for a class of nonlinear systems with disturbance is proposed. A control law is designed by transforming control Lyapunov function (CLF to input-to-state stability control Lyapunov function (ISS-CLF. The transformed CLF satisfies a Hamilton-Jacobi-Isaacs (HJI equation. The feedback system by the proposed control law has characteristics of L2 gain. Finally, it is shown by a numerical example that the proposed control law makes a controller by feedback linearization robust against disturbance.

  17. Randomized controlled clinical trial of behavioral lifestyle intervention with partial meal replacement to reduce excessive gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Suzanne; Wing, Rena R; Brannen, Anna; McHugh, Angelica; Hagobian, Todd A; Schaffner, Andrew; Jelalian, Elissa; Hart, Chantelle N; Scholl, Theresa O; Munoz-Christian, Karen; Yin, Elaine; Phipps, Maureen G; Keadle, Sarah; Abrams, Barbara

    2018-02-01

    Behavioral lifestyle interventions during pregnancy can prevent excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) in women with normal weight; however, effective interventions to reduce GWG in ethnically diverse women with obesity are lacking. A randomized controlled trial was conducted to test whether a behavioral lifestyle intervention with partial meal replacement reduces GWG rate in Hispanic and non-Hispanic women with overweight or obesity relative to enhanced usual care. Participants (n = 257) were recruited in San Luis Obispo, California, and Providence, Rhode Island, between November 2012 and May 2016. Participants were pregnant (mean ± SD: 13.6 ± 1.8 wk of gestation) with overweight or obesity and had a mean age of 30.3 y; 41.6% of participants were Hispanic. Women were randomly assigned within site and by ethnicity to enhanced usual care (n = 128) or to a behavioral lifestyle intervention with partial meal replacement (n = 129). The primary outcome was GWG per week of observation. Secondary outcomes were proportions exceeding Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines for total GWG, changes in weight-control behaviors and cardiovascular disease risk factors, and incidence of pregnancy complications. Study retention was 99.6% (256 of 257). The intervention compared with usual care resulted in less mean ± SD weekly GWG (0.33 ± 0.25 compared with 0.39 ± 0.23 kg/wk; P = 0.02) and total GWG (9.4 ± 6.9 compared with 11.2 ± 7.0 kg; P = 0.03) and reduced the proportion of women who exceeded IOM guidelines for total GWG (41.1% compared with 53.9%; P = 0.03). No significant group × time × demographic subgroup (ethnicity, BMI, age, parity, and income) interactions were observed. Among intervention participants, greater meal replacement intake was related to reduced GWG rate (β = -0.07; 95% CI:-0.12, -0.03; P = 0.002). The intervention compared with usual care increased weight-control strategies (P meal replacement significantly reduced GWG in Hispanic

  18. All-optical pulse data generation in a semiconductor optical amplifier gain controlled by a reshaped optical clock injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gong-Ru; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Yu, Kun-Chieh

    2006-05-01

    Wavelength-maintained all-optical pulse data pattern transformation based on a modified cross-gain-modulation architecture in a strongly gain-depleted semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) is investigated. Under a backward dark-optical-comb injection with 70% duty-cycle reshaping from the received data clock at 10GHz, the incoming optical data stream is transformed into a pulse data stream with duty cycle, rms timing jitter, and conversion gain of 15%, 4ps, and 3dB, respectively. The high-pass filtering effect of the gain-saturated SOA greatly improves the extinction ratio of data stream by 8dB and reduces its bit error rate to 10-12 at -18dBm.

  19. Control of the inversionless gain and refractive index in a V-type atom via squeezed vacuum and quantum interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.A.; Calderon, Oscar G.; Carreno, F.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the steady-state populations and gain lineshape of a V-type three-level atom with a closely spaced excited doublet. The atom is driven by a strong coherent field, a weak probe, and a single broadband squeezed vacuum. We focus our attention in the interplay between the quantum interference and the squeezed field on the probe gain. It is shown that the relative phases between the two coherent fields and the squeezed field play an important role in the optical properties of the atom. Specifically, we find that the probe can experience gain without population inversion for proper values of the parameters characterizing the squeezed field and in the absence of incoherent pumping. The system can be tailored to exhibit multiple dispersion regimes accompanied by negligible gain or absorption over a large bandwidth, a desirable feature for obtaining propagation of pulses with negligible distortion

  20. MRI observation of the light-induced release of a contrast agent from photo-controllable polymer micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepage, Martin; Jiang Jinqiang; Babin, Jerome; Qi, Bo; Tremblay, Luc; Zhao Yue

    2007-01-01

    The encapsulation of molecules into nanocarriers is studied for its potential in delivering a high dose of anticancer drugs to a tumor, while minimizing side effects. Most systems either release their content in a non-specific manner or under specific environmental conditions such as temperature or pH. We have synthesized a novel class of photo-controllable polymer micelles that can stably encapsulate a hydrophilic compound and subsequently release it upon absorption of UV light. Here, we describe an in vitro magnetic resonance imaging assay that can evaluate the state of incorporation of a small Gd-based contrast agent. Our results indicate that the contrast agent alone can diffuse through a filter, but that the same agent incorporated into micelles cannot. After exposure to UV light, the micelles released the contrast agent, which could then diffuse through the filter. (note)

  1. Optimization of Photosynthetic Productivity in Contrasting Environments by Regulons Controlling Plant Form and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Demmig-Adams

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We review the role of a family of transcription factors and their regulons in maintaining high photosynthetic performance across a range of challenging environments with a focus on extreme temperatures and water availability. Specifically, these transcription factors include CBFs (C-repeat binding factors and DREBs (dehydration-responsive element-binding, with CBF/DREB1 primarily orchestrating cold adaptation and other DREBs serving in heat, drought, and salinity adaptation. The central role of these modulators in plant performance under challenging environments is based on (i interweaving of these regulators with other key signaling networks (plant hormones and redox signals as well as (ii their function in integrating responses across the whole plant, from light-harvesting and sugar-production in the leaf to foliar sugar export and water import and on to the plant’s sugar-consuming sinks (growth, storage, and reproduction. The example of Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes from geographic origins with contrasting climates is used to describe the links between natural genetic variation in CBF transcription factors and the differential acclimation of plant anatomical and functional features needed to support superior photosynthetic performance in contrasting environments. Emphasis is placed on considering different temperature environments (hot versus cold and light environments (limiting versus high light, on trade-offs between adaptations to contrasting environments, and on plant lines minimizing such trade-offs.

  2. Regulation of Blood Glucose Concentration in Type 1 Diabetics Using Single Order Sliding Mode Control Combined with Fuzzy On-line Tunable Gain, a Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinani, Soudabeh Taghian; Zekri, Maryam; Kamali, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is considered as a global affecting disease with an increasing contribution to both mortality rate and cost damage in the society. Therefore, tight control of blood glucose levels has gained significant attention over the decades. This paper proposes a method for blood glucose level regulation in type 1 diabetics. The control strategy is based on combining the fuzzy logic theory and single order sliding mode control (SOSMC) to improve the properties of sliding mode control method and to alleviate its drawbacks. The aim of the proposed controller that is called SOSMC combined with fuzzy on-line tunable gain is to tune the gain of the controller adaptively. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. As a result, this method can decline the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating blood glucose level in diabetics caused by a low blood glucose level. Moreover, it attenuates the chattering observed in SOSMC significantly. It is worth noting that in this approach, a mathematical model called minimal model is applied instead of the intravenously infused insulin-blood glucose dynamics. The simulation results demonstrate a good performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. In addition, this method is compared to fuzzy high-order sliding mode control (FHOSMC) and the superiority of the new method compared to FHOSMC is shown in the results.

  3. Contrasting burnout, turnover intention, control, value congruence and knowledge sharing between Baby Boomers and Generation X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Michael P; Jackson, Nicole J; Shaughnessy, Krystelle

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the contrasting role of work values for nurses from two generations: Baby Boomers and Generation X. Differences among nurses regarding core values pertaining to their work has a potential to influence the quality of their work life. These differences may have implications for their vulnerability to job burnout. The analysis is based upon questionnaire surveys of nurses representing Generation X (n = 255) and Baby Boomers (n = 193) that contrasted their responses on job burnout, areas of work life, knowledge transfer and intention to quit. The analysis identified a greater person/organization value mismatch for Generation X nurses than for Baby Boomer nurses. Their greater value mismatch was associated with a greater susceptibility to burnout and a stronger intention to quit for Generation X nurses. The article notes the influence of Baby Boomer nurses in the structure of work and the application of new knowledge in health care work settings. Implications for recruitment and retention are discussed with a focus on knowledge transfer activities associated with distinct learning styles. Understanding value differences between generations will help nursing managers to develop more responsive work settings for nurses of all ages.

  4. Comparative analysis of contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocity of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Jin; Han, Joon Koo; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Dong Hyuk

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocities of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver. 31 patient with normal liver and 39 patients with moderate degree of fatty liver were studies with sonography with controlled velocities of ultrasound (1,580 m/sec, 1,540 m/sec, 1,500 m/sec, 1,460 m/sec). Sonographic images were captured with picture grabbing (Sono-PACS) and were recalled with visual C++(Microsoft Redmond. WA, USA). The contrast between hepatic vein and parenchyma was measured and analyzed on each sonographic image. The number of patients with the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 31 patients with normal liver were 5 (16.1%) with 1,580 m/sec, 12 (38.8%) with 1,540 m/sec, 9 (29.0%) with 1,500 m/sec, and 5 (16.1%) with 1,460 m/sec. The number of patients with highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 39 patients with fatty liver were 3 (7.7%) with 1,580 m/sec, 7 (17.9%) with 1,540 m/sec, 12 (30.8%) with 1,500 m/sec and 17 (43.6%) with 1,460 m/sec. The velocity of ultrasound for the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma in normal liver was 1,540 m/sec, and 1,460 m/sec in fatty liver.

  5. Control of Growth Efficiency in Young Plantation Loblolly Pine and Sweetgum through Irrigation and Fertigation Enhancement of Leaf Carbon Gain; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Samuelson

    1999-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine if growth efficiency of young plantation loblolly pine and sweetgum can be maintained by intensive forest management and whether increased carbon gain is the mechanism controlling growth efficiency response to resource augmentation. Key leaf physiological processes were examined over two growing seasons in response to irrigation, fertigation (irrigation with a fertilizer solution), and fertigation plus pest control (pine only). Although irrigation improved leaf net photosynthesis in pine and decreased stomatal sensitivity to vapor pressure deficit in sweetgum, no consistent physiological responses to fertigation were detected in either species. After 4 years of treatment, a 3-fold increase in woody net primary productivity was observed in both species in response to fertigation. Trees supplemented with fertigation and fertigation plus pest control exhibited the largest increases in growth and biomass. Furthermore, growth efficiency was maintained by fertigation and fertigation plus pest control, despite large increases in crown development and self-shading. Greater growth in response to intensive culture was facilitated by significant gains in leaf mass and whole tree carbon gain rather than detectable increases in leaf level processes. Growth efficiency was not maintained by significant increases in leaf level carbon gain but was possibly influenced by changes in carbon allocation to root versus shoot processes

  6. PI and PID controller tuning rule design for processes with delay, to achieve constant gain and phase margins for all values of delay

    OpenAIRE

    O'Dwyer, Aidan

    2001-01-01

    This paper will discuss the design of PI and PID controller tuning rules to compensate processes with delay, that are modelled in a number of ways. The rules allow the achievement of constant gain and phase margins as the delay varies.

  7. Contrasting Perspectives Of Junior versus Senior NASA ISS Flight Controllers On Leadership And Cultural Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, James L.; Boyd, J. E.; Saylor, S.; Kanas, N.

    2007-01-01

    NASA flight controllers have always worked in a very demanding environment, but the International Space Station (ISS) poses even more challenges than prior missions. A recent NASA/Ames survey by Parke and Orasanu of NASA/Johnson flight controllers uncovered concerns about communications problems between American personnel and their international counterparts. To better understand these problems, we interviewed 14 senior and 12 junior ISS flight controllers at NASA/Johnson about leadership and cultural challenges they face and strategies for addressing these challenges. The qualitative interview data were coded and tabulated. Here we present quantitative analyses testing for differences between junior and senior controllers. Based on nonparametric statistical tests comparing responses across groups, the senior controllers were significantly more aware of the impact of working in dispersed teams, the context of constant change, and the upcoming multilateral challenges, while junior controllers were more aware of language and cultural issues. We consider our findings in light of other studies of controllers and other known differences between senior and junior controllers. For example, the fact that senior controllers had their formative early experience controlling pre-ISS short-duration Shuttle missions seems to have both positive and negative aspects, which are supported by our data. Our findings may also reflect gender differences, but we cannot unconfound this effect in our data because all the senior respondents were males. Many of the junior-senior differences are not only due to elapsed time on the job, but also due to a cohort effect. The findings of this study should be used for training curricula tailored differently for junior and senior controllers.

  8. Adjustment of Adaptive Gain with Bounded Linear Stability Analysis to Improve Time-Delay Margin for Metrics-Driven Adaptive Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari-Nejad, Maryam; Nguyen, Nhan T.; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje Srinvas

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the application of Bounded Linear Stability Analysis (BLSA) method for metrics driven adaptive control. The bounded linear stability analysis method is used for analyzing stability of adaptive control models, without linearizing the adaptive laws. Metrics-driven adaptive control introduces a notion that adaptation should be driven by some stability metrics to achieve robustness. By the application of bounded linear stability analysis method the adaptive gain is adjusted during the adaptation in order to meet certain phase margin requirements. Analysis of metrics-driven adaptive control is evaluated for a linear damaged twin-engine generic transport model of aircraft. The analysis shows that the system with the adjusted adaptive gain becomes more robust to unmodeled dynamics or time delay.

  9. Intake of Sweets, Snacks and Soft Drinks Predicts Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: Detailed Analysis of the Results of a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Renault

    Full Text Available Lifestyle interventions targeting obese pregnant women often result in modest reduction in gestational weight gain, pregnancy complications and related risk factors. Examining adherence to the intervention can, however, provide valuable information on the importance of the different factors targeted.To evaluate improvements and relevance of different dietary factors targeted with respect to gestational weight gain in a 3-arm Randomised Controlled Trial (n=342 among obese pregnant women with BMI≥30 kg/m2.Randomisation 1:1:1 to either hypocaloric Mediterranean type of diet and physical activity intervention (D+PA; physical activity intervention alone (PA; or control (C. Diet was assessed at baseline (weeks 11-14 and endpoint (weeks 36-37 using a validated food frequency questionnaire.During the intervention women in the D+PA group significantly lowered their intakes of added sugars and saturated fat and increased their protein intake by ~1% of total energy compared to controls. Of these dietary variables only intakes of added sugar appeared to be related to GWG, while no association was observed for saturated fat or protein. Further analyses revealed that foods that contributed to intake of added sugars, including sweets, snacks, cakes, and soft drinks were strongly associated with weight gain, with women consuming sweets ≥2/day having 5.4 kg (95% CI 2.1-8.7 greater weight gain than those with a low (<1wk intake. The results for soft drinks were more conflicting, as women with high weight gain tended to favour artificially sweetened soft drinks.In our sample of obese pregnant women, craving for sweets, snacks, and soft drinks strongly predicts GWG. Emphasis on reducing intakes of these foods may be more relevant for limiting gestational weight gain than encouraging strict compliance to more specific diets.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01345149.

  10. Intake of Sweets, Snacks and Soft Drinks Predicts Weight Gain in Obese Pregnant Women: Detailed Analysis of the Results of a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Kristina M; Carlsen, Emma M; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Nilas, Lisbeth; Pryds, Ole; Secher, Niels J; Olsen, Sjurdur F; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I

    2015-01-01

    Lifestyle interventions targeting obese pregnant women often result in modest reduction in gestational weight gain, pregnancy complications and related risk factors. Examining adherence to the intervention can, however, provide valuable information on the importance of the different factors targeted. To evaluate improvements and relevance of different dietary factors targeted with respect to gestational weight gain in a 3-arm Randomised Controlled Trial (n=342) among obese pregnant women with BMI≥30 kg/m2. Randomisation 1:1:1 to either hypocaloric Mediterranean type of diet and physical activity intervention (D+PA); physical activity intervention alone (PA); or control (C). Diet was assessed at baseline (weeks 11-14) and endpoint (weeks 36-37) using a validated food frequency questionnaire. During the intervention women in the D+PA group significantly lowered their intakes of added sugars and saturated fat and increased their protein intake by ~1% of total energy compared to controls. Of these dietary variables only intakes of added sugar appeared to be related to GWG, while no association was observed for saturated fat or protein. Further analyses revealed that foods that contributed to intake of added sugars, including sweets, snacks, cakes, and soft drinks were strongly associated with weight gain, with women consuming sweets ≥2/day having 5.4 kg (95% CI 2.1-8.7) greater weight gain than those with a low (<1wk) intake. The results for soft drinks were more conflicting, as women with high weight gain tended to favour artificially sweetened soft drinks. In our sample of obese pregnant women, craving for sweets, snacks, and soft drinks strongly predicts GWG. Emphasis on reducing intakes of these foods may be more relevant for limiting gestational weight gain than encouraging strict compliance to more specific diets. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01345149.

  11. Realisations of single-resistance-controlled quadrature oscillators using a generalised current follower transconductance amplifier and a unity-gain voltage-follower

    OpenAIRE

    Herencsár, Norbert; Vrba, Kamil; Koton, Jaroslav; Lahiri, Abhirup

    2010-01-01

    This article presents realisations of single-resistance-controlled-oscillators (SRCOs) using the recently proposed modern active building block (ABB), namely the generalised current follower transconductance amplifier (GCFTA) and unity-gain voltage-follower (UGVF). The SRCO is made using reduced number of components: one GCFTA and one UGVF as the ABBs, two resistors and two grounded capacitors. The circuit offers the advantage of non-interactive control of condition of oscillation and frequen...

  12. Attenuating effect of reboxetine on appetite and weight gain in olanzapine-treated schizophrenia patients: a double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyurovsky, Michael; Fuchs, Camil; Pashinian, Artashez; Levi, Aya; Faragian, Sarit; Maayan, Rachel; Gil-Ad, Irit

    2007-06-01

    Search for safe and effective strategies to diminish weight gain associated with second generation antipsychotics (SGAs) is imperative. In the present study, we sought to replicate our preliminary findings, which indicated that coadministration of the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor reboxetine attenuates olanzapine-induced weight gain. Fifty-nine patients hospitalized for first-episode DSM-IV schizophrenic disorder participated in this randomized double-blind study. Reboxetine (4 mg/day; 31 patients) or placebo (29 patients) was coadministered with olanzapine (10 mg/day) for 6 weeks. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Nine patients in each group prematurely discontinued the trial. Olanzapine/reboxetine-treated patients showed a significantly lower increase in body weight (mean = 3.31 kg, SD = 2.73) than their olanzapine/placebo-treated counterparts (mean = 4.91 kg, SD = 2.45). Significantly fewer olanzapine/reboxetine-treated patients gained at least 7% of their initial weight, the cutoff for clinically significant weight gain (6 [19.4%] of 31 patients vs 13 [46.4%] of 28 patients). Seven (22.6%) olanzapine/reboxetine-treated patients compared to only one patient (3.6%) in the olanzapine/placebo group revealed no weight change or even modest weight loss. Appetite increase was significantly lower in the olanzapine/reboxetine than olanzapine/placebo group and was correlated with attenuation of weight gain. Reboxetine addition was safe and well tolerated. The results confirm that coadministration of reboxetine promotes a clinically meaningful attenuation of olanzapine-induced weight gain in schizophrenia patients. If substantiated in long-term studies, along with behavioral management and diet counseling, reboxetine may have a clinical utility in controlling SGA-induced weight gain.

  13. Light-scattering properties of a woven shade-screen material used for daylighting and solar heat-gain control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Jacob; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Lee, Eleanor S.; Rubin, Mike

    2008-08-01

    Shade-screens are widely used in commercial buildings as a way to limit the amount of direct sunlight that can disturb people in the building. The shade screens also reduce the solar heat-gain through glazing the system. Modern energy and daylighting analysis software such as EnergyPlus and Radiance require complete scattering properties of the scattering materials in the system. In this paper a shade screen used in the LBNL daylighting testbed is characterized using a photogoniometer and a normal angle of incidence integrating sphere. The data is used to create a complete bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF) that can be used in simulation programs. The resulting BSDF is compared to a model BADFs, both directly and by calculating the solar heat-gain coefficient for a dual pane system using Window 6.

  14. Ultrasonic testing of canning tubes in stainless steel of the EL 4 reactor; Controle par ultrasons des tubes de gaine en acier inoxydable du reacteur EL 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prot, A; Monnier, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    From all the methods possible for controlling thin cans the one chosen, for numerous reasons, vas that making use of ultrasonic techniques. A method has been developed which should make it possible to carry out a rapid and efficient industrial control of canning tubes, The reasons for the choice of the ultrasonic method are given in detail, together with the principles of the method and the actual control parameters. In the present state of our research, it should be possible to control at least 50 000 tubes a year. Improvements brought about in the details of the control technique itself should make it possible to increase this rate considerably. (authors) [French] Parmi toutes les methodes possibles de controle des gaines minces, le procede retenu pour de multiples raisons a ete celui faisant appel a la technique des ultrasons. Une methode a ete mise au point qui doit permettre un controle industriel rapide et efficace des tubes de gaine. Sont exposes en detail, les raisons du choix de la methode par ultrasons, les principes de cette methode et les parametres du controle proprement dit. Dans l'etat actuel de nos etudes la cadence devrait permettre le controle de 50000 tubes par an au minimum. Des ameliorations de detail portant sur la technique de controle elle-meme, doivent permettre d'accelerer tres notablement cette cadence. (auteurs)

  15. Stereotype contrast effect on neuropsychological assessment of contact-sport players: The moderating role of locus of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresson, Megan; Dardenne, Benoit; Geurten, Marie; Meulemans, Thierry

    2017-11-01

    Diagnosis threat has been shown to produce detrimental effects on neuropsychological performance in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Focusing on contact-sport players who are at great risk of mTBI, our study was designed to examine the moderating role of internal locus of control. Specifically, we predicted that following diagnosis threat (reminder of their risk of sustaining mTBI and of its consequences), low-internal contact-sport players would underperform (assimilation to the stereotype), while their high-internal counterparts would outperform (contrast effect). We predicted that effort and anxiety would mediate these effects. Contact-sport players and non-contact-sport players ("control" group) were randomly assigned to one condition (diagnosis threat or neutral) and then completed attention, executive, episodic memory, and working memory tasks. Regarding mediating and moderating variables, participants rated their effort and anxiety (self-report measures) and completed the Levenson (1974) locus of control scale. Regression-based path analyses were carried out to examine the direct and indirect effects. As expected, there was no effect of condition on the control group's performance. Contact-sport players with moderate and high levels of internal control outperformed (contrast effect) on executive and episodic memory tasks following diagnosis threat compared to the neutral condition. Additionally, the less anxiety moderate- and high-internal contact-sport participants felt, the better they performed on episodic memory and executive tasks. However, contact-sport players low in internal control did not underperform (assimilation effect) under diagnosis threat. Our results suggest that diagnosis threat instructions may have challenged moderate- and high-internal contact-sport participants, leading them to outperform compared to the neutral condition. Individuals who have moderate and high levels of internal locus of control may have higher

  16. Recruitment of young adults into a randomized controlled trial of weight gain prevention: message development, methods, and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Deborah F; LaRose, Jessica G; Griffin, Leah P; Erickson, Karen E; Robichaud, Erica F; Perdue, Letitia; Espeland, Mark A; Wing, Rena R

    2014-08-16

    Young adulthood (age 18 to 35) is a high-risk period for unhealthy weight gain. Few studies have recruited for prevention of weight gain, particularly in young adults. This paper describes the recruitment protocol used in the Study of Novel Approaches to Prevention (SNAP). We conducted extensive formative work to inform recruitment methods and message development. We worked with a professional marketing firm to synthesize major themes and subsequently develop age-appropriate messages for recruitment. A variety of approaches and channels were used across two clinical centers to recruit young adults who were normal or overweight (body mass index (BMI) 21 to 30 kg/m2) for a 3-year intervention designed to prevent weight gain. We tracked recruitment methods, yields, and costs by method. Logistic regression was used to identify recruitment methods that had the highest relative yield for subgroups of interest with covariate adjustments for clinic. The final sample of 599 participants (27% minority, 22% male) was recruited over a 19-month period of sustained efforts. About 10% of those who initially expressed interest via a screening website were randomized. The most common reason for ineligibility was already being obese (BMI >30 kg/m2). The top two methods for recruitment were mass mailing followed by email; together they were cited by 62% of those recruited. Television, radio, paid print advertising, flyers and community events each yielded fewer than 10% of study participants. Email was the most cost-effective method per study participant recruited. These findings can guide future efforts to recruit young adults and for trials targeting weight gain prevention. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01183689 (registered 13 August 2010).

  17. Design of a low noise distributed amplifier with adjustable gain control in 0.15 μm GaAs PHEMT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ying; Wang Zhigong; Xu Jian; Luo Yin

    2012-01-01

    A low noise distributed amplifier consisting of 9 gain cells is presented. The chip is fabricated with 0.15-μm GaAs pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) technology from Win Semiconductor of Taiwan. A special optional gate bias technique is introduced to allow an adjustable gain control range of 10 dB. A novel cascode structure is adopted to extend the output voltage and bandwidth. The measurement results show that the amplifier gives an average gain of 15 dB with a gain flatness of ±1 dB in the 2–20 GHz band. The noise figure is between 2 and 4.1 dB during the band from 2 to 20 GHz. The amplifier also provides 13.8 dBm of output power at a 1 dB gain compression point and 10.5 dBm of input third order intercept point (IIP3), which demonstrates the excellent performance of linearity. The power consumption is 300 mW with a supply of 5 V, and the chip area is 2.36 × 1.01 mm 2 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  18. Adolescent Parenting: Contrasts in Self-Esteem and Locus of Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ann; Troike, Roger

    Pregnant and parenting adolescents represent a unique and challenging problem for educational systems. Of the 17,051 women who become pregnant every day in America, 2,795 or 16% of them are adolescents. The self-esteem and locus of control of 85 pregnant and parenting teens enrolled in the Ohio Graduation, Reality, Dual Role Skills (GRADS) Program…

  19. Manipulation and mobilisation for neck pain contrasted against an inactive control or another active treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gross, Anita; Langevin, Pierre; Burnie, Stephen J.; Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie; Empey, Brian; Dugas, Estelle; Faber-Dobrescu, Michael; Andres, Cristy; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charles H.; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L.; LeBlanc, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on

  20. Photomultiplier gain stabilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Baud, P.; Sautiez, B.

    1958-07-01

    By the control and adjustment of magnetic deflection applied to the electron beam of a photomultiplier it has proved possible to flatten the gain curve, forming plateaux at levels dependent upon the voltage at intake. It should be possible to add this simple device to most photomultipliers on the market today. (author) [fr

  1. Gain-scheduled {{\\mathscr{H}}}_{\\infty } buckling control of a circular beam-column subject to time-varying axial loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffner, Maximilian; Platz, Roland

    2018-06-01

    For slender beam-columns loaded by axial compressive forces, active buckling control provides a possibility to increase the maximum bearable axial load above that of a purely passive structure. In this paper, an approach for gain-scheduled {{\\mathscr{H}}}∞ buckling control of a slender beam-column with circular cross-section subject to time-varying axial loads is investigated experimentally. Piezo-elastic supports with integrated piezoelectric stack actuators at the beam-column ends allow an active stabilization in arbitrary lateral directions. The axial loads on the beam-column influence its lateral dynamic behavior and, eventually, cause the beam-column to buckle. A reduced modal model of the beam-column subject to axial loads including the dynamics of the electrical components is set up and calibrated with experimental data. Particularly, the linear parameter-varying open-loop plant is used to design a model-based gain-scheduled {{\\mathscr{H}}}∞ buckling control that is implemented in an experimental test setup. The beam-column is loaded by ramp- and step-shaped time-varying axial compressive loads that result in a lateral deformation of the beam-column due to imperfections, such as predeformation, eccentric loading or clamping moments. The lateral deformations and the maximum bearable loads of the beam-column are analyzed and compared for the beam-column with and without gain-scheduled {{\\mathscr{H}}}∞ buckling control or, respectively, active and passive configuration. With the proposed gain-scheduled {{\\mathscr{H}}}∞ buckling control it is possible to increase the maximum bearable load of the active beam-column by 19% for ramp-shaped axial loads and to significantly reduce the beam-column deformations for step-shaped axial loads compared to the passive structure.

  2. Experience gained in the process of the variable mass heat flow control implemented in the district heat supply system of the city of Gyor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, F.; Milanovich, L.; Lelek, J.; Kekk, I. [District Heating LTD. of Gyor (Hungary)

    1996-11-01

    The district heating system of the city of Gyor is fed from a hot water boiler plant. The total heat demand for 23,000 residential homes and several public facilities is 260 MW. The variable mass flow control was implemented in 1991 through 1992. Design, preparatory job and the majority of implementation was carried out without external involvement. The paper presents historical background and brief project presentation which is followed by comparative presentation of the variable mass flow control and constant mass flow control. This comparative survey has been conducted on the basis of operating data for 1993 and those for 1988. In the conclusion the gained experience is summarized.

  3. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhao-Yi; Li Da-Yu; Hu Li-Fa; Mu Quan-Quan; Yang Cheng-Liang; Cao Zhao-Liang; Xuan Li

    2016-01-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor (S–H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S–H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. (special topic)

  4. Manipulation and mobilisation for neck pain contrasted against an inactive control or another active treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anita; Langevin, Pierre; Burnie, Stephen J; Bédard-Brochu, Marie-Sophie; Empey, Brian; Dugas, Estelle; Faber-Dobrescu, Michael; Andres, Cristy; Graham, Nadine; Goldsmith, Charles H; Brønfort, Gert; Hoving, Jan L; LeBlanc, Francis

    2015-09-23

    Manipulation and mobilisation are commonly used to treat neck pain. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2003, and previously updated in 2010. To assess the effects of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared wiith those of an inactive control or another active treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without radicular symptoms and cervicogenic headache (CGH) at immediate- to long-term follow-up. When appropriate, to assess the influence of treatment characteristics (i.e. technique, dosage), methodological quality, symptom duration and subtypes of neck disorder on treatment outcomes. Review authors searched the following computerised databases to November 2014 to identify additional studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). We also searched ClinicalTrials.gov, checked references, searched citations and contacted study authors to find relevant studies. We updated this search in June 2015, but these results have not yet been incorporated. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) undertaken to assess whether manipulation or mobilisation improves clinical outcomes for adults with acute/subacute/chronic neck pain. Two review authors independently selected studies, abstracted data, assessed risk of bias and applied Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methods (very low, low, moderate, high quality). We calculated pooled risk ratios (RRs) and standardised mean differences (SMDs). We included 51 trials (2920 participants, 18 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus control; 34 trials of manipulation/mobilisation versus another treatment, 1 trial had two comparisons). Cervical manipulation versus inactive control: For subacute and chronic neck pain, a single manipulation (three trials, no meta

  5. Contrasting Population Structures of Two Vectors of African Trypanosomoses in Burkina Faso: Consequences for Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Sophie; Vreysen, Marc J. B.; Domagni, Kouadjo T.; Causse, Sandrine; Solano, Philippe; de Meeûs, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Background African animal trypanosomosis is a major obstacle to the development of more efficient and sustainable livestock production systems in West Africa. Riverine tsetse species such as Glossina palpalis gambiensis Vanderplank and Glossina tachinoides Westwood are the major vectors. A wide variety of control tactics is available to manage these vectors, but their removal will in most cases only be sustainable if the control effort is targeting an entire tsetse population within a circumscribed area. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, genetic variation at microsatellite DNA loci was used to examine the population structure of G. p. gambiensis and G. tachinoides inhabiting four adjacent river basins in Burkina Faso, i.e. the Mouhoun, the Comoé, the Niger and the Sissili River Basins. Isolation by distance was significant for both species across river basins, and dispersal of G. tachinoides was ∼3 times higher than that of G. p. gambiensis. Thus, the data presented indicate that no strong barriers to gene flow exists between riverine tsetse populations in adjacent river basins, especially so for G. tachinoides. Conclusions/Significance Therefore, potential re-invasion of flies from adjacent river basins will have to be prevented by establishing buffer zones between the Mouhoun and the other river basin(s), in the framework of the PATTEC (Pan African Tsetse and Trypanosomosis Eradication Campaign) eradication project that is presently targeting the northern part of the Mouhoun River Basin. We argue that these genetic analyses should always be part of the baseline data collection before any tsetse control project is initiated. PMID:21738812

  6. An analytical fuzzy-based approach to ?-gain optimal control of input-affine nonlinear systems using Newton-type algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Vladimir; Kasac, Josip; Novakovic, Branko

    2015-10-01

    This paper is concerned with ?-gain optimisation of input-affine nonlinear systems controlled by analytic fuzzy logic system. Unlike the conventional fuzzy-based strategies, the non-conventional analytic fuzzy control method does not require an explicit fuzzy rule base. As the first contribution of this paper, we prove, by using the Stone-Weierstrass theorem, that the proposed fuzzy system without rule base is universal approximator. The second contribution of this paper is an algorithm for solving a finite-horizon minimax problem for ?-gain optimisation. The proposed algorithm consists of recursive chain rule for first- and second-order derivatives, Newton's method, multi-step Adams method and automatic differentiation. Finally, the results of this paper are evaluated on a second-order nonlinear system.

  7. The Effects of Embedded Question Type and Locus of Control on Processing Depth, Knowledge Gain, and Attitude Change in a Computer-Based Interactive Video Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Michael W.

    1997-01-01

    The differential effectiveness of two types of adjunct embedded questions in facilitating deep processing, increased knowledge gain, and increased positive attitude change was examined in this two-session laboratory study. In session one, subjects completed a measure of locus of control (LOC) orientation, as well as measures of pretest knowledge and attitudes regarding drinking. Two weeks later, stratified assignment was used to place 33 subjects (ages 12 to 15...

  8. A Voltage Gain-Controlled Modified CFOA And Its Application in Electronically Tunable Four-Mode All-Pass Filter Design

    OpenAIRE

    Norbert Herencsar; Jaroslav Koton; Abhirup Lahiri; Bilgin Metin; Kamil Vrba

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new active building block (ABB) called voltage gain-controlled modified current feedback amplifier (VGC-MCFOA) based on bipolar junction transistor technology. The versatility of the new ABB is demonstrated in new first-order all-pass filter structure design employing single VGC-MCFOA, single grounded capacitor, and three resistors. Introduced circuit provides all four possible transfer functions at the same configuration, namely current-mode, transimpedance-mode, transa...

  9. The role of a personalized dietary intervention in managing gestational weight gain: a prospective, controlled study in a low-risk antenatal population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Carlo, Costantino; Iannotti, Giuseppina; Sparice, Stefania; Chiacchio, Maria Pia; Greco, Elena; Tommaselli, Giovanni Antonio; Nappi, Carmine

    2014-04-01

    To compare the efficacy of a personal dietary intervention on gestational weight gain control with a general intervention promoting healthy eating. Prospective, controlled study including 154 low-risk pregnant women randomly allocated to two groups: 77 receiving a personalized diet plan and a close follow-up by a dietician (intervention group), 77 receiving standard dietary care by means of a brochure on healthy eating during pregnancy (control group). Pre-pregnancy weight, gestational age, height, weight and BMI at baseline, weight at term, gestational age at delivery and newborn weight were recorded for all participants. The primary end-point was the difference in body weight between baseline and term. Secondary end-points were the difference in body weight between pre-pregnancy and term and in newborn weights. Maternal weight gain at term was significantly lower both as compared to pre-pregnancy weight (8.2 ± 4.0 vs. 13.4 ± 4.2 kg; p weight at baseline (7.7 ± 3.8 vs. 13.7 ± 4.3 kg; p weight between baseline and term and newborn weight was observed in both groups, but stronger in patients from the intervention group (intervention group R = 0.76, p weight gain in pregnant women.

  10. A High-Gain Reflex-Based Bidirectional DC Charger with Efficient Energy Recycling for Low-Voltage Battery Charging-Discharging Power Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ming Lai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a high-gain reflex-charging-based bidirectional DC charger (RC-BDC to enhance the battery charging efficiency of light electric vehicles (LEV in a DC-microgrid. The proposed charger topology consists of an unregulated level converter (ULC and a two-phase interleaved buck-boost charge-pump converter (IBCPC, which together provide low ripple and high voltage conversion ratio. As the high-gain RC-BDC charges, the LEV’s battery with reflex charging currents, high battery charging efficiency, and prolonged battery life cycles are achieved. This is possible due to the recovering of negative pulse energy of reflex charging currents to reduce charge dissipations within LEV’s batteries. Derivations of the operating principles of the high-gain RC-BDC, analyses of its topology, and the closed-loop control designs were presented. Simulations and experiments were implemented with battery voltage of 48 V and DC-bus voltage of 400 V for a 500 W prototype. The results verify the feasibility of the proposed concept and were compared with the typical constant-current/constant-voltage (CC/CV charger. The comparison shows that the proposed high gain RC-BDC improves battery charging speed and reduces the battery thermal deterioration effect by about 12.7% and 25%, respectively.

  11. Front-end circuit for position sensitive silicon and vacuum tube photomultipliers with gain control and depth of interaction measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrero, Vicente; Colom, Ricardo; Gadea, Rafael; Lerche, Christoph W.; Cerda, Joaquin; Sebastia, Angel; Benlloch, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon Photomultipliers, though still under development for mass production, may be an alternative to traditional Vacuum Photomultipliers Tubes (VPMT). As a consequence, electronic front-ends initially designed for VPMT will need to be modified. In this simulation, an improved architecture is presented which is able to obtain impact position and depth of interaction of a gamma ray within a continuous scintillation crystal, using either kind of PM. A current sensitive preamplifier stage with individual gain adjustment interfaces the multi-anode PM outputs with a current division resistor network. The preamplifier stage allows to improve front-end processing delay and temporal resolution behavior as well as to increase impact position calculation resolution. Depth of interaction (DOI) is calculated from the width of the scintillation light distribution, which is related to the sum of voltages in resistor network input nodes. This operation is done by means of a high-speed current mode scheme

  12. Differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types in a temperate forest ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ye-Ming; Wang, Juan; Sun, Xiao-Lu; Tang, Zuo-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the controls on soil carbon dynamics is crucial for modeling responses of ecosystem carbon balance to global change, yet few studies provide explicit knowledge on the direct and indirect effects of forest stands on soil carbon via microbial processes. We investigated tree species, soil, and site factors in relation to soil carbon density and mineralization in a temperate forest of central China. We found that soil microbial biomass and community structure, extracellular enzyme activities, and most of the site factors studied varied significantly across contrasting forest types, and that the associations between activities of soil extracellular enzymes and microbial community structure appeared to be weak and inconsistent across forest types, implicating complex mechanisms in the microbial regulation of soil carbon metabolism in relation to tree species. Overall, variations in soil carbon density and mineralization are predominantly accounted for by shared effects of tree species, soil, microclimate, and microbial traits rather than the individual effects of the four categories of factors. Our findings point to differential controls on soil carbon density and mineralization among contrasting forest types and highlight the challenge to incorporate microbial processes for constraining soil carbon dynamics in global carbon cycle models. PMID:26925871

  13. Automatic and remote controlled ictal SPECT injection for seizure focus localization by use of a commercial contrast agent application pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtinger, Michael; Eder, Hans; Holl, Alexander; Körner, Eva; Zmugg, Gerda; Aigner, Reingard; Fazekas, Franz; Ott, Erwin

    2007-07-01

    In the presurgical evaluation of patients with partial epilepsy, the ictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a useful noninvasive diagnostic tool for seizure focus localization. To achieve optimal SPECT scan quality, ictal tracer injection should be carried out as quickly as possible after the seizure onset and under highest safety conditions possible. Compared to the commonly used manual injection, an automatic administration of the radioactive tracer may provide higher quality standards for this procedure. In this study, therefore, we retrospectively analyzed efficiency and safety of an automatic injection system for ictal SPECT tracer application. Over a 31-month period, 26 patients underwent ictal SPECT by use of an automatic remote-controlled injection pump originally designed for CT-contrast agent application. Various factors were reviewed, including latency of ictal injection, radiation safety parameters, and ictal seizure onset localizing value. Times between seizure onset and tracer injection ranged between 3 and 48 s. In 21 of 26 patients ictal SPECT supported the localization of the epileptogenic focus in the course of the presurgical evaluation. In all cases ictal SPECT tracer injection was performed with a high degree of safety to patients and staff. Ictal SPECT by use of a remote-controlled CT-contrast agent injection system provides a high scan quality and is a safe and confirmatory presurgical evaluation technique in the epilepsy-monitoring unit.

  14. Haemodynamic-guided fluid administration for the prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury: the POSEIDON randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Somjot S; Aharonian, Vicken; Mansukhani, Prakash; Moore, Naing; Shen, Albert Y-J; Jorgensen, Michael; Dua, Aman; Short, Lindsay; Kane, Kevin

    2014-05-24

    The administration of intravenous fluid remains the cornerstone treatment for the prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury. However, no well-defined protocols exist to guide fluid administration in this treatment. We aimed to establish the efficacy of a new fluid protocol to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury. In this randomised, parallel-group, comparator-controlled, single-blind phase 3 trial, we assessed the efficacy of a new fluid protocol based on the left ventricular end-diastolic pressure for the prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation. The primary outcome was the occurrence of contrast-induced acute kidney injury, which was defined as a greater than 25% or greater than 0·5 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine concentration. Between Oct 10, 2010, and July 17, 2012, 396 patients aged 18 years or older undergoing cardiac catheterisation with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 60 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) or less and one or more of several risk factors (diabetes mellitus, history of congestive heart failure, hypertension, or age older than 75 years) were randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to left ventricular end-diastolic pressure-guided volume expansion (n=196) or the control group (n=200) who received a standard fluid administration protocol. Four computer-generated concealed randomisation schedules, each with permuted block sizes of 4, were used for randomisation, and participants were allocated to the next sequential randomisation number by sealed opaque envelopes. Patients and laboratory personnel were masked to treatment assignment, but the physicians who did the procedures were not masked. Both groups received intravenous 0·9% sodium chloride at 3 mL/kg for 1 h before cardiac catheterisation. Analyses were by intention to treat. Adverse events were assessed at 30 days and 6 months and all such events were classified by staff who were masked to treatment assignment. This

  15. A randomized controlled trial to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss in overweight and obese women: Health In Pregnancy and Postpartum (HIPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sara; Liu, Jihong; Addy, Cheryl L; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Burgis, Judith T; Wingard, Ellen; Dahl, Alicia A; Whitaker, Kara M; Schneider, Lara; Boutté, Alycia K

    2018-03-01

    Interventions to prevent excessive gestational weight gain and promote postpartum weight loss have yielded modest results, particularly in overweight and obese women. To examine the impact of a theory-based lifestyle intervention on gestational weight gain, postpartum weight loss, and related maternal and child outcomes and to examine race differences in these outcomes. A randomized controlled trial (target N=400; 200 intervention, 200 standard care; 200 African American, 200 white). Overweight and obese African American and white women ≤16weeks gestation are recruited from obstetrics and gynecology clinics in South Carolina. Intervention participants receive two in-depth counseling sessions (early pregnancy and postpartum), telephone counseling, behavioral podcasts, and social media support that target weight self-monitoring and increasing physical activity and healthy dietary behavior practices, guided by Social Cognitive Theory. Standard care participants receive monthly mailings and a matched number of podcasts on non-weight related topics. All intervention activities last from ≤18weeks gestation to 6months after delivery. Gestational weight gain is the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes are meeting gestational weight gain guidelines (inadequate, adequate, excessive), weekly rate of gestational weight gain, postpartum weight retention, physical activity and dietary behaviors, health-related quality of life, and offspring adiposity. Participants are assessed at baseline (≤16weeks gestation), 32weeks gestation, and 6 and 12months postpartum, and offspring are assessed at 6 and 12months. HIPP is an innovative study that addresses significant gaps in the literature. Primary outcome results are expected in 2019. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous gains tuning in boiler/turbine PID-based controller clusters using iterative feedback tuning methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Taft, Cyrus W; Bentsman, Joseph; Hussey, Aaron; Petrus, Bryan

    2012-09-01

    Tuning a complex multi-loop PID based control system requires considerable experience. In today's power industry the number of available qualified tuners is dwindling and there is a great need for better tuning tools to maintain and improve the performance of complex multivariable processes. Multi-loop PID tuning is the procedure for the online tuning of a cluster of PID controllers operating in a closed loop with a multivariable process. This paper presents the first application of the simultaneous tuning technique to the multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) PID based nonlinear controller in the power plant control context, with the closed-loop system consisting of a MIMO nonlinear boiler/turbine model and a nonlinear cluster of six PID-type controllers. Although simplified, the dynamics and cross-coupling of the process and the PID cluster are similar to those used in a real power plant. The particular technique selected, iterative feedback tuning (IFT), utilizes the linearized version of the PID cluster for signal conditioning, but the data collection and tuning is carried out on the full nonlinear closed-loop system. Based on the figure of merit for the control system performance, the IFT is shown to deliver performance favorably comparable to that attained through the empirical tuning carried out by an experienced control engineer. Copyright © 2012 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of matrix singular value properties for evaluating gain and phase margins of multiloop systems. [stability margins for wing flutter suppression and drone lateral attitude control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.; Newsom, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    A stability margin evaluation method in terms of simultaneous gain and phase changes in all loops of a multiloop system is presented. A universal gain-phase margin evaluation diagram is constructed by generalizing an existing method using matrix singular value properties. Using this diagram and computing the minimum singular value of the system return difference matrix over the operating frequency range, regions of guaranteed stability margins can be obtained. Singular values are computed for a wing flutter suppression and a drone lateral attitude control problem. The numerical results indicate that this method predicts quite conservative stability margins. In the second example if the eigenvalue magnitude is used instead of the singular value, as a measure of nearness to singularity, more realistic stability margins are obtained. However, this relaxed measure generally cannot guarantee global stability.

  18. Effect of the method of photomultiplier gain control on electron time-of-flight in FEhU-30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladyshev, D.A.; Li, B.N.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of a method of control of the multiplication factor of a photomultiplier on the electron flight time has been investigated. Presented are the results of measuring the dependence of the electron flight time for the following methods of stabilizing the photomultiplier multiplication: adjustment of multiplication by changing the supply voltage; control of multiplication with the help of a resistor which shunts two neighbouring interdynode gaps, and the control of the multiplication factor by changing a magnetic field caused due to changes in the current flowing through a special solenoid. It has been found that in these methods changes in the flight time constituted 260 and 140 ns. Magnetic-field control does not affect the flight time with an accuracy of up to 20 ps

  19. Contrast Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is mixed with water before administration liquid paste tablet When iodine-based and barium-sulfate contrast materials ... for patients with kidney failure or allergies to MRI and/or computed tomography (CT) contrast material. Microbubble ...

  20. Gaining Control over Radiolytic Synthesis of Uniform Sub-3-nanometer Palladium Nanoparticles: Use of Aromatic Liquids in the Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Parent, Lucas R.; Al Hasan, Naila M.; Park, Chiwoo; Arslan, Ilke; Karim, Ayman M.; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-01-07

    Synthesizing nanomaterials of uniform shape and size is of critical importance to access and manipulate the novel structure-property relationships arising at the nanoscale. In this work we synthesize Pd nanoparticles with well-controlled size using in situ liquid-stage scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and demonstrate a match between the reaction kinetics and products of the radiolytic and chemical syntheses of size-stabilized Pd nanoparticles. We quantify the effect of electron dose on the nucleation kinetics, and compare these results with in situ small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments investigating the effect of temperature during chemical synthesis. This work introduces methods for precise control of nanoparticle synthesis in the STEM and provides a means to uncover the fundamental processes behind the size and shape stabilization of nanoparticles.

  1. Adherence to self-monitoring via interactive voice response technology in an eHealth intervention targeting weight gain prevention among Black women: randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Dori M; Levine, Erica L; Lane, Ilana; Askew, Sandy; Foley, Perry B; Puleo, Elaine; Bennett, Gary G

    2014-04-29

    eHealth interventions are effective for weight control and have the potential for broad reach. Little is known about the use of interactive voice response (IVR) technology for self-monitoring in weight control interventions, particularly among populations disproportionately affected by obesity. This analysis sought to examine patterns and predictors of IVR self-monitoring adherence and the association between adherence and weight change among low-income black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. The Shape Program was a randomized controlled trial comparing a 12-month eHealth behavioral weight gain prevention intervention to usual care among overweight and obese black women in the primary care setting. Intervention participants (n=91) used IVR technology to self-monitor behavior change goals (eg, no sugary drinks, 10,000 steps per day) via weekly IVR calls. Weight data were collected in clinic at baseline, 6, and 12 months. Self-monitoring data was stored in a study database and adherence was operationalized as the percent of weeks with a successful IVR call. Over 12 months, the average IVR completion rate was 71.6% (SD 28.1) and 52% (47/91) had an IVR completion rate ≥80%. At 12 months, IVR call completion was significantly correlated with weight loss (r =-.22; P=.04) and participants with an IVR completion rate ≥80% had significantly greater weight loss compared to those with an IVR completion rate self-monitoring. Adherence to IVR self-monitoring was high among socioeconomically disadvantaged black women enrolled in a weight gain prevention intervention. Higher adherence to IVR self-monitoring was also associated with greater weight change. IVR is an effective and useful tool to promote self-monitoring and has the potential for widespread use and long-term sustainability. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00938535; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00938535.

  2. Gaining Control over Radiolytic Synthesis of Uniform Sub-3-nanometer Palladium Nanoparticles: Use of Aromatic Liquids in the Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan, Patricia; Parent, Lucas R; Al Hasan, Naila; Park, Chiwoo; Arslan, Ilke; Karim, Ayman M; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel D

    2016-02-16

    Synthesizing nanomaterials of uniform shape and size is of critical importance to access and manipulate the novel structure-property relationships arising at the nanoscale, such as catalytic activity. In this work, we synthesize Pd nanoparticles with well-controlled size in the sub-3 nm range using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) in combination with an in situ liquid stage. We use an aromatic hydrocarbon (toluene) as a solvent that is very resistant to high-energy electron irradiation, which creates a net reducing environment without the need for additives to scavenge oxidizing radicals. The primary reducing species is molecular hydrogen, which is a widely used reductant in the synthesis of supported metal catalysts. We propose a mechanism of particle formation based on the effect of tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP) on size stabilization, relatively low production of radicals, and autocatalytic reduction of Pd(II) compounds. We combine in situ STEM results with insights from in situ small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) from alcohol-based synthesis, having similar reduction potential, in a customized microfluidic device as well as ex situ bulk experiments. This has allowed us to develop a fundamental growth model for the synthesis of size-stabilized Pd nanoparticles and demonstrate the utility of correlating different in situ and ex situ characterization techniques to understand, and ultimately control, metal nanostructure synthesis.

  3. Muscle weakness and lack of reflex gain adaptation predominate during post-stroke posture control of the wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Helm Frans CT

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instead of hyper-reflexia as sole paradigm, post-stroke movement disorders are currently considered the result of a complex interplay between neuronal and muscular properties, modified by level of activity. We used a closed loop system identification technique to quantify individual contributors to wrist joint stiffness during an active posture task. Methods Continuous random torque perturbations applied to the wrist joint by a haptic manipulator had to be resisted maximally. Reflex provoking conditions were applied i.e. additional viscous loads and reduced perturbation signal bandwidth. Linear system identification and neuromuscular modeling were used to separate joint stiffness into the intrinsic resistance of the muscles including co-contraction and the reflex mediated contribution. Results Compared to an age and sex matched control group, patients showed an overall 50% drop in intrinsic elasticity while their reflexive contribution did not respond to provoking conditions. Patients showed an increased mechanical stability compared to control subjects. Conclusion Post stroke, we found active posture tasking to be dominated by: 1 muscle weakness and 2 lack of reflex adaptation. This adds to existing doubts on reflex blocking therapy as the sole paradigm to improve active task performance and draws attention to muscle strength and power recovery and the role of the inability to modulate reflexes in post stroke movement disorders.

  4. To Fear Is to Gain? The Role of Fear Recognition in Risky Decision Making in TBI Patients and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie C Visser-Keizer

    Full Text Available Fear is an important emotional reaction that guides decision making in situations of ambiguity or uncertainty. Both recognition of facial expressions of fear and decision making ability can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI, in particular when the frontal lobe is damaged. So far, it has not been investigated how recognition of fear influences risk behavior in healthy subjects and TBI patients. The ability to recognize fear is thought to be related to the ability to experience fear and to use it as a warning signal to guide decision making. We hypothesized that a better ability to recognize fear would be related to a better regulation of risk behavior, with healthy controls outperforming TBI patients. To investigate this, 59 healthy subjects and 49 TBI patients were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (Facial Expression of Emotion: Stimuli and Tests and a gambling task (Iowa Gambling Task (IGT. The results showed that, regardless of post traumatic amnesia duration or the presence of frontal lesions, patients were more impaired than healthy controls on both fear recognition and decision making. In both groups, a significant relationship was found between better fear recognition, the development of an advantageous strategy across the IGT and less risk behavior in the last blocks of the IGT. Educational level moderated this relationship in the final block of the IGT. This study has important clinical implications, indicating that impaired decision making and risk behavior after TBI can be preceded by deficits in the processing of fear.

  5. To Fear Is to Gain? The Role of Fear Recognition in Risky Decision Making in TBI Patients and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J; Gerritsen, Marleen J J; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2016-01-01

    Fear is an important emotional reaction that guides decision making in situations of ambiguity or uncertainty. Both recognition of facial expressions of fear and decision making ability can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI), in particular when the frontal lobe is damaged. So far, it has not been investigated how recognition of fear influences risk behavior in healthy subjects and TBI patients. The ability to recognize fear is thought to be related to the ability to experience fear and to use it as a warning signal to guide decision making. We hypothesized that a better ability to recognize fear would be related to a better regulation of risk behavior, with healthy controls outperforming TBI patients. To investigate this, 59 healthy subjects and 49 TBI patients were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (Facial Expression of Emotion: Stimuli and Tests) and a gambling task (Iowa Gambling Task (IGT)). The results showed that, regardless of post traumatic amnesia duration or the presence of frontal lesions, patients were more impaired than healthy controls on both fear recognition and decision making. In both groups, a significant relationship was found between better fear recognition, the development of an advantageous strategy across the IGT and less risk behavior in the last blocks of the IGT. Educational level moderated this relationship in the final block of the IGT. This study has important clinical implications, indicating that impaired decision making and risk behavior after TBI can be preceded by deficits in the processing of fear.

  6. Prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy with single bolus erythropoietin in patients with diabetic kidney disease: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shema-Didi, Lilach; Kristal, Batya; Eizenberg, Sarit; Marzuq, Nabil; Sussan, Majdy; Feldman-Idov, Yulie; Ofir, Pnina; Atar, Shaul

    2016-04-01

    Contrast-induced-nephropathy (CIN) is associated with poor outcomes, thus prevention of CIN may be of clinical value. Erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to elicit tissue-protective effects in experimental models and in clinical studies of acute kidney injury. We therefore evaluated its effectiveness for prevention of CIN after coronary angiography (CA) ± percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial was carried out in 138 diabetic patients with eGFR <60 mL/min who underwent non-urgent CA ± PCI. Patients received normal saline and n-acetyl cysteine before CA, with or without 50,000 U of EPO administered 30 min prior to CA. CIN was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of at least 0.5 mg/dL during the first 2 days after exposure to contrast media. Primary outcome was the incidence of CIN. Secondary outcomes were the sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) of Cystatin C (CC) and Neutrophil-gelatinase-associated-lipocalin (NGAL) for diagnosis of CIN. The observed incidence of CIN was 8.7%, significantly lower than the expected for such high-risk population. The administration of EPO prior to CA did not reduce the incidence of CIN (9.7% vs. 7.6%, P = 0.65). CC and NGAL demonstrated a low sensitivity (16.6%) and low PPV (6.7 and 33.3%, respectively) for detecting CIN. The administration of EPO prior to CA did not reduce the incidence of CIN. Additional prospective research with a larger sample size and in other patient categories is essential to further define the potential protective effect of EPO on prevention of CIN. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. Experience gained with certification of instruments for the system for nuclear material physical protection, accounting, and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gus'kov, O.M.; Egorov, V.V.; Morozov, O.S.; Novikov, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the tests have confirmed the expedience of certification of the equipment, especially imported items. For the use of imported equipment at Russian facilities, it is justified to accommodate the accompanying documents thereto for the Russian standards. Equipment items shipped to Russia should be prepared for the certification tests and/or operation. When taking decision on the certification of imported equipment, it is expedient to preliminarily estimate the instrument's parameters and its operation in Russia. To solve the question whether the imported equipment is usable for Russia and what engineering support and maintenance is needed for its operation, it would be justified to create the Center for engineering support of instruments to be used for nuclear material protection, control and accounting on the basis of one of institutes dealing with the development of instruments for these application [ru

  8. Metformin for treatment of antipsychotic-induced amenorrhea and weight gain in women with first-episode schizophrenia: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-Rong; Jin, Hua; Gao, Keming; Twamley, Elizabeth W; Ou, Jian-Jun; Shao, Ping; Wang, Juan; Guo, Xiao-Feng; Davis, John M; Chan, Philip K; Zhao, Jing-Ping

    2012-08-01

    Data on the treatment of antipsychotic-induced amenorrhea, particularly when occurring with weight gain, are limited. The authors investigated the efficacy and safety of metformin in the treatment of antipsychotic-induced amenorrhea and weight gain in women with first-episode schizophrenia. Eighty-four women (ages 18-40 years) with first-episode schizophrenia who suffered from amenorrhea during antipsychotic treatment were randomly assigned, in a double-blind study design, to receive 1000 mg/day of metformin or placebo in addition to their antipsychotic treatment for 6 months. The primary outcome measures were restoration of menstruation and change in body weight and body mass index (BMI). Secondary outcome measures were changes in levels of prolactin, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol, and testosterone; in fasting levels of insulin and glucose; in LH/FSH ratio; and in insulin resistance index. Repeated mixed models with repeated-measures regression analyses and binary logistic regression were used in the analysis. A total of 76 patients completed the 6-month trial. Significantly more patients in the metformin group (N=28, 66.7%) than in placebo group (N=2, 4.8%) resumed their menstruation. Among patients treated with metformin, BMI decreased by a mean of 0.93 and the insulin resistance index by 2.04. In contrast, patients who received placebo had a mean increase in BMI of 0.85. The prolactin, LH, and testosterone levels and LH/FSH ratio decreased significantly in the metformin group at months 2, 4, and 6, but these levels did not change in the placebo group. Metformin was effective in reversing antipsychotic-induced adverse events, including restoration of menstruation, promotion of weight loss, and improvement in insulin resistance in female patients with schizophrenia.

  9. Fractional-order active fault-tolerant force-position controller design for the legged robots using saturated actuator with unknown bias and gain degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Yousef; Majd, Vahid Johari; Ehsani-Seresht, Abbas

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, a novel fault accommodation strategy is proposed for the legged robots subject to the actuator faults including actuation bias and effective gain degradation as well as the actuator saturation. First, the combined dynamics of two coupled subsystems consisting of the dynamics of the legs subsystem and the body subsystem are developed. Then, the interaction of the robot with the environment is formulated as the contact force optimization problem with equality and inequality constraints. The desired force is obtained by a dynamic model. A robust super twisting fault estimator is proposed to precisely estimate the defective torque amplitude of the faulty actuator in finite time. Defining a novel fractional sliding surface, a fractional nonsingular terminal sliding mode control law is developed. Moreover, by introducing a suitable auxiliary system and using its state vector in the designed controller, the proposed fault-tolerant control (FTC) scheme guarantees the finite-time stability of the closed-loop control system. The robustness and finite-time convergence of the proposed control law is established using the Lyapunov stability theory. Finally, numerical simulations are performed on a quadruped robot to demonstrate the stable walking of the robot with and without actuator faults, and actuator saturation constraints, and the results are compared to results with an integer order fault-tolerant controller.

  10. Should I Gain Weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Should I Gain Weight? KidsHealth / For Teens / Should I Gain Weight? ... something about it. Why Do People Want to Gain Weight? Some of the reasons people give for ...

  11. An Open-label Randomized Controlled Trial to Compare Weight Gain of Very Low Birth Weight Babies with or without Addition of Coconut Oil to Breast Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Sumitha; Kumar, Manish; Paul, Thomas; Thomas, Nihal; Mathai, Sarah; Rebekah, Grace; Thomas, Niranjan

    2018-03-23

    Nutritional guidelines involving the feeding of very low birth weight babies (VLBW) recommend addition of Human Milk Fortifiers to breast milk. Owing to financial constraints, it is a practice in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) to add coconut oil to aid better weight gain. There are inadequate data on improvement of growth parameters with oral coconut oil supplementation of breast milk. In this randomized controlled trial, we measured growth parameters and body composition of 60 babies who received either breast milk with coconut oil or breast milk alone. Randomization was stratified according to intrauterine growth appropriate for gestational age (n = 30) and small for gestational age (n = 30). There was no difference in weight gain between the two groups. The weight gain velocity was 15 ± 3.6 and 14.4 ± 3.4 g/kg/day (p value = 0.49) in the breast milk alone and in the breast milk with coconut oil group, respectively. There was no difference in increase in head circumference and length. Triceps skinfold thickness (n = 56) was similar in both groups, but subscapular skinfold thickness was significantly more in the coconut oil group. Total body fat percentage did not differ between the groups (25.2 ± 4.3 vs. 25.5 ± 4.3%, p = 0.79). Oral supplementation of coconut oil along with breast milk did not increase growth parameters or result in change in body composition in very low birth weight (VLBW) babies.

  12. Contrasting Complement Control, Temporal Adjunct Control and Controlled Verbal Gerund Subjects in ASD: The Role of Contextual Cues in Reference Assignment

    OpenAIRE

    Janke, Vikki; Perovic, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This study examines two complex syntactic dependencies (complement control and sentence-final temporal adjunct control) and one pragmatic dependency (controlled verbal gerund subjects) in children with ASD. Sixteen high-functioning (HFA) children (aged 6 to 16) with a diagnosis of autism and no language impairment, matched on age, gender and non-verbal MA to one TD control group, and on age, gender and verbal MA to another TD control group, undertook three picture-selection tasks. Task 1 meas...

  13. Application of multi-objective controller to optimal tuning of PID gains for a hydraulic turbine regulating system using adaptive grid particle swam optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhihuan; Yuan, Yanbin; Yuan, Xiaohui; Huang, Yuehua; Li, Xianshan; Li, Wenwu

    2015-05-01

    A hydraulic turbine regulating system (HTRS) is one of the most important components of hydropower plant, which plays a key role in maintaining safety, stability and economical operation of hydro-electrical installations. At present, the conventional PID controller is widely applied in the HTRS system for its practicability and robustness, and the primary problem with respect to this control law is how to optimally tune the parameters, i.e. the determination of PID controller gains for satisfactory performance. In this paper, a kind of multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, named adaptive grid particle swarm optimization (AGPSO) is applied to solve the PID gains tuning problem of the HTRS system. This newly AGPSO optimized method, which differs from a traditional one-single objective optimization method, is designed to take care of settling time and overshoot level simultaneously, in which a set of non-inferior alternatives solutions (i.e. Pareto solution) is generated. Furthermore, a fuzzy-based membership value assignment method is employed to choose the best compromise solution from the obtained Pareto set. An illustrative example associated with the best compromise solution for parameter tuning of the nonlinear HTRS system is introduced to verify the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed AGPSO-based optimization approach, as compared with two another prominent multi-objective algorithms, i.e. Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGAII) and Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II (SPEAII), for the quality and diversity of obtained Pareto solutions set. Consequently, simulation results show that this AGPSO optimized approach outperforms than compared methods with higher efficiency and better quality no matter whether the HTRS system works under unload or load conditions. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Contrasting distributions of groundwater arsenic and uranium in the western Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia: Implication for origins and fate controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Huaming; Jia, Yongfeng; Wanty, Richard B.; Jiang, Yuxiao; Zhao, Weiguang; Xiu, Wei; Shen, Jiaxing; Li, Yuan; Cao, Yongsheng; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Di; Wei, Chao; Zhang, Yilong; Cao, Wengeng

    2016-01-01

    Although As concentrations have been investigated in shallow groundwater from the Hetao basin, China, less is known about U and As distributions in deep groundwater, which would help to better understand their origins and fate controls. Two hundred and ninety-nine groundwater samples, 122 sediment samples, and 14 rock samples were taken from the northwest portion of the Hetao basin, and analyzed for geochemical parameters. Results showed contrasting distributions of groundwater U and As, with high U and low As concentrations in the alluvial fans along the basin margins, and low U and high As concentrations downgradient in the flat plain. The probable sources of both As and U in groundwater were ultimately traced to the bedrocks in the local mountains (the Langshan Mountains). Chemical weathering of U-bearing rocks (schist, phyllite, and carbonate veins) released and mobilized U as UO_2(CO_3)_2"2"− and UO_2(CO_3)_3"4"− species in the alluvial fans under oxic conditions and suboxic conditions where reductions of Mn and NO_3"− were favorable (OSO), resulting in high groundwater U concentrations. Conversely, the recent weathering of As-bearing rocks (schist, phyllite, and sulfides) led to the formation of As-bearing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides in sediments, resulting in low groundwater As concentrations. Arsenic mobilization and U immobilization occurred in suboxic conditions where reduction of Fe(III) oxides was favorable and reducing conditions (SOR). Reduction of As-bearing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, which were formed during palaeo-weathering and transported and deposited as Quaternary aquifer sediments, was believed to release As into groundwater. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) would lead to the formation of uraninite, and therefore remove U from groundwater. We conclude that the contrasting distributions of groundwater As and U present a challenge to ensuring safe drinking water in analogous areas, especially with high background values of U and As. - Highlights:

  15. Contrasting distributions of groundwater arsenic and uranium in the western Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia: Implication for origins and fate controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Huaming, E-mail: hmguo@cugb.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Jia, Yongfeng [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Wanty, Richard B. [U.S. Geological Survey, MS 964d Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Jiang, Yuxiao; Zhao, Weiguang [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Xiu, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Shen, Jiaxing [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Cao, Yongsheng [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Wu, Yang [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Di [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); Wei, Chao [School of Water Resources and Environment, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); The National Institute of Metrology, Beijing 100013 (China); Zhang, Yilong; Cao, Wengeng [Institute of Hydrogeology and Environmental Geology, China Academy of Geological Sciences, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, 050061 (China); and others

    2016-01-15

    Although As concentrations have been investigated in shallow groundwater from the Hetao basin, China, less is known about U and As distributions in deep groundwater, which would help to better understand their origins and fate controls. Two hundred and ninety-nine groundwater samples, 122 sediment samples, and 14 rock samples were taken from the northwest portion of the Hetao basin, and analyzed for geochemical parameters. Results showed contrasting distributions of groundwater U and As, with high U and low As concentrations in the alluvial fans along the basin margins, and low U and high As concentrations downgradient in the flat plain. The probable sources of both As and U in groundwater were ultimately traced to the bedrocks in the local mountains (the Langshan Mountains). Chemical weathering of U-bearing rocks (schist, phyllite, and carbonate veins) released and mobilized U as UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2−} and UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4−} species in the alluvial fans under oxic conditions and suboxic conditions where reductions of Mn and NO{sub 3}{sup −} were favorable (OSO), resulting in high groundwater U concentrations. Conversely, the recent weathering of As-bearing rocks (schist, phyllite, and sulfides) led to the formation of As-bearing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides in sediments, resulting in low groundwater As concentrations. Arsenic mobilization and U immobilization occurred in suboxic conditions where reduction of Fe(III) oxides was favorable and reducing conditions (SOR). Reduction of As-bearing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, which were formed during palaeo-weathering and transported and deposited as Quaternary aquifer sediments, was believed to release As into groundwater. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) would lead to the formation of uraninite, and therefore remove U from groundwater. We conclude that the contrasting distributions of groundwater As and U present a challenge to ensuring safe drinking water in analogous areas, especially with high

  16. Contrasting distributions of groundwater arsenic and uranium in the western Hetao basin, Inner Mongolia: Implication for origins and fate controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huaming; Jia, Yongfeng; Wanty, Richard B.; Jiang, Yuxiao; Zhao, Weiguang; Xiu, Wei; Shen, Jiaxing; Li, Yuan; Cao, Yongsheng; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Di; Wei, Chao; Zhang, Yilong; Cao, Wengeng; Foster, Andrea L.

    2016-01-01

    Although As concentrations have been investigated in shallow groundwater from the Hetao basin, China, less is known about U and As distributions in deep groundwater, which would help to better understand their origins and fate controls. Two hundred and ninety-nine groundwater samples, 122 sediment samples, and 14 rock samples were taken from the northwest portion of the Hetao basin, and analyzed for geochemical parameters. Results showed contrasting distributions of groundwater U and As, with high U and low As concentrations in the alluvial fans along the basin margins, and low U and high As concentrations downgradient in the flat plain. The probable sources of both As and U in groundwater were ultimately traced to the bedrocks in the local mountains (the Langshan Mountains). Chemical weathering of U-bearing rocks (schist, phyllite, and carbonate veins) released and mobilized U as UO2(CO3)22 − and UO2(CO3)34 − species in the alluvial fans under oxic conditions and suboxic conditions where reductions of Mn and NO3− were favorable (OSO), resulting in high groundwater U concentrations. Conversely, the recent weathering of As-bearing rocks (schist, phyllite, and sulfides) led to the formation of As-bearing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides in sediments, resulting in low groundwater As concentrations. Arsenic mobilization and U immobilization occurred in suboxic conditions where reduction of Fe(III) oxides was favorable and reducing conditions (SOR). Reduction of As-bearing Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, which were formed during palaeo-weathering and transported and deposited as Quaternary aquifer sediments, was believed to release As into groundwater. Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) would lead to the formation of uraninite, and therefore remove U from groundwater. We conclude that the contrasting distributions of groundwater As and U present a challenge to ensuring safe drinking water in analogous areas, especially with high background values of U and As.

  17. The effect of zonisamide on antipsychotic-associated weight gain in patients with schizophrenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Nikseresht, Mohammad Saeed; Sahraian, Ali

    2013-06-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia suffer from metabolic symptoms and weight gain in which predispose them to obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular problems. This trial examines the efficacy and safety of zonisamide on weight and body mass index in patients with schizophrenia being administered with atypical antipsychotics. In this 10-week, double blind randomized placebo controlled clinical trial, forty one patients with schizophrenia diagnosed according to DSM-IV-TR criteria who were taking a stable dose of atypical antipsychotic are allocated into one of the two groups of zonisamide or placebo group. Weight, body mass index, waist circumference, and adverse effects were assessed. The two groups were not statistically different regarding baseline characteristics on age, gender, education, diagnosis, weight, body mass index, daily cigarette smoking, and the duration of illness. After 10 weeks, the patients in the placebo group had significantly gained weight, while the patients in the zonisamide group lost weight (mean=1.9, SD=2.2 versus mean=-1.1 kg, SD=1.4). The changes of body mass index in the two groups were significantly different. Body mass index decreased in the zonisamide group (mean=-0.3, SD=0.4) while it increased in the placebo group (mean=2.2, SD=6.9). There was a significance difference between the two groups regarding waist circumference at the end of trial (Pweight loss of patients with schizophrenia being treated with atypical antipsychotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contrast-induced nephropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus between iso- and low-osmolar contrast media: A meta-analysis of full-text prospective, randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Xin-Xiu; Liu, Ke-Mei; Tan, Hua; Zhang, Qiu

    2018-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare iso-osmolar contrast medium, iodixanol, with low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM) for assessing contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) incidence, exclusively in the diabetic population. A systematic search was conducted for full-text, prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The primary outcome was incidence of CIN. Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and other sources were searched until May 31, 2017. Twelve RCTs finally met the search criteria. Iodixanol did not significantly reduce the risk of CIN (risk ratio [RR]: 0.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): [0.49, 1.04], p = 0.08). However, there was significantly reduced risk of CIN when iodixanol was compared to a LOCM agent iohexol (RR: 0.32, 95% CI [0.12, 0.89]). There were no differences between iodixanol and the other non-iohexol LOCM (RR: 0.92, 95% CI [0.68, 1.25]). In diabetic populations, iodixanol is not associated with a significant reduction of CIN risk. Iodixanol is associated with a reduced risk of CIN compared with iohexol, whereas no significant difference between iodixanol and other LOCM could be found.

  19. Gazprom gains control over Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovak, K.

    2008-01-01

    Although the European Union has been declaring for quite some time its intention to avoid the influence of Russian gas monopoly, Gazprom, no action has been taken. EU members are actually keen on doing business with Gazprom. And the Russian giant is strengthening its position in the EU and elsewhere. With the goal of increasing the share of non-Russian gas in the EU, Brussels has approached Middle Eastern and North African countries. But all the time Gazprom is one step ahead. Any attempts to diversify gas infrastructure are problematic. Announced gas pipelines, Nord Stream and Nabucco, will either be delayed or fail completely. Environmental issues are a problem for Nord Stream in the Baltic Sea and the list of potential suppliers to Nabucco from Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa is getting shorter and shorter, all of which favours Gazprom. The daily paper, Nezavisimaya gazeta, recently published an article stating that Europe would soon be dependent on the Russian giant. (authors)

  20. Gazprom gains control over Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2007-01-01

    Although the European Union has been declaring for quite some time its intention to avoid the influence of Russian gas monopoly, Gazprom, no action has been taken. European Union (EU) members are actually keen on doing business with Gazprom. And the Russian giant is strengthening its position in the EU and elsewhere. With the goal of increasing the share of non-Russian gas in the EU, Brussels has approached Middle Eastern and North African countries. But all the time Gazprom is one step ahead. Any attempts to diversify gas infrastructure are problematic. Announced gas pipelines, Nord Stream and Nabucco, will either be delayed or fail completely. Environmental issues are a problem for Nord Stream in the Baltic Sea and the list of potential suppliers to Nabucco from Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa is getting shorter and shorter, all of which favours Gazprom. The daily paper, Nezavisimaya gazeta, recently published an article stating that Europe would soon be dependent on the Russian giant. (authors)

  1. Anthropogenic and geomorphic controls on peatland dynamics in contrasting floodplain environments during the Holocene and its impact on carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Gert; Broothaerts, Nils; Notebaert, Bastiaan

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of carbon in terrestrial environments, and scientific interest in peatlands has increased strongly in the light of the recent global climatic changes. Much attention has been paid to peatland dynamics in extensive arctic and boreal wetlands or to blanket peat in temperate regions. Nevertheless, long-term dynamics of peat in alluvial wetlands in temperate regions remains largely underresearched. In this study, data from three contrasting environments were used to provide more insights in the anthropogenic and geomorphic controls on peatland dynamics. The results show a high variability in alluvial peatland dynamics between the different study sites. In the central Belgian Loess Belt, alluvial peatlands developed during the early Holocene but gradually disappeared from the Mid-Holocene onwards due to the gradual intensification of agricultural activities in the catchment and consequent higher sedimentation rates in the floodplain system. The end of peat growth is shown to be diachronous at catchment scale, ranging between 6500 and 500 cal a BP. The disappearance of the alluvial peatlands has important implications since it potentially reduces the storage of locally produced C. Nevertheless, it was shown that this reduced production of local C but was outbalanced by the burial of hillslope derived C. Also within the sandy catchments of the Belgian Campine region alluvial peatlands initiated in the early Holocene but, here, they abruptly disappeared in the Mid-Holocene before the onset of intense agricultural activities in the catchment. This suggests that for the sandy regions, anthropogenic impact on peatland dynamics is less important compared to natural factors. For these regions, the disappearance of alluvial peatland formation resulted in a sharp decline in alluvial carbon storage as there is no compensation through hillslope derived C input. For the upper Dee catchment in NE Scotland, Holocene carbon floodplain storage varies

  2. Phase contrast image synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method is presented for synthesizing arbitrary intensity patterns based on phase contrast imaging. The concept is grounded on an extension of the Zernike phase contrast method into the domain of full range [0; 2 pi] phase modulation. By controlling the average value of the input phase funct...... function and by choosing appropriate phase retardation at the phase contrast filter, a pure phase to intensity imaging is accomplished. The method presented is also directly applicable in dark field image synthesis....

  3. Gain scheduling using the Youla parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, Jakob

    1999-01-01

    Gain scheduling controllers are considered in this paper. The gain scheduling problem where the scheduling parameter vector cannot be measured directly, but needs to be estimated is considered. An estimation of the scheduling vector has been derived by using the Youla parameterization. The use...... in connection with H_inf gain scheduling controllers....

  4. A Voltage Gain-Controlled Modified CFOA And Its Application in Electronically Tunable Four-Mode All-Pass Filter Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Herencsar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new active building block (ABB called voltage gain-controlled modified current feedback amplifier (VGC-MCFOA based on bipolar junction transistor technology. The versatility of the new ABB is demonstrated in new first-order all-pass filter structure design employing single VGC-MCFOA, single grounded capacitor, and three resistors. Introduced circuit provides all four possible transfer functions at the same configuration, namely current-mode, transimpedance-mode, transadmittance-mode, and voltage-mode. The pole frequency of the circuit can be easily tuned by means of DC bias currents. The theoretical results are verified by SPICE simulations based on bipolar transistor arrays AT&T ALA400-CBIC-R process parameters.

  5. Ability to Gain Control Over One’s Own Brain Activity and its Relation to Spiritual Practice: A Multimodal Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia E. Kober

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spiritual practice, such as prayer or meditation, is associated with focusing attention on internal states and self-awareness processes. As these cognitive control mechanisms presumably are also important for neurofeedback (NF, we investigated whether people who pray frequently (N = 20 show a higher ability of self-control over their own brain activity compared to a control group of individuals who rarely pray (N = 20. All participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and one session of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR, 12–15 Hz based NF training. Individuals who reported a high frequency of prayer showed improved NF performance compared to individuals who reported a low frequency of prayer. The individual ability to control one’s own brain activity was related to volumetric aspects of the brain. In the low frequency of prayer group, gray matter volumes in the right insula and inferior frontal gyrus were positively associated with NF performance, supporting prior findings that more general self-control networks are involved in successful NF learning. In contrast, participants who prayed regularly showed a negative association between gray matter volume in the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann’s area (BA 10 and NF performance. Due to their regular spiritual practice, they might have been more skillful in gating incoming information provided by the NF system and avoiding task-irrelevant thoughts.

  6. Paediatric cardiac catheterization. Controlled, randomized study of two iodinated contrast media: iopromide 300 and ioxaglate 320 mgI/ml

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, M.; Revel, D.

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-one children were included in a prospective randomized trial comparing a new non-ionic contrast medium, iopromide 300 and the ionic low osmolar contrast medium, ioxaglate 320 mgI/ml in pediatric cardiac catheterization. There were fewer adverse effects with iopromide but no statistically significant difference was demonstrated in this small population, with a very low incidence of allergoid reactions; this tendency was confirmed by meta-analysis of the multicentre study [fr

  7. Reclaiming the everyday world: how long-term ventilated patients in critical care seek to gain aspects of power and control over their environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patricia

    2004-08-01

    Critical care nurses are increasingly seeking to base patient care on evidence derived from research studies. The purpose of this study was to explore the meanings former patients attributed to being on long-term mechanical ventilation in a critical care unit (CCU) in Australia. Using Heideggerian phenomenology, unstructured interviews were undertaken with nine participants. Data were analysed thematically using the method developed by van Manen. Thematic analysis revealed four major themes. This article presents the findings from the theme titled: Reclaiming the everyday world, which describes how the study participants gained comfort from the presence of nurses and their families, sought control over their treatments, and questioned and interpreted the environment, in order to reclaim self. The study highlighted the central role of nurses in patient care, and served as a basis for a number of recommendations, which include recognising the significant role of nurses and family in patient care, and being aware that patients may want more control over their environment and instigate ways to facilitate this. Further research is warranted to examine CCU patients' perceived level of control and power, and to investigate the extent and type of involvement CCU patients would like to have in their care.

  8. Advancing High Contrast Adaptive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammons, M.; Poyneer, L.; GPI Team

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing challenge has been to directly image faint extrasolar planets adjacent to their host suns, which may be ~1-10 million times brighter than the planet. Several extreme AO systems designed for high-contrast observations have been tested at this point, including SPHERE, Magellan AO, PALM-3000, Project 1640, NICI, and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI, Macintosh et al. 2014). The GPI is the world's most advanced high-contrast adaptive optics system on an 8-meter telescope for detecting and characterizing planets outside of our solar system. GPI will detect a previously unstudied population of young analogs to the giant planets of our solar system and help determine how planetary systems form. GPI employs a 44x44 woofer-tweeter adaptive optics system with a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor operating at 1 kHz. The controller uses Fourier-based reconstruction and modal gains optimized from system telemetry (Poyneer et al. 2005, 2007). GPI has an apodized Lyot coronal graph to suppress diffraction and a near-infrared integral field spectrograph for obtaining planetary spectra. This paper discusses current performance limitations and presents the necessary instrumental modifications and sensitivity calculations for scenarios related to high-contrast observations of non-sidereal targets.

  9. Associations of neonatal high birth weight with maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain: a case-control study in women from Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yao Jie; Peng, Rong; Han, Lingli; Zhou, Xiaoli; Xiong, Zhengai; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Junnan; Yao, Ruoxue; Li, Tingyu; Zhao, Yong

    2016-08-16

    To examine the associations of maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) with neonatal high birth weight (HBW) in a sample of Chinese women living in southwest China. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in Chongqing, China. A total of 221 mothers who delivered HBW babies (>4.0 kg) were recruited as cases and 221 age-matched (2-year interval) mothers with normal birth weight babies (2.5-4.0 kg) were identified as controls. ORs were estimated using conditional logistic regression analysis. For the analysis, pre-pregnancy BMI was categorised as underweight/normal weight/overweight and obesity and GWG was categorised as inadequate/appropriate/excessive. Among the cases, mean pre-pregnancy BMI was 21.8±2.8 kg/m(2), mean GWG was 19.7±5.1 kg and mean neonatal birth weight was 4.2±0.2 kg. In the controls, the corresponding values were 21.1±3.1 kg/m(2), 16.4±5.0 kg and 3.3±0.4 kg, respectively. More cases than controls gained excessive weight during pregnancy (80.1% vs 48.4%, p0.05). GWG was positively related to HBW after adjustment for gravidity, gestational age, newborns' gender and family income (OR=1.18, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.25; pweight women (OR=10.27, 95% CI 3.20 to 32.95; p<0.001). Overall, the findings suggest a significantly positive association between GWG and HBW. However, pre-pregnancy BMI shows no independent relationship with HBW. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Contrasting Complement Control, Temporal Adjunct Control and Controlled Verbal Gerund Subjects in ASD: The Role of Contextual Cues in Reference Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Vikki; Perovic, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This study examines two complex syntactic dependencies (complement control and sentence-final temporal adjunct control) and one pragmatic dependency (controlled verbal gerund subjects) in children with ASD. Sixteen high-functioning (HFA) children (aged 6-16) with a diagnosis of autism and no language impairment, matched on age, gender and non-verbal MA to one TD control group, and on age, gender and verbal MA to another TD control group, undertook three picture-selection tasks. Task 1 measured their base-line interpretations of the empty categories ( ec ). Task 2 preceded these sentence sets with a weakly established topic cueing an alternative referent and Task 3 with a strongly established topic cueing an alternative referent. In complement control (Ron persuaded Hermione ec to kick the ball) and sentence-final temporal adjunct control (Harry tapped Luna while ec feeding the owl), the reference of the ec is argued to be related obligatorily to the object and subject respectively. In controlled verbal-gerund subjects (VGS) ( ec Rowing the boat clumsily made Luna seasick), the ec 's reference is resolved pragmatically. Referent choices across the three tasks were compared. TD children chose the object uniformly in complement control across all tasks but in adjunct control, preferences shifted toward the object in Task 3. In controlled VGSs, they exhibited a strong preference for an internal-referent interpretation in Task 1, which shifted in the direction of the cues in Tasks 2 and 3. HFA children gave a mixed performance. They patterned with their TD counterparts on complement control and controlled VGSs but performed marginally differently on adjunct control: no TD groups were influenced by the weakly established topic in Task 2 but all groups were influenced by the strongly established topic in Task 3. HFA children were less influenced than the TD children, resulting in their making fewer object choices overall but revealing parallel patterns of performance. In

  11. Positive enteric contrast material for abdominal and pelvic CT with automatic exposure control: What is the effect on patient radiation exposure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhen J., E-mail: jane.wang@radiology.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States); Chen, Katherine S.; Gould, Robert; Coakley, Fergus V.; Fu Yanjun; Yeh, Benjamin M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0628 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the effect of positive enteric contrast administration on automatic exposure control (AEC) CT radiation exposure in (1) a CT phantom, and (2) a retrospective review of patients. Materials and methods: We scanned a CT phantom containing simulated bowel that was sequentially filled with water and positive enteric contrast, and recorded the mean volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). We also identified 17 patients who had undergone 2 technically comparable CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis, one with positive enteric contrast and the other with oral water. Paired Student's t-tests were used to compare the mean CTDIvol between scans performed with and without positive enteric contrast. Both the phantom and patient CT scans were performed using AEC with a fixed noise index. Results: The mean CTDIvol for the phantom with simulated bowel containing water and positive enteric contrast were 8.2 {+-} 0.2 mGy, and 8.7 {+-} 0.1 mGy (6.1% higher than water, p = 0.02), respectively. The mean CTDIvol for patients scanned with oral water and with positive enteric contrast were 11.8 mGy and 13.1 mGy, respectively (p = 0.003). This corresponded to a mean CTDIvol which was 11.0% higher (range: 0.0-20.7% higher) in scans with positive enteric contrast than those with oral water in patients. Conclusions: When automatic exposure control is utilized for abdominopelvic CT, the radiation exposure, as measured by CTDIvol, is higher for scans performed with positive enteric contrast than those with oral water.

  12. Performance evaluation of contrast-detail in full field digital mammography systems using ideal (Hotelling) observer vs. conventional automated analysis of CDMAM images for quality control of contrast-detail characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delakis, Ioannis; Wise, Robert; Morris, Lauren; Kulama, Eugenia

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the contrast-detail performance of full field digital mammography (FFDM) systems using ideal (Hotelling) observer Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) methodology and ascertain whether it can be considered an alternative to the conventional, automated analysis of CDMAM phantom images. Five FFDM units currently used in the national breast screening programme were evaluated, which differed with respect to age, detector, Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) and target/filter combination. Contrast-detail performance was analysed using CDMAM and ideal observer SNR methodology. The ideal observer SNR was calculated for input signal originating from gold discs of varying thicknesses and diameters, and then used to estimate the threshold gold thickness for each diameter as per CDMAM analysis. The variability of both methods and the dependence of CDMAM analysis on phantom manufacturing discrepancies also investigated. Results from both CDMAM and ideal observer methodologies were informative differentiators of FFDM systems' contrast-detail performance, displaying comparable patterns with respect to the FFDM systems' type and age. CDMAM results suggested higher threshold gold thickness values compared with the ideal observer methodology, especially for small-diameter details, which can be attributed to the behaviour of the CDMAM phantom used in this study. In addition, ideal observer methodology results showed lower variability than CDMAM results. The Ideal observer SNR methodology can provide a useful metric of the FFDM systems' contrast detail characteristics and could be considered a surrogate for conventional, automated analysis of CDMAM images. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decazes, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    The Guerbet firm, which holds 69% of the capital on the contrast media for medical imagery, could sale about 20% of this capital in order to accelerate its development in the United States, one of its next market with the Japan. (O.M.)

  14. Time-varying auditory gain control in response to double-pulse stimuli in harbour porpoises is not mediated by a stapedial reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asger Emil Munch Schrøder

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Echolocating animals reduce their output level and hearing sensitivity with decreasing echo delays, presumably to stabilize the perceived echo intensity during target approaches. In bats, this variation in hearing sensitivity is formed by a call-induced stapedial reflex that tapers off over time after the call. Here, we test the hypothesis that a similar mechanism exists in toothed whales by subjecting a trained harbour porpoise to a series of double sound pulses varying in delay and frequency, while measuring the magnitudes of the evoked auditory brainstem responses (ABRs. We find that the recovery of the ABR to the second pulse is frequency dependent, and that a stapedial reflex therefore cannot account for the reduced hearing sensitivity at short pulse delays. We propose that toothed whale auditory time-varying gain control during echolocation is not enabled by the middle ear as in bats, but rather by frequency-dependent mechanisms such as forward masking and perhaps higher-order control of efferent feedback to the outer hair cells.

  15. Weight Gain during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Map Premature Birth Report Cards Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... fitness > Weight gain during pregnancy Weight gain during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ...

  16. Preventing Weight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Local Programs Related Topics Diabetes Nutrition Preventing Weight Gain Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... cancer. Choosing an Eating Plan to Prevent Weight Gain So, how do you choose a healthful eating ...

  17. Analysis of reactor power behaviour using estimation of period for the gain adaptation in a state feedback controller; Atomos para el desarrollo de Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez R, J.S. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Perez C, J.H. [CINVESTAV, IPN, A.P. 14740 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivero G, T. [ITT, 50140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper a novel procedure for power regulation in a TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor is presented. The control scheme combines state variable feedback with a first order predictor, which is incorporated to speed up the power response of the reactor without exceeding the safety requirement imposed by the reactor period. The simulation results using the proposed control strategy attains different values of steady-state power from different values of initial power in short time, complying at all times with the safety restriction imposed on the reactor period. The predictor, derived from the theory of first order numerical integration, produces very good results during the ascent of power. These results include a fast response and independence of the wide variety of potential operating conditions something not easy and even impossible to obtain with other procedures. By using this control scheme, the reactor period is maintained within safety limits during the start up of the reactor, which is normally the operating condition where an occurrence of a period scram is common. However, the predictor can not be used when the power is reaching the desired power level because the instantaneous power increases far above the desired level. Thus, when the power increases above certain power level, the state feedback gain is set constant to a predefined value. This causes some oscillations that decrease in a few seconds. Afterwards, the power response smoothly approaches, with a small overshoot, the desired power. This constraint on the use of the predictor prevents the unbounded increase of the neutron power. The control law proposed requires all the system's state variables. Since only the neutron power is available, it is necessary the estimation of the non measurable states. The key issue of the existence of a solution to this problem has been previously considered. One of the conclusions is that the point kinetic equations are observable under certain restrictions

  18. Sodium Bicarbonate Versus Sodium Chloride for Preventing Contrast-Associated Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valette, Xavier; Desmeulles, Isabelle; Savary, Benoit; Masson, Romain; Seguin, Amélie; Sauneuf, Bertrand; Brunet, Jennifer; Verrier, Pierre; Pottier, Véronique; Orabona, Marie; Samba, Désiré; Viquesnel, Gérald; Lermuzeaux, Mathilde; Hazera, Pascal; Dutheil, Jean-Jacques; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; du Cheyron, Damien

    2017-04-01

    To test whether hydration with bicarbonate rather than isotonic sodium chloride reduces the risk of contrast-associated acute kidney injury in critically ill patients. Prospective, double-blind, multicenter, randomized controlled study. Three French ICUs. Critically ill patients with stable renal function (n = 307) who received intravascular contrast media. Hydration with 0.9% sodium chloride or 1.4% sodium bicarbonate administered with the same infusion protocol: 3 mL/kg during 1 hour before and 1 mL/kg/hr during 6 hours after contrast medium exposure. The primary endpoint was the development of contrast-associated acute kidney injury, as defined by the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria, 72 hours after contrast exposure. Patients randomized to the bicarbonate group (n = 151) showed a higher urinary pH at the end of the infusion than patients randomized to the saline group (n = 156) (6.7 ± 2.1 vs 6.2 ± 1.8, respectively; p 0.99) were also similar between the saline and bicarbonate groups, respectively. Except for urinary pH, none of the outcomes differed between the two groups. Among ICU patients with stable renal function, the benefit of using sodium bicarbonate rather than isotonic sodium chloride for preventing contrast-associated acute kidney injury is marginal, if any.

  19. Enhancement tuning and control for high dynamic range images in multi-scale locally adaptive contrast enhancement algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cvetkovic, S.D.; Schirris, J.; With, de P.H.N.

    2009-01-01

    For real-time imaging in surveillance applications, visibility of details is of primary importance to ensure customer confidence. If we display High Dynamic-Range (HDR) scenes whose contrast spans four or more orders of magnitude on a conventional monitor without additional processing, results are

  20. The relationship between weight gain during pregnancy and urinary tract infections in pregnant women of Shahrekord, by using the “Nested case-control study”, in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejali, Mehri; Ahmadi, Seyede Soghra; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Yazdani, Rezvan; Ahmadi, Seyede Nafiseh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pregnancy is one of the most important and risky periods in mothers and the fetus life, which plays a key role in health and social activity of the person, family and community. This study is trying to see if there is a relation between increasing weight and urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnancy by using the open nested case-control study in the city of Shahrekord. Materials and Methods: In a nested case-control study, one cohort including 832 patients was examined until week 26 to 30 of pregnancy and their UTIs were studied. The required information was collected by examining the health records of pregnant women and completion of the data registration forms. Data collection was controlled by using SPSS and analyzed by using an independent t-test, Chi-square test, Pearson correlation and logistic regression. Results: According to the results of the cohort study with 832 individuals, average weight gain of the group with a UTI was 11.13 ± 3.9 kg and it was 10.63 ± 3.9 kg in the group without UTI, showing no statistically significant difference (P = 0.245). According to the results, genitourinary problems had the highest predictive value for UTIs and the numbers of infertility and the childbirth variables were in the second and third positions, respectively. Conclusion: According to the results study we can conclude that screening and treatment of UTIs have been on time and appropriate in health systems of the city of Shahrekord which have lead to the reduction of infant and maternal diseases even with the condition in having no UTI, and continuing this process for screening and treatment is recommended. PMID:27462626

  1. The relationship between weight gain during pregnancy and urinary tract infections in pregnant women of Shahrekord, by using the "Nested case-control study", in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejali, Mehri; Ahmadi, Seyede Soghra; Hassanzadeh, Akbar; Yazdani, Rezvan; Ahmadi, Seyede Nafiseh

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy is one of the most important and risky periods in mothers and the fetus life, which plays a key role in health and social activity of the person, family and community. This study is trying to see if there is a relation between increasing weight and urinary tract infection (UTI) in pregnancy by using the open nested case-control study in the city of Shahrekord. In a nested case-control study, one cohort including 832 patients was examined until week 26 to 30 of pregnancy and their UTIs were studied. The required information was collected by examining the health records of pregnant women and completion of the data registration forms. Data collection was controlled by using SPSS and analyzed by using an independent t-test, Chi-square test, Pearson correlation and logistic regression. According to the results of the cohort study with 832 individuals, average weight gain of the group with a UTI was 11.13 ± 3.9 kg and it was 10.63 ± 3.9 kg in the group without UTI, showing no statistically significant difference (P = 0.245). According to the results, genitourinary problems had the highest predictive value for UTIs and the numbers of infertility and the childbirth variables were in the second and third positions, respectively. According to the results study we can conclude that screening and treatment of UTIs have been on time and appropriate in health systems of the city of Shahrekord which have lead to the reduction of infant and maternal diseases even with the condition in having no UTI, and continuing this process for screening and treatment is recommended.

  2. A 24-week, randomized, controlled trial of adjunctive sibutramine versus topiramate in the treatment of weight gain in overweight or obese patients with bipolar disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McElroy, Susan L.; Frye, Mark A.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Suppes, Trisha; Hellemann, Gerhard; Black, David; Mintz, Jim; Kupka, Ralph; Nolen, Willem; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Denicoff, Kirk D.; Post, Robert M.; Keck, Paul E.

    Objectives: Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have an increased risk of obesity as well as psychotropic-associated weight gain. The objective of this study was to compare sibutramine and topiramate as adjunctive treatments for psychotropic-associated weight gain in overweight or obese outpatients

  3. Low Dark-Current, High Current-Gain of PVK/ZnO Nanoparticles Composite-Based UV Photodetector by PN-Heterojunction Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Won; Cha, Seung-Hwan; Choi, Kyung-Jae; Kang, Byoung-Ho; Lee, Jae-Sung; Kim, Sae-Wan; Kim, Ju-Seong; Jeong, Hyun-Min; Gopalan, Sai-Anand; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-07

    We propose a solution-processable ultraviolet (UV) photodetector with a pn-heterojunction hybrid photoactive layer (HPL) that is composed of poly-n-vinylcarbazole (PVK) as a p-type polymer and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) as an n-type metal oxide. To observe the effective photo-inducing ability of the UV photodetector, we analyzed the optical and electrical properties of HPL which is controlled by the doping concentration of n-type ZnO NPs in PVK matrix. Additionally, we confirmed that the optical properties of HPL dominantly depend on the ZnO NPs from the UV-vis absorption and the photoluminescence (PL) spectral measurements. This HPL can induce efficient charge transfer in the localized narrow pn-heterojunction domain and increases the photocurrent gain. It is essential that proper doping concentration of n-type ZnO NPs in polymer matrix is obtained to improve the performance of the UV photodetector. When the ZnO NPs are doped with the optimized concentration of 3.4 wt.%, the electrical properties of the photocurrent are significantly increased. The ratio of the photocurrent was approximately 10³ higher than that of the dark current.

  4. Low Dark-Current, High Current-Gain of PVK/ZnO Nanoparticles Composite-Based UV Photodetector by PN-Heterojunction Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Won Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a solution-processable ultraviolet (UV photodetector with a pn-heterojunction hybrid photoactive layer (HPL that is composed of poly-n-vinylcarbazole (PVK as a p-type polymer and ZnO nanoparticles (NPs as an n-type metal oxide. To observe the effective photo-inducing ability of the UV photodetector, we analyzed the optical and electrical properties of HPL which is controlled by the doping concentration of n-type ZnO NPs in PVK matrix. Additionally, we confirmed that the optical properties of HPL dominantly depend on the ZnO NPs from the UV-vis absorption and the photoluminescence (PL spectral measurements. This HPL can induce efficient charge transfer in the localized narrow pn-heterojunction domain and increases the photocurrent gain. It is essential that proper doping concentration of n-type ZnO NPs in polymer matrix is obtained to improve the performance of the UV photodetector. When the ZnO NPs are doped with the optimized concentration of 3.4 wt.%, the electrical properties of the photocurrent are significantly increased. The ratio of the photocurrent was approximately 103 higher than that of the dark current.

  5. Review of experience gained in fabricating nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds and their analytical quality control at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao, A.; Franca, J.M. Jr.; Ikuta, A.; Pueschel, C.R.; Federgruen, L.; Lordello, A.R.; Tomida, E.K.; Moraes, S.; Brito, J. de; Gomes, R.P.; Araujo, J.A.; Floh, B.; Matsuda, H.T.

    1977-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main activities dealing with the fabrication of nuclear grade uranium and thorium compounds at the Instituto de Energia Atomica, Sao Paulo. Identification of problems and their resolutions, the experience gained in plant operation, the performance characteristics of an ion-exchange facility and a solvent extraction unit (a demonstration plant based on pulsed columns for purification of uranium and production of ammonium diuranate) are described. A moving-bed facility for UF 4 preparation and its operation is discussed. A pilot plant for uranium and thorium oxide microsphere preparation based on internal gelation for HTGR fuel type is also described. A solvent extraction pilot plant for thorium purification based on a compound extraction-scrubbing column and a mixer-settler battery and the involved technology for thorium purification are commented. The main products, namely ammonium diuranate, uranyl amonium tricarbonate, uranium trioxide, uranium tetrafluoride, thorium nitrate and thorium oxalate and their quality are commented. The development of necessary analytical procedures for the quality control of the mentioned nuclear grade products is summarized. A great majority of such procedures was particularly suitable for analyzing traces impurities. Designed for installation are the units for denitration of uranyl nitrate solutions and pilot plants for elemental fluorine and UF 6 . The installation of a laboratory-scale plant designed for reprocessing irradiated uranium and an experimental unit for the recovery of protactinium from irradiated thorium is in progress

  6. Testing the feasibility of a mobile technology intervention promoting healthy gestational weight gain in pregnant women (txt4two) - study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Jane Catherine; Campbell, Karen Jane; McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Wilkinson, Shelley Ann; Lappas, Martha; Ball, Kylie; Fjeldsoe, Brianna; Griffiths, Anne; Whittaker, Robyn; Maddison, Ralph; Shub, Alexis; Pidd, Deborah; Fraser, Elise; Moshonas, Nelly; Crawford, David Andrew

    2015-05-07

    Overweight, obesity and excess gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with negative health outcomes for mother and child in pregnancy and across the life course. Interventions promoting GWG within guidelines report mixed results. Most are time and cost intensive, which limits scalability. Mobile technologies (mHealth) offer low cost, ready access and individually-tailored support. We aim to test the feasibility of an mHealth intervention promoting healthy nutrition, physical activity and GWG in women who begin pregnancy overweight or obese. txt4two is a parallel randomised control trial pilot recruiting women with a singleton, live gestation between 10(+0) and 17(+6) weeks at the first hospital antenatal clinic visit. Inclusion criteria are pre-pregnancy BMI > 25 kg/m(2) and mobile phone ownership. One hundred consenting women will be randomised to intervention or control groups at a 1:1 ratio. All participants will receive standard antenatal care. In addition, the txt4two intervention will be delivered from baseline to 36 weeks gestation and consists of a tailored suite of theoretically-grounded, evidence-based intervention strategies focusing on healthy nutrition, physical activity and GWG. This includes: mobile phone interactive text messages promoting positive health behaviours, goal setting and self-monitoring; video messages; an information website; and a private moderated Facebook® chat forum. The primary outcome is the feasibility of the intervention. Secondary outcomes include GWG and participants' knowledge and behaviour regarding diet and physical activity during pregnancy. Findings will inform the development of larger-scale mHealth programmes to improve the delivery of healthy pregnancy nutrition, physical activity and GWG, that could be widely translated and disseminated. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRNU111111544397 . Date of registration: 19 March 2014.

  7. Active video games as a tool to prevent excessive weight gain in adolescents: rationale, design and methods of a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive body weight, low physical activity and excessive sedentary time in youth are major public health concerns. A new generation of video games, the ones that require physical activity to play the games –i.e. active games- may be a promising alternative to traditional non-active games to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviors in youth. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the design of a study evaluating the effects of a family oriented active game intervention, incorporating several motivational elements, on anthropometrics and health behaviors in adolescents. Methods/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT), with non-active gaming adolescents aged 12 – 16 years old randomly allocated to a ten month intervention (receiving active games, as well as an encouragement to play) or a waiting-list control group (receiving active games after the intervention period). Primary outcomes are adolescents’ measured BMI-SDS (SDS = adjusted for mean standard deviation score), waist circumference-SDS, hip circumference and sum of skinfolds. Secondary outcomes are adolescents’ self-reported time spent playing active and non-active games, other sedentary activities and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. In addition, a process evaluation is conducted, assessing the sustainability of the active games, enjoyment, perceived competence, perceived barriers for active game play, game context, injuries from active game play, activity replacement and intention to continue playing the active games. Discussion This is the first adequately powered RCT including normal weight adolescents, evaluating a reasonably long period of provision of and exposure to active games. Next, strong elements are the incorporating motivational elements for active game play and a comprehensive process evaluation. This trial will provide evidence regarding the potential contribution of active games in prevention of excessive weight gain in

  8. Excess of Radiation Burden for Young Testicular Cancer Patients using Automatic Exposure Control and Contrast Agent on Whole-body Computed Tomography Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiniviita, Hannele; Kulmala, Jarmo; Pölönen, Tuukka; Määttänen, Heli; Järvinen, Hannu; Salminen, Eeva

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess patient dose from whole-body computed tomography (CT) in association with patient size, automatic exposure control (AEC) and intravenous (IV) contrast agent. Sixty-five testicular cancer patients (mean age 28 years) underwent altogether 279 whole-body CT scans from April 2000 to April 2011. The mean number of repeated examinations was 4.3. The GE LightSpeed 16 equipped with AEC and the Siemens Plus 4 CT scanners were used for imaging. Whole-body scans were performed with (216) and without (63) IV contrast. The ImPACT software was used to determine the effective and organ doses. Patient doses were independent (p < 0.41) of patient size when the Plus 4 device (mean 7.4 mSv, SD 1.7 mSv) was used, but with the LightSpeed 16 AEC device, the dose (mean 14 mSv, SD 4.6 mSv) increased significantly (p < 0.001) with waist cirfumference. Imaging with the IV contrast agent caused significantly higher (13% Plus 4, 35% LightSpeed 16) exposure than non-contrast imaging (p < 0.001). Great caution on the use of IV contrast agent and careful set-up of the AEC modulation parameters is recommended to avoid excessive radiation exposure on the whole-body CT imaging of young patients.

  9. Effective Strategies to Recruit Young Adults Into the TXT2BFiT mHealth Randomized Controlled Trial for Weight Gain Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestracci, Kate; Wong, Annette TY; Hebden, Lana; McGeechan, Kevin; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Harris, Mark F; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bauman, Adrian; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background Younger adults are difficult to engage in preventive health, yet in Australia they are gaining more weight and increasing in waist circumference faster than middle-to-older adults. A further challenge to engaging 18- to 35-year-olds in interventions is the limited reporting of outcomes of recruitment strategies. Objective This paper describes the outcomes of strategies used to recruit young adults to a randomized controlled trial (RCT), healthy lifestyle mHealth program, TXT2BFiT, for prevention of weight gain. The progression from enquiry through eligibility check to randomization into the trial and the costs of recruitment strategies are reported. Factors associated with nonparticipation are explored. Methods Participants were recruited either via letters of invitation from general practitioners (GPs) or via electronic or print advertisements, including Facebook and Google—social media and advertising—university electronic newsletters, printed posters, mailbox drops, and newspapers. Participants recruited from GP invitation letters had an appointment booked with their GP for eligibility screening. Those recruited from other methods were sent an information pack to seek approval to participate from their own GP. The total number and source of enquiries were categorized according to eligibility and subsequent completion of steps to enrolment. Cost data and details of recruitment strategies were recorded. Results From 1181 enquiries in total from all strategies, 250 (21.17%) participants were randomized. A total of 5311 invitation letters were sent from 12 GP practices—16 participating GPs. A total of 131 patients enquired with 68 participants randomized (68/74 of those eligible, 92%). The other recruitment methods yielded the remaining 182 randomized participants. Enrolment from print media was 26% of enquiries, from electronic media was 20%, and from other methods was 3%. Across all strategies the average cost of recruitment was Australian Dollar

  10. Effective Strategies to Recruit Young Adults Into the TXT2BFiT mHealth Randomized Controlled Trial for Weight Gain Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Stephanie R; Balestracci, Kate; Wong, Annette Ty; Hebden, Lana; McGeechan, Kevin; Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth; Harris, Mark F; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Bauman, Adrian; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-06-05

    Younger adults are difficult to engage in preventive health, yet in Australia they are gaining more weight and increasing in waist circumference faster than middle-to-older adults. A further challenge to engaging 18- to 35-year-olds in interventions is the limited reporting of outcomes of recruitment strategies. This paper describes the outcomes of strategies used to recruit young adults to a randomized controlled trial (RCT), healthy lifestyle mHealth program, TXT2BFiT, for prevention of weight gain. The progression from enquiry through eligibility check to randomization into the trial and the costs of recruitment strategies are reported. Factors associated with nonparticipation are explored. Participants were recruited either via letters of invitation from general practitioners (GPs) or via electronic or print advertisements, including Facebook and Google-social media and advertising-university electronic newsletters, printed posters, mailbox drops, and newspapers. Participants recruited from GP invitation letters had an appointment booked with their GP for eligibility screening. Those recruited from other methods were sent an information pack to seek approval to participate from their own GP. The total number and source of enquiries were categorized according to eligibility and subsequent completion of steps to enrolment. Cost data and details of recruitment strategies were recorded. From 1181 enquiries in total from all strategies, 250 (21.17%) participants were randomized. A total of 5311 invitation letters were sent from 12 GP practices-16 participating GPs. A total of 131 patients enquired with 68 participants randomized (68/74 of those eligible, 92%). The other recruitment methods yielded the remaining 182 randomized participants. Enrolment from print media was 26% of enquiries, from electronic media was 20%, and from other methods was 3%. Across all strategies the average cost of recruitment was Australian Dollar (AUD) $139 per person. The least expensive

  11. Acting to gain information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenchein, Stanley J.; Burns, J. Brian; Chapman, David; Kaelbling, Leslie P.; Kahn, Philip; Nishihara, H. Keith; Turk, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This report is concerned with agents that act to gain information. In previous work, we developed agent models combining qualitative modeling with real-time control. That work, however, focused primarily on actions that affect physical states of the environment. The current study extends that work by explicitly considering problems of active information-gathering and by exploring specialized aspects of information-gathering in computational perception, learning, and language. In our theoretical investigations, we analyzed agents into their perceptual and action components and identified these with elements of a state-machine model of control. The mathematical properties of each was developed in isolation and interactions were then studied. We considered the complexity dimension and the uncertainty dimension and related these to intelligent-agent design issues. We also explored active information gathering in visual processing. Working within the active vision paradigm, we developed a concept of 'minimal meaningful measurements' suitable for demand-driven vision. We then developed and tested an architecture for ongoing recognition and interpretation of visual information. In the area of information gathering through learning, we explored techniques for coping with combinatorial complexity. We also explored information gathering through explicit linguistic action by considering the nature of conversational rules, coordination, and situated communication behavior.

  12. PI fussy multimodal controller of programmed gains for the operation in the wide range of a turbo gas unit; Controlador PI difuso multimodo de ganancias programadas para la operacion en rango amplio de una unidad turbogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Martinez, Arnulfo A.

    2004-11-15

    In this thesis work it was developed a new control algorithm which merges the characteristics of multimode control, gain scheduling control and fuzzy logic techniques, in order to obtain a control system which gives a better gas turbine speed and load control performance, as compared to the current control systems, which are based on conventional PI control algorithms. This new algorithm is intended to provide a better quality control system, which provides both better disturbance rejection response, as well as better reference tracking response. Switching logic (multimode control) and interpolation strategy (gain scheduling) implementation problems are solved applying fuzzy controllers, which retain the advantages of both strategies for non lineal processes in wide operation regions. Since the controllers implemented by the fuzzy system rules are of the same type (PI, Proportional Integral), the multimode gain scheduling fuzzy controller design was reduced to the design of a gain scheduling fuzzy PI controller (PI-GSF). In order to define the gain scheduling scheme, three well-known gain scheduling fuzzy controller design approaches were analyzed and the interpolation mechanism of each of them were compared. The incorporation of a generalized PI controller structure in the local controllers that conform the PI-GSF (see chapter 4), allowed to generate a better control action for both disturbance rejection and reference tracking. As a final product a PI-GSF controller was obtained, which constitutes a more effective control strategy and showed to be a viable solution to the outlined technological problem. With the PI-GSF controller the speed control performance of the generating unit during startup stage, as well as the load control during the generation stage were considerably improved, as compared to the performance obtained with the conventional PI. [Spanish] En este trabajo de tesis se desarrollo un nuevo algoritmo de control que conjunta las caracteristicas de

  13. Transvenous DSA: ECG-controlled cardial effects and venous complications after pre-atrial injection of nonionic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Sigel, H.

    1986-01-01

    Transvenous DSA is a diagnostic technique for ambulatory examination that is well tolerated by patients, although it is commonly known that bolus injection of contrast medium for examination of the cardiovascular system may affect the cardiovascular hemodynamic process. The prospective study described was intended to reveal in 100 patients the effects on ECG data, as well as clinical symptoms of non-tolerance of contrast medium (nonionic, with high iodine content, Iopamidol 370), applied by central pre-atrial injection. In addition, catheterization-induced complications in the venous system of the arm were studied in 130 patients. Change of heart rate was the most frequent effect observed (increase in 49% of patients pretreated with Buscopan, decrease in 36% of non-pretreated patients). The second next effects were supraventricular and ventricular ES (20%), minor prolongations of PQ and QRS intervals (14%), and ST lowering (3%), without clinical symptons. In one case, an attack of Angina pectoris was observed, another patient developed a cutane allergy. After catheterization of brachial vein, thromboses were observed in 3% of patients, as well as local inflammations in 6%, short attacks of fever in 2.3%. The complications were observed for the most part in cases where re-sterilised catheters had been used. (orig.) [de

  14. Automated Gain Control and Internal Calibration With External Ion Accumulation Capillary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, Mikhail E.(VISITORS); Zhang, Rui (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Strittmatter, Eric F.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Prior, David C.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Tang, Keqi (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Smith, Richard D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-08-15

    When combined with capillary LC separations, Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (ESI-FTICR MS) has increasingly been applied for advanced characterization of proteolytic digests. Incorporation of external (to the ICR cell) ion accumulation multipoles with FTICR for ion pre selection and accumulation has enhanced the dynamic range, sensitivity and duty cycle of measurements. However, the highly variable ion production rate from an LC separation can result in overfilling of the external trap, resulting in m/z discrimination and fragmentation of peptide ions. An excessive space charge trapped in the ICR cell causes significant shifts in the detected ion cyclotron frequencies, reducing the achievable mass measurement accuracy (MMA) for protein identification. To eliminate m/z discrimination in the external ion trap, further increase the duty cycle and improve MMA, we developed a capability for data-dependent adjustment of ion accumulation times in the course of an LC separation, referred to as Automated Gain Control (AGC), in combination with low kinetic energy gated ion trapping and internal calibration using a dual-channel electrodynamic ion funnel. The system was initially evaluated in the analysis of a 0.5 mg/mL tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin. The implementation of LC/ESI/AGC/FTICR with internal calibration gave rise to a {approx} 10-fold increase in the number of identified tryptic peptides within mass measurement accuracy of 2 ppm as compared to that detected during the conventional LC/FTICR run with a fixed ion accumulation time and external calibration.

  15. Short term reproducibility of a high contrast 3-D isotropic optic nerve imaging sequence in healthy controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Robert L.; Smith, Alex K.; Mawn, Louise A.; Smith, Seth A.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The optic nerve (ON) plays a crucial role in human vision transporting all visual information from the retina to the brain for higher order processing. There are many diseases that affect the ON structure such as optic neuritis, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Because the ON is the sole pathway for visual information from the retina to areas of higher level processing, measures of ON damage have been shown to correlate well with visual deficits. Increased intracranial pressure has been shown to correlate with the size of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the ON. These measures are generally taken at an arbitrary point along the nerve and do not account for changes along the length of the ON. We propose a high contrast and high-resolution 3-D acquired isotropic imaging sequence optimized for ON imaging. We have acquired scan-rescan data using the optimized sequence and a current standard of care protocol for 10 subjects. We show that this sequence has superior contrast-to-noise ratio to the current standard of care while achieving a factor of 11 higher resolution. We apply a previously published automatic pipeline to segment the ON and CSF sheath and measure the size of each individually. We show that these measures of ON size have lower short- term reproducibility than the population variance and the variability along the length of the nerve. We find that the proposed imaging protocol is (1) useful in detecting population differences and local changes and (2) a promising tool for investigating biomarkers related to structural changes of the ON.

  16. Contrast Media Use in Radiation Oncology: A Prospective, Controlled Educational Intervention Study with Retrospective Analysis of Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Christopher A.; Mutter, Robert W.; Shapiro, Lauren Q.; Zhang, Zhigang; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Yahalom, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intravenous contrast media (ICM) administration is recommended as part of radiation therapy (RT) simulation in a variety of clinical scenarios, but can cause adverse events. We sought to assess radiation oncology resident knowledge about ICM, and to determine if an educational intervention (EI) could improve this level of knowledge. In conjunction, we retrospectively analyzed risk factors and adverse events related to ICM use before and after the EI to determine whether any improvements in patient outcomes could be realized. Methods Over 2 years, 21 residents in radiation oncology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) participated in a pretest-EI-posttest study based on the ACR’s Manual on Contrast Media. Medical and RT records were reviewed, and ICM use, risk factors and adverse events were recorded. Results There was no significant difference in resident understanding of ICM use in residents of different years of training (p=0.85). Understanding of ICM use increased in residents that attended the EI (p<0.05), but this was not sustained 1 year after the EI (p=0.48). Of the 6852 RT simulations that were performed at MSKCC, 1350 (19.7%) involved ICM. Mild adverse events occurred in a few patients (<5%) simulated with ICM, but there was no difference in the number of risk factors or adverse events before and after the EI. Conclusions The EI effectively improved short-term understanding of ICM use. However, the effect was not sustained. The frequency of adverse events related to ICM use was small and not significantly impacted by the EI. PMID:21129689

  17. Ring-enhancement pattern on contrast-enhanced CT predicts adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hara, Kazuo; Hijioka, Susumu; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Ogura, Takeshi; Obayashi, Tomohiko; Shinagawa, Akihide; Sakaguchi, Masafumi; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Kato, Mina; Niwa, Yasumasa; Yamao, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASC) is a rare malignant neoplasm of the pancreas, exhibiting both glandular and squamous differentiation. However, little is known about its imaging features. This study examined the imaging features of pancreatic ASC. We evaluated images of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). As controls, solid pancreatic neoplasms matched in a 2:1 ratio to ASC cases for age, sex and tumor location were also evaluated. Twenty-three ASC cases were examined, and 46 solid pancreatic neoplasms (43 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and one acinar cell carcinoma) were matched as controls. Univariate analysis demonstrated significant differences in the outline and vascularity of tumors on contrast-enhanced CT in the ASC and control groups (P outline, cystic changes, and the ring-enhancement pattern on contrast-enhanced CT were seen to have significant predictive powers by stepwise forward logistic regression analysis (P = 0.044, P = 0.010, and P = 0.001, respectively). Of the three, the ring-enhancement pattern was the most useful, and its predictive diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for diagnosis of ASC were 65.2%, 89.6%, 75.0% and 84.3%, respectively. These results demonstrate that presence of the ring-enhancement pattern on contrast-enhanced CT is the most useful predictive factor for ASC. Copyright © 2014 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Higher gestational weight gain is associated with increasing offspring birth weight independent of maternal glycemic control in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna L; Parellada, Clara B; Ringholm, Lene

    2014-01-01

    ; P = 0.02) and birth weight SD score (β = 0.06; P = 0.008) when adjusted for prepregnancy BMI, HbA1c at 36 weeks, smoking, parity, and ethnicity. CONCLUSIONS: Higher gestational weight gain in women with type 1 diabetes was associated with increasing offspring birth weight independent of glycemic......OBJECTIVE: We evaluate the association between gestational weight gain and offspring birth weight in singleton term pregnancies of women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: One hundred fifteen consecutive women referred at ... (prepregnancy BMI Women...

  19. Antidepressants and Weight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015;37:46. Blumenthal SR, et al. An electronic health records study of long-term weight gain following antidepressant ... your agreement to the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy linked below. Terms and Conditions Privacy Policy ...

  20. Weight gain - unintentional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes Hormone changes or medical problems can also cause unintentional weight gain. This may be due to: Cushing syndrome Underactive thyroid, or low thyroid (hypothyroidism) Polycystic ovary syndrome Menopause Pregnancy Bloating, or swelling ...

  1. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Technology-Based Approach for Preventing Excess Weight Gain during Pregnancy among Women with Overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana M. Chao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveOverweight/obesity and excess weight gain during pregnancy are associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Few interventions have been effective in limiting gestational weight gain among women with overweight or obesity. This pilot, randomized clinical trial compared treatment as usual (TAU to a lifestyle modification program delivered via phone for the prevention of excess gestational weight gain in women who had overweight or obesity.MethodsParticipants included 41 pregnant women with a body mass index (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 (mean age = 28.7 ± 5.8 years; mean pre-gravid BMI = 31.2 ± 6.2 kg/m2; 54% black, 39% white. The intervention group (n = 20 received weekly telephone counseling sessions and used WiFi scales to monitor their weight from weeks 16 to 36 of pregnancy. We compared differences in weight and birth outcomes for the intervention vs. the TAU group (n = 21.ResultsThe intervention and TAU groups did not differ with respect to: gestational weight gain (15.5 ± 5.3 vs. 13.3 ± 6.8 kg, respectively; proportion gaining above the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommended weight range (83 vs. 70%; and weight gain from pre-pregnancy weight to 6 weeks postpartum (4.8 ± 4.6 vs. 3.0 ± 5.5 kg. Other birth and health outcomes also did not differ.ConclusionA telemedicine intervention designed to decrease logistical burden on participants was not more successful in reducing excessive weight gain during pregnancy as compared to TAU. Future studies should examine more intensive forms of remote treatment beginning earlier in pregnancy as well as interventions promoting a healthy weight prior to pregnancy.

  2. Numerical study on the selective excitation of Helmholtz-Gauss beams in end-pumped solid-state digital lasers with the control of the laser gain transverse position provided by off-axis end pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ko-Fan; Chu, Shu-Chun

    2018-03-01

    This study proposes a complete and unified method for selective excitation of any specified nearly nondiffracting Helmholtz-Gauss (HzG) beam in end-pumped solid-state digital lasers. Four types of the HzG beams: cosine-Gauss beams, Bessel-Gauss beams, Mathieu-Gauss beams, and, in particular, parabolic-Gauss beams are successfully demonstrated to be generated with the proposed methods. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, parabolic-Gauss beams have not yet been directly generated from any kind of laser system. The numerical results of this study show that one can successfully achieve any lasing HzG beams directly from the solid-state digital lasers with only added control of the laser gain transverse position provided by off-axis end pumping. This study also presents a practical digital laser set-up for easily manipulating off-axis pumping in order to achieve the control of the laser gain transverse gain position in digital lasers. The reported results in this study provide advancement of digital lasers in dynamically generating nondiffracting beams. The control of the digital laser cavity gain position creates the possibility of achieving real-time selection of more laser modes in digital lasers, and it is worth further investigation in the future.

  3. Cranial nerve contrast using nerve-specific fluorophores improved by paired-agent imaging with indocyanine green as a control agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Veronica C.; Vuong, Victoria D.; Wilson, Todd; Wewel, Joshua; Byrne, Richard W.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2017-09-01

    Nerve preservation during surgery is critical because damage can result in significant morbidity. This remains a challenge especially for skull base surgeries where cranial nerves (CNs) are involved because visualization and access are particularly poor in that location. We present a paired-agent imaging method to enhance identification of CNs using nerve-specific fluorophores. Two myelin-targeting imaging agents were evaluated, Oxazine 4 and Rhodamine 800, and coadministered with a control agent, indocyanine green, either intravenously or topically in rats. Fluorescence imaging was performed on excised brains ex vivo, and nerve contrast was evaluated via paired-agent ratiometric data analysis. Although contrast was improved among all experimental groups using paired-agent imaging compared to conventional, solely targeted imaging, Oxazine 4 applied directly exhibited the greatest enhancement, with a minimum 3 times improvement in CNs delineation. This work highlights the importance of accounting for nonspecific signal of targeted agents, and demonstrates that paired-agent imaging is one method capable of doing so. Although staining, rinsing, and imaging protocols need to be optimized, these findings serve as a demonstration for the potential use of paired-agent imaging to improve contrast of CNs, and consequently, surgical outcome.

  4. Receiver gain function: the actual NMR receiver gain

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Huaping; Harwood, John S.; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The observed NMR signal size depends on the receiver gain parameter. We propose a receiver gain function to characterize how much the raw FID is amplified by the receiver as a function of the receiver gain setting. Although the receiver is linear for a fixed gain setting, the actual gain of the receiver may differ from what the gain setting suggests. Nevertheless, for a given receiver, we demonstrate that the receiver gain function can be calibrated. Such a calibration enables accurate compar...

  5. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of Naltrexone to Counteract Antipsychotic-Associated Weight Gain: Proof of Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Tek, Cenk; Ratliff, Joseph; Reutenauer, Erin; Ganguli, Rohan; O’Malley, Stephanie S.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from higher rates of obesity and related morbidity and mortality than the general population. Women with schizophrenia are at particular risk for antipsychotic-induced weight gain, obesity, and related medical disorders such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given preclinical studies revealing the role of the endogenous opioid systems in human appetite and the potential of antipsychotic medications to interfere with this system, we hypothesized that op...

  6. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. METHODS: In the North European Small......-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. RESULTS: The average dose during the second year of the randomised...... trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0...

  7. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study of naltrexone to counteract antipsychotic-associated weight gain: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tek, Cenk; Ratliff, Joseph; Reutenauer, Erin; Ganguli, Rohan; O'Malley, Stephanie S

    2014-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia experience higher rates of obesity as well as related morbidity and mortality than the general population does. Women with schizophrenia are at particular risk for antipsychotic-associated weight gain, obesity, and related medical disorders such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given preclinical studies revealing the role of the endogenous opioid systems in human appetite and the potential of antipsychotic medications to interfere with this system, we hypothesized that opioid antagonists may be beneficial in arresting antipsychotic-associated weight gain and promoting further weight loss in women with schizophrenia. In the present study, 24 overweight women with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were randomized to placebo or naltrexone (NTX) 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a change in body weight from baseline. The patients in the NTX group had significant weight loss (-3.40 kg) compared with weight gain (+1.37 kg) in the patients in the placebo group. Mainly, nondiabetic subjects lost weight in the NTX arm. These data support the need to further investigate the role of D2 blockade in reducing food reward-based overeating. A larger study addressing the weaknesses of this pilot study is currently underway.

  8. [Contrast-induced nephropathy in patients at risk of renal failure undergoing computed tomography: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Catalá-López, Ferrán

    2010-09-11

    We evaluated and quantified by meta-analysis techniques the incidence of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) in patients at risk undergoing computed tomography (CT). We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled clinical trials designated to evaluate the nephrotoxicity related to iso-osmolar contrast media (IOCM) compared to low-osmolar contrast media (LOCM). Main electronic databases searched included PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge and Virtual Health Library (BVS-BIREME), as well as abstracts presented at related scientific societies meetings. Prior to data extraction, definitions of nephrotoxicity and risk population were established. Besides meta-analysis, the global agreement between CIN definitions was evaluated with Mantel-Haenszel stratified test. Five studies were included with 716 randomized patients. When CIN was defined as increased serum creatinine (SCr)>or=25%, the relative risk (RR) was 0.71 (CI95%: 0.40-1.26)-in favor of IOCM-and when it was defined as SCr>or=0.5mg/dL it showed a RR 1.48 (CI95%: 0.37-5.87)-favoring LOCM-in the four studies used this criterion. Mantel-Haenszel stratified test was chi2=2.51 (p=0.8). In patients with renal failure undergoing CT there is a similar risk of CIN with the administration of any contrast media studied. CIN incidence depends on the chosen criteria and is lower with the definition of SCr>or=0.5mg/dL at 24-72h. No agreement was found between CIN definitions were adopted. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study on the effects of lutein and zeaxanthin on photostress recovery, glare disability, and chromatic contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Billy R; Fletcher, Laura M; Roos, Franz; Wittwer, Jonas; Schalch, Wolfgang

    2014-12-02

    Past studies have shown that higher macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and lutein (L) and zeaxanthin (Z) supplementation are related to improvements in glare disability, photostress recovery, and chromatic contrast. This study assessed those links using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design. The visual effects of 1 year of supplementing L (10 mg/d) and Z (2 mg/d) were investigated. One hundred fifteen young, healthy subjects were recruited and randomized into the study (58 received placebo, 57 L+Z). Several dependent measures were collected at baseline and then once every 3 months: serum L and Z measured by HPLC chromatography; MPOD measured using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry; photostress recovery assessed by measuring the time needed to recover visual acquisition of a grating target after 30 seconds of an intense xenon white flash exposure; glare disability evaluated as the energy in a surrounding annulus necessary to veil a central grating target; and chromatic contrast assessed by measuring thresholds for a yellow grating target superposed on a 460-nm background. Macular pigment optical density increased significantly versus placebo at all eccentricities (10, 30, 60, and 105 minutes from the center of the macula). Serum L and Z also increased significantly by the first follow-up visit (at 3 months), and remained elevated throughout the intervention period of 1 year. Chromatic contrast and photostress recovery time improved significantly versus placebo. Glare disability was correlated with macular pigment density throughout the study period but did not increase significantly in the treated group. Daily supplementation with L+Z resulted in significant increase in serum levels and MPOD and improvements in chromatic contrast and recovery from photostress. These results are consistent with past studies showing that increasing MPOD leads to improved visual performance. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00909090.). Copyright 2014 The

  10. Climate vs. carbon dioxide controls on biomass burning: a model analysis of the glacial-interglacial contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M. Martin; Prentice, I. C.; Harrison, S. P.

    2014-02-01

    Climate controls fire regimes through its influence on the amount and types of fuel present and their dryness; CO2 availability, in turn, constrains primary production by limiting photosynthetic activity in plants. However, although fuel accumulation depends on biomass production, and hence CO2 availability, the links between atmospheric CO2 and biomass burning are not well known. Here a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model (the Land surface Processes and eXchanges model, LPX) is used to attribute glacial-interglacial changes in biomass burning to CO2 increase, which would be expected to increase primary production and therefore fuel loads even in the absence of climate change, vs. climate change effects. Four general circulation models provided Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climate anomalies - that is, differences from the pre-industrial (PI) control climate - from the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase 2, allowing the construction of four scenarios for LGM climate. Modelled carbon fluxes in biomass burning were corrected for the model's observed biases in contemporary biome-average values. With LGM climate and low CO2 (185 ppm) effects included, the modelled global flux was 70 to 80% lower at the LGM than in PI time. LGM climate with pre-industrial CO2 (280 ppm) however yielded unrealistic results, with global and Northern Hemisphere biomass burning fluxes greater than in the pre-industrial climate. Using the PI CO2 concentration increased the modelled LGM biomass burning fluxes for all climate models and latitudinal bands to between four and ten times their values under LGM CO2 concentration. It is inferred that a substantial part of the increase in biomass burning after the LGM must be attributed to the effect of increasing CO2 concentration on productivity and fuel load. Today, by analogy, both rising CO2 and global warming must be considered as risk factors for increasing biomass burning. Both effects need to be included in models to

  11. Climate versus carbon dioxide controls on biomass burning: a model analysis of the glacial-interglacial contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, M. Martin; Prentice, I. C.; Harrison, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    Climate controls fire regimes through its influence on the amount and types of fuel present and their dryness. CO2 concentration constrains primary production by limiting photosynthetic activity in plants. However, although fuel accumulation depends on biomass production, and hence on CO2 concentration, the quantitative relationship between atmospheric CO2 concentration and biomass burning is not well understood. Here a fire-enabled dynamic global vegetation model (the Land surface Processes and eXchanges model, LPX) is used to attribute glacial-interglacial changes in biomass burning to an increase in CO2, which would be expected to increase primary production and therefore fuel loads even in the absence of climate change, vs. climate change effects. Four general circulation models provided last glacial maximum (LGM) climate anomalies - that is, differences from the pre-industrial (PI) control climate - from the Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase~2, allowing the construction of four scenarios for LGM climate. Modelled carbon fluxes from biomass burning were corrected for the model's observed prediction biases in contemporary regional average values for biomes. With LGM climate and low CO2 (185 ppm) effects included, the modelled global flux at the LGM was in the range of 1.0-1.4 Pg C year-1, about a third less than that modelled for PI time. LGM climate with pre-industrial CO2 (280 ppm) yielded unrealistic results, with global biomass burning fluxes similar to or even greater than in the pre-industrial climate. It is inferred that a substantial part of the increase in biomass burning after the LGM must be attributed to the effect of increasing CO2 concentration on primary production and fuel load. Today, by analogy, both rising CO2 and global warming must be considered as risk factors for increasing biomass burning. Both effects need to be included in models to project future fire risks.

  12. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  13. Quantifying topographic and saturation frequency controls on magnitude and duration of hot moments in contrasting biogeochemical hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, J. M.; Band, L. E.

    2010-12-01

    We combine high frequency field measurements and terrain analysis to assess the combined effects of topography and wetting frequency on nutrient processing for different landscape patches. This work is conducted in Pond Branch, a 40 ha reference catchment of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study LTER site. Pond Branch exhibits regular summer peaks in nitrate loads, the majority of which is exported at baseflow suggesting that non-storm periods may play an important role in the nutrient dynamics at this site. Terrain analysis of a high resolution LiDAR DEM enables identification of hotspots of solute transport, retention and transformation. On hillslopes, breaks in slope or small depressions along dominant flowpaths can have important implications for nutrient cycling and export. In riparian zones, secondary channels and riparian low spots are critical locations for the hydrological and biogeochemical response of the watershed. Furthermore, high frequency measurements of soil moisture and oxygen levels in these locations reveal that the magnitude and frequency of precipitation events is an important control on hotspot efficacy. Implications of using coarser resolution DEMs that do not capture this topographic variability are discussed.

  14. Direct laser writing of a low-loss waveguide with independent control over the transverse dimension and the refractive index contrast between the core and the cladding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masselin, Pascal; Bychkov, Eugène; Coq, David Le

    2016-08-01

    In this Letter, we present the realization of a low-loss waveguide in a chalcogenide glass by direct laser writing technique in a particular configuration that allows the independent control over the diameter of the core and the magnitude of the refractive index contrast with the cladding. The waveguide is of multicore type and composed of 19 channels arranged on a hexagonal lattice. Each channel is obtained by stacking voxels of refractive index variation obtained by static exposure to femtosecond laser pulse burst. The distance between the channels can be used to vary the diameter of the waveguide, while the duration of laser burst controls the magnitude of the effective index and the propagation loss. We demonstrate that it can be reduced down to 0.11 dB/cm.

  15. Control of asthma for reducing the risk of bronchospasm in asthmatics undergoing general anesthesia and/or intravascular administration of radiographic contrast media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardi, Gennaro; Salzillo, Antonello; De Blasio, Francesco; D'Amato, Gennaro

    2009-07-01

    It is well known that patients suffering from bronchial asthma undergoing surgical procedures requiring general anesthesia (GA) or the administration of water soluble radiographic contrast media (RCM) have an increased risk of potentially severe bronchospasm. Nevertheless, little attention has been devoted to the possible preventive measures to reduce the occurrence of this potentially life-threatening event. It has been shown that the most important risk factor for bronchospasm during GA induction and/or the use of RCM is represented by a high degree of bronchial hyperreactivity with airway instability not adequately controlled by long-term anti-inflammatory treatment. The aim of this commentary is to underline the need for an accurate clinical and functional evaluation of asthmatics undergoing surgical procedures requiring GA or radiological procedures requiring the administration of RCM, as well as to suggest a stepwise preventive pharmacological approach for reducing the risk of bronchospasm. The authors' suggestions represent clinical experience of the respiratory section of an internal hospital-based working group whose aim is the prevention of asthmatic/anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions during the administration of anesthetics and/or RCM. The MEDLINE database was searched with a combination of keywords: general anesthesia, radio contrast media [and] bronchial asthma. The main limitation of this commentary is the scarcity of available literature on this topic. The authors suggest a therapeutic approach before surgical procedures requiring GA and/or RCM administration based on the degree of asthma control as assessed by clinical/functional criteria. In this setting, in addition to the necessity of obtaining the best control of airway reactivity, the authors suggest that an optimal control of asthma symptoms in 'real life' conditions might likely constitute a safety issue in asthmatic patients in the case of emergency procedures.

  16. Do intravenous N-acetylcysteine and sodium bicarbonate prevent high osmolal contrast-induced acute kidney injury? A randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jose Inda-Filho

    Full Text Available N-acetylcysteine (NAC or sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, singly or combined, inconsistently prevent patients exposed to radiographic contrast media from developing contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI.We asked whether intravenous isotonic saline and either NaHCO3 in 5% dextrose or else a high dose of NAC in 5% dextrose prevent CI-AKI in outpatients exposed to high-osmolal iodinated contrast medium more than does saline alone.This completed prospective, parallel, superiority, open-label, controlled, computer-randomized, single-center, Brazilian trial (NCT01612013 hydrated 500 adult outpatients (214 at high risk of developing CI-AKI exposed to ioxitalamate during elective coronary angiography and ventriculography. From 1 hour before through 6 hours after exposure, 126 patients (group 1 received a high dose of NAC and saline, 125 (group 2 received NaHCO3 and saline, 124 (group 3 received both treatments, and 125 (group 4 received only saline.Groups were similar with respect to age, gender, weight, pre-existing renal dysfunction, hypertension, medication, and baseline serum creatinine and serum cystatin C, but diabetes mellitus was significantly less prevalent in group 1. CI-AKI incidence 72 hours after exposure to contrast medium was 51.4% (257/500, measured as serum creatinine > (baseline+0.3 mg/dL and/or serum cystatin C > (1.1 · baseline, and 7.6% (38/500, measured as both serum creatinine and serum cystatin C > (baseline+0.3 mg/dL or > (1.25 · baseline. CI-AKI incidence measured less sensitively was similar among groups. Measured more sensitively, incidence in group 1 was significantly (p<0.05 lower than in groups 2 and 3 but not group 4; adjustment for confounding by infused volume equalized incidence in groups 1 and 3.We found no evidence that intravenous isotonic saline and either NaHCO3 or else a high dose of NAC prevent CI-AKI in outpatients exposed to high osmolal iodinated contrast medium more than does saline alone

  17. Intravascular ultrasound guidance to minimize the use of iodine contrast in percutaneous coronary intervention: the MOZART (Minimizing cOntrast utiliZation With IVUS Guidance in coRonary angioplasTy) randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, José; Guedes, Cristiano; Soares, Paulo; Zalc, Silvio; Campos, Carlos M; Lopes, Augusto C; Spadaro, André G; Perin, Marco A; Filho, Antonio Esteves; Takimura, Celso K; Ribeiro, Expedito; Kalil-Filho, Roberto; Edelman, Elazer R; Serruys, Patrick W; Lemos, Pedro A

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance on the final volume of contrast agent used in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). To date, few approaches have been described to reduce the final dose of contrast agent in PCIs. We hypothesized that IVUS might serve as an alternative imaging tool to angiography in many steps during PCI, thereby reducing the use of iodine contrast. A total of 83 patients were randomized to angiography-guided PCI or IVUS-guided PCI; both groups were treated according to a pre-defined meticulous procedural strategy. The primary endpoint was the total volume contrast agent used during PCI. Patients were followed clinically for an average of 4 months. The median total volume of contrast was 64.5 ml (interquartile range [IQR]: 42.8 to 97.0 ml; minimum, 19 ml; maximum, 170 ml) in the angiography-guided group versus 20.0 ml (IQR: 12.5 to 30.0 ml; minimum, 3 ml; maximum, 54 ml) in the IVUS-guided group (p MOZART]; NCT01947335). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Topiramate for prevention of olanzapine associated weight gain and metabolic dysfunction in schizophrenia: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Preeta Kaur; Rehan, H S; Unni, K E S; Gupta, Neeraj

    2010-05-01

    Olanzapine associated weight gain (WG) is a major concern in patients with schizophrenia. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of topiramate to prevent olanzapine induced WG in these cases. We also studied various metabolic parameters. In this 12-week, double-blind, parallel group study, seventy-two drug-naïve, first-episode schizophrenia patients were randomized to receive olanzapine+placebo (olanzapine group) or olanzapine+topiramate (100mg/day) (topiramate group). Weight, body mass index, fasting glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (IR), leptin, lipids and blood pressure were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks. The patients were clinically evaluated using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and were monitored for adverse effects. Topiramate resulted in a weight loss of 1.27+/-2.28 kg (pweight gain and adverse metabolic effects. It also results in a greater clinical improvement when used with olanzapine in schizophrenia. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Learn and gain

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Alami, Suhair Eyad Jamal

    2013-01-01

    Initiating the slogan ""love it, live it"", Learn and Gain includes eight short stories, chosen to illustrate various modes of narration, as well as to provoke reflection and discussion on a range of issues. All texts utilized here illustrate how great writers can, with their insight and gift for words, help us to see the world we live in, in new probing and exciting ways. What characterises the book, the author believes, is the integration of the skills of literary competence, communicative c...

  20. Extract of Irish potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) decreases body weight gain and adiposity and improves glucose control in the mouse model of diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubow, Stan; Hobson, Luc; Iskandar, Michèle M; Sabally, Kebba; Donnelly, Danielle J; Agellon, Luis B

    2014-11-01

    Both sexes of mice were fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks without and with polyphenolic-rich potato extracts (PRPE) of cultivars Onaway and Russet Burbank. PRPE attenuated weight gain in male and female mice by as much as 63.2%, which was associated mostly with a reduction in adiposity. Mice receiving PRPE showed enhanced capacity for blood glucose clearance. Sex differences regarding the impact of HFD and PRPE on plasma levels of insulin, ghrelin, leptin, gastric inhibitory peptide, and resistin were noted. PRPE may serve as part of a preventative dietary strategy against the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Melatonin for Reducing Weight Gain Following Administration of Atypical Antipsychotic Olanzapine for Adolescents with Bipolar Disorder: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Seyed-Ali; Solhi, Mahmoud; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate melatonin effectiveness in weight gain reduction following olanzapine use for 11-17-year-old bipolar disorder patients. Seventy-seven adolescent outpatients, subsequent to their initial diagnosis of bipolar I disorder by a psychiatrist, entered this study. After assessing inclusion and exclusion criteria, 48 patients consented to participate. Twenty-four patients were allocated to receive olanzapine, lithium carbonate, and melatonin, and 24 patients were allocated to receive olanzapine, lithium carbonate, and placebo by simple randomization. The Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) was performed at baseline. Before treatment and after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment, weight, height, and body mass index (BMI) were measured. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure and t-test were used to analyze data. Nineteen patients in each group finished the study and their data were entered for analysis. Mean rise in BMI in the melatonin group compared with placebo (2.45 vs. 3.25 respectively) was marginally significant (t = 1.936; df = 36; p = 0.061). ANOVA with repeated measure also showed a marginally significant difference (F = 3.74; df = 1; p = 0.061) between groups and across time in regard to BMI. Mean body weight rise in the melatonin group compared with the placebo group (5.8 kg vs. 8.2 kg respectively) was marginally significant (t = 1.923; df = 28; p = 0.065). ANOVA with repeated measure also showed a marginally significant difference (F = 3.73; df = 1.1; p = 0.056) between groups and across time for body weight. Coadministration of melatonin with olanzapine and lithium carbonate in adolescents with bipolar disorder could reduce the sharp weight gain side effect of these drugs to near significance.

  2. Optomechanical transistor with mechanical gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. Z.; Tian, Lin; Li, Yong

    2018-04-01

    We study an optomechanical transistor, where an input field can be transferred and amplified unidirectionally in a cyclic three-mode optomechanical system. In this system, the mechanical resonator is coupled simultaneously to two cavity modes. We show that it only requires a finite mechanical gain to achieve the nonreciprocal amplification. Here the nonreciprocity is caused by the phase difference between the linearized optomechanical couplings that breaks the time-reversal symmetry of this system. The amplification arises from the mechanical gain, which provides an effective phonon bath that pumps the mechanical mode coherently. This effect is analogous to the stimulated emission of atoms, where the probe field can be amplified when its frequency is in resonance with that of the anti-Stokes transition. We show that by choosing optimal parameters, this optomechanical transistor can reach perfect unidirectionality accompanied with strong amplification. In addition, the presence of the mechanical gain can result in ultralong delay in the phase of the probe field, which provides an alternative to controlling light transport in optomechanical systems.

  3. Energy gains from lattice-enabled nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The energy gain of a system is defined as the ratio of its output energy divided by the energy provided to operate the system. Most familiar systems have energy gains less than one due to various inefficiencies. By contrast, lattice-enabled nuclear reactions (LENR) offer high energy gains. Theoretical values in excess of 1000 are possible. Energy gains over 100 have already been reported. But, they have not yet been sustained for commercially significant durations. This article summarizes the current status of LENR energy gains. (author)

  4. Kinetic analysis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the liver of body-temperature-controlled mice using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging and an empirical mathematical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kenya; Assanai, Purapan; Takata, Hiroshige; Matsumoto, Nozomi; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Nishiura, Motoko

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method for analyzing the kinetic behavior of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the murine liver under control of body temperature using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and an empirical mathematical model (EMM). First, we investigated the influence of body temperature on the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver by controlling body temperature using our temperature-control system. Second, we investigated the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver when mice were injected with various doses of GdCl3, while keeping the body temperature at 36°C. Finally, we investigated it when mice were injected with various doses of zymosan, while keeping the body temperature at 36°C. We also investigated the effect of these substances on the number of Kupffer cells by immunohistochemical analysis using the specific surface antigen of Kupffer cells (CD68). To quantify the kinetic behavior of SPIONs in the liver, we calculated the upper limit of the relative enhancement (A), the rates of early contrast uptake (α) and washout or late contrast uptake (β), the parameter related to the slope of early uptake (q), the area under the curve (AUC), the maximum change of transverse relaxation rate (ΔR2) (ΔR2(max)), the time to ΔR2(max) (Tmax), and ΔR2 at the last time point (ΔR2(last)) from the time courses of ΔR2 using the EMM. The β and Tmax values significantly decreased and increased, respectively, with decreasing body temperature, suggesting that the phagocytic activity of Kupffer cells is significantly affected by body temperature. The AUC, ΔR2(max), and ΔR2(last) values decreased significantly with increasing dose of GdCl3, which was consistent with the change in the number of CD68-positive cells. They increased with increasing dose of zymosan, which was also consistent with the change in the number of CD68-positive cells. These results suggest that AUC, ΔR2(max), and ΔR2

  5. Gains from quota trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Levring; Bogetoft, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We provide a framework for evaluating potential effects of introducing tradable quotas to a sector. The effects depend on the economies of scale and scope of the production technology, and on firms' ability and willingness to learn best practice methods (catching up) and to change their input...... and output composition (mix). To illustrate our approach, data from the Danish fishery are used to calculate the potential gains from introducing individually transferable fishing quotas. Data envelopment analysis is used to model the production technology. We find that pure reallocation is as important...

  6. Gaining Relational Competitive Advantages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yimei; Zhang, Si; Li, Jizhen

    2015-01-01

    Establishing strategic technological partnerships (STPs) with foreign partners is an increasingly studied topic within the innovation management literature. Partnering firms can jointly create sources of relational competitive advantage. Chinese firms often lack research and development (R......&D) capabilities but are increasingly becoming preferred technological partners for transnational corporations. We investigate an STP between a Scandinavian and a Chinese firm and try to explore how to gain relational competitive advantage by focusing on its two essential stages: relational rent generation...... and appropriation. Based on an explorative case study, we develop a conceptual framework that consists of process, organizational alliance factors, and coordination modes that we propose lead to relational competitive advantage....

  7. Efficacy of short-term high-dose statin in preventing contrast-induced nephropathy: a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchuan Li

    Full Text Available A few studies focused on statin therapy as specific prophylactic measures of contrast-induced nephropathy have been published with conflicting results. In this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of short-term high-dose statin treatment for the prevention of CIN and clinical outcomes and re-evaluate of the potential benefits of statin therapy.We searched PubMed, OVID, EMBASE, Web of science and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases for randomized controlled trials comparing short-term high-dose statin treatment versus low-dose statin treatment or placebo for preventing CIN. Our outcome measures were the risk of CIN within 2-5 days after contrast administration and need for dialysis.Seven randomized controlled trials with a total of 1,399 patients were identified and analyzed. The overall results based on fixed-effect model showed that the use of short-term high-dose statin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in risk of CIN (RR =0.51, 95% CI 0.34-0.76, p =0.001; I(2 = 0%. The incidence of acute renal failure requiring dialysis was not significant different after the use of statin (RR = 0.33, 95% CI 0.05-2.10, p = 0.24; I(2 = 0%. The use of statin was not associated with a significant decrease in the plasma C-reactive protein level (SMD -0.64, 95% CI: -1.57 to 0.29, P = 0.18, I(2 = 97%.Although this meta-analysis supports the use of statin to reduce the incidence of CIN, it must be considered in the context of variable patient demographics. Only a limited recommendation can be made in favour of the use of statin based on current data. Considering the limitations of included studies, a large, well designed trial that incorporates the evaluation of clinically relevant outcomes in participants with different underlying risks of CIN is required to more adequately assess the role for statin in CIN prevention.

  8. Evaluation of microvascular endothelial function in patients with infective endocarditis using laser speckle contrast imaging and skin video-capillaroscopy: research proposal of a case control prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Amanda; Lamas, Cristiane; Tibiriça, Eduardo

    2017-07-28

    Infective endocarditis is a severe condition with high in-hospital and 5-year mortality. There is increasing incidence of infective endocarditis, which may be related to healthcare and changes in prophylaxis recommendations regarding oral procedures. Few studies have evaluated the microcirculation in patients with infective endocarditis, and so far, none have utilized laser-based technology or evaluated functional capillary density. The aim of the study is to evaluate the changes in the systemic microvascular bed of patients with both acute and subacute endocarditis. This is a cohort study that will include adult patients with confirmed active infective endocarditis according to the modified Duke criteria who were admitted to our center for treatment. A control group of sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers will be included. Functional capillary density, which is defined as the number of spontaneously perfused capillaries per square millimeter of skin, will be assessed by video-microscopy with an epi-illuminated fiber optic microscope. Capillary recruitment will be evaluated using post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. Microvascular flow will be evaluated in the forearm using a laser speckle contrast imaging system for the noninvasive and continuous measurement of cutaneous microvascular perfusion changes. Laser speckle contrast imaging will be used in combination with skin iontophoresis of acetylcholine, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator, or sodium nitroprusside (endothelium independent) to test microvascular reactivity. The present study will contribute to the investigation of microcirculatory changes in infective endocarditis and possibly lead to an earlier diagnosis of the condition and/or determination of its severity and complications. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT02940340.

  9. Contrast-enhanced peripheral MRA. Technique and contrast agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Yousef W.; Thomsen, Henrik S.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) has gained wide acceptance as a valuable tool in the diagnostic work-up of patients with peripheral arterial disease. This review presents current concepts in peripheral CE-MRA with emphasis on MRI technique and contrast agents. Peripheral CE-MRA is defined as an MR angiogram of the arteries from the aortic bifurcation to the feet. Advantages of CE-MRA include minimal invasiveness and lack of ionizing radiation. The basic technique employed for peripheral CE-MRA is the bolus-chase method. With this method a paramagnetic MRI contrast agent is injected intravenously and T1-weighted images are acquired in the subsequent arterial first-pass phase. In order to achieve high quality MR angiograms without interfering venous contamination or artifacts, a number of factors need to be taken into account. This includes magnetic field strength of the MRI system, receiver coil configuration, use of parallel imaging, contrast bolus timing technique, and k-space filling strategies. Furthermore, it is possible to optimize peripheral CE-MRA using venous compression techniques, hybrid scan protocols, time-resolved imaging, and steady-state MRA. Gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents are used for CE-MRA of the peripheral arteries. Extracellular Gd agents have a pharmacokinetic profile similar to iodinated contrast media. Accordingly, these agents are employed for first-pass MRA. Blood-pool Gd-based agents are characterized by prolonged intravascular stay, due to macromolecular structure or protein binding. These agents can be used for first-pass, as well as steady-state MRA. Some Gd-based contrast agents with low thermodynamic stability have been linked to development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis in patients with severe renal insufficiency. Using optimized technique and a stable MRI contrast agent, peripheral CE-MRA is a safe procedure with diagnostic accuracy close to that of conventional catheter X

  10. Experience gained with a case control study of risk factors in bronchial carcinoma - would the approach be suitable for assessment of the radon problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wichmann, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    In the USA and in Sweden, case control studies are being done for investigating the incidence of lung cancer and a possible association with indoor exposure to radon daughters. In the F.R.G., methods and results of a case control study of other risk factors in bronchial carcinoma are available, and the question currently discussed is whether the data obtained by this study, together with additional measurements, could be used to assess the radon problem, or whether an individual radon study should be done, and what its requirements would be. (orig.) [de

  11. Reducing undercarboxylated osteocalcin with vitamin K supplementation does not promote lean tissue loss or fat gain over three years in older women and men: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a vitamin K-dependent protein synthesized during bone formation. Mice injected with the undercarboxylated form of OC (ucOC) had more skeletal muscle mass and less fat mass than sham-treated controls, suggesting a unique metabolic role for ucOC. UcOC decreases in response to vitam...

  12. Adjunctive α-lipoic acid reduces weight gain compared with placebo at 12 weeks in schizophrenic patients treated with atypical antipsychotics: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Wook; Song, Yul-Mai; Kim, Eosu; Cho, Hyun-Sang; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Jin Young

    2016-09-01

    α-Lipoic acid (ALA) has been reported to be effective in reducing body weight in rodents and obese patients. Our previous open trial showed that ALA may play a role in reducing weight gain in patients with schizophrenia on atypical antipsychotics. The present study evaluated the efficacy of ALA in reducing weight and BMI in patients with schizophrenia who had experienced significant weight gain since taking atypical antipsychotics. In a 12-week, double-blind randomized placebo-controlled study, 22 overweight and clinically stable patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to receive ALA or placebo. ALA was administered at 600-1800 mg, as tolerated. Weight, BMI, abdomen fat area measured by computed tomography, and metabolic values were determined. Adverse effects were also assessed to examine safety. Overall, 15 patients completed 12 weeks of treatment. There was significant weight loss and decreased visceral fat levels in the ALA group compared with the placebo group. There were no instances of psychopathologic aggravation or severe ALA-associated adverse effects. ALA was effective in reducing weight and abdominal obesity in patients with schizophrenia who had experienced significant weight gain since beginning an atypical antipsychotic regimen. Moreover, ALA was well tolerated throughout this study. ALA might play an important role as an adjunctive treatment in decreasing obesity in patients who take atypical antipsychotics.

  13. CoMET: a protocol for a randomised controlled trial of co-commencement of METformin as an adjunctive treatment to attenuate weight gain and metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia newly commenced on clozapine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskind, Dan; Friend, Nadia; Russell, Anthony; McGrath, John J; Lim, Carmen; Patterson, Sue; Flaws, Dylan; Stedman, Terry; Moudgil, Vikas; Sardinha, Savio; Suetani, Shuichi; Kisely, Steve; Winckel, Karl; Baker, Andrea

    2018-03-02

    Clozapine, while effective in treatment refractory schizophrenia, is associated with significant weight gain, heart disease and increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although there is evidence for weight loss with metformin for people with obesity who are already taking clozapine, there have been no published trials that have investigated the effect of metformin in attenuating weight gain at the time of clozapine initiation. A 24-week double-blind placebo-controlled trial of concomitant prescription of metformin at clozapine commencement. Eighty-six people being commenced on clozapine will be randomised to placebo or metformin (variable dose, up to 2 g/day). The primary outcome is comparative end point body weight, between the placebo and metformin groups. Secondary outcomes are comparative rates of conversion to T2DM, alteration of metabolic syndrome parameters, proportion gaining >5% body weight and changes in diet and appetite. We will additionally examine biomarkers associated with change in weight among trial participants. Ethics approval was granted by the Metro South Human Research Ethics Committee HREC/17/QPAH/538-SSA/17/QPAH/565. We plan to submit a manuscript of the results to a peer-reviewed journal, and present results at conferences, consumer forums and hospital grand rounds. ACTRN12617001547336; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Metformin plus sibutramine for olanzapine-associated weight gain and metabolic dysfunction in schizophrenia: a 12-week double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Trino; Uzcátegui, Euderruh; Rangel, Nairy; El Fakih, Yamily; Galeazzi, Tatiana; Beaulieu, Serge; de Baptista, Enma Araujo

    2008-05-30

    Metformin (850-1700 mg) plus sibutramine (10-20 mg, n=13) or placebo (n=15) was administered for 12 weeks in olanzapine-treated chronic schizophrenia patients. Weight loss was similar in both groups: -2.8+/-3.2 kg vs. -1.4+/-2.6 kg. Except for preventing a triglyceride increase, the drug combination lacked efficacy for metabolic control in this clinical population.

  15. Development of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.

    1993-01-01

    Description of all contrast media (ionic and nonionic monomers, ionic and nonionic dimers) was presented. Chemotoxicity, osmolality and viscosity of some contrast agents were analyzed. The main adverse reactions to ionic and nonionic contrast media were described

  16. A brief intervention to improve exercising in patients with schizophrenia: a controlled pilot study with mental contrasting and implementation intentions (MCII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Pascal; Wieber, Frank; Pröpster, Karl; Stoewer, Steffen; Nischk, Daniel; Volk, Franz; Odenwald, Michael

    2015-09-03

    Regular exercise can have positive effects on both the physical and mental health of individuals with schizophrenia. However, deficits in cognition, perception, affect, and volition make it especially difficult for people with schizophrenia to plan and follow through with their exercising intentions, as indicated by poor attendance and high drop-out rates in prior studies. Mental Contrasting and Implementation Intentions (MCII) is a well-established strategy to support the enactment of intended actions. This pilot study tests whether MCII helps people with schizophrenia in highly structured or autonomy-focused clinical hospital settings to translate their exercising intentions into action. Thirty-six inpatients (eleven women) with a mean age of 30.89 years (SD = 11.41) diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders from specialized highly structured or autonomy-focused wards were randomly assigned to two intervention groups. In the equal contact goal intention control condition, patients read an informative text about physical activity; they then set and wrote down the goal to attend jogging sessions. In the MCII experimental condition, patients read the same informative text and then worked through the MCII strategy. We hypothesized that MCII would increase attendance and persistence relative to the control condition over the course of four weeks and this will be especially be the case when applied in an autonomy-focused setting compared to when applied in a highly structured setting. When applied in autonomy-focused settings, MCII increased attendance and persistence in jogging group sessions relative to the control condition. In the highly structured setting, no differences between conditions were found, most likely due to a ceiling effect. These results remained even when adjusting for group differences in the pre-intervention scores for the control variables depression (BDI), physical activity (IPAQ), weight (BMI), age, and education. Whereas commitment and

  17. The effect of four-phasic versus three-phasic contrast media injection protocols on extravasation rate in coronary CT angiography. A randomized controlled trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karady, Julia; Panajotu, Alexisz; Kolossvary, Marton; Szilveszter, Balint; Jermendy, Adam L.; Bartykowszki, Andrea; Karolyi, Mihaly; Celeng, Csilla; Merkely, Bela; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal [Semmelweis University, MTA-SE Cardiovascular Imaging Research Group, Heart and Vascular Center, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-11-15

    Contrast media (CM) extravasation is a well-known complication of CT angiography (CTA). Our prospective randomized control study aimed to assess whether a four-phasic CM administration protocol reduces the risk of extravasation compared to the routinely used three-phasic protocol in coronary CTA. Patients referred to coronary CTA due to suspected coronary artery disease were included in the study. All patients received 400 mg/ml iomeprol CM injected with dual-syringe automated injector. Patients were randomized into a three-phasic injection-protocol group, with a CM bolus of 85 ml followed by 40 ml of 75%:25% saline/CM mixture and 30 ml saline chaser bolus; and a four-phasic injection-protocol group, with a saline pacer bolus of 10 ml injected at a lower flow rate before the three-phasic protocol. 2,445 consecutive patients were enrolled (mean age 60.6 ± 12.1 years; females 43.6%). Overall rate of extravasation was 0.9% (23/2,445): 1.4% (17/1,229) in the three-phasic group and 0.5% (6/1,216) in the four-phasic group (p = 0.034). Four-phasic CM administration protocol is easy to implement in the clinical routine at no extra cost. The extravasation rate is reduced by 65% with the application of the four-phasic protocol compared to the three-phasic protocol in coronary CTA. (orig.)

  18. Manipulation of Contents of Nitrate, Phenolic Acids, Chlorophylls, and Carotenoids in Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) via Contrasting Responses to Nitrogen Fertilizer When Grown in a Controlled Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Othman; Siervo, Mario; Seal, Chris J; Brandt, Kirsten

    2017-11-22

    This study aimed to use different nitrogen fertilizer regimes to produce Butterhead lettuce with such large differences in nitrate content that they could be used as treatment and placebo to study the effect of inorganic nitrate on human health. Plants were grown under controlled conditions at 27/23 °C day/night with a relatively low photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) of 150 μmol m -2 s -1 for 14 h day -1 and nitrogen supplies ranging from 26 to 154 ppm of N as ammonium nitrate in the fertigation solution. This resulted in contrasting high (∼1078 mg nitrate 100 g -1 FW) or low (∼6 mg 100 g -1 ) nitrate contents in the leaves. Contents of carotenoids and chlorophylls in fresh weight did not differ significantly between the highest and the lowest N-supply levels. However, increased nitrogen supply reduced contents of phenolic compounds from 154 to 22 mg 100 g -1 FW, dry matter content from 8.9% to 4.6%, and fresh weight per plant from 108.52 to 47.57 g/plant FW (all P < 0.001). Thus, while fertilizer treatments can provide lettuce with substantially different nitrate contents, maintaining similar pigment contents (color), they also strongly influence the contents of phenolic acids and flavones.

  19. Contrasting sedimentation patterns in two semi-enclosed mesotidal bays along the west and south coasts of Korea controlled by their orientation to the regional monsoon climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Hwi; Chun, Seung Soo; Chang, Tae Soo; Jang, Dae Geon

    2017-08-01

    Sedimentation patterns of tidal flats along the Korean west coast have long been known to be largely controlled by the monsoon climate. On the other hand, much less is known about the effect of the monsoon on sedimentation in coastal embayments with mouths of different geographic orientations. Good examples are Hampyeong and Yeoja bays along the west and south coasts, respectively. Both have narrow entrances, but their mouths open toward the northwest and the south, respectively. With mean tidal ranges of 3.46 and 3.2 m, respectively, the two bays experience similar tidal regimes and are hence excellent candidates to compare the effect of different exposure to the same regional monsoon climate on their respective sediment distribution patterns. The winter monsoon, in particular, is characterized by strong northwesterly winds that directly impact the west coast, but blow offshore along the south coast. For the purpose of this study, surficial sediment samples were collected from intertidal and subtidal flats of the two bays, both in summer and winter. Grain-size analyses were carried out by sieving (sand fraction) and Sedigraph (mud fraction). In the case of Yeoja Bay, the sediments consist mostly of mud (mean grain sizes of 5.4 to 8.8 phi). Seasonal changes are very subtle, the sediments being slightly coarser in summer when silt-dominated sediments are supplied by two streams to the northern parts of the bay in response to heavy rainfall. With the exception of the deeper tidal channels, Yeoja Bay is characterized by a thick mud blanket the year round, which is modulated by processes associated with the summer monsoon that predominantly blows from the east. Textural parameters suggest severely restricted sediment mixing on the subtidal and intertidal flats, the overall low energy situation preventing sands from reaching the tidal flats. The sediments of Hampyeong Bay, by contrast, are characterized by a distinct shoreward fining trend. Mean grain sizes average

  20. Right and Left Ventricular Function and Mass in Male Elite Master Athletes: A Controlled Contrast-Enhanced Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Philipp; Schneider, Günther; Linneweber, Lutz; Rentzsch, Axel; Krämer, Nadine; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Kindermann, Wilfried; Meyer, Tim; Scharhag, Jürgen

    2016-05-17

    It is under debate whether the cumulative effects of intensive endurance exercise induce chronic cardiac damage, mainly involving the right heart. The aim of this study was to examine the cardiac structure and function in long-term elite master endurance athletes with special focus on the right ventricle by contrast-enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Thirty-three healthy white competitive elite male master endurance athletes (age range, 30-60 years) with a training history of 29±8 years, and 33 white control subjects pair-matched for age, height, and weight underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing, echocardiography including tissue-Doppler imaging and speckle tracking, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Indexed left ventricular mass and right ventricular mass (left ventricular mass/body surface area, 96±13 and 62±10 g/m(2); Pright ventricular mass/body surface area, 36±7 and 24±5 g/m(2); Pleft ventricular end-diastolic volume and right ventricular end-diastolic volume (left ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area, 104±13 and 69±18 mL/m(2); Pright ventricular end-diastolic volume/body surface area, 110±22 and 66±16 mL/m(2); PRight ventricular ejection fraction did not differ between athletes and control subjects (52±8 and 54±6%; P=0.26). Pathological late enhancement was detected in 1 athlete. No correlations were found for left ventricular and right ventricular volumes and ejection fraction with N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, and high-sensitive troponin was negative in all subjects. Based on our results, chronic right ventricular damage in elite endurance master athletes with lifelong high training volumes seems to be unlikely. Thus, the hypothesis of an exercise-induced arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy has to be questioned. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Radiographic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golman, K.; Holtz, E.; Almen, T.

    1987-01-01

    Contrast media are used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the X-ray attenuation between a body structure of interest and the surrounding tissue. A detail becomes perceptible on a roentgenogram only when its contrast exceeds a minimum value in relation to the background. Small areas of interest must have higher contrast than the background. The contrast effect depends on concentration of the contrast media with the body. A high contrast media concentration difference thus gives rise to more morphological details in the radiographs. Contrast media can be divided into negative contrast media such as air and gas which attenuate X-rays less than the body tissues, and positive contrast materials which attenuate X-rays more than the body tissues. The positive contrast media all contain either iodine (atomic number 53) or barium (atomic number 56) and can be divided into water-insoluble and water-soluble contrast media

  2. Intrinsic gain modulation and adaptive neural coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Hong

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In many cases, the computation of a neural system can be reduced to a receptive field, or a set of linear filters, and a thresholding function, or gain curve, which determines the firing probability; this is known as a linear/nonlinear model. In some forms of sensory adaptation, these linear filters and gain curve adjust very rapidly to changes in the variance of a randomly varying driving input. An apparently similar but previously unrelated issue is the observation of gain control by background noise in cortical neurons: the slope of the firing rate versus current (f-I curve changes with the variance of background random input. Here, we show a direct correspondence between these two observations by relating variance-dependent changes in the gain of f-I curves to characteristics of the changing empirical linear/nonlinear model obtained by sampling. In the case that the underlying system is fixed, we derive relationships relating the change of the gain with respect to both mean and variance with the receptive fields derived from reverse correlation on a white noise stimulus. Using two conductance-based model neurons that display distinct gain modulation properties through a simple change in parameters, we show that coding properties of both these models quantitatively satisfy the predicted relationships. Our results describe how both variance-dependent gain modulation and adaptive neural computation result from intrinsic nonlinearity.

  3. Leading Gainful Employment Metric Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kristina; MacPherson, Derek

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will address the importance of intercampus involvement in reporting of gainful employment student-level data that will be used in the calculation of gainful employment metrics by the U.S. Department of Education. The authors will discuss why building relationships within the institution is critical for effective gainful employment…

  4. Good maintenance of exercise-induced bone gain with decreased training of female tennis and squash players: a prospective 5-year follow-up study of young and old starters and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontulainen, S; Kannus, P; Haapasalo, H; Sievänen, H; Pasanen, M; Heinonen, A; Oja, P; Vuori, I

    2001-02-01

    This prospective 5-year follow-up study of 64 adult female racquet sports players and 27 controls assessed the changes in the playing-to-nonplaying arm bone mineral content (BMC) differences to answer three questions: (1) Are training-induced bone gains lost with decreased training? (2) Is the bone response to decreased training different if the playing career has been started before or at puberty rather than after it? (3) Are the possible bone changes related to the changes in training? The players were divided into two groups according to the starting age of their tennis or squash playing. The mean starting age was 10.5 years (SD, 2.2) among the players who had started training before or at menarche (young starters; n = 36) while 26.4 years (SD, 8.0) among those players who had begun training a minimum of 1 year after menarche (old starters; n = 28). At baseline of the 5-year follow-up, the mean age of the young starters was 21.6 years (SD, 7.6) and that of old starters was 39.4 years (SD, 10.5). During the follow-up, the young starters had reduced the average training frequency from 4.7 times a week (2.7) to 1.4 times a week (1.3) and the old starters from 4.0 times a week (1.4) to 2.0 times a week (1.4), respectively. The 5-year follow-up revealed that despite reduced training the exercise-induced bone gain was well maintained in both groups of players regardless of their clearly different starting age of activity and different amount of exercise-induced bone gain. The gain was still 1.3-2.2 times greater in favor of the young starters (at the follow-up, the dominant-to-nondominant arm BMC difference was 22% [8.4] in the humeral shaft of the young starters versus 10% [3.8] in the old starters, and 3.5% [2.4] in controls). In the players, changes in training were only weakly related to changes in the side-to-side BMC difference (r(s) = 0.05-0.34, all NS), and this was true even among the players who had stopped training completely a minimum 1 year before the

  5. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm 2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  6. Study of gain-coupled distributed feedback laser based on high order surface gain-coupled gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Qin, Li; Chen, Yongyi; Jia, Peng; Chen, Chao; Cheng, LiWen; Chen, Hong; Liang, Lei; Zeng, Yugang; Zhang, Xing; Wu, Hao; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2018-03-01

    Single-longitudinal-mode, gain-coupled distributed feedback (DFB) lasers based on high order surface gain-coupled gratings are achieved. Periodic surface metal p-contacts with insulated grooves realize gain-coupled mechanism. To enhance gain contrast in the quantum wells without the introduction of effective index-coupled effect, groove length and depth were well designed. Our devices provided a single longitudinal mode with the maximum CW output power up to 48.8 mW/facet at 971.31 nm at 250 mA without facet coating, 3dB linewidth (39 dB). Optical bistable characteristic was observed with a threshold current difference. Experimentally, devices with different cavity lengths were contrasted on power-current and spectrum characteristics. Due to easy fabrication technique and stable performance, it provides a method of fabricating practical gain-coupled distributed feedback lasers for commercial applications.

  7. Resistance to erythropoiesis stimulating agents in patients treated with online hemodiafiltration and ultrapure low-flux hemodialysis: results from a randomized controlled trial (CONTRAST.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelke C van der Weerd

    Full Text Available Resistance to erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA is common in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis (HD treatment. ESA responsiveness might be improved by enhanced clearance of uremic toxins of middle molecular weight, as can be obtained by hemodiafiltration (HDF. In this analysis of the randomized controlled CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST; NCT00205556, the effect of online HDF on ESA resistance and iron parameters was studied. This was a pre-specified secondary endpoint of the main trial. A 12 months' analysis of 714 patients randomized to either treatment with online post-dilution HDF or continuation of low-flux HD was performed. Both groups were treated with ultrapure dialysis fluids. ESA resistance, measured every three months, was expressed as the ESA index (weight adjusted weekly ESA dose in daily defined doses [DDD]/hematocrit. The mean ESA index during 12 months was not different between patients treated with HDF or HD (mean difference HDF versus HD over time 0.029 DDD/kg/Hct/week [-0.024 to 0.081]; P = 0.29. Mean transferrin saturation ratio and ferritin levels during the study tended to be lower in patients treated with HDF (-2.52% [-4.72 to -0.31]; P = 0.02 and -49 ng/mL [-103 to 4]; P = 0.06 respectively, although there was a trend for those patients to receive slightly more iron supplementation (7.1 mg/week [-0.4 to 14.5]; P = 0.06. In conclusion, compared to low-flux HD with ultrapure dialysis fluid, treatment with online HDF did not result in a decrease in ESA resistance.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00205556.

  8. The effect of four-phasic versus three-phasic contrast media injection protocols on extravasation rate in coronary CT angiography: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karády, Júlia; Panajotu, Alexisz; Kolossváry, Márton; Szilveszter, Bálint; Jermendy, Ádám L; Bartykowszki, Andrea; Károlyi, Mihály; Celeng, Csilla; Merkely, Béla; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2017-11-01

    Contrast media (CM) extravasation is a well-known complication of CT angiography (CTA). Our prospective randomized control study aimed to assess whether a four-phasic CM administration protocol reduces the risk of extravasation compared to the routinely used three-phasic protocol in coronary CTA. Patients referred to coronary CTA due to suspected coronary artery disease were included in the study. All patients received 400 mg/ml iomeprol CM injected with dual-syringe automated injector. Patients were randomized into a three-phasic injection-protocol group, with a CM bolus of 85 ml followed by 40 ml of 75%:25% saline/CM mixture and 30 ml saline chaser bolus; and a four-phasic injection-protocol group, with a saline pacer bolus of 10 ml injected at a lower flow rate before the three-phasic protocol. 2,445 consecutive patients were enrolled (mean age 60.6 ± 12.1 years; females 43.6%). Overall rate of extravasation was 0.9% (23/2,445): 1.4% (17/1,229) in the three-phasic group and 0.5% (6/1,216) in the four-phasic group (p = 0.034). Four-phasic CM administration protocol is easy to implement in the clinical routine at no extra cost. The extravasation rate is reduced by 65% with the application of the four-phasic protocol compared to the three-phasic protocol in coronary CTA. • Four-phasic CM injection-protocol reduces extravasation rate by 65% compared to three-phasic. • The saline pacer bolus substantially reduces the risk of CM extravasation. • The implementation of four-phasic injection-protocol is at no cost.

  9. [Study of CT Automatic Exposure Control System (CT-AEC) Optimization in CT Angiography of Lower Extremity Artery by Considering Contrast-to-Noise Ratio].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Satoshi; Masuda, Takanori; Maruyama, Naoya; Yamashita, Yukari; Sato, Tomoyasu; Imada, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the image quality and effect of radiation dose reduction by setting for computed tomography automatic exposure control system (CT-AEC) in computed tomographic angiography (CTA) of lower extremity artery. Two methods of setting were compared for CT-AEC [conventional and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) methods]. Conventional method was set noise index (NI): 14and tube current threshold: 10-750 mA. CNR method was set NI: 18, minimum tube current: (X+Y)/2 mA (X, Y: maximum X (Y)-axis tube current value of leg in NI: 14), and maximum tube current: 750 mA. The image quality was evaluated by CNR, and radiation dose reduction was evaluated by dose-length-product (DLP). In conventional method, mean CNRs for pelvis, femur, and leg were 19.9±4.8, 20.4±5.4, and 16.2±4.3, respectively. There was a significant difference between the CNRs of pelvis and leg (P<0.001), and between femur and leg (P<0.001). In CNR method, mean CNRs for pelvis, femur, and leg were 15.2±3.3, 15.3±3.2, and 15.3±3.1, respectively; no significant difference between pelvis, femur, and leg (P=0.973) in CNR method was observed. Mean DLPs were 1457±434 mGy⋅cm in conventional method, and 1049±434 mGy·cm in CNR method. There was a significant difference in the DLPs of conventional method and CNR method (P<0.001). CNR method gave equal CNRs for pelvis, femur, and leg, and was beneficial for radiation dose reduction in CTA of lower extremity artery.

  10. Suprathreshold contrast summation over area using drifting gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Thomas J; Dickinson, J Edwin; Badcock, David R

    2018-04-01

    This study investigated contrast summation over area for moving targets applied to a fixed-size contrast pedestal-a technique originally developed by Meese and Summers (2007) to demonstrate strong spatial summation of contrast for static patterns at suprathreshold contrast levels. Target contrast increments (drifting gratings) were applied to either the entire 20% contrast pedestal (a full fixed-size drifting grating), or in the configuration of a checkerboard pattern in which the target increment was applied to every alternate check region. These checked stimuli are known as "Battenberg patterns" and the sizes of the checks were varied (within a fixed overall area), across conditions, to measure summation behavior. Results showed that sensitivity to an increment covering the full pedestal was significantly higher than that for the Battenberg patterns (areal summation). Two observers showed strong summation across all check sizes (0.71°-3.33°), and for two other observers the summation ratio dropped to levels consistent with probability summation once check size reached 2.00°. Therefore, areal summation with moving targets does operate at high contrast, and is subserved by relatively large receptive fields covering a square area extending up to at least 3.33° × 3.33° for some observers. Previous studies in which the spatial structure of the pedestal and target covaried were unable to demonstrate spatial summation, potentially due to increasing amounts of suppression from gain-control mechanisms which increases as pedestal size increases. This study shows that when this is controlled, by keeping the pedestal the same across all conditions, extensive summation can be demonstrated.

  11. Ionic versus nonionic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylak, C.J.; Gafni, A.

    1988-01-01

    The efficacy and effectiveness of the nonionic contrast media have been established. Widespread usage has been hampered because of the approximate tenfold increase in cost compared with the ionic media. An economic evaluation considering costs and consequences of both interventions (ionic vs nonionic contrast media) was performed; it is a cost effectiveness (CEA) and a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) for the Canadian experience. The results of the CEA demonstrate a value per life-year saved within an acceptable range when compared with value for quality-adjusted life years for programs such as treatment of severe (diastolic≥ 105 mm Hg) and mild (diastolic 95-104 mm Hg) hypertension in men aged 40. The CBA showed a net cost to society when benefits were measured as future treatment costs saved plus productivity gained. However, if people are willing to pay a small amount for the comfort of the new intervention, this will result in a break-even situation

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced case-control analysis in 3T MRI of prostate cancer can help to characterize tumor aggressiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.sanz@quironsalud.es [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Bonmatí, Luis [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); Pérez-Martínez, Rosario [Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); García-Martí, Gracián [Biomedical Engineering, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Radiology Department, Hospital Quirónsalud Valencia, Valencia (Spain); GIBI230, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria y Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia (Spain); CIBER-SAM, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Curve types showed no statistical association with healthy/tumor peripheral areas. • K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC showed significant differences in controls vs. tumors. • The global diagnostic performance of standard MRI perfusion parameters is poor. • Normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC had good diagnostic accuracy for tumor grading. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this work is to establish normality and tumor tissue ranges for perfusion parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR of the peripheral prostate at 3T and to compare the diagnostic performance of quantitative and semi-quantitative parameters. Materials and methods: Thirty-six patients with prostate carcinomas (18 Gleason-6, 15 Gleason-7, and 3 Gleason-8) and 33 healthy subjects were included. Image analysis workflow comprised four steps: manual segmentation of whole prostate and lesions, series registration, voxelwise T1 mapping and calculation of pharmacokinetic and semi-quantitative parameters. Results: K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC60 showed statistically significant differences between healthy peripheral areas and tumors. Curve type showed no association with healthy/tumor peripheral areas (chi-square = 0.702). Areas under the ROC curves were 0.64 (95% CI: 0.54–0.75), 0.70 (0.60–0.80), 0.62 (0.51–0.72) and 0.63 (0.52–0.74) for K{sup trans}, v{sub e}, upslope and AUC60, respectively. The optimal cutoff values were: K{sup trans} = 0.21 min{sup −1} (sensitivity = 0.61, specificity = 0.64), v{sub e} = 0.36 (0.63, 0.71), upslope = 0.59 (0.59, 0.59) and AUC60 = 2.4 (0.63, 0.64). Significant differences were found between Gleason scores 6 and 7 for normalized K{sup trans}, upslope and AUC60, with good diagnostic accuracy (area under ROC curve 0.80, 95% CI: 0.60–1.00). Conclusion: Quantitative (K{sup trans} and v{sub e}) and semi-quantitative (upslope and AUC60) perfusion parameters showed significant differences between tumors and control

  13. New MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, C.D.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.; Szeverenyi, N.E.; Rosenbaum, A.M.; Gagne, G.; Tillapaugh-Fay, G.; Berlin, R.; Ritter-Hrncirik, C.; Yu, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates an MR contrast agent-meglumine tris-(2,6-dicarboxypyridine) gadolinium (III) or gadolinium dipicolinate (Gd-DPC)-produced in-house. Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital. For renal imaging, bowel motion artifact was minimized with glucagon (0.014 mg/kg, intravenous (IV)). Enhanced images were generated on a 2-T chemical shift imaging system with a 31-cm horizontal bore magnet after IV injection of Gd-DPC (100 μM/kg). Coronal sections of the kidneys and sagittal sections of the brain, 2 mm thick, were made. Six to eight excitations and 128 or 356 phase-encoding steps were used for each image. Control animals were injected with equivalent doses of gadopentetate dimeglumine

  14. Gaining Control of Iraq's Shadow Economy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramirez, David S

    2007-01-01

    .... These conditions fuel a sprawling, decades-old shadow economy manipulated by elements of organized crime, militias, and insurgents to fund attacks on Coalition forces, infrastructure and innocent Iraqi civilians...

  15. Help Your Child Gain Control Over Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure you know the right amount of medicine your child needs to take each day. Talk to your ... all the time. And I use lots less medicine now that I have fish instead of a furry ... what may trigger your child’s asthma As we said in Part 1, triggers ...

  16. Gaining Control of Iraq's Shadow Economy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ramirez, David S

    2007-01-01

    .... The shadow economy is also used extensively by the poor and women for subsistence living. The combined effect for Iraqi citizens is they have to survive in a country without adequate institutions and poor governance...

  17. Adriamycin nephrosis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Golman, K.; Hemmingsen, L.; Larsen, S.; Skaarup, P.; Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Herlev; Koebenhavns Amts Sygehus, Herlev; Centralsygehuset, Nykoebing Falster; Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus

    1990-01-01

    Urine profiles (albumin, glucose, NAG, LDH, GGT and sodium) were followed for 9 days after intravenous injection of either diatrizoate, iohexol, or saline in 27 Wistar rats with nephrosis induced by Adriamycin 42 days before. Another 9 rats exposed to neither Adriamycin nor contrast media served as controls. None of the contrast media caused further increased albuminuria of significance, whereas both induced significantly increased excretion of all 5 tubular components. The excretion of NAG and sodium was significantly higher following diatrizoate than following iohexol. From 24 h post injection there was no significantly greater excretion of any of the components after either diatrizoate or iohexol than after saline among the rats given Adriamycin. At the end of day 9 after contrast medium injection neither serum sodium, potassium, glucose, urea, creatinine, nor albumin revealed any contrast media related changes. Kidney histology showed quantitatively larger lesions in kidneys exposed to Adriamycin and contrast media than in kidneys exposed to Adriamycin and saline. There were no differences between the two contrast media groups. It is thus concluded, that both high osmolar ionic and low osmolar non-ionic contrast media cause temporary tubular dysfunction but no further glomerular dysfunction in rats with nephrosis induced by Adriamycin. The histologic findings indicate that both media may worsen non-reversible renal lesions. (orig.)

  18. Operational gain : measuring the capture of genetic gain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of operational gain is more than the weighted average of the genetic quality of planted hectares, and encompasses tree breeding efficiencies, propagation efficiencies, matching of species and genotype to site, plant use efficiency and early measures of stand density and growth. To test the operational gain ...

  19. Chemical control in steam systems by using a stabilized inorganic product with gain of energy and speed in detecting contaminations; Controle quimico em geradores de vapor, pelo uso de agente inorganico estabilizado, com ganhos de energia e celeridade na deteccao de contaminacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Barny de; Pereira, Renato Andre Nunes [Kurita do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper shows the basic conditions to control the relation between phosphate and sodium in high pressure boilers by applying a stabilized chemical product ensuring operation with low variability and energy gain by the eliminating of corrective blowdown. It presents the routine and the relevant benefits provided by a strong monitoring program of phosphate application in high pressure boilers as an important tool do detect deviations and to get better control of silica solubilization in this pressure level. (author)

  20. Clinical Medicine: Endocrinology and Diabetes: Gender-associated Differences in Weight Gain, Insulin Requirement and Metabolic control in Newly Insulin-treated Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Secondary Sulfonylurea Failure–-a One-year Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Biesenbach

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of the present study was to determine differences between male and female type 2 diabetic patients concerning body weight, metabolic control, insulin requirement and prevalence of vascular diseases during the first year insulin therapy. Patients and Methods We investigated 102 newly insulin-treated type 2 diabetic patients (60 female with secondary sulfonylurea failure. Observation period was the first year insulin therapy. We compared BMI, HbA1c, lipids and insulin requirement at the begin and after one year, C-peptide and prevalence of vascular diseases at the start of insulin therapy. Results At the start of insulin substitution, omen had a higher BMI (27 + 3 versus 25 + 3; p < 0.05. Women also required a higher insulin dose than did men (28 + 6 versus 24 + 6 IU/day Mean HbA1c and cholesterol levels were similar in both groups whereas triglycerides were higher in women (244 + 88 versus 203 + 76 mg/dl; p < 0.05. Both groups achieved a similar gain in body weight after one year (+2.5% versus +2.6%; NS. HbA1c decreased from 9.2 + 1.1 to 7.4% + 0.9% (–19% in women and from 9.4 + 1.1 to 7.5% + 1.0% (–20% in men. The prevalence of vascular diseases was not significantly different in both groups. Conclusions At the start of insulin therapy female type 2 diabetic patients showed a significant higher BMI and a higher insulin requirement than male patients. The metabolic control was similar in men and women, only the triglycerides were higher in the female patients. Weight gain and increase of needed insulin as well as prevalence of macroangiopathy were the same in both groups.

  1. Trial Protocol: randomised controlled trial of the effects of very low calorie diet, modest dietary restriction, and sequential behavioural programme on hunger, urges to smoke, abstinence and weight gain in overweight smokers stopping smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lycett, Deborah; Hajek, Peter; Aveyard, Paul

    2010-10-07

    Weight gain accompanies smoking cessation, but dieting during quitting is controversial as hunger may increase urges to smoke. This is a feasibility trial for the investigation of a very low calorie diet (VLCD), individual modest energy restriction, and usual advice on hunger, ketosis, urges to smoke, abstinence and weight gain in overweight smokers trying to quit. This is a 3 armed, unblinded, randomized controlled trial in overweight (BMI > 25 kg/m2), daily smokers (CO > 10 ppm); with at least 30 participants in each group. Each group receives identical behavioural support and NRT patches (25 mg(8 weeks),15 mg(2 weeks),10 mg(2 weeks)). The VLCD group receive a 429-559 kcal/day liquid formula beginning 1 week before quitting and continuing for 4 weeks afterwards. The modest energy restricted group (termed individual dietary and activity planning(IDAP)) engage in goal-setting and receive an energy prescription based on individual basal metabolic rate(BMR) aiming for daily reduction of 600 kcal. The control group receive usual dietary advice that accompanies smoking cessation i.e. avoiding feeling hungry but eating healthy snacks. After this, the VLCD participants receive IDAP to provide support for changing eating habits in the longer term; the IDAP group continues receiving this support. The control group receive IDAP 8 weeks after quitting. This allows us to compare IDAP following a successful quit attempt with dieting concurrently during quitting. It also aims to prevent attrition in the unblinded, control group by meeting their need for weight management. Follow-up occurs at 6 and 12 months.Outcome measures include participant acceptability, measured qualitatively by semi-structured interviewing and quantitatively by recruitment and attrition rates. Feasibility of running the trial within primary care is measured by interview and questionnaire of the treatment providers. Adherence to the VLCD is verified by the presence of urinary ketones measured weekly. Daily

  2. Trial Protocol: Randomised controlled trial of the effects of very low calorie diet, modest dietary restriction, and sequential behavioural programme on hunger, urges to smoke, abstinence and weight gain in overweight smokers stopping smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajek Peter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Weight gain accompanies smoking cessation, but dieting during quitting is controversial as hunger may increase urges to smoke. This is a feasibility trial for the investigation of a very low calorie diet (VLCD, individual modest energy restriction, and usual advice on hunger, ketosis, urges to smoke, abstinence and weight gain in overweight smokers trying to quit. Methods This is a 3 armed, unblinded, randomized controlled trial in overweight (BMI > 25 kg/m2, daily smokers (CO > 10 ppm; with at least 30 participants in each group. Each group receives identical behavioural support and NRT patches (25 mg(8 weeks,15 mg(2 weeks,10 mg(2 weeks. The VLCD group receive a 429-559 kcal/day liquid formula beginning 1 week before quitting and continuing for 4 weeks afterwards. The modest energy restricted group (termed individual dietary and activity planning(IDAP engage in goal-setting and receive an energy prescription based on individual basal metabolic rate(BMR aiming for daily reduction of 600 kcal. The control group receive usual dietary advice that accompanies smoking cessation i.e. avoiding feeling hungry but eating healthy snacks. After this, the VLCD participants receive IDAP to provide support for changing eating habits in the longer term; the IDAP group continues receiving this support. The control group receive IDAP 8 weeks after quitting. This allows us to compare IDAP following a successful quit attempt with dieting concurrently during quitting. It also aims to prevent attrition in the unblinded, control group by meeting their need for weight management. Follow-up occurs at 6 and 12 months. Outcome measures include participant acceptability, measured qualitatively by semi-structured interviewing and quantitatively by recruitment and attrition rates. Feasibility of running the trial within primary care is measured by interview and questionnaire of the treatment providers. Adherence to the VLCD is verified by the presence of

  3. A randomized, comparative pilot trial of family-based interpersonal psychotherapy for reducing psychosocial symptoms, disordered-eating, and excess weight gain in at-risk preadolescents with loss-of-control-eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Matherne, Camden E; Mehari, Rim D; Olsen, Cara H; Marwitz, Shannon E; Bakalar, Jennifer L; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M; Kelly, Nichole R; Schvey, Natasha A; Burke, Natasha L; Cassidy, Omni; Brady, Sheila M; Dietz, Laura J; Wilfley, Denise E; Yanovski, Susan Z; Yanovski, Jack A

    2017-09-01

    Preadolescent loss-of-control-eating (LOC-eating) is a risk factor for excess weight gain and binge-eating-disorder. We evaluated feasibility and acceptability of a preventive family-based interpersonal psychotherapy (FB-IPT) program. FB-IPT was compared to family-based health education (FB-HE) to evaluate changes in children's psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, and body mass. A randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted with 29 children, 8 to 13 years who had overweight/obesity and LOC-eating. Youth-parent dyads were randomized to 12-week FB-IPT (n = 15) or FB-HE (n = 14) and evaluated at post-treatment, six-months, and one-year. Changes in child psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, BMI, and adiposity by dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry were assessed. Missing follow-up data were multiply imputed. FB-IPT feasibility and acceptability were indicated by good attendance (83%) and perceived benefits to social interactions and eating. Follow-up assessments were completed by 73% FB-IPT and 86% FB-HE at post-treatment, 60% and 64% at six-months, and 47% and 57% at one-year. At post-treatment, children in FB-IPT reported greater decreases in depression (95% CI -7.23, -2.01, Cohen's d = 1.23) and anxiety (95% CI -6.08, -0.70, Cohen's d = .79) and less odds of LOC-eating (95% CI -3.93, -0.03, Cohen's d = .38) than FB-HE. At six-months, children in FB-IPT had greater reductions in disordered-eating attitudes (95% CI -0.72, -0.05, Cohen's d = .66) and at one-year, tended to have greater decreases in depressive symptoms (95% CI -8.82, 0.44, Cohen's d = .69) than FB-HE. There was no difference in BMI gain between the groups. Family-based approaches that address interpersonal and emotional underpinnings of LOC-eating in preadolescents with overweight/obesity show preliminary promise, particularly for reducing internalizing symptoms. Whether observed psychological benefits translate into sustained prevention of disordered-eating or excess

  4. A Randomized, Comparative Pilot Trial of Family-Based Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Reducing Psychosocial Symptoms, Disordered-eating, and Excess Weight Gain in At-Risk Preadolescents with Loss-of-control-eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomaker, Lauren B.; Tanofsky-Kraff, Marian; Matherne, Camden E.; Mehari, Rim D.; Olsen, Cara H.; Marwitz, Shannon E.; Bakalar, Jennifer L.; Ranzenhofer, Lisa M.; Kelly, Nichole R.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Burke, Natasha L.; Cassidy, Omni; Brady, Sheila M.; Dietz, Laura J.; Wilfley, Denise E.; Yanovski, Susan Z.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2018-01-01

    Objective Preadolescent loss-of-control-eating (LOC-eating) is a risk factor for excess weight gain and binge-eating-disorder. We evaluated feasibility and acceptability of a preventive family-based interpersonal psychotherapy (FB-IPT) program. FB-IPT was compared to family-based health education (FB-HE) to evaluate changes in children’s psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, and body mass. Method A randomized, controlled pilot trial was conducted with 29 children, 8 to 13 years who had overweight/obesity and LOC-eating. Youth-parent dyads were randomized to 12-week FB-IPT (n=15) or FB-HE (n=14) and evaluated at post-treatment, six-months, and one-year. Changes in child psychosocial functioning, LOC-eating, BMI, and adiposity by dual-energy-X-ray-absorptiometry were assessed. Missing follow-up data were multiply imputed. Results FB-IPT feasibility and acceptability were indicated by good attendance (83%) and perceived benefits to social interactions and eating. Follow-up assessments were completed by 73% FB-IPT and 86% FB-HE at post-treatment, 60% and 64% at six-months, and 47% and 57% at one-year. At post-treatment, children in FB-IPT reported greater decreases in depression (95% CI −7.23, −2.01, Cohen’s d=1.23) and anxiety (95% CI −6.08, −0.70, Cohen’s d=.79) and less odds of LOC-eating (95% CI −3.93, −0.03, Cohen’s d=.38) than FB-HE. At six-months, children in FB-IPT had greater reductions in disordered-eating attitudes (95% CI −0.72, −0.05, Cohen’s d=.66) and at one-year, tended to have greater decreases in depressive symptoms (95% CI −8.82, 0.44, Cohen’s d=.69) than FB-HE. There was no difference in BMI gain between the groups. Discussion Family-based approaches that address interpersonal and emotional underpinnings of LOC-eating in preadolescents with overweight/obesity show preliminary promise, particularly for reducing internalizing symptoms. Whether observed psychological benefits translate into sustained prevention of

  5. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me...

  6. Generalized phase contrast:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast...

  7. Perforations during contrast enema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Steinkamp, U.; Grabbe, E.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus Ochsenzoll, Hamburg

    1983-01-01

    During contrast enema, perforation into the retroperitoneal space can be differentiated from perforation into the peritoneum and perforation into the intestinal wall associated with formation of barium granulomas or submucosal spreading of the contrast medium. Other special forms are perforation with contrast medium embolism of diverticula; of the processus vermiformis; penetration of contrast medium into fistulous systems and from the operated areas. Risk factors are: balloon catheter, intestinal tubes with a hard tip, preternatural anus, excessive enema pressure, contrast medium additions, preceding manipulations, intestinal diseases, advanced age and delegation of manipulations to assistants and unskilled staff. Children are particularly at risk. (orig.) [de

  8. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The Contrast Media Safety Committee (CMSC) of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology (ESUR) has updated its 1999 guidelines on contrast medium-induced nephropathy (CIN). AREAS COVERED: Topics reviewed include the definition of CIN, the choice of contrast medium, the prophylactic me....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  9. High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Alison; Zhang, Gengsheng

    2006-01-01

    NAVSYS High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver (HAGR) uses a digital beam-steering antenna array to enable up to eight GPS satellites to be tracked, each with up to 10 dBi of additional antenna gain over a conventional receiver solution...

  10. Multicriteria Gain Tuning for Rotorcraft Flight Controls (also entitled The Development of the Conduit Advanced Control System Design and Evaluation Interface with a Case Study Application Fly by Wire Helicopter Design)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biezad, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Handling qualities analysis and control law design would seem to be naturally complimenting components of aircraft flight control system design, however these two closely coupled disciplines are often not well integrated in practice. Handling qualities engineers and control system engineers may work in separate groups within an aircraft company. Flight control system engineers and handling quality specialists may come from different backgrounds and schooling and are often not aware of the other group's research. Thus while the handling qualities specifications represent desired aircraft response characteristics, these are rarely incorporated directly in the control system design process. Instead modem control system design techniques are based on servo-loop robustness specifications, and simple representations of the desired control response. Comprehensive handling qualities analysis is often left until the end of the design cycle and performed as a check of the completed design for satisfactory performance. This can lead to costly redesign or less than satisfactory aircraft handling qualities when the flight testing phase is reached. The desire to integrate the fields of handling qualities and flight,control systems led to the development of the CONDUIT system. This tool facilitates control system designs that achieve desired handling quality requirements and servo-loop specifications in a single design process. With CONDUIT, the control system engineer is now able to directly design and control systems to meet the complete handling specifications. CONDUIT allows the designer to retain a preferred control law structure, but then tunes the system parameters to meet the handling quality requirements.

  11. Systematic review of antiretroviral-associated lipodystrophy: lipoatrophy, but not central fat gain, is an antiretroviral adverse drug reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reneé de Waal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lipoatrophy and/or central fat gain are observed frequently in patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. Both are assumed to be antiretroviral adverse drug reactions. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to determine whether fat loss or gain was more common in HIV-infected patients on ART than in uninfected controls; was associated with specific antiretrovirals; and would reverse after switching antiretrovirals. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies met our inclusion criteria. One cohort study reported more lipoatrophy, less subcutaneous fat gain, but no difference in central fat gain in HIV-infected patients on ART than in controls. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs showed more limb fat loss (or less fat gain with the following regimens: stavudine (versus other nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs; efavirenz (versus protease inhibitors (PIs; and NRTI-containing (versus NRTI-sparing. RCTs showed increased subcutaneous fat after switching to NRTI-sparing regimens or from stavudine/zidovudine to abacavir/tenofovir. There were no significant between-group differences in trunk and/or visceral fat gain in RCTs of various regimens, but results from efavirenz versus PI regimens were inconsistent. There was no significant between-group differences in central fat gain in RCTs switched to NRTI-sparing regimens, or from PI-containing regimens. CONCLUSIONS: There is clear evidence of a causal relationship between NRTIs (especially thymidine analogues and lipoatrophy, with concomitant PIs possibly having an ameliorating effect or efavirenz causing additive toxicity. By contrast, central fat gain appears to be a consequence of treating HIV infection, because it is not different from controls, is not linked to any antiretroviral class, and doesn't improve on switching.

  12. Intraoperative iodinated contrast swallow with CT-scan delayed control for detection of early complications in laparoscopic gastric bypass: A case series of 260 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Consalvo, M.D.

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: This study gives a contribute to the existing issue of fast track in bariatric surgery for the early diagnosis of complications and patients' readmission or non-discharge. In conclusion, the use of intraoperative iodinated water soluble contrast swallow and abdominal CT-scan at 48 h was a safe and accurate test in order to detect and treat any potential early surgical complication in LRYGB.

  13. Front-End Light Source for aWaveform-Controlled High-Contrast Few-Cycle Laser System for High-Repetition Rate Relativistic Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Lopez-Martens

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the current development of an injector for a high-contrast, ultrashort laser system devoted to relativistic laser-plasma interaction in the few-cycle regime. The front-end is based on CEP-stabilized Ti:Sa CPA followed by XPW filter designed at the mJ level for temporal cleaning and shortening. Accurate characterization highlights the fidelity of the proposed injector. Measured CEP drift is 170 mrad rms.

  14. Dialysis and contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcos, Sameh K.; Thomsen, Henrik S.; Webb, Judith A.W.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous survey we revealed uncertainty among responders about (a) whether or not to perform hemodialysis in patients with severely reduced renal function who had received contrast medium; and (b) when to perform hemodialysis in patients on regular treatment with hemodialysis or continuous ambulatory dialysis who received contrast medium. Therefore, the Contrast Media Safety Committee of The European Society of Urogenital Radiology decided to review the literature and to issue guidelines. The committee performed a Medline search. Based on this, a report and guidelines were prepared. The report was discussed at the Ninth European Symposium on Urogenital Radiology in Genoa, Italy. Hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis safely remove both iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast media. The effectiveness of hemodialysis depends on many factors including blood and dialysate flow rate, permeability of dialysis membrane, duration of hemodialysis and molecular size, protein binding, hydrophilicity, and electrical charge of the contrast medium. Generally, several hemodialysis sessions are needed to removal all contrast medium, whereas it takes 3 weeks for continuous ambulatory dialysis to remove the agent completely. There is no need to schedule the dialysis in relation to the injection of iodinated or MR contrast media or the injection of contrast agent in relation to the dialysis program. Hemodialysis does not protect poorly functioning kidneys against contrast-medium-induced nephrotoxicity. Simple guidelines are given. (orig.)

  15. NGO's moving business : an analysis of contrasting strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijstee, M.M. van; Glasbergen, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we seek to advance understanding of nongovernmental organization (NGO) strategies with regard to influencing corporations. We study two contrasting NGO strategies (symbolic gain and symbolic damage), which simultaneously target the same corporation on the same issue. In

  16. Improved eating behaviours mediate weight gain prevention of young adults: moderation and mediation results of a randomised controlled trial of TXT2BFiT, mHealth program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Stephanie R; McGeechan, Kevin; Bauman, Adrian; Phongsavan, Philayrath; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2016-04-02

    Explanatory evaluation of interventions for prevention of weight gain is required beyond changes in weight, to determine for whom the intervention works and the underlying mechanisms of change. It was hypothesised that participant characteristics moderate intervention effect on weight change and improved eating and physical activity behaviours during the 3-month program mediate the relationship between intervention and weight. In our randomised controlled trial, young adults at risk of weight gain (n = 250) were assigned either to an intervention group that received a 3-month mHealth (TXT2BFiT) program with 6-month maintenance or to a control group. Data were collected via online self-report surveys. Hypothesised moderators and mediators of the intervention effect on weight were independently assessed in PROCESS macro models for 3 and 9-month weight change. Males (P = 0.01), mid-20s age group (P = 0.04), and higher income earners (P = 0.02) moderated intervention effects on weight change at 3-months and males only at 9-months (P = 0.02). Weight change at 3 (-1.12 kg) and 9-months (-1.38 kg) remained significant when 3-month nutrition and physical activity behaviours were specified as mediators (P <0.01 and P = 0.01 respectively). Indirect paths explained 39% (0.72/1.85 kg) and 40 % (0.92/2.3 kg) of total effect on weight change at 3 and 9-months respectively. Increased vegetable intake by intervention group at 3-months accounted for 19 and 17% and decreased sugar-sweetened beverages accounted for 8 and 13% of indirect weight change effects at 3 and 9-months respectively. TXT2BFiT was effective for both young men and women. Small sustained behavioural changes, including increased vegetable intake and decreased sugar-sweetened beverages consumption significantly mediated the intervention's effects on weight change. Improved eating behaviours and increased physical activity accounted for approximately 40% of the weight change. The trial is

  17. Effects of contrast on smooth pursuit eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spering, Miriam; Kerzel, Dirk; Braun, Doris I; Hawken, Michael J; Gegenfurtner, Karl R

    2005-05-20

    It is well known that moving stimuli can appear to move more slowly when contrast is reduced (P. Thompson, 1982). Here we address the question whether changes in stimulus contrast also affect smooth pursuit eye movements. Subjects were asked to smoothly track a moving Gabor patch. Targets varied in velocity (1, 8, and 15 deg/s), spatial frequency (0.1, 1, 4, and 8 c/deg), and contrast, ranging from just below individual thresholds to maximum contrast. Results show that smooth pursuit eye velocity gain rose significantly with increasing contrast. Below a contrast level of two to three times threshold, pursuit gain, acceleration, latency, and positional accuracy were severely impaired. Therefore, the smooth pursuit motor response shows the same kind of slowing at low contrast that was demonstrated in previous studies on perception.

  18. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory predict gains in mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C

    2013-01-01

    Visuospatial competencies are related to performance in mathematical domains in adulthood, but are not consistently related to mathematics achievement in children. We confirmed the latter for first graders and demonstrated that children who show above average first-to-fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory have an advantage over other children in mathematics. The study involved the assessment of the mathematics and reading achievement of 177 children in kindergarten to fifth grade, inclusive, and their working memory capacity and processing speed in first and fifth grade. Intelligence was assessed in first grade and their second to fourth grade teachers reported on their in-class attentive behavior. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory span (d = 2.4) were larger than gains in the capacity of the central executive (d = 1.6) that in turn were larger than gains in phonological memory span (d = 1.1). First to fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory and in speed of numeral processing predicted end of fifth grade mathematics achievement, as did first grade central executive scores, intelligence, and in-class attentive behavior. The results suggest there are important individual differences in the rate of growth of visuospatial memory during childhood and that these differences become increasingly important for mathematics learning.

  19. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory predict gains in mathematics achievement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoran Li

    Full Text Available Visuospatial competencies are related to performance in mathematical domains in adulthood, but are not consistently related to mathematics achievement in children. We confirmed the latter for first graders and demonstrated that children who show above average first-to-fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory have an advantage over other children in mathematics. The study involved the assessment of the mathematics and reading achievement of 177 children in kindergarten to fifth grade, inclusive, and their working memory capacity and processing speed in first and fifth grade. Intelligence was assessed in first grade and their second to fourth grade teachers reported on their in-class attentive behavior. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory span (d = 2.4 were larger than gains in the capacity of the central executive (d = 1.6 that in turn were larger than gains in phonological memory span (d = 1.1. First to fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory and in speed of numeral processing predicted end of fifth grade mathematics achievement, as did first grade central executive scores, intelligence, and in-class attentive behavior. The results suggest there are important individual differences in the rate of growth of visuospatial memory during childhood and that these differences become increasingly important for mathematics learning.

  20. Developmental Gains in Visuospatial Memory Predict Gains in Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Visuospatial competencies are related to performance in mathematical domains in adulthood, but are not consistently related to mathematics achievement in children. We confirmed the latter for first graders and demonstrated that children who show above average first-to-fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory have an advantage over other children in mathematics. The study involved the assessment of the mathematics and reading achievement of 177 children in kindergarten to fifth grade, inclusive, and their working memory capacity and processing speed in first and fifth grade. Intelligence was assessed in first grade and their second to fourth grade teachers reported on their in-class attentive behavior. Developmental gains in visuospatial memory span (d = 2.4) were larger than gains in the capacity of the central executive (d = 1.6) that in turn were larger than gains in phonological memory span (d = 1.1). First to fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory and in speed of numeral processing predicted end of fifth grade mathematics achievement, as did first grade central executive scores, intelligence, and in-class attentive behavior. The results suggest there are important individual differences in the rate of growth of visuospatial memory during childhood and that these differences become increasingly important for mathematics learning. PMID:23936154

  1. Effect of intensifying screens to subject contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Ja; Huh, Joon; Kang, Hong Seok; Yoon, Chul Ho

    1990-01-01

    It is an experimental report about object contrast according to the Kinds of screen and obtained results as follows ; 1. In the same object radiography, use acquired the difference of the object contrast between LT-II(CaWO 4 system) and G4(Gd system) screens. 2. object contrast more decreased in Gd system screen than CaWO 4 and object contrast controlled by X-ray tube voltage. 3. The difference of object contrast seen clearly in 80 kVp

  2. Contrast analysis : A tutorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.

    2018-01-01

    Contrast analysis is a relatively simple but effective statistical method for testing theoretical predictions about differences between group means against the empirical data. Despite its advantages, contrast analysis is hardly used to date, perhaps because it is not implemented in a convenient

  3. Leaving out control groups: an internal contrast analysis of gene expression profiles in atrial fibrillation patients--a systems biology approach to clinical categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Kurt; de Asmundis, Carlo; Francesconi, Anna; Figysl, Jurgen; Steurs, Griet; Boussy, Tim; Roos, Markus; Mueller, Andreas; Massimo, Lucio; Paparella, Gaetano; Van Caelenberg, Kristien; Chierchia, Gian Battista; Sarkozy, Andrea; Terradellas, Pedro Brugada Y; Zizi, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent chronic dysrythmia with an incidence that increases with age (>40). Because of its medical and socio-economic impacts it is expected to become an increasing burden on most health care systems. AF is a multi-factorial disease for which the identification of subtypes is warranted. Novel approaches based on the broad concepts of systems biology may overcome the blurred notion of normal and pathological phenotype, which is inherent to high throughput molecular arrays analysis. Here we apply an internal contrast algorithm on AF patient data with an analytical focus on potential entry pathways into the disease. We used a RMA (Robust Multichip Average) normalized Affymetrix micro-array data set from 10 AF patients (geo_accession #GSE2240). Four series of probes were selected based on physiopathogenic links with AF entryways: apoptosis (remodeling), MAP kinase (cell remodeling), OXPHOS (ability to sustain hemodynamic workload) and glycolysis (ischemia). Annotated probe lists were polled with Bioconductor packages in R (version 2.7.1). Genetic profile contrasts were analysed with hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis. The analysis revealed distinct patient groups for all probe sets. A substantial part (54% till 67%) of the variance is explained in the first 2 principal components. Genes in PC1/2 with high discriminatory value were selected and analyzed in detail. We aim for reliable molecular stratification of AF. We show that stratification is possible based on physiologically relevant gene sets. Genes with high contrast value are likely to give pathophysiological insight into permanent AF subtypes.

  4. Verification and simulation analysis of wind turbine control based on linear parameter varying gain scheduling%基于LPV增益调度的风电机组控制验证与仿真分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓英; 周峰; 陈忠雷; 田德; 高尚

    2016-01-01

    With the installed capacity of wind turbines increasing, the wind turbine output characteristics and optimal operation obtain much more concerns in the industry. This paper discusses the influence of wind turbulence on the performance of wind turbines. Wind turbine is a complex nonlinear system. Due to structure load coupling, wind variation and pitch actions, the parameters of aerodynamic subsystem are changing with operation state. Usually, PI (proportional integral) control algorithm is satisfied for a linear time invariant system. To obtain better performance, a nonlinear system needs an advanced control algorithm. To address this issue, we propose a linear parameter varying (LPV) gain scheduling control to mitigate the influence of wind turbulence on wind turbine performance.At different wind speed with variable pitch and rotor speed, the LPV control can adjust feedback gain to satisfy the changing operation point. First, we introduce the stability of LPV system and LPV controller design process. Once the stability conditions are reached, the closed-loop system is stable. Then, we derive a control model with a 2 MW wind turbine based on an actual double-fed induction generator. The input is a recommended turbulence model, Kaimal. In order to check the simulation model, the field data are compared with simulation results. The generator power and torque have similar statistic characteristics. So the model is suitable for simulation and the simulation results are credible. According to the analysis of field data, wind turbulence has a great impact on wind turbine performance, such as fatigue damage of gearbox and decreasing power generation efficiency. Therefore the economic benefits are reduced in the entire lifetime of wind turbine. Simulation results of LPV control algorithm and PI control algorithm are obtained by the software Bladed under 12 and 16 m/s wind turbulence, respectively. In time domain, the generator speed and torque are varying due to the wind

  5. Color contrasting in radioscopy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopaev, V.P.; Pavlov, S.V.; Nazarenko, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    Transformation principles for achromatic radioscopy control systems to color ones have been considered. Described is the developed ''Gamma 1'' roentgen-TV facility with color contrasting, which is based on the principle of analog conversion of brightness signal to a hue. By means of color channels amplifiers realized are the special amplitude characteristics, permitting in comparison with the common method of analogous transformation to obtain the greater number of hues within the identical range of brightnesses of image under investigation due to introducing purple colors. The investigation of amplitude resolution capability of color contrasting device has shown, that in the case of color contrasting of image the amplitude resolution is 1.7-1.8 time higher than in the case of achromatic one. Defectoscopic sensitivity during the testing of 5-20 mm thick steel products in the process of experimental-production tests turned out to be 1.1-1.3 time higher when using color contrasting of radioscopic image. Realization simplicity, high resolution, noise stability and wide functional possibilities of the facility show the prospects for its using during the quality control of welded joints in products of power engineering

  6. Quantifying the mechanisms of domain gain in animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljan, Marija; Frankish, Adam; Bateman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Protein domains are protein regions that are shared among different proteins and are frequently functionally and structurally independent from the rest of the protein. Novel domain combinations have a major role in evolutionary innovation. However, the relative contributions of the different molecular mechanisms that underlie domain gains in animals are still unknown. By using animal gene phylogenies we were able to identify a set of high confidence domain gain events and by looking at their coding DNA investigate the causative mechanisms. Here we show that the major mechanism for gains of new domains in metazoan proteins is likely to be gene fusion through joining of exons from adjacent genes, possibly mediated by non-allelic homologous recombination. Retroposition and insertion of exons into ancestral introns through intronic recombination are, in contrast to previous expectations, only minor contributors to domain gains and have accounted for less than 1% and 10% of high confidence domain gain events, respectively. Additionally, exonization of previously non-coding regions appears to be an important mechanism for addition of disordered segments to proteins. We observe that gene duplication has preceded domain gain in at least 80% of the gain events. The interplay of gene duplication and domain gain demonstrates an important mechanism for fast neofunctionalization of genes.

  7. Predictors for contrast media-induced nephropathy and long-term survival: Prospectively assessed data from the randomized controlled Dialysis-Versus-Diuresis (DVD) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Birgit; Heitmeyer, Christine; Fobker, Manfred; Breithardt, Günter; Schaefer, Roland M; Reinecke, Holger

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Among the numerous studies concerning contrast media-induced nephropathy (CIN), there was no prospective trial that provided data on the long-term outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively assess predictors of CIN and long-term outcomes of affected patients. METHODS: Four hundred twelve consecutive patients with serum creatinine levels of 115 μmol/L to 309 μmol/L (1.3 mg/dL to 3.5 mg/dL) undergoing elective coronary angiography were included. Patients were randomly assigned to periprocedural hydration alone, hydration plus onetime hemodialysis or hydration plus N-acetylcysteine. RESULTS: Multivariate logistic regression identified the following as predictors of CIN within 72 h (equivalent to an increase in creatinine 44.2 μmol/L [0.5 mg/dL] or more) : prophylactic postprocedural hemodialysis (OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.07 to 7.69), use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (OR 6.16, 95% CI 2.01 to 18.93), baseline glomerular filtration rate (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.98) and the amount of contrast media given (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.01). With regard to long-term outcome (mean follow-up 649 days), multivariate Cox regression models found elevated creatinine levels at 30 days (hazard rate ratio [HRR] 5.48, 95% CI 2.85 to 10.53), but not CIN within 72 h (HRR 1.12, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.02), to be associated with increased mortality. In addition, independent predictors for death during follow-up included left ventricular ejection fraction lower than 35% (HRR 4.01, 95% CI 2.22 to 7.26), serum phosphate (HRR 1.64, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.43) and hemoglobin (HRR 0.80, 95% CI 0.67 to 0.96). CONCLUSION: From the present prospective trial, performance of post-procedural hemodialysis, use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, reduced baseline glomerular filtration rate and amount of contrast media were independent predictors of CIN within 72 h after catheterization. Assessing renal function after 30 days, rather than within 72 h, seemed to be more predictive for

  8. How material contrast around subduction faults may control coseismic slip and rupture dynamics: tsunami applications for the case study of Tohoku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Antonio; Murphy, Shane; Romano, Fabrizio; Lorito, Stefano; Festa, Gaetano; Volpe, Manuela; Piatanesi, Alessio

    2017-04-01

    Recent megathrust tsunamigenic events, e.g. Maule 2010 (M8.8) and Tohoku 2011 (M9.0), generated huge tsunami waves as a consequence of high slip in the shallow part of the respective subduction zone. Other events, (e.g. the recent Mentawai 2010, M7.8, or the historical Meiji 1896, M8.2), referred to as tsunami earthquakes, produced unexpectedly large tsunami waves, probably due to large slip at shallow depth over longer rupture durations compared to deeper thrust events. Subduction zone earthquakes originate and propagate along bimaterial interfaces separating materials having different elastic properties, e.g. continental and oceanic crust, a stiffer deep mantle wedge, shallow compliant accretionary prism etc. Bimaterial interfaces have been showed, through observations (seismological and laboratory) and theoretical studies, to affect the rupture: introducing a preferred rupture direction as well as asymmetric rupture velocities and shear stress redistributions. Such features are predominantly due to the break of symmetry between the two sides of the interface in turn ascribable to the complex coupling between the frictional interfacial sliding and the slip-induced normal stress perturbations. In order to examine the influence of material contrast on a fault plane on the seismic source and tsunami waves, we modelled a Tohoku-like subduction zone to perform a large number of 2D along-dip rupture dynamics simulations in the framework of linear slip weakening both for homogeneous and bimaterial fault. In this latter model, the rupture acts as the interface between the subducting oceanic crust and the overriding layers (accretionary prism, continental crust and mantle wedge), varying the position of the shear stress asperity acting as nucleation patch. Initial results reveal that ruptures in homogeneous media produce earthquakes with large slip at depth compared to the case where bi-material interface is included. However the opposite occurs for events nucleating at

  9. Contrast agents for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemain, B.

    1994-01-01

    Contrast agents MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) have been developed to improve the diagnostic information obtained by this technic. They mainly interact on T1 and T2 parameters and increase consequently normal to abnormal tissues contrast. The paramagnetic agents which mainly act on longitudinal relaxation rate (T1) are gadolinium complexes for which stability is the main parameter to avoid any release of free gadolinium. The superparamagnetic agents that decrease signal intensity by an effect on transversal relaxation rate (T2) are developed for liver, digestive and lymph node imaging. Many area of research are now opened for optimal use of present and future contrast agents in MRI. (author). 28 refs., 4 tabs

  10. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-01-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  11. Serotonin Decreases the Gain of Visual Responses in Awake Macaque V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seillier, Lenka; Lorenz, Corinna; Kawaguchi, Katsuhisa; Ott, Torben; Nieder, Andreas; Pourriahi, Paria; Nienborg, Hendrikje

    2017-11-22

    Serotonin, an important neuromodulator in the brain, is implicated in affective and cognitive functions. However, its role even for basic cortical processes is controversial. For example, in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), heterogenous serotonergic modulation has been observed in anesthetized animals. Here, we combined extracellular single-unit recordings with iontophoresis in awake animals. We examined the role of serotonin on well-defined tuning properties (orientation, spatial frequency, contrast, and size) in V1 of two male macaque monkeys. We find that in the awake macaque the modulatory effect of serotonin is surprisingly uniform: it causes a mainly multiplicative decrease of the visual responses and a slight increase in the stimulus-selective response latency. Moreover, serotonin neither systematically changes the selectivity or variability of the response, nor the interneuronal correlation unexplained by the stimulus ("noise-correlation"). The modulation by serotonin has qualitative similarities with that for a decrease in stimulus contrast, but differs quantitatively from decreasing contrast. It can be captured by a simple additive change to a threshold-linear spiking nonlinearity. Together, our results show that serotonin is well suited to control the response gain of neurons in V1 depending on the animal's behavioral or motivational context, complementing other known state-dependent gain-control mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin is an important neuromodulator in the brain and a major target for drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, surprisingly little is known about how it shapes information processing in sensory areas. Here we examined the serotonergic modulation of visual processing in the primary visual cortex of awake behaving macaque monkeys. We found that serotonin mainly decreased the gain of the visual responses, without systematically changing their selectivity, variability, or covariability. This

  12. Weight suppression predicts total weight gain and rate of weight gain in outpatients with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frances A; Boden, Joseph M; Jordan, Jennifer; McIntosh, Virginia V W; Bulik, Cynthia M; Joyce, Peter R

    2015-11-01

    The present study sought to replicate the finding of Wildes and Marcus, Behav Res Ther, 50, 266-274, 2012 that higher levels of weight suppression at pretreatment predict greater total weight gain, faster rate of weight gain, and bulimic symptoms amongst patients admitted with anorexia nervosa. Participants were 56 women with anorexia nervosa diagnosed by using strict or lenient weight criteria, who were participating in a randomized controlled psychotherapy trial (McIntosh et al., Am J Psychiatry, 162, 741-747, 2005). Thirty-five women completed outpatient treatment and post-treatment assessment. Weight suppression was the discrepancy between highest lifetime weight at adult height and weight at pretreatment assessment. Outcome variables were total weight gain, rate of weight gain, and bulimic symptoms in the month prior to post-treatment assessment [assessed using the Eating Disorders Examination (Fairburn et al., Binge-Eating: Nature, Assessment and Treatment. New York: Guilford, 1993)]. Weight suppression was positively associated with total weight gain and rate of weight gain over treatment. Regression models showed that this association could not be explained by covariates (age at onset of anorexia nervosa and treatment modality). Weight suppression was not significantly associated with bulimic symptoms in the month prior to post-treatment assessment, regardless of whether bulimic symptoms were examined as continuous or dichotomous variables. The present study reinforces the previous finding that weight suppression predicts total weight gain and rate of weight gain amongst patients being treated for anorexia nervosa. Methodological issues may explain the failure of the present study to find that weight suppression predicts bulimic symptoms. Weight suppression at pretreatment for anorexia nervosa should be assessed routinely and may inform treatment planning. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dopaminergic control of food choice: contrasting effects of SKF 38393 and quinpirole on high-palatability food preference in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S J; Al-Naser, H A

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the behavioural effects of the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF 38393, and of the selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist, quinpirole, on the feeding performance of food-deprived rats in a model of food-preference behaviour. The animals were familiarised with a choice between a high-palatability, high-fat, high-sugar food (chocolate biscuits/cookies) and their regular maintenance diet. Following administration of either SKF 38393 (1.0-10.0 mg/kg, s.c.) or quinpirole (0.03-0.3 mg/kg, s.c.), the animals were observed throughout a 15-min test period, and their feeding behaviour was carefully monitored. Other behavioural categories were also observed. The resulting data were subject to a microstructural analysis to determine the loci of the behavioural effects. The results indicated that SKF 38393 and quinpirole had contrasting effects on the preference for the high-palatability chocolate food. SKF 38393 enhanced the preference, whereas quinpirole eliminated it. These data reinforce the view that forebrain dopamine mechanisms are closely involved in responses to high-palatability energy-dense food constituents, including chocolate. The data also indicate that pharmacological characterization is important, such that dopamine receptor subtypes appear to mediate contrasting effects on food preference for a high-fat, high-sugar food. Hence, brain dopamine appears to be involved in potentially complex ways in determining food preferences, and this may carry implications in the growing evidence for a link between brain dopamine and human obesity.

  14. Comparative evaluation of positive contrast and double contrast gastrography in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dileepkumar, K.M.; Rajankutty, K.; Sarada, Amma T.; Devanand, C.B.; Vijayan, N.

    2012-01-01

    A contrast radiography of stomach with oral barium sulphate suspension 25% (5 mL/kg b.wt positive contrast) and double contrast with oral barium sulphate 25% (3 mL/kg b.wt) followed by air (2 to 10 mL/kg b.wt, negative contrast) was done on six dogs to study the affections of stomach. Contrast radiography using barium sulphate alone was found satisfactory to identify most of the lesions of the stomach. Double contrast radiography using barium sulphate and air, required sedation to control the animals for proper administration. For the diagnosis of mucosal lesions, double contrast radiography was better than barium sulphate alone. Key words: Barium, Contrast radiography, Dog, Double contrast, Stomach

  15. Generalized Phase Contrast

    CERN Document Server

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast elevates the phase contrast technique not only to improve phase imaging but also to cross over and interface with diverse and seemingly disparate fields of contemporary optics and photonics. This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method including an overview of the range of current and potential applications of GPC in wavefront sensing and phase imaging, structured laser illumination and image projection, optical trapping and manipulation, and optical encryption and decryption. The GPC method goes further than the restrictive assumptions of conventional Zernike phase contrast analysis and achieves an expanded range of validity beyond weak phase perturbations. The generalized analysis yields design criteria for tuning experimental parameters to achieve optimal performance in terms of accuracy, fidelity and light efficiency. Optimization can address practical issues, such as finding an optimal spatial filter for the chosen application, ...

  16. Mamografia Espectral de Contraste

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Inês Santiago; Pereira, Inês; Pacheco, Hugo Pisco; Moutinho, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    A mamografia de contraste é uma aplicação recente possível com a mamografia digital directa, que utiliza contraste iodado endovenoso tendo como princípio a neovascularização induzida no cancro da mama, permitindo obter informação morfológica e funcional. Na mamografia espectral de contraste realiza-se uma aquisição simultânea com alta e baixa energia para cada incidência após administração de contraste iodado endovenoso. É depois feita uma imagem recombinada em que são realçadas as áreas que ...

  17. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes Santos, Cristina; Steen, Bárbara

    2014-01-01

    The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient’s medical fil...

  18. Effect of aerobic exercise training on maternal weight gain in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Weight gains in pregnancy within the recommended guidelines are associated with healthy fetal and maternal outcomes; higher weight gains are associated with fetal macrosomia. This study was a systemic review of randomized controlled trials on the effect of aerobic training on maternal weight in ...

  19. Stability, gain, and robustness in quantum feedback networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Helon, C.; James, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we are concerned with the problem of stability for quantum feedback networks. We demonstrate in the context of quantum optics how stability of quantum feedback networks can be guaranteed using only simple gain inequalities for network components and algebraic relationships determined by the network. Quantum feedback networks are shown to be stable if the loop gain is less than one--this is an extension of the famous small gain theorem of classical control theory. We illustrate the simplicity and power of the small gain approach with applications to important problems of robust stability and robust stabilization

  20. Study on high gain broadband optical parametric chirped pulse amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.K.; Fujita, M.; Yamanaka, C.; Yoshida, H.; Kodama, R.; Fujita, H.; Nakatsuka, M.; Izawa, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Optical parametric chirped pulse amplification has apparent advantages over the current schemes for high energy ultrashort pulse amplification. High gain in a single pass amplification, small B-integral, low heat deposition, high contrast ratio and, especially the extremely broad gain bandwidth with large-size crystals available bring people new hope for over multi-PW level at which the existing Nd:glass systems suffered difficulties. In this paper we present simulation and experimental studies for a high gain optical parametric chirped pulse amplification system which may be used as a preamplifier to replace the current complicated regenerative system or multi-pass Ti:sapphire amplifiers. Investigations on the amplification bandwidth and gain with BBO are performed. Analysis and discussions are also given. (author)

  1. Temporal variations in near surface soil moisture at two contrasting sites in the Wye catchment and their control on storm streamflow generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G.; Crane, S. B.

    Near surface soil moisture measurements were recorded at hourly intervals at two contrasting sites within the Cyff sub-catchment using a prototype capacitance probe system. In a mire area within a valley bottom, over the twelve month recording period, very little change in moisture content occurred. At the other site, a well drained area on a steeply sloping hillside, major variations occurred with significant soil moisture deficits being generated during a particularly dry summer. Soil moisture on the slope responded rapidly to rainfall inputs during wet periods, with little response during particularly dry periods. A number of rainfall events was analysed to determine whether changes in soil moisture could be used to characterise storm hydrographs for the Cyff and the Gwy, two sub-catchments being composed of differing percentages of mire area and steep slopes. It was found that percentage runoff for the Cyff was correlated with antecedent soil moisture on the slope, though the agreements for peak flow and lag time were poorer. For the Gwy, poor agreements were obtained for all three hydrograph characteristics. A simple formulation, based on storm rainfall and antecedent soil moisture deficits in the slope and mire areas, gave good agreement with storm streamflow volumes.

  2. Temporal variations in near surface soil moisture at two contrasting sites in the Wye catchment and their control on storm streamflow generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Roberts

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Near surface soil moisture measurements were recorded at hourly intervals at two contrasting sites within the Cyff sub-catchment using a prototype capacitance probe system. In a mire area within a valley bottom, over the twelve month recording period, very little change in moisture content occurred. At the other site, a well drained area on a steeply sloping hillside, major variations occurred with significant soil moisture deficits being generated during a particularly dry summer. Soil moisture on the slope responded rapidly to rainfall inputs during wet periods, with little response during particularly dry periods. A number of rainfall events was analysed to determine whether changes in soil moisture could be used to characterise storm hydrographs for the Cyff and the Gwy, two sub-catchments being composed of differing percentages of mire area and steep slopes. It was found that percentage runoff for the Cyff was correlated with antecedent soil moisture on the slope, though the agreements for peak flow and lag time were poorer. For the Gwy, poor agreements were obtained for all three hydrograph characteristics. A simple formulation, based on storm rainfall and antecedent soil moisture deficits in the slope and mire areas, gave good agreement with storm streamflow volumes.

  3. Developmental Gains in Visuospatial Memory Predict Gains in Mathematics Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yaoran; Geary, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Visuospatial competencies are related to performance in mathematical domains in adulthood, but are not consistently related to mathematics achievement in children. We confirmed the latter for first graders and demonstrated that children who show above average first-to-fifth grade gains in visuospatial memory have an advantage over other children in mathematics. The study involved the assessment of the mathematics and reading achievement of 177 children in kindergarten to fifth grade, inclusiv...

  4. Three-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial to reduce excessive weight gain in the first two years of life: protocol for the POI follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael W. Taylor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Prevention of Overweight in Infancy (POI study was a four-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT in 802 families which assessed whether additional education and support on sleep (Sleep group; food, physical activity and breastfeeding (FAB group; or both (Combination group, reduced excessive weight gain from birth to 2 years of age, compared to usual care (Control group. The study had high uptake at recruitment (58 % and retention at 2 years (86 %. Although the FAB intervention produced no significant effect on BMI or weight status at 2 years, the odds of obesity were halved in those who received the sleep intervention, despite no apparent effect on sleep duration. We speculate that enhanced self-regulatory behaviours may exist in the Sleep group. Self-regulation was not measured in our initial intervention, but extensive measures have been included in this follow-up study. Thus, the overall aim of the POI follow-up is to determine the extent to which augmented parental support and education on infant sleep, feeding, diet, and physical activity in the first 2 years of life reduces BMI at 3.5 and 5 years of age, and to determine the role of self-regulation in any such relationship. Methods/design We will contact all 802 families and seek renewed consent to participate in the follow-up study. The families have received no POI intervention since the RCT finished at 2 years of age. Follow-up data collection will occur when the children are aged 3.5 and 5 years (i.e. up to 3 years post-intervention. Outcomes of interest include child anthropometry, body composition (DXA scan, diet (validated food frequency questionnaire, physical activity (accelerometry, sleep (questionnaire and accelerometry, and self-regulation (questionnaires and neuropsychological assessment. Discussion Our follow-up study has been designed primarily to enable us to determine whether the intriguing benefit of the sleep intervention suggested at 2

  5. Investigation of Color Constancy in 4.5-Month-Old Infants under a Strict Control of Luminance Contrast for Individual Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiale; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kuriki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined color constancy in infants using a familiarization paradigm. We first obtained isoluminance in each infant as defined by the minimum motion paradigm and used these data to control the luminance of stimuli in the main experiments. In the familiarization phase of the main experiment, two identical smiling face patterns…

  6. Aspiration of Barium Contrast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Fuentes Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aspiration of barium contrast is a rare complication that may occur during studies of the digestive tract. Barium is an inert material that can cause anywhere from an asymptomatic mechanical obstruction to serious symptoms of respiratory distress that can result in patient death. We present the case of a 79-year-old male patient in whom we observed the presence of contrast medium residue in the lung parenchyma as an incidental finding during hospitalization. When the patient’s medical file was reviewed, images were found of a barium swallow study that the patient had undergone months earlier, and we were able to observe the exact moment of the aspiration of the contrast material. The patient had been asymptomatic since the test.

  7. Determining productivity gains from herbaceous vegetation management with 'age-shift' calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South; James H. Miller; Mark O. Kimberley; Curtis L. Vanderschaaf

    2006-01-01

    Gains in stand volume that result from competition control and fertilization are sometimes reported as 'percentage gains'. Because percentage gains arithmetically decline over time asstand volume increases, plantation managers have difficultyin using percentage gains to project growth and revenues. The 'age-shift' method quantifies the year...

  8. Effect of DM Actuator Errors on the WFIRST/AFTA Coronagraph Contrast Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shi, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The WFIRST/AFTA 2.4 m space telescope currently under study includes a stellar coronagraph for the imaging and the spectral characterization of extrasolar planets. The coronagraph employs two sequential deformable mirrors (DMs) to compensate for phase and amplitude errors in creating dark holes. DMs are critical elements in high contrast coronagraphs, requiring precision and stability measured in picometers to enable detection of Earth-like exoplanets. Working with a low-order wavefront-sensor the DM that is conjugate to a pupil can also be used to correct low-order wavefront drift during a scientific observation. However, not all actuators in a DM have the same gain. When using such a DM in low-order wavefront sensing and control subsystem, the actuator gain errors introduce high-spatial frequency errors to the DM surface and thus worsen the contrast performance of the coronagraph. We have investigated the effects of actuator gain errors and the actuator command digitization errors on the contrast performance of the coronagraph through modeling and simulations, and will present our results in this paper.

  9. Contrast media: future aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinmann, H.J.; Platzek, J.; Schirmer, H.; Pietsch, H.; Carretero, J.; Harto, J.; Medina, J.; Riefke, B.; Martin, J.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of the dramatic development in CT, there was no major breakthrough in the iodinated contrast media development. New agents based on hybrid between MRI and CT compounds may be a new innovative alternative. This new approach may also open new indications such as radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. Roentgen contrast medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamborski, C.

    1989-01-01

    The patent deals with a roentgen contrast medium containing a perfluorinebrominealkylether of the formula C m F 2m+1 OC n F 2n Br dispersed in water, preferentially in the presence of a non-ionic dispersing agent such as a fluorinated amidoaminoxide. 2 tabs

  11. Direct and indirect controls of the interannual variability in atmospheric CO2 exchange of three contrasting ecosystems in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus; Herbst, Mathias; Friborg, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    neighboring sites (agriculture, forest, and meadow) subjected to management in variable degree were evaluated to determine typical CO2 budgets and controlling factors of IAV. In terms of average annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) the agricultural and wet meadow site showed identical rates of −156 (±110...... sources of IAV of CO2 fluxes between direct climatic effects and indirect effects (functional changes). This analysis showed that NEE at the forest (through both GPP and RE) was most prone to interannual functional changes. The wet meadow showed moderate functional changes with respect to RE and thus NEE...

  12. Iodinated contrast media nephrotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    In the late seventies, iodinated contrast agents (ICA) were considered to be a major cause of acute iatrogenic renal failure. Over the last decade new contrast agents have been synthesized, nonionic and less hyperosmolar. The incidence of acute renal failure due to ICAs, varies from 3.7 to 70% of cases according to the series, with an average figure of 10.2%. The pathophysiology of ICA nephrotoxicity was mainly studied in laboratory animal models. Three main factors are involved in an inducing ICA-mediated decrease in glomerular filtration rate: reduction of the renal plasma flow, a direct cytotoxic effect on renal tubular cells and erythrocyte alteration leading to intra-renal sludge. Excluding dysglobulinemias with urinary excretion of immunoglobulin light chains, which represent a special case of maximum nephrotoxicity, 4 main risk factors of renal toxicity have been identified in nondiabetic subjects: previous renal failure with serum creatinine levels greater than 140 μmol per liter, extracellular dehydration, age over 60 and use of high doses of ICA and/or repeated ICA injections before serum creatinine levels return to baseline. Preventive measures for avoiding ICA nephrotoxicity are threefold: maintain or restore adequate hydration with saline infusion, stop NSAID treatment several days before ICA administration, and allow a 5 day interval before repeating contrast media injections. New, nonionic and moderately hyperosmolar contrast agents appear to be much less nephrotoxic than conventional ICAs in laboratory animals and in high-risk patients. It is advisable to select such contrast media for investigating high-risk patients. This approach was recently substantiated in well designed, randomized clinical studies which included more than 2 000 patients. (author)

  13. Interventions to reduce weight gain in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, G; Cohn, T; Remington, G

    2007-01-24

    Weight gain is common for people with schizophrenia and this has serious implications for health and well being. To determine the effects of both pharmacological (excluding medication switching) and non pharmacological strategies for reducing or preventing weight gain in people with schizophrenia. We searched key databases and the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's trials register (April 2006), reference sections within relevant papers, hand searched key journals, and contacted the first author of each relevant study and other experts to collect further information. We included all clinical randomised controlled trials comparing any pharmacological or non pharmacological intervention for weight gain (diet and exercise counselling) with standard care or other treatments for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data from studies. As weight is a continuous outcome measurement, weighted mean differences (WMD) of the change from baseline were calculated. The primary outcome measure was weight loss. Twenty-three randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria for this review. Five trials assessed a cognitive/behavioural intervention and eighteen assessed a pharmacological adjunct. In terms of prevention, two cognitive/behavioural trials showed significant treatment effect (mean weight change) at end of treatment (n=104, 2 RCTs, WMD -3.38 kg CI -4.2 to -2.0). Pharmacological adjunct treatments were significant with a modest prevention of weight gain (n=274, 6 RCTs, WMD - 1.16 kg CI -1.9 to -0.4). In terms of treatments for weight loss, we found significantly greater weight reduction in the cognitive behavioural intervention group (n=129, 3 RCTs, WMD -1.69 kg CI -2.8 to -0.6) compared with standard care. Modest weight loss can be achieved with selective pharmacological and non pharmacological interventions. However, interpretation is limited by the small number of studies, small sample size

  14. Interventions to reduce weight gain in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Guy; Cohn, Tony; Remington, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background Weight gain is common for people with schizophrenia and this has serious implications for health and well being. Objectives To determine the effects of both pharmacological (excluding medication switching) and non pharmacological strategies for reducing or preventing weight gain in people with schizophrenia. Search methods We searched key databases and the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s trials register (April 2006), reference sections within relevant papers, hand searched key journals, and contacted the first author of each relevant study and other experts to collect further information. Selection criteria We included all clinical randomised controlled trials comparing any pharmacological or non pharmacological intervention for weight gain (diet and exercise counselling) with standard care or other treatments for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses. Data collection and analysis We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data from studies. As weight is a continuous outcome measurement, weighted mean differences (WMD) of the change from baseline were calculated. The primary outcome measure was weight loss. Main results Twenty-three randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria for this review. Five trials assessed a cognitive/behavioural intervention and eighteen assessed a pharmacological adjunct. In terms of prevention, two cognitive/behavioural trials showed significant treatment effect (mean weight change) at end of treatment (n=104, 2 RCTs, WMD −3.38 kg CI −4.2 to −2.0). Pharmacological adjunct treatments were significant with a modest prevention of weight gain (n=274, 6 RCTs, WMD − 1.16 kg CI −1.9 to −0.4). In terms of treatments for weight loss, we found significantly greater weight reduction in the cognitive behavioural intervention group (n=129, 3 RCTs, WMD −1.69 kg CI −2.8 to −0.6) compared with standard care. Authors’ conclusions Modest weight loss can be achieved with selective

  15. MR imaging with metal artifact-reducing sequences and gadolinium contrast agent in a case-control study of periprosthetic abnormalities in patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gunilla M.; Mueller, Markus F.; Ekberg, Olle [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Malmoe (Sweden); Maansson, Sven [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden); Schewelov, Thord von [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Malmoe (Sweden); Nittka, Mathias [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany); Lundin, Bjoern [Lund University, Skaane University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Lund (Sweden)

    2014-08-15

    To apply and compare magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metal artifact reducing sequences (MARS) including subtraction imaging after contrast application in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses, investigate the prevalence and characteristics of periprosthetic abnormalities, as well as their relation with pain and risk factors. Fifty-two MoM prostheses (35 cases with pain and or risk factors, and 17 controls) in 47 patients were examined in a 1.5-T MR scanner using MARS: turbo spin echo (TSE) with high readout bandwidth with and without view angle tilting (VAT), TSE with VAT and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC), short tau inversion recovery (STIR) with matched RF pulses, and post-contrast imaging. The relations of MRI findings to pain and risk factors were analyzed and in five revised hips findings from operation, histology, and MRI were compared. TSE VAT detected the highest number of osteolyses. Soft tissue mass, effusion, and capsular thickening were common, whereas osteolysis in acetabulum and femur were less frequent. Contrast enhancement occurred in bone, synovia, joint capsule, and the periphery of soft tissue mass. There was no significant relation between MRI findings and pain or risk factors. MARS and gadolinium subtraction imaging are useful for evaluation of complications to MoM prosthesis. TSE VAT had the highest sensitivity for osteolysis. Contrast enhancement might indicate activation of aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion (ALVAL). Pain, small head, or steep prosthesis inclination angle are not useful predictors of periprosthetic abnormalities, and wide indications for MR follow-up are warranted. (orig.)

  16. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettab, Kamel; Roux, Stéphanie; Mathé, Doriane; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril; Dumontet, Charles; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40–80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles. PMID:26274324

  17. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chettab, Kamel; Roux, Stéphanie; Mathé, Doriane; Cros-Perrial, Emeline; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril; Dumontet, Charles; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles.

  18. Spatial and Temporal Control of Cavitation Allows High In Vitro Transfection Efficiency in the Absence of Transfection Reagents or Contrast Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Chettab

    Full Text Available Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. In this study, we developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. The regulation system incorporated in the device allowed a real-time control of the cavitation level during sonoporation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (pEGFP-C1 in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the device was compared to those observed with lipofection and nucleofection methods. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device allowed high rate of transfection of pEGFP-C1 (40-80%, as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. The transfection efficiency and toxicity of sonoporation on the non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 were similar to those of nucleofection, while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection by lipofection. Moreover, sonoporation was used to produce three stably transfected human lymphoma and leukemia lines. Significant transfection efficiency was also observed in two fresh samples of human acute myeloid leukemia cells. In conclusion, we developed a user-friendly and cost-effective ultrasound device, well adapted for routine in vitro high-yield transfection experiments and which does not require the use of any transfection reagent or gas micro-bubbles.

  19. GAIN Technology Workshops Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braase, Lori Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    National and global demand for nuclear energy is increasing and United States (U.S.) global leadership is eroding. There is a sense of urgency with respect to the deployment of the innovative nuclear energy technologies. The Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative is based on the simultaneous achievement of three strategic goals. The first is maintaining global technology leadership within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The second is enabling global industrial leadership for nuclear vendors and suppliers. The third is focused on utility optimization of nuclear energy within the clean energy portfolio. An effective public-private partnership is required to achieve these goals. DOEs recognizes the recent sense of urgency new developers and investors have in getting their concepts to market. They know that time to market for nuclear technology takes too long and the facilities needed to conduct the necessary research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities are very expensive to develop and maintain. Early technologies, in the lower technology readiness levels (TRL) need materials testing, analysis, modeling, code development, etc., most of which currently exists in the DOE national laboratory system. However, mature technologies typically need large component testing and demonstration facilities, which are expensive and long-lead efforts. By understanding the needs of advanced nuclear technology developers, GAIN will connect DOE national laboratory capabilities (e.g., facilities, expertise, materials, and data) with industry RD&D needs. In addition, GAIN is working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to streamline processes and increase understanding of the licensing requirements for advanced reactors.

  20. GAIN Technology Workshops Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braase, Lori Ann

    2016-01-01

    National and global demand for nuclear energy is increasing and United States (U.S.) global leadership is eroding. There is a sense of urgency with respect to the deployment of the innovative nuclear energy technologies. The Gateway for Accelerated Innovation in Nuclear (GAIN) initiative is based on the simultaneous achievement of three strategic goals. The first is maintaining global technology leadership within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The second is enabling global industrial leadership for nuclear vendors and suppliers. The third is focused on utility optimization of nuclear energy within the clean energy portfolio. An effective public-private partnership is required to achieve these goals. DOEs recognizes the recent sense of urgency new developers and investors have in getting their concepts to market. They know that time to market for nuclear technology takes too long and the facilities needed to conduct the necessary research, development and demonstration (RD&D) activities are very expensive to develop and maintain. Early technologies, in the lower technology readiness levels (TRL) need materials testing, analysis, modeling, code development, etc., most of which currently exists in the DOE national laboratory system. However, mature technologies typically need large component testing and demonstration facilities, which are expensive and long-lead efforts. By understanding the needs of advanced nuclear technology developers, GAIN will connect DOE national laboratory capabilities (e.g., facilities, expertise, materials, and data) with industry RD&D needs. In addition, GAIN is working with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to streamline processes and increase understanding of the licensing requirements for advanced reactors.

  1. [Fast food promotes weight gain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Steen; Dyerberg, Jørn; Astrup, Arne V

    2007-05-07

    The total amounts of fat in a fast food menu consisting of French fries and fried Chicken Nuggets from McDonald's and KFC, respectively, bought in 35 different countries vary from 41 to 71 gram. In most countries the menu contained unacceptably high amounts of industrially-produced trans fat which contributes to an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease, weight gain, abdominal fat accumulation and type 2 diabetes. The quality of the ingredients in fast food ought to be better and the size of the portions smaller and less energy-dense so that frequent fast food meals do not increase the risk of obesity and diseases among customers.

  2. Mamografia com contraste

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Rita; Silva, Carina; Reis, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    O estudo pretendeu apresentar as indicações clínicas, vantagens e princípios da mamografia com contraste, identificar as evoluyções tecnológicas para a mamografia com contraste e caracterizar as práticas e os desafios dos técnicos de radiologia do Hospital de Santarém (único no país a utilizar esta técnica). O cancro da mama é uma das principais causas de morte nas mulheres, em todo o mundo, mas principalmente nos Estados Unidos da América, Canadá, Europa Ocidental e Austrália. Em Portugal, e...

  3. Current iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacul, F.

    2001-01-01

    The number of scientific papers on iodinated contrast media is declining. Indeed, comparative trials between high-osmolality and low-osmolality agents largely showed the higher safety and tolerability of the latter, and this is no longer a matter of discussion. Only financial constraints could prevent a total conversion to low-osmolality agents. Research comparing low-osmolality (nonionic monomers, ionic dimer) and iso-osmolality contrast media (nonionic dimers) are still ongoing. Both classes of nonionic compounds proved safer than the ionic dimer. The relative merits of nonionic monomers and nonionic dimers are a matter for debate, and criteria for a selective use of different agents for different procedures could be discussed. (orig.)

  4. Contrast detail phantom for SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, M.L. de; Arashiro, J G; Giannone, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camuyrano, M; Nohara, G [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Exactas

    1996-06-01

    A new low variable contrast phantom for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was constructed, tested and compared with other existing phantoms. It contains simulated cylindrical lesions of four different diameters (D{sub i}), embedded in a cylindrical scattering medium and a uniform section to evaluate tomographic uniformity. The concentration of tracer in the simulated lesions and the scattering medium (background) can be varied to simulate hot and cold lesions. Different applications of the phantom were tested, including determination of the minimum object contrast (OCm) necessary to detect lesions as a function of lesion size, lesion type (hot or cold) and acquisition and processing protocols by visual inspection. This parameter allows categorization of instruments comparing an `image quality index` (IQI). Preliminary comparison with the Britten contrast processing method showed that the detectable OCm was of the same order of magnitude, but the presented device seems more suitable for training and intercomparison purposes. The constructed phantom, of simple design, has proved to be useful for acquisition and processing condition evaluation, OCm estimation and external quality control. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  5. Can Beta Blockers Cause Weight Gain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause weight gain? Can beta blockers cause weight gain? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Yes. Weight gain can occur as a side effect of some ... and metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol-XL). The average weight gain is about 2.6 pounds (about 1.2 ...

  6. A gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chris J; Van der Slot, Peter J M; Boller, Klaus-J

    2013-01-01

    We report on a gain-coefficient switched Alexandrite laser. An electro-optic modulator is used to switch between high and low gain states by making use of the polarization dependent gain of Alexandrite. In gain-coefficient switched mode, the laser produces 85 ns pulses with a pulse energy of 240 mJ at a repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  7. SiPM Gain Stabilization Studies for Adaptive Power Supply

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074257; Zalieckas, Justas; Cvach, Jaroslav; Kvasnicka, Jiri; Polak, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    We present herein gain stabilization studies of SiPMs using a climate chamber at CERN. We present results for four detectors not tested before, three from Hamamatsu and one from KETEK. Two of the Hamamatsu SiPMs are novel sensors with trenches that reduce cross talk. We use an improved readout system with a digital oscilloscope controlled with a dedicated LabView program. We improved and automized the analysis to deal with large datasets. We have measured the gain-versus-bias-voltage dependence at fixed temperature and gain-versus-temperature dependence at fixed bias voltage to determine the bias voltage dependence on temperature $V(T)$ for stable gain. We show that the gain remains stable to better than $\\pm 0.5\\%$ in the $20^\\circ \\rm C - 30^\\circ C$ temperature range if the bias voltage is properly adjusted with temperature.

  8. Slow-light-enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Chen, Yaohui

    2014-01-01

    Passive photonic crystals have been shown to exhibit a multitude of interesting phenomena, including slow-light propagation in line-defect waveguides. It was suggested that by incorporating an active material in the waveguide, slow light could be used to enhance the effective gain of the material......, which would have interesting application prospects, for example enabling ultra-compact optical amplifiers for integration in photonic chips. Here we experi- mentally investigate the gain of a photonic crystal membrane structure with embedded quantum wells. We find that by solely changing the photonic...... crystal structural parameters, the maximum value of the gain coefficient can be increased compared with a ridge waveguide structure and at the same time the spectral position of the peak gain be controlled. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theory and show that gain values similar...

  9. Changes in job strain and subsequent weight gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterlund, Gitte Kingo; Keller, Amélie Cléo; Heitmann, Berit Lilienthal

    2018-01-01

    in 1999 between those who were rarely v. sometimes v. often busy in 1993 (P=0·03), with the largest weight gain in individuals with sustained high busyness in both years. Loss of influence between 1993 and 1999 was associated with larger subsequent weight gain than sustained high influence (P=0......Objective: Obesity as well as job strain is increasing, and job strain might contribute to weight gain. The objective of the current study was to examine associations between longitudinal alterations in the components of job strain and subsequent weight gain. Design: The study was designed...... as a prospective cohort study with three questionnaire surveys enabling measurement of job-strain alterations over 6 years and subsequent measurements of weight gain after further 10 years of follow-up. ANCOVA and trend analyses were conducted. Job demands were measured as job busyness and speed, and control...

  10. Estimating the potential gains from mergers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Wang, Dexiang

    2005-01-01

    We introduce simple production economic models to estimate the potential gains from mergers. We decompose the gains into technical ef¿ciency, size (scale) and harmony (mix) gains, and we discuss alternative ways to capture these gains. We propose to approximate the production processes using...... the non-parametric. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) approach, and we use the resulting operational approach to estimate the potential gains from merging agricultural extension of¿ces in Denmark....

  11. The increase in physical performance and gain in lean and fat mass occur in prepubertal children independent of mode of school transportation. One year data from the prospective controlled Pediatric Osteoporosis Prevention (POP) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this 12-month study in pre-pubertal children was to evaluate the effect of school transportation on gain in lean and fat mass, muscle strength and physical performance. Methods Ninety-seven girls and 133 boys aged 7-9 years from the Malmö Pediatric Osteoporosis Prevention Study were included. Regional lean and fat mass were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, isokinetic peak torque of knee extensors and flexors by a computerised dynamometer and physical performance by vertical jump height. Level of physical activity was assessed by accelerometers. The 12-month changes in children who walked or cycled to school were compared with changes in those who travelled by bus or car. Results There were no differences in baseline or annual changes in lean or fat mass gain, muscle strength or physical performance between the two groups. All children reached the internationally recommended level of 60 minutes per day of moderate or high physical activity by accelerometers. Conclusion The choice of school transportation in pre-pubertal children seems not to influence the gain in lean and fat mass, muscle strength or functional ability, probably as the everyday physical activity is so high that the mode of school transportation contributes little to the total level of activity.

  12. A Mathematical Model to Investigate Gain-Induced Oscillation in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    that increase in the gain of the baroreflex feedback loop controlling venous volume ... The existence of fluctuations in blood pressure has been known since the ...... Thus, young adults, with high gain and small D2, are in the unstable region,.

  13. Heritability of gestational weight gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Elina Scheers; Silventoinen, Karri; Tynelius, Per

    2015-01-01

    Gestational weight gain (GWG) is a complex trait involving intrauterine environmental, maternal environmental, and genetic factors. However, the extent to which these factors contribute to the total variation in GWG is unclear. We therefore examined the genetic and environmental influences...... on the variation in GWG in the first and second pregnancy in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin mother-pairs. Further, we explored if any co-variance existed between factors influencing the variation in GWG of the mothers’ first and second pregnancies. By using Swedish nationwide record-linkage data, we...... identified 694 twin mother-pairs with complete data on their first pregnancy and 465 twin mother-pairs with complete data on their second pregnancy during 1982–2010. For a subanalysis, 143 twin mother-pairs had complete data on two consecutive pregnancies during the study period. We used structural equation...

  14. Unidirectional high gain brake stop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, David J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    This invention relates to a unidirectional high gain brake arrangement that includes in combination a shaft mounted for rotation within a housing. The shaft is rotatable in either direction. A brake is selectively releasably coupled to the housing and to the shaft. The brake has a first member. An intermittent motion device is respectively coupled through the first member to the housing and through a one-way clutch to the shaft. The brake also has a second member that is mechanically coupled to the first brake member and to the housing. The intermittent motion device causes the brake to be activated by movement imparted to the first brake member after a preset number of revolutions of the shaft in one direction. The brake is released by rotation of the shaft in an opposite direction whereby torque transmitted through the one-way clutch to the first brake member is removed.

  15. Boesmanland gains from nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, I.

    1984-01-01

    It is being claimed that the geobotany of the Boesmanland will gain from the use of the farm Vaalputs for radioactive waste disposal from the Koeberg nuclear power station. Only 1 km 2 of the 10 000 ha that was bought for the purpose will be used for the disposal of low-level radioactive wastes and 2 m 3 to 3 m 3 per year will be used for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. The rest of the area, Nucor plans to develop as a nature reserve, restoring the natural botany and ecology. Before Vaalputs was selected as site for radioactive waste disposal, a regional analysis was done. According to this there is more or less 500 people staying within a radius of 25km from the farm. Geological surveys showed no mineral deposits of economic value. During the past 100 million years the area was also free from seismic activity

  16. Image contrast enhancement based on a local standard deviation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Dah-Chung; Wu, Wen-Rong

    1996-01-01

    The adaptive contrast enhancement (ACE) algorithm is a widely used image enhancement method, which needs a contrast gain to adjust high frequency components of an image. In the literature, the gain is usually inversely proportional to the local standard deviation (LSD) or is a constant. But these cause two problems in practical applications, i.e., noise overenhancement and ringing artifact. In this paper a new gain is developed based on Hunt's Gaussian image model to prevent the two defects. The new gain is a nonlinear function of LSD and has the desired characteristic emphasizing the LSD regions in which details are concentrated. We have applied the new ACE algorithm to chest x-ray images and the simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm

  17. Contrast Invariant SNR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Pierre; Escande, Paul; Dong, Yiqiu

    We design an image quality measure independent of local contrast changes, which constitute simple models of illumination changes. Given two images, the algorithm provides the image closest to the first one with the component tree of the second. This problem can be cast as a specific convex progra...... algorithms based on interior point methods. The algorithm has potential applications in change detection, color image processing or image fusion. A Matlab implementation is available at http://www.math.univ-toulouse.fr/_weiss/PageCodes.html....

  18. Investigating the safety and efficacy of naltrexone for anti-psychotic induced weight gain in severe mental illness: study protocol of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tek, Cenk; Guloksuz, Sinan; Srihari, Vinod H; Reutenauer, Erin L

    2013-06-27

    Obesity is a growing health problem leading to high rates of mortality and morbidity in patients with severe mental illness (SMI). The increased rate of obesity is largely attributed to antipsychotic use. The effect of antipsychotic medications on H1 and 5HT2 receptors has been associated with weight gain, but there is also a substantial amount of evidence showing that D2 receptor blockade may be responsible for weight gain by interacting with the dopamine-opioid system. Unfortunately, current available medications for weight loss have limited efficacy in this population. Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, may be a promising agent to reduce antipsychotic induced weight gain by decreasing food cravings. We aim to investigate the safety and efficacy of two doses of naltrexone (25 mg & 50 mg) versus placebo for weight and health risk reduction in overweight and obese individuals (BMI ≥ 28) with SMI, who gained weight while being treated with antipsychotics. One hundred and forty four patients will be recruited throughout the greater New Haven area. The participants will be randomized to naltrexone 25 mg/day, naltrexone 50 mg/day, or placebo in a 1:1:1 ratio. Participants will be on the study medication for 52 weeks, and assessed weekly for the first 4 weeks and bi-weekly thereafter. The primary outcome measurements are weight reduction and percentage achieving clinically significant weight loss (5% of total body weight). Waist circumference, body mass index, serum lipid profile, fasting glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin are the secondary outcome measures. The effect of naltrexone on other outcome measurements such as schizophrenia symptoms, depression, dietary consumption, quality of life, cognitive functioning, physical activity, metabolism/inflammation markers, serum leptin, ghrelin, peptide YY, adinopectin, high sensitivity CRP, interleukin 6, interleukin-1B, interleukin-18, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) will be evaluated. The data will be

  19. Effect of contrast material on image noise and radiation dose in adult chest computed tomography using automatic exposure control: A comparative study between 16-, 64- and 128-slice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jijo, E-mail: jijopaul1980@gmail.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe University, Department of Biophysics, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Schell, Boris, E-mail: boris.schell@googlemail.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kerl, J. Matthias, E-mail: matthias.kerl@gmai.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Maentele, Werner, E-mail: maentele@biophysik.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University, Department of Biophysics, Max von Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bauer, Ralf W., E-mail: ralfwbauer@aol.com [Clinic of the Goethe University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Haus 23C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the difference in radiation dose between non-enhanced (NECT) and contrast-enhanced (CECT) chest CT examinations contributed by contrast material with different scanner generations with automatic exposure control (AEC). Methods and materials: Each 42 adult patients received a NECT and CECT of the chest in one session on a 16-, 64- or 128-slice CT scanner with the same scan protocol settings. However, AEC technology (Care Dose 4D, Siemens) underwent upgrades in each of the three scanner generations. DLP, CTDIvol and image noise were compared. Results: Although absolute differences in image noise were very small and ranged between 10 and 13 HU for NECT and CECT in median, the differences in image noise and dose (DLP: 16-slice:+2.8%; 64-slice:+3.9%; 128-slice:+5.6%) between NECT and CECT were statistically significant in all groups. Image noise and dose parameters were significantly lower in the most recent 128-slice CT generation for both NECT and CECT (DLP: 16-slice:+35.5-39.2%; 64-slice:+6.8-8.5%). Conclusion: The presence of contrast material lead to an increase in dose for chest examinations in three CT generations with AEC. Although image noise values were significantly higher for CECT, the absolute differences were in a range of 3 HU. This can be regarded as negligible, thus indicating that AEC is able to fulfill its purpose of maintaining image quality. However, technological developments lead to a significant reduction of dose and image noise with the latest CT generation.

  20. Gain attenuation of gated framing camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Shali; Liu Shenye; Cao Zhurong; Li Hang; Zhang Haiying; Yuan Zheng; Wang Liwei

    2009-01-01

    The theoretic model of framing camera's gain attenuation is analyzed. The exponential attenuation curve of the gain along the pulse propagation time is simulated. An experiment to measure the coefficient of gain attenuation based on the gain attenuation theory is designed. Experiment result shows that the gain follows an exponential attenuation rule with a quotient of 0.0249 nm -1 , the attenuation coefficient of the pulse is 0.00356 mm -1 . The loss of the pulse propagation along the MCP stripline is the leading reason of gain attenuation. But in the figure of a single stripline, the gain dose not follow the rule of exponential attenuation completely, instead, there is a gain increase at the stripline bottom. That is caused by the reflection of the pulse. The reflectance is about 24.2%. Combining the experiment and theory, which design of the stripline MCP can improved the gain attenuation. (authors)

  1. Effect of increased convective clearance by on-line hemodiafiltration on all cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients – the Dutch CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST: rationale and design of a randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN38365125

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nubé Menso J

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high incidence of cardiovascular disease in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD is related to the accumulation of uremic toxins in the middle and large-middle molecular weight range. As online hemodiafiltration (HDF removes these molecules more effectively than standard hemodialysis (HD, it has been suggested that online HDF improves survival and cardiovascular outcome. Thus far, no conclusive data of HDF on target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are available. Therefore, the CONvective TRAnsport STudy (CONTRAST has been initiated. Methods CONTRAST is a Dutch multi-center randomised controlled trial. In this trial, approximately 800 chronic hemodialysis patients will be randomised between online HDF and low-flux HD, and followed for three years. The primary endpoint is all cause mortality. The main secondary outcome variables are fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events. Conclusion The study is designed to provide conclusive evidence whether online HDF leads to a lower mortality and less cardiovascular events as compared to standard HD.

  2. Contrast induced hyperthyroidism due to iodine excess

    OpenAIRE

    Mushtaq, Usman; Price, Timothy; Laddipeerla, Narsing; Townsend, Amanda; Broadbridge, Vy

    2009-01-01

    Iodine induced hyperthyroidism is a thyrotoxic condition caused by exposure to excessive iodine. Historically this type of hyperthyroidism has been described in areas of iodine deficiency. With advances in medicine, iodine induced hyperthyroidism has been observed following the use of drugs containing iodine—for example, amiodarone, and contrast agents used in radiological imaging. In elderly patients it is frequently difficult to diagnose and control contrast related hyperthyroidism, as most...

  3. Epitaxial growth of quantum rods with high aspect ratio and compositional contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L. H.; Patriarche, G.; Fiore, A.

    2008-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of quantum rods (QRs) on GaAs was investigated. It was found that GaAs thickness in the GaAs/InAs superlattice used for QR formation plays a key role in improving the QR structural properties. Increasing the GaAs thickness results in both an increased In compositional contrast between the QRs and surrounding layer, and an increased QR length. QRs with an aspect ratio of up to 10 were obtained, representing quasiquantum wires in a GaAs matrix. Due to modified confinement and strain potential, such nanostructure is promising for controlling gain polarization

  4. Phase Contrast Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1996-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a system for synthesizing a prescribed intensity pattern based on phase contrast imaging that is not based on the assumption of prior art methods that the pahase shift phi is less than 1 radian. An improved method based on a simple imaging operation...... phasors attain predetermined values for predetermined spatial frequencies, and the phasor value of the specific resolution element of the spatial phase mask corresponds to a distinct intensity level of the image of the resolution element in the intensity pattern, and a spatial phase filter for phase...... shifting of a part of the electromagntic radiation, in combination with an imaging system for generation of the intensity pattern by interference in the image plane of the imaging system between the part of the electromagnetic raidation that has been phase shifted by the phase filter and the remaining part...

  5. Paramagnetic contrast material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Paramagnetic contrast materials have certainly demonstrated clinical utility in a variety of organ systems for improved detection of various neoplastic, inflammatory, infectious, and physiologic abnormalities. Although the more commonly employed extracellular agents, such as Gd-DTPA, have been quite safe and useful, particularly in the CNS, it is almost certain that other substances will achieve more success in various other organs, such as iron oxides in the reticuloendothelial system and persisting extracellular agents in the cardiovascular system. Finally, as MRI technology continues to evolve, producing such exciting new sequences as gradient-echo fast scans, the roles of currently existing and newly discovered paramagnetic pharmaceuticals must be continuously reevaluated both to obtain maximum clinical benefit and to guide the search for newer agents that may further optimize the diagnostic efficacy of MRI

  6. Review of High Gain FELs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintake, Tsumoru

    2007-01-01

    For understanding on basic radiation mechanism of the high-gain FEL based on SASE, the author presents electron-crystal interpretation of FEL radiation. In the electron-crystal, electrons are localized at regularly spaced multi-layers, which represents micro-bunching, whose spacing is equal to the radiation wavelength, and the multi-layers are perpendicular to beam axis, thus, diffracted wave creates Bragg's spots in forward and backward directions. Due to the Doppler's effect, frequency of the back-scattered wave is up-converted, generates forwardly focused X-ray. The Bragg's effect contributes focusing the X-ray beam into a spot, thus peak power becomes extremely higher by factor of typically 107. This is the FEL radiation. As well known, the total numbers of scattered photons in Bragg's spots is equal to the total elastic scattering photons from the atoms contained in the crystal. Therefore, total power in the FEL laser is same as the spontaneous radiation power from the undulator for the same beam parameter. The FEL radiation phenomenon is simple interference effect. In today's presentations, we use the laser pointer, and we frequently experience difficulty in pointing precisely or steadily in one place on the screen, since the laser spot is very small and does not spread. Exactly same to this, X-ray FEL is a highly focused beam, and pointing stability dominates productivity of experiment, thus we need special care on beam stability from linear accelerator

  7. Determination of the STIS CCD Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Allyssa; Monroe, TalaWanda; Lockwood, Sean

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the analysis and absolute gain results of the STIS Cycle 23 special calibration program 14424 that was designed to measure the gain of amplifiers A, C and D at nominal gain settings of 1 and 4 e-/DN. We used the mean-variance technique and the results indicate a mean-variance technique.

  8. Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidhauer, K.; Odatzidu, L.; Schicha, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Methods: Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. Results: All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. Conclusions: An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas. (orig.) [de

  9. [Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidhauer, K; Odatzidu, L; Kiencke, P; Schicha, H

    2002-02-01

    Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas.

  10. Gain and loss learning differentially contribute to life financial outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Knutson

    Full Text Available Emerging findings imply that distinct neurobehavioral systems process gains and losses. This study investigated whether individual differences in gain learning and loss learning might contribute to different life financial outcomes (i.e., assets versus debt. In a community sample of healthy adults (n = 75, rapid learners had smaller debt-to-asset ratios overall. More specific analyses, however, revealed that those who learned rapidly about gains had more assets, while those who learned rapidly about losses had less debt. These distinct associations remained strong even after controlling for potential cognitive (e.g., intelligence, memory, and risk preferences and socioeconomic (e.g., age, sex, ethnicity, income, education confounds. Self-reported measures of assets and debt were additionally validated with credit report data in a subset of subjects. These findings support the notion that different gain and loss learning systems may exert a cumulative influence on distinct life financial outcomes.

  11. High temperature electronic gain device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.B.; Depp, S.W.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments is described. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube

  12. Nucleus accumbens response to gains in reputation for the self relative to gains for others predicts social media use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshi, Dar; Morawetz, Carmen; Heekeren, Hauke R

    2013-01-01

    Our reputation is important to us; we've experienced natural selection to care about our reputation. Recently, the neural processing of gains in reputation (positive social feedback concerning one's character) has been shown to occur in the human ventral striatum. It is still unclear, however, how individual differences in the processing of gains in reputation may lead to individual differences in real-world behavior. For example, in the real-world, one way that people currently maintain their reputation is by using social media websites, like Facebook. Furthermore, Facebook use consists of a social comparison component, where users observe others' behavior and can compare it to their own. Therefore, we hypothesized a relationship between the way the brain processes specifically self-relevant gains in reputation and one's degree of Facebook use. We recorded functional neuroimaging data while participants received gains in reputation, observed the gains in reputation of another person, or received monetary reward. We demonstrate that across participants, when responding to gains in reputation for the self, relative to observing gains for others, reward-related activity in the left nucleus accumbens predicts Facebook use. However, nucleus accumbens activity in response to monetary reward did not predict Facebook use. Finally, a control step-wise regression analysis showed that Facebook use primarily explains our results in the nucleus accumbens. Overall, our results demonstrate how individual sensitivity of the nucleus accumbens to the receipt of self-relevant social information leads to differences in real-world behavior.

  13. Health service costs and clinical gains of psychotherapy for personality disorders: a randomized controlled trial of day-hospital-based step-down treatment versus outpatient treatment at a specialist practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Day-hospital-based treatment programmes have been recommended for poorly functioning patients with personality disorders (PD). However, more research is needed to confirm the cost-effectiveness of such extensive programmes over other, presumably simpler, treatment formats. Methods This study compared health service costs and psychosocial functioning for PD patients randomly allocated to either a day-hospital-based treatment programme combining individual and group psychotherapy in a step-down format, or outpatient individual psychotherapy at a specialist practice. It included 107 PD patients, 46% of whom had borderline PD, and 40% of whom had avoidant PD. Costs included the two treatment conditions and additional primary and secondary in- and outpatient services. Psychosocial functioning was assessed using measures of global (observer-rated GAF) and occupational (self-report) functioning. Repeated assessments over three years were analysed using mixed models. Results The costs of step-down treatment were higher than those of outpatient treatment, but these high costs were compensated by considerably lower costs of other health services. However, costs and clinical gains depended on the type of PD. For borderline PD patients, cost-effectiveness did not differ by treatment condition. Health service costs declined during the trial, and functioning improved to mild impairment levels (GAF > 60). For avoidant PD patients, considerable adjuvant health services expanded the outpatient format. Clinical improvements were nevertheless superior to the step-down condition. Conclusion Our results indicate that decisions on treatment format should differentiate between PD types. For borderline PD patients, the costs and gains of step-down and outpatient treatment conditions did not differ. For avoidant PD patients, the outpatient format was a better alternative, leaning, however, on costly additional health services in the early phase of treatment. Trial

  14. Gestational weight gain among minority adolescents predicts term birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekambaram, Maheswari; Irigoyen, Matilde; DeFreitas, Johelin; Rajbhandari, Sharina; Geaney, Jessica Lynn; Braitman, Leonard Edward

    2018-03-07

    In adolescents, there is limited evidence on the independent and additive effect of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain on infant birth weight. Data also show that this effect may vary by race. We sought to examine the impact of maternal prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain on birth weight and risk of large for gestational age (LGA) in term newborns of minority adolescent mothers. This was a retrospective cohort study of 411 singleton live term infants born to mothers ≤ 18 years. Data were abstracted from electronic medical records. Gestational weight gain was related to infant birth weight (ρ = 0.36, P gain, gestational age and Hispanic ethnicity were independent predictors of birth weight, controlling for maternal age, BMI, parity, tobacco/drug use and preeclampsia. The probability of having an LGA infant increased with weight gain [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.21] but not with BMI. Mothers who gained weight in excess of 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations had a greater risk of having an LGA infant compared to those who gained within recommendations (aOR 5.7, 95% CI 1.6-19.5). Minority adolescents with greater gestational weight gain had infants with higher birth weight and greater risk of LGA; BMI was not associated with either outcome. Further studies are needed to examine the applicability of the 2009 BMI-specific IOM gestational weight gain recommendations to adolescents in minority populations.

  15. 78 FR 74125 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Measuring Educational Gain in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ...; Comment Request; Measuring Educational Gain in the National Reporting System for Adult Education AGENCY... Educational Gain in the National Reporting System for Adult Education. OMB Control Number: 1830-0567. Type of... tests to measure and report educational gain under the NRS. Dated: December 4, 2013. Tomakie Washington...

  16. Early detection and intervention using neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) may improve renal outcome of acute contrast media induced nephropathy: a randomized controlled trial in patients undergoing intra-arterial angiography (ANTI-CIN Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilcher, Gernot; Ribitsch, Werner; Otto, Ronald; Portugaller, Rupert H; Quehenberger, Franz; Truschnig-Wilders, Martini; Zweiker, Robert; Stiegler, Philipp; Brodmann, Marianne; Weinhandl, Klemens; Horina, Joerg H

    2011-08-17

    Patients with pre-existing impaired renal function are prone to develop acute contrast media induced nephropathy (CIN). Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a new biomarker predictive for acute kidney injury (AKI), has been shown to be useful for earlier diagnosis of CIN; however, urinary NGAL values may be markedly increased in chronic renal failure at baseline. Results from those studies suggested that urinary NGAL values may not be helpful for the clinician. An intravenous volume load is a widely accepted prophylactic measure and possibly a reasonable intervention to prevent deterioration of renal function. The aim of our study is to evaluate NGAL as an early predictor of CIN and to investigate the clinical benefit of early post-procedural i.v. hydration. The study will follow a prospective, open-label, randomized controlled design. Patients requiring intra-arterial contrast media (CM) application will be included and receive standardized, weight-based, intravenous hydration before investigation. Subjects with markedly increased urinary NGAL values after CM application will be randomized into one of two study groups. Group A will receive 3-4 ml/kg BW/h 0.9% saline intravenously for 6 hours. Group B will undergo only standard treatment consisting of unrestricted oral fluid intake. The primary outcome measure will be CIN defined by an increase greater than 25% of baseline serum creatinine. Secondary outcomes will include urinary NGAL values, cystatin C values, contrast media associated changes in cardiac parameters such as NT-pro-BNP/troponin T, changes in urinary cytology, need for renal replacement treatment, length of stay in hospital and death.We assume that 20% of the included patients will show a definite rise in urinary NGAL. Prospective statistical power calculations indicate that the study will have 80% statistical power to detect a clinically significant decrease of CIN of 40% in the treatment arm if 1200 patients are recruited into the

  17. Temporally evolving gain mechanisms of attention in macaque area V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Ilaria; Santandrea, Elisa; Morrone, Maria Concetta; Chelazzi, Leonardo

    2017-08-01

    Cognitive attention and perceptual saliency jointly govern our interaction with the environment. Yet, we still lack a universally accepted account of the interplay between attention and luminance contrast, a fundamental dimension of saliency. We measured the attentional modulation of V4 neurons' contrast response functions (CRFs) in awake, behaving macaque monkeys and applied a new approach that emphasizes the temporal dynamics of cell responses. We found that attention modulates CRFs via different gain mechanisms during subsequent epochs of visually driven activity: an early contrast-gain, strongly dependent on prestimulus activity changes (baseline shift); a time-limited stimulus-dependent multiplicative modulation, reaching its maximal expression around 150 ms after stimulus onset; and a late resurgence of contrast-gain modulation. Attention produced comparable time-dependent attentional gain changes on cells heterogeneously coding contrast, supporting the notion that the same circuits mediate attention mechanisms in V4 regardless of the form of contrast selectivity expressed by the given neuron. Surprisingly, attention was also sometimes capable of inducing radical transformations in the shape of CRFs. These findings offer important insights into the mechanisms that underlie contrast coding and attention in primate visual cortex and a new perspective on their interplay, one in which time becomes a fundamental factor. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We offer an innovative perspective on the interplay between attention and luminance contrast in macaque area V4, one in which time becomes a fundamental factor. We place emphasis on the temporal dynamics of attentional effects, pioneering the notion that attention modulates contrast response functions of V4 neurons via the sequential engagement of distinct gain mechanisms. These findings advance understanding of attentional influences on visual processing and help reconcile divergent results in the literature. Copyright © 2017 the

  18. Effects of gamma radiation on stem diameter growth, carbon gain and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiede, M.E.; Link, S.O.; Fellows, R.J.; Beedlow, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the effects of gamma radiation on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning, 19-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) were given variable doses (0–40 Gy) from a 60Co gamma source. Exposure of plants to gamma radiation caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that very low doses of radiation could induce morphological growth changes. Carbohydrate analysis of plants exposed to 40 Gy demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less in stems 18 days after exposure compared with control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content of the roots of plants exposed to 40 Gy was not significantly different from non-irradiated plants 18 days after exposure. (author)

  19. Phase Contrast Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    All standard (medical) x-ray imaging technologies, rely primarily on the amplitude properties of the incident radiation, and do not depend on its phase. This is unchanged since the discovery by Roentgen that the intensity of an x-ray beam, as measured by the exposure on a film, was related to the relative transmission properties of an object. However, recently various imaging techniques have emerged which depend on the phase of the x-rays as well as the amplitude. Phase becomes important when the beam is coherent and the imaging system is sensitive to interference phenomena. Significant new advances have been made in coherent optic theory and techniques, which now promise phase information in medical imaging. The development of perfect crystal optics and the increasing availability of synchrotron radiation facilities have contributed to a significant increase in the application of phase based imaging in materials and life sciences. Unique source characteristics such as high intensity, monochromaticity, coherence and high collimating provide an ideal source for advanced imaging. Phase contrast imaging has been applied in both projection and computed tomography modes, and recent applications have been made in the field of medical imaging. Due to the underlying principle of X-ray detection conventional image receptors register only intensities of wave fields and not their phases. During the last decade basically five different methods were developed that translate the phase information into intensity variations. These methods are based on measuring the phase shift φ directly (using interference phenomena), the gradient ∇ φ , or the Laplacian ∇ 2 φ. All three methods can be applied to polychromatic X-ray sources keeping in mind that the native source is synchrotron radiation, featuring monochromatic and reasonable coherent X-ray beams. Due to the vast difference in the coefficients that are driven absorption and phase effects (factor 1,000-10,000 in the energy

  20. Are videogame training gains specific or general?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Adam C; Patterson, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Many recent studies using healthy adults document enhancements in perception and cognition from playing commercial action videogames (AVGs). Playing action games (e.g., Call of Duty, Medal of Honor) is associated with improved bottom-up lower-level information processing skills like visual-perceptual and attentional processes. One proposal states a general improvement in the ability to interpret and gather statistical information to predict future actions which then leads to better performance across different perceptual/attentional tasks. Another proposal claims all the tasks are separately trained in the AVGs because the AVGs and laboratory tasks contain similar demands. We review studies of action and non-AVGs to show support for the latter proposal. To explain transfer in AVGs, we argue that the perceptual and attention tasks share common demands with the trained videogames (e.g., multiple object tracking (MOT), rapid attentional switches, and peripheral vision). In non-AVGs, several studies also demonstrate specific, limited transfer. One instance of specific transfer is the specific enhancement to mental rotation after training in games with a spatial emphasis (e.g., Tetris). In contrast, the evidence for transfer is equivocal where the game and task do not share common demands (e.g., executive functioning). Thus, the "common demands" hypothesis of transfer not only characterizes transfer effects in AVGs, but also non-action games. Furthermore, such a theory provides specific predictions, which can help in the selection of games to train human cognition as well as in the design of videogames purposed for human cognitive and perceptual enhancement. Finally this hypothesis is consistent with the cognitive training literature where most post-training gains are for tasks similar to the training rather than general, non-specific improvements.

  1. Are videogame training gains specific or general?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C. Oei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Many recent studies using healthy adults document enhancements in perception and cognition from playing commercial action videogames. Playing action games (e.g., Call of Duty, Medal of Honor is associated with improved bottom-up lower-level information processing skills like visual-perceptual and attentional processes. One proposal states a general improvement in the ability to interpret and gather statistical information to predict future actions which then leads to better performance across different perceptual/attentional tasks. Another proposal claims all the tasks are separately trained in the action videogames because the action videogames and laboratory tasks contain similar demands. We review studies of action and non-action videogames to show support for the latter proposal. To explain transfer in action videogames, we argue that the perceptual and attention tasks share common demands with the trained videogames (e.g., multiple object tracking, rapid attentional switches, and peripheral vision. In non-action videogames, several studies also demonstrate specific, limited transfer. One instance of specific transfer is the specific enhancement to mental rotation after training in games with a spatial emphasis (e.g, Tetris. In contrast, the evidence for transfer is equivocal where the game and task do not share common demands (e.g., executive functioning. Thus, the common demands hypothesis of transfer not only characterizes transfer effects in action videogames, but also non-action games. Furthermore, such a theory provides specific predictions, which can help in the selection of games to train human cognition as well as in the design of videogames purposed for human cognitive and perceptual enhancement. Finally this hypothesis is consistent with the cognitive training literature where most post-training gains are for tasks similar to the training rather than general, non-specific improvements.

  2. Are videogame training gains specific or general?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Many recent studies using healthy adults document enhancements in perception and cognition from playing commercial action videogames (AVGs). Playing action games (e.g., Call of Duty, Medal of Honor) is associated with improved bottom-up lower-level information processing skills like visual-perceptual and attentional processes. One proposal states a general improvement in the ability to interpret and gather statistical information to predict future actions which then leads to better performance across different perceptual/attentional tasks. Another proposal claims all the tasks are separately trained in the AVGs because the AVGs and laboratory tasks contain similar demands. We review studies of action and non-AVGs to show support for the latter proposal. To explain transfer in AVGs, we argue that the perceptual and attention tasks share common demands with the trained videogames (e.g., multiple object tracking (MOT), rapid attentional switches, and peripheral vision). In non-AVGs, several studies also demonstrate specific, limited transfer. One instance of specific transfer is the specific enhancement to mental rotation after training in games with a spatial emphasis (e.g., Tetris). In contrast, the evidence for transfer is equivocal where the game and task do not share common demands (e.g., executive functioning). Thus, the “common demands” hypothesis of transfer not only characterizes transfer effects in AVGs, but also non-action games. Furthermore, such a theory provides specific predictions, which can help in the selection of games to train human cognition as well as in the design of videogames purposed for human cognitive and perceptual enhancement. Finally this hypothesis is consistent with the cognitive training literature where most post-training gains are for tasks similar to the training rather than general, non-specific improvements. PMID:24782722

  3. A randomised controlled trial evaluating IGF1 titration in contrast to current GH dosing strategies in children born small for gestational age: the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M; Kirk, Jeremy; Donaldson, Malcolm; Ivarsson, Sten-A; Söder, Olle; Roche, Edna; Hoey, Hilary; Dunger, David B; Juul, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Short children born small for gestational age (SGA) are treated with a GH dose based on body size, but treatment may lead to high levels of IGF1. The objective was to evaluate IGF1 titration of GH dose in contrast to current dosing strategies. In the North European Small-for-Gestational-Age Study (NESGAS), 92 short pre-pubertal children born SGA were randomised after 1 year of high-dose GH treatment (67 μg/kg per day) to three different regimens: high dose (67 μg/kg per day), low dose (35 μg/kg per day) or IGF1 titration. The average dose during the second year of the randomised trial did not differ between the IGF1 titration group (38 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.019) and the low-dose group (35 μg/kg per day, s.d. 0.002; P=0.46), but there was a wide variation in the IGF1 titration group (range 10-80 μg/kg per day). The IGF1 titration group had significantly lower height gain (0.17 SDS, s.d. 0.18) during the second year of the randomised trial compared with the high-dose group (0.46 SDS, s.d. 0.25), but not significantly lower than the low-dose group (0.23 SDS, s.d. 0.15; P=0.17). The IGF1 titration group had lower IGF1 levels after 2 years of the trial (mean 1.16, s.d. 1.24) compared with both the low-dose (mean 1.76, s.d. 1.48) and the high-dose (mean 2.97, s.d. 1.63) groups. IGF1 titration of GH dose in SGA children proved less effective than current dosing strategies. IGF1 titration resulted in physiological IGF1 levels with a wide range of GH dose and a poorer growth response, which indicates the role of IGF1 resistance and highlights the heterogeneity of short SGA children. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. Abnormal Auditory Gain in Hyperacusis: Investigation with a Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter U. Diehl

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperacusis is a frequent auditory disorder that is characterized by abnormal loudness perception where sounds of relatively normal volume are perceived as too loud or even painfully loud. As Hyperacusis patients show decreased loudness discomfort levels (LDLs and steeper loudness growth functions, it has been hypothesized that hyperacusis might be caused by an increase in neuronal response gain in the auditory system. Moreover, since about 85% of hyperacusis patients also experience tinnitus, the conditions might be caused by a common mechanism. However, the mechanisms that give rise to hyperacusis have remained unclear.Here we have used a computational model of the auditory system to investigate candidate mechanisms for hyperacusis. Assuming that perceived loudness is proportional to the summed activity of all auditory nerve fibers, the model was tuned to reproduce normal loudness perception. We then evaluated a variety of potential hyperacusis gain mechanisms by determining their effects on model equal-loudness contours and comparing the results to the LDLs of hyperacusis patients with normal hearing thresholds. Hyperacusis was best accounted for by an increase in nonlinear gain in the central auditory system. Good fits to the average patient LDLs were obtained for a general increase in gain that affected all frequency channels to the same degree, and also for a frequency-specific gain increase in the high-frequency range. Moreover, the gain needed to be applied after subtraction of spontaneous activity of the auditory nerve, which is in contrast to current theories of tinnitus generation based on amplification of spontaneous activity. Hyperacusis and tinnitus might therefore be caused by different changes in neuronal processing in the central auditory system.

  5. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the primary tumor in muscle invasive carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Patients with muscle invasive carcinoma of the urinary bladder were examined with contrast-enhanced CT of the primary tumor. A specially designed technique was developed to increase the diagnostic potential of CT. The most important points about the technique were controlled filling of the bladder, the use of thin slices, series of scans before and after intravenous injection of contrast medium, and long scanning times in the precontrast series. The absorbed dose to the patient resulting from the new technique was found to be within the range of the dose from urography or barium enema. This dose was considered to be acceptable given the diagnostic gain of the procedure. Features of irradiated bladder tumors were analysed to find which parameter correlated with persistent malignancy. High contrast enhancement of a tumor relative to the bladder wall was found to be the best indicator of a malignant tumour after irradiation. 127 refs

  6. Functional Connectivity with Distinct Neural Networks Tracks Fluctuations in Gain/Loss Framing Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David V.; Sip, Kamila E.; Delgado, Mauricio R.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple large-scale neural networks orchestrate a wide range of cognitive processes. For example, interoceptive processes related to self-referential thinking have been linked to the default-mode network (DMN); whereas exteroceptive processes related to cognitive control have been linked to the executive-control network (ECN). Although the DMN and ECN have been postulated to exert opposing effects on cognition, it remains unclear how connectivity with these spatially overlapping networks contribute to fluctuations in behavior. While previous work has suggested the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is involved in behavioral change following feedback, these observations could be linked to interoceptive processes tied to DMN or exteroceptive processes tied to ECN because MPFC is positioned in both networks. To address this problem, we employed independent component analysis combined with dual-regression functional connectivity analysis. Participants made a series of financial decisions framed as monetary gains or losses. In some sessions, participants received feedback from a peer observing their choices; in other sessions, feedback was not provided. Following feedback, framing susceptibility—indexed as the increase in gambling behavior in loss frames compared to gain frames—was heightened in some participants and diminished in others. We examined whether these individual differences were linked to differences in connectivity by contrasting sessions containing feedback against those that did not contain feedback. We found two key results. As framing susceptibility increased, the MPFC increased connectivity with DMN; in contrast, temporal-parietal junction decreased connectivity with the ECN. Our results highlight how functional connectivity patterns with distinct neural networks contribute to idiosyncratic behavioral changes. PMID:25858445

  7. Maternal Supplementation with Small-Quantity Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Compared with Multiple Micronutrients, but Not with Iron and Folic Acid, Reduces the Prevalence of Low Gestational Weight Gain in Semi-Urban Ghana: A Randomized Controlled Trial123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosti, Stephen A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether maternal supplementation with small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNSs; 118 kcal/d) affects maternal weight. Objective: We compared several secondary anthropometric measures between 3 groups of women in the iLiNS (International Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements)-DYAD trial in Ghana. Methods: Women (n = 1320; gestation) were randomly assigned to receive 60 mg Fe + 400 μg folic acid/d (IFA), 18 vitamins and minerals/d [multiple micronutrients (MMNs)], or 20 g SQ-LNSs with 22 micronutrients/d (LNS) during pregnancy and a placebo (200 mg Ca/d), MMNs, or SQ-LNSs, respectively, for 6 mo postpartum. Weight, midupper arm circumference (MUAC), and triceps skinfold (TSF) thickness at 36 wk of gestation and 6 mo postpartum were analyzed, as were changes from estimated prepregnancy values. We assessed the adequacy of estimated gestational weight gain (GWG) by using Institute of Medicine (IOM) and International Fetal and Newborn Growth Standards for the 21st Century (INTERGROWTH-21st) guidelines. Results: The estimated prepregnancy prevalence of overweight or obesity was 38.5%. By 36 wk of gestation, women (n = 1015) had a mean ± SD weight gain of 7.4 ± 3.7 kg and changes of −1.0 ± 1.7 cm in MUAC and −2.8 ± 4.1 mm in TSF thickness. The LNS group had a lower prevalence of inadequate GWG on the basis of IOM guidelines (57.4%) than the MMN (67.2%) but not the IFA (63.1%) groups (P = 0.030), whereas the prevalence of adequate (26.9% overall) and excessive (10.4% overall) GWG did not differ by group. The percentages of normal-weight women (in kg/m2: 18.5 < body mass index < 25.0; n = 754) whose GWG was less than the third centile of the INTERGROWTH-21st standards were 23.0%, 28.7%, and 28.5% for the LNS, MMN, and IFA groups, respectively (P = 0.36). At 6 mo postpartum, the prevalence of overweight or obesity was 45.3%, and the risk of becoming overweight or obese did not differ by group. Conclusion: SQ-LNS supplementation is

  8. Maternal Supplementation with Small-Quantity Lipid-Based Nutrient Supplements Compared with Multiple Micronutrients, but Not with Iron and Folic Acid, Reduces the Prevalence of Low Gestational Weight Gain in Semi-Urban Ghana: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Lartey, Anna; Okronipa, Harriet; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla; Zeilani, Mamane; Arimond, Mary; Vosti, Stephen A; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-04-01

    Background: It is unclear whether maternal supplementation with small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (SQ-LNSs; 118 kcal/d) affects maternal weight. Objective: We compared several secondary anthropometric measures between 3 groups of women in the iLiNS (International Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements)-DYAD trial in Ghana. Methods: Women ( n = 1320; gestation) were randomly assigned to receive 60 mg Fe + 400 μg folic acid/d (IFA), 18 vitamins and minerals/d [multiple micronutrients (MMNs)], or 20 g SQ-LNSs with 22 micronutrients/d (LNS) during pregnancy and a placebo (200 mg Ca/d), MMNs, or SQ-LNSs, respectively, for 6 mo postpartum. Weight, midupper arm circumference (MUAC), and triceps skinfold (TSF) thickness at 36 wk of gestation and 6 mo postpartum were analyzed, as were changes from estimated prepregnancy values. We assessed the adequacy of estimated gestational weight gain (GWG) by using Institute of Medicine (IOM) and International Fetal and Newborn Growth Standards for the 21st Century (INTERGROWTH-21st) guidelines. Results: The estimated prepregnancy prevalence of overweight or obesity was 38.5%. By 36 wk of gestation, women ( n = 1015) had a mean ± SD weight gain of 7.4 ± 3.7 kg and changes of -1.0 ± 1.7 cm in MUAC and -2.8 ± 4.1 mm in TSF thickness. The LNS group had a lower prevalence of inadequate GWG on the basis of IOM guidelines (57.4%) than the MMN (67.2%) but not the IFA (63.1%) groups ( P = 0.030), whereas the prevalence of adequate (26.9% overall) and excessive (10.4% overall) GWG did not differ by group. The percentages of normal-weight women (in kg/m 2 : 18.5 < body mass index < 25.0; n = 754) whose GWG was less than the third centile of the INTERGROWTH-21st standards were 23.0%, 28.7%, and 28.5% for the LNS, MMN, and IFA groups, respectively ( P = 0.36). At 6 mo postpartum, the prevalence of overweight or obesity was 45.3%, and the risk of becoming overweight or obese did not differ by group. Conclusion: SQ-LNS supplementation

  9. The Value of Contrast Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon C. Treiber

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: There is much evidence-based research proving the effectiveness of contrast echocardiography, but there are still questions and concerns about its specific uses. This study tested the effectiveness of contrast echocardiography in defining the left ventricular endocardial border. Methods: From 30 patients, a total of 60 echocardiograms –– 30 with and 30 without use of contrast –– were retrospectively reviewed by four blinded cardiologists with advanced training in echocardiography. No single cardiologist reviewed contrast and noncontrast images of the same patient. Each set of 30 echocardiograms was then studied for wall-motion scoring. Visualization of left ventricular wall segments and a global visualization confidence level of interpretation were recorded. Results: Of all wall segments (N = 510, 91% were visualized in echocardiograms with use of contrast, whereas 75% of the walls were visualized in echocardiograms without contrast (P < 0.001. Of 30 examinations, 17 contrast echocardiograms were read with high confidence compared to 6 without contrast use (P = 0.004. The number of walls visualized with contrast was increased in 18 patients (60%, whereas noncontrast echocardiograms yielded more visualized walls in 6 patients (20%, P = 0.002. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that contrast is valuable to echocardiographic imaging. Its use should be supported throughout echocardiography clinics and encouraged in certain patients for whom resting and stress echocardiography results without contrast often prove uninterpretable.

  10. Pregnancy weight gain by gestational age and stillbirth: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K; Hutcheon, J A; Bodnar, L M; Cnattingius, S; Stephansson, O

    2017-11-21

    To study the association between total and early pregnancy (gain and risk of stillbirth, stratified by early-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). Population-based cohort study. Stockholm-Gotland Region, Sweden. Pregnant women with singleton births (n = 160 560). Pregnancy weight gain was standardised into gestational age-specific z-scores. For analyses of total pregnancy weight gain, a matched design with an incidence density sampling approach was used. Findings were also contrasted with current Institute of Medicine (IOM) weight gain recommendations. Stillbirth defined as fetal death at ≥22 completed weeks of gestation. For all BMI categories, there was no statistical association between total or early pregnancy weight gain and stillbirth within the range of a weight gain z-score of -2.0 SD to +2.0 SD. Among normal-weight women, the adjusted odds ratio of stillbirth for lower (-2.0 to -1.0 SD) and higher (+1.0 to +1.9 SD) total weight gain was 0.85 (95% CI; 0.48-1.49) and 1.03 (0.60-1.77), respectively, as compared with the reference category. Further, there were no associations between total or early pregnancy weight gain and stillbirth within the range of weight gain currently recommended by the IOM. For the majority of the BMI categories, the point estimates at the extremes of weight gain values (gain and increased risks of high weight gain, but estimates were imprecise and not statistically significant. We found no associations between total or early pregnancy weight gain and stillbirth across the range of weight gain experienced by most women. There was no association between weight gain during pregnancy and stillbirth among most women. © 2017 Karolinska Institutet. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  11. Influences of finite gain bandwidth on pulse propagation in parabolic fiber amplifiers with distributed gain profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jia-Sheng; Li Pan; Chen Xiao-Dong; Feng Su-Juan; Mao Qing-He

    2012-01-01

    The evolutions of the pulses propagating in decreasing and increasing gain distributed fiber amplifiers with finite gain bandwidths are investigated by simulations with the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The results show that the parabolic pulse propagations in both the decreasing and the increasing gain amplifiers are restricted by the finite gain bandwidth. For a given input pulse, by choosing a small initial gain coefficient and gain variation rate, the whole gain for the pulse amplification limited by the gain bandwidth may be higher, which is helpful for the enhancement of the output linearly chirped pulse energy. Compared to the decreasing gain distributed fiber amplifier, the increasing gain distributed amplifier may be more conducive to suppress the pulse spectral broadening and increase the critical amplifier length for achieving a larger output linearly chirped pulse energy

  12. Energy Gaining Windows for Residental Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Jesper; Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents some of the research done during the last 8 years at the Technical University of Denmark developing improved low-energy window solutions. The focus has been on maximizing the net energy gain of windows for residential buildings. The net energy gain of windows is the solar gain...... minus the heat loss integrated over the heating season. It is assumed that in northern cold climates all of the solar gain during the heating season can be utilized for space heating. Problems with overheating in the summer period must be solved with overhang or moveable solar shading devices. Two...... and longer durability of the window. The glazing in these fiber reinforced polyester windows is both unsealed and sealed triple glazing units. To increase the net energy gain slim frame profiles have been developed to increase the glazing area and thereby the solar gain. The challenge when developing slim...

  13. Fetal Programming of Obesity: Maternal Obesity and Excessive Weight Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seray Kabaran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity is an increasing health problem throughout the world. Maternal pre-pregnancy weight, maternal nutrition and maternal weight gain are among the factors that can cause childhood obesity. Both maternal obesity and excessive weight gain increase the risks of excessive fetal weight gain and high birth weight. Rapid weight gain during fetal period leads to changes in the newborn body composition. Specifically, the increase in body fat ratio in the early periods is associated with an increased risk of obesity in the later periods. It was reported that over-nutrition during fetal period could cause excessive food intake during postpartum period as a result of metabolic programming. By influencing the fetal metabolism and tissue development, maternal obesity and excessive weight gain change the amounts of nutrients and metabolites that pass to the fetus, thus causing excessive fetal weight gain which in turn increases the risk of obesity. Fetal over-nutrition and excessive weight gain cause permanent metabolic and physiologic changes in developing organs. While mechanisms that affect these organs are not fully understood, it is thought that the changes may occur as a result of the changes in fetal energy metabolism, appetite control, neuroendocrine functions, adipose tissue mass, epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression. In this review article, the effects of maternal body weight and weight gain on fetal development, newborn birth weight and risk of obesity were evaluated, and additionally potential mechanisms that can explain the effects of fetal over-nutrition on the risk of obesity were investigated [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(5.000: 427-434

  14. Effects of computed tomography contrast medium factors on contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasawa, Kazuaki; Hatcho, Atsushi; Okuda, Itsuko

    2011-01-01

    The various nonionic iodinated contrast media used in contrast computed tomography (CT) studies differ in terms of their composition, characteristics, and iodine concentration (mgI/ml), as well as the volume injected (ml). Compared with ionic iodinated contrast media, nonionic iodinated contrast media are low-osmolar agents, with different agents having different osmotic pressures. Using a custom-made phantom incorporating a semipermeable membrane, the osmotic flow rate (hounsfield unit (HU)/s) could easily be measured based on the observed increase in CT numbers, and the relationship between the osmotic pressure and the osmotic flow rate could be obtained (r 2 =0.84). In addition, taking the effects of patient size into consideration, the levels of contrast enhancement in the abdominal aorta (AA) and inferior vena cava (IVC) were compared among four types of CT contrast medium. The results showed differences in contrast enhancement in the IVC during the equilibrium phase depending on the type of contrast medium used. It was found that the factors responsible for the differences observed in enhancement in the IVC were the osmotic flow rate and the volume of the blood flow pathways in the circulatory system. It is therefore considered that the reproducibility of contrast enhancement is likely to be reduced in the examination of parenchymal organs, in which scanning must be performed during the equilibrium phase, even if the amount of iodine injected per unit body weight (mgI/kg) is maintained at a specified level. (author)

  15. Measurement of Antenna Bore-Sight Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortinberry, Jarrod; Shumpert, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    The absolute or free-field gain of a simple antenna can be approximated using standard antenna theory formulae or for a more accurate prediction, numerical methods may be employed to solve for antenna parameters including gain. Both of these methods will result in relatively reasonable estimates but in practice antenna gain is usually verified and documented via measurements and calibration. In this paper, a relatively simple and low-cost, yet effective means of determining the bore-sight free-field gain of a VHF/UHF antenna is proposed by using the Brewster angle relationship.

  16. Soft measures and incremental gains in mines; Mesures douces et gains incrementaux : mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laliberte, P. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a variety of measures that mine operators can adopt to save energy. Researchers at the CANMET Mining and Mineral Sciences Laboratories of Natural Resources Canada have conducted a joint study with Hydro-Quebec to investigate the impact of alternate energy technologies and control systems on energy savings. The impacts of a range of technologies were evaluated and rates of energy efficiency were compared. Technologies included hybrid vehicles; fuel cell-powered vehicles; automated ventilation control systems; heat recovery; compressed air; and electrical mining equipment. Energy profiles for various industrial applications were included. This paper also provided details of computerized simulations currently being conducted to estimate the potential incremental gains associated with the use of technology innovations in mining applications. 9 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. Productivity gains by fertilisation in Eucalyptus urophylla clonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Productivity gains by fertilisation in Eucalyptus urophylla clonal plantations across gradients in site and stand conditions. ... The control plot may typically be a permanent plot of an inventory network, providing representative information for a company's decisionmaking. The paired twin-plot receives intensive management ...

  18. Effect of Experimental Coccidiosis Infections on Body Weight Gain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infections with E. tenella in broiler breeder males showed that body weight gains of the uninfected males were significantly greater (p< 0.05) at 5, 7 and 14 days post inoculation (dpi) than those of the infected groups. Sperm productions at 0, 5 and 7 dpi (0=day of inoculation with infected oocysts) for the uninfected controls ...

  19. Weight gain following treatment of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, J; Daykin, J; Holder, R; Sheppard, M C; Franklyn, J A

    2001-08-01

    Patients frequently express concern that treating hyperthyroidism will lead to excessive weight gain. This study aimed to determine the extent of, and risk factors for, weight gain in an unselected group of hyperthyroid patients. We investigated 162 consecutive hyperthyroid patients followed for at least 6 months. Height, weight, clinical features, biochemistry and management were recorded at each clinic visit. Documented weight gain was 5.42 +/- 0.46 kg (mean +/- SE) and increase in BMI was 8.49 +/- 0.71%, over a mean 24.2 +/- 1.6 months. Pre-existing obesity, Graves' disease causing hyperthyroidism, weight loss before presentation and length of follow-up each independently predicted weight gain. Patients treated with thionamides or radioiodine gained a similar amount of weight (thionamides, n = 87, 5.16 +/- 0.63 kg vs. radioiodine, n = 62, 4.75 +/- 0.57 kg, P = 0.645), but patients who underwent thyroidectomy (n = 13) gained more weight (10.27 +/- 2.56 kg vs. others, P = 0.007). Development of hypothyroidism (even transiently) was associated with weight gain (never hypothyroid, n = 102, 4.57 +/- 0.52 kg, transiently hypothyroid, n = 29, 5.37 +/- 0.85 kg, on T4, n = 31, 8.06 +/- 1.42 kg, P = 0.014). This difference remained after correcting for length of follow-up. In the whole cohort, weight increased by 3.95 +/- 0.40 kg at 1 year (n = 144) to 9.91 +/- 1.62 kg after 4 years (n = 27) (P = 0.008), representing a mean weight gain of 3.66 +/- 0.44 kg/year. We have demonstrated marked weight gain after treatment of hyperthyroidism. Pre-existing obesity, a diagnosis of Graves' disease and prior weight loss independently predicted weight gain and weight continued to rise with time. Patients who became hypothyroid, despite T4 replacement, gained most weight.

  20. Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Nischita K; Ioncica, Ana Maria; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Contrast agents are increasingly being used to characterize the vasculature in an organ of interest, to better delineate benign from malignant pathology and to aid in staging and directing therapeutic procedures. We review the mechanisms of action of first, second and third generation contrast...... agents and their use in various endoscopic procedures in the gastrointestinal tract. Various applications of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasonography include differentiating benign from malignant mediastinal lymphadenopathy, assessment of depth of invasion of esophageal, gastric and gall bladder...

  1. Comparison of tissue distribution, phrenic nerve involvement, and epidural spread in standard- vs low-volume ultrasound-guided interscalene plexus block using contrast magnetic resonance imaging: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stundner, O; Meissnitzer, M; Brummett, C M; Moser, S; Forstner, R; Koköfer, A; Danninger, T; Gerner, P; Kirchmair, L; Fritsch, G

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound guidance allows for the use of much lower volumes of local anaesthetics for nerve blocks, which may be associated with less aberrant spread and fewer complications. This randomized, controlled study used contrast magnetic resonance imaging to view the differential-volume local anaesthetic distribution, and compared analgesic efficacy and respiratory impairment. Thirty patients undergoing shoulder surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound-guided interscalene block by a single, blinded operator with injection of ropivacaine 0.75% (either 20 or 5 ml) plus the contrast dye gadopentetate dimeglumine, followed by magnetic resonance imaging. The primary outcome was epidural spread. Secondary outcomes were central non-epidural spread, contralateral epidural spread, spread to the phrenic nerve, spirometry, ultrasound investigation of the diaphragm, block duration, pain scores during the first 24 h, time to first analgesic consumption, and total analgesic consumption. All blocks provided fast onset and adequate intra- and postoperative analgesia, with no significant differences in pain scores at any time point. Epidural spread occurred in two subjects of each group (13.3%); however, spread to the intervertebral foramen and phrenic nerve and extensive i.m. local anaesthetic deposition were significantly more frequent in the 20 ml group. Diaphragmatic paralysis occurred twice as frequently (n=8 vs 4), and changes from baseline peak respiratory flow rate were larger [Δ=-2.66 (1.99 sd) vs -1.69 (2.0 sd) l min(-1)] in the 20 ml group. This study demonstrates that interscalene block is associated with epidural spread irrespective of injection volume; however, less central (foraminal) and aberrant spread after low-volume injection may be associated with a more favourable risk profile. This study was registered with the European Medicines Agency (Eudra-CT number 2013-004219-36) and with the US National Institutes' of Health registry and results base, clinicaltrials

  2. Accumulation of MRI contrast agents in malignant fibrous histiocytoma for gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, T.; Ichikawa, H.; Akisue, T.; Fujita, I.; Kishimoto, K.; Hara, H.; Imabori, M.; Kawamitsu, H.; Sharma, P.; Brown, S.C.; Moudgil, B.M.; Fujii, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Kurosaka, M.; Fukumori, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron-capture therapy with gadolinium (Gd-NCT) has therapeutic potential, especially that gadolinium is generally used as a contrast medium in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The accumulation of gadolinium in a human sarcoma cell line, malignant fibrosis histiocytoma (MFH) Nara-H, was visualized by the MRI system. The commercially available MRI contrast medium Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, dimeglumine gadopentetate aqueous solution) and the biodegradable and highly gadopentetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (Gd-nanoCPs) were prepared as MRI contrast agents. The MFH cells were cultured and collected into three falcon tubes that were set into the 3-tesra MRI system to acquire signal intensities from each pellet by the spin echo method, and the longitudinal relaxation time (T1) was calculated. The amount of Gd in the sample was measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrography (ICP-AES). The accumulation of gadolinium in cells treated with Gd-nanoCPs was larger than that in cells treated with Gd-DTPA. In contrast, and compared with the control, Gd-DTPA was more effective than Gd-nanoCPs in reducing T1, suggesting that the larger accumulation exerted the adverse effect of lowering the enhancement of MRI. Further studies are warranted to gain insight into the therapeutic potential of Gd-NCT.

  3. Properties of conventional contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muetzel, W.

    1981-01-01

    A comprehensive overview is given of the properties of contrast media currently used in computed tomography (CT). The chemical structure of the compounds and the physicochemical properties derived therefrom are described. Emphasis is placed on the importance of the physicochemical properties of contrast media for tolerance and the pharmacokinetic behavior of compounds in the body. An outline is given of the basic ideas governing rational use of contrast media in CT, which result from complex, time-dependent distribution of contrast media in different tissue spaces. (Auth.)

  4. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  5. Gain Shift Corrections at Chi-Nu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Tristan Brooks [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Applied Physics; Devlin, Matthew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Ambient conditions have the potential to cause changes in liquid scintillator detector gain that vary with time and temperature. These gain shifts can lead to poor resolution in both energy as well as pulse shape discrimination. In order to correct for these shifts in the Chi-Nu high energy array, a laser system has been developed for calibration of the pulse height signals.

  6. Nonunity gain minimal-disturbance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabuncu, Metin; Mišta, L.; Fiurášek, J.

    2007-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an optimal nonunity gain Gaussian scheme for partial measurement of an unknown coherent state that causes minimal disturbance of the state. The information gain and the state disturbance are quantified by the noise added to the measurement outcomes...

  7. Efficiency gains, bounds, and risk in finance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarisoy, Cisil

    2015-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters. The first chapter analyzes efficiency gains in the estimation of expected returns based on asset pricing models and examines the economic implications of such gains in portfolio allocation exercises. The second chapter provides nonparametric efficiency bounds

  8. Evaluating realized genetic gains from tree improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.B. St. Clair

    1993-01-01

    Tree improvement has become an essential part of the management of forest lands for wood production, and predicting yields and realized gains from forests planted with genetically-improved trees will become increasingly important. This paper discusses concepts of tree improvement and genetic gain important to growth and yield modeling, and reviews previous studies of...

  9. Weight Gain: A Possible Side Effect of All Antiretrovirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Elena; Menzaghi, Barbara; Orofino, Giancarlo; Passerini, Simone; Madeddu, Giordano; Martinelli, Canio Vito; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Squillace, Nicola; Rusconi, Stefano; Bonfanti, Paolo; Di Biagio, Antonio; Quirino, T; Bonfanti, P; Ricci, E; Bellacosa, C; Maggi, P; Calza, L; Abeli, C; Menzaghi, B; Celesia, B M; Grosso, C; Stagno, A; Vichi, F; Mazzotta, F; Martinelli, C; Penco, G; Cassola, G; Di Biagio, A; Taramasso, L; Nicolini, L A; Dentone, C; Molteni, C; Palvarini, L; Scalzini, A; Carenzi, L; Rizzardini, G; Valsecchi, L; Cordier, L; Rusconi, S; Colombo, V; Galli, M; Franzetti, M; De Socio, G V; Mazzotta, E; Parruti, G; Madeddu, G; Bagella, P; S. Mura, M; Libertone, R; Antinori, A; Di Giambenedetto, S; Orofino, G; Guastavigna, M; Caramell, P

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Weight gain and body mass index (BMI) increase are central issues in patients living with HIV who need to minimize the risk of metabolic disease. Information collected through the SCOLTA cohort revealed significant 1-year BMI increase in patients treated with dolutegravir (P = .004), raltegravir (P = .0004), elvitegravir (P = .004), darunavir (P = .0006), and rilpivirine (P = .029). BMI gain correlated with low baseline BMI (P = .002) and older age (P = .0007) in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stages A/B, with lower BMI (P = .005) and CD4+ T-cell count (P = .007) at enrollment in stage C. PMID:29255735

  10. High gain multigap avalanche detectors for Cerenkov ring imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, R.S.; Lavender, W.M.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    We report on a continuing study of multigap parallel plate avalanche chambers, primarily as photoelectron detectors for use with Cerenkov ring imaging counters. By suitable control of the fields in successive gaps and by introducing screens to reduce photon feedback to the cathode the gain many be increased considerably. We have obtained gains in excess of 6 x 10/sup 7/ for photoelectrons with a good pulse height spectrum and expect to increase this further. We discuss the use of resistive anodes to give avalanche positions in two dimensions by charge division.

  11. Progress toward high-gain laser fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm, E.

    1988-01-01

    A 1985-1986 Review of the US inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (/approximately/1--10% of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (/approximately/10%, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an /approximately/100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (/approximately/1%), and can we control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that the US Department of Energy is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade. 22 refs., 1 fig

  12. Letter contrast sensitivity function of the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, H L; Brennan, N A

    1998-06-01

    To provide empirical data of letter CSF for various levels of defocus under controlled conditions of luminance and age. Corrected distance visual acuities were tested at different levels of contrast and defocus. An experiment was conducted using the Medmont visual acuity tester on 10 young subjects and under normal room lighting. Empirical data of visual acuity were obtained for 7 levels of contrast (5, 10, 15, 25, 40, 60, 80%) and defocus levels of 0, +1 and +2D. A mathematical model was derived (R2=0.995) and this can be used to estimate visual acuity at various contrast levels for defocus of < or =+2D. This information is useful for the clinician as normative data and for further development of optical models to predict visual performance of the eye.

  13. Directional amplifier in an optomechanical system with optical gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng; Song, L. N.; Li, Yong

    2018-05-01

    Directional amplifiers are crucial nonreciprocal devices in both classical and quantum information processing. Here we propose a scheme for realizing a directional amplifier between optical and microwave fields based on an optomechanical system with optical gain, where an active optical cavity and two passive microwave cavities are coupled to a common mechanical resonator via radiation pressure. The two passive cavities are coupled via hopping interaction to facilitate the directional amplification between the active and passive cavities. We obtain the condition of achieving optical directional amplification and find that the direction of amplification can be controlled by the phase differences between the effective optomechanical couplings. The effects of the gain rate of the active cavity and the effective coupling strengths on the maximum gain of the amplifier are discussed. We show that the noise added to this amplifier can be greatly suppressed in the large cooperativity limit.

  14. Mutually-modulated cross-gain modulation and slow light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternklar, Shmuel; Sarid, Eyal; Wart, Maxim; Granot, Er'el

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of pump and Stokes light in a Brillouin medium, where both beams are modulated, can be utilized for controlling the group velocity of the amplified Stokes (or depleted pump). The dependence of the group velocity for this mutually-modulated cross-gain modulation (MMXGM) technique on the Brillouin gain parameter is studied. A sharp transition to slow light occurs in the G 1 α/β≈1 regime, where G 1 is the Brillouin gain parameter, and α and β are the pump and Stokes modulation indices, respectively. A comparison of MMXGM slow light to the Brillouin dispersion-based slow-light technique reveals the fundamental differences between them. The formation of higher harmonics of the modulation frequency is also discussed. The theoretical predictions are experimentally corroborated and potential applications in fiber-based sensing and interferometry are discussed

  15. Screened Poisson Equation for Image Contrast Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Michel Morel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose a discussion and detailed implementation of a very simple gradient domain method that tries to eliminate the effect of nonuniform illumination and at the same time preserves the images details. This model, which to the best of our knowledge has not been explored in spite of its simplicity, acts as a high pass filter. We show that with a single contrast parameter (which keeps the same value in most experiments, the model delivers state of the art results. They compare favorably to results obtained with more complex algorithms. Our algorithm is designed for all kinds of images, but with the special specification of making minimal image detail alteration thanks to a first order fidelity term, instead of the usual zero order term. Experiments on non-uniform medical images and on hazy images illustrate significant perception gain.

  16. Short-Term High-Dose Vitamin E to Prevent Contrast Medium-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Elective Coronary Angiography: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Yousef; Khademvatani, Kamal; Rahimi, Behzad; Khoshfetrat, Mehran; Arjmand, Nasim; Seyyed-Mohammadzad, Mir-Hossein

    2016-03-15

    Contrast medium-induced acute kidney injury (CIAKI) is a leading cause of acquired renal impairment. The effects of antioxidants have been conflicting regarding the prevention of CIAKI. We performed a study of vitamin E use to decrease CIAKI in patients undergoing elective coronary angiography. In a placebo-controlled randomized trial at 2 centers in Iran, 300 patients with chronic kidney disease-defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate vitamin E 12 hours before plus 400 mg vitamin E 2 hours before coronary angiography or to receive placebo. The primary end point was the development of CIAKI, defined as an increase ≥0.5 mg/dL or ≥25% in serum creatinine that peaked within 72 hours. Based on an intention-to-treat analysis, CIAKI developed in 10 (6.7%) and 21 (14.1%) patients in the vitamin E and placebo groups, respectively (P=0.037). Change in white blood cell count from baseline to peak value was greater in the vitamin E group compared with the placebo group (-500 [-1500 to 200] versus 100 [-900 to 600]×10(3)/mL, P=0.001). In multivariate analysis, vitamin E (odds ratio 0.408, 95% CI 0.170-0.982, P=0.045) and baseline Mehran score (odds ratio 1.257, 95% CI 1.007-1.569; P=0.043) predicted CIAKI. Prophylactic short-term high-dose vitamin E combined with 0.9% saline infusion is superior to placebo for prevention of CIAKI in patients undergoing elective coronary angiography. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/. Unique identifier: NCT02070679. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. Effect of eico