WorldWideScience

Sample records for continuing pharmacy education

  1. A Prescription for Reframing Continuing Pharmacy Education in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research indicates that adults learn best when they are motivated, self-directed and choose what and how they learn. This project focuses on continuing pharmacy education and seeks to answer the question: "How can pharmacists be motivated to participate in continuing pharmacy education programs because they want to, not because they…

  2. Current and Future Opportunities and Challenges in Continuing Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadelin, Jeffrey W; Travlos, Dimitra V; Janke, Kristin K; Zellmer, William A; Vlasses, Peter H

    2017-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) convened a consensus-seeking invitational conference on October 29-30, 2015, in Chicago, Ill. ACPE's desire to have stakeholder guidance on its role in the future of continuing pharmacy education and continuing professional development led to the convening of the conference. The purpose of this article is to summarize the proceedings of the conference, including the recommendations from the stakeholders.

  3. Validating e-learning in continuing pharmacy education: user acceptance and knowledge change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterowicz, Krzysztof; Librowski, Tadeusz; Edelbring, Samuel

    2014-02-15

    Continuing pharmacy education is becoming mandatory in most countries in order to keep the professional license valid. Increasing number of pharmacists are now using e-learning as part of their continuing education. Consequently, the increasing popularity of this method of education calls for standardization and validation practices. The conducted research explored validation aspects of e-learning in terms of knowledge increase and user acceptance. Two e-courses were conducted as e-based continuing pharmacy education for graduated pharmacists. Knowledge increase and user acceptance were the two outcome measured. The change of knowledge in the first e-course was measured by a pre- and post-test and results analysed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The acceptance of e-learning in the second e-course was investigated by a questionnaire and the results analysed using descriptive statistics. Results showed that knowledge increased significantly (p education; e-learning is effective in increasing knowledge and highly accepted by pharmacists from various working environments such as community and hospital pharmacies, faculties of pharmacy or wholesales.

  4. Mandatory continuing professional education in pharmacy: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Hui-Gek; Pua, Yong-Hao; Subari, Nur Azah

    2013-08-01

    Mandatory Continuing Professional Education (CPE) for the renewal of pharmacists' practising certificate was implemented in Singapore in 2008 OBJECTIVE: To study pharmacists' perceptions and attitudes about the impact of mandatory CPE in Singapore. Singapore. Internet-based questionnaire survey, conducted between May and June 2011. Pharmacists' perceptions and attitudes toward mandatory CPE and the perceived difficulty in fulfilling the CPE requirements. The overall survey response rate was 52 % (840/1,609). Of the respondents, 32 % were non-practising, 49 % were practising in patient care areas, and 19 % were practising in non-patient care areas. More than half the pharmacists agreed that mandatory CPE (1) enhanced or increased their knowledge base and skills (70 %; 95 % CI 67-73 %), (2) motivated them to continually learn (64 %; 95 % CI, 60-67 %), and (3) motivated them to reflect on their professional practice or work (58 %; 95 % CI, 54-61 %). Mandatory CPE was not perceived to enhance or increase employability. Non-practising pharmacists appeared to have the greatest difficulty meeting the CPE requirements. In general, pharmacists value mandatory CPE more for positive professional reasons than for employability reasons. The survey results may serve as useful baseline data for future studies of pharmacists' perceptions and attitudes toward CPE in Singapore.

  5. Using an intervention mapping framework to develop an online mental health continuing education program for pharmacy staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Amanda; Fowler, Jane; Hattingh, Laetitia

    2013-01-01

    Current mental health policy in Australia recognizes that ongoing mental health workforce development is crucial to mental health care reform. Community pharmacy staff are well placed to assist people with mental illness living in the community; however, staff require the knowledge and skills to do this competently and effectively. This article presents the systematic planning and development process and content of an education and training program for community pharmacy staff, using a program planning approach called intervention mapping. The intervention mapping framework was used to guide development of an online continuing education program. Interviews with mental health consumers and carers (n = 285) and key stakeholders (n = 15), and a survey of pharmacy staff (n = 504) informed the needs assessment. Program objectives were identified specifying required attitudes, knowledge, skills, and confidence. These objectives were aligned with an education technique and delivery strategy. This was followed by development of an education program and comprehensive evaluation plan. The program was piloted face to face with 24 participants and then translated into an online program comprising eight 30-minute modules for pharmacists, 4 of which were also used for support staff. The evaluation plan provided for online participants (n ≅ 500) to be randomized into intervention (immediate access) or control groups (delayed training access). It included pre- and posttraining questionnaires and a reflective learning questionnaire for pharmacy staff and telephone interviews post pharmacy visit for consumers and carers. An online education program was developed to address mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence, and skills required by pharmacy staff to work effectively with mental health consumers and carers. Intervention mapping provides a systematic and rigorous approach that can be used to develop a quality continuing education program for the health workforce

  6. Didactic Lecture Versus Interactive Workshop for Continuing Pharmacy Education on Reproductive Health: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Mohammadreza; Kargar, Alireza; Gholami, Kheirollah; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Rashidian, Arash; Torkamandi, Hassan; Sarayani, Amir

    2015-09-01

    Pharmacists are routinely providing reproductive health counseling in community pharmacies, but studies have revealed significant deficits in their competencies. Therefore, continuing pharmacy education (CPE) could be utilized as a valuable modality to upgrade pharmacists' capabilities. A randomized controlled trial was designed to compare the efficacy of CPE meetings (lecture based vs. workshop based) on contraception and male sexual dysfunctions. Sixty pharmacists were recruited for each CPE meeting. Small group training using simulated patients was employed in the workshop-based CPE. Study outcomes were declarative/procedural knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction of the participants. Data were collected pre-CPE, post-CPE, and 2 months afterward and were analyzed using repeated measure analysis of variance and Mann-Whitney U test. Results showed that lecture-based CPE was more successful in improving pharmacists' knowledge post-CPE (p < .001). In contrast, a significant decrease was observed in the lecture-based group at follow-up (p = .002), whereas the workshop-based group maintained their knowledge over time (p = 1.00). Knowledge scores of both groups were significantly higher at follow-up in comparison with pre-CPE (p < .01). No significant differences were observed regarding satisfaction and attitudes scores between groups. In conclusion, an interactive workshop might not be superior to lecture-based training for improving pharmacists' knowledge and attitudes in a 1-day CPE meeting. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Continuing Education Programs on Providing Clinical Community Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques dos Reis, Tiago; Guidoni, Camilo Molino; Girotto, Edmarlon; Guerra, Marisabelle Lima; de Oliveira Baldoni, André; Leira Pereira, Leonardo Régis

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize the effects of media methods used in continuing education (CE) programs on providing clinical community pharmacy services and the methods used to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. Methods. A systematic review was performed using Medline, SciELO, and Scopus databases. The timeline of the search was 1990 to 2013. Searches were conducted in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. Results. Nineteen articles of 3990 were included. Fourteen studies used only one media method, and the live method (n=11) was the most frequent (alone or in combination). Only two studies found that the CE program was ineffective or partially effective; these studies used only the live method. Most studies used nonrobust, nonvalidated, and nonstandardized methods to measure effectiveness. The majority of studies focused on the effect of the CE program on modifying the knowledge and skills of the pharmacists. One study assessed the CE program’s benefits to patients or clients. Conclusion. No evidence was obtained regarding which media methods are the most effective. Robust and validated methods, as well as assessment standardization, are required to clearly determine whether a particular media method is effective. PMID:27402991

  8. Pharmacy Education in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedouch, Pierrick; Nguyen, Thi-Hoai; Nguyen, Thi-Lien-Huong; Hoang, Thi-Kim-Huyen; Calop, Jean; Allenet, Benoît

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacy education programs in Vietnam are complex and offer various career pathways. All include theory and laboratory modules in general, foundation, and pharmaceutical knowledge; placements in health facilities; and a final examination. The various pharmacy degree programs allow specialization in 1 or more of 5 main fields: (1) drug management and supply, (2) drug development and production, (3) pharmacology and clinical pharmacy, (4) traditional medicine and pharmacognosy, and (5) drug quality control, which are offered as main specialization options during the reformed undergraduate and postgraduate programs. However, pharmacy education in Vietnam in general remains product oriented and clinical pharmacy training has not received adequate attention. Only students who have obtained the bachelor of pharmacy degree, which requires a minimum of 5 years of study, are considered as fully qualified pharmacists. In contrast, an elementary diploma in pharmacy awarded after 1 year of pharmacy study permits entry into more junior pharmacy positions. Since the 2000s, there has been a surge in the number and types of schools offering pharmacy qualifications at various levels. PMID:23966717

  9. Clinical pharmacy education in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Melody; Shao, Hong; Yang, Li; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Zhai, Suo-Di; Shi, Lu-Wen; Lubawy, William C

    2008-12-15

    Pharmacy education in China focuses on pharmaceutical sciences, with the bachelor of science (BS) of pharmacy as the entry-level degree. Pharmacy practice curricula in these programs are centered on compounding, dispensing, pharmacy administration, and laboratory experiences, which are the traditional responsibilities for pharmacists. Additional graduate-level training is available at the master of science (MS) and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) levels, most of which concentrate on drug discovery and drug development research. Presently, the emphasis in practice is beginning to shift to clinical pharmacy. With this change, additional degree offerings are being developed to meet the growing demand for clinical pharmacists. There is also interest in developing more clinical skills in practicing pharmacists through additional non-degree training. The Ministry of Education is considering a proposal for an entry-level professional degree of master and/or doctor in clinical pharmacy similar to the doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree in the United States.

  10. Education...A must in all levels of pharmacy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keresztes, Jan M

    2010-11-01

    Public perception of a profession is extremely important, but even more vital is the actual worth the profession provides to those who partake of its services. As pharmacy recreates itself as a consultative profession, many changes are occurring in the college of pharmacy students' education. The onset of the Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE), the continued rotations in the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE), and the proposal to have mandatory residencies occurring by 2020 show the steps that pharmacy will take to move forward. But pharmacy continues to miss the first rung of the ladder as the profession climbs to its future success by not addressing the mandatory education of the primary workforce in day-to-day activities: that of standardized education and training of pharmacy technicians. While IPPE, APPE, and residencies will strengthen the pharmacy "dwelling," its foundation does not have solid ground. A deadline needs to be established for mandatory education, training, and certification for all technicians entering the profession today and, only after achieving these goals, should the pharmacy technicians be licensed to practice. With even more forethought, pharmacy might require that potential college of pharmacy students, as well as those not fortunate enough to be admitted to a college of pharmacy, become pharmacy technicians first. Only then can the pharmacy profession conquer the top rung of the ladder in a strong, upright fashion.

  11. Nuclear pharmacy education: international harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Cox, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Education of nuclear pharmacists exists in many countries around the world. The approach and level of education varies between countries depending upon the expectations of the nuclear pharmacist, the work site and the economic environment. In Australia, training is provided through distance learning. In Europe and Canada, nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists receive postgraduate education in order to engage in the small-scale preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals as well as research and development. In the U.S.A., nuclear pharmacy practitioners obtain basic knowledge primarily through undergraduate programs taken when pursuit the first professional degree in pharmacy. Licensed practitioners in pharmacy enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy through distance learning programs or short courses. While different approaches to education exist, there is a basic core of knowledge and a level of competence required of all nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists providing radiopharmaceutical products and services. It was with this realization that efforts were initiated to develop harmonization concepts and documents pertaining to education in nuclear pharmacy. The benefits of international harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education are numerous. Assurance of the availability of quality professionals to provide optimal products and care to the patient is a principle benefit. Spanning national barriers through the demonstration of self governance and unification in education will enhance the goal of increased freedom of employment between countries. Harmonization endeavors will improve existing education programs through sharing of innovative concepts and knowledge between educators. Documents generated will benefit new educational programs especially in developing nations. A committee on harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education was formed consisting of educators and practitioners from the international community. A working document on education was

  12. Continuing education: vocational training in the context of hospital pharmacy as a strategy for integration in a multidisciplinary team of specialized hospital Sergipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adriano Santos Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current reality of hospitals increasingly require professionals qualified to assume roles that require high levels of technical and scientific knowledge. The supervised internship in hospital pharmacy aims to train future professionals with critical awareness and ability to understand the reality and act on it. This study consists of an report of the experience of students supervised III internship of the graduate course in Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe. Initially the students made visits in the fields of pharmacy, warehouse, intensive care unit (ICU, emergency care to make the diagnosis of both situational and physical aspects of the information relating to medicines by nursing professionals. Later lectures were held, they were directed to health professionals and administrative staff of the pharmacy. From the results we observed that implement continuing education was of great importance to the quality of pharmacy professionals / warehouse and nursing staff, in which participants were able to actively interact with pharmacists and interns. This interaction reflected in increased communication and more concrete understanding of the multidisciplinary team.

  13. CONTINUING EDUCATION: VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN THE CONTEXT OF HOSPITAL PHARMACY AS A STRATEGY FOR INTEGRATION IN A MULTIDISCIPLINARY TEAM OF SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL SERGIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adriano Santos Souza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The current reality of hospitals increasingly require professionals qualified to assume roles that require high levels of technical and scientific knowledge. The supervised internship in hospital pharmacy aims to train future professionals with critical awareness and ability to understand the reality and act on it. This study consists of an report of the experience of students supervised III internship of the graduate course in Pharmacy, Federal University of Sergipe. Initially the students made visits in the fields of pharmacy, warehouse, intensive care unit (ICU, emergency care to make the diagnosis of both situational and physical aspects of the information relating to medicines by nursing professionals. Later lectures were held, they were directed to health professionals and administrative staff of the pharmacy. From the results we observed that implement continuing education was of great importance to the quality of pharmacy professionals / warehouse and nursing staff, in which participants were able to actively interact with pharmacists and interns. This interaction reflected in increased communication and more concrete understanding of the multidisciplinary team.

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness of an Internet-based continuing education program on pharmacy-based minor ailment management: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roque Obreli-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this work was to evaluate the effectiveness of an internet-based continuing education (CE program on pharmacy-based minor ailment schemes (PMASs. A controlled randomized clinical trial was conducted in community pharmacies in Brazil. Community pharmacists (CPs were enrolled in two groups: intervention (n = 61 and control (n = 60. CPs who were enrolled to the intervention group participated in an Internet-based CE program. CPs in the control group received no educational intervention. We evaluated participant perception, learning outcomes, and practice performance. Learner satisfaction with the CE program was high for every point evaluated (mean ± standard deviation = 4.2 ± 0.4. Posttest learner outcome scores and practice performance in the intervention group after the conclusion of the CE program significantly improved compared with pretest scores (p < 0.001 and were significantly better compared with the control group (p < 0.001. The present Internet-based CE program is a viable educational strategy for improving participant perception, learning outcomes, and practice performance in PMASs.

  15. An Approach for All in Pharmacy Informatics Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Brent I; Flynn, Allen; Clauson, Kevin A; Seaton, Terry L; Breeden, Elizabeth

    2017-03-25

    Computerization is transforming health care. All clinicians are users of health information technology (HIT). Understanding fundamental principles of informatics, the field focused on information needs and uses, is essential if HIT is going to support improved patient outcomes. Informatics education for clinicians is a national priority. Additionally, some informatics experts are needed to bring about innovations in HIT. A common approach to pharmacy informatics education has been slow to develop. Meanwhile, accreditation standards for informatics in pharmacy education continue to evolve. A gap remains in the implementation of informatics education for all pharmacy students and it is unclear what expert informatics training should cover. In this article, we propose the first of two complementary approaches to informatics education in pharmacy: to incorporate fundamental informatics education into pharmacy curricula for all students. The second approach, to train those students interested in becoming informatics experts to design, develop, implement, and evaluate HIT, will be presented in a subsequent issue of the Journal .

  16. State of Pharmacy Education in Bangladesh

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hospitals are not benefiting from the training of pharmacy graduates just like community pharmacies ... A proper regulatory framework that ensures quality training of ... quality assurance [1]. In order to ensure socio- economic development, many countries that provide Pharmacy Education do so by having different types of ...

  17. Importance of social pharmacy education in Libyan pharmacy schools: perspectives from pharmacy practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Saad Saleh Abrika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to explore the perceptions among pharmacy practitioners in Libya on the importance of social pharmacy education. A qualitative methodology was employed to conduct this study. Using a purposive sampling technique, a total of ten Libyan registered pharmacists were interviewed. Based on the content analysis of the interviews, two major themes emerged, namely the understanding of social pharmacy education and the need for incorporating social pharmacy courses into the pharmacy education curriculum. The majority of the respondents knew about the concept. Of those that had no prior knowledge of this term, half of them expressed interest in knowing more about it. There was a positive perception of introducing social pharmacy into the undergraduate curricula among the respondents, and they believed that it is necessary for future pharmacists to know about social pharmacy components. The findings from the pharmacy practitioners??evaluation suggest the need to incorporate social pharmacy courses into the curricula of all pharmacy schools in Libya.

  18. Pharmacy Practice and Education in Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muceniece, Ruta; Riekstina, Una; Maurina, Baiba; Enina, Vija; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    The PHARMINE (“Pharmacy Education in Europe”) project studied the organisation of pharmacy practice and education in the member states of the European Union (EU). The work was carried out using an electronic survey sent to chosen pharmacy representatives. The surveys of the individual member states are now being published as reference documents. This paper presents the results of the PHARMINE survey on pharmacy practice and education in Latvia. In the light of this, we examine the harmonisation of practice and education in Latvia with EU norms. PMID:29361717

  19. Developing patient education in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.T.G.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians’ patient education behavior and the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities in the pharmacy.

  20. Improving Health Care Providers' Capacity for Self-Regulated Learning in Online Continuing Pharmacy Education: The Role of Internet Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Lin; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Mao, Pili Chih-Min; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Although Internet-based learning is widely used to improve health professionals' knowledge and skills, the self-regulated learning (SRL) activities of online continuing education in pharmacy are seldom discussed. The main purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between pharmacists' Internet self-efficacy (ISE) and their SRL in online continuing education. A total of 164 in-service pharmacists in Taiwan were surveyed with the Internet Self-Efficacy Survey, including basic ISE (B-ISE), advanced ISE (A-ISE) and professional ISE (P-ISE), as well as the Self-Regulated Learning Questionnaire consisting of preparatory SRL (P-SRL) and enactment SRL (E-SRL). Results of a 1-by-3 (educational levels: junior college versus bachelor versus master) analysis of variance and a 1-by-4 (institutions: community-based versus hospital versus clinic versus company) analysis of variance revealed that there were differences in ISE and SRL among different education levels and working institutions. The hierarchical regression analyses indicated that B-ISE and P-ISE were significant predictors of P-SRL, whereas P-ISE was a critical predictor of E-SRL. Moreover, the interaction of P-ISE × age was linked to E-SRL, implying that P-ISE has a stronger influence on E-SRL for older pharmacists than for younger pharmacists. However, the interactions between age and ISE (A-ISE, B-ISE, and P-ISE) were not related to P-SRL. This study highlighted the importance of ISE and age for increasing pharmacists' SRL in online continuing education.

  1. Pharmacy Education in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wazaify, Mayyada; Matowe, Lloyd; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Al-Omran, Ola A.

    2006-01-01

    The practice of pharmacy, as well as pharmacy education, varies significantly throughout the world. In Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, the profession of pharmacy appears to be on the ascendance. This is demonstrated by an increase in the number of pharmacy schools and the number of pharmacy graduates from pharmacy programs. One of the reasons pharmacy is on the ascendance in these countries is government commitment to fund and support competitive, well-run pharmacy programs.

  2. International practice experiences in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Robert M; Jawaid, Sarah Parnapy; Kendall, Debra A; McPherson, Charles E; Mu, Keli; Weston, Grady Scott; Roberts, Kenneth B

    2013-11-12

    To identify reasons for inclusion of international practice experiences in pharmacy curricula and to understand the related structure, benefits, and challenges related to the programs. A convenience sample of 20 colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States with international pharmacy education programs was used. Telephone interviews were conducted by 2 study investigators. University values and strategic planning were among key driving forces in the development of programs. Global awareness and cultural competency requirements added impetus to program development. Participants' advice for creating an international practice experience program included an emphasis on the value of working with university health professions programs and established travel programs. Despite challenges, colleges and schools of pharmacy value the importance of international pharmacy education for pharmacy students as it increases global awareness of health needs and cultural competencies.

  3. Pharmacy Practice and Education in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Sandulovici

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The PHARMINE (“Pharmacy Education in Europe” project examined the organisation of pharmacy practice and education in the European Union (EU. An electronic survey was sent out to representatives of different sectors (community, hospital, industrial pharmacists, university staff, and students in each individual EU member state. This paper presents the results of the PHARMINE survey on pharmacy practice and education in Romania. In the light of this data we examine to what extent harmonisation of practice and education with EU norms has occurred, whether this has promoted mobility of pharmacy professionals, academics and students, and what impact it has had on healthcare in Romania. The survey reveals the substantial changes in Romanian pharmacy practice and education since the 1989 change in government and Romania joining the EU in 2007. Romania remains, however, a poor country with expenditure on healthcare less than one-third of the EU average. This factor also impacts pharmacy practice. Although practice seems aligned with EU norms, this masks the substantial imbalance between the situation in the richer capital, Bucharest, and that of the poorer countryside. Harmonisation to EU norms in pharmacy education has not promoted student exchange and mobility but, rather, a brain drain in pharmaceutical graduates to other EU countries. Specialisation in industrial practice has been lost since 1989 with pharmacists being replaced by chemists. In hospitals the hospital pharmacist is being replaced by the clinical pharmacist.

  4. Motivational Orientations: Evaluation of the Education Participation Scale in a Nontraditional Doctor of Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garst, William C.; Ried, L. Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated the Education Participation Scale (EPS) in determining motivational orientations of nontraditional doctor of pharmacy students (n=17) compared to continuing education pharmacists (n=83). Nontraditional pharmacy students were significantly different from the continuing education pharmacists on the "professional advancement" and…

  5. Pharmacy Practice and Education in Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Petkova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacies in Bulgaria have a monopoly on the dispensing of medicinal products that are authorized in the Republic of Bulgaria, as well as medical devices, food additives, cosmetics, and sanitary/hygienic articles. Aptekari (pharmacists act as responsible pharmacists, pharmacy owners, and managers. They follow a five year Masters of Science in Pharmacy (M.Sc. Pharm. degree course with a six month traineeship. Pomoshnik-farmacevti (assistant pharmacists follow a three year degree with a six month traineeship. They can prepare medicines and dispense OTC medicines under the supervision of a pharmacist. The first and second year of the M.Sc. Pharm. degree are devoted to chemical sciences, mathematics, botany and medical sciences. Years three and four center on pharmaceutical technology, pharmacology, pharmacognosy, pharmaco-economics, and social pharmacy, while year five focuses on pharmaceutical care, patient counselling, pharmacotherapy, and medical sciences. A six month traineeship finishes the fifth year together with redaction of a master thesis, and the four state examinations with which university studies end. Industrial pharmacy and clinical (hospital pharmacy practice are integrated disciplines in some Bulgarian higher education institutions such as the Faculty of Pharmacy of the Medical University of Sofia. Pharmacy practice and education in Bulgaria are organized in a fashion very similar to that in most member states of the European Union.

  6. The challenges of pharmacy education in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Worafi, Yaser Mohammed

    2014-10-15

    Pharmacy education in Yemen has faced many challenges since its introduction in the 1980s. Most Yemeni pharmacy schools, especially private ones, are experiencing difficulties in providing the right quality and quantity of clinical educational experiences. Most of these challenges are imbedded in a teaching style and curricula that have failed to respond to the needs of the community and country. The slow shift from traditional drug-dispensing to a patient-centered or focused approach in pharmacy practice requires a fundamental change in the roles and responsibilities of both policymakers and educators. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to discuss the challenges facing the pharmacy education in Yemen; (2) to provided recommendations to overcome challenges.

  7. A Survey of Pharmacy Education in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanakit, Teeraporn; Low, Bee Yean; Wongpoowarak, Payom; Moolasarn, Summana; Anderson, Claire

    2014-11-15

    To explore the current status of pharmacy education in Thailand. The International Pharmaceutical Federation of the World Health Organization's (FIP-WHO) Global Survey of Pharmacy Schools was used for this study. The survey instrument was distributed to the deans of the 19 faculties (colleges) of pharmacy in Thailand. More than half the colleges have been in existence less than 20 years, and the government owns 80% of them. There were 2 paths of admission to study pharmacy: direct admission and central admission system. The doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs can be divided into 4 types. Approximately 60% of all teaching staff holds a doctoral degree. Regarding the work balance among teaching staff, around 60% focus on teaching activities, 20% focus on research, and less than 20% focus on patient care services concurrent with real practice teaching. The proportion of student time dedicated to theory, practice, and research in PharmD programs is 51.5%, 46.7%, and 1.8%, respectively. Sites owned by the colleges or by others were used for student training. Colleges followed the Office of the National Education Standards' Internal Quality Assurance (IQA) and External Quality Assurance (EQA), and the Pharmacy Council's Quality Assessment (ONESQA). This study provides a picture of the current status of curriculum, teaching staff, and students in pharmacy education in Thailand. The curriculum was adapted from the US PharmD program with the aim of meeting the country's needs and includes industrial pharmacy and public health tracks as well as clinical tracks. However, this transition in pharmacy education in Thailand needs to be monitored and evaluated.

  8. Asynchronous versus Synchronous Learning in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motycka, Carol A.; St. Onge, Erin L.; Williams, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To better understand the technology being used today in pharmacy education through a review of the current methodologies being employed at various institutions. Also, to discuss the benefits and difficulties of asynchronous and synchronous methodologies, which are being utilized at both traditional and distance education campuses.…

  9. Sowing the seeds for improved Pharmacy education in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sowing the seeds for improved Pharmacy education in Nigeria: development of ICT at university of Benin Faculty of Pharmacy. ... For today\\'s pharmacy graduates to function effectively in an ever increasing technological world, pharmacy students must be trained to use computer facilities as they will always encounter the ...

  10. Pharmacy education in India: strategies for a better future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishnu, V; Gilhotra, Rm; Mishra, Dn

    2011-10-01

    In this world of specialization and globalization the pharmacy education in India is suffering from serious backdrops and flaws. There is an urgent need to initiate an academic exercise aimed at attaining revamping of curriculum, keeping in pace with current and emerging trends in the field of pharmacy. Unfortunately all these years, enough emphasis was not laid on strengthening the components of Community Pharmacy, Hospital and Clinical pharmacy, while designing curriculum at diploma and degree levels of teaching. The curriculum followed by almost all universities in India are no were up to the world standards and students are still getting the 20-30 yrs older compounding practical exposure in labs during the graduation level. The article emphasises the concept of innovation ecosystems and quality management. Application of TQM to the educational system improves the present situation. The counseling system which serves to be the gateway of the students for entry into the profession should be brought under the scanner. Introducing specializations at the graduation level will result in professional expertise and excellence. Education is a customer focused industry and every student should be capable of evaluating themselves for continuously improving their quality and professionalism. Teacher focused mastery learning should give away to student focused smart learning. An educational institution should provide the student with a stress-free atmosphere for learning and developing his intellectual capabilities. Every college should have a counseling centre to address the problems of students in their academic and personal life. An emphasis on the concept of quality teacher is included. Revival of the pharmacy education in India is the need of the hour which in turn will pave the way for the up gradation of the pharmacy profession in the country.

  11. The WHO UNESCO FIP Pharmacy Education Taskforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Bates, Ian; Beck, Diane; Brock, Tina Penick; Futter, Billy; Mercer, Hugo; Rouse, Mike; Whitmarsh, Sarah; Wuliji, Tana; Yonemura, Akemi

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacists' roles are evolving from that of compounders and dispensers of medicines to that of experts on medicines within multidisciplinary health care teams. In the developing country context, the pharmacy is often the most accessible or even the sole point of access to health care advice and services. Because of their knowledge of medicines and clinical therapeutics, pharmacists are suitably placed for task shifting in health care and could be further trained to undertake functions such as clinical management and laboratory diagnostics. Indeed, pharmacists have been shown to be willing, competent, and cost-effective providers of what the professional literature calls "pharmaceutical care interventions"; however, internationally, there is an underuse of pharmacists for patient care and public health efforts. A coordinated and multifaceted effort to advance workforce planning, training and education is needed in order to prepare an adequate number of well-trained pharmacists for such roles. Acknowledging that health care needs can vary across geography and culture, an international group of key stakeholders in pharmacy education and global health has reached unanimous agreement that pharmacy education must be quality-driven and directed towards societal health care needs, the services required to meet those needs, the competences necessary to provide these services and the education needed to ensure those competences. Using that framework, this commentary describes the Pharmacy Education Taskforce of the World Health Organization, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the International Pharmaceutical Federation Global Pharmacy and the Education Action Plan 2008–2010, including the foundation, domains, objectives and outcome measures, and includes several examples of current activities within this scope. PMID:19500351

  12. The WHO UNESCO FIP Pharmacy Education Taskforce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouse Mike

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmacists' roles are evolving from that of compounders and dispensers of medicines to that of experts on medicines within multidisciplinary health care teams. In the developing country context, the pharmacy is often the most accessible or even the sole point of access to health care advice and services. Because of their knowledge of medicines and clinical therapeutics, pharmacists are suitably placed for task shifting in health care and could be further trained to undertake functions such as clinical management and laboratory diagnostics. Indeed, pharmacists have been shown to be willing, competent, and cost-effective providers of what the professional literature calls "pharmaceutical care interventions"; however, internationally, there is an underuse of pharmacists for patient care and public health efforts. A coordinated and multifaceted effort to advance workforce planning, training and education is needed in order to prepare an adequate number of well-trained pharmacists for such roles. Acknowledging that health care needs can vary across geography and culture, an international group of key stakeholders in pharmacy education and global health has reached unanimous agreement that pharmacy education must be quality-driven and directed towards societal health care needs, the services required to meet those needs, the competences necessary to provide these services and the education needed to ensure those competences. Using that framework, this commentary describes the Pharmacy Education Taskforce of the World Health Organization, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the International Pharmaceutical Federation Global Pharmacy and the Education Action Plan 2008–2010, including the foundation, domains, objectives and outcome measures, and includes several examples of current activities within this scope.

  13. Providing nuclear pharmacy education via the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, N.L.; Pickett, M.; Thaxton, P.; Norenberg, J.P.; Wittstrom, K.; Rhodes, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: (1) Increase the nuclear pharmacy education opportunities across the United States and the around the world. (2) Establish collaborative educational agreements between colleges of pharmacy and local nuclear pharmacy preceptors. (3) Decrease the shortage of radio pharmacists. 4) Provide nuclear education courses to supplement existing educational programs. Materials and Methods: Nuclear Education Online (www.nuclearonline.org) is an educational consortium between the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and the University of New Mexico. The faculty members from each institution have collaborated to design an online didactic curriculum and experiential training materials. The didactic portion is delivered via WebCT (www.webct.com) and involves interactive studies with faculty from UNM and UAMS. The student-centered curriculum is based on the APhA Syllabus for Nuclear Pharmacy Training and includes interactive web-based course materials, discussion groups, preceptor-led activities and problem-based learning (PBL) case studies based upon actual clinical studies and real-life pharmacy situations. Individual units of study include Nuclear Physics, Radiation Biology, Radiation Safety, Instrumentation, and Radiochemistry/Radiopharmacology. Students can begin the program at anytime. Once a cohort of students is established, the students proceed through the PBL cases, working interactively as a group. Results: Since June 2001, over 26 students have completed the 10-week certificate program. These students have been located across the U.S. and in Saudi Arabia. Fifteen students have completed individual courses in nuclear physics and instrumentation through colleges of pharmacy course offerings using the NEO faculty as instructors. Student evaluations revealed that 78% of the students thought that the NEO program was a 'great way to learn' (highest rating). When comparing PBL to a traditional classroom setting, two thirds of students preferred problem

  14. Safety implications of standardized continuous quality improvement programs in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Ho, Certina; Mackinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Thomas; Taylor, Jeffrey M

    2013-06-01

    Standardized continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs combine Web-based technologies and standardized improvement processes, tools, and expectations to enable quality-related events (QREs) occurring in individual pharmacies to be shared with pharmacies in other jurisdictions. Because standardized CQI programs are still new to community pharmacy, little is known about how they impact medication safety. This research identifies key aspects of medication safety that change as a result of implementing a standardized CQI program. Fifty-three community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, adopted the SafetyNET-Rx standardized CQI program in April 2010. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Canada's Medication Safety Self-Assessment (MSSA) survey was administered to these pharmacies before and 1 year into their use of the SafetyNET-Rx program. The nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to explore where changes in patient safety occurred as a result of SafetyNETRx use. Significant improvements occurred with quality processes and risk management, staff competence, and education, and communication of drug orders and other information. Patient education, environmental factors, and the use of devices did not show statistically significant changes. As CQI programs are designed to share learning from QREs, it is reassuring to see that the largest improvements are related to quality processes, risk management, staff competence, and education.

  15. Cultural competency in health care and its implications for pharmacy part 3A: emphasis on pharmacy education, curriculums, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Mary Beth; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly; Poirier, Therese; Karaoui, Lamis R; Echeverri, Margarita; Chen, Aleda M H; Lee, Shin-Yu; Vyas, Deepti; O'Neil, Christine K; Jackson, Anita N

    2013-12-01

    Culture influences patients' beliefs and behaviors toward health and illness. As the U.S. population becomes more diverse, a critical need exists for pharmacy education to incorporate patient-centered culturally sensitive health care knowledge and skills into the curriculum. Nursing was the first profession to incorporate this type of learning and training into its curriculums, followed by medicine. Pharmacy has also made great progress to revise curriculums, but inconsistency exists in depth, breadth, and methods across pharmacy colleges. This article addresses important aspects of pharmacy education such as curriculum development, incorporation of educational innovations and techniques into the teaching of patient-centered culturally sensitive health care across the curriculum from didactic to experiential learning, assessment tools, and global education. A preliminary model curriculum with objectives and examples of teaching methods is proposed. Future directions in pharmacy education, teaching and learning scholarship, postgraduate education, licensure, and continuing education are also presented. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  16. The Catch-22 of Pharmacy Practice in Pakistan’s Pharmacy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atta Abbas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New developments in the pharmacy education structure in Pakistan led to the formation of a separate department grouping high specialized services/subjects. However, inadequate planning has exposed a vacuity, as the educational authorities failed to develop a workforce before creating the specialized department. As a result, this vacuum is on the verge of being impinged by pharmacy professionals specialized in entirely different domains which would be detrimental to the future prospects of the development of pharmacy practice in Pakistan.

  17. A profile of current pharmacy education in the Sudan | Haga | Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first pharmacy college affiliated to University of Khartoum was established in (1963) with intake of only twenty students per year. This policy of admission continued with no substantial annual increase in the number of students enrolled in the college of pharmacy. However, after the revolution of higher education in the ...

  18. The role of curriculum committees in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jean T; Draugalis, JoLaine R; Bruce, Susan P; Gonyeau, Michael R

    2011-10-10

    To conduct a follow-up survey of curriculum committee chairs in US colleges and schools of pharmacy to describe current committee structures and functions and determine whether changes have occurred over time. A descriptive cross-sectional study design using a 30-item survey instrument regarding the structure, function, and charges of curriculum committees was sent to 100 curriculum committee chairs. Several new variables were added to the questionnaire to explore the use of systematic reviews, oversight of experiential education, and the impact of accreditation standards on work focus. Eighty-five chairs responded. Curriculum committees are on average 1 person larger, less likely to have a student vote, more likely to have formal charges, and more likely to be involved in implementing an outcomes-based curriculum compared with 1994. Committees have shifted their work focus from review of curricular content to curricular revision. Curriculum committees continue to evolve as they respond to changes in pharmacy education and accreditation standards.

  19. Team-based learning in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofstad, William; Brunner, Lane J

    2013-05-13

    Instructors wanting to engage students in the classroom seek methods to augment the delivery of factual information and help students move from being passive recipients to active participants in their own learning. One such method that has gained interest is team-based learning. This method encourages students to be prepared before class and has students work in teams while in the classroom. Key benefits to this pedagogy are student engagement, improved communication skills, and enhanced critical-thinking abilities. In most cases, student satisfaction and academic performance are also noted. This paper reviews the fundamentals of team-based learning in pharmacy education and its implementation in the classroom. Literature reports from medical, nursing, and pharmacy programs are also discussed.

  20. Mobile computing initiatives within pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Bird, Eleanora R; Jones, Mikael

    2008-08-15

    To identify mobile computing initiatives within pharmacy education, including how devices are obtained, supported, and utilized within the curriculum. An 18-item questionnaire was developed and delivered to academic affairs deans (or closest equivalent) of 98 colleges and schools of pharmacy. Fifty-four colleges and schools completed the questionnaire for a 55% completion rate. Thirteen of those schools have implemented mobile computing requirements for students. Twenty schools reported they were likely to formally consider implementing a mobile computing initiative within 5 years. Numerous models of mobile computing initiatives exist in terms of device obtainment, technical support, infrastructure, and utilization within the curriculum. Responders identified flexibility in teaching and learning as the most positive aspect of the initiatives and computer-aided distraction as the most negative, Numerous factors should be taken into consideration when deciding if and how a mobile computing requirement should be implemented.

  1. Pharmacy education in Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wazaify, Mayyada; Matowe, Lloyd; Albsoul-Younes, Abla; Al-Omran, Ola A

    2006-02-15

    The practice of pharmacy, as well as pharmacy education, varies significantly throughout the world. In Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, the profession of pharmacy appears to be on the ascendance. This is demonstrated by an increase in the number of pharmacy schools and the number of pharmacy graduates from pharmacy programs. One of the reasons pharmacy is on the ascendance in these countries is government commitment to fund and support competitive, well-run pharmacy programs. In this report we describe pharmacy education in 3 Middle East countries: Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia. All 3 countries offer bachelor of pharmacy (BPharm) degrees. In addition, 2 universities in Jordan and 1 in Saudi Arabia offer PharmD degree programs. The teaching methods in all 3 countries combine traditional didactic lecturing and problem-based learning. Faculties of pharmacy in all 3 countries are well staffed and offer competitive remuneration. All 3 countries have a policy of providing scholarships to local students for postgraduate training abroad. The majority of students in Jordan and Kuwait are female, while the ratio of male to female students in Saudi Arabia is even. Students' attitudes towards learning are generally positive in all 3 countries. In Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, most pharmacy graduates work in the public sector, while in Jordan, the majority work in the private sector.

  2. Academic entitlement in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Romanelli, Frank; Smith, Kelly M

    2012-12-12

    The constructs of academic entitlement and student consumerism refer to students' attitudes toward education as a commodity and the underlying belief that as consumers, they should be catered to and given the opportunity to participate in the education process according to their preferences. Most discussions regarding these attitudes are anecdotal, but the pervasiveness of these accounts and the troubling effects that ensue warrant attention. Grade inflation, student incivility, altered classroom practices, and decreased faculty morale are all potential aftereffects of teaching students who hold academic entitlement beliefs. Numerous factors are posited as attributing to academic entitlement including personal issues, societal pressures, and broad academic practices. This paper discusses these factors and offers faculty members and administrators recommendations regarding practices that may curb or alleviate issues associated with academically entitled students.

  3. Academic Entitlement in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Frank; Smith, Kelly M.

    2012-01-01

    The constructs of academic entitlement and student consumerism refer to students’ attitudes toward education as a commodity and the underlying belief that as consumers, they should be catered to and given the opportunity to participate in the education process according to their preferences. Most discussions regarding these attitudes are anecdotal, but the pervasiveness of these accounts and the troubling effects that ensue warrant attention. Grade inflation, student incivility, altered classroom practices, and decreased faculty morale are all potential aftereffects of teaching students who hold academic entitlement beliefs. Numerous factors are posited as attributing to academic entitlement including personal issues, societal pressures, and broad academic practices. This paper discusses these factors and offers faculty members and administrators recommendations regarding practices that may curb or alleviate issues associated with academically entitled students. PMID:23275654

  4. A Framework for Assessing Continuing Professional Development Activities for Satisfying Pharmacy Revalidation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donyai, Parastou; Alexander, Angela M.; Denicolo, Pam M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The United Kingdom's pharmacy regulator contemplated using continuing professional development (CPD) in pharmacy revalidation in 2009, simultaneously asking pharmacy professionals to demonstrate the value of their CPD by showing its relevance and impact. The idea of linking new CPD requirements with revalidation was yet to be…

  5. Comparison of self-reported professional competency across pharmacy education programs: a survey of Thai pharmacy graduates enrolled in the public service program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumpradit N

    2014-10-01

    and community health services, and drug review and information, but no significant differences in the health administration and communication domain among three pharmacy programs.Conclusion: Despite a complete change into a 6-year Pharm D program in 2014, pharmacy education in Thailand should continue evolving to be responsive to the needs of the health system. An annual survey of new pharmacy graduates should be continued, to monitor changes of professional competency across different program tracks and other factors which may influence their contribution to the health service system. Likewise, a longitudinal monitoring of their competencies in the graduate cohort should be conducted.Keywords: pharmacy education, professional competency, pharmacy graduate, Doctor of Pharmacy, Thailand

  6. Pharmacies

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Pharmacies in the United States and Territories A pharmacy is a facility whose primary function is to store, prepare and legally dispense prescription drugs under...

  7. An Innovative Approach to Pharmacy Law Education Utilizing a Mock Board of Pharmacy Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Todd Bess

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of pharmacy law by students is important in the molding of future pharmacy practitioners, but a standardized template for the best way to educate students in this area has not been created. A mock Board of Pharmacy meeting was designed and incorporated into the Pharmacy Law course at the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. Students acted as Board of Pharmacy members and utilized technology to decide outcomes of cases and requests addressed in a typical 2 day Tennessee Board of Pharmacy meeting. The actual responses to those cases, as well as similar cases and requests addressed over a 5 year period, were revealed to students after they made motions on mock scenarios. The mock Board of Pharmacy meeting engages the students in a way that lectures alone often fail to achieve with some initial evidence of successful student learning. Utilizing this teaching format as a law education tool challenges the status quo of pharmacy education and may serve as an impetus and catalyst for future innovations. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents, and royalties. Dr. Wang’s time was partly supported by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01AG040146 and R01AG049696. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.   Type: Idea Paper

  8. Adopting an Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experiential Educational Model Across Colleges of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Rodis, Pharm.D., BCPS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the experience of sharing an experiential model of education and practice development between two colleges of pharmacy and to provide a framework to guide faculty in this type of collaboration.Case Study: The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy (OSU COP Partner for Promotion (PFP program was developed in response to the need for advancing practice in the community pharmacy setting. After successful implementation of this program, the PFP program design and materials were shared, adapted, and implemented at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy (Utah COP. Collaborating faculty developed a framework based on lessons learned through this experience which proposes key guiding strategies as considerations to address prior to embarking on sharing any aspect of an educational program or model between institutions. Each step of the framework is described and applied to the process followed by The OSU COP and Utah COP in sharing the PFP program. Additional considerations related to transfer of educational models are discussed.Results/Conclusion: Sharing the education model and materials associated with the PFP program between institutions has enhanced experiential opportunities for students and helped develop residency training sites in the community setting. In addition, the relationship between the two colleges has contributed to faculty development, as well as an increase in community pharmacy service development with community pharmacy partners at each institution. It is hoped this experience will help guide collaborations between other colleges of pharmacy to enhance education of future pharmacists while positively impacting pharmacy practice, teaching, and research by faculty.

  9. Using Bourdieu’s Theoretical Framework to Examine How the Pharmacy Educator Views Pharmacy Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To explore how different pharmacy educators view pharmacy knowledge within the United Kingdom MPharm program and to relate these findings to Pierre Bourdieu’s theoretical framework. Methods. Twelve qualitative interviews were conducted with 4 faculty members from 3 different types of schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom: a newer school, an established teaching-based school, and an established research-intensive school. Selection was based on a representation of both science-based and practice-based disciplines, gender balance, and teaching experience. Results. The interview transcripts indicated how these members of the academic community describe knowledge. There was a polarization between science-based and practice-based educators in terms of Bourdieu’s description of field, species of capital, and habitus. Conclusion. A Bourdieusian perspective on the differences among faculty member responses supports our understanding of curriculum integration and offers some practical implications for the future development of pharmacy programs. PMID:26889065

  10. Using Bourdieu's Theoretical Framework to Examine How the Pharmacy Educator Views Pharmacy Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterfield, Jon

    2015-12-25

    To explore how different pharmacy educators view pharmacy knowledge within the United Kingdom MPharm program and to relate these findings to Pierre Bourdieu's theoretical framework. Twelve qualitative interviews were conducted with 4 faculty members from 3 different types of schools of pharmacy in the United Kingdom: a newer school, an established teaching-based school, and an established research-intensive school. Selection was based on a representation of both science-based and practice-based disciplines, gender balance, and teaching experience. The interview transcripts indicated how these members of the academic community describe knowledge. There was a polarization between science-based and practice-based educators in terms of Bourdieu's description of field, species of capital, and habitus. A Bourdieusian perspective on the differences among faculty member responses supports our understanding of curriculum integration and offers some practical implications for the future development of pharmacy programs.

  11. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students’ perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Katoue, Maram G.; Awad, Abdelmoneim I.; Schwinghammer, Terry L.; Kombian, Samuel B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients’ quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. Objective: To investigate pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance...

  12. Educational testing validity and reliability in pharmacy and medical education literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Matthew J; Jung, Rose; Jacobs, David M; Peeters, Michael J

    2013-12-16

    To evaluate and compare the reliability and validity of educational testing reported in pharmacy education journals to medical education literature. Descriptions of validity evidence sources (content, construct, criterion, and reliability) were extracted from articles that reported educational testing of learners' knowledge, skills, and/or abilities. Using educational testing, the findings of 108 pharmacy education articles were compared to the findings of 198 medical education articles. For pharmacy educational testing, 14 articles (13%) reported more than 1 validity evidence source while 83 articles (77%) reported 1 validity evidence source and 11 articles (10%) did not have evidence. Among validity evidence sources, content validity was reported most frequently. Compared with pharmacy education literature, more medical education articles reported both validity and reliability (59%; pteaching and learning (SoTL) articles in pharmacy education compared to medical education, validity, and reliability reporting were limited in the pharmacy education literature.

  13. Pharmacy education in Saudi Arabia: A vision of the fut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Aljadhey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacy education in developing countries faces many challenges. An assessment of the challenges and opportunities for the future of pharmacy education in Saudi Arabia has not been conducted. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to ascertain the views and opinions of pharmacy education stakeholders regarding the current issues challenging pharmacy education, and to discuss the future of pharmacy education in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A total of 48 participants attended a one-day meeting in October 2011, designed especially for the purpose of this study. The participants were divided into six round-table discussion sessions with eight persons in each group. Six major themes were explored in these sessions, including the need to improve pharmacy education, program educational outcomes, adoption of an integrated curriculum, the use of advanced teaching methodologies, the need to review assessment methods, and challenges and opportunities to improve pharmacy experiential training. The round-table discussion sessions were videotaped and transcribed verbatim and analyzed by two independent researchers. Results: Participants agreed that pharmacy education in the country needs improvement. Participants agreed on the need for clear, measureable, and national educational outcomes for pharmacy programs in the Kingdom. Participants raised the importance of collaboration between faculty members and departments to design and implement an integrated curriculum. They also emphasized the use of new teaching methodologies focusing on student self-learning and active learning. Assessments were discussed with a focus on the use of new tools, confidentiality of examinations, and providing feedback to students. Several points were raised regarding the opportunities to improve pharmacy experiential training, including the need for more experiential sites and qualified preceptors, addressing variations in training quality between experiential sites, the

  14. Global education implications of the foreign pharmacy graduate equivalency examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Clauson, Kevin A; Latif, David A; Al-Rousan, Rabaa M

    2010-06-15

    Although the Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Equivalency Examination (FPGEE) is not intended to measure educational outcomes or institutional effectiveness, it may be a reliable and valid criterion to assess the quality or success of international pharmacy programs. This comprehensive review describes the evolution and historical milestones of the FPGEE, along with trends in structure, administration, and passing rates, and the impact of country of origin on participant performance. Similarities between the FPGEE and the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) are also explored. This paper aims to provide a global prospective and insight for foreign academic institutions into parameters for evaluating their students' educational capabilities.

  15. Using critical realism as a framework in pharmacy education and social pharmacy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmann, Carmen; Boughey, Chrissie

    2012-01-01

    This article challenges the idea that positivism is capable of representing the complexity of social pharmacy and pharmacy education. It is argued that critical realism provides a framework that allows researchers to look at the nature of reality and at mechanisms that produce, or have the tendency to produce, events and experiences of those events. Critical realism is a framework, not a method. It allows researchers to make observations about phenomena and explain the relationships and connections involved. The researcher has to look for mechanisms and structures that could explain why the phenomena, the connections, and the relationships exist (or do not) and then try to show that these mechanisms do exist. This article first contextualizes critical realism, then briefly describes it, and lastly exemplifies the use of critical realism in a discussion of a research project conducted in pharmacy education. Critical realism may be particularly useful in interdisciplinary research, for example, where practitioners and researchers are working together in a social pharmacy or pharmacy education setting. Critical realism requires the practitioners and the researchers to question and make known their assumptions about their own realities and to think of a complex problem or phenomenon in terms of a stratified reality, generative mechanisms, and tendencies. Critical realism may make research more rigorous and also allow researchers to conceive of a greater breadth of research designs for their work. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Professional Stereotypes of Interprofessional Education Naive Pharmacy and Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Maria Miller; Harris, Elaine C.; Ryan, Gina J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To assess and compare interprofessional education (IPE) naive pharmacy and nursing student stereotypes prior to completion of an IPE activity. Methods. Three hundred and twenty-three pharmacy students and 275 nursing students at Mercer University completed the Student Stereotypes Rating Questionnaire. Responses from pharmacy and nursing students were compared, and responses from different level learners within the same profession also were compared. Results. Three hundred and fifty-six (59.5%) students completed the survey. Pharmacy students viewed pharmacists more favorably than nursing students viewed pharmacists for all attributes except the ability to work independently. Additionally, nursing students viewed nurses less favorably than pharmacy students viewed nurses for academic ability and practical skills. There was some variability in stereotypes between professional years. Conclusion. This study confirms the existence of professional stereotypes, although overall student perceptions of their own profession and the other were generally positive. PMID:28720912

  17. A Review on Different Virtual Learning Methods in Pharmacy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Noori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Virtual learning is a type of electronic learning system based on the web. It models traditional in- person learning by providing virtual access to classes, tests, homework, feedbacks and etc. Students and teachers can interact through chat rooms or other virtual environments. Web 2.0 services are usually used for this method. Internet audio-visual tools, multimedia systems, a disco CD-ROMs, videotapes, animation, video conferencing, and interactive phones can all be used to deliver data to the students. E-learning can occur in or out of the classroom. It is time saving with lower costs compared to traditional methods. It can be self-paced, it is suitable for distance learning and it is flexible. It is a great learning style for continuing education and students can independently solve their problems but it has its disadvantages too. Thereby, blended learning (combination of conventional and virtual education is being used worldwide and has improved knowledge, skills and confidence of pharmacy students.The aim of this study is to review, discuss and introduce different methods of virtual learning for pharmacy students.Google scholar, Pubmed and Scupus databases were searched for topics related to virtual, electronic and blended learning and different styles like computer simulators, virtual practice environment technology, virtual mentor, virtual patient, 3D simulators, etc. are discussed in this article.Our review on different studies on these areas shows that the students are highly satisfied withvirtual and blended types of learning.

  18. The use of social media in pharmacy practice and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy F; Aslani, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Social media is becoming increasingly ubiquitous. It has significant potential as a health communication and educational tool, and may provide a medium for the delivery of health-related services. This systematic review aimed to investigate the use of social media in professional pharmacy practice and pharmacy education, and includes an evaluation of the research designs utilized. Medline, Embase, PubMed, IPA, and CINAHL databases were broadly searched for peer-reviewed research studies about pharmacy and social media (SM). The search was restricted to years 2000 to June 2013, with no other restrictions applied. Key words used were within three concept areas: "social media" and "pharmacist or student" and "pharmacy." Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. SM was broadly addressed as a general concept in 3 of the 24 studies. The other 21 studies investigated/used specific SM tools. Fourteen of those addressed social networking sites (SNS), four wikis, two blogs, and one Twitter. The studies' foci were to describe SM use (n = 17 studies) by pharmacist, pharmacy educators, and pharmacy students and investigate usage related topics (such as e-professionalism and student-educator boundary issues); or the use of SM as an educational tool in pharmacy education (n = 7). Pharmacy students were the subject of 12 studies, pharmacists of six, and faculty members and administrators of four. Survey methods were used in 17 studies, alone or with an additional method; focus groups were used in two; interviews in one; and direct observation of social media activity in seven. Results showed that SM in general and SNS in particular were used mainly for personal reasons. Wikis, Facebook, and Twitter were used as educational tools in pharmacy education with positive feedback from students. Research investigating the use of SM in the practice of pharmacy is growing; however, it is predominantly descriptive in nature with no controlled studies identified. Although some

  19. Effectiveness of E-learning in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M.; Clifford, Rhonda M.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels. PMID:24850945

  20. Effectiveness of E-learning in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Sandra M; Karia, Ajay; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2014-05-15

    Over the past 2 decades, e-learning has evolved as a new pedagogy within pharmacy education. As learners and teachers increasingly seek e-learning opportunities for an array of educational and individual benefits, it is important to evaluate the effectiveness of these programs. This systematic review of the literature examines the quality of e-learning effectiveness studies in pharmacy, describes effectiveness measures, and synthesizes the evidence for each measure. E-learning in pharmacy education effectively increases knowledge and is a highly acceptable instructional format for pharmacists and pharmacy students. However, there is limited evidence that e-learning effectively improves skills or professional practice. There is also no evidence that e-learning is effective at increasing knowledge long term; thus, long-term follow-up studies are required. Translational research is also needed to evaluate the benefits of e-learning at patient and organizational levels.

  1. Should Torsion Balance Technique Continue to be Taught to Pharmacy Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Rhonda; Chereson, Rasma; Salama, Noha Nabil

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To determine the types of balances used in compounding pharmacies: torsion or digital. Methods. A survey was mailed to the pharmacist-in-charge at 698 pharmacies, representing 47% of the pharmacies in Missouri as of July 2013. The pharmacies were randomly selected and stratified by region into eight regions to ensure a representative sample. Information was gathered regarding the type and use of balances and pharmacists' perspectives on the need to teach torsion balance technique to pharmacy students. Results. The response rate for the survey was 53.3%. Out of the total responses received, those pharmacies having a torsion balance, digital balance or both were 46.8%, 27.4% and 11.8%, respectively. About 68.3% of respondents compound prescriptions. The study showed that 52% of compounding pharmacies use torsion balances in their practice. Of those with a balance in their pharmacy, 65.6% favored continuation of torsion balance instruction. Conclusions. Digital balances have become increasingly popular and have replaced torsion balances in some pharmacies, especially those that compound a significant number of prescriptions. The results of this study indicate that torsion balances remain integral to compounding practice. Therefore, students should continue being taught torsion balance technique at the college.

  2. Educational Games as a Teaching Tool in Pharmacy Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Mona Hassan; Mohamed, Heba Moustafa

    2015-05-25

    The shift in the pharmacist's role from simply dispensing medications to effective delivery of pharmaceutical care interventions and drug therapy management has influenced pharmacy education.(1-3) The educational focus has shifted from basic sciences to clinical and integrated courses that require incorporating active-learning strategies to provide pharmacy graduates with higher levels of competencies and specialized skills. As opposed to passive didactic lectures, active-learning strategies address the educational content in an interactive learning environment to develop interpersonal, communication, and problem-solving skills needed by pharmacists to function effectively in their new roles.(4-6) One such strategy is using educational games. The aim of this paper is to review educational games adopted in different pharmacy schools and to aid educators in replicating the successfully implemented games and overcoming deficiencies in educational games. This review also highlights the main pitfalls within this research area.

  3. Educational Games as a Teaching Tool in Pharmacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Heba Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    The shift in the pharmacist’s role from simply dispensing medications to effective delivery of pharmaceutical care interventions and drug therapy management has influenced pharmacy education.1-3 The educational focus has shifted from basic sciences to clinical and integrated courses that require incorporating active-learning strategies to provide pharmacy graduates with higher levels of competencies and specialized skills. As opposed to passive didactic lectures, active-learning strategies address the educational content in an interactive learning environment to develop interpersonal, communication, and problem-solving skills needed by pharmacists to function effectively in their new roles.4-6 One such strategy is using educational games. The aim of this paper is to review educational games adopted in different pharmacy schools and to aid educators in replicating the successfully implemented games and overcoming deficiencies in educational games. This review also highlights the main pitfalls within this research area. PMID:26089568

  4. Integrating Internships with Professional Study in Pharmacy Education in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfhjelm, Ulla; Passi, Sanna; Airaksinen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy internships are an important part of undergraduate pharmacy education worldwide. Internships in Finland are integrated into professional study during the second and third year, which has several pedagogic advantages, such as better understanding of the association between academic studies and pharmaceutical work-life during the studies, and enhanced self-reflection through the feedback from preceptors and peers during the internships. The objective of this paper is to describe the Finnish integrated internship using the pharmacy curriculum at the University of Helsinki as an example. PMID:26056411

  5. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  6. Reflective Practice and Its Implications for Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Smith, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy students require critical-thinking and problem-solving skills to integrate theory learned in the classroom with the complexities of practice, yet many pharmacy students fall short of acquiring these skills.1-2 Reflective practice activities encourage learning from the student’s own experiences and those of others, and offer a possible solution for the integration of knowledge-based curricula with the ambiguities of practice, as well as enhance communication and collaboration within a multidisciplinary team. Although reflective practices have been embraced elsewhere in health professions education, their strengths and shortcomings need to be considered when implementing such practices into pharmacy curricula. This review provides an overview of the evolution of theories related to reflective practice, critically examines the use of reflective tools (such as portfolios and blogs), and discusses the implications of implementing reflective practices in pharmacy education. PMID:24558286

  7. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-05-25

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation with increased time on task, immediate feedback, ability to learn from mistakes without becoming discouraged, and potential for behavior and attitude change. Development of quality games for pharmacy education requires content expertise as well as expertise in the science and design of gaming. When well done, serious gaming provides a valuable additional tool for pharmacy education.

  8. Quality assurance in European pharmacy education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Morais JA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of quality assurance (QA systems in European faculties of pharmacy was carried out under the auspices of the European Association of Faculties of Pharmacy PHARMINE consortium. A questionnaire based on the quality criteria of the International Pharmaceutical Federation and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (USA was sent out to European faculties. Replies were obtained from 28 countries. Just above half has a working QA system. QA scores were high concerning matters such as complete curriculum and training, use of European Credit Transfer System, students’ representation and promotion of professional behavior. QA scores were low concerning matters such as evaluation of achievement of mission and goals, and financial resources. The PHARMINE consortium now has a basis upon which to elaborate and promote QA in European pharmacy faculties.

  9. A continuous quality improvement program to focus a college of pharmacy on programmatic advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Philip D; Dipiro, Joseph T; Rowen, Randall C; McNair, David

    2013-08-12

    To enhance the achievement of a college of pharmacy's goals for education, research, and service missions by implementing an excellence program based on the Studer Group model for continuous quality improvement. The Studer model was combined with university strategic planning for a comprehensive quality-improvement program that was implemented over 5 years. The program included identifying and measuring key performance indicators, establishing specific "pillar" goals, aligning behaviors with goals and values, and training leaders. Assessment of key performance indicators over 5 years demonstrated progress toward achieving college goals for student and faculty satisfaction, research funding, numbers of students seeking formal postgraduate training, and private giving. Implementation of a continuous quality-improvement program based on the Studer program enabled the college to focus on and meet its yearly and strategic goals for all components of its mission.

  10. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 88 ...

  11. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 88 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 51 - 88 of 88 ...

  12. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients’ quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. Objective: To investigate pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126 was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. Results: The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%, lack of pharmacist time (83.3%, organizational obstacles (82.6%, and pharmacists’ physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%. Conclusion: Pharmacy students’ attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University

  13. Pharmaceutical care education in Kuwait: pharmacy students' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoue, Maram G; Awad, Abdelmoneim I; Schwinghammer, Terry L; Kombian, Samuel B

    2014-07-01

    Pharmaceutical care is defined as the responsible provision of medication therapy to achieve definite outcomes that improve patients' quality of life. Pharmacy education should equip students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to practise pharmaceutical care competently. To investigate pharmacy students' attitudes towards pharmaceutical care, perceptions of their preparedness to perform pharmaceutical care competencies, opinions about the importance of the various pharmaceutical care activities, and the barriers to its implementation in Kuwait. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey of pharmacy students (n=126) was conducted at Faculty of Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Descriptive statistics including percentages, medians and means Likert scale rating (SD) were calculated and compared using SPSS, version 19. Statistical significance was accepted at a p value of 0.05 or lower. The response rate was 99.2%. Pharmacy students expressed overall positive attitudes towards pharmaceutical care. They felt prepared to implement the various aspects of pharmaceutical care, with the least preparedness in the administrative/management aspects. Perceived pharmaceutical care competencies grew as students progressed through the curriculum. The students also appreciated the importance of the various pharmaceutical care competencies. They agreed/strongly agreed that the major barriers to the integration of pharmaceutical care into practice were lack of private counseling areas or inappropriate pharmacy layout (95.2%), lack of pharmacist time (83.3%), organizational obstacles (82.6%), and pharmacists' physical separation from patient care areas (82.6%). Pharmacy students' attitudes and perceived preparedness can serve as needs assessment tools to guide curricular change and improvement. Student pharmacists at Kuwait University understand and advocate implementation of pharmaceutical care while also

  14. Education on Correct Inhaler Technique in Pharmacy Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Standard educational training may not be the most appropriate method of teaching students the correct use of inhalers. Clearly, there is a practice element missing which needs to be addressed in a feasible way. Keywords: Inhaler technique, Pharmacy education, Hands-on training, Training barrier ...

  15. Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in pharmacy education - a trend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirwaikar, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy education has undergone a radical change as it evolves towards becoming a more patient oriented profession. With a greater emphasis on problem based teaching and competency, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), supported by its reliability and validity became the gold standard for the evaluation of clinical skills of undergraduate students of medicine and pharmacy worldwide. Core competency evaluation has become a mandatory and critical norm for accountability of educational objectives as the traditional testing tools cannot evaluate clinical competence. Interpersonal and communication skills, professional judgment, skills of resolution etc., may be best assessed through a well- structured OSCE in comparison to oral examinations, multiple choice tests and other methods of assessment. Though OSCEs as an objective method of evaluation offer several advantages to both students and teachers, it also has disadvantages and pitfalls in implementation. This article reviews the OSCE as a trend in pharmacy education. PMID:26759616

  16. Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE in pharmacy education - a trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirwaikar A

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy education has undergone a radical change as it evolves towards becoming a more patient oriented profession. With a greater emphasis on problem based teaching and competency, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE, supported by its reliability and validity became the gold standard for the evaluation of clinical skills of undergraduate students of medicine and pharmacy worldwide. Core competency evaluation has become a mandatory and critical norm for accountability of educational objectives as the traditional testing tools cannot evaluate clinical competence. Interpersonal and communication skills, professional judgment, skills of resolution etc., may be best assessed through a well- structured OSCE in comparison to oral examinations, multiple choice tests and other methods of assessment. Though OSCEs as an objective method of evaluation offer several advantages to both students and teachers, it also has disadvantages and pitfalls in implementation. This article reviews the OSCE as a trend in pharmacy education.

  17. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research: a network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Philbert, Daphne; Rump, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-08-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This paper presents the characteristics and benefits of the Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research, a practice based research network affiliated with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Utrecht University. Yearly, this network is used to realize approximately 600 student internships (in hospital and community pharmacies) and 20 research projects. To date, most research has been performed in community pharmacy and research questions frequently concerned prescribing behavior or adherence and subjects related to uptake of regulations in the pharmacy setting. Researchers gain access to different types of data from daily practice, pharmacists receive feedback on the functioning of their own pharmacy and students get in depth insight into pharmacy practice.

  18. Competence-Based Pharmacy Education in the University of Helsinki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Katajavuori

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the expectations to act as an expert in the health care profession, it is of utmost importance that pharmacy education creates knowledge and skills needed in today’s working life. Thus, the planning of the curriculum should be based on relevant and up-to-date learning outcomes. In the University of Helsinki, a university wide curriculum reform called ‘the Big Wheel’ was launched in 2015. After the reform, the basic degrees of the university are two-cycle (Bachelor–Master and competence-based, where the learning outcomes form a solid basis for the curriculum goals and implementation. In the Faculty of Pharmacy, this curriculum reform was conducted in two phases during 2012–2016. The construction of the curriculum was based on the most relevant learning outcomes concerning working life via high quality first (Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and second (Master of Science in Pharmacy cycle degree programs. The reform was kicked off by interviewing all the relevant stakeholders: students, teachers, and pharmacists/experts in all the working life sectors of pharmacy. Based on these interviews, the intended learning outcomes of the Pharmacy degree programs were defined including both subject/contents-related and generic skills. The curriculum design was based on the principles of constructive alignment and new structures and methods were applied in order to foster the implementation of the learning outcomes. During the process, it became evident that a competence-based curriculum can be created only in close co-operation with the stakeholders, including teachers and students. Well-structured and facilitated co-operation amongst the teachers enabled the development of many new and innovative teaching practices. The European Union funded PHAR-QA project provided, at the same time, a highly relevant framework to compare the curriculum development in Helsinki against Europe-wide definitions of competences and learning outcomes in

  19. Pharmacy students' ability to identify plagiarism after an educational intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeeter, Michelle; Harris, Kira; Kehr, Heather; Ford, Carolyn; Lane, Daniel C; Nuzum, Donald S; Compton, Cynthia; Gibson, Whitney

    2014-03-12

    Objective. To determine if an educational intervention in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program increases pharmacy students' ability to identify plagiarism. Methods. First-year (P1), second-year (P2), and third-year (P3) pharmacy students attended an education session during which types of plagiarism and methods for avoiding plagiarism were reviewed. Students completed a preintervention assessment immediately prior to the session and a postintervention assessment the following semester to measure their ability. Results. Two hundred fifty-two students completed both preintervention and postintervention assessments. There was a 4% increase from preintervention to postintervention in assessment scores for the overall student sample (pplagiarism can significantly improve students' ability to identify plagiarism.

  20. Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Identify Plagiarism After an Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kira; Kehr, Heather; Ford, Carolyn; Lane, Daniel C.; Nuzum, Donald S.; Compton, Cynthia; Gibson, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To determine if an educational intervention in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program increases pharmacy students’ ability to identify plagiarism. Methods. First-year (P1), second-year (P2), and third-year (P3) pharmacy students attended an education session during which types of plagiarism and methods for avoiding plagiarism were reviewed. Students completed a preintervention assessment immediately prior to the session and a postintervention assessment the following semester to measure their ability. Results. Two hundred fifty-two students completed both preintervention and postintervention assessments. There was a 4% increase from preintervention to postintervention in assessment scores for the overall student sample (pplagiarism can significantly improve students’ ability to identify plagiarism. PMID:24672066

  1. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 25, No 9 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Keeping the "continuous" in continuous quality improvement: exploring perceived outcomes of CQI program use in community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Duggan, Kellie; Reid, Carolyn; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J; Mahaffey, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    Given the significant potential of continuous quality improvement (CQI) programs in enhancing overall levels of patient safety, community pharmacies in North America are under increasing pressure to have a formal and documented CQI program in place. However, while such initiatives may seem great on paper, in practice the outcomes of such programs to community pharmacy practice remain unclear. To explore the perceived outcomes identified by community pharmacies that adopted and actively used a standardized (i.e., common across pharmacies) CQI program for at least 1 year and to develop a framework for how such outcomes were achieved. A multi-site study of SafetyNET-Rx, a standardized and technologically sophisticated (e.g., online reporting of medication errors to a national database) CQI program, involving community pharmacies in Nova Scotia, Canada, was performed. During the summer and fall of 2011, 22 interviews were conducted with the CQI facilitators in 12 Nova Scotia community pharmacies; equally split between independent/banners and corporate chains. Of the CQI facilitators, 14 were pharmacists, while the remaining eight were pharmacy technicians. Thematic analysis following the procedures presented by Braun and Clarke was adopted to identify and explore the major outcomes. Results of the thematic analysis highlighted a number of perceived outcomes from the use of a standardized CQI program in community pharmacies, specifically: (1) perceived reduction in the number of medication errors that were occurring in the pharmacy, (2) increased awareness/confidence of individual actions related to dispensing, (3) increased understanding of the dispensing and related processes/workflow, (4) increased openness to talking about medication errors among pharmacy staff, and (5) quality and safety becoming more entrenched in the workflow (e.g., staff is more aware of their roles and responsibilities in patient safety and confident that the dispensing processes are safe and

  4. Are Serious Games a Good Strategy for Pharmacy Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Cain, Jeff; Piascik, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Serious gaming is the use of game principles for the purposes of learning, skill acquisition, and training. Higher education is beginning to incorporate serious gaming into curricula, and health professions education is the most common area for serious game use. Advantages of serious gaming in pharmacy education include authentic, situated learning without risk of patient consequences, collaborative learning, ability to challenge students of all performance levels, high student motivation wit...

  5. The Educational Use of Social Media Sites by Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Onge, Erin L.; Hoehn, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Social media sites are widely used among professional students and may offer an alternative means of communication for professors to utilize within their courses. Social media site usage has been characterized within healthcare education, however, data is lacking on its use within pharmacy programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate social…

  6. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkova, Valentina B

    2009-04-01

    There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients' disease management, medication compliance and from there patients' quality of life. To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner's visits and hospitalizations are expected. Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71), attending pharmacies - intervention group; and 43 individuals - control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. PARAMETERS ASSESSED DURING THE FOUR STAGES OF THE PROGRAM WERE: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner's visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients' health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients' pain, decrease in the physician's visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care. Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient's quality of life.

  7. State of Pharmacy Education in Bangladesh | Alam | Tropical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current state of pharmacy education in Bangladesh and identification of the current gaps in terms of manpower development for the pharmaceutical sector are described in this paper. Information for the preparation of this paper was obtained from documents and interviews of stakeholders drawn from regulatory, ...

  8. Communications Training in Pharmacy Education, 1995-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudan, Cristina; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2013-01-01

    The role of the pharmacist as a “communicator” of information and advice between patients, other healthcare practitioners, and the community is recognized as a vital component of the responsibilities of a practicing pharmacist. Pharmacy education is changing to reflect this, although the difficulty is in designing a curriculum that is capable of equipping students with the necessary knowledge and skills, using activities that are effective in promoting communication competency. The objective of this review was to identify published, peer-reviewed articles concerning communication training in pharmacy education programs, and describe which communication skills the structured learning activities aimed to improve and how these learning activities were assessed. A systematic literature search was conducted and the articles found were analyzed and divided into categories based on specific communication skills taught and type of learning activity used. Oral interpersonal communication skills targeted at patients were the most common skill-type described, followed by clinical writing skills. Common teaching methods included simulated and standardized patient interactions and pharmacy practice experience courses. Most educational interventions were assessed by subjective measures. Many interventions were described as fragments, in isolation of other learning activities that took place in a course, which impedes complete analysis of study results. To succeed in communication training, integration between different learning activities and progression within pharmacy educations are important. PMID:23519011

  9. Communications training in pharmacy education, 1995-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Andy; Vaudan, Cristina; Sporrong, Sofia Kälvemark

    2013-03-12

    The role of the pharmacist as a "communicator" of information and advice between patients, other healthcare practitioners, and the community is recognized as a vital component of the responsibilities of a practicing pharmacist. Pharmacy education is changing to reflect this, although the difficulty is in designing a curriculum that is capable of equipping students with the necessary knowledge and skills, using activities that are effective in promoting communication competency. The objective of this review was to identify published, peer-reviewed articles concerning communication training in pharmacy education programs, and describe which communication skills the structured learning activities aimed to improve and how these learning activities were assessed. A systematic literature search was conducted and the articles found were analyzed and divided into categories based on specific communication skills taught and type of learning activity used. Oral interpersonal communication skills targeted at patients were the most common skill-type described, followed by clinical writing skills. Common teaching methods included simulated and standardized patient interactions and pharmacy practice experience courses. Most educational interventions were assessed by subjective measures. Many interventions were described as fragments, in isolation of other learning activities that took place in a course, which impedes complete analysis of study results. To succeed in communication training, integration between different learning activities and progression within pharmacy educations are important.

  10. Employing the nominal group technique to explore the views of pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and women on community pharmacy weight management services and educational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Souhiela; Marriott, Jennifer L; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate how pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and women feel about community pharmacy involvement in weight management, and to identify what pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and women want in weight management educational resources. Three homogenous and one heterogeneous nominal group (NG) sessions of up to 120-min duration were conducted with nine women, ten pharmacists and eight pharmacy assistants. The NG technique was used to conduct each session to determine the most important issues that should be considered surrounding community pharmacy weight management services and development of any educational resources. The heterogeneous NG session was used to finalise what women, pharmacists and pharmacy assistants want in educational resources. Overall, pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and women believe that pharmacy staff have an important role in the management of overweight and obesity because of their accessibility, trust and the availability of products in pharmacy. Regarding the most suitable healthcare professional(s) to treat overweight and obesity, the majority of participants believed that no one member of the healthcare team was most suitable and that overweight and obesity needs to be treated by a multidisciplinary team. The importance of having weight management educational resources for pharmacy staff and women that come from trustworthy resources without financial gain or commercialisation was also emphasised. Pharmacists, pharmacy assistants and women feel that community pharmacies have a definite role to play in weight management. Pharmacy-specific weight management educational resources that are readily available to pharmacy staff and women are highly desirable. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Legal and ethical issues regarding social media and pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Fink, Joseph L

    2010-12-15

    Widespread use of social media applications like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter has introduced new complexities to the legal and ethical environment of higher education. Social communications have traditionally been considered private; however, now that much of this information is published online to the public, more insight is available to students' attitudes, opinions, and character. Pharmacy educators and administrators may struggle with the myriad of ethical and legal issues pertaining to social media communications and relationships with and among students. This article seeks to clarify some of these issues with a review of the legal facets and pertinent court cases related to social media. In addition, 5 core ethical issues are identified and discussed. The article concludes with recommendations for pharmacy educators with regard to preparing for and addressing potential legal issues pertaining to social media.

  12. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review article willintroduce readers to the educational subject matter, along with one-page summarises (in print) of additional articles that may be accessed in full online. We will continue to offer topical and up-to-date CME material. Readers are encouraged to register with samj.org.za to receive future notifications of new ...

  13. Education for arthritis patients: a community pharmacy based pilot project.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petkova VB

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available There are different kinds of arthritis, widely spread among the population, that make them a clinical problem with social, psychological and economic burden. Different education programs have been developed in order to improve patients’ disease management, medication compliance and from there patients’ quality of life.Objective: To develop and implement a community pharmacy-based educational program for patients with arthritis. Improvements in pain, medication compliance, decrease in general practitioner’s visits and hospitalizations are expected.Methods: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. The sample consisted of 43 individuals, with different stages of arthritis (aged 15 - 71, attending pharmacies – intervention group; and 43 individuals – control group. A 4-month education was conducted on the following topics: what causes arthritis and what are the factors that can intensify it; pain management and physical activities; self-management and prevention; pharmacotherapy and possible adverse drug reactions. Patient's health-related quality of life was assessed in the beginning and at the end of the survey. Results: Parameters assessed during the four stages of the program were: frequency of severe pain, frequency of general practitioner’s visits, frequency of urgent medical aid calls, compliance with therapy, satisfaction with pharmacy services. Improvement in patients’ health-related quality of life was observed and also: decrease in the severity of patients’ pain, decrease in the physician’s visits, and increase in satisfaction overall care.Conclusions: Positive results from the educational approach in pharmacy conditions were demonstrated. These consequences have a potential to increase arthritis patient’s quality of life.

  14. Continuing Education in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Catalina

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is not enough to hold a degree title allowing us to exercise a profession. We all know—indeed, it is obvious—that the socioeconomic environment we operate in has evolved rapidly and dramatically. Greater competition in the job market and training needs that are increasingly more specific and dynamic are driving the demand for specialized learning and are making concepts such as continuing education or lifelong training more important. A health professional must have a calling for ...

  15. Educational technology use among US colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Michael S; Cain, Jeff J; Malone, Patrick M; Chapman, Tracy A; Walters, Ryan W; Thompson, David C; Riedl, Steven T

    2011-06-10

    To develop a searchable database of educational technologies used at schools and colleges of pharmacy. A cross-sectional survey design was used to determine what educational technologies were being used and to identify an individual at each institution who could serve as an information resource for peer-to-peer questions. Eighty-nine survey instruments were returned for a response rate of 75.4%. The resulting data illustrated the almost ubiquitous presence of educational technology. The most frequently used technology was course management systems and the least frequently used technology was microblogging. Educational technology use is trending toward fee-based products for enterprise-level applications and free, open-source products for collaboration and presentation. Educational technology is allowing educators to restructure classroom time for something other than simple transmission of factual information and to adopt an evidence-based approach to instructional innovation and reform.

  16. Pharmacy students in private institutions of higher education: motivating factors when studying pharmacy and influences on university choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Jason S E; Lim, Shiao Wei; Ng, Yew Keong; Tiong, John J L

    2017-12-01

    To identify factors influencing the decisions of Malaysian first-year pharmacy undergraduate students in private higher education when choosing to pursue a degree in pharmacy as well as their choice of private university. This cross-sectional study employed a validated, self-administered questionnaire which was administered to 543 first-year pharmacy students from nine different private universities. Factor analysis was utilised to extract key factors from the responses. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the data. Eight factors motivating students' decision to study pharmacy emerged from the responses, accounting for 63.8% of the variance observed. Students were primarily motivated by intrinsic interests, with work conditions and profession attributes also exerting significant influence. In terms of choice of private university, nine factors were identified, accounting for 73.8% of the variance observed. The image of the school and university were most influential factors in this context, followed by university safety, programme attributes and financial factors. First-year pharmacy students in the private higher education sector are motivated by intrinsic interest when choosing to study pharmacy over other courses, while their choice of private university is influenced primarily by the image of the school and university. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  17. Web 2.0 and pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Jeff; Fox, Brent I

    2009-11-12

    New types of social Internet applications (often referred to as Web 2.0) are becoming increasingly popular within higher education environments. Although developed primarily for entertainment and social communication within the general population, applications such as blogs, social video sites, and virtual worlds are being adopted by higher education institutions. These newer applications differ from standard Web sites in that they involve the users in creating and distributing information, hence effectively changing how the Web is used for knowledge generation and dispersion. Although Web 2.0 applications offer exciting new ways to teach, they should not be the core of instructional planning, but rather selected only after learning objectives and instructional strategies have been identified. This paper provides an overview of prominent Web 2.0 applications, explains how they are being used within education environments, and elaborates on some of the potential opportunities and challenges that these applications present.

  18. The Country Profiles of the PHARMINE Survey of European Higher Educational Institutions Delivering Pharmacy Education and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Atkinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The PHARMINE (Pharmacy Education in Europe consortium surveyed pharmacy education and practice in 2012. Surveys were updated in 2017 for publication. The PHARMINE consortium was especially interested in specialization in pharmacy education and practice (for community, hospital, and industrial pharmacy, and in the impact of the Bologna agreement and the directive of the European Commission on education and training for the sectoral profession of pharmacy on European degree courses. The surveys underline the varying attitudes of the different European countries to these various aspects. The surveys will now be published in Pharmacy. They will be useful to researchers in education, and to staff and students interested in mobility amongst different European and/or non-European countries. In order to assure a full understanding of the country profiles to be published in the journal Pharmacy, this introductory article describes the general format of the survey questionnaire used.

  19. The Country Profiles of the PHARMINE Survey of European Higher Educational Institutions Delivering Pharmacy Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2017-06-22

    The PHARMINE (Pharmacy Education in Europe) consortium surveyed pharmacy education and practice in 2012. Surveys were updated in 2017 for publication. The PHARMINE consortium was especially interested in specialization in pharmacy education and practice (for community, hospital, and industrial pharmacy), and in the impact of the Bologna agreement and the directive of the European Commission on education and training for the sectoral profession of pharmacy on European degree courses. The surveys underline the varying attitudes of the different European countries to these various aspects. The surveys will now be published in Pharmacy . They will be useful to researchers in education, and to staff and students interested in mobility amongst different European and/or non-European countries. In order to assure a full understanding of the country profiles to be published in the journal Pharmacy , this introductory article describes the general format of the survey questionnaire used.

  20. Redefining continuing education delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, K H

    1997-01-01

    individual health-care worker consumer. A number of national and world-wide trends are propelling rapid changes in the delivery modalities and types of emerging providers for health-care CE. Examples of these advanced telecommunications applications of CE opportunities for health-care personnel are becoming more prevalent in the literature and the pattern of CE marketing, and delivery evolution can be seen readily on the Internet. Continued program success and viability will belong to the individuals and organizations who are able to conceptualize and envision the positive transformations and opportunities that can occur from the evolving paradigm of education for the lifelong learner of the 21st century.

  1. Global Health Education in Doctor of Pharmacy Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lydia C; DiPietro Mager, Natalie A

    2016-05-25

    The objective of this Review is to characterize content related to global health in didactic and experiential curricula of doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs in the United States. The review was completed through a systematic website search of 133 US PharmD programs accredited or currently in the process of obtaining accreditation to identify global health dual degrees, minors/concentrations, required and elective courses, and experiential opportunities. Programs' course catalogs were referenced as needed to find more specific course listings/descriptions. More than 50 programs offered an elective course related to global health; eight had a required course; eight offered a minor or certification for global health; three offered dual degrees in pharmacy and global health. Fourteen institutions had a center for global health studies on campus. More than 50 programs offered experiential education opportunities in global health including international advanced pharmacy practice experiences or medical mission trips. Inclusion of and focus on global health-related topics in US PharmD programs was widely varied.

  2. A Computer Simulation of Community Pharmacy Practice for Educational Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoff, Ivan; Ling, Tristan; Bereznicki, Luke; Westbury, Juanita; Chalmers, Leanne; Peterson, Gregory; Ollington, Robert

    2014-11-15

    To provide a computer-based learning method for pharmacy practice that is as effective as paper-based scenarios, but more engaging and less labor-intensive. We developed a flexible and customizable computer simulation of community pharmacy. Using it, the students would be able to work through scenarios which encapsulate the entirety of a patient presentation. We compared the traditional paper-based teaching method to our computer-based approach using equivalent scenarios. The paper-based group had 2 tutors while the computer group had none. Both groups were given a prescenario and postscenario clinical knowledge quiz and survey. Students in the computer-based group had generally greater improvements in their clinical knowledge score, and third-year students using the computer-based method also showed more improvements in history taking and counseling competencies. Third-year students also found the simulation fun and engaging. Our simulation of community pharmacy provided an educational experience as effective as the paper-based alternative, despite the lack of a human tutor.

  3. Implementation of a virtual dispensing simulator to support US pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrone, Marcus; Kebodeaux, Clark; Fitzgerald, Jill; Holle, Lisa

    2017-07-01

    A key element for pharmacy practice defined by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) is medication use systems management. A web-based community pharmacy simulation originally created for Australian pharmacy students was adapted for pharmacy students in the United States (US). The objective of this study was to collaboratively adapt an existing international simulation program for utility in the US and measure student perceptions of a web-based community pharmacy simulation program in three US schools of pharmacy. An Australian development team in collaboration with US pharmacy school faculty modified the existing MyDispense software to create a virtual environment that accurately represented US community pharmacy practice. Students at three US schools of pharmacy used the newly adapted version of MyDispense and were surveyed on their prior experience in community pharmacy and their perceptions of MyDispense as a learning tool. Overall 241 (44%) students completed the satisfaction survey. Approximately 40% of these students worked in a community pharmacy before starting pharmacy school. Most students agreed or strongly agreed that MyDispense was straightforward to learn (76%), was more realistic than addressing similar paper cases (73%), and offered a learning opportunity to safely make errors (84%). Qualitative thematic analysis revealed that MyDispense allowed students to practice how to gather patient information and ask appropriate questions, counsel patients, and practice the dispensing process. Response to the US version of My Dispense is positive and proves to be a viable option for introducing and reinforcing community pharmacy practice skills to students during in their pharmacy education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Critical Thinking Development in Pharmacy Education: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Peeters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The investigators aimed to summarize prior studies of critical thinking development among pharmacy students, using the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST, Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT, and Defining Issues Test (DIT. Methods: Independently, two investigators (KLZ, MJP systematically searched available literature using PubMed, Google Scholar, ERIC, PsychInfo, as well as pharmacy education conference abstracts in American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education. Their search terms were ‘pharmacy’, and [‘critical thinking’, ‘HSRT’, ‘CCTST’, and ‘DIT’]. Studies included were those that investigated pharmacy students, used one of the tests (CCTST, HSRT, DIT, and used a longitudinal design with test administration at two or more time-points for the same subjects (i.e., development. On review, the CCTST and HSRT seem more foundational to analytical/critical thinking, while the DIT appears to measure moral/complex thinking. Summarizing used meta-analysis with Cohen’s d and random-effects modelling. Results: Five studies involved thinking development with 10 separate cohorts for meta-analysis (8 cohorts for CCTST, 2 for DIT, and 0 for HSRT. At 5 institutions, 407 and 1148 students were included (CCTST and DIT, respectively. For the CCTST, the overall effect was 0.33 (0.19-0.47 95%CI with some heterogeneity among study cohorts (I2=52%. For the DIT, the overall effect was -0.23 (-0.83-0.37 95%CI with considerable heterogeneity between study cohorts (I2=95%. For the CCTST and DIT, some studies showed effect-sizes greater than 0.5. Meta-analysis of the HSRT could not be conducted (i.e., 0 studies found. Implications: While measuring different aspects of “critical thinking”, the CCTST and DIT showed responsiveness to change and appear to be promising measures of cognitive development. These tests should be used in further well-designed research studies that explore strategies for improving cognitive

  5. Adult education in the continuous education system

    OpenAIRE

    Verbitsky Andrey Aleksandrovich

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals problems of adults’ education as a part of lifelong learning. The article formulates the mission of continuing education, its values, purposes, contents, and principles and terms of organizing the educational process.

  6. Does Competency-Based Education Have a Role in Academic Pharmacy in the United States?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S. Medina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Competency-based Education (CBE is an educational model that allows students to learn and demonstrate their abilities at their own pace. CBE is growing in popularity in undergraduate educational programs and its role in pharmacy education in the United States (US is under review. In comparison, medical education is utilizing competency-based approaches (such as competencies and Entrustable Professional Activities to ensure that students possess the required knowledge, skills, and attitudes prior to graduation or program completion. The concept of competency-based approaches is growing in use in pharmacy education in the US, but the future related to aspects of this concept (e.g., mandatory Entrustable Professional Activities is not certain. A review of pharmacy education’s evolution in the US and a comparison of competency-related terms offers insight into the future use of competency-based approaches and CBE in pharmacy education in the US through the lens of benefits and challenges.

  7. Status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Khan, Seher A; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the current status of physiology education in US Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs. A survey instrument was developed and distributed through SurveyMonkey to American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Biological Sciences section members of 132 PharmD programs. Survey items focused on soliciting qualitative and quantitative information on the delivery of physiology curricular contents and faculty perceptions of physiology education. A total of 114 programs responded to the survey, resulting in a response rate of 86%. Out of 114 schools/colleges, 61 programs (54%) offered standalone physiology courses, and 53 programs (46%) offered physiology integrated with other courses. When integrated, the average contact hours for physiology contents were significantly reduced compared with standalone courses (30 vs. 84 h, P physiology contents. Eighty percent of the responding faculty (n = 204) agree/strongly agree that physiology is underemphasized in PharmD curriculum. Moreover, 67% of the respondents agree/strongly agree that physiology should be taught as a standalone foundational course. A wide variation in the depth and breadth of physiology course offerings in US PharmD programs remains. The reduction of physiology contents is evident when physiology is taught as a component of integrated courses. Given current trends that favor integrated curricula, these data suggest that additional collaboration among basic and clinical science faculty is required to ensure that physiology contents are balanced and not underemphasized in a PharmD curriculum. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. An international validation study of two achievement goal measures in a pharmacy education context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alrakaf S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Saleh Alrakaf,1 Ahmed Abdelmageed,2 Mary Kiersma,2 Sion A Coulman,3 Dai N John,3 June Tordoff,4 Claire Anderson,5 Ayman Noreddin,6 Erica Sainsbury,1 Grenville Rose,7 Lorraine Smith11Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Pharmacy, Manchester University, Fort Wayne, IN, USA; 3School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK; 4School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, NZ; 5School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; 6School of Pharmacy, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA; 7Aftercare, Sydney, NSW, AustraliaBackground: Achievement goal theory helps us understand what motivates students to participate in educational activities. However, measuring achievement goals in a precise manner is problematic. Elliot and McGregor's Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ and Elliot and Murayama's revised Achievement Goal Questionnaire (AGQ-R are widely used to assess students' achievement goals. Both instruments were developed and validated using undergraduate psychology students in the USA.Methods: In this study, our aims were to first of all, assess the construct validity of both questionnaires using a cohort of Australian pharmacy students and, subsequently, to test the generalizability and replicability of these tools more widely in schools of pharmacy in other English-speaking countries. The AGQ and the AGQ-R were administered during tutorial class time. Confirmatory factor analysis procedures, using AMOS 19 software, were performed to determine model fit.Results: In contrast to the scale developers' findings, confirmatory factor analysis supported a superior model fit for the AGQ compared with the AGQ-R, in all countries under study.Conclusion: Validating measures of achievement goal motivation for use in pharmacy education is necessary and has implications for future research. Based on these results, the AGQ will be used to conduct future cross-sectional and

  9. Continuing education and professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Edwina

    2002-01-01

    The success of a profession will be determined upon its education and training. A profession is required to encompass: a core body of knowledge; a set of ethical codes of practice; and have practitioners with humanistic qualities. In order to maintain the success of a profession it is necessary to have continuing education, which enhances professional development. Continuing professional education includes a form of self-regulation, which ensures the maintenance of a minimum standard of practice in this ever-changing workplace, and by regulating this standard, the discipline becomes more accountable to the client and the profession as a whole. In Australia, the Nuclear Medicine society's continuing education programs and Universities offering postgraduate programs promote continuing education. If technologists are to successfully keep up with developments in instrumentation, protocols and changing health care requirements, we must ensure that the education of practitioners does not cease at certification of entry to the workplace (Au)

  10. Two Approaches to Vocational Education and Training. A View from Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterfield, Jon

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on the relationship between theoretical knowledge and professional practice within pharmacy education. The discussion takes two different approaches to examine the selected literature. The first approach is concerned with how curriculum changes may potentially contribute to the improvement of professional practice. This…

  11. Evaluation of a Continuing Professional Development program for first year student pharmacists undergoing an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Tofade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a live and online training program for first year pharmacy students in implementing Continuing Professional Development (CPD principles (Reflect, Plan, Act, and Evaluate, writing SMART learning objectives, and documenting learning activities prior to and during a hospital introductory professional practice experience. Design: Cohort Study. Setting: Introductory professional practice experience. Participants: First year (PY1 students at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Intervention: Live training or online training to introduce the concept of Continuing Professional Development in practice. Main Outcomes: Implementation of CPD principles through 1 completed pre-rotation education action plans with specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound (SMART learning objectives; and 2 completed learning activity worksheets post-rotation indicating stimuli for learning, resources used and accomplished learning. objectives; and 3 documented suggestions and content feedback for future lectures and pharmaceutical care lab experiences. Results:Out of the whole cohort (N=154, 14 (87.5% live (in person trainees and 122 (88% online trainees submitted an education action plan. Objectives were scored using a rubric on a scale of 1-5. A rating of 5 means "satisfactory", 3 means "work in progress" and 1 means "unacceptable". There were significant differences between the mean live trainee scores and the mean online trainee scores for the following respective section comparisons: Specific 4.7 versus 3.29 (p Conclusion: Live trainees performed significantly better than online trainees in writing SMART learning objectives. With focused training, students are more capable of implementing principles of CPD.   Type: Original Research

  12. Evaluation of a guided continuous quality improvement program in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthammit, Chanadda; Rupp, Michael T; Armstrong, Edward P; Modisett, Tara; Snead, Rebecca P; Warholak, Terri L

    2017-01-01

    The importance of creating and sustaining a strong culture of patient safety has been recognized as a critical component of safe medication use. This study aims to assess changes in attitudes toward patient safety culture and frequency of quality-related event (QRE) reporting after guided implementation of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) program in a panel of community pharmacies in the United States (U.S.). Twenty-one community pharmacies volunteered to participate in the project and were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Pharmacy staff in the intervention group received guided training to ensure full implementation of a CQI program while those in the control group partially implemented the program. Pharmacy staff in both groups completed retrospective pre-post safety culture questionnaires and reported medication errors and near misses that occurred in their practices. Rasch analysis was applied to assess questionnaire validity and reliability and to confirm if the ordinal level data approximated interval level measures. Paired t-tests and repeated measure analysis of covariance tests were subsequently used to compare observed changes in the attitudes of subjects and frequency of QREs reporting in intervention and control groups. Sixty-nine employees completed the questionnaire, a 43.9% response rate. Improvement in attitudes toward patient safety was statistically significant in the intervention group in six domains: staff, training, and skill ( p  = 0.017); patient counseling ( p  = 0.043); communication about mistakes ( p  continuous improvement ( p  < 0.001); and overall patient safety perceptions ( p  = 0.033). No significant differences were observed in QRE reporting rates between intervention and control groups. However, differences were observed in the types of QREs reported (e.g., incorrect safety cap) and the point in the prescription processing workflow where a QRE was detected (e.g., partner check station, and drug

  13. The sustainability of improvements from continuing professional development in pharmacy practice and learning behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Karen J; Delate, Thomas; Newlon, Carey L

    2015-04-25

    To assess the long-term sustainability of continuing professional development (CPD) training in pharmacy practice and learning behaviors. This was a 3-year posttrial survey of pharmacists who had participated in an unblinded randomized controlled trial of CPD. The online survey assessed participants' perceptions of pharmacy practice, learning behaviors, and sustainability of CPD. Differences between groups on the posttrial survey responses and changes from the trial's follow-up survey to the posttrial survey responses within the intervention group were compared. Of the 91 pharmacists who completed the original trial, 72 (79%) participated in the sustainability survey. Compared to control participants, a higher percentage of intervention participants reported in the sustainability survey that they had utilized the CPD concept (45.7% vs 8.1%) and identified personal learning objectives (68.6% vs 43.2%) during the previous year. Compared to their follow-up survey responses, lower percentages of intervention participants reported identifying personal learning objectives (94.3% vs 68.6%), documenting their learning plan (82.9% vs 22.9%) and participating in learning by doing (42.9% vs 14.3%) in the sustainability survey. In the intervention group, many of the improvements to pharmacy practice items were sustained over the 3-year period but were not significantly different from the control group. Sustainability of a CPD intervention over a 3-year varied. While CPD-trained pharmacists reported utilizing CPD concepts at a higher rate than control pharmacists, their CPD learning behaviors diminished over time.

  14. The Faculties of Pharmacy Schools Should Make an Effort to Network with Community Pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    By law, medical faculties are mandated to have a designated partner hospital for the purposes of student practical training. In contrast, pharmacy faculties do not have such a legal requirement for student training in a community pharmacy setting. Nevertheless, there are several public and private universities that do have community pharmacies. However, there is no national university that has established both an educational hospital and a community pharmacy. When Kanazawa University (KU) established a graduate school with a clinical pharmacy course, the faculty of KU deemed it necessary to set up an independent community pharmacy for the purpose of practical training. Thus, in 2003, the Acanthus Pharmacy was set up as the first educational community pharmacy in Japan, managed by a nonprofit organization, with the permission of the Ishikawa Pharmaceutical Association and local community pharmacists. Since that time, Acanthus has managed a clinical pharmacy practice for students from both the undergraduate and graduate schools of KU. From 2006, the undergraduate pharmacy program was changed to a 6-year program, and the Acanthus Pharmacy has continued its roles in educating undergraduate pharmaceutical students, medical students, and as a site of early exposure for KU freshmen. From our experience, it is important to have a real clinical environment available to university pharmacy faculty and students, especially in training for community pharmacy practices.

  15. Interprofessional Education (IPE and Pharmacy in the UK. A Study on IPE Activities across Different Schools of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh Patel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education (IPE has been recognised internationally as a way to improve healthcare professional interactions and team working in order to enhance patient care. Since pharmacists are increasingly part of multi-professional healthcare teams and are expanding their clinical roles, many pharmacy regulators have stipulated IPE must be included in educational curricula. This study aimed to examine how different Schools of Pharmacy (SOPs in the UK implement IPE within their pharmacy course. Information about IPE was mainly obtained through interviews with staff from various SOPs. Nine telephone interviews were conducted which were analysed using a thematic analysis approach in order to derive common categories. These were identified as students, activities, barriers and facilitators and benefits of IPE. It was found that teaching methods used for IPE varied across SOPs. No standard strategy to deliver IPE was identified. Students were thought to value the IPE experience, especially the interaction with other professionals. The main barriers to implementing IPE arose from limited financial and organisational support. In general, many SOPs in the UK are undertaking IPE but challenges remain in establishing it as a routine part of the course, something which seems to echo difficulties in implementation of IPE both nationally and internationally.

  16. Confidentiality | Benatar | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Defining the Continuing Education Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, John K.

    1992-01-01

    A job description for continuing education practitioners includes 11 domains and the job responsibilities for each: client management, external marketing, internal marketing, strategic planning, administration, program development, technology management, adult learning, personal development, career management, and community and professional…

  18. A qualitative analysis of common concerns about challenges facing pharmacy experiential education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Jennifer; Craddick, Karen; Eccles, Dayl; Kwasnik, Abigail; O'Sullivan, Teresa A

    2015-02-17

    To qualitatively analyze free-text responses gathered as part of a previously published survey in order to systematically identify common concerns facing pharmacy experiential education (EE) programs. In 2011, EE directors at all 118 accredited pharmacy schools in the US were asked in a survey to describe the most pressing issues facing their programs. Investigators performed qualitative, thematic analysis of responses and compared results against demographic data (institution type, class size, number of practice sites, number and type of EE faculty member/staff). Expert and novice investigators identified common themes via an iterative process. To check validity, additional expert and novice reviewers independently coded responses. The Cohen kappa coefficient was calculated and showed good agreement between investigators and reviewers. Seventy-eight responses were received (66% response rate) representing 75% of publicly funded institutions and 71% of schools with class sizes 51-150. Themes identified as common concerns were site capacity, workload/financial support, quality assurance, preceptor development, preceptor stipends, assessment, onboarding, and support/recognition from administration. Good agreement (mean percent agreement 93%, ƙ range=0.59-0.92) was found between investigators and reviewers. Site capacity for student placements continues to be the foremost concern for many experiential education programs. New concerns about preceptor development and procedures for placing and orienting students at individual practice sites (ie, "onboarding") have emerged and must be addressed as new accreditation standards are implemented.

  19. A national survey on the current status of informatics residency education in pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blash, Anthony; Saltsman, Connie L; Steil, Condit

    2017-11-01

    Upon completion of their post-graduate training, pharmacy informatics residents need to be prepared to interact with clinical and technology experts in the new healthcare environment. This study describes pharmacy informatics residency programs within the United States. Preliminary information for all pharmacy informatics residency programs was accessed from program webpages. An email was sent out to programs asking them to respond to a six-item questionnaire. This questionnaire was designed to elicit information on attributes of the program, behaviors of the preceptors and residents, and attitudes of the residency directors. Of 22 pharmacy informatics residencies identified, nineteen (86%) participated. Twenty (91%) were second post-graduate year (PGY2) residencies. Ten (45%) were accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), while eight (36%) were candidates for accreditation. Hospital (17/22, 77%) and administrative offices (3/22, 14%) were the predominant training sites for pharmacy informatics residents. Large institutions were the predominant training environment for the pharmacy informatics resident, with 19 of 22 (86%) institutions reporting a licensed bed count of 500 or more. The median (range) number of informatics preceptors at a site was six to eight. Regarding barriers to pharmacy informatics residency education, residency directors reported that residents did not feel prepared based on the limited availability of curricular offerings. In the United States, relatively few residencies are explicitly focused on pharmacy informatics. Most of these are accredited and hospital affiliated, especially with large institutions (>500 beds). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Students' perceptions of and amount of diabetes education in Canadian schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Kerry; Mansell, Holly; Neubeker, Wendell; Drake, Haley

    2017-05-01

    To determine the amount of diabetes content taught at Canadian schools of pharmacy, and students' perceptions of diabetes education. Between September 23 and October 23, 2015, faculty members at each pharmacy school were asked to provide the amount of didactic, interactive, and elective hours devoted to diabetes education. These faculty members subsequently emailed an electronic web-survey to all fourth year pharmacy students to ascertain their perceptions of the amount of diabetes-related material they received and comfort level pertaining to diabetes education. Representatives from each pharmacy school (10/10; 100%) reported the amount of diabetes education provided at their schools (range of 18-43.5hours; mean 25.3hours). Student responses were obtained from 90% (9/10) of pharmacy schools; a total of 313/1216 (25.7%) students completed the questionnaire. The majority of pharmacy students (53.2%; 166/313) reported feeling the overall amount of diabetes content in their curriculum was just right while 46.2% (144/313) felt there was too little. 95.6% (299/313) disagreed diabetes received too much attention in the curriculum. A post-hoc analysis revealed that students who attended schools with more contact hours or a diabetes-specific elective felt more comfortable with dealing with certain diabetes patients and situations. Pharmacy schools vary in the amount of diabetes content taught in their curriculum. Students were split between feeling they received enough diabetes education or too little; students who received more content reported greater comfort in dealing with most diabetes patients and situations. This information is useful for pharmacy schools looking to evaluate their curricular diabetes content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. REMOTE TRAINING AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider two trends in teaching methods and tools chosen on the base of continuing education concept and challenges of the information society. Indeed, the modern post-school education requires improved efficiency and activity of training as it should or can be combined with productive activity of students. Here we discuss and analyze some trends of contemporary distance learning in order to include them into solution of lifelong learning problems. 

  2. Evaluation of a Continuing Professional Development program for first year student pharmacists undergoing an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Tofade, MS, PharmD, BCPS, CPCC, Pharmacotherapy Director, Wake Area Health Education Center and Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a live and online training program for first year pharmacy students in implementing Continuing Professional Development (CPD principles (Reflect, Plan, Act, and Evaluate, writing SMART learning objectives, and documenting learning activities prior to and during a hospital introductory professional practice experience.Design: Cohort Study. Setting: Introductory professional practice experience. Participants: First year (PY1 students at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Intervention: Live training or online training to introduce the concept of Continuing Professional Development in practice. Main Outcomes: Implementation of CPD principles through 1 completed pre-rotation education action plans with specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound (SMART learning objectives; and 2 completed learning activity worksheets post-rotation indicating stimuli for learning, resources used and accomplished learning. objectives; and 3 documented suggestions and content feedback for future lectures and pharmaceutical care lab experiences. Results: Out of the whole cohort (N=154, 14 (87.5% live (in person trainees and 122 (88% online trainees submitted an education action plan. Objectives were scored using a rubric on a scale of 1-5. A rating of 5 means “satisfactory”, 3 means “work in progress” and 1 means “unacceptable”. There were significant differences between the mean live trainee scores and the mean online trainee scores for the following respective section comparisons: Specific 4.7 versus 3.29 (p<0.001; Measurable 3.9 versus 2.05 (p<0.001; number of objectives 3.6 versus 4.6 (p<0.001; and average grade 92.9 versus 77.7 (p<0.001. Of the 396 learning activity worksheets reviewed, 75% selected discussion with peers and/or health providers as a stimulus for learning. Students reported spending an average of 50.2 hours completing the learning objectives. All

  3. Continuing Education for Distance Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassner, Mary; Adams, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Distance librarians as engaged professionals work in a complex environment of changes in technologies, user expectations, and institutional goals. They strive to keep current with skills and competencies to support distance learners. This article provides a selection of continuing education opportunities for distance librarians, and is relevant…

  4. Marketing Continuing Education for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide presents an overview of marketing and its potential value in continuing education programs for nurses. The first portion of the guide briefly discusses the concept of marketing. It contains definitions of key marketing concepts (product, place, price, and promotion), discussion of the basic tenets of marketing (consumer needs…

  5. Social media use and educational preferences among first-year pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauson, Kevin A; Singh-Franco, Devada; Sircar-Ramsewak, Feroza; Joseph, Shine; Sandars, John

    2013-01-01

    Social media may offer a means to engage students, facilitate collaborative learning, and tailor educational delivery for diverse learning styles. The purpose of this study is to characterize social media awareness among pharmacy students and determine perceptions toward integrating these tools in education. A 23-item survey was administered to 1st-year students at a multicampus college of pharmacy. Students (95% response rate; N = 196) most commonly used wikis (97%), social networking (91%), and videosharing (84%). Tools reported as never used or unknown included social bookmarking (89%), collaborative writing (84%), and RSS readers (73%). Respondents indicated that educational integration of social media would impact their ability to learn in a positive/very positive manner (75%) and make them feel connected/very connected (68%). Selectively targeting social media for educational integration and instructing pharmacy students how to employ a subset of these tools may be useful in engaging them and encouraging lifelong learning.

  6. End-of-life and palliative care education in US pharmacy schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, George E

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this endeavor was to ascertain the current status of end-of-life and palliative care within the curriculum of US pharmacy schools and compare to a similar 1986 study. Additionally, responses to recent professional guidelines for pharmacy schools regarding end-of-life issues can be addressed. A fixed-choice survey was mailed to the 125 US pharmacy schools with a 49% response rate. Results revealed that the lecture format of teaching on end-of-life issues continues to be used today with an increase in offerings and greater participation by students than in 1986. Recently established guidelines and standards regarding end-of-life issues for pharmacy schools are being addressed, thus today's pharmacists should be better prepared to relate to patients with terminal illnesses and their families than in 1986.

  7. Challenges to web-based learning in pharmacy education in Arabic language speaking countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ramez M Alkoudmani; Ramadan M Elkalmi

    2015-01-01

    Web-based learning and web 2.0 tools which include new online educational technologies (EdTech) and social media websites like Facebook® are playing crucial roles nowadays in pharmacy and medical education among millennial learners. Podcasting, webinars, and online learning management systems like Moodle® and other web 2.0 tools have been used in pharmacy and medical education to interactively share knowledge with peers and students. Learners can use laptops, iPads, iPhones, or tablet devices...

  8. Study Circles at the Pharmacy--A New Model for Diabetes Education in Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkadi, Anna; Rosenqvist, Urban

    1999-01-01

    Tests the feasibility of a one-year group education model for patients with type 2 diabetes in Sweden. Within study circles led by pharmacists, participants learned to self-monitor glucose, to interpret the results and to act upon them. Results show that study circles held at pharmacies are a feasible way of education persons with type 2 diabetes.…

  9. Self-perceived professional identity of pharmacy educators in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Sue; Boschmans, Shirley-Anne; Hoelson, Chris

    2013-12-16

    Objective. To identify, describe, and analyze the self-perceived professional identities of pharmacy educators within the South African context. Methods. Narrative interviews were conducted, recorded, and transcribed. Thematic analysis and interpretation of the transcripts were conducted using qualitative data analysis software. Results. Multiplicities of self-perceived professional identities were identified. All of these were multi-faceted and could be situated on a continuum between pharmacist identity on one end and academic identity on the other. In addition, 6 key determinants were recognized as underpinning the participants' self-perception of their professional identity. Conclusion. This study afforded a better understanding of who pharmacy educators in South Africa are as professionals. Moreover, the findings contribute to an international, collective understanding of the professional identity of pharmacy educators.

  10. Gifts and corporate influence in doctor of pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piascik, Peggy; Bernard, Daphne; Madhavan, Suresh; Sorensen, Todd D; Stoner, Steve C; TenHoeve, Tom

    2007-08-15

    To explore the nature of corporate gifts directed at PharmD programs and pharmacy student activities and the perceptions of administrators about the potential influences of such gifts. A verbally administered survey of administrative officials at 11 US colleges and schools of pharmacy was conducted and responses were analyzed. All respondents indicated accepting corporate gifts or sponsorships for student-related activities in the form of money, grants, scholarships, meals, trinkets, and support for special events, and cited many advantages to corporate partner relationships. Approximately half of the respondents believed that real or potential problems could occur from accepting corporate gifts. Forty-four percent of respondents agreed or strongly agreed that corporate contributions could influence college or school administration. Sixty-one percent agreed or strongly agreed that donations were likely to influence students. Corporate gifts do influence college and school of administration and students. Policies should be in place to manage this influence appropriately.

  11. An Investigation of Teaching and Learning Programs in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baia, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate published, peer-reviewed literature on pharmacy teaching and learning development programs and to synthesize existing data, examine reported efficacy and identify future areas for research. Methods. Medline and ERIC databases were searched for studies on teaching development programs published between 2001 and 2015. Results. Nineteen publications were included, representing 21 programs. Twenty programs were resident teaching programs, one program described faculty development. The majority of programs spanned one year and delivered instruction on teaching methodologies and assessment measures. All except one program included experiential components. Thirteen publications presented outcomes data; most measured satisfaction and self-perceived improvement. Conclusion. Published literature on teacher development in pharmacy is focused more on training residents than on developing faculty members. Although programs are considered important and highly valued by program directors and participants, little data substantiates that these programs improve teaching. Future research could focus on measurement of program outcomes and documentation of teaching development for existing faculty members. PMID:27293226

  12. An Investigation of Teaching and Learning Programs in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Aimee F; Baia, Patricia

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To investigate published, peer-reviewed literature on pharmacy teaching and learning development programs and to synthesize existing data, examine reported efficacy and identify future areas for research. Methods. Medline and ERIC databases were searched for studies on teaching development programs published between 2001 and 2015. Results. Nineteen publications were included, representing 21 programs. Twenty programs were resident teaching programs, one program described faculty development. The majority of programs spanned one year and delivered instruction on teaching methodologies and assessment measures. All except one program included experiential components. Thirteen publications presented outcomes data; most measured satisfaction and self-perceived improvement. Conclusion. Published literature on teacher development in pharmacy is focused more on training residents than on developing faculty members. Although programs are considered important and highly valued by program directors and participants, little data substantiates that these programs improve teaching. Future research could focus on measurement of program outcomes and documentation of teaching development for existing faculty members.

  13. Effectiveness of educational technology to improve patient care in pharmacy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael A; Benedict, Neal

    2015-02-17

    A review of the literature on the effectiveness of educational technologies to teach patient care skills to pharmacy students was conducted. Nineteen articles met inclusion criteria for the review. Seven of the articles included computer-aided instruction, 4 utilized human-patient simulation, 1 used both computer-aided instruction and human-patient simulation, and 7 utilized virtual patients. Educational technology was employed with more than 2700 students at 12 colleges and schools of pharmacy in courses including pharmacotherapeutics, skills and patient care laboratories, drug diversion, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) orientation. Students who learned by means of human-patient simulation and virtual patients reported enjoying the learning activity, whereas the results with computer-aided instruction were mixed. Moreover, the effect on learning was significant in the human-patient simulation and virtual patient studies, while conflicting data emerged on the effectiveness of computer-aided instruction.

  14. Assessing the Value of Online Learning and Social Media in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Leslie A; Franks, Andrea; Heidel, R Eric; McDonough, Sharon L K; Suda, Katie J

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To assess student preferences regarding online learning and technology and to evaluate student pharmacists' social media use for educational purposes. Methods. An anonymous 36-question online survey was administered to third-year student pharmacists enrolled in the Drug Information and Clinical Literature Evaluation course. Results. Four hundred thirty-one students completed the survey, yielding a 96% response rate. The majority of students used technology for academic activities, with 90% using smart phones and 91% using laptop computers. Fifty-eight percent of students also used social networking websites to communicate with classmates. Conclusion. Pharmacy students frequently use social media and some online learning methods, which could be a valuable avenue for delivering or supplementing pharmacy curricula. The potential role of social media and online learning in pharmacy education needs to be further explored.

  15. Challenges to web-based learning in pharmacy education in Arabic language speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramez M Alkoudmani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Web-based learning and web 2.0 tools which include new online educational technologies (EdTech and social media websites like Facebook® are playing crucial roles nowadays in pharmacy and medical education among millennial learners. Podcasting, webinars, and online learning management systems like Moodle® and other web 2.0 tools have been used in pharmacy and medical education to interactively share knowledge with peers and students. Learners can use laptops, iPads, iPhones, or tablet devices with a stable and good Internet connection to enroll in many online courses. Implementation of novel online EdTech in pharmacy and medical curricula has been noticed in developed countries such as European countries, the US, Canada, and Australia. However, these trends are scarce in the majority of Arabic language speaking countries (ALSC, where traditional and didactic educational methods are still being used with some exceptions seen in Palestine, Kuwait, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, UAE, and Qatar. Although these new trends are promising to push pharmacy and medical education forward, major barriers regarding adaptation of E-learning and new online EdTech in Arab states have been reported such as higher connectivity costs, information communication technology (ICT problems, language barriers, wars and political conflicts, poor education, financial problems, and lack of qualified ICT-savvy educators. More research efforts are encouraged to study the effectiveness and proper use of web-based learning and emerging online EdTech in pharmacy education not only in ALSC but also in developing and developed countries.

  16. Rufus A. Lyman: pharmacy's lamplighter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthen, Dennis B

    2009-08-28

    Rufus Ashley Lyman, a physician, was one of the most prominent leaders in US pharmacy education during the first half of the 20th century. He remains the only individual to be the founding dean at colleges of pharmacy at 2 state universities. His role in the creation and sustenance of the American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education provided a platform for a national community and a sounding board for faculty members and others interested in professional education. His efforts to increase pharmacy educational standards were instrumental in the abandonment of the 2-year graduate in pharmacy (PhG) degree and the universal acceptance of the 4-year bachelor of science (BS) degree. Lyman's simple approach and fierce championship of his beliefs led to his recognition as a lamplighter for the profession.Curt P. Wimmer, chair of the New York Branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association (now the American Pharmacists Association (APhA), introduced the 1947 Remington Honor Medalist, Rufus Ashley Lyman. Wimmer mentioned that Lyman worked as a lamplighter in Omaha, Nebraska, during medical school. Continuing the lamplighter analogy, Wimmer cited Lyman's work as a pharmacy educator and editor: "in the councils of your colleagues, your lamp became a torch emitting red hot sparks that often burnt and seared and scorched -- but always made for progress."1 This description provides an evocative image of one of the most prominent pharmacy educators and leaders of the first half of the 20th century.

  17. An Overview of Comic Books as an Educational Tool and Implications for Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagannath Muzumdar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present an overview of comic books as an educational tool and discuss the use of comic books in pharmacy education. Literature Identification: This research is comprised of a narrative literature review and critical analysis of the information retrieved. Key words included: comic(s, graphic novels, and pharmacy education. News articles, dissertations, theses, books, and scholarly articles from peer reviewed journals were selected and reviewed for inclusion in this article. Results: Comics have been used as a pedagogical tool to motivate students to read, help them remember the content, and make the whole learning process fun. They have been used as supplemental readings in biochemistry, physics, and business ethics. Comic books have been used in educating patients about the challenges of dialysis, promoting health, and informing consumers about diseases such as AIDS and cancer. Conclusion: In today’s media rich environment, comic books could be a visually interactive and innovative educational tool. Pharmacy faculty could use comic books or graphic novels as stand-alone texts or as part of a larger curriculum. Comic books could help students learn pharmacy-relevant content while enjoying the reading. Conflict of Interest The author declares no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties   Type: Review

  18. Opportunities of Continuing Adult Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Ušeckienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available After becoming the member state of the European Union, Lithuania undertook all the obligations of a member state. One of them is the implementation of The Lisbon Strategy aiming at the worlds most dynamic and competitive knowledge– based economy by 2010. Under the strategy, a stronger economy will drive job creation, sustainable development, and social inclusion. These changes demand the modernisation of education systems in the E U states, Lithuania among them. To achieve this objective, political forces came to an agreement on the future of Lithuanian education. In 2003 The Seimas of the Republic of Lithuania approved of National Education Strategy 2003–2012. This strategy is special not only because it is based on the experiences of the reform, addresses current and future world’s challenges and opportunities, maintains links with other strategic national reforms, but also emphasises efforts to ensure quality lifelong education for Lithuanian population and striving to become a partner in modern knowledge-based economy. Therefore, an extensive discussion on lifelong education strategies on individual and institution levels in all spheres of social and personal life has started in the E U and Lithuania. Nowadays lifelong learning is not just one aspect of education and training; it gradually is becoming the most important principle in the continuum of complex learning contexts. Such vision must be implemented this decade. The object of the research: the preconditions for the development of continuing adult education. The aim of the research: to examine the peculiarities of the preconditions for the development of continuing adult education in Pakruojis region. The methods of the research: analysis of references and documents on education; an anonymous survey in written form (a questionnaire; statistical analysis of data. The sample. The research was conducted in Pakruojis region in January-April, 2006. 300 respondents of different age

  19. The Value of Example Solutions in Pharmacy Education: The role of seniority and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Hansen, Helle Rüsz; Baldursdóttir, Stefanía Guðlaug

    2011-01-01

    Background: Example solutions to problem sets and exams are provided in the majority of pharmacy courses at the University of Copenhagen. Aims: Since the impact and usage of examples solutions are unknown, we wanted to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of the usage of example solutions...... as an educational tool¬. Method: 164 Danish pharmacy program students answered a questionnaire and answers were analyzed using non-parametric tests. Results: We found that example solutions encourage deep learning strategies among students. Furthermore, the study identified significant differences in the students...

  20. Best practices for implementing team-based learning in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farland, Michelle Z; Sicat, Brigitte L; Franks, Andrea S; Pater, Karen S; Medina, Melissa S; Persky, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    Colleges and schools of pharmacy are incorporating more team-based learning (TBL) into their curriculum. Published resources are available to assist instructors with implementing TBL and describing it in the health professions literature. The 7 core elements include: team formation, readiness assurance, immediate feedback, sequencing of in-class problem solving, the 4 "S" structure for developing team application exercises (significant problem, same problem, specific answer choice, simultaneous reporting), incentive structure, and peer evaluation. This paper summarizes best practices related to implementation of TBL in pharmacy education, including courses taught using teaching teams.

  1. Interprofessional education involving medical and pharmacy students during transitions of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Carrie; Arnoldi, Jennifer; Moose, Helen; Hingle, Susan T

    2017-05-01

    The transition of care from hospital to home is susceptible to clinical errors and adverse drug events. Despite this risk and the benefits of an interprofessional approach to patient care, medicine and pharmacy do not often collaborate during transitions of care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an interprofessional education experience consisting of medical and pharmacy students performing transitions of care. A total of 88 students (13 pharmacy students and 75 medical students) participated and were surveyed before and after the experience, to evaluate their confidence in performing aspects of the transition of care process as well as their attitudes towards interprofessional care. Pharmacy students had higher baseline levels of confidence compared with the medical students, and both student groups revealed a significantly greater level of confidence in their abilities after the experience. The impact of the experience on students' attitudes towards interprofessional care varied, with medical students showing very little change from baseline and pharmacy students showing improved attitudes in several areas. The results of this study have positive implications for an interprofessional approach to transitions of care while highlighting potential future areas of study.

  2. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to providing contraceptive information and counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Peter; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate pharmacy staff perspectives of a 2-year pharmacy intervention aimed at reducing unintended pregnancy in 18- to 30-year-old women. Pharmacy staff completed a 48-item, self-administered paper survey consisting of scaled and open-ended questions. 55 community pharmacies in 12 Iowa counties. All pharmacy staff participated, including pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and other pharmacy employees. Online continuing education (CE) training was made available to all pharmacy staff. Promotional materials including posters, brochures, and shelf talkers were displayed in all of the pharmacies. Pharmacy staff perceptions and self-reported behaviors related to displaying posters, brochures, and shelf talkers in their pharmacies and providing contraceptive information and counseling to patients/customers. A total of 192 (43% return rate) pharmacy staff responded. Only 44% of respondents consistently provided contraceptive information and counseling, yet more than 90% felt that talking with patients/customers about contraceptives was easy, and more than 50% could do so privately. The study showed increased pharmacy staff desire to make this topic a priority. Community pharmacy staff can play a key role in educating and counseling young adult women about contraceptive health and pregnancy planning. This study indicates that staff are comfortable providing this service and that patients/customers are open to receiving guidance from pharmacists. However, pharmacy staff are missing additional opportunities to provide information and counseling. There is also a need for greater attention to provision of nonprescription contraceptive education.

  3. Evaluation of a Unique Interprofessional Education Program Involving Medical and Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagge, Jeff J; Lee-Poy, Michael F; Richard, Cynthia L

    2017-12-01

    Objective. To measure changes in interprofessional competencies among pharmacy and medical students following a half-day event focusing on interprofessional learning. Methods. There were 118 pharmacy students and 28 medical students who participated in the Healthcare Interprofessional Education Day (HIPED) which consisted of three stations (communication, patient interviewing, and prescribing) in which pharmacy and medical students had to work collaboratively. The standardized Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Results. There were 133 surveys completed for a response rate of 91%. All 20 items measured by the ICCAS showed a significant improvement. The strongest effect sizes were in the collaboration, roles & responsibilities, and collaborative practice/family-centered approach categories. The least robust effects were in the conflict management/resolution category. Conclusion. The HIPED activity was an effective IPE experience. The strong and consistent improvement in all ICCAS scores suggest a framework for pharmacy and medical school training to move from siloed educational experiences to synergistic learning opportunities.

  4. Global Health Education in Doctor of Pharmacy Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Gina M; Vu, Betty N; Alsharif, Naser Z; Prescott, William Allan

    2017-03-25

    Objective. To determine the extent and manner in which global health education is taught at US PharmD programs. Methods. A pre-tested 40-question electronic survey instrument was developed and sent to each of the 127 accredited or candidate-status US doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) programs. Results. Twenty-eight public and 27 private PharmD programs responded to the survey (43.3%). Twenty-five (45.5%) programs had integrated global health topics into their required didactic curriculum, and 30 of 52 programs (57.7%) offered at least one standalone global health elective course. Of the 52 programs that provided details regarding experiential education, 41 (78.8%) offered introductory and/or advanced pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs and/or APPEs) in global health, and 34 (65.4%) programs offered medical mission trips. Conclusion. Doctor of pharmacy programs participating in global health education most commonly educate students on global health through experiential learning, while inclusion of required and elective coursework in global health was less common. To adequately prepare students for an increasingly global society, US PharmD programs should consider expanding global health education.

  5. The description and evaluation of virtual worlds in clinical pharmacy education in Northern Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Maria; Englund, Claire; Gallego, Gisselle

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate the use of a three-dimensional virtual world (3DVW) in a clinical pharmacy course. Students are provided with training opportunities in simulated ward rounds and patient meetings in a 3DVW. The 3DVW enables students to practice communication with patients and colleagues in a professional manner. To evaluate the course and use of the 3DVW, an online course evaluation was completed by students after they had finished the clinical pharmacy course. Forty-two students completed the online course evaluation (62%). Most students (83%) reported that they could adopt the role of a clinical pharmacist in the 3DVW. Sixty percent reported that the environment felt authentic, although some noted that "it can never be quite the same as sitting next to a real person to talk". More than half of the students (66%) described the use of the 3DVW as a worthwhile exercise. The majority (93%) rated the overall quality of the course as good or very good, with 76% reporting that the pedagogical design of the course helped them with their studies. Students at Umeå University valued the use of 3DVWs in clinical pharmacy teaching. However, there is a need to make the virtual environment more realistic and easier to use. The invaluable feedback gathered from students will help to improve the future use of virtual worlds in pharmacy education. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Knowledge and attitudes about smoking cessation among pharmacy technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillich, Alan J; Aquilino, Mary L; Farris, Karen B

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of pharmacy technicians before and after attending a continuing education program about smoking cessation. A pre/post survey of a single group. Two statewide meetings of the Iowa Pharmacy Association. Pharmacy technicians. One 2-hour continuing education (CE) course about smoking cessation for pharmacy technicians. Changes in scores before and after the CE sessions among three domains (knowledge, efficacy, and outcome) of a validated survey instrument. Fifty-one technicians completed both the presession and postsession questionnaire. For the three survey domains, technicians' knowledge (P = .034), efficacy (P < .001), and outcome (P < .001) showed significant improvement between the presession and postsession surveys (Wilcoxon signed rank test). Pharmacy technicians who attended a CE program on smoking cessation improved their knowledge, attitudes, and self-confidence in helping smokers quit. Additional research should be conducted to test the role of pharmacy technicians in smoking cessation promotion.

  7. Peer teaching as an educational tool in Pharmacy schools; fruitful or futile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburahma, Mona Hassan; Mohamed, Heba Moustafa

    2017-11-01

    In the past decade, various health care programs have implemented diverse types of peer-assisted learning (PAL) programs, in particularly peer teaching (PT), due to their reported benefits for students (both those undertaking teaching and those being taught), teachers, and educational institutes. Unfortunately, peer teaching is still under-recognized in pharmacy programs worldwide when compared to other health care programs. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the published literature centered on formal PT programs that are implemented in pharmacy schools. In addition, this review focuses on the methodologies adopted for peer teacher recruitment and training as well as the benefits gained by students (both those undertaking teaching and those being taught). The rationales behind PT implementation are recapitulated as well. Finally, a simple scheme for successful implementation of PT activity is provided to serve as a groundwork for educators. Pre-defined key terms were used to search for experimental peer teaching activities in pharmacy schools between January 2000 and June 2016. Titles were selected based on pre-set eligibility criteria. Only complete research articles with clear design and evaluation sections were included in this review. Studies about inter-professional peer teaching activities between pharmacy students and other healthcare professions were also included. Six relevant educational research articles containing peer teaching activities were included. A lot of variety exists between different pharmacy courses implementing PT, the format/setting of PT, how peer teachers are selected, and how training and evaluation are implemented. The studies reviewed confirmed that PT was well received by most of the students and had a positive impact on their learning outcome. These findings cannot be generalized due to the insufficient number of studies published beside their methodological limitations and inadequate descriptions of the PT format

  8. Systematic Education of Self-Medication at Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narui, Koji; Samizo, Kazuo; Inoue, Michiko; Watanabe, Kinzo

    2016-01-01

    The promotion of self-medication by pharmacies, with the aim of encouraging a patient's self-selection of proper OTC drug, is written about in the national action plan "Japan is Back". The subject of self-medication has been improved in the 2013 revised edition of "Model Core Curriculum for Pharmaceutical Education". At Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, the systematic education of self-medication was started from the onset of the six-year course in the third, fourth and fifth grade. We introduce here a new approach in our systematic education of self-medication. In the practice of the fourth grade, groups of around 5-6 students are formed. The pharmacy students assume various roles-of pharmacist, rater, observer, and chairman-and perform role-playing. We prepared a standardized patient (SP) showing various symptoms. The student of the role of pharmacist asks about the SP's symptoms, chooses an OTC drug suitable for the SP, and explains the OTC drug to the SP. After the role-playing, those in the roles of rater, observer, SP, and faculty give feedback to the student who played the role of pharmacist. Because we conduct this role-playing using SPs with a variety of symptoms, we can create a situation similar to a real drugstore.

  9. A longitudinal online interprofessional education experience involving family nurse practitioner students and pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Andrea; Broeseker, Amy; Cunningham, Jill; Cortes, Cyndi; Beall, Jennifer; Bigham, Amy; Chang, Jongwha

    2017-03-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) continues to gain traction worldwide. Challenges integrating IPE into health profession programmes include finding convenient times, meeting spaces, and level-appropriate assignments for each profession. This article describes the implementation of a 21-month prospective cohort study pilot programme for the Master of Science in nursing family nurse practitioner (FNP) and doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students at a private university in the United States. This IPE experience utilised a blended approach for the learning activities; these students had initial and final sessions where they met face-to-face, with asynchronous online activities between these two sessions. The online assignments, discussions, and quizzes during the pilot programme involved topics such as antimicrobial stewardship, hormone replacement therapy, human papilloma virus vaccination, prenatal counselling, emergency contraception, and effects of the Affordable Care Act on practice. The results suggested that the FNP students held more favourable attitudes about online IPE and that the PharmD students reported having a clearer understanding of their own roles and those of the other participating healthcare students. However, the students also reported wanting more face-to-face interaction during their online IPE experience. Implications from this study suggest that effective online IPE can be supported by ensuring educational parity between students regarding the various topics discussed and a consistent approach of the required involvement for all student groups is needed. In addition, given the students desire for more face-to-face interaction, it may be beneficial to offer online IPE activities for a shorter time period. It is anticipated that this study may inform other programmes that are exploring innovative approaches to provide IPE to promote effective collaboration in patient care.

  10. A Faculty Toolkit for Formative Assessment in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Alston, Greg L; Bird, Eleanora; Buring, Shauna M; Kelley, Katherine A; Murphy, Nanci L; Schlesselman, Lauren S; Stowe, Cindy D; Szilagyi, Julianna E

    2014-11-15

    This paper aims to increase understanding and appreciation of formative assessment and its role in improving student outcomes and the instructional process, while educating faculty on formative techniques readily adaptable to various educational settings. Included are a definition of formative assessment and the distinction between formative and summative assessment. Various formative assessment strategies to evaluate student learning in classroom, laboratory, experiential, and interprofessional education settings are discussed. The role of reflective writing and portfolios, as well as the role of technology in formative assessment, are described. The paper also offers advice for formative assessment of faculty teaching. In conclusion, the authors emphasize the importance of creating a culture of assessment that embraces the concept of 360-degree assessment in both the development of a student's ability to demonstrate achievement of educational outcomes and a faculty member's ability to become an effective educator.

  11. Educators' Interprofessional Collaborative Relationships: Helping Pharmacy Students Learn to Work with Other Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Anne; Smith, Tony; Fisher, Karin; Littlejohns, Sonja

    2016-03-30

    Similar to other professions, pharmacy educators use workplace learning opportunities to prepare students for collaborative practice. Thus, collaborative relationships between educators of different professions are important for planning, implementing and evaluating interprofessional learning strategies and role modelling interprofessional collaboration within and across university and workplace settings. However, there is a paucity of research exploring educators' interprofessional relationships. Using collaborative dialogical inquiry we explored the nature of educators' interprofessional relationships in a co-located setting. Data from interprofessional focus groups and semi-structured interviews were interpreted to identify themes that transcended the participants' professional affiliations. Educators' interprofessional collaborative relationships involved the development and interweaving of five interpersonal behaviours: being inclusive of other professions; developing interpersonal connections with colleagues from other professions; bringing a sense of own profession in relation to other professions; giving and receiving respect to other professions; and being learner-centred for students' collaborative practice . Pharmacy educators, like other educators, need to ensure that interprofessional relationships are founded on positive experiences rather than vested in professional interests.

  12. The influence of learning environment on trainee pharmacy technicians' education and training experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafheutle, Ellen I; Jee, Samuel D; Willis, Sarah C

    2017-12-16

    In Great Britain (GB), pharmacy technicians (PTs) are registered professionals, with their education and training regulated; little is known about this or the learning environment in which it takes place. This study aimed to profile recently registered pre-registration trainee pharmacy technicians (PTPTs) in GB and capture views on PTPTs' training experiences, focussing on differences in community and hospital settings. A mixed methods study was conducted in 2013-14, following university ethics approval. One-to-one, semi-structured telephone interviews with face-to-face and distance education providers, and hospital and community pharmacy employers of PTPTs explored views on education delivery, work-based learning, and assessment. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, analysed thematically and findings informed design of a census survey of all 1457 recently registered PTs, investigating satisfaction with various aspects of their training. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS v20, employing comparative statistics (Mann-Whitney U, Chi-Square). Six-hundred and forty-six questionnaires were returned (response rate 44.3%), 632 were usable. Three-quarters (75.9%) of respondents had trained in community; the majority (88.0%) were female, the average age was 35.26 ± 10.22. Those based in hospitals were more satisfied with their training: hospital trainees worked in larger teams and tended to be better supported, they had more study time, and were more likely to complete their training in the intended two-year period. Interviews with staff in 17 Further Education colleges, 6 distance providers, 16 community pharmacies and 15 NHS organisations confirmed survey findings and offered explanations into why differences in training experiences may exist. This study has identified differences between PTPTs' work-based experiences in hospital and community pharmacy. Perceiving PTPTs as 'apprentices' vs. 'employees' may define how their training is managed by employers

  13. Teaching and learning curriculum programs: recommendations for postgraduate pharmacy experiences in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; Brown, Bonnie; Gettig, Jacob; Martello, Jay L; McClendon, Katie S; Smith, Kelly M; Teeters, Janet; Ulbrich, Timothy R; Wegrzyn, Nicole; Bradley-Baker, Lynette R

    2014-08-01

    Recommendations for the development and support of teaching and learning curriculum (TLC) experiences within postgraduate pharmacy training programs are discussed. Recent attention has turned toward meeting teaching- and learning-related educational outcomes through a programmatic process during the first or second year of postgraduate education. These programs are usually coordinated by schools and colleges of pharmacy and often referred to as "teaching certificate programs," though no national standards or regulation of these programs currently exists. In an effort to describe the landscape of these programs and to develop a framework for their basic design and content, the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Pharmacy Practice Section's Task Force on Student Engagement and Involvement, with input from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, reviewed evidence from the literature and conference proceedings and considered author experience and expertise over a two-year period. The members of the task force created and reached consensus on a policy statement and 12 recommendations to guide the development of best practices of TLC programs. The recommendations address topics such as the value of TLC programs, program content, teaching and learning experiences, feedback for participants, the development of a teaching portfolio, the provision of adequate resources for TLC programs, programmatic assessment and improvement, program transparency, and accreditation. TLC programs provide postgraduate participants with valuable knowledge and skills in teaching applicable to the practitioner and academician. Postgraduate programs should be transparent to candidates and seek to ensure the best experiences for participants through systematic program implementation and assessments. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mixing Metaphors in Pharmacy Education is a Bad Solution for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly discussion has recently been directed toward the negative effects of consumerism in pharmacy education. Frequently in these discussions, the metaphor of student-as-customer is cited as an indicator of such consumer mentality. However, the customer metaphor is more deeply entangled in the thinking on this matter than has been acknowledged, even for those who roundly criticize its use. A richer understanding of the power of metaphor and of the fiducial obligations that underlie professionalism can help to create educational paradigms more likely to meet the best interests of students, faculty members, and the general public. PMID:25657362

  15. Mixing metaphors in pharmacy education is a bad solution for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlatic, Thomas D

    2014-12-15

    Scholarly discussion has recently been directed toward the negative effects of consumerism in pharmacy education. Frequently in these discussions, the metaphor of student-as-customer is cited as an indicator of such consumer mentality. However, the customer metaphor is more deeply entangled in the thinking on this matter than has been acknowledged, even for those who roundly criticize its use. A richer understanding of the power of metaphor and of the fiducial obligations that underlie professionalism can help to create educational paradigms more likely to meet the best interests of students, faculty members, and the general public.

  16. Nourishing Professional Practice: Continuing Education in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinneer, James W.

    The literature on continuing education (CE) in dietetics was reviewed. The review focused on the following: motivators and barriers for participation in continuing dietetic education, formats for CE in dietetics, and approaches to assessing learner needs. The role of professional associations, the existence of voluntary credentialing programs, the…

  17. 4-H Volunteer Continuing Education Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Ken, III; Bullock, Leslie R.

    2017-01-01

    The 4-H Volunteer Continuing Education Academy was developed to provide 4-H club leaders a continuing education opportunity, to assist them in developing and enhancing the skills and knowledge necessary for their volunteer role, and to provide a means for 4-H livestock and horse club leaders to recertify. All participants reported satisfaction…

  18. Hospital pharmacy practice in Saudi Arabia: Drug monitoring and patient education in the Riyadh region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsultan, Mohammed S; Mayet, Ahmed Y; Khurshid, Fowad; Al-Jedai, Ahmed H

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this national survey is to evaluate hospital pharmacy practice in the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia. The results of the survey pertaining to the monitoring and patient education of the medication use process were presented. We have invited pharmacy directors from all 48 hospitals in the Riyadh region to participate in a modified-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) survey questionnaire. The survey was conducted using similar methods to those of the ASHP surveys. The response rate was 60.4% (29/48). Most hospitals (23, 79%) had pharmacists regularly monitor medication therapy for patients. Of these hospitals, 61% had pharmacists monitoring medication therapy daily for less than 26% of patients, 17% monitored 26-50% of patients and 22% monitored more than half of patients daily. In 41% of hospitals, pharmacists routinely monitored serum medication concentrations or their surrogate markers; 27% gave pharmacists the authority to order initial serum medication concentrations, and 40% allowed pharmacists to adjust dosages. Pharmacists routinely documented their medication therapy monitoring activities in 52% of hospitals. Overall, 74% of hospitals had an adverse drug event (ADE) reporting system, 59% had a multidisciplinary committee responsible for reviewing ADEs, and 63% had a medication safety committee. Complete electronic medical record (EMR) systems were available in 15% of hospitals and 81% had a partial EMR system. The primary responsibility for performing patient medication education lays with nursing (37%), pharmacy (37%), or was a shared responsibility (26%). In 44% of hospitals, pharmacists provided medication education to half or more inpatients and in a third of hospitals, pharmacists gave medication education to 26% or more of patients at discharge. Hospital pharmacists in the Riyadh region are actively engaged in monitoring medication therapy and providing patient medication education, although there is considerable

  19. Continuing Medical Education: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  20. An Overview of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Interprofessional education, continuing interprofessional education, interprofessional collaboration, and interprofessional care are moving to the forefront of approaches with the potential to reorganize the delivery of health professions education and health care practice. This article discusses 7 key trends in the scholarship and practice of…

  1. Providing Continuing Education for International Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Debra L

    2015-10-01

    In an increasingly globalized world, providing continuing education (CE) for nurses is becoming a more common opportunity for U.S. educators. It is important for educators to provide CE programs in a culturally competent and sensitive environment. The challenges involved include effective communication, appropriate teaching methodologies, contextually appropriate content, and awareness of cultural-specific needs and customs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Information and Communication Technologies and Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada. A Survey of Providers Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memorial Univ., St. John's (Newfoundland).

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in continuing health professional education (CHPE) was examined in a national survey of Canadian CHPE providers. Of the 3,044 surveys distributed to schools of medicine, nursing, and pharmacy, national/provincial health professional associations, nonprofit health advocacy organizations,…

  3. A comprehensive systematic review of pharmacy perspectives on interprofessional education and collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awaisi, Alla; Joseph, Sundari; El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Diack, Lesley

    2017-11-02

    Pharmacists are key professionals in the collaborative working process and are integral members of the healthcare team. However, there is paucity of information regarding their perspectives towards interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice. The aim of this systematic review is to synthesise, summarise and evaluate the quality of the quantitative and qualitative literature related to the perspectives of pharmacy students, pharmacy faculty and practising pharmacists toward IPE and collaborative practice. The perspectives included their views, experiences and attitudes with a special focus on their perceived benefits and challenges in relation to IPE and collaborative practice. An integrated mixed method systematic review was conducted. Four electronic databases were searched for articles published in English between 2000 and 2015. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool (MMAT) was used to assess the quality of the studies. Twenty-nine articles were identified meeting the selection criteria from the first initial search of 8512 articles. Seventeen articles (59%) targeted pharmacy students, 11 articles (38%) focused on practising pharmacists and 1 study (3%) was related to pharmacy faculty. The majority of studies were conducted in the United States (n = 13), were published in the last five years (83%, n = 24) and employed quantitative methods (52%, n = 15). The two commonly used survey instruments to measure the perspectives were: different versions of the RIPLS (35%, n = 6) and the IEPS scale (35%, n = 6). Fourteen of the 29 studies were rated as low quality (MMAT = 25%), eight studies were rated as average quality (MMAT = 50%), four were rated as high quality (MMAT 75%) and three were rated as very poor quality (MMAT 0%). No studies were rated with 100% MMAT quality. Overall, the findings suggest that pharmacy students, practicing pharmacists and faculty valued interprofessional education and collaborative practice and had positive

  4. Effectiveness of problem-based learning in Chinese pharmacy education: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen; Huang, Chunji; Xu, Rufu; Zhang, Zuo; Zeng, Shengya; Qian, Guisheng

    2016-01-19

    This review provides a critical overview of problem-based learning (PBL) practices in Chinese pharmacy education. PBL has yet to be widely applied in pharmaceutical education in China. The results of those studies that have been conducted are published in Chinese and thus may not be easily accessible to international researchers. Therefore, this meta-analysis was carried out to review the effectiveness of PBL. Databases were searched for studies in accordance with the inclusion criteria. Two reviewers independently performed the study identification and data extraction. A meta-analysis was conducted using Revman 5.3 software. Sixteen randomized controlled trials were included. The meta-analysis revealed that PBL had a positive association with higher theoretical scores (SMD = 1.17, 95% CI [0.77, 11.57], P education. PBL methods could be an optional, supplementary method of pharmaceutical teaching in China. However, Chinese pharmacy colleges and universities should revise PBL curricula according to their own needs, which would maximize the effectiveness of PBL.

  5. News bites: International | Bateman | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 8 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Implementing a pediatric pharmacy educational program for health-system pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Rachel S; Costello-Curtin, Jennifer

    2011-12-15

    To implement an educational program to improve pediatric content knowledge and confidence in providing pediatric care among health-system pharmacists. Pharmacists were asked to voluntarily participate in this prospective, observational education program. A demographic assessment, pre- and post-intervention confidence assessments, and pre- and post-lecture competency assessments were conducted to evaluate the program. Five of the 6 confidence scores improved from the preintervention to the postintervention stage. Test scores for 2 of the 8 postlecture tests improved significantly, and the average test scores for all postlecture tests combined were significantly higher than those for the prelecture tests. This study demonstrated significant improvements in both confidence and competence in pediatric pharmacotherapy among health-system pharmacists following implementation of a pediatric pharmacy education program.

  7. A Reflection on Continuing Professional Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Barrie

    2017-01-01

    Barrie Brennan's thesis entitled "Continuing Professional Education in Australia. A Tale of Missed Opportunities" offers a history of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the Australian context. This paper arose from Brennan's research for his thesis and is focused on issues that arose from the introduction of Australia's…

  8. An Anatomy of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Continuing interprofessional education is the means by which experienced health, social care, and other practitioners learn with, from, and about each other, formally and informally, to improve their collective practice and to cultivate closer collaboration. It applies principles of interprofessional education through media commonly employed in…

  9. The SHEFC Review of Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Critiques a Scottish proposal to convert liberal adult education into credit-bearing courses for funding purposes. Argues that this would reduce access and narrow curricular offerings for certain groups and that wholesale accreditation should not displace all other agendas and goals for adult and continuing education. (SK)

  10. Continuities, Discontinuities, Interactions: Values, Education, and Neuroethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semetsky, Inna

    2009-01-01

    This article begins by revisiting the current model of values education (moral education) which has recently been set up in Australian schools. This article problematizes the pedagogical model of teaching values in the direct transmission mode from the perspective of the continuity of experience as central to the philosophies of John Dewey and…

  11. Research Areas in Adult and Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Röbken, Heinke; Ehrenspeck-Kolasa, Yvonne; von Ossietzky, Carl

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon a Delphi study carried out by Zawacki-Richter (2009) which posited a validated classification of research areas in the special area of distance education. We now replicate the study for the broader field of adult and continuing education (ACE). The aims of this paper are: firstly, to develop a categorisation of research…

  12. Continuing Professional Education in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiman, Ashley; Zacharakis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The military relies on continuing professional education as a key component to the success of its organization. With decreasing budgets and increasing importance for a force that operates efficiently and thinks critically, the cognitive tension among training, education, and learning comes center stage.

  13. Continuous professional development of educators: the state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous Professional Development (CPD) for educators should form an integral part of an education system. CPD should include diverse programmes that are reflective and that promote and embrace technological development. Such programmes would make it possible to respond to challenges brought about by ...

  14. Evaluation of Qatari and Canadian Pharmacy Students Learning Together about Cultural Competency using Videoconference Educational Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Jorgenson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pharmacists are under pressure to provide patient centered care within increasingly culturally diverse settings. Pharmacy schools play an important role in educating learners regarding culture and its impact on patient care. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine if a novel cultural competency learning activity, which involved students from two culturally and ethnically different pharmacy schools learning together using videoconference education activities, improved: (1 student knowledge and confidence pertaining to cultural competency concepts, (2 attitudes and perceptions towards being a culturally competent pharmacist, and (3 academic performance related to cultural competency case studies. Methods: Pharmacy students from Qatar University in Doha, Qatar (n=25 and the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada (n=85 participated in a cultural competency activity comprised of small group work on a patient case study, followed by tutorial discussions. Some Canadian students (n=31/85 worked collaboratively (via video conference with the students from Qatar. The evaluation used a convergent mixed methods design comprised of: (1 a pre and post session survey measuring student knowledge and confidence; (2 pre and post session student self-reflections; and, (3 student academic performance on care plans and an observed structured clinical exam (OSCE. Results: The survey identified small but statistically significant (p<0.05 improvements in knowledge and confidence with respect to 11 of the 12 questionnaire items in the students from Canada and 2 of the 12 items in the students from Qatar. The self-reflections found that 44.4% (n=36/81 of students who completed the pre and post reflective questions reported a change in knowledge and attitudes regarding cultural competency, but a reason for the change was not evident. Student grades on the cultural competency care plans and the OSCE were not different between the

  15. Experiences and Perceptions of Pharmacy Students on Practical Skills and Education During Clinical Rotations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Bandari, Deepak Kumar; Gogikar, Sudhir Kumar; Elnour, Asim Ahmed; Shehab, Abdulla

    2017-08-01

    Objective. To investigate the overall experience of pharmacy students in India during their clinical rotations and their assessment of primary mentors in imparting the intended clinical skills. Methods. A prospective cross-sectional study using a self-administered survey instrument containing 34 items to obtain feedback from senior PharmD students in the latter three years of their six-year program from November 2014 to February 2015. Results. Of the 415 PharmD students invited for this survey, 261(63% response rate) completed the survey (54% males and 46% females). Of the surveyed participants, 74% were fifth- and final-year interns undertaking clinical training in private hospitals (60.9%). Interestingly, 37.9% of the students ranked their clinical training as "least satisfactory" and remarked that their clinical pharmacy services were not recognized or appreciated in their respective hospitals (42.9%). However, 20% of the students expressed that their site "definitely" provided them with the opportunity to hone clinical pharmacy skills. Only 10% of the students strongly agreed that their mentors encouraged them to use resource materials and learn on their own, met with them regularly to review their work and to provide feedback, and encouraged them to express their opinion in patient-care issues. Conclusion. Majority of PharmD students who completed the survey were "least satisfied" with their clinical training program. Mentors should take more effort to demonstrate practice-based clinical training and provide patient-centered education to PharmD students at their clinical sites.

  16. An Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice Model for Dentistry and Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch-Mays, Grishondra L; Pittenger, Amy L; Williamson, Kristyn; Milone, Anna; Hein, Emily; Thierer, Todd

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of an interprofessional education and collaborative practice model (IECPM) developed by the School of Dentistry (SOD) and College of Pharmacy (COP) for the University of Minnesota dental clinics and to report results of the needs assessment using specific primary care metrics and medication histories gathered through use of the model in 2015-16. Planning focused on establishing a workflow to implement the IECPM by the SOD and COP. The interprofessional team that provided patient care for the study consisted of 50 dental students, ten dental therapy students, one pharmacy student, one pharmacy resident, one faculty pharmacist, one dental assistant, one faculty dental hygienist, and two dentists. The team selected 190 patients in the SOD clinic for the study based on the inclusion criteria: patients with two or more chronic medical conditions who were taking medications. The 190 patients received a comprehensive dental exam, review of social and medical history, and medication therapy management assessment by the interprofessional team. Specific core primary care metrics (blood pressure, pulse, tobacco use, and diabetes status) and identification of drug therapy problems (DTPs) were monitored and/or screened for during the dental visit. The results showed that the IECPM helped identify that this cohort of patients presented with chronic conditions: 64% had hypertension, 34% had diabetes, and 10.5% reported smoking cigarettes. Several DTPs were identified, of which "needs additional drug therapy" was the most common. This cohort was taking multiple medications (2-34 per patient) to address a variety of medical conditions. The study concluded that the IECPM with the SOD and COP helped address a primary care need that often goes unmet in dental clinics.

  17. Science of safety topic coverage in experiential education in US and Taiwan colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek H; Warholak, Terri L; Slack, Marion K; Malone, Daniel C; Gau, Churn-Shiouh

    2011-12-15

    To compare the science of safety (SoS) topic coverage and associated student competencies in the experiential education curricula of colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Taiwan. The experiential education director, assistant director, or coordinator at a random sample of 34 US colleges and schools of pharmacy and all 7 Taiwan schools of pharmacy were interviewed and then asked to complete an Internet-based survey instrument. Faculty members in both countries perceived that experiential curricula were focused on the postmarketing phase of the SoS, and that there is a need for the pharmacy experiential curricula to be standardized in order to fill SoS coverage gaps. Inter-country differences in experiential SoS coverage were noted in topics included for safety biomarkers that signal potential for drug-induced problems and pharmacogenomics. Experiential SoS topic coverage and student ability gaps were perceived within and between US and Taiwan colleges and schools of pharmacy.

  18. Effectiveness of contact-based education for reducing mental illness-related stigma in pharmacy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A strategy for reducing mental illness-related stigma in health-profession students is to include contact-based sessions in their educational curricula. In such sessions students are able to interact socially with a person that has a mental illness. We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of this strategy in a multi-centre study of pharmacy students. Methods The study was a randomized controlled trial conducted at three sites. Because it was necessary that all students receive the contact-based sessions, the students were randomized either to an early or late intervention, with the late intervention group not having participated in the contact-based education at the time when the primary outcome was assessed. The primary outcome, stigma, was assessed using an attitudes scale called the Opening Minds Survey for Health Care Providers (OMS-HC. Results We initially confirmed that outcomes were homogeneous across study centres, centre by group interaction, p = 0.76. The results were pooled across the three study centres. A significant reduction in stigma was observed in association with the contact-based sessions (mean change 4.3 versus 1.5, t=2.1, p=0.04. The effect size (Cohen’s d was 0.45. A similar reduction was seen in the control group when they later received the intervention. Conclusions Contact-based education is an effective method of reducing stigma during pharmacy education. These results add to a growing literature confirming the effectiveness of contact-based strategies for stigma reduction in health profession trainees.

  19. 78 FR 16447 - Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program (RCEP) for the Technical Assistance and Continuing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... (RCEP) for the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Centers (TACE Centers); Proposed Extension... (RCEP) for the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Centers (TACE Centers), the Secretary... with disabilities through enhanced technical assistance (TA) and continuing education (CE) for State...

  20. Interprofessional impressions among nursing and pharmacy students: a qualitative study to inform interprofessional education initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Kerry; Kelly, Isabelle

    2015-03-19

    Medical care is increasingly complex and must draw upon the distinct, yet complementary skills of various health disciplines. Healthcare student integration through interprofessional education (IPE) activity is considered one way to promote early, and subsequently sustain, the principles of teamwork. However, It has been demonstrated that each profession has distinct profession-based subcultures, or common attitudes, beliefs and values, even among undergraduate students before commencing their training. We sought to evaluate if undergraduate pharmacy and nursing student in the Middle East had similarly formed attitudes and perceptions of each others' roles. Focus group and semi-structured interviews were conducted with undergraduate pharmacy and nursing students enrolled at Qatar University College of Pharmacy and University of Calgary - Qatar Nursing programs. An eight-question topic guide was developed following comprehensive literature review of reports of other interdisciplinary assessments (either quantitative and qualitative). Working theories were drawn by the two primary investigators based on relevant topic characteristics such as expressed roles and purposes for interacting with one other, patients, and physicians, to develop explanatory constructs for the findings and identify patterns in the data. Qualitative analysis of interviews were supported by NVivo10 (©) (QSR International 2013) software. One shared themes across both health professional groups evolved during data analysis: perceptions of collaborative roles. Discipline specific themes included pharmacist knowledge and visibility (nursing students) and nurses as informants and roles in total patient care (pharmacy students). As expected, students with little or no curricular-based structured experiential training yet largely drew upon personal experiences, whereas senior students, who did have some amount of professional context, often mirrored those that have been found in other studies

  1. Addressing Cultural Competency in Pharmacy Education through International Service Learning and Community Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemin Kassam

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a course in international service learning and community engagement for pharmacy undergraduate students. The course offered students opportunities to cultivate cultural competency in an international setting foreign to their own—Sub-Saharan Africa. The experience consisted of pre-departure preparation seminars followed by subsequent community immersion to experience, explore and confront personal attitudes and perceptions. A key feature of this course was its emphasis on a continuing cycle of learning, community engagement and reflection. Three students participated, a near-maximum cohort. Their daily self-reflections were qualitatively analyzed to document the impact of their cultural learning and experiences and revealed meaningful learning in the domains of self-assessment and awareness of their personal and professional culture, exposure to a participatory health delivery model involving the patient, the community and a multidisciplinary team and opportunities to engage in patient care in a different cultural setting. This proof-of-concept course provided students with experiences that were life-changing on both personal and professional levels and confirmed the viability and relevance of international service learning for the pharmacy field within its university-wide mandate.

  2. Attitude of fourth year Doctor of Pharmacy students towards pharmacy profession and their career preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Saad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Fourth year students believed that pharmacy education and practice affect the health care system. Their favorite career areas were clinical pharmacy, industrial pharmacy, and hospital pharmacy. Personal interest was the most important factor involved in this selection. Most of them were interested in pharmacy-related research activities.

  3. Using modern information technologies in continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Магомедхан Магомедович Ниматулаев

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Article opens problems of formation of system of continuous education and improvement of professional skill for effective realization of professional work of the teacher in the conditions of use of modern information technology. Possibilities and necessities of use of information-communication technologies, Web-technologies for an intensification and giving of additional dynamics to educational process are considered. In this connection new forms and methods of the organization of educational activity for development and perfection of this activity are defined.

  4. Marketing Continuing Education: A Study of Price Strategies. Occasional Papers in Continuing Education, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Marvin E.

    The objective of the study conducted at the Centre for Continuing Education (CCE) at the University of British Columbia was to determine that threshold pricing not only existed for continuing education courses, but also was applicable to an administrative decision-making structure. The first part of the three-part investigation analyzed consumer…

  5. A pharmacy student's role as a teaching assistant in an undergraduate medicinal chemistry course - Implementation, evaluation, and unexpected opportunities for educational outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaVecchia, Matthew J; Claudio, Alyssa M; Fairclough, Jamie L

    2017-11-01

    To describe 1) a pharmacy student's teaching assistant (TA) role in an undergraduate medicinal chemistry course, 2) an active learning module co-developed by the TA and instructor, and 3) the unexpected opportunities for pharmacy educational outreach that resulted from this collaboration. Medicinal Chemistry (CHM3413) is an undergraduate course offered each fall at Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBA). As a TA for CHM3413, a pharmacy student from the Gregory School of Pharmacy (GSOP) at PBA co-developed and implemented an active learning module emphasizing foundational medicinal chemistry concepts as they pertain to performance enhancing drugs (PEDs). Surveys assessed undergraduate students' perceived knowledge of medicinal chemistry concepts, PEDs, and TA involvement. Students' (total n = 60, three fall semesters) perceived confidence in knowledge of medicinal chemistry concepts and PEDs increased significantly (p medicinal chemistry course. An advanced pharmacy practice experience elective in sports pharmacy (based on Ambrose's model) begins Fall 2017. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning Technologies for Adult Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robin

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses three technologies used in an adult continuing education Masters programme: blogging, learning objects and e-portfolios. My reflections on their use and on the literature underpinning their use form the basis of the discussion. All three of these technologies were used to promote self-directed learning, reflection and learner…

  7. Rural-Urban Partnering in Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malay, Michael E.; Moore, Jayne F.

    2002-01-01

    Interactive television was used to deliver instruction on advanced cardiac life support to rural health care providers. The partnership between rural and urban hospitals enabled the provision of high-quality, cost-effective continuing education to geographically isolated populations. (SK)

  8. Clinical pharmacology | Blockman | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 3 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Clinical pharmacology. M Blockman. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  9. More about ... Immunology | Singh | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 8 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  10. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  11. Thriving in Partnership: Models for Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, Peter; Boeck, Deena

    2012-01-01

    This article, based on a presentation at the University Professional and Continuing Education Association Annual Conference, March 29, 2012, provides concepts, terminology, and financial models for establishing and maintaining successful institutional partnerships. The authors offer it as a contribution to developing a wider understanding of the…

  12. Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a study that explored the professional lives of eight leaders of continuing education in Canadian universities, with a focus on their administrative role, to provide a deeper understanding of how they live within their practice (lived experience). A practical listing of 56 horizons of experience was identified, useful as…

  13. The Painful Shoulder | Roche | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The painful shoulder is commonly managed by the non-specialist. Continuing Medical Education Vol. 26 (8) 2008: pp. 398-402. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News.

  14. Review article: Ethnomusicology and music education: Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review article further explores the nexus between music education and African music/(ethno)musicology that continues the dialogue between the disciplines of musicology and ethnomusicology initiated by Susan Harrop-Allin in SAMUS vol. 25 109-24). Although there has been an explosion of literature over the last five ...

  15. Marketing Realities in Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Ruth F.; DuHamel, Martha B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes tenets of continuing professional education marketing: identify target audience, define mission, assess community needs, identify competition, establish credibility, develop marketing plans, provide options, evaluate, and develop high-quality programs. Offers advice for pricing, cancellations, new courses, promotion expenses, direct…

  16. Continuous Improvement through Baldridge in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Diane K.; Miller, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Describes efforts of the Baldrige in Education Center and Quality Leadership Academy in Santa Cruz County, California, to support teacher and administrator efforts to improve student performance in selected schools through the use of continuous-improvement techniques adopted by many American corporations to improve product quality and increase…

  17. Google Scholar and the Continuing Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Jared L.; Howell, Scott; Wright, Thomas C.; Dickson, Cody

    2009-01-01

    The recent introduction of Google Scholar has renewed hope that someday a powerful research tool will bring continuing education literature more quickly, freely, and completely to one's computer. The authors suggest that using Google Scholar with other traditional search methods will narrow the research gap between what is discoverable and…

  18. Impact of an online educational program on pharmacy students' knowledge of folic acid and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykhovsky, Margarita; Meier, Mary Frances K; Mager, Natalie A DiPietro

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacy students must receive adequate training regarding folic acid for the prevention of neural tube defects (NTDs). Pharmacy students' knowledge should be evaluated and effective methods utilized to improve it, if needed. The objective of this study was to assess baseline knowledge among third-year students in a 0-6 Doctor of Pharmacy program and to evaluate the impact of an online educational video. Baseline knowledge was assessed by a pretest adapted with permission from the March of Dimes (MOD). Students watched a 30-minute MOD video and completed a posttest. Nine months later, students completed a longitudinal posttest. Analysis of variance was used to assess differences in the percentage of correct responses to each question. A total of 133 (90.5%) students completed the educational program and 105 (78.9%) completed the longitudinal test. Statistically significant improvements in knowledge from baseline were seen for 9 of 10 questions on the posttest and for 6 of 10 questions on the longitudinal test. Online videos are tools to teach pharmacy students key information regarding folic acid and NTD; however, material should be reinforced in experiential education as well. Counseling women of childbearing potential about folic acid fulfills an important public health need. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Determination Effective Elements of Continuing Interprofessional Education Models

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Safabakhsh; Alireza Irajpour; Nikoo Yamani

    2017-01-01

    Background: Traditional continuing education (CE) approaches have limited impact on patient management and outcomes. Continuing interprofessional education is an innovated educational approach that can improve patient care and outcomes related to health care. There is a need to provide guidance to continuing education professionals in the development, implementation, and evaluation of continuing interprofessional education activities. Objectives: This study attempted to identity effective ele...

  20. Recommendations for Planning and Managing International Short-term Pharmacy Service Trips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kalin L; Alsharif, Naser Z; Rovers, John; Connor, Sharon; White, Nicole D; Hogue, Michael D

    2017-03-25

    International pharmacy service trips by schools and colleges of pharmacy allow students to provide health care to medically underserved areas. A literature review (2000-2016) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms was performed to assess current practices to establish and maintain successful pharmacy service trips. Educational documents such as syllabi were obtained from pharmacy programs and examined. A preliminary draft was developed and authors worked on sections of interest and expertise. Considerations and current recommendations are provided for the key aspects of the home institution and the host country requirements for pharmacy service trips based on findings from a literature search and the authors' collective, extensive experience. Evaluation of the trip and ethical considerations are also discussed. This article serves as a resource for schools and colleges of pharmacy that are interested in the development of new pharmacy service trips and provides key considerations for continuous quality improvement of current or future activities.

  1. Mapping Antimicrobial Stewardship in Undergraduate Medical, Dental, Pharmacy, Nursing and Veterinary Education in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Castro-Sánchez

    Full Text Available To investigate the teaching of antimicrobial stewardship (AS in undergraduate healthcare educational degree programmes in the United Kingdom (UK.Cross-sectional survey of undergraduate programmes in human and veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and nursing in the UK. The main outcome measures included prevalence of AS teaching; stewardship principles taught; estimated hours apportioned; mode of content delivery and teaching strategies; evaluation methodologies; and frequency of multidisciplinary learning.80% (112/140 of programmes responded adequately. The majority of programmes teach AS principles (88/109, 80.7%. 'Adopting necessary infection prevention and control precautions' was the most frequently taught principle (83/88, 94.3%, followed by 'timely collection of microbiological samples for microscopy, culture and sensitivity' (73/88, 82.9% and 'minimisation of unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing' (72/88, 81.8%. The 'use of intravenous administration only to patients who are severely ill, or unable to tolerate oral treatment' was reported in ~50% of courses. Only 32/88 (36.3% programmes included all recommended principles.Antimicrobial stewardship principles are included in most undergraduate healthcare and veterinary degree programmes in the UK. However, future professionals responsible for using antimicrobials receive disparate education. Education may be boosted by standardisation and strengthening of less frequently discussed principles.

  2. Mapping Antimicrobial Stewardship in Undergraduate Medical, Dental, Pharmacy, Nursing and Veterinary Education in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Enrique; Drumright, Lydia N; Gharbi, Myriam; Farrell, Susan; Holmes, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the teaching of antimicrobial stewardship (AS) in undergraduate healthcare educational degree programmes in the United Kingdom (UK). Cross-sectional survey of undergraduate programmes in human and veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and nursing in the UK. The main outcome measures included prevalence of AS teaching; stewardship principles taught; estimated hours apportioned; mode of content delivery and teaching strategies; evaluation methodologies; and frequency of multidisciplinary learning. 80% (112/140) of programmes responded adequately. The majority of programmes teach AS principles (88/109, 80.7%). 'Adopting necessary infection prevention and control precautions' was the most frequently taught principle (83/88, 94.3%), followed by 'timely collection of microbiological samples for microscopy, culture and sensitivity' (73/88, 82.9%) and 'minimisation of unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing' (72/88, 81.8%). The 'use of intravenous administration only to patients who are severely ill, or unable to tolerate oral treatment' was reported in ~50% of courses. Only 32/88 (36.3%) programmes included all recommended principles. Antimicrobial stewardship principles are included in most undergraduate healthcare and veterinary degree programmes in the UK. However, future professionals responsible for using antimicrobials receive disparate education. Education may be boosted by standardisation and strengthening of less frequently discussed principles.

  3. Educational Gaming for Pharmacy Students - Design and Evaluation of a Diabetes-themed Escape Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eukel, Heidi N; Frenzel, Jeanne E; Cernusca, Dan

    2017-09-01

    Objective. To design an educational game that will increase third-year professional pharmacy students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and to evaluate their perceived value of the game. Methods. Faculty members created an innovative educational game, the diabetes escape room. An authentic escape room gaming environment was established through the use of a locked room, an escape time limit, and game rules within which student teams completed complex puzzles focused on diabetes disease management. To evaluate the impact, students completed a pre-test and post-test to measure the knowledge they've gained and a perception survey to identify moderating factors that could help instructors improve the game's effectiveness and utility. Results. Students showed statistically significant increases in knowledge after completion of the game. A one-sample t -test indicated that students' mean perception was statistically significantly higher than the mean value of the evaluation scale. This statically significant result proved that this gaming act offers a potential instructional benefit beyond its novelty. Conclusion. The diabetes escape room proved to be a valuable educational game that increased students' knowledge of diabetes mellitus disease management and showed a positive perceived overall value by student participants.

  4. VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of communication and information technologies lead to the changes in continuing medical education by offering the possibility to move up-to-date medical information through Internet to the physicians. The main goal of this study was to create a virtual space for continuing medical education. In this context, a number of computer-assisted tools for instruction, evaluation and utilization in daily activity have been developed and integrated into a unitary system. The main imposed specifications of the system were accessibility, integrity, availability, and security.This report describes the characteristics of tables design and organization, and of system integration. The security level was imposed for assuring the accessibility of each physician to medical information useful in his or her activity and the knowledge database development.

  5. Continuing Education Credits | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are pleased to be able to offer continuing education credits to Registered Dietitians. Registered Dietitians This event is pending for approval by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 2 CPEUs.  Procedure  Immediately after the event, a link to a short questionnaire will be sent to you by email. Please complete the questionnaire online and print out your certificate of completion.  |

  6. Student Experiences of Engaged Enquiry in Pharmacy Education: Digital Natives or Something Else?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Bliuc, Ana-Maria; Goodyear, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on research into the student experience of enquiry in two tasks in a university pharmacy course. Students were required to investigate through a field trip how a community pharmacy operated to meet customer needs and the requirements of the Health System in which it operated. Students were also required to investigate…

  7. The Challenges of Professional Development in the Evolving World of Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motycka, Carol; Williams, Jennifer S.; Hogan, Thanh; Gray, Matthew; Hartman, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of schools and colleges of pharmacy is to produce pharmacists capable of providing competent patient centered care. To accomplish this goal, pharmacy students must learn and retain a great deal of knowledge as well as develop professional attitudes and behaviors. In recent years, several articles have been published questioning…

  8. Reasons nurses participate in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A B

    1979-01-01

    The study was undertaken to identify dimensions, or motivational orientations that underlie reasons nurses participate in continuing education programs and to determine relationships between these orientations and the legal status of CE and selected demographic characteristics of participants. The sample included 843 nurses who participated in CE programs sponsored by colleges and universities with accredited baccalaureate schools of nursing. Two instruments were used for data collection: a 56-item checklist consisting of reasons for participation (Education Participation Scale) and a personal data sheet. Factor analysis of responses to the EPS indicated that seven motivational orientations underlay the nurses' reasons for participation: compliance with authority, improvement in social relations, improvement in social welfare skills, professional advancement, professional knowledge, relief from routine, and acquisition of credentials. Mean scores on each orientation for the entire sample ranged from 6.55 (professional knowledge) to 1.57 (improvement in social relations) on a 10-point scale. Analysis of variance to determine the relationship between motivational orientation scores and legal status of continuing nursing education revealed no differences among the three legal conditions studied---mandatory, proposed, and voluntary CE---except on the acquisition of credentials orientation. Scores on this orientation varied significantly (p less than .001), but only for respondents employed part-time; for these nurses mean scores were ranked mandatory, proposed, then voluntary. Study findings suggest that, for these nurses, the presence or threat of a mandatory CE law had little influence in motivating participation. Rather, these nurses participated in continuing nursing education programs for reasons related to maintaining professional currency and improving their ability to serve the public.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Pharmacy Education on Infection Management Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in an Indonesian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Azizah; Sulaiman, SA. Syed; Shafie, A.A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the clinical and economic impacts of clinical pharmacy education (CPE) on infection management among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4 and 5 in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Indonesia. Methods A quasi-experimental economic evaluation comparing CPE impact on 6-month CKD mortality was conducted on the basis of payer perspective. The experimental group (n = 63) received care by health care providers who were given CPE on drug-related probl...

  10. Migraine management in community pharmacies: practice patterns and knowledge of pharmacy personnel in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengcharoen, Woranuch; Lerkiatbundit, Sanguan

    2013-10-01

    To describe practice behavior and understanding among pharmacy personnel, both pharmacists and non-pharmacist staff, in the management of mild and moderate migraines. Migraine is recognized as a prevalent and chronic neurological disorder. In developing countries, such as Thailand, community pharmacies are a widely used source of health care for various illnesses including migraine. However, the quality of migraine management and knowledge among pharmacy personnel is unclear. Cross-sectional study. The sample comprised 142 randomly selected community pharmacies in a city in the south of Thailand. Simulated clients visited the pharmacies twice, at least 1 month apart, to ask for the treatment of mild and moderate migraines. After the encounters, question asking, drug dispensing, and advice giving by pharmacy staff were recorded. Subsequently, the providers in 135 pharmacies participated in the interview to evaluate their knowledge in migraine management. The majority of pharmacy personnel were less likely to ask questions in cases of mild migraine when compared with moderate attack (mean score [full score = 12] 1.8 ± 1.6 vs 2.6 ± 1.5, respectively, P knowledge on migraine management. Pharmacists had better knowledge on question asking (mild migraine 5.1 ± 2.1 vs 3.1 ± 1.3, respectively, P knowledge on advice giving but poorer drug dispensing in moderate migraine according to the guidelines, relative to non-pharmacists (20.5% vs 40.3%, P = .014). A large number of community pharmacists and non-pharmacist staff had inappropriate practice behavior and understanding. Continuing education and interventions are important to improve the practice and knowledge of pharmacy personnel, particularly the pharmacists. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  11. Evaluating an undergraduate interprofessional education session for medical and pharmacy undergraduates on therapeutics and prescribing: the medical student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelvey BM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bethany M Shelvey,1 Sion A Coulman,2 Dai N John2 1School of Medicine, 2School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff, Wales, UK Background: The current literature on undergraduate interprofessional education (IPE for pharmacy and medical students highlights a range of positive outcomes, although to date IPE has focused predominantly on student views and experiences of IPE sessions with these opinions being sought at the end of the sessions. This study aimed to evaluate medical students’ experiences of therapeutics and prescribing IPE, with pharmacy students, 1 year following the session. Methods: Following ethics committee approval, 3rd year medical students at Cardiff University were invited to participate using non-probability sampling. Topic guide development was informed by the literature and research team discussions, including a review of the materials used in the IPE session. Semi-structured one-to-one interviews explored experiences, prior to, during, and after the IPE session. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Results: Eighteen medical students were interviewed; 11 were females. Seven themes were identified, namely 1 refinement of pre-session preparation, 2 session value, 3 learning with a pharmacy student, 4 learning about a pharmacist, 5 learning from a pharmacy student, 6 importance and application of what was learnt into practice, and 7 suggestions for change. Conclusion: This study provides a valuable insight into medical students’ experiences of a therapeutics and prescribing IPE session and emphasizes the value they placed on interaction with pharmacy students. Medical students were able to recall clear learning experiences from the IPE session that had taken place 12 months earlier, which itself is an indicator of the impact of the session on the students. Furthermore, they were able to describe how knowledge and skills learnt had been applied to

  12. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinira Magali Fortuna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. METHOD: groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". CONCLUSIONS: continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  13. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Matumoto, Silvia; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; Camargo-Borges, Celiane; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2013-01-01

    to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  14. Consumers and Carers Versus Pharmacy Staff: Do Their Priorities for Australian Pharmacy Services Align?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Sara S; Kelly, Fiona; Sav, Adem; Kendall, Elizabeth; King, Michelle A; Whitty, Jennifer A; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2015-10-01

    Health professionals, including pharmacists, are encouraged to meet the needs of their consumers in an efficient and patient-centred manner. Yet, there is limited information as to what consumers with chronic conditions need from pharmacy as a healthcare destination or how well pharmacy staff understand these needs. The aim of this study was to identify service user priorities for ideal community pharmacy services for consumers with chronic conditions and their carers, and compare these priorities with what pharmacy staff think these groups want. The nominal group technique was undertaken with pharmacist, pharmacy support staff, consumer and carer groups in four Australian regions between December 2012 and April 2013. Participant ideas and priorities for ideal services or care were identified, and contextual insight was obtained by thematic analysis. Twenty-one nominal group sessions are accepted, including 15 consumer and carer, four pharmacist and two pharmacy support staff groups. Pharmacy staff views generally aligned with consumer priorities, such as access, affordability, patient-centred care and continuity and coordinated care, yet diverged with respect to consumer information or education on medication and services. Fundamentally, consumers and carers sought streamlined access to information and medication, in a coordinated, patient-centred approach. Alleviating financial burden was a key consumer priority, with a call for the continuation and extension of medication subsidies. Overall, pharmacy staff had a reasonable understanding of what consumers would prioritise, but further emphasis on the importance, delivery, or both, of consumer information is needed. Greater consideration is needed from policy makers regarding the financial barriers to accessing medication for consumers with chronic conditions.

  15. Effect of a resident physician educational program on pediatric emergency department pharmacy interventions and medication errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Megan E; Lighter, Donald E; Godambe, Ashok V; Edgerson, Brandon; Bradley, Randy; Godambe, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of a resident physician educational program in a pediatric emergency department (ED) on pharmacy interventions and medication errors, particularly dose adjustments, order clarifications, and adverse drug events (ADE). The ED pharmacist recorded all interventions and medication errors on weekdays from 3 to 11 pm during a 9-month period, consisting of a preobservational (Quarter 1), observational (Quarter 2), and interventional (Quarter 3) phases. Program implementation occurred in Quarter 3, with an initial 3-hour lecture during the ED orientation, followed by daily patient case discussions. Weekly interventions and errors were analyzed using statistical process control u-chart analyses. Chi-square analyses of independence were also performed. Resident and ED staff feedback on the program was obtained through anonymous internet-based surveys. A total of 3507 interventions were recorded during the 9-month period. Chi-square approximation and interval estimation of odds ratio showed a statistically significant decrease between Quarters 1 and 3 in the number of dose adjustments (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.324-0.689) and order clarifications (95% CI, 0.137 to 0.382) after initiation of the program. The decline in ADE, while not as substantial (95% CI, 0.003 to 1.078), still achieved a level of significance (90% CI, 0.006 to 0.674). Survey results were positive toward the program. The implementation of a resident physician educational program in our pediatric ED significantly decreased the number of medication errors, increased resident physician awareness of the potential for errors, and increased ED pharmacist utilization.

  16. Dialysis (Part 1): Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (continuing education credit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J

    1997-02-19

    The first of two articles on dialysis outlines the experience of patients from chronic renal failure to end stage renal failure and offers a historical perspective of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). It relates to UKCC Professional Development categories: Care enhancement and Reducing risk.

  17. Continuing education is the key in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the Jamaican Women's Center Programme by the Population Council of New York found that 55% of teenage mothers in Jamaica returned to school in Kingston and 73% in the Mandeville branch following their pregnancies and exposure to the program. Only 15% who were not exposed to the program returned to school. The Sister School Workshop Program on Teenage Pregnancy provides knowledge instead of the myth and fantasy given by parents and clergy. Continuing education is particularly important for those with low self-esteem. The Center also provided knowledge about contraception. The findings were that contraceptive use was 89% among program graduates and 81% among nonprogram persons. In addition to the higher % of usage, there were differences in methods used. Center users preferred the IUD and pills, while nonprogram persons favored pills and injections. Subsequent pregnancies were much higher among nonprogram persons at 39%, while for program participants 15% at Kingston and 8% from the Mandeville Center had subsequent pregnancies within 3 years. The creation of the Jamaican Women's Center in 1978 has also promoted continuing education during pregnancy. Assistance is also provided to those reentering the school system after giving birth. The financial cost has been reasonable at J$3500 program year/woman and nursery facility costs at J$664/child/year. Other services to former students include counseling and school visits and occasionally financial aid amounts J$176/woman/year. Rural outreach averages J$336/woman/year. The identifiable weakness was in preparation of these girls for employment. It is suggested that additional efforts be made to provide wider and more marketable skills to meet local needs. There is also a need to provide linkage with other skills training programs and small business groups in order to expand labor force opportunities for these women.

  18. Language barriers to prescriptions for patients with limited English proficiency: a survey of pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Tomany-Korman, Sandra; Flores, Glenn

    2007-08-01

    Twenty-three million Americans have limited English proficiency. Language barriers can have major adverse consequences in health care, but little is known about whether pharmacies provide adequate care to patients with limited English proficiency. We sought to evaluate pharmacies' ability to provide non-English-language prescription labels, information packets, and verbal communication, and assess pharmacies' satisfaction with communication with patients who have limited English proficiency. We used a cross-sectional, mixed-methods survey of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, pharmacies. Survey questions addressed sociodemographic and language-service characteristics of pharmacies. A pharmacist or technician at each pharmacy was asked 45 questions by telephone, fax, or mail. The main outcome measures were the ability of pharmacies to provide non-English-language prescription labels, information packets, and verbal communication; and pharmacy satisfaction with communication with patients who have limited English proficiency. Of 175 pharmacies, 73% responded. Forty-seven percent of the pharmacies never/only sometimes can print non-English-language prescription labels, 54% never/only sometimes can prepare non-English-language information packets, and 64% never/only sometimes can verbally communicate in non-English languages. Eleven percent use patients' family members/friends to interpret. Only 55% were satisfied with their communication with patients who have limited English proficiency. In multivariate analyses, community pharmacies had significantly lower odds of being able to verbally communicate in non-English languages, whereas pharmacies using telephone interpreting services had significantly higher odds. Pharmacies' suggestions for improving patient communication included continuing education, producing a chain-wide list of resources, hiring bilingual staff, using telephone interpreters, analyzing translation quality/accuracy of labels and information packets, and

  19. Educating medical students: lessons from research in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, K V

    1994-01-01

    Creating a true continuum of medical education from admission to medical school throughout a lifetime of professional learning is easier said than done. To do so, the various components on the continuum must be explored to determine where appropriate links might be made. The author considers selected concepts and evidence from the theory and practice underlying continuing medical education (CME) and continuing professional education (CPE) insofar as CME and CPE can inform undergraduate medical curricula, including its current innovations. Five conceptual and empirical approaches from CME and CPE are discussed in detail: social learning theory, how physicians learn and change, competence in business and the professions, how professionals learn in practice, and lifelong self-directed learning. Then the author describes the implications of these approaches for the ongoing development of undergraduate medical education. (1) The entire learning environment, and not merely discrete aspects such as curriculum content, must be examined and fully utilized to benefit learning. (2) The importance of the contexts in which learning occurs must be emphasized in several ways. (3) Learning should be centered around clinical problems. (4) The many benefits of small-group learning and other ways of learning from colleagues should be emphasized. (5) The undergraduate curriculum should emphasize the development of students' feelings of self-efficacy to ensure that students become physicians who are confident about their abilities. (6) CME research and CPE research reinforce the efforts in undergraduate medical education to emphasize the early development of students' process skills as well as content mastery.

  20. Entrepreneurs: leading the way to pharmacy's future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2011-12-01

    Entrepreneurship has always been central to the practice of pharmacy. Whether opening a new retail store, setting up a unique clinic practice, or researching a novel therapy, pharmacists are continually looking forward and following their visions of how pharmacy can be part of a new direction in health care. In 2011, the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) Foundation--itself the product of entrepreneurship--awarded grants to three entrepreneurs who are seeking to establish a fee-for-service component of their senior care pharmacy practices in the community. The grant recipients, while differing in their approaches, share the common goal of providing safe, effective, and cost-justified medication therapy and education to ambulatory older adults.

  1. 42 CFR 136.340 - Provision of continuing education allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of continuing education allowances. 136... Improvement Act Programs Subdivision J-5-Continuing Education Allowances § 136.340 Provision of continuing education allowances. In order to encourage physicians, dentists and other health professionals to join or...

  2. [Development of an advanced education program for community medicine by Nagasaki pharmacy and nursing science union consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Mugen; Nakashima, Mikiro; Hatakeyama, Susumi

    2012-01-01

    The Nagasaki University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences has conducted a project concerning "development of an advanced education program for community medicine" for its students in collaboration with the University's School of Nursing Sciences, the University of Nagasaki School of Nursing Sciences, and the Nagasaki International University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences. The project was named "formation of a strategic base for the integrated education of pharmacy and nursing science specially focused on home-healthcare and welfare", that has been adopted at "Strategic University Cooperative Support Program for Improving Graduate" by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan from the 2009 academic year to the 2011 academic year. Our project is a novel education program about team medical care in collaboration with pharmacist and nurse. In order to perform this program smoothly, we established "Nagasaki pharmacy and nursing science union consortium (Nagasaki University, The University of Nagasaki, Nagasaki International University, Nagasaki Pharmaceutical Association, Nagasaki Society of Hospital Pharmacists, Nagasaki Nursing Association, Nagasaki Medical Association, Nagasaki Prefectural Government)". In this symposium, we introduce contents about university education program and life learning program of the project.

  3. Improved STD syndrome management by a network of clinicians and pharmacy workers in Peru: The PREVEN Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia J; Carcamo, Cesar P; Garnett, Geoff P; Campos, Pablo E; Holmes, King K

    2012-01-01

    Sexually Transmitted diseases (STD) syndrome management has been one cornerstone of STD treatment. Persons with STD symptoms in many countries, especially those with limited resources, often initially seek care in pharmacies. The objective of the study was to develop and evaluate an integrated network of physicians, midwives and pharmacy workers trained in STD syndromic management (The PREVEN Network) as part of a national urban community-randomized trial of sexually transmitted infection prevention in Peru. After a comprehensive census of physicians, midwives, and pharmacies in ten intervention and ten control cities, we introduced seminars and workshops for pharmacy workers, and continuing education for physicians and midwives in intervention cities and invited graduates to join the PREVEN Network. "Prevention Salespersons" visited pharmacies, boticas and clinicians regularly for educational support and collection of information on numbers of cases of STD syndromes seen at pharmacies and by clinicians in intervention cities. Simulated patients evaluated outcomes of training of pharmacy workers with respect to adequate STD syndrome management, recommendations for condom use and for treatment of partners. In intervention cities we trained, certified, and incorporated into the PREVEN Network the workers at 623 (80.6%) of 773 pharmacies and 701 (69.6%) of 1007 physicians and midwives in private practice. Extremely high clinician and pharmacy worker turnover, 13.4% and 44% respectively in the first year, dictated continued training of new pharmacy workers and clinicians. By the end of the intervention the Network included 792 pharmacies and 597 clinicians. Pharmacies reported more cases of STDs than did clinicians. Evaluations by simulated patients showed significant and substantial improvements in the management of STD syndromes at pharmacies in intervention cities but not in control cities. Training pharmacy workers linked to a referral network of clinicians proved

  4. The Role of Motivation in Continuing Education for Pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin a Tsoi, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare professionals, including pharmacists, need to continuously update their knowledge and are, therefore, expected to participate in Continuing Education (CE) and Continuous Professional Development (CPD) activities on a regular basis. Lack of intrinsic (or autonomous) motivation appears to

  5. The Critical Role of the Continuing Education Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2016-11-01

    Continuing education departments are charged with the responsibility of developing, implementing, and evaluating education that improves the practice of nursing and enhances the professional development of the nurse. This article addresses the importance of the continuing education (CE) Specialist in supporting this work. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(11):482-483. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Pharmacy and freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, D L

    1984-03-01

    The development of pharmacy in Western civilization has been influenced by ideas of individual liberty; the impact of these ideas is traced. For a short time during the French Revolution, individuals without qualifications could practice pharmacy, but abuses prompted return of regulation; from 1803, pharmacy was closely regulated by the state. Liberal thinking in 19th-century Britain left control of pharmacy mainly within the profession; regulation was definitive rather than restrictive. With the influence of Jacksonian Democracy and freedom of trade in the United States, there were no effective pharmacy regulations until the late 19th century and few educational requirements for licensure until the 1920s. In Germany, the old system of concessions and privileges was upset after World War II when any qualified pharmacist was allowed to open a shop wherever desired in the American-occupied zone; the courts upheld this policy as the basis for establishment of pharmacies in West Germany. Liberty in dispensing drugs has been limited out of concern for the well-being of individuals and of society as a whole. In Great Britain and the U.S., restrictions on dispensing antedated laws establishing qualifications for pharmacists. The history of pharmacy demonstrates that there are moral and social barriers to realization of the ideals of liberty. History also suggests that if pharmacists assume responsibilities that use their specialized training, they can defend against inroads by nonpharmacists.

  7. The development of self-efficacy and self-esteem in pharmacy students based on experiential education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorra, Mark L.

    This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on self-efficacy and self-esteem and the relationship to a student's school, age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, paid and introductory pharmacy practice experiences in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Graduates with a high level of self-efficacy and self-esteem are more desirable as pharmacists upon graduation. A quantitative survey, which includes two standardized instruments, the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale (GSE) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), was administered to students at five schools of pharmacy in the northeast United States, resulting in a total of 399 responses. The findings confirm the significance of paid experiences and increased levels of a student's self-efficacy in a pharmacy setting. The other finding was related to ethnicity where the Asian/Pacific Islander students showed lower self-efficacy than other ethnic groups, which may be due to a cultural difference in displaying traits of high self-efficacy. Self-esteem also showed a positive finding for students with paid experiences and students who were older. There was an ethnicity finding where Asian/Pacific Islanders scored lower on the self-esteem scale, while the African-Americans scored higher than all the other groups. The results show that students improve their levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem through extended practical experiences. Schools should provide structured experiences of a sufficient length, beyond the present 300 hours, to prepare students for their transition into a professional role. Educators should be aware of the difference in Asian/Pacific Islander culture and encourage students to demonstrate their self-efficacy and self-esteem so other professionals can recognize them for their attributes.

  8. Pharmacy informatics: A call to action for educators, administrators, and residency directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, Taylor J; Brownlee, Michael J; Urick, Benjamin Y; Farley, Matthew J

    2017-09-01

    Pharmacy informatics involves the customization and application of information technology to improve medication-related processes. It is a critical function given the recent expansion of technology and prevalence of medication use throughout healthcare. Despite the necessity for pharmacy involvement, many pharmacists and student pharmacists are unaware of how to get started in informatics. Ideally, training should start early with student pharmacists being enrolled in introductory courses taught by leaders in the field. Students especially interested in informatics can build upon their classroom experience with postgraduate year two (PGY2) residencies in several informatics-related areas. Additionally, current pharmacists can gather information from national pharmacy organizations and local information technology pharmacists to prepare for projects in the field. These approaches provide opportunities for all pharmacists to expand their knowledge and establish the basis for highly-motivated pharmacists to become experts in informatics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Strategies for implementation of an effective pharmacogenomics program in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, U Subrahmanyeswara; Mayhew, Susan L; Rao, Prema S

    2015-07-01

    Sequencing of the human genome and the evidence correlating specific genetic variations to diseases have opened up the potential of genomics to more effective and less harmful interventions of human diseases. A wealth of pharmacogenomics knowledge is in place for the practice of precision medicine. However, this knowledge is not fully realized in clinical practice. One reason for this impasse is the lack of in-depth understanding of the potential of pharmacogenomics among the healthcare professionals. Pharmacists are the point-of-care providers and are expected to advise clinicians on matters relating to the implementation of pharmacogenomics in patient care. However, current pharmacogenomics instruction in pharmacy schools fails to produce pharmacists with the required knowledge or practical training in this discipline. In this perspective, we provide several strategies to overcome limitations faced by pharmacy schools. Once implemented, pharmacy schools will produce precision medicine-ready pharmacists.

  10. Assessment of Egyptian pharmacists' attitude, behaviors, and preferences related to continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Ibrahim, Osama H

    2012-04-01

    Contemporary pharmaceutical care requires sustained pharmacist competency through maintenance and improvement of knowledge, skills, and performance. Existing continuing education (CE) models reflect a wide spectrum of international approaches to life-long learning. The objective of this study was to determine CE preferences of pharmacists in Egypt before implementing a plan for compulsory annual CE activities and events for licensure renewal. A questionnaire containing questions about continuing education needs and preferences of Egyptian pharmacists was distributed to 400 pharmacies in Cairo. The sample was drawn randomly from the address list in yellow pages. The survey was conducted by personal interview. The questionnaire was designed and validated. Questions were divided into specific domains of interest including pharmacist demographics; access to internet resources; frequency and characteristics of past CE activities; preferences for delivery and content; motivation to participation; and plans for future CE activities. All data analyses were conducted using SPSS for Windows version 18.0. All statistical tests were 2-tailed and based on a significance level of p value ≤ 0.05. Results During the six months of questionnaire distribution, 400 pharmacists (one from each randomly selected pharmacies) were asked to complete the questionnaire. The response rate was 359 out of 400 pharmacists (89.75%). Twenty three percent of respondents had held their highest pharmacy degree to practice for less than 5 years and 19% had obtained their initial degree more than 15 years ago. More than half of the respondents were female (53.3%). Topics related to therapeutics were of highest interest to 85.3%, closely followed by clinical skills topics. Pharmacists working in community pharmacies had attended less CE events (15 vs. 28%, p = 0.034 within the past 2 years) when compared to their hospital-based counterparts. Conversely, hospital pharmacists generally reported less

  11. Third-year pharmacy students propose an interprofessional prediabetes educational programme: PreDiaMe (Prediabetes + Me).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitin, Chava; Velasquez, Jaimie; Khanfar, Nile M; Chassange, Stephanie; Perez Torres, Rennie; Loan Pham, Ngoc; Rodriguez, Martha M; Hale, Genevieve M

    2018-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association announced in 2012 that 86 million Americans were diagnosed with prediabetes compared to 79 million in 2010. Prediabetes + Me (PreDiaMe) is an innovative educational programme developed by pharmacy students at Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy, which provides collaborative interprofessional care for patients with prediabetes. A literature review using EBSCOhost, EMBASE, and MEDLINE databases searching the terms education, health services, interprofessional team, and prediabetes was conducted. Human studies published in English between 2006 and 2016 were included. Investigators interviewed a community pharmacist and a consultant pharmacist certified in diabetes education. Based on these interviews and the literature found, PreDiaMe was created to unite healthcare professionals through a three-step community outreach programme. The goal of PreDiaMe is to identify patients at risk of prediabetes, to decrease the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), to reduce healthcare costs, and to improve the quality of life for patients with prediabetes. PreDiaMe benefits patients with prediabetes, the healthcare system, and pedagogy as it aims to decrease in the prevalence and economic burden and increase health outcomes of patients with prediabetes while being used as a tool to provide integrative education in health professional programmes.

  12. Nurse practitioner continuing education: exploring influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, JoEllen

    2015-07-01

    This article introduces the interrelated concepts of nurse practitioner (NP) continuing education (CE) funding patterns, regulatory guidance surrounding NP CE, and its effect on patient outcomes in the United States. A literature review was done by searching online databases: MEDLINE and CINAHL. Searches included review of NP certifying body websites, Institute of Medicine, Josiah Macy Foundation, and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing websites. The nursing literature supports no connection between required CE and improvement in provision of care to patients, nor does it support improvement in individual provider competence. The funding patterns for nursing and medicine indicate a bias toward biomedical and pharmacological interventions. This type of funding stream may contribute to practice gaps rather than improve them. Understanding factors that influence CE program availability, plus the choices NPs make regarding mandatory CE, can provide planning guidance. This guidance can help reach the goal of improved patient outcomes and decreased healthcare disparities as a result of CE interventions. NP-specific findings may potentially influence regulatory reform relevant to mandatory CE and maintenance of certification. It is important that NPs recognize existing conflicts of interest in order to make informed program choices. © 2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  13. Evaluating an online pharmaceutical education system for pharmacy interns in critical care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Ting; Chen, Hsiang-Yin; Cheng, Kuei-Ju; Hou, Ssu-An; Yen, Yu-Hsuan; Liu, Chien-Tsai

    2014-02-01

    Incorporating electronic learning (eLearning) system into professional experimental programs such as pharmacy internships is a challenge. However, none of the current systems can fully support the unique needs of clinical pharmacy internship. In this study we enhanced a commercial eLearning system for clinical pharmacy internship (The Clinical Pharmacy Internship eLearning System, CPIES). The KAP questionnaire was used to evaluate the performance of group A with the traditional teaching model and group B with the CPIES teaching model. The CPIES teaching model showed significant improvement in interns' knowledge and practice (p = 0.002 and 0.031, respectively). The traditional teaching model only demonstrated significant improvement in practice (p = 0.011). Moreover, professionalism, such as attitudes on cooperating with other health professionals, is developed by learning from a good mentor. The on-line teaching and traditional teaching methods should undoubtedly be blended in a complete teaching model in order to improve learners' professional knowledge, facilitate correct attitude, and influence good practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mapping the Terrain of Continuing Allied Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Terrie

    A number of factors make continuing education in the allied health professions a unique category of adult education. The mandatory nature of continuing allied health education violates two of the basic tenets of adult learning theory--that adults voluntarily participate in learning to satisfy personal needs and that adults are generally not…

  15. Continuity and Change in Disaster Education in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe post-war continuity and change in disaster education in Japan. Preparedness for natural disasters has been a continuous agenda in Japan for geographical and meteorological reasons, and disaster education has been practised in both formal and informal settings. Post-war disaster management and education have taken a…

  16. Reflections on the role of the pharmacy regulatory authority in enhancing quality related event reporting in community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A; Bishop, Andrea C; Mahaffey, Thomas; Mackinnon, Neil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality-related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice. This study was aimed to gain a better understanding of the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies, and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (Deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven Deputy registrars/Practice managers, and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may help to mitigate this conflict

  17. The role of community pharmacy-based vaccination in the USA: current practice and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bach AT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Albert T Bach, Jeffery A Goad School of Pharmacy, Chapman University, Irvine, California, USA Abstract: Community pharmacy-based provision of immunizations in the USA has become commonplace in the last few decades, with success in increasing rates of immunizations. Community pharmacy-based vaccination services are provided by pharmacists educated in the practice of immunization delivery and provide a convenient and accessible option for receiving immunizations. The pharmacist's role in immunization practice has been described as serving in the roles of educator, facilitator, and immunizer. With a majority of pharmacist-provided vaccinations occurring in the community pharmacy setting, there are many examples of community pharmacists serving in these immunization roles with successful outcomes. Different community pharmacies employ a number of different models and workflow practices that usually consist of a year-round in-house service staffed by their own immunizing pharmacist. Challenges that currently exist in this setting are variability in scopes of immunization practice for pharmacists across states, inconsistent reimbursement mechanisms, and barriers in technology. Many of these challenges can be alleviated by continual education; working with legislators, state boards of pharmacy, stakeholders, and payers to standardize laws; and reimbursement design. Other challenges that may need to be addressed are improvements in communication and continuity of care between community pharmacists and the patient centered medical home. Keywords: immunization, pharmacy practice, pharmacists, continuity of care 

  18. Measuring social science concepts in pharmacy education research: From definition to item analysis of self-report instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cor, M Ken

    Interpreting results from quantitative research can be difficult when measures of concepts are constructed poorly, something that can limit measurement validity. Social science steps for defining concepts, guidelines for limiting construct-irrelevant variance when writing self-report questions, and techniques for conducting basic item analysis are reviewed to inform the design of instruments to measure social science concepts in pharmacy education research. Based on a review of the literature, four main recommendations emerge: These include: (1) employ a systematic process of conceptualization to derive nominal definitions; (2) write exact and detailed operational definitions for each concept, (3) when creating self-report questionnaires, write statements and select scales to avoid introducing construct-irrelevant variance (CIV); and (4) use basic item analysis results to inform instrument revision. Employing recommendations that emerge from this review will strengthen arguments to support measurement validity which in turn will support the defensibility of study finding interpretations. An example from pharmacy education research is used to contextualize the concepts introduced. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Toward a Freedom to Learn in Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Cheryl

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid of professional continuing education and Carl Rogers's humanistic philosophy supporting freedom in learning is proposed, and the five principles of the philosophy are examined for their potential for transfer to professional education. (MSE)

  20. Discrepancies between Patients' Preferences and Educational Programs on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Survey in Community Pharmacies and Hospital Consultations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Macquart de Terline

    Full Text Available Oral anticoagulation therapy is increasingly used for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic complications in various clinical situations. Nowadays, education programs for patients treated with anticoagulants constitute an integrated component of their management. However, such programs are usually based on the healthcare providers' perceptions of what patients should know, rather than on patients' preferences.To investigate patients' viewpoints on educational needs and preferred modalities of information delivery.We conducted an observational study based on a self-administered questionnaire. To explore several profiles of patients, the study was designed for enrolling patients in two settings: during outpatient consultations in a cardiology department (Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris, France and in community pharmacies throughout France.Of the 371 patients who completed the questionnaire, 187 (50.4% were recruited during an outpatient consultation and 184 (49.6% were recruited in community pharmacies. 84.1% of patients were receiving a vitamin K antagonist and 15.6% a direct oral anticoagulant. Patients ranked 16 of 21 (76.2% questionnaire items on information about their treatment as important or essential; information on adverse effects of treatment was the highest ranked domain (mean score 2.38, 95% CI 2.30-2.46. Pharmacists (1.69, 1.58-1.80, nurses (1.05, 0.95-1.16, and patient associations (0.36, 0.29-0.44, along with group sessions (0.85, 0.75-0.95, the internet (0.77, 0.67-0.88, and delivery of material at the patient's home (1.26, 1.14-1.38, were ranked poorly in terms of delivering educational material.This study revealed substantial discrepancies between patient preferences and current educational programs. These findings should be useful for tailoring future educational programs that are better adapted to patients, with a potential associated enhancement of their effectiveness.

  1. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of educational intervention by health care providers on clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients in a Yemeni health facility. Methods: A prospective, one-group and pre- and post-test design to assess the effects of health care providers' education on clinical patient outcomes was ...

  2. Continuous professional development of educators: the state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher Education is one of the mechanisms that can be employed to provide and sustain reflective practice within CPD. Factors that may inhibit the capacity of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to render a sustainable service in this regard should be identified and circumvented. A necessary partner in enhancing the ...

  3. Integration through adult and continuing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Geiger, Tinne

    2011-01-01

    In the Nordic countries a large proportion of immigrants and descendants are excluded from the labour market and the group is overrepresented among the unemployed. International experience shows that adult education and training can be useful tools in providing immigrant groups a foothold in the ...... countries, analysing the use of adult education and training targeted at the integration of immigrants into the labour market (employability) . This article outlines the findings and relates them to international experience....

  4. NSAID-avoidance education in community pharmacies for patients at high risk for acute kidney injury, upstate New York, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Soo Min; Cerulli, Jennifer; Grabe, Darren W; Fox, Chester; Vassalotti, Joseph A; Prokopienko, Alexander J; Pai, Amy Barton

    2014-12-18

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently associated with community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI), a strong risk factor for development and progression of chronic kidney disease. Using access to prescription medication profiles, pharmacists can identify patients at high risk for NSAID-induced AKI. The primary objective of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a community pharmacy-based patient education program on patient knowledge of NSAID-associated renal safety concerns. Patients receiving prescription medications for hypertension or diabetes mellitus were invited to participate in an educational program on the risks of NSAID use. A patient knowledge questionnaire (PKQ) consisting of 5 questions scored from 1 to 5 was completed before and after the intervention. Information was collected on age, race, sex, and frequency of NSAID use. A total of 152 participants (60% women) completed both the pre- and post-intervention questionnaire; average age was 54.6 (standard deviation [SD], 17.5). Mean pre-intervention PKQ score was 3.3 (SD, 1.4), and post-intervention score was 4.6 (SD, 0.9) (P = .002). Participants rated program usefulness (1 = not useful to 5 = extremely useful) as 4.2 (SD, 1.0). In addition, 48% reported current NSAID use and 67% reported that the program encouraged them to limit their use. NSAID use was common among patients at high risk for AKI. A brief educational intervention in a community pharmacy improved patient knowledge on NSAID-associated risks. Pharmacists practicing in the community can partner with primary care providers in the medical home model to educate patients at risk for AKI.

  5. Medication therapy management services in community pharmacy: a pilot programme in HIV specialty pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Ashley; Best, Brookie M; Miller, Teresa A; Gilmer, Todd P; Hirsch, Jan D

    2010-12-01

    Pharmacist-provided medication therapy management services (MTMS) have been shown to increase patient's adherence to medications, improve health outcomes and reduce overall medical costs. The purpose of this study was to describe a pilot programme that provided pharmacy-based MTMS for patients with HIV/AIDS in the state of California, USA. Pharmacists from the 10 pilot pharmacies were surveyed using an online data collection tool. Information was collected to describe the types of MTMS offered, proportion of patients actively using specific MTMS, pharmacist beliefs regarding effect on patient outcomes and barriers to providing MTMS, ability to offer MTMS without pilot programme funding and specialized pharmacist or staff training. Each responding pharmacy (7 of 10) varied in the number of HIV/AIDS patients served and prescription volume. All pharmacists had completed HIV/AIDS-related continuing education programmes, and some had other advanced training. The type of MTMS being offered varied at each pharmacy with 'individualized counselling by a pharmacist when overuse or underuse was detected' and 'refill reminders by telephone' being actively used by the largest proportion of patients. Most, but not all, pharmacists cited reimbursement as a barrier to MTMS provision. Pharmacists believed the MTMS they provide resulted in improved satisfaction (patient and provider), medication usage, therapeutics response and patient quality of life. The type of MTMS offered, and proportion of patients actively using, varied among participating pilot pharmacies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Continuing education for performance improvement: a creative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patti-Ann; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L; Zisblatt, Lara

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, continuing medical education has begun to focus on performance improvement initiatives for physician practices. Boston University School of Medicine's (BUSM) Continuing Nursing Education Accredited Provider Unit has begun a creative project to award nursing contact hours for nurses' participation in performance improvement activities. This column highlights its initial efforts. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Towards More Effective Continuing Education and Training for Australian Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen; Choy, Sarojni; Dymock, Darryl; Smith, Ray; Henderson, Amanda; Tyler, Mark; Kelly, Ann

    2015-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year research project that aimed to identify and evaluate the potential models and practices of learning support that might constitute a national approach to workers' continuing education and training. The identification of a national approach to continuing education and training is emerging as a priority for…

  8. Concept and Theory in Continuing Education for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pauline Taglialavore

    1987-01-01

    The explosion of new knowledge and increased specialization have heightened the nurse's need for continuing education. The concepts of motivation, obsolescence, competence, and lifelong learning are inherent in the continuing education process. These concepts and the theories of learning and change are presented and related to nursing practice.…

  9. Real Estate Tax Exemption for Continuing Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charters, Alexander N.

    A court case in which the issue was whether Syracuse University was entitled to tax exemption for certain real property used for administrative offices, classrooms, student housing, and parking lots by its continuing education programs, particularly the Continuing Education Center for the Public Service, is presented. The finding of the Court is…

  10. Continuing Professional Education for Teachers and University and College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranton, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, the author explores a variety of aspects of continuing professional education for teachers and university and college faculty members. She discusses the kinds of knowledge that are addressed and the role of online learning in continuing professional education.

  11. Using Principles of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses in School Nurse Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Ruth K.; Sprague-McRae, Julie

    2014-01-01

    School nurses require ongoing continuing education in a number of areas. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) framework can be utilized in considering school nurses' roles and developing continuing education. Focusing on neurology continuing education, the QSEN framework is illustrated with the example of concussion management…

  12. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION: CLOSING THE GAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    medical education (CME) entails in- service training necessary to update knowledge and skills and maintain an effective and relevant delivery of health task ... person working life3. This write-up attempts to re- echo the concept of CME as a key to improving medical practice with emphasis on the contending issues in the ...

  13. Report on Health Manpower and Programs in Ohio: Part Two. Allied Health, Area Health Education Centers, Dentistry, Emergency Medical Services, Nursing, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, and Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio Board of Regents, Columbus.

    Information on health occupations educational programs in Ohio and current and projected employment needs for health professionals are presented. The following health fields are examined: allied health, dentistry, emergency medical service, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine. Issues and trends affecting each field are…

  14. Using Your VOICE(S: Adding Telephonic Communication to Pharmacy Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorin B Grieve

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacists utilize a myriad of communication methods to deliver patient care. One of the most prevalent communication methods is the telephone. The University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy created a novel instructional and assessment technique to enhance student pharmacist training experiences in telephonic communication within the PharmD curriculum. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties   Type: Note

  15. University Continuing Education for Lifelong Learning in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejoo

    2008-01-01

    Lifelong education achieves its goals when it improves people's quality of life and when it brings social cohesion and development. University continuing education (UCE) has contributed to the expansion of higher education opportunities in terms of its quantity. However, we have to look further than sheer volume of activity. Original ideals of…

  16. Initial teacher education and continuing professional development for science teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry

    2011-01-01

    Research into ways of improving the initial education and continuing professional development of science teachers is closely related to both common and unique strands. The field is complex since science teachers teach at different educational levels, are often educated in different science subjec...

  17. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  18. A study on the continuing education of radiologic technologists: Focused on current status and satisfaction of continuing education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hye Lim; Choi, In Seok; Nam, So Ra; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yoon, Yong Su; Her, Jae; Han, Seong Gyu; Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of bio-convergence engineering, graduate school, Korea university, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Duck Sun [Korea university college of medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we surveyed the current status, satisfaction and demand of radiologic technologist continuing education for 93 radiologic technologists who participated in the continuing education. To understand the current status and general evaluation and to find out the improvement direction, survey was conducted on 3 categories: participation, satisfaction and demand of continuing education. In addition, we analyzed the continuing education implementation status and the management system by collecting related regulations. As a result, the education completion rates of radiologic technologists from 2010 to 2012 were respectively 42.6%, 43.4% and 34.2%; the rates were similar to other medical technician’s average education completion rates. According to the survey, in case of participation, the most frequent answer was ‘more than five times less than 10 times per year’ with 48.4% and in satisfaction section, the most common answer was ‘Average(3)’ with 34.4%. In demand of continuing education section, 32.8% of the respondents chose ‘Clinical skill training in major field’. In the results of this research, continuing education needs to be managed in the direction of helping radiologists improve their personal ability and self development. Furthermore, to meet the demand of radiologists, the quality of continuing education should be improved to satisfy the educatee.

  19. A study on the continuing education of radiologic technologists: Focused on current status and satisfaction of continuing education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Hye Lim; Choi, In Seok; Nam, So Ra; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yoon, Yong Su; Her, Jae; Han, Seong Gyu; Kim, Jung Min; Ahn, Duck Sun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we surveyed the current status, satisfaction and demand of radiologic technologist continuing education for 93 radiologic technologists who participated in the continuing education. To understand the current status and general evaluation and to find out the improvement direction, survey was conducted on 3 categories: participation, satisfaction and demand of continuing education. In addition, we analyzed the continuing education implementation status and the management system by collecting related regulations. As a result, the education completion rates of radiologic technologists from 2010 to 2012 were respectively 42.6%, 43.4% and 34.2%; the rates were similar to other medical technician’s average education completion rates. According to the survey, in case of participation, the most frequent answer was ‘more than five times less than 10 times per year’ with 48.4% and in satisfaction section, the most common answer was ‘Average(3)’ with 34.4%. In demand of continuing education section, 32.8% of the respondents chose ‘Clinical skill training in major field’. In the results of this research, continuing education needs to be managed in the direction of helping radiologists improve their personal ability and self development. Furthermore, to meet the demand of radiologists, the quality of continuing education should be improved to satisfy the educatee

  20. Issues Facing Pharmacy Leaders in 2015: Suggestions for Pharmacy Strategic Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 include practice model growth and the role of pharmacy students, clinical privileging of health-system pharmacists and provider status, medication error prevention, and specialty pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide practical approaches to 4 issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 to help them focus their department’s goals. This article will address (1) advances in the pharmacy practice model initiative and the role of pharmacy students, (2) the current thinking of pharmacists being granted clinical privileges in health systems, (3) updates on preventing harmful medication errors, and (4) the growth of specialty pharmacy services. The sample template of a strategic plan may be used by a pharmacy department in 2015 in an effort to continue developing patient-centered pharmacy services. PMID:25717212

  1. Issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015: suggestions for pharmacy strategic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Robert J

    2015-02-01

    Issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 include practice model growth and the role of pharmacy students, clinical privileging of health-system pharmacists and provider status, medication error prevention, and specialty pharmacy services. The goal of this article is to provide practical approaches to 4 issues facing pharmacy leaders in 2015 to help them focus their department's goals. This article will address (1) advances in the pharmacy practice model initiative and the role of pharmacy students, (2) the current thinking of pharmacists being granted clinical privileges in health systems, (3) updates on preventing harmful medication errors, and (4) the growth of specialty pharmacy services. The sample template of a strategic plan may be used by a pharmacy department in 2015 in an effort to continue developing patient-centered pharmacy services.

  2. ASHP statement on the pharmacy technician's role in pharmacy informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The American Society of Health- System Pharmacists (ASHP) believes that specially trained pharmacy technicians can assume important supportive roles in pharmacy informatics. These roles include automation and technology systems management, management of projects, training and education, policy and governance, customer service, charge integrity, and reporting. Such roles require pharmacy technicians to gain expertise in information technology (IT) systems, including knowledge of interfaces, computer management techniques, problem resolution, and database maintenance. This knowledge could be acquired through specialized training or experience in a health science or allied scientific field (e.g., health informatics). With appropriate safeguards and supervision, pharmacy technician informaticists (PTIs) will manage IT processes in health-system pharmacy services, ensuring a safe and efficient medication-use process.

  3. Pharmacy alternatives (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common source for obtaining prescriptions is the local pharmacy. Usually the pharmacy is located in a drug or grocery store. ... some insurance companies have chosen is mail-order pharmacy. Once a pharmacy has been chosen it is ...

  4. Pharmacy students' perceptions of natural science and mathematics subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Wilson, Sarah Ellen; Wan, Kai-Wai

    2014-08-15

    To determine the level of importance pharmacy students placed on science and mathematics subjects for pursuing a career in pharmacy. Two hundred fifty-four students completed a survey instrument developed to investigate students' perceptions of the relevance of science and mathematics subjects to a career in pharmacy. Pharmacy students in all 4 years of a master of pharmacy (MPharm) degree program were invited to complete the survey instrument. Students viewed chemistry-based and biology-based subjects as relevant to a pharmacy career, whereas mathematics subjects such as physics, logarithms, statistics, and algebra were not viewed important to a career in pharmacy. Students' experience in pharmacy and year of study influenced their perceptions of subjects relevant to a pharmacy career. Pharmacy educators need to consider how they can help students recognize the importance of scientific knowledge earlier in the pharmacy curriculum.

  5. Center for Continuing Education and Community Service at Kuwait University: A Model in Leadership for Adult and Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, Eissa M.; Albustan, Suad A.

    2009-01-01

    Education should not be limited only to formal school education but individuals should always find ways and means to increase their knowledge and improve their skills. The rapid flow of knowledge and social change, the discovery of new techniques and innovations, etc call for continuous learning. Individuals who missed formal education looked to…

  6. Branding a college of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2012-11-12

    In a possible future of supply-demand imbalance in pharmacy education, a brand that positively differentiates a college or school of pharmacy from its competitors may be the key to its survival. The nominal group technique, a structured group problem-solving and decision-making process, was used during a faculty retreat to identify and agree on the core qualities that define the brand image of Midwestern University's College of Pharmacy in Glendale, AZ. Results from the retreat were provided to the faculty and students, who then proposed 168 mottos that embodied these qualities. Mottos were voted on by faculty members and pharmacy students. The highest ranked 24 choices were submitted to the faculty, who then selected the top 10 finalists. A final vote by students was used to select the winning motto. The methods described here may be useful to other colleges and schools of pharmacy that want to better define their own brand image and strengthen their organizational culture.

  7. Interdisciplinary education in palliative care: impact on attitudes of students in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and chaplaincy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Susan L; Brechtelsbauer, David; Heins, Jodi; Holland, Peter; Schroeder, Pamela A

    2012-10-01

    Interdisciplinary education among health professions has been recommended, and related evaluation can be found in the literature. However questions remain on how effective interdisciplinary education is and what impact it has. The objective of this study was to determine changes in student attitudes and perceptions upon completion of a 5-week interdisciplinary palliative care seminar. Pre-test and post-test instruments were administered at three five-week Interdisciplinary Palliative Care Seminars in Sioux Falls, SD during 2009-2010. The central hypotheses were that, at the conclusion of the seminar, students will have greater familiarity with their role in a team and more understanding of the roles of other disciplines in palliative care, and will identify positive contributions to professional practice and patient care using the team approach. Both quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed. Participating students in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and chaplaincy (N = 88) completed surveys. Quantitative data suggest that interdisciplinary education enhances students' understanding of their discipline and the work of other disciplines. Data show students perceive the team approach as enhancing patient outcomes, goal setting, and communication among colleagues. Qualitative data reinforced the importance of interdisciplinary education while revealing strains among disciplines in hierarchy and valuing. Playing one's part in the team strengthens students' confidence and comfort in interdisciplinary settings. Yet, the hazard of experiencing the limitations of teamwork in action must be acknowledged for some.

  8. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  9. Using quantum principles to develop independent continuing nursing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurlinden, Jeffrey; Pepsnik, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Innovations in health care call for fresh approaches to continuing nursing education that support lateral relationships, teamwork, and collaboration. To foster this transformation, we devised the following education principles: Everyone teaches, everyone learns; embrace probability; information is dynamic; and trust professionals to practice professionally. These principles guided the development of seven independent, practice-specific, evidence-based continuing nursing education programs totaling 21.5 contact hours for casual-status nurses who practiced as childbirth educators. The programs were popular, promoted teamwork, and increased communication about evidence-based practice.

  10. Collaborative pharmacy practice: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law AV

    2013-06-01

    practice in health profession education. Other challenges need to be addressed across health systems, given the inefficiencies and problems that arise from lack of communication and coordination of patient care including medication nonadherence, errors and patient safety, complexity of compounded health problems, and potential liability. The existing evidence needs to be examined to address some challenges and improve infrastructure for CPP. Keywords: collaborative pharmacy practice, collaboration model, interprofessional education, collaborative patient care, coordination of care, continuity of care

  11. Continuing geographic education model contribution to environmental culture development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of geographic culture and educations were found in schools and communities caused by formal education systems shortcomings, poor geographic educative influence aside learning institutions, and lose comprehension of individual and social needs. The main objective of the research supporting this article was to devise a continuing geographic education model for social agents at schools and communities, as a requirement to attain a sustainable development based on the practical usage of this model to favor the organization of its systematic cultural influences. This research is part of a larger project leaded by the author and is derived from his PH D studies. The findings are being appraised since 2005 in social and educative contexts of Camagüey Province making evident the validity of the model. Key words: continuing geographic education model, geographic education, geographic culture.

  12. Trends in Adult and Continuing Education in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Nuissl

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution summarizes the most important trends in adult education in Germany as they were elaborated in a secondary analytic research project of the DIE (Deutsches Institut für Erwachsenenbildung – German Institute for Adult Education in 2007. According to the study, participation in continuing education in Germany is increasing after long years of decrease, even though, overall, financing of adult education has been further reduced. Cooperation as well as competition between continuing education institutions has increased. Course offers have become shorter, counselling and information have more significant roles than in the past, and those employed in adult education, especially teaching staff, have a higher level of qualifications than before. Adult education policy in Germany has varying aims as a result of the federal structure of the country. Incentives for vocational and workplace training predominate however.

  13. A new vision for distance learning and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Ronald M

    2005-01-01

    Increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) are taking place at a time of significant developments in educational thinking and new learning technologies. Such developments allow today's CME providers to better meet the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing education: convenience, relevance, individualization, self-assessment, independent learning, and a systematic approach. The International Virtual Medical School (IVIMEDS) provides a case study that illustrates how rapid growth of the Internet and e-learning can alter undergraduate education and has the potential to alter the nature of CME. Key components are a bank of reusable learning objects, a virtual practice with virtual patients, a learning-outcomes framework, and self-assessment instruments. Learning is facilitated by a curriculum map, guided-learning resources, "ask-the-expert" opportunities, and collaborative or peer-to-peer learning. The educational philosophy is "just-for-you" learning (learning customized to the content, educational strategy, and distribution needs of the individual physician) and "just-in-time" learning (learning resources available to physicians when they are required). Implications of the new learning technologies are profound. E-learning provides a bridge between the cutting edge of education and training and outdated procedures embedded in institutions and professional organizations. There are important implications, too, for globalization in medical education, for multiprofessional education, and for the continuum of education from undergraduate to postgraduate and continuing education.

  14. Opioid use in palliative care | Hosking | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. Effects of continuing paediatric education in interpersonal communication skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van; Holl, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Paediatric care places great demands on interpersonal communication skills, especially as regards the handling of psychosocial issues. Recent shifts in paediatric morbidity and increases in patient empowerment furthermore emphasize the need for continuing paediatric education in communication

  16. History of Continuing Nursing Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alice M.

    1998-01-01

    Nursing history since 1853 is presented to identify issues in continuing nursing education, such as the influence of feminism and professionalism, changing constituencies, and philosophies in health care. (SK)

  17. Neurosciences Continuing Education: An Adult With New-Onset Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Rimas V

    2018-04-01

    The case of a 43-year-old woman with new-onset seizures is presented within the context of a continuing education quiz. Details regarding the underlying etiology and contemporary advances in the literature are referenced.

  18. Continuing Education in Research Ethics for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia

    2002-01-01

    Review of professional nursing statements, federal policy, and recommendations for protection of human research subjects resulted in a topic and content outline for research ethics training for nurses. Suggestions for continuing education programs on research ethics were formulated. (SK)

  19. Strategic Market Planning in Conglomerate Continuing Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, James P.

    1987-01-01

    The author tells how very large, multidivision continuing education programs can use their size as a marketing advantage. Some advantages include (1) superior service, (2) an image of high quality, (3) the bandwagon effect, and (4) stronger buying power. (CH)

  20. Learning as the Basis for Continuing Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Barbara J.; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an update and expansion of previous work and explores how professionals construct knowledge in the context of their practice by connecting concepts from their experiences and continuing professional education activities.

  1. Mentoring and Informal Learning as Continuing Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the role of mentoring in continuing professional education from a critical perspective, addressing informal and formal mentoring relationships while highlighting their potential to encourage critical reflection, learning, and coconstruction of knowledge.

  2. Strengthening healthcare delivery in Haiti through nursing continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M; Julmisse, M; Marcelin, N; Merry, L; Tuck, J; Gagnon, A J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to (1) highlight nursing continuing education as a key initiative for strengthening healthcare delivery in low-resource settings, and (2) provide an example of a nursing continuing education programme in Haiti. Haiti and other low-resource settings face extreme challenges including severe shortages of healthcare workers, high rates of nurse out-migration and variations in nurse competency at entry-to-practice. Nursing continuing education has the potential to address these challenges and improve healthcare delivery through enhanced nurse performance and retention; however, it is underutilized in low-resource settings. A case study is presented from the Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais in Mirebalais, Haiti of a new nursing continuing education programme called the Beyond Expert Program. The case study highlights eight key dimensions of nursing continuing education in low-resource settings: (1) involving local stakeholders in planning process, (2) targeting programme to nurse participant level and area of care, (3) basing course content on local context, (4) including diverse range of nursing topics, (5) using participatory teaching methods, (6) addressing resource constraints in time and scheduling, (7) evaluating and monitoring outcomes, and (8) establishing partnerships. The case study provides guidance for others wishing to develop programmes in similar settings. Creating a nursing continuing education programme in a low-resource setting is possible when there is commitment and engagement for nursing continuing education at all levels of the organization. Our report suggests a need for policy-makers in resource-limited settings to make greater investments in nursing continuing education as a focus of human resources for health, as it is an important strategy for promoting nurse retention, building the knowledge and skill of the existing nursing workforce, and raising the image of nursing in low-resource settings. © 2015

  3. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  4. Content analysis of continuing education for cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Virginia L; Crenshaw, Jeannette T; Gilder, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to assess free and low-cost web-based continuing education activities to determine if they reflect updated national guidelines for cervical cancer screening. A qualitative design and descriptive statistics were used to conduct a content analysis. An abstraction tool was used to evaluate 15 continuing education activities. Data collection was conducted between January and February 2013 by two registered nurses. The results were recorded independently and compared for agreement between data collectors, as well as inter-rater reliability of the data collectors, and the abstraction tool was used to collect data for the analysis. The majority of the continuing education activities included the updated guidelines for screening intervals, the age to begin screening and when to discontinue screening. Most of the activities also indicated that human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is not recommended for younger women. Very few of the continuing education activities included tips for providers to use when counselling patients. The correct information on age-appropriate screening intervals and HPV co-testing was included in the continuing education activities reviewed. The areas that were largely underrepresented in the continuing education activities were the risk factors, prevention measures for transmission of HPV, patient counselling about HPV and the appropriate screening practices. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  5. Continuing education for Physical Education teachers: Assistive Technology in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Salzani Fiorini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the development of continuing education for physical education teachers towards the incorporation of Assistive Technology and the creation of favorable conditions to an inclusive school. The methodology employed was reflective and collaborative research. Two teachers who were facing difficulties to include a physically disabled student and one student with global developmental delay took part in the study. The continuing education plan comprised three steps: 1 reflecting on their own practice after watching a video and planning one lesson, together with the researcher, seeking to incorporate Assistive Technology and favor inclusion; 2 videoing the lesson; 3 evaluating and reflecting on what was planned and what was executed and planning a new lesson. Some factors were seen to be essential to the development of continuing education: considering the teacher’s demand, developing collaborative work, promoting reflection on the practices and having Assistive Technology as a support to the human element.

  6. Social Work Continuing Education: Current Issues and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education is arising as an area of rapid growth and increased attention in the social work profession. Conceptually, the impetus and focus are on the promotion of the principles of lifelong learning and professional replenishment; but pragmatically, the driving force has been the virtually universal requirement of continuing education…

  7. A Report of the Center for Continuing Education, Drake University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Clarence H., Ed.

    With assistance from Title I of the Higher Education Act, a two-day workshop for counselors in Iowa was sponsored by the Center for Continuing Education at Drake University. Proceedings of the workshop, reported in this publication, include four interlocking dimensions: (1) the counselor's role in vocational decision making, (2) the counselor's…

  8. Impact of diabetes continuing education on health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The short-term impact of a continuing medical education program on providers. Diabetes Care. 1999; 22: 1929. 25. Gagliardino JJ, González C, Caporale JE. Diabetes. Education Study Group of Argentina. The diabetes- related attitudes of health care professionals and persons with diabetes in Argentina. Rev Panam Salud.

  9. Exceptional Adults Learn in Broward Community College's Continuing Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lucia O'C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Educational Programs for Exceptional Adults (EPEA), a continuing education project for mentally and physically handicapped adults at Broward (Florida) Community College, offers a varied curriculum in personal and vocational adjustment, home management, and leisure time skills, includes a summer camp program, and draws on the support of community…

  10. Continuous Improvement in Action: Educators' Evidence Use for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Marisa; Redding, Christopher; Rubin, Mollie

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the article is the process educators use to interpret data to turn it into usable knowledge (Honig & Coburn, 2008) while engaging in a continuous improvement process. The authors examine the types of evidence educators draw upon, its perceived relevance, and the social context in which the evidence is examined. Evidence includes…

  11. Problem Based Learning in Continuing Education--Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeager, Nikolaj; Thomassen, Anja Overgaard; Laursen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the PBL model applied at Aalborg University in order to discuss research findings with regard to the educational effectiveness of the PBL model in securing an efficient transfer of learning from university driven continuing education to the context of the workplace. In recent years Aalborg University has seen a progressive…

  12. Social Work Continuing Education: A Statewide Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianino, Mark; Ruth, Betty J.; Miyake Geron, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings from a 2013 qualitative study of social work continuing education (CE) in Massachusetts. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 75 participants from key stakeholder groups: practitioners, educators, licensing board members, and agency administrators. Although positive perspectives surfaced--such as diversity of CE…

  13. Adult, Continuing, and Health Professions Education: Moving Forward Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Barbara J.; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2018-01-01

    In this final chapter, we summarize the themes of this sourcebook along with the issues and trends in health professions education (HPE) identified by the chapter authors. By comparing and contrasting HPE and adult and continuing education, we discuss ways in which the two can be integrated.

  14. Integrating Aesthetics: Transforming Continuing Education through Africentric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Auburn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Manuscript written for the Adult Education Research Conference based on dissertation research completed at National Louis University. Purpose: To increase knowledge base of art based learning as a mode of anti-racist pedagogy and the use of an Africentric framework for continuing and professional education. Setting: African Centered…

  15. Student Performance Requirements: Minitary Service. Continuation Education System Development Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Puente Union High School District, CA.

    Funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, the La Puente, California, continuation education project investigated (1) attitudes of former students concerning the success of the school in preparing them for entry into military service, (2) the minimal skills and knowledge required by each of the armed forces, (3)…

  16. Challenges of Women Participation in Continuing Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engr E. Egbochukwu

    higher education programme with particular focus on the B.Ed part-time programme of the University of Lagos ... challenges of women participants in the programme include time constraints, increasing marital demand, poor .... young girls and married women in educational pursuit and had continued to exhibit their desire or ...

  17. Public Administration Education in Europe: Continuity or Reorientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    The article explores the changing patterns of disciplinary orientation in European public administration (PA) education. The study builds on an earlier research, which defined three distinct clusters of countries, based on their specific PA education tradition. It asks whether countries' movement away from the Legalist paradigm has continued since…

  18. Complete-block scheduling for advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Randy C; Weitzel, Kristin W

    2013-12-01

    An innovative approach to meeting increased student demand for advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) is described, including lessons learned during a two-year pilot project. To achieve more efficient allocation of preceptor resources, the University of Florida College of Pharmacy (UFCOP) adopted a new APPE rotation model in which 20 pharmacy students per year complete all required and elective APPEs at one practice site, an affiliated academic medical center. Relative to the prevailing model of experiential training for Pharm.D. students, the "complete-block scheduling" model offers a number of potential benefits to students, preceptors, and the pharmacy school. In addition to potentially reduced student housing expenses and associated conveniences, complete-block scheduling may enable (1) more efficient use of teaching resources, (2) increased collaboration among preceptors, (3) greater continuity and standardization of educational experiences, and (4) enhanced opportunities for students to engage in longer and more complex research projects. The single-site APPE rotation model also can provide value to the training site by enabling the extension of clinical pharmacy services; for example, UFCOP students perform anticoagulation monitoring and discharge medication counseling at the host institution. Despite logistical and other challenges encountered during pilot testing of the new scheduling model, the program has been well received by students and preceptors alike. Complete-block APPE scheduling is a viable model for some health systems to consider as a means of streamlining experiential education practices and helping to ensure high-quality clinical rotations for Pharm.D. students.

  19. Challenges in nursing continuing education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Jalil; Moeini, Mahin; Soleimani, Marzie

    2015-01-01

    Nursing continuing education with development of knowledge, skill, and attitude results in improvement of nursing activity, and thus improves the health care in the society. If the education is not planned and implement properly, it affects the patient care. This study was designed to explore the challenges of nursing continuing education in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. The research was conducted from April 2012 to February 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was begun with purposeful method and continued with snowball method. Thirty-nine participants were selected among the nurses of Alzahra, Kashani, and Noor hospitals, nursing and midwifery faculty, continuing education center, and the vice-chancellery for treatment. The participants were both learners and planners of continuing education program. In this descriptive explorative qualitative research, we interviewed 39 participants in five focus group and five individual interviews, until data saturation was achieved. We used semi-structured interviews and field notes for data gathering, and members checking, triangulation (data and method), peer debriefing, and peer review to increase the strength of data. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis method that was proposed by Broun and Clarke in 2006. Data analysis produced 175 initial codes, 8 subthemes, and 5 main themes. The main themes included: Learners related factors, teachers related factors, educational process related factors, inadequate facilities, and defective evaluation. According to the results, we need to revise the educational process in nursing continuing education. To achieve this goal, we need a team for needs assessment, planning, and evaluation. In addition, we must pay attention to educators' and learners' issues.

  20. Continuing medical education based on the needs of society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmanzadeh H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main reasons of inefficiency in traditional medical education is the application of diseaseoriented educational system in continuing medical education, instead of a symptom-oriented approach. Purpose. To determine the most common and important symptoms and complaints among Iranian nation according to the viewpoints of general parishioners. Method. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data and 153 scaled-questions about body systems and organs, which were designed based on Likert style. A pilot study was performed. Of 26217 GPs all over the country, 5000 physicians were selected by stage randomized sampling method. Of this number, 1714 GPs answered and returned the questionnaire. Result. Demographic data, the relative number of male and female GPs, and relative and absolute distribution of GPs were described and analyzed using Chi square test. The difference of GPs’ opinions about the most common symptoms were analyzed according to the physicians’ gender, duration of practice and their province of practice; there were significant differences found in some systems. Conclusion. It seems that continuing medical education programs should be planned based on a modern evidencebased approach and according to the society’s and practicing physicians’ needs in order to achieve a communityoriented medical education system. Keywords: DISEASE-ORIENTED MEDICAL EDUCATION, CLINICAL PROCESS, CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION, GENERAL PRACTITIONERS, PERCEIVED NEEDS ASSESSMENT, EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICAL EDUCATION, COMMUNITY-ORIENTED MEDICAL EDUCATION

  1. Continuous Improvement in Nursing Education through Total Quality Management (TQM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Wai Mun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM has generally been validated as a crucial revolution in the management field. Many academicians believe that the concept of TQM is applicable to academics and provides guiding principles towards improving education. Therefore, an increasing number of educational institutions such as schools, colleges and universities have started to embrace TQM philosophies to their curricula.Within the context of TQM, this paper would explore the concept of continuous improvement by using the Deming philosophy. Subsequently, this paper would elaborate on the application of TQM to bring about continuous improvement in the current education system.

  2. Effect of Two Educational Interventions on Pharmacy Students' Confidence and Skills in Dealing with Adolescents with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Amy; Shah, Smita; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate the feasibility of incorporating the Triple A programme into the undergraduate pharmacy curriculum; (2) to compare the effect of the Triple A programme versus problem-based learning methods on the asthma knowledge of final-year pharmacy students and their perceived confidence in dealing…

  3. A Model of Small-Group Problem-Based Learning in Pharmacy Education: Teaching in the Clinical Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumsikiew, Jeerisuda; Donsamak, Sisira; Saeteaw, Manit

    2015-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) is an alternate method of instruction that incorporates basic elements of cognitive learning theory. Colleges of pharmacy use PBL to aid anticipated learning outcomes and practice competencies for pharmacy student. The purpose of this study were to implement and evaluate a model of small group PBL for 5th year pharmacy…

  4. The Development of Self-Efficacy and Self-Esteem in Pharmacy Students Based on Experiential Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorra, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This doctoral thesis contributes to the literature on self-efficacy and self-esteem and the relationship to a student's school, age, gender, ethnicity, GPA, paid and introductory pharmacy practice experiences in a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. Graduates with a high level of self-efficacy and self-esteem are more desirable as pharmacists…

  5. First-year Student Pharmacists' Spirituality and Perceptions Regarding the Role of Spirituality in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Bobby; White, Annesha; Shogbon, Angela

    2017-08-01

    Objective: To measure student pharmacists' spirituality utilizing validated survey instruments and to determine perceptions regarding the anticipated role of spirituality in academic course work and professional practice. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. The survey was offered to all first-year student pharmacists during the first week of the fall semester (2012-2015). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze data. Results: A total of 580 students (98%) participated. The majority of students reported having each of the spiritual experiences on most days of the week or more frequently (58% to 89% based on individual item). Furthermore, 57% of students anticipate that matters of spirituality would be significant components of academic course work and 75% anticipate they would be incorporated into eventual professional practice settings. These perceptions were positively correlated to measures of spirituality and religiosity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that faculty should evaluate current and future incorporation of topics related to spirituality and health in pharmacy curriculum.

  6. First-year Student Pharmacists’ Spirituality and Perceptions Regarding the Role of Spirituality in Pharmacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Annesha; Shogbon, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To measure student pharmacists’ spirituality utilizing validated survey instruments and to determine perceptions regarding the anticipated role of spirituality in academic course work and professional practice. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive study. The survey was offered to all first-year student pharmacists during the first week of the fall semester (2012-2015). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze data. Results: A total of 580 students (98%) participated. The majority of students reported having each of the spiritual experiences on most days of the week or more frequently (58% to 89% based on individual item). Furthermore, 57% of students anticipate that matters of spirituality would be significant components of academic course work and 75% anticipate they would be incorporated into eventual professional practice settings. These perceptions were positively correlated to measures of spirituality and religiosity. Conclusion: These findings suggest that faculty should evaluate current and future incorporation of topics related to spirituality and health in pharmacy curriculum. PMID:28970609

  7. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-04-01

    Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Workplace continuing education for nurses caring for hospitalised older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbusch, Jennifer; Shaw, Maureen; Leblanc, Marie-Eve; Kjorven, Mary; Kwon, Jae-Yung; Blackburn, Lorraine; Lawrie, Barb; Shamatutu, Marilyn; Wolff, Angela C

    2017-12-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a workplace continuing education programme about nursing care of hospitalised older people. The healthcare system cannot rely solely upon nurses' prelicensure education to prepare them to meet the evolving needs of hospitalised older patients. Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic rise in the proportion of older people in hospitals, yet many nurses do not have specialised knowledge about the unique care needs of this population. A multimethod pre-to post-design was employed. Between September 2013 and April 2014, data were collected via surveys, focus groups and interviews. Thirty-two Registered Nurses initially enrolled in the programme of which 22 completed all data points. Three managers also participated in interviews. One-way repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate the effect of the programme and change over time. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Survey results indicated improvements in perceptions about nursing care of older people but no changes in knowledge. Themes generated from the qualitative data focused on participants' experiences of taking part in the programme and included: (i) relevance of content and delivery mode, (ii) value of participating in the programme and (iii) continuing education in the context of acute care. This study illustrated the potential role of workplace continuing education in improving care for hospitalised older people, particularly the potential to change nurses' perceptions about this population. Nurses prefer learning opportunities that are varied in delivery of educational elder-focused content and accessible at work. Organisational leaders need to consider strategies that minimise potential barriers to workplace continuing education. Workplace continuing education can play a key role in improving quality of care for hospitalized older adults and ought to be a priority for employers planning education for nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Continuing education in physical education at school: principals and challenges for a critical education project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ferreira de Souza Antunes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The theme of teacher's formation has gained a spotlight in academic research, especially in the context of the researches conducted in the perspective of the "researcher professor", and in the consolidation of the partnerships between universities and educational systems by promoting programs of continuing education. The Laboratory of Studies about School, Curriculum and Physical Education of the Faculty of Physical Education at the Federal University of Uberlândia (LECEF/FAEFI/UFU is constituted as a unifying space for teachers and students whose aim is the further study on issues related to school, teaching and curriculum planning for physical education as a curriculum component as well as providing space for continuing education to promote qualitative changes in teaching practice. This article presents a model of educational planning held on the curricular component of physical education, developed in a collective planning context, under an extension project offered by LECEF. We underline the principles and assumptions leading the planning process adopted. We emphasize that the collective work gives us dialogue, exchange of experience, inclination to listen, overcoming the difficulties of individualism and isolation presents in the organization and realization of pedagogical work routine.

  10. 34 CFR 389.1 - What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program? 389.1 Section 389.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued... CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS General § 389.1 What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program? This...

  11. Combining continuing education with expert consultation via telemedicine in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Xavier; Aird, James; Tho, Ly; Bintcliffe, Fiona; Monsell, Fergal; Gollogly, Jim; Noor, Saqib

    2014-04-01

    Telemedicine has the potential to increase access to both clinical consultation and continuing medical education in Cambodia. We present a Cambodian surgical centre's experience with a collaboration in which complicated orthopaedic cases were presented to a panel of consultants using free online videoconferencing software, providing a combined opportunity for both continuing education and the enhancement of patient care. Effects of the case conference on patient care were examined via a retrospective review and clinician perspectives were elicited via a qualitative survey. The case conference altered patient care in 69% of cases. All Cambodian staff reported learning from the conference and 78% reported changes in their care for patients not presented at the conference. Real-time videoconferencing between consultants in the developed world and physicians in a developing country may be an effective, low-cost and easily replicable means of combining direct benefits to patient care with continuing medical education.

  12. [Outcomes of Pharmaceutical Faculty-focused Introduction to Nursing Education for Pharmacy Students: A Questionnaire Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Takashi; Ohara, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

     The scope of pharmaceutical education in Japan has been expanding, and with it an awareness of the importance of team medical care. However, pharmaceutical education still gives little attention to the psychosocial aspects of care, instead focusing on the structures and functions of drugs. In contrast, nursing education emphasizes the fact that medical care involves patients' family and significant others as much as the patients themselves, and thus nursing students are taught the basic needs and developmental stages of those people requiring care alongside their practical nursing skills. In this study, we examined the effect of incorporating certain aspects of introductory nursing education into pharmaceutical education on the self-efficacy of pharmaceutical students. We thus ran an introduction to nursing education course for fourth-year pharmaceutical students (n=86). After the course had finished, we surveyed students about the course. Approximately 94.2% of the students became more interested in team medical care and nearly all (98.8%) thought that what they had learned in the course would be useful in their career. The results indicated that the introduction to nursing education course offered students an opportunity to acquire different viewpoints on clinical situations because the lectures were given by a pharmacist with a nurse license and they were based on his clinical experiences. We therefore propose that more facets of introductory nursing education be incorporated into pharmaceutical education to help students develop their ability to consider patients' psychosocial backgrounds.

  13. Competency, Programming, and Emerging Innovation in Graduate Education within Schools of Pharmacy: The Report of the 2016-2017 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloyac, Samuel M; Block, Kirsten F; Cavanaugh, Jane E; Dwoskin, Linda P; Melchert, Russell B; Nemire, Ruth E; O'Donnell, James M; Priefer, Ronny; Touchette, Daniel R

    2017-10-01

    Graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences is a cornerstone of research within pharmacy schools. Pharmaceutical scientists are critical contributors to addressing the challenges of new drug discovery, delivery, and optimal care in order to ensure improved therapeutic outcomes in populations of patients. The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) charged the 2016-2017 Research and Graduate Affairs Committee (RGAC) to define the competencies necessary for graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences (Charge 1), recommend collaborative curricular development across schools of pharmacy (Charge 2), recommend AACP programing for graduate education (Charge 3), and provide guidance on emerging areas for innovation in graduate education (Charge 4). With respect to Charges 1 and 2, the RGAC committee developed six domains of core competencies for graduate education in the pharmaceutical sciences as well as recommendations for shared programming. For Charge 3, the committee made 3 specific programming recommendations that include AACP sponsored regional research symposia, a professional development forum at the AACP INterim Meeting, and the addition of a graduate research and education poster session at the AACP Annual Meeting. For Charge 4, the committee recommended that AACP develop a standing committee of graduate program deans and directors to provide guidance to member schools in support of graduate program representation at AACP meetings, develop skills for interprofessional teamwork and augment research through integration of Pharm.D., Ph.D., postdoctoral associates, resident, and fellow experiences. Two proposed policy statements by the committee are that AACP believes core competencies are essential components of graduate education and AACP supports the inclusion of research and graduate education focuses in its portfolio of meetings and programs.

  14. [Twelve years of continuing medical education in Slovakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristúfek, P; Gajdosík, J

    2010-07-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is an important part of the medical practice today. After the pregraduate and postgraduate education each general practitioner and specialist should follow the CME to maintain, develop or increase the knowledge and professional skills. In May of 2004 a Slovak accreditation council for continuing medical education (SACCME) was established on the base of mutual agreement among statutory representatives of Slovak Medical University, Association of Medical Schools, Slovak Medical Association, Slovak Medical Chamber, and Association of Private Physicians as non governmental non for profit organisations. During the period of 2004-2009, the number of accredited events (educational meetings, conferences and congresses) increased from 133 to 938 including the autodidactic tests in medical journals. From the beginning of 2009, SACCME credits obtained by physicians yearly are being transferred to the database of Slovak medical chamber which is responsible by law for control of CME process.

  15. Recent trends in continuing medical education among obstetrician-gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwick, Richard M; Schulkin, Jay; Cooley, Sarah W; Janakiraman, Vanitha; Norwitz, Errol R; Robinson, Julian N

    2011-05-01

    To estimate current trends in continuing medical education among obstetrician-gynecologists in relation to the Maintenance of Certification program. A validated questionnaire was mailed to 1,030 randomly selected physicians of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada. Participants were asked about current practices and opinions regarding continuing medical education activities. Responses were compared between members mandated for Maintenance of Certification (board certification 1986 or later; time-limited certificate) or not (board certification before 1986; nontime-limited certificate). Five hundred twenty (50.4%) surveys were completed. Respondents were more often male (57.1%), generalists (87.3%), in community-based (73.8%) group practices (77.2%) with mean (±standard deviation) age 52.4±9.9 years. College physicians mandated to participate in the Maintenance of Certification program were more likely to rely on Annual Board Certification articles as a major source of continuing medical education credits compared with those not requiring Maintenance of Certification (79.9% compared with 44.6%, Pinternational meetings (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.67) and self-selected continuing medical education materials (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.14-0.60) as sources of continuing medical education credits. Despite these differences, physicians in both groups equally valued the relevance of Annual Board Certification articles (92.6% compared with 96.4%, P=.23), the importance of content at academic meetings (98.3% compared with 99.3%, P=.33), the usefulness of simulation drills (97.8% compared with 94.3%, P=.35), and the general ability of continuing medical education activities to improve skills as a physician (90.9% compared with 86.4%, P=.20). Requirement of the Maintenance of Certification program has led to significant changes in continuing medical education choices by obstetrician-gynecologists. The changes in continuing

  16. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p distance continuing education programs.

  17. Student Preferences on Gaming Aspects for a Serious Game in Pharmacy Practice Education: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Huan Ying; Poh, David Yan Hong; Wong, Li Lian; Yap, John Yin Gwee; Yap, Kevin Yi-Lwern

    2015-05-11

    Serious games are motivating and provide a safe environment for students to learn from their mistakes without experiencing any negative consequences from their actions. However, little is known about students' gaming preferences and the types of serious games they like to play for education. This study aims to determine the types of gaming aspects that students would like to play in a pharmacy-related serious game. A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered survey, which obtained students' responses on their preferences regarding various gaming aspects (reward systems, game settings, storylines, viewing perspectives, and gaming styles) and for a hypothetical gaming scenario (authentic simulation or post-apocalyptic fantasy). Descriptive statistics, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analyses. Response rate was 72.7% (497/684 undergraduates). The most popular game reward systems were unlocking mechanisms (112/497, 22.5%) and experience points (90/497, 18.1%). Most students preferred fantasy/medieval/mythic (253/497, 50.9%) and modern (117/497, 23.5%) settings, but lower year undergraduates preferred modern settings less than upper year seniors (47/236, 19.9% vs 70/242, 28.9%, P=.022). Almost one-third (147/497, 29.6%) preferred an adventurer storyline or an authentic pharmacy-related plot (119/497, 23.9%), and a collaborative game style was most preferred by the students (182/497, 36.6%). Three-dimensional game perspectives (270/497, 54.3%) were more popular than two-dimensional perspectives (221/497, 44.5%), especially among males than females (126/185, 68.1% vs 142/303, 46.9%, Pgame, a post-apocalyptic fantasy game (scenario B, 287/497, 57.7%) was more popular than an authentic simulation game (scenario A, 209/497, 42.1%). More males preferred the post-apocalyptic fantasy scenario than females (129/187, 69.0% vs 155/306, 50.7%, Pgame, based on an adventurer storyline with an unlocking mechanism reward system. A

  18. A Review of Integrated Courses in Pharmacy Education and Impact of Integration in Pharm D Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nikanmehr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, due to ever-increasing knowledge and large volumes of information, educational planners of various fields around the world, have been seeking to establish a better and faster refresh for learning. Integration can be a good educational strategy by blending different subjects and contents when presented to students. The aim of this study is to evaluate the medical literature about integration in the curriculum; its process, importance, necessity and different types of it.This review article was prepared by searching the PubMed database, Google Scholar and science direct websites, national and international journals in the field of medical education curricula. The keywords were educational planning, curriculum integration, and medical education with integration and incorporation.Integration and its eleven steps can be an important strategy in educational planning. According to various studies, integration can enhance the students’ learning and skills in medicinal and pharmaceutical care. It also improves the satisfaction of faculty and students, the quality of education and increases the students’ grades at their examinations. Considering the proper planning, cooperation and co-teaching of faculty members, focus on the desired performance of students and correct assessment of the fundamental principles of integration are crucial to this strategy.

  19. Apps for Health-Related Education in Pharmacy Practice: Needs Assessment Survey Among Patients Within a Large Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirk, Sean M; Wegrzyn, Nicole Marie

    2017-07-19

    preliminary needs assessment identified that patients are interested in using mHealth apps for health-related education in pharmacy practice, particularly if their health care provider recommends it. ©Sean M Mirk, Nicole Marie Wegrzyn. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 19.07.2017.

  20. Self-Assessment in Pharmacy and Health Science Education and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Renee L.; Ried, L. Douglas; Brazeau, Gayle

    2010-01-01

    Self-assessment is an important skill necessary for continued development of a health care professional from student pharmacist throughout their professional career. This paper reviews the literature on student and practitioner self-assessment and whether this skill can be improved upon. Although self-assessment appears to be a skill that can be improved, both students and professionals continue to have difficulty with accurate self-assessment. Experts' external assessment of students should remain the primary method of testing skills and knowledge until self-assessment strategies improve. While self-assessment is important to lifelong learning, external assessment is also important for practitioners' continuing professional development. PMID:20798800

  1. Pharmacy workers' sexually transmitted diseases/human immunodeficiency virus knowledge in Fuzhou, China: implications for human immunodeficiency virus testing, treatment, and prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Guan, Jihui; Wu, Zunyou; Li, Li; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Lin, Chunqing; Detels, Roger

    2009-04-01

    Pharmacies play a special role in providing treatment services for patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in China. There is a need to study the STD/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) knowledge among pharmacy workers in retail pharmacies. A total of 200 pharmacy workers were recruited from 120 randomly selected retail pharmacies in Fuzhou, China. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect information of demographics, working experience, pharmacy structure and clientele profile, and pharmacy workers' attitudes toward traditional Chinese folk remedies and their STD/HIV knowledge. Work-related training during the past 6 months, holding pharmacist license, and years of being a pharmacy worker showed significant association with STD/HIV knowledge. Work-related training also significantly associated with provision of consultation. Years of education and medical training, however, failed to show significant association with STD/HIV knowledge. In order to improve service quality and avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of STD/HIV, on-the-job training or continuous education for pharmacy workers should be required, implemented, and monitored as part of the national effort for STD control and treatment.

  2. Pharmacy Workers’ Sexually Transmitted Diseases/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Knowledge in Fuzhou, China: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Testing, Treatment, and Prevention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yi; Guan, Jihui; Wu, Zunyou; Li, Li; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Lin, Chunqing; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background Pharmacies play a special role in providing treatment services for patients with sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in China. There is a need to study the STD/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) knowledge among pharmacy workers in retail pharmacies. Method A total of 200 pharmacy workers were recruited from 120 randomly selected retail pharmacies in Fuzhou, China. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to collect information of demographics, working experience, pharmacy structure and clientele profile, and pharmacy workers’ attitudes toward traditional Chinese folk remedies and their STD/HIV knowledge. Results Work-related training during the past 6 months, holding pharmacist license, and years of being a pharmacy worker showed significant association with STD/HIV knowledge. Work-related training also significantly associated with provision of consultation. Years of education and medical training, however, failed to show significant association with STD/HIV knowledge. Conclusions In order to improve service quality and avoid misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of STD/HIV, on-the-job training or continuous education for pharmacy workers should be required, implemented, and monitored as part of the national effort for STD control and treatment. PMID:19265742

  3. 78 FR 42871 - Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver; Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... CFR Chapter III Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver; Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program for the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Centers (TACE Centers) AGENCY...) and continuing education (CE) provided to State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies and their...

  4. Uncertain aspirations for continuing in education: antecedents and associated outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Leslie Morrison; Schoon, Ingrid; Sabates, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    Relatively little is known about adolescents who hold uncertain aspirations, that is, those who do not know what they would like to do in the future regarding their educational or occupational plans. Drawing upon the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England born in 1989-1990, the authors tested a pathway model to investigate the antecedents of uncertain aspirations for continuing in education past compulsory schooling age (i.e., 16 years) and associated later educational outcomes. Gender differences in the pathways are also tested. Findings indicate that the relationship linking socioeconomic status to uncertain aspirations is mediated through parents' educational expectations and the relationship linking academic performance at age 11 to uncertain aspirations is mediated through parents' educational expectations and adolescents' self-perceived ability, which, in turn, predict academic performance at age 16 and educational enrollment at age 18. Gender differences in these processes are also evident: young males not only hold greater uncertainty about continuing in education, the consequences of uncertainty regarding later academic performance are worse for males than females.

  5. Report of the National Commission on Nurse Anesthesia Education. Current and future perspectives regarding the framework for nurse anesthesia education: nurse anesthesia curriculum in the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, Wayne State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, P

    1991-12-01

    The nurse anesthesia educational program at Wayne State University, Detroit, is one of four allied health programs that offers a master's degree from the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions. The program itself is housed in a teaching hospital, where CRNAs control and deliver the coursework. Advantages and limitations of this arrangement are analyzed and discussed.

  6. A cross-sectional survey examining the extent to which interprofessional education is used to teach nursing, pharmacy and medical students in Australian and New Zealand universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2012-09-01

    The current status of interprofessional education (IPE) in Australian and New Zealand universities is largely unexamined despite its generally acknowledged benefit. Data are also limited about the use of IPE in teaching medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medical students. For this reason a web-based cross-sectional survey was used to gather information from Australian and New Zealand universities offering nursing, pharmacy or medical programs. Responses were received from 31 of the 43 (72%) target universities. Eighty percent of the participants indicated that they currently offer IPE experiences, but only 24% of these experiences met the accepted definition of IPE. Of the participants who offer IPE as defined by Center for the Advancement of Interprofessional Education, only 50% use it to teach medication safety. Timetabling restrictions and lack of appropriate teaching and learning resources were identified as the main barriers to implementation of IPE. All participants reported that staff development, multi-media and e-learning resources would be beneficial to IPE initiatives and the teaching of medication safety. Innovative approaches will be needed to overcome the barriers and facilitate the uptake of quality IPE more broadly. Web-based and e-learning options promise a possible way forward, particularly in the teaching of medication safety to nursing, pharmacy and medical students.

  7. HIV and the eye | Visser | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 4 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  8. Continuing Medical Education - Vol 27, No 1 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education - Vol 27, No 1 (2009). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 27, No 1 (2009). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Addiction treatment · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. R Meyer ...

  9. Impact of diabetes continuing education on health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a continuing education (CE) program on the attitudes of health care professionals (HCPs) towards diabetes care in Yemen. Methods: A pre- and post-intervention study was carried out in Mukalla City, Hadramout, Yemen and was offered to all physicians, pharmacists, and nurses ...

  10. Improving the Relationship between Continuing Education Leadership and Marketing Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jim

    2009-01-01

    In this economy, college and university continuing education units will not automatically reap the benefits of returning adult learners as in past recessions: this economy caused a drastic reduction of resources available to the workforce and for personal revenue. As a result of decreased personal income and workforce training funding, competition…

  11. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  12. Streaming of Continuous Media for Distance Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Ali; Safar, Maytham

    2007-01-01

    Distance education created new challenges regarding the delivery of large size isochronous continuous streaming media (SM) objects. In this paper, we consider the design of a framework for customized SM presentations, where each presentation consists of a number of SM objects that should be retrieved and displayed to the user in a coherent…

  13. Continuing Medical Education on the Internet: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Review of 205 continuing medical education (CME) websites found the following: most university sites offered only class schedules; far more commercial sites than university sites offered online CME content; 60-80% of content met quality control standards; only 10% of sites provided information on peer review of content. (SK)

  14. Continuing Education Modules and the Scholarship of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Economic and political trends underscore the importance of engaged scholarship as evidence that colleges and universities are serving their constituencies. Set in a background of debate about pure versus applied social science this article describes a planned approach to continuing gerontological education grounded firmly in the principles of the…

  15. Leadership in Continuing Education: Leveraging Student-Centred Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marilyn; Plessis, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For this study, we interviewed eight Canadian and American continuing education deans and directors to explore how their personal accounts or "stories" about leadership high-light the dynamic nature of their leadership roles. This article focuses on the potential impact of these stories to better integrate and serve the adult learner…

  16. Continuing education in geriatrics for rural health care providers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population trends in developing countries show an increasing population of older adults (OAs), especially in rural areas. The purpose of this study was to explore the geriatrics continuing education needs of health care providers (HCPs) working in rural Uganda. The study employed a descriptive design to collect data from ...

  17. The Problem of Pseudoscience in Social Work Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Bruce A.; Pignotti, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of Social Workers requires social workers to obtain continuing education (CE) after they receive their social work degrees. A large and profitable industry that has emerged catering to this need for CE that is particularly focused on the needs of licensed social workers. Quality control mechanisms in place to monitor the…

  18. Lessons in University Continuing Education: A 25-Year Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Andy; Rogers, Lynda M.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the enrollment patterns of a continuing education institution over 25 years of its history. The institution is an auxiliary unit of a major state university system with the mission of providing postgraduate professional training to nonmatriculated students. Our study illustrates that both the quantity and the quality of…

  19. Evaluation of a Continuing Education Training on Client Financial Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Svoboda, Deborah; Sander, Rebecca L.; Osteen, Philip J.; Callahan, Christine; Elkinson, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The researchers conducted an evaluation study assessing outcomes among 37 social workers who completed a continuing education course on financial capability and working with clients. Key constructs assessed included participants' attitudes about financial capability, self-efficacy to provide services, organizational barriers, and basic financial…

  20. Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory…

  1. A Gerontology Practitioner Continuing Education Certificate Program: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englehardt, Jacqueline; Hash, Kristina M.; Mankowski, Mariann; Harper-Dorton, Karen V.; Pilarte, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a school of social work survey assessing the geriatric training needs of social workers and other professionals in aging and the need for a gerontology practitioner's continuing education (CE) certificate program. A total of 391 professionals, the majority of whom were social workers, participated in an online…

  2. Case Study: Online Continuing Education for New Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Beth R.; McKeal, Alyse E.

    2017-01-01

    Continuing education is vital for new librarians to gain skills and knowledge beyond library school. Professional development offered free in an online environment is often the best option for staying current on the issues and trends necessary for young librarians to grow and flourish. This paper presents a case study of an online professional…

  3. Challenges of Women Participation in Continuing Higher Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the challenges or constraints of women in continuing higher education programme with particular focus on the B.Ed part-time programme of the University of Lagos. A simple survey research design was employed to explore the issue. A 15 item questionnaire supplemented with oral interview ...

  4. Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

  5. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  6. Needed: A Voucher Plan in Support of Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, David S.

    Opportunities for career advancement, an adequate pool of trained manpower, and the growth of our economy are inextricably connected with the availability of continuing education and training opportunities to working adults. Availability is a function of access to training and successful participation in training. The federally funded voucher plan…

  7. Marketing and Market Research for Adult and Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Annette

    Marketing is an essential part of conducting a continuing education program, but marketing consists of more than just promotion. According to Kotler, exchange is the central concept underlying marketing. Marketing involves understanding, planning, implementing, and controlling this exchange. The exchange situation contains all the elements of the…

  8. Assessment of Family Planning Services at Community Pharmacies in San Diego, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Rafie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Levonorgestrel emergency contraception and other contraceptive methods are available over-the-counter (OTC; however youth continue to face a number of barriers in accessing healthcare services, including lack of knowledge of the method, fear of loss of privacy, difficulties in finding a provider, and cost. A descriptive, nonexperimental, cross-sectional study of a sample of 112 community pharmacies in San Diego, California was conducted between December 2009 and January 2010 to assess community pharmacy practices related to the availability and accessibility of family planning health pharmacy services and products, particularly to youth. A majority (n = 79/112, 70.5% of the pharmacies carried a wide selection of male condoms; however, the other OTC nonhormonal contraceptive products were either not available or available with limited selection. A majority of the pharmacies sold emergency contraception (n = 88/111, 78.6%. Most patient counseling areas consisted of either a public or a semi-private area. A majority of the pharmacy sites did not provide materials or services targeting youth. Significant gaps exist in providing family planning products and services in the majority of community pharmacies in San Diego, California. Education and outreach efforts are needed to promote provision of products and services, particularly to the adolescent population.

  9. VIRTUAL INTERNSHIP AS AN EFFECTIVE RESOURCE OF CONTINUOUS PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М П Нечаев

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the necessity of introduction of new effective forms and technologies to support continuous professional growth of teachers. Emphasizes the role of virtual internships as an effective resource in the organization of system of continuous pedagogical education based on the development of professional reflection of the teacher. Noted that the organization of virtual internships will allow teachers to build on the scientific basis of the technology of following tasks: formation of motivation of teachers to continuously improve their professional skills; developing the ability to analyze educational experience of their colleagues; the development of the ability to analyze the pedagogical experience through the prism of analysis of the “alien” experience; develop the ability to see your “strong” and “weak” parties in a professional way, to determine the cause of professional difficulties, to identify internal resources to build individual trajectory of their professional development.

  10. Group dynamics within long-term continuing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilorio, C; Lehr, S; Keen, P D

    1989-01-01

    Nursing educators have responded to the need for continuing education by developing a variety of programs ranging in length from half-day seminars to several months of intensive study. Although books and articles have been written about nurses returning to school for baccalaureate degrees and the ensuing expectations, changes, and needs involved in this process, the literature revealed little information on how students, families, and faculty "live" a long-term continuing education (CE) experience. This article will examine the evolution of students into well-defined groups. The stages of group process, development of norms, assumption of roles within the groups, and factors related to conflicts are discussed. Methods used to reduce conflict and facilitate the movement of the groups to the resolution stage are presented in order to assist instructors involved in long-term CE programs.

  11. Enrichment of the educational environment with information and communication technologies: state of art at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrimiene, Edita; Stankeviciene, Nida

    2008-01-01

    Both traditional and new educational environments, the latter enriched with information and communication technologies, coexist in today's university. The goal of this article is to present the concept of educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies, to reveal the main features of such environment, and to present the results of certain investigation on the application of information technologies in teaching/learning processes at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine. The discussion object of this paper is the educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies. In designing the environments of this type, positive aspects of traditional teaching models are being developed by integrating them into the new educational environment. The concept of educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies is reviewed in the first part of this paper. The structure and main features of educational environments enriched with information and communication technologies are highlighted in the second part. The results of the study on the application of information technologies in teaching/learning processes at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine are presented in the third part.

  12. Comparison of Iran’s and World’s Leading Faculties Approved Curriculum in the Field of Pharmacy, in terms of Pharmaceutical Care Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Eslami

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Following the changes in the basic concepts of pharmaceutical science, the main opinion in pharmacy practice changed from “drug-oriented pharmacy” to “patient-oriented pharmacy”, leading to changes in the pharmacy education in many aspects.Methods: In the presented study, we compare Iran’s Pharm.D education system and the four of high ranking systems available in the world in term of pharmaceutical care related educations and how much is the portion of this type educations in the curriculum. The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF with a rank of 2, The University of Michigan with a rank of 7, and the Universities of Pittsburgh and Purdue with ranks of almost under 50 in the world ranking have been selected.Results: The results showed, in the United States (US colleges about 60.5% of educational program was related to the pharmaceutical care concept. This calculation for the University of Waterloo was about 74%. The Saudi University compared, had about 47% related units. Regarding the Iranian program, when the specialized units after basic science were considered as the professional course, about 24% of them had a relationship with the pharmaceutical care. However, this was in the case that a student chooses the hospital internship instead of industry internship in the final year; otherwise, the percentage would reduce to 22.7%.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, and regarding internationally accepted standards, we strongly recommend to change the structure of pharmacy curriculum in Iran to improve the ability of students for patient-oriented services.

  13. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  14. Athletic training continuing education needs assessment: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, T G

    1994-03-01

    Continuing education for certified athletic trainers is both required and essential. The purpose of this study was to determine the need, including solutions and priorities, for continuing education for athletic trainers in various employment settings. Focus group sessions were conducted during the Spring 1992 District 4 meeting of the National Athletic Trainers Association. Representatives for each of the following employment settings were selected from the preregistration list and invited to participate: high school (7 participated), college/university (8), corporate/industrial (6), professional (3), and clinical (8). Data were compiled from written lists and audio cassette recordings of group discussions. Focus group participants across all employment settings felt that their primary continuing education needs were not being addressed at district meetings. Less traditional topics (eg, ergonomics, budgeting, public relations, and functional capacity evaluations) were identified as the more essential education needs. Focus group opinions varied somewhat regarding specific topics and methods of presentation. Recommendations included a more thematic approach to topics and presentations and ample opportunities for work or discussions in small groups. Results of the focus groups could impact the professional preparation of athletic trainers.

  15. Using Curriculum Mapping to Engage Faculty Members in the Analysis of a Pharmacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercaigne, Lavern; Davies, Neal M.; Davis, Christine; Renaud, Robert; Kristjanson, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop a curriculum mapping process that supports continuous analysis and evidence-based decisions in a pharmacy program. Design. A curriculum map based on the national educational outcomes for pharmacy programs was created using conceptual frameworks grounded in cognitive learning and skill acquisition. Assessment. The curriculum map was used to align the intended curriculum with the national educational outcomes and licensing examination blueprint. The leveling and sequencing of content showed longitudinal progression of student learning and performance. There was good concordance between the intended and learned curricula as validated by survey responses from employers and graduating students. Conclusion. The curriculum mapping process was efficient and effective in providing an evidence-based approach to the continuous quality improvement of a pharmacy program. PMID:25258444

  16. Baseline Knowledge and Education on Patient Safety in the Ambulatory Care Setting for 4th Year Pharmacy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica W. Skelley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the baseline knowledge of fourth year student pharmacists on their ability to properly identify and categorize medication related problems (MRP during their Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE in the ambulatory care setting, and to assess the efficacy of a written resource designed to educate and train users on identification and documentation of MRP's and used for this purpose with participating students on their ambulatory care APPE. Methods: A pretest consisting of ten multiple-choice questions was administered electronically to fourth year student pharmacists (N=18 at the start of their ambulatory care APPE. The test was designed to assess both the students' baseline knowledge regarding MRP's, and their ability to identify a wide variety of medication-related problems. Students then received a written copy of The Medication Therapy Intervention & Safety Documentation Program training manual and were asked to read it in its entirety in the first week of their APPE. Finally, students were given a posttest survey (identical to the pretest to complete to assess if their knowledge had increased from baseline. Results: The average score for the 18 students taking the baseline knowledge pre-test was 63.33%, indicating limited baseline knowledge regarding the identification and classification of MRP's. In assessing the effectiveness of the written training document, the overall posttest results compared to pretest results did not indicate improvement in students' knowledge or ability to properly identify and classify medication related problems (MRP after reviewing the training manual. The average scores declined from 63.33% on the pretest to 62.78% on the posttest, although this was not found to be statistically significant (p = 0.884. However, a statistically significant decline in students' knowledge occurred on one specific question, which tested their ability to classify MRP's (p = 0.029. Conclusions: Based on the

  17. Principles for Further Education in Professional Communication: Continuing Education or Postgraduate Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withnall, Janice; Harris, Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    Presents preliminary findings about practitioners' attitudes to postgraduate education in journalism and public relations. Discusses implications for university education, vocational specialization and continuing professional development in light of current debates on professionalization, the tertiary education sector, and the nature of knowledge…

  18. A preliminary analysis of library holdings as compared to the basic resources for pharmacy education list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, K T L V; Lerner, Rachel C

    2013-01-01

    The catalogs of 11 university libraries were analyzed against the Basic Resources for Pharmaceutical Education (BRPE) to measure the percent coverage of the core total list as well as the core sublist. There is no clear trend in this data to link school age, size, or rank with percentage of coverage of the total list or the "First Purchase" core list when treated as independent variables. Approximately half of the schools have significantly higher percentages of core titles than statistically expected. Based on this data, it is difficult to predict what percentage of titles on the BRPE a library will contain.

  19. Pharmacy Students Perception of the Application of Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate pharmacy students' perception of the application of learning management system (LMS) in their education in a Doctor of Pharmacy program in Benin City. Method: In a special ICT class, 165 pharmacy students were introduced to LMS using an open source program, DoceboÓ after which a ...

  20. Narratives of continued formation: meanings produced by Physical Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André da Silva Mello

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It discusses the meanings given by 14 physical education teachers about their experiences with the continued formation process. It is a (auto biographical narrative research, which used focal groups and interviews as tools for compiling the data. The colaborators are six male teachers and eight female teachers of municipal networks from Serra, Vitoria and Viana municipalities in the metropolitan region of Vitória, ES. The analyzes indicate that the assigned meanings are related to the collective need to reorganize institutional provided formations in dialogue with the political interests of teachers and the specificity of Physical Education as a curriculum component. In general, teachers consider the formation focused on practice and in the teaching profession as those that best reflect their expectations. The practice appears as a know-how to be appropriate from continued formetion to be experienced in school; a knowledge that, when apprehended, is reframed to produce other experiences.

  1. Online Continuing Education for Expanding Clinicians' Roles in Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A; Colchamiro, Rachel; Tolan, Ellen; Browne, Susan; Foley, Mary; Jenkins, Lucia; Mainello, Kristen; Vallu, Rohith; Hanley, Lauren E; Boisvert, Mary Ellen; Forgit, Julie; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Nordstrom, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Lack of health professional support is an important variable affecting mothers' achievement of breastfeeding goals. Online continuing education is a recognized pathway for disseminating content for improving clinicians' knowledge and supporting efforts to change practices. At the time we developed our project, free, accredited continuing education for physicians related to breastfeeding management that could be easily accessed using portable devices (via tablets/smartphones) was not available. Such resources were in demand, especially for facilities pursuing designation through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. We assembled a government, academic, health care provider, and professional society partnership to create such a tutorial that would address the diverse content needed for supporting breastfeeding mothers postdischarge in the United States. Our 1.5-hour-long continuing medical and nursing education was completed by 1606 clinicians (1172 nurses [73%] and 434 physicians [27%]) within 1 year. More than 90% of nurses and over 98% of physicians said the tutorial achieved its 7 learning objectives related to breastfeeding physiology, broader factors in infant feeding decisions and practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement, and breastfeeding management/troubleshooting. Feedback received from the tutorial led to the creation of a second tutorial consisting of another 1.5 hours of continuing medical and nursing education related to breast examination and assessment prior to delivery, provision of anticipatory guidance to pregnant women interested in breastfeeding, maternity care practices that influence breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding preterm infants, breastfeeding's role in helping address disparities, and dispelling common myths. The tutorials contribute to achievement of 8 Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health objectives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. The role of community pharmacy-based vaccination in the USA: current practice and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Albert T; Goad, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Community pharmacy-based provision of immunizations in the USA has become commonplace in the last few decades, with success in increasing rates of immunizations. Community pharmacy-based vaccination services are provided by pharmacists educated in the practice of immunization delivery and provide a convenient and accessible option for receiving immunizations. The pharmacist's role in immunization practice has been described as serving in the roles of educator, facilitator, and immunizer. With a majority of pharmacist-provided vaccinations occurring in the community pharmacy setting, there are many examples of community pharmacists serving in these immunization roles with successful outcomes. Different community pharmacies employ a number of different models and workflow practices that usually consist of a year-round in-house service staffed by their own immunizing pharmacist. Challenges that currently exist in this setting are variability in scopes of immunization practice for pharmacists across states, inconsistent reimbursement mechanisms, and barriers in technology. Many of these challenges can be alleviated by continual education; working with legislators, state boards of pharmacy, stakeholders, and payers to standardize laws; and reimbursement design. Other challenges that may need to be addressed are improvements in communication and continuity of care between community pharmacists and the patient centered medical home.

  3. Continuing education mitigates the negative consequences of adolescent childbearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kate; Clark, Jamie; Castrucci, Brian; Samsel, Rachel; Fonseca, Vincent; Garcia, Imelda

    2011-04-01

    Beginning childbearing during adolescence is consistently linked with negative outcomes for both children and parents. Many have attributed this association to maternal background characteristics which are often difficult to change through policy. Though maternal educational attainment is often a side effect of adolescent childbearing, it also represents a potential avenue through which we can help young mothers overcome the obstacles associated with an early birth. The data for this study come from the 1997 Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, a nationally representative sample of mothers and their children (N = 3,193). Data are used to explore the cognitive stimulation and emotional support in the home, measured using the HOME Scale (Caldwell and Bradley in Home observation for measurement of the environment. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, 1984). OLS regression models how maternal education moderates the association between age at first birth and quality of children's home environment. Adolescent mothers scored significantly lower on the indicator of home environment than older mothers. However, when continuing education was considered, maternal age at first birth was no longer significantly associated with the home environment. The negative consequences of early births were mediated by adolescent mothers' continuing education efforts. While interventions are needed to reduce adolescent childbearing, these results highlight the need to ensure that adolescent mothers are provided support to continue their education following delivery. The negative consequences of adolescent births are not inevitable. Encouraging school retention may help young mothers form a safe, healthy, nurturing, and developmentally appropriate home environment.

  4. The Growing Necessity for Continuing Education: The Short Course Option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhorter, P.J.; Romig, A.D.

    1999-02-02

    Continuing education is a critical issue in the workplace. Rapid change, the emergence of new technology, and the lack of trained individuals make continuing education an imperative for employers. The desire for individual growth and marketability make it an imperative for the employee also. While there are many options for continuing education, an increasingly popular vehicle is the short course. Time, cost efficiency and instruction by those experienced in real industrial practice are key factors in the success of this educational format. Over the past couple of decades, short course offerings and the number and type of sponsoring organizations have grown significantly. Within the scientific community, courses in basic disciplines (e.g., materials characterization), emergent technologies (e.g., Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems), equipment operation (e.g., electron microscopes) and even business practices (e.g., ES&H, proposal writing) have emerged and are taught by universities, technical societies and equipment manufacturers. Short course offerings and formats are evolving. Presently, it is possible to find series of courses which define specific curricula. These curricula set the stage for new developments in the future, including increased certification and licensing (e.g., technologists). Along with such certifications will come the need for accreditation. Who will offer such programs, and especially, who will accredit them are significant questions. Perhaps the most dramatic changes will occur with the integration of advanced information technology. While satellite-based remote offerings are available, the use of the web for educating a dispersed group is just beginning to emerge. In its simplest forms, this offers little advantage over a video or a real-time satellite course, but the eventual emergence of tele-operation of experimental equipment will revolutionize remote teaching.

  5. 25 CFR 166.908 - Who can participate in continuing education and training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can participate in continuing education and training... participate in continuing education and training? (a) The purpose of continuing education and training is to... personnel employed by approved organizations. This program will emphasize continuing education and training...

  6. Student and faculty member perspectives on lecture capture in pharmacy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Jon-Paul; Pearson, Marion L; Albon, Simon P

    2014-05-15

    To examine faculty members' and students' use and perceptions of lecture recordings in a previously implemented lecture-capture initiative. Patterns of using lecture recordings were determined from software analytics, and surveys were conducted to determine awareness and usage, effect on attendance and other behaviors, and learning impact. Most students and faculty members were aware of and appreciated the recordings. Students' patterns of use changed as the novelty wore off. Students felt that the recordings enhanced their learning, improved their in-class engagement, and had little effect on their attendance. Faculty members saw little difference in students' grades or in-class engagement but noted increased absenteeism. Students made appropriate use of recordings to support their learning, but faculty members generally did not make active educational use of the recordings. Further investigation is needed to understand the effects of lecture recordings on attendance. Professional development activities for both students and faculty members would help maximize the learning benefits of the recordings.

  7. The Role of Pharmacists and Pharmacy Education in Point-of-Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehrer, James P; James, Deborah E

    2016-10-25

    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is defined as laboratory testing conducted close to the site of patient care. Although performed originally primarily by clinical staff for acute conditions, recent advances in technology have made such testing possible for disease screening and prevention across a wide range of conditions in virtually any setting, and often by individuals with little or no training. With the ongoing evolution in POCT, numerous concerns have arisen about the quality and accuracy of the tests, comparability between multiple tests for the same endpoint, interpretation of test results, and whether and how results should be used for therapeutic decisions and included in a patient's medical record. The pharmacist is well-positioned to manage and interpret POCT performed outside of the usual clinical settings. However, educational and regulatory changes are needed to enable pharmacists to take on this emerging activity effectively.

  8. Mobile applications in clinical practice: What is needed in the pharmacy scenario?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hassan Elnaem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacy informatics is demonstrated to have a positive effect on pharmacy practice. The incorporation of pharmacy informatics in academic programs is a common feature in the pharmacy curriculum. This work aims to provide an overview of the current and potential role of mobile applications (apps in pharmacy education and practice. Mobile apps are the most common informatics tools used by medical and pharmacy practitioners as well as students. Both students and practitioners have overall positive perceptions toward using mobile apps in their daily clinical training and practice although the fact that the number of pharmacy apps is still small relatively in comparison with other medical-related apps. There are many potential roles for mobile apps in pharmacy practice and education. The future efforts of educational uses of mobile apps in pharmacy should target playing a role in the provision of customized tools for clinical pharmacy education.

  9. Hospital diversification: how to involve the pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J E; Black, B L

    1987-05-01

    Participation by hospital pharmacy departments in planning and development of diversified services is described. Diversification requires market planning. Seven basic marketing steps are identification of mission, goals, and objectives; identification of growth strategies (market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification); market analysis of external factors (size, growth, and logistics; reimbursement and financial considerations; competition; regulatory issues; and legal issues); market analysis of internal factors (departmental organization and reporting lines, demographics of the institution, and costs and productivity associated with the new service); program development and design; implementation; and evaluation. Hospitals can diversify by expanding acute-care services through management contracts and mergers; developing new services to include long-term-care, ambulatory-care, occupational-health, and wellness programs; starting other health-care ventures, such as consulting, continuing medical education, and continuing education for nurses; and expanding into non-health-care businesses. Vertical diversification is finding new markets for existing services; horizontal diversification is development of new services for new markets. To diversify, an institution may need to change its corporate structure; it may form a family of corporations that includes a university, nonprofit hospitals, holding companies, for-profit corporations, joint ventures, and service organizations. Through diversification, institutions and pharmacy departments can create alternative sources of funding and offer more comprehensive services to patients.

  10. A global picture of pharmacy technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler, Tamara; Brown, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Understanding how pharmacy technicians and other pharmacy support workforce cadres assist pharmacists in the healthcare system will facilitate developing health systems with the ability to achieve universal health coverage as it is defined in different country contexts. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the present global variety in the technician and other pharmacy support workforce cadres considering; their scope, roles, supervision, education and legal framewo...

  11. Patient perceptions of a pharmacy star rating model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warholak, Terri L; Patel, Mira; Rosenthal, Meagen; West-Strum, Donna; Ettienne, Earl B; Nunlee-Bland, Gail; Nau, David; Hincapie, Ana L

    To identify patients' understanding of what constitutes a "quality pharmacy" and to obtain their feedback regarding the development and use of the pharmacy star rating model, a pharmacy-specific aggregate performance score based on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Medicare Star Rating. Prospective cross-sectional study. Focus groups were conducted in Arizona, California, Mississippi, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, and one-on-one interviews were conducted in Indiana. Eligible patients were required to routinely use a community pharmacy. Consumer insights on their experiences with their pharmacies and their input on the pharmacy star rating model were attained. Key themes from the focus groups and interviews were obtained through the use of qualitative data analyses. Forty-nine subjects from 5 states and DC participated in 6 focus groups and 4 one-on-one interviews. Eighty-eight percent of participants reported currently taking at least 1 medication, and 87% reported having at least 1 health condition. The 7 themes identified during qualitative analysis included patient care, relational factors for choosing a pharmacy, physical factors for choosing a pharmacy, factors related to use of the pharmacy star rating model, reliability of the pharmacy star rating model, trust in pharmacists, and measures of pharmacy quality. Most participants agreed that the ratings would be useful and could aid in selecting a pharmacy, especially if they were moving to a new place or if they were dissatisfied with their current pharmacy. Pharmacy quality measures are new to patients. Therefore, training and education will need to be provided to patients, as pharmacies begin to offer additional clinical services, such as medication therapy management and diabetes education. The use of the pharmacy star rating model was dependent on the participants' situation when choosing a pharmacy. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc

  12. Evaluating pharmacy leader development through the seven action logics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Achsah; Desai, Avani; Nguyen, Phouc Anne; Birney, Patrick; Colavecchia, Anthony; Karralli, Rusol; Smith, Lindsey; Lorimer, Dirk; Burgess, Gwen; Munch, Kyle; Daniel, Nelvin; Lionetti, Jason; Garey, Kevin W

    2016-01-15

    Pharmacy leader development over time was analyzed using the seven action logics. As part of an ongoing leadership seminar series, students were required to select a visionary pharmacy leader and conduct a structured interview to evaluate pharmacy leaders' action logics. A standardized questionnaire comprising 13 questions was created by the class. Questions addressed leadership qualities during the leaders' early years, education years, and work years. Transcripts were then coded by two separate trained investigators based on the leader's stage of life to provide a score for each action logic individually over time. Kappa coefficient was used to evaluate interrater agreement. A total of 14 leaders were interviewed. All leaders were currently employed and had won national awards for their contributions to pharmacy practice. Overall, there was 82% agreement between the two evaluators' scores for the various characteristics. Action logics changed based on the leaders' life stage. Using aggregate data from all leader interviews, a progression from lower-order action logics (opportunist, diplomat, expert) to higher-order action logics (strategist, alchemist) was found. Ten leaders (71%) were diplomats during their early years. Six leaders (43%) were experts during their education years, and 4 (29%) were strategists or alchemists. During the third life stage analyzed (the work years), 6 leaders (43%) were strategists, and 2 were alchemists. During their work years, all leaders had a percentage of their answers coded as alchemist (range, 5-22%). Throughout their professional careers, pharmacy leaders continually develop skills through formal education and mentorship that follow action logics. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparison of Osteopathic, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant and Occupational Therapy Students' Personality Styles: Implications for Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardigan, Patrick C.; Cohen, Stanley R.

    This study compared personality traits of students in five health professions. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator was completed by 1,508 osteopathic students, 654 pharmacy students, 165 physical therapy students, 211 physician assistant students, and 70 occupational therapy students. Comparing the extrovert/introvert dimension revealed that pharmacy…

  14. Impact of Previous Pharmacy Work Experience on Pharmacy School Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Ellena; T-L Tang, Terrill; Sasaki-Hill, Debra; Kuperberg, James R.; Knapp, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether students' previous pharmacy-related work experience was associated with their pharmacy school performance (academic and clinical). Methods The following measures of student academic performance were examined: pharmacy grade point average (GPA), scores on cumulative high-stakes examinations, and advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) grades. The quantity and type of pharmacy-related work experience each student performed prior to matriculation was solicited through a student survey instrument. Survey responses were correlated with academic measures, and demographic-based stratified analyses were conducted. Results No significant difference in academic or clinical performance between those students with prior pharmacy experience and those without was identified. Subanalyses by work setting, position type, and substantial pharmacy work experience did not reveal any association with student performance. A relationship was found, however, between age and work experience, ie, older students tended to have more work experience than younger students. Conclusions Prior pharmacy work experience did not affect students' overall academic or clinical performance in pharmacy school. The lack of significant findings may have been due to the inherent practice limitations of nonpharmacist positions, changes in pharmacy education, and the limitations of survey responses. PMID:20498735

  15. Continuing midwifery education beyond graduation: Student midwives' awareness of continuous professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Valcke, M

    2017-05-01

    Midwifery education plays an important role in educating graduates about engaging in continuous professional development (CPD) but there is a lack of empirical research analysing student midwives' awareness of CPD beyond graduation. We aimed to explore student midwives' awareness of the need to become lifelong learners and to map their knowledge of CPD activities available after graduation. Therefore, forty-seven reflective documents, written in the last week of student midwives' training programme, were analysed in a thematic way. Content analysis confirmed student midwives' awareness of the importance of CPD before graduation. They mentioned different reasons for future involvement in CPD and described both, formal and informal CPD-activities. Respondents were especially aware of the importance of knowledge, to a lesser degree of skills-training and still less of the potential value of the Internet for individual and collective learning. Respondents perceived a need for a mandatory preceptorship. Supporting learning guides were highly valued and the importance of reflection on CPD was well-established. This could have resulted from an integrated reflective learning strategy during education. Undergraduate midwives are aware of the importance of CPD and the interplay of formal and informal learning activities. Virtual learning requires special attention to overcome CPD challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Seyed Aliakbar; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Jalil; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran; Faghih, Zahra; Parikh, Sagar V; Shirazi, Mandana

    2016-04-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. The participants' experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers' use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  17. Online Continuing Medical Education for the Latin American Nephrology Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Gonzalez-Martinez, Francisco; Noboa, Oscar; Abbud-Filho, Mario; Lorier, Leticia; Nin, Marcelo; Silvariño, Ricardo; García, Sofía; Pefaur, Jacqueline; Greloni, Gustavo C; Noronha, Irene L; Lopez, Antonio; Ribeiro-Alves, María A; Tanús, Roberto; Fernández-Cean, Juan

    2015-01-01

    A continuing medical education (CME) course was implemented for Latin American nephrologists in 2013. The topic was Immunopathology in native and transplanted kidneys. The course was given in Spanish and Portuguese. The activities included a distance education seven-week asynchronous online modality with multiple educational strategies. Thirty hours of study workload were estimated to complete the course. Four hundred and ninety-eight physicians coming from 18 countries registered for the course; 442 of them participated in it. Of those who participated, 51% received a certificate of completion and 29% a certificate of participation. Sixty-five percent of registrants participated in the case discussions. Eighty-six percent were very satisfied and 13% were satisfied. Lack of time to devote to the course was the main limitation expressed (62%), while Internet access or difficulties in the use of technology were considered by only 12 and 6% of participants, respectively. There was a significant increase in knowledge between before and after the course; the average grade increased from 64 to 83%. In conclusion, technology-enabled education demonstrated potential to become an instrument for Latin American nephrologists.

  18. Municipal boards and educational management: the continuing education distance and its movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalla Corte, Marilene Gabriel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Through scientific research in development, this article is based on distance extension actions of continuing education of a specific public program, the National Program of Training Municipal Counselors of Education (Pro-Council. This program targets a policy of democratization of education management and qualification on work of municipal counselors of education as well as education technicians in relation to educational practices, legislation, financing mechanisms, transfer and control of the use of funds of education in order to enable a good performance of the Municipal Boards of Education (MCE in their socio-educational institutions. In this context, the objective is recognizing and analyzing the continuing education impacts developed under Pro-Council/Federal University of Santa Maria about aspects as competence and commitment of ex-attendants at the Municipal Councils of Education as a democratic collective bodies. The study is developed under a quantitative and qualitative approach, using the production of semi-open questionnaires data applied to counselors and technicians. From this, we stress the growing interest of the Boards of Education and the Departments of Education to capacitate their counselors and technicians; the establishment and implementation of new Municipal Boards of Education in Rio Grande do Sul State/Brazil; the relationship between the professional exercise and political and theoretical reflection; and so on. Whereas the Municipal Boards of Education are required to consolidate the democratic management, it is very important the training of individuals involved and especially establishing dialogic processes with social demands of each municipality, mainly, the educational ones, in the sense of [re] building the public policies for basic education in a responsible and participatory way.

  19. The Economic, Social and Administrative Pharmacy (ESAP) Discipline in US Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M.; Latif, David A.; Adkins, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States have struggled over the past several decades with identifying a consistent title for the broad body of knowledge related to the social, economic, behavioral, and administrative aspects of pharmacy. This paper examines the educational background and professional experience of those teaching…

  20. Counselling quality in community pharmacies: implementation of the pseudo customer methodology in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, K; Eickhoff, C; Schulz, M

    2005-02-01

    To investigate a new method for evaluating counselling performance of staff in community pharmacies and to assess the quality of patient counselling. Trained pseudo customers, instructed to play their role according to two different self-medication scenarios, visited voluntarily participating community pharmacies in Berlin. After documenting the counselling process, immediately after each visit, outside the pharmacy on an assessment form, the pseudo customer re-entered the pharmacy and gave detailed performance feedback to the counsellor and the pharmacist in charge in order to provide support for improving counselling skills and practice behaviour, when appropriate. This was followed with a written summary of the general performance of all participating pharmacies and additional individual feedback and suggestions for improvement. Educational needs were identified for subsequent performance-based educational strategies such as group-workshops, team-training and on-site team-coaching. Forty-nine community pharmacies in Berlin volunteered to participate in this pilot study. Ninety-eight per cent of the participating pharmacies offered advice. However, in 36% of the cases, advice was only given on request. The different types of scenarios--presentation of a symptom or request for a specific product--made a great difference to the spontaneity of questions and advice. At least one question to check on accuracy of self-diagnosis was asked in 95% of the cases of symptom presentation but in only 47% of the cases of specific product request. Information on appropriate self-medication was provided on at least one item in 74% of pseudo customer visits, but most of the time the information was not sufficient. Communication skills (nonverbal elements, comprehensibility etc.) were very good or good in 54% of the visits. Potential for improvement was mainly in relation to the use of open-ended questions to gain more information and on counselling about appropriate self

  1. A Virtual Childhood Obesity Collaborative: Satisfaction With Online Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Aldrich, Heather; Dandreaux, Danielle; Oetzel, Keri Bolton; Schmiege, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive study evaluated school-based health center (SBHC) providers' satisfaction with Web-based continuing education as part of a virtual childhood obesity intervention. Thirty-six participants from 24 SBHCs in six states participated in the training modules. Modules were divided into four learning sessions, with a total of 17 training modules. Participants completed satisfaction surveys after each module, as well as an overall survey at the end of the training. Questions were rated on a 4-point Likert scale (4 = strongly agree, 3 = agree, 2 = disagree, 1 = strongly disagree). Participation in the first two learning sessions was higher than the last two. Provider satisfaction of training modules by question type and content area was quite high (μ = 3.66-3.33). Overall satisfaction means ranged from 3.76 to 3.24. Many providers also reported plans to make changes in their practice after completing the training. This study demonstrated that a virtual childhood obesity collaborative is an acceptable delivery method for continuing education. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuing Education Workshops in Bioinformatics Positively Impact Research and Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2016-06-01

    Bioinformatics.ca has been hosting continuing education programs in introductory and advanced bioinformatics topics in Canada since 1999 and has trained more than 2,000 participants to date. These workshops have been adapted over the years to keep pace with advances in both science and technology as well as the changing landscape in available learning modalities and the bioinformatics training needs of our audience. Post-workshop surveys have been a mandatory component of each workshop and are used to ensure appropriate adjustments are made to workshops to maximize learning. However, neither bioinformatics.ca nor others offering similar training programs have explored the long-term impact of bioinformatics continuing education training. Bioinformatics.ca recently initiated a look back on the impact its workshops have had on the career trajectories, research outcomes, publications, and collaborations of its participants. Using an anonymous online survey, bioinformatics.ca analyzed responses from those surveyed and discovered its workshops have had a positive impact on collaborations, research, publications, and career progression.

  3. ICT energy efficiency in higher education. Continuous measurement and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter Hofte, H. [Novay, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Power consumption of information and communications technology (ICT) is rising rapidly worldwide. Reducing (the growth in) energy demand helps to achieve sustainability goals in the area of energy resource depletion, energy security, economy, and ecology. Various governments and industry consortia have set out policies and agreements to reduce the (growth in) demand for energy. In the MJA3 agreements in the Netherlands, various organizations, including all 14 universities and 39 universities of applied sciences pledged to achieve 30% increase in energy efficiency in 2020 compared to 2005. In this report, we argue that using the number of kilowatt-hours of final electricity used for ICT per enrolled student per day (kWh/st/d), should be used as the primary metric for ICT energy efficiency in higher education. For other uses of electricity than ICT in higher education, we express electricity use in kilowatthours per person per day (kWh/p/d). Applying continuous monitoring and management of ICT energy is one approach one could take to increase ICT energy efficiency in education. In households, providing direct (i.e. real-time) feedback about energy use typically results in 5-15% energy savings, whereas indirect feedback (provided some time after consumption occurs), results in less energy savings, typically 0-10%. Continuous measurement of ICT electricity use can be done in a variety of ways. In this report, we distinguish and describe four major measurement approaches: (1) In-line meters, which require breaking the electrical circuit to install the meter; (2) clamp-on-meters, which can be wrapped around a wire; (3) add-ons to existing energy meters, which use analog or digital ports of existing energy meters; (4) software-only measurement, which uses existing network interfaces, protocols and APIs. A measurement approach can be used at one or more aggregation levels: at building level (to measure all electrical energy used in a building, e.g. a datacenter); at

  4. REFLECTIONS ON THE ROLE OF THE PHARMACY REGULATORY AUTHORITY IN ENHANCING QUALITY RELATED EVENT REPORTING IN COMMUNITY PHARMACIESi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Todd A.; Bishop, Andrea C.; Mahaffey, Thomas; MacKinnon, Neil J.; Ashcroft, Darren; Zwicker, Bev; Reid, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Given the demanding nature of providing pharmacy services, coupled with the expanded scope of practice of the professions in jurisdictions around the world, greater commitment to continuous quality improvement through adoption of quality related event (QRE) reporting is necessary to ensure patient safety. Pharmacy regulatory authorities (PRAs) are in a unique position to enhance QRE reporting and learning through the standardization of expected practice Objective This study aims to better understand the perceived roles of PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning in community pharmacies and identifying regulatory best practices to execute such roles. Methods A purposive case sampling approach was used to identify PRA staff members from two groups (deputy registrars and pharmacy inspectors) in 10 Canadian jurisdictions to participate in focus groups in the fall of 2011. Focus groups were used to explore perceptions of the role of PRAs in enhancing and promoting QRE reporting and learning, and perceived barriers to effective implementation in practice. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the qualitative data. Results Two focus groups were conducted, one with seven deputy registrars/practice managers and one with nine pharmacy inspectors. Five themes were identified, including (1) defining QRE reporting and compliance, (2) navigating role conflict, (3) educating for enhanced QRE reporting and learning, (4) promoting the positive/removing the fear of QREs, and (5) tailoring QRE reporting and learning consistency. Conclusions Overall, participants perceived a strong role for PRAs in enhancing QRE reporting and learning and providing education for pharmacies to support their compliance with reporting standards. However, PRAs must navigate the conflict inherent in both educating and promoting a process for achieving a standard while simultaneously inspecting compliance to that standard. Ensuring pharmacies have autonomy in operationalizing standards may

  5. An online survey of chiropractors' opinions of continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Dean L

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing Education (CE for chiropractors is mandatory for licensure in most North American jurisdictions. Numerous chiropractic colleges have begun collaborating with universities to offer master's degree programs. Distance education master's degree programs may be desirable to allow full-time practicing doctors to further their post-graduate education. The present survey sought to answer three questions. First, what is the level of satisfaction of chiropractors with their continuing education? Second, what is the level of interest of chiropractors in online master's degree programs? Lastly, what is the response rate of chiropractors to an online survey? Methods An online survey consisting of 22 multiple choice questions was e-mailed to 1000 chiropractors randomly selected from the mailing list of an online chiropractic newsletter. Upon completion of the questionnaire, participants' answers were saved on a secure site. Data analysis included evaluation of the demographic characteristics of the respondents, their opinions of and patterns of taking CE including online education, preferred learning formats, and their interest in proposed online master's degree programs. A survey response rate was determined. Results Nearly 86% of respondents felt their previously completed CE courses were either somewhat or extremely satisfactory. Over ninety percent of respondents who had completed online or distance CE coursesfound them to be somewhat or extremelysatisfactory. Almost half the respondents indicated that they most preferred online distance learning, while 34.08% most preferred face-to-face interaction. Fifty-three percent of respondents indicated an interest in starting a master's degree program; however 70.46% of respondents were interested in an online master's degree program that would offer CE credit. A response rate of 35.8% was obtained. Conclusion Satisfaction among chiropractors with CE programs is high. The notion of

  6. Storytelling: a care technology in continuing education for active ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nadia Pinheiro da; Polaro, Sandra Helena Isse; Vahl, Eloá Aparecida Caliari; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase

    2016-01-01

    assessing relevance and effectiveness of care/educational technology in the form of "storytelling" as a strategy in the cultivation of active ageing (AA) for elderly users of a Basic Health Unit (BHU), from the Amazon region. convergent care research (CCR) held in a BHU in Belém, state of Pará, with eight elderly ladies for testing this technology. An active ageing assessment questionnaire and WHOQOL-BREF - quality of life assessment were applied. After training with a view to continuing education, elderly ladies told stories for an audience that addressed the question: "What did you learn from it for your life?" tThe popular stories elicited reactions from which the following categories emerged: solidarity; respect for the other; imagination, dreams, hopes and culture of the Amazonian. This practice had a positive result, producing changes in the quality of life of the elderly, particularly in the psychological domain. "storytelling" proved to be an innovative technology, a relevant and effective resource in health education, especially for active ageing.

  7. Teaching performance improvement: an opportunity for continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Larry V

    2003-01-01

    Practicing physicians generally are not engaged in either the methods of performance improvement for health care or the measurement and reporting of clinical outcomes. The principal reasons are lack of compensation for such work, the perception that the work of performance improvement adds no value and is a waste of time, the lack of knowledge and skill in the use of basic tools for outcomes measurement and performance improvement, the failure of medical educators to teach these skills, and the inability of mentors to model their use in practice. In this article, an overview of the history of quality improvement or performance improvement in general and the adoption of two methods of improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act and SIX SIGMA) by health care is given. Six simple tools that are easy to understand and use and could be used in every continuing medical education (CME) program are then explained and illustrated. Postgraduate medical educators and CME program directors must step up to the challenge of teaching these skills. By learning to include them in planning, evaluation, policy making, and needs assessments of CME programs, the skills of every physician could be improved. Additional goals of every CME program could be accountability for outcomes, reduction of errors, alignment of incentives, and advocacy for the very best in evidence-based health care. To develop activities that affect physician practice and population health, CME professionals must partner with performance improvement experts for needs assessment and evaluation of outcomes data. An understanding of performance improvement principles helps those in performance improvement and those in CME to determine which educational activities might be expected to influence physician competency and performance.

  8. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED ALIAKBAR FAGHIHI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuing Medical Education (CME has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Methods: Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. Results: The participants’ experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers’ use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Conclusion: Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  9. THE CYBERSPACE IN THE CONTINUED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The cybernetic spaces simulate the real world with interactive multimedia. This work  has been applied since January, 2007 on the curricular student’s apprenticeship at high school and graduation, in the site “bioq.educacao.biz/ULAB-HC-UFPE”. It has been developed to provide continuity to the technical-scientific learning of students and professionals, and also to improve their human social relations on the  labour  environment.  It’s comprises a virtual space, destined to communication and collective building of knowledge on the clinical biochemistry.   It’s about an interactive environment which allows the users registered as coordinator professor (professional  or the scientist student (trainee,  unlimited access to  posting contents (classes, texts, presentations, animations, consultations, non-synchronic discussions (on orkut, forums, e-mail and synchronic discussions (on chats, videoconferences. After a few live tutorials  about new  input in this environment, and the use of the new learning tool,  the collective building of knowledge on cyberspace begins. As a trainee’s program task, the scientist student would have to build a space of his own, under guidance and supervision of the coordinator teachers.  The cyberspace efficiency was evaluated from reports collected in February, 2008: the adherence to this  work was satisfactory, regarding this period, with 68 registered users, 870 accesses and 52 contents available on the several sections of the virtual laboratory. Our work is still being applied, and new adhesions are  happening everyday. We intend to amplify this cyber environment in order to make it a  permanent  continued education site on the health area.  From interest contracts and common knowledge,  the technological interfaces constitute an interaction, in which everyone is a potential author.  Keywords: Cyberspace, online biochemistry education, continued education.

  10. Attitude of Pharmacy Students Towards a Nutrition Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Abdul, Majid Mufaqam

    Today's pharmacists are likely to encounter questions about nutritional products sold in the pharmacy. This is due, in part, to the increased number of pharmacies attached to grocery stores and the availability of pharmacists. Many pharmacists report they lack nutritional knowledge and believe the best time to educate pharmacists about nutrition is during pharmacy school. This study was conducted to determine if today's pharmacy students receive education in nutrition and if they realize the importance of nutrition education. Two hundred and twenty five students from India and ninety five students from the United States currently attending pharmacy school were surveyed. Results showed only 3.5% of students from India and 13.6% of students from the United States received nutrition education during their pharmacy degree curriculum. In addition, 81.8% of students from India and 82.9% of students from the United States who had taken a course in nutrition believed a nutrition course should be incorporated into the pharmacy degree curriculum. When pharmacy-related experience was taken into account, 92.9% of students from India and 73.3% of students from the United States also believed a nutrition course should be incorporated into the pharmacy degree curriculum. Overall, 88% of students from India and 70.5% of students from the United States believed nutrition education was important and should be included in the pharmacy degree curriculum. Results of this study suggest the majority of today's pharmacy students believe a nutrition course should be incorporated into the pharmacy degree curriculum regardless of past nutrition education or pharmacy-related experience.

  11. Curriculum and instructional methods for drug information, literature evaluation, and biostatistics: survey of US pharmacy schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer A; Gabay, Michael P; Ficzere, Cathy; Ward, Kristina E

    2012-06-01

    The drug information curriculum in US colleges of pharmacy continues to evolve. The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Drug Information Practice and Research Network (DI PRN) published an opinion paper with specific recommendations regarding drug information education in 2009. Adoption of these recommendations has not been evaluated. To assess which recommendations made in the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper are included in US pharmacy school curricula and characterize faculty qualifications, educational methods, and recent changes in drug information education. An electronic survey was designed using the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education standards and guidelines for accreditation of PharmD programs in the US. Survey questions addressed curricular content within the following categories: drug information, literature evaluation, and biostatistics. A letter including the online survey link was sent via email to the dean of each US college/school of pharmacy (N = 128). Recipients were instructed to forward the email to the individual at their institution who was the most knowledgeable about the content and methodology used for didactic drug information education. Sixty-four responses were included in the final analysis. Of the 19 ACCP DI PRN minimum core concepts, 9 (47%) were included in curricula of all responding institutions; 14 of 19 (74%) were included in curricula for all but 1 institution. In contrast, 5 of 16 concepts (31%) were not formally taught by a number of institutions. Many respondents noted an increased focus on evidence-based medicine, medication safety, and informatics. Although a survey of drug information curricula documented substantial inclusion of the essential concepts presented in the ACCP DI PRN opinion paper, room for improvement remains in drug information curricula in US colleges of pharmacy.

  12. [Continuing Medical Education in Germany - mandatory and voluntary obligations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böthin, Elke

    2013-01-01

    After 1945 the common medical training infrastructure was broken up into two different political systems. While in the Federal Republic of Germany the structure was based on physicians' self-governance, in the German Democratic Republic medical professional structures were organised by the government. After the unification of the two German states, which took place on October 3, 1990, the centralistic structure was replaced by the system of physician self-governance. Before January 1, 2004, continuing medical education (CME) in West Germany relied on a system of voluntary obligations. In East Germany, though, professional CMEs were compulsory; they were called "obligatorische periphere Fortbildung." Based on 15 expert interviews on the topic of "CME in Germany", the different circumstances and conditions were analysed taking account of the historical background. Only selected professionals with experience in both German states (one with a federal, the other with a centralistic system), were chosen for the survey. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  13. Comprehensive Training of Engineering Students through Continuing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Reynoso Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a priority for student training in general and particularly for future engineers. Although this issue has been frequently addressed in recent years, proposals are still insufficient for engineering students. This paper is aimed at theoretically and empirically demonstrating the potential of continuing education as one of the key areas that engineering schools have for the comprehensive training of students. Preliminary results of a research project commissioned by the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Electrica-FIME of Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico, are presented to respond to the need to improve the learning process of students with a comprehensive approach. The research justification and some of the results obtained in the exploratory phase are also described.

  14. Continuing medical education and burnout among Danish GPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndt, Anders; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been minimal research into continuing medical education (CME) and its association with burnout among GPs. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between participating in CME and experiencing burnout in a sample of Danish GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross......-sectional questionnaire study. SETTING: All 458 active GPs in 2004, in the County of Aarhus, Denmark were invited to participate. METHOD: Data on CME activities were obtained for all GPs and linked to burnout which was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey. The relationship between CME...... activity and burnout was calculated as prevalence ratios (PR) in a generalised linear model. RESULTS: In total, 379 (83.5%) GPs returned the questionnaire. The prevalence of burnout was about 25%, and almost 3% suffered from 'high burnout'. A total of 344 (92.0%) GPs were members of a CME group...

  15. Continuous Evaluation in Ethics Education: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Tristan; Higgs, Cory; Mumford, Michael; Connelly, Shane; DuBois, James

    2017-06-14

    A great need for systematic evaluation of ethics training programs exists. Those tasked with developing an ethics training program may be quick to dismiss the value of training evaluation in continuous process improvement. In the present effort, we use a case study approach to delineate how to leverage formative and summative evaluation measures to create a high-quality ethics education program. With regard to formative evaluation, information bearing on trainee reactions, qualitative data from the comments of trainees, in addition to empirical findings, can ensure that the training program operates smoothly. Regarding summative evaluation, measures examining trainee cognition, behavior, and organization-level results provide information about how much trainees have changed as a result of taking the ethics training. The implications of effective training program evaluation are discussed.

  16. Innovative Outcome Assessment in Graduate Business Education and Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changed environment of global economy with painful austerity and restructuring measures causing severe economic dislocations in many diverse parts of the world have brought into focus the usefulness and value of management education in general and graduate management education in particular. The various accrediting bodies in America, Europe and Asia in recent years have shifted their emphasis to ensuring that learning outcomes of students in the program are tied to the goals and missions of the academic institution and meet the needs of the external partners of the academic enterprise that the students go on to serve. This has resulted in rapid advances in the field of innovative outcome assessment, and measurement of competency in performing higher order tasks as well as demonstration of traits related to successful transition into the business world and contribution to the success of the enterprise where the students are employed. The mere assessment/measurement of traits is not the end, but rather the first step in the cycle of continuous improvement in the tradition of the Plan-Do-Study-Act tradition of TQM. The goal is to identify shortcomings or opportunities for improvement via the assessment process and then to “close the loop” by introducing planned changes to improve system performance.

  17. Using QR codes for continuous assessment in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Jiménez Rodríguez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and communications technology (ICT in education has accelerated in recent years. At university level educational platforms that provide access to the contents of different subjects are used, as well as on-line communication between teachers and students. This project intended to improve teacher quality and motivation and satisfaction in 1st grade students, through the insertion of new ICT tools [forms Google and QR codes (quick response codes] that allow students the continuous assessment of their own learning, with particular emphasis on the application of metacognitive strategies for problem solving. It was conducted during the academic year 2014-2015 in the subject of Basic Psychology (practices. The subject Basic Psychology is taught in 1st Degree of Social Work at the Complutense University of Madrid. It consists of six ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits and as such, students receive two hours of lecture and practical class one hour each week. It was during the weekly hour of practice which was carried out this innovation project.

  18. A continuing education preference survey of public health graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S J; Perkocha, V A; Novotny, T E

    1995-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) is a vital component in strengthening the public health work force, and its importance has been emphasized by the Institute of Medicine and the Council for Education in Public Health. A CE preference survey was undertaken of alumni of the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health (UCB-SPH). Questionnaires were mailed to a one-third random sample of 1,500 graduates from 1981-1992 who currently reside in U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Region IX. A response rate of 57% was achieved. Results of the survey show that CE activities are highly desired among respondents. Overall, 58% of respondents prefer a half-day to one-day seminar format during regular business hours, as opposed to night classes. They prefer a traditional didactic classroom presentation that is within one hour's automobile travel. The optimal setting for CE courses would be at the University of California, Berkeley, or in-house at their institution. Subject areas of interest noted by respondents are health policy development, communication in public health, community involvement, and research. Schools of public health may respond to the CE needs of their alumni through a variety of channels, including the mainstreaming of CE as part of a school's teaching responsibility, special seminars or institutes, extension courses through the larger university system, distance-based learning, and through a separately funded for-profit CE activity.

  19. Community hospital and medical school cooperation in continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, S J; Casebeer, L; Woods, J R; Nyhuis, A W; O'Toole, J B

    1995-02-01

    To determine the extent and trends of cooperation in continuing medical education (CME) between community teaching hospitals and medical schools in the United States. A questionnaire was sent in September 1992 to the directors of CME at 276 teaching hospital members of the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME). The survey was designed to answer two questions: (1) What is the extent of cooperation between hospital CME providers and medical schools? (2) In the next three years will community hospitals seek competitive or collaborative relationships in CME with medical schools? By late April 1993, 216 (78%) of the questionnaires had been returned. Of these, 177 (64% of the sample) were analyzed. Of the responding hospitals, 91 (52%) cooperated with 92 medical schools in CME; 75 (45%) of the hospitals planned to increase cooperation. Only ten (11%) of the hospitals described their current CME relationship with a medical school as "competitive in most areas"; 23 (14%) expected to increase competition in the next three years. Forty-one (24%) of the respondents were part of a community hospital CME consortium; only 20 (16%) of the other institutions expected to participate in a consortium in the next three years. Hospital size and membership in the Association of American Medical Colleges' Council of Teaching Hospitals were generally correlated with current and future competition in CME with a medical school and likely participation in a community CME consortium. The majority of teaching hospital members of the AHME perceived that they would have cooperative relationships in CME with affiliated medical schools in the three years following the survey. These collaborative relationships should provide an important basis for the further planning and development of medical education consortia.

  20. Nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education: a comparison by level of education and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Tanya K

    2012-01-01

    The education of nurses has an influence on patient safety and outcomes, the nursing shortage, the faculty shortage, and nurses' attitudes and actions. This article reports on a dissertation study designed to examine the attitudes of nurses, initially registered with an associate degree or diploma in nursing, toward continuing formal education. Actively licensed registered nurses in the eastern and western United States (n=535) participated. The main finding of this study was that, although nurses held positive attitudes overall, attitudes ranked barely above neutral. The findings suggest that work needs to be done to improve nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education and research needs to be undertaken to understand what would entice nurses back to school. Implications for nursing practice and education are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

  1. Organization and Management of Continuing Education in German and Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Knust, Michaela; Hanft, Anke

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, an international comparison study investigated the organization and management of university continuing education (UCE). The Finnish continuing education system proved to be especially advanced in this study. On the other hand, it became clear that Germany was still lagging behind in continuing education. In this article, German and…

  2. Continuing education requirements among State Occupational Therapy Regulatory Boards in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the contents of each state’s occupational therapy (OT) regulatory board requirements regarding licensees’ acquisition of continuing education units in the United States of America. Methods Data related to continuing education requirements from each OT regulatory board of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the United States were reviewed and categorized by two reviewers. Analysis was conducted based on the categorization of the continuing education requirements and activities required, allowed, and not allowed/not mentioned for continuing education units. Results Findings revealed non-uniformity and inconsistency of continuing education requirements for licensure renewal between OT regulatory boards and was coupled with lack of specific criteria for various continuing education activities. Continuing education requirements were not tailored to meet the needs of individual licensee’s current and anticipated professional role and job responsibilities, with a negative bias towards presentation and publication allowed for continuing education units. Few boards mandated continuing education topics on ethics related to OT practice within each renewal cycle. Conclusion OT regulatory boards should move towards unifying the reporting format of continuing education requirements across all states to reduce ambiguity and to ensure licensees are equipped to provide ethical and competent practice. Efforts could be made to enact continuing education requirements specific to the primary role of a particular licensee. Finally, assigning the amount of continuing education credits to be awarded for different activities should be based on research evidence rather than arbitrary determination. PMID:27780351

  3. Continuing Education Needs and the Professional Reading of School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrobe, Kathy

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of school library media specialists in Oklahoma regarding continuing education activities and topics. Data are presented on the relative importance of several continuing education activities, percentage of respondents regularly reading specific journals, and continuing education topics ranked by respondents' prioritized…

  4. 24 CFR 206.308 - Continuing education requirements of counselors listed on the HECM Counselor Roster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing education requirements... MORTGAGE INSURANCE HECM Counselor Roster § 206.308 Continuing education requirements of counselors listed... successful completion of such continuing education, and such evidence must be made available to HUD upon...

  5. Continuing education requirements among State Occupational Therapy Regulatory Boards in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Savannah R; Crifasi, Kristen A; Marinelli, Christina M; Yuen, Hon K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the contents of each state's occupational therapy (OT) regulatory board requirements regarding licensees' acquisition of continuing education units in the United States of America. Data related to continuing education requirements from each OT regulatory board of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the United States were reviewed and categorized by two reviewers. Analysis was conducted based on the categorization of the continuing education requirements and activities required, allowed, and not allowed/not mentioned for continuing education units. Findings revealed non-uniformity and inconsistency of continuing education requirements for licensure renewal between OT regulatory boards and was coupled with lack of specific criteria for various continuing education activities. Continuing education requirements were not tailored to meet the needs of individual licensee's current and anticipated professional role and job responsibilities, with a negative bias towards presentation and publication allowed for continuing education units. Few boards mandated continuing education topics on ethics related to OT practice within each renewal cycle. OT regulatory boards should move towards unifying the reporting format of continuing education requirements across all states to reduce ambiguity and to ensure licensees are equipped to provide ethical and competent practice. Efforts could be made to enact continuing education requirements specific to the primary role of a particular licensee. Finally, assigning the amount of continuing education credits to be awarded for different activities should be based on research evidence rather than arbitrary determination.

  6. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and... Training § 163.41 Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs. (a... agency's performance standards, during the internship period. (c) Continuing education and training. (1...

  7. A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Edward M; Lisi, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods : Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results : The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion : The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education.

  8. Combining Evidence-Based Practice, Learner-Guided Education, and Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Tahnee J; Theiss, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Personal interest and investment in a topic can bring learning to life and affect real change in nursing practice. This article explains an innovative approach to combining learner-guided education and continuing education credit through a three-part approach to implementing evidence-based practice. This method can be used for nurses in any practice setting to generate learner interest and participation, while improving patient care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Problem-based learning: an exploration of student opinions on its educational role in one UK pharmacy undergraduate curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; Wickham, Jane; Sach, Tracey

    2014-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) was introduced into the first 3 years of the undergraduate degree course at the University of East Anglia (UEA) to both enhance the student learning experience and to enable it to meet external course accreditation criteria. Evidence to support both of these assertions is required. The objective was to determine student opinions on the value of PBL and the PBL learning process at one UK school of pharmacy. Utilising the professional accreditation criteria for UK schools of pharmacy a questionnaire was devised and piloted before being given to all UEA undergraduate pharmacy students for self-completion. The most appropriate method of dissemination was determined from a student-led focus group. A total of 201/329 (61.1%) students responded. The majority of students agreed that PBL improved their team working (83.1%), oral communication (89.1%) and problem-solving skills (61.7%). Additionally PBL improved students' ability to identify and address ethical dilemmas (74.5%) as well as enhancing their ability to manage their own learning (67.6%). Male students and those with a stated preference for team working were found to prefer PBL. Students generally believe that PBL develops a number of key skills and consequently inclusion of PBL alongside traditional teaching methods enables the school to meet a number of degree accreditation criteria. Male students, those who enjoyed team working and working with their current group were more positive about PBL. Further work is required to improve the experience for all students. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Implementation of a pharmacogenomics service in a community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Stefanie P; Greco, Angelo J; Michaels, Natasha M; O'Connor, Shanna K; Chater, Rebecca W; Viera, Anthony J; Faruki, Hawazin; McLeod, Howard L; Roederer, Mary W

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the feasibility of implementing a pharmacogenomics service in a community pharmacy. SETTING A single community pharmacy that is part of a regional chain known for offering innovative pharmacy services. PRACTICE DESCRIPTION Community pharmacists at the project site routinely provide clinical pharmacy services, including medication therapy management, immunizations, point-of-care testing, blood pressure monitoring, and diabetes education. PRACTICE INNOVATION The implementation of a pharmacogenomic testing and interpretation service for the liver isoenzyme cytochrome P450 2C19. PARTICIPANTS 18 patients taking clopidogrel, a drug metabolized by CYP2C19. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Rate of patient participation, rate of prescriber acceptance of pharmacist recommendation, time to perform genetic testing service, and number of claims submitted to and paid by insurance. RESULTS Of 41 patients taking clopidogrel and meeting project criteria, 18 (43.9%) enrolled and completed testing and interpretation of pharmacogenomic results. The mean time pharmacists spent completing all stages of the project with each participant was 76.6 minutes. The mean time to complete participation in the project (time between person's first and second visit) was 30.1 days. Nine patients had wild-type alleles, and pharmacists recommended continuation of therapy as ordered. Genetic variants were found in the other nine patients, and all pharmacist recommendations for modifications in therapy were ultimately accepted by prescribers. Overall, 17 patients consented to filing of reimbursement claims with their insurers. Five were not able to be billed due to submission difficulties. Of the remaining 12, none was paid. CONCLUSION A pharmacogenomics service can be an extension of medication therapy management services in a community pharmacy. Prescribers are receptive to having community pharmacists conduct pharmacogenomics testing, but reimbursement is a challenge.

  11. Prevalence of hazardous alcohol use among pharmacy students at nine U.S. schools of pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hazardous use of alcohol continues to be recognized as a problem at the university level. Knowledge regarding alcohol consumption in healthcare professional students is limited, especially in regards to pharmacy students. Much of the information available focuses on pharmacy student drinking patterns in specific geographic regions or is simply outdated.Objectives: This study was designed to assess levels of alcohol consumption and estimate the level of hazardous drinking among pharmacy students in a larger sample size that is representative of US pharmacy schools.Methods: An anonymous survey regarding alcohol usage was offered to students at nine school of pharmacy across the United States. The survey consisted of demographic questions, the World Health Organization Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT, and questions that assess particular alcohol-induced behaviorsResults: More than 25% of 1161 respondents had a total AUDIT score = 8, which indicates a risk of alcohol-related problems. Students that were male, in their first or second professional year of school, not married, and without children were statistically more likely to have AUDIT scores in the hazardous drinking range. Grade point average and student housing did not statistically affect student’s AUDIT scores.Conclusion: These results indicate that over one-fourth of pharmacy students surveyed have indicators of harmful alcohol use. Pharmacy schools should continue to address and confront hazardous alcohol use on campuses in order to curtail heavy alcohol consumption and reduce the risk of alcohol-related problems in pharmacy students.

  12. Conceptions of Environment in a Continuing Education Course for Science Teachers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Matos, Mauricio; Barbosa, Paulo; Coelho-Matos, Myrna Elisa Chagas

    2012-01-01

    Studies focusing on environmental education and continuing education of science teachers play an important role in the science education area. This research analyzed conceptions of environment in a continuing education course for science teachers developed at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The analysis of the material was made using a…

  13. Pharmacy Students as Health Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick P Trombetta, Pharm.D

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases are the main contributor to both health care costs and mortality in the United States, with medication non-adherence and lifestyle modifications being leading causes. To motivate patients with several co-morbidities, the longitudinal care class was used to educate on maintaining adherence to prescribed regimens. Twenty pharmacy students were trained in health coaching and motivational interviewing methods. Specifically, students were to provide patients with education sheets, apply the teach-back method, and motivate the patient to develop and reach SMART goals made with the pharmacy student over a course of one academic school year. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Note

  14. Development and evaluation of continuing education course in renal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Rizk, Rana

    2016-02-01

    Competent renal dietitians are crucial for better patient compliance and clinical outcomes, specifically in critical settings. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based course in renal dietetics for dietitians working in health care systems where dietetic specialization is absent. Fifteen licensed dietitians working with hemodialysis patients in Lebanon were randomly recruited to participate in the course. The latter was developed by the study's primary investigator, according to evidence-based practice guidelines, and focused on all aspects of renal nutrition. Total course duration was 28 hours spread over a 2 month period. Dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition was tested pre- and post-training through a 23-item questionnaire; the total score was expressed in percentage (insufficient knowledge). Paired-samples t test was used for statistical analysis. Overall knowledge of the dietitians significantly improved post-training and reached satisfactory levels (pre: 38.75 ± 17.20%, post: 62.08 ± 21.85%). Sub-analysis of the change in the knowledge showed significant and satisfactory improvement only in 3 topics: 1) correct body weight use in calculations, 2) energy estimation method and 3) phosphorus management. Knowledge in the fluid management significantly improved but did not achieve a satisfactory level. The course significantly improved dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition. If adopted as part of the continuing education of dietitians in countries that lack dietetic specializations, it may serve the first step towards improving health care practice.

  15. Recruitment of rural healthcare professionals for live continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holuby, Ronnie Scott; Pellegrin, Karen L; Barbato, Anna; Ciarleglio, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The availability of rural healthcare is a growing concern in the United States as fewer healthcare providers choose to work in rural areas. Accessing quality continuing education (CE) for rural healthcare practitioners (HCPs) remains a challenge and may pose a barrier to quality care. To maximize attendance at a live, in-person, free CE program focusing on geriatric medication and issues specifically targeted to HCPs in rural areas, two methods were implemented sequentially. The first method used formal advertising implemented by a professional marketing service to promote CE events. The second method enlisted local healthcare organizations and physician groups to promote the CE event to their employees. Cost per attendee was calculated for comparison. Professional marketing services recruited 31 HCPs (March 2011) and resulted in a per-participant recruitment cost of US$428.62. Local healthcare organizations and physician groups' marketing recruited 48 HCPs (July-August 2011) and resulted in a per-participant recruitment cost of US$55.19. Providing free CE coordinated through local healthcare organizations and physician groups was the most cost-effective method of recruiting rural HCPs for CE. Formal advertising added cost without increasing the number of participants per event. Although this is the first study of the cost-effectiveness of recruitment methods targeting HCPs in rural areas, results are consistent with research on cost-effectiveness of outreach to rural lay community members.

  16. Distance Learning Course for Healthcare Professionals: Continuing Education in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Vagner Kunz; Valentini, Dirceu Felipe; Rocha, Marcos Vinícius Vieira; de Almeida, Carlos Podalírio Borges; Cazella, Sílvio Cesar; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2017-12-01

    Continuing education of healthcare workers (HCWs) is an essential strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB) transmission, enabling HCWs in early detection and appropriate treatment of TB cases. We developed a distance learning (DL) course on TB for nurses. We conducted a quasi-experimental before and after study to evaluate the DL community at the participant's learning level. In addition, to evaluate the DL community at the level of participant satisfaction, a cross-sectional study was carried out after the course. Nurses involved in active inpatient or outpatient care of patients were recruited to participate in the study. Sixty-six participants started and completed the course and they were included in the analysis. The overall mean pretest and post-test scores were 10.3 ± 2.2 and 11.4 ± 2.7, respectively. Participants increased their knowledge to a statistically significant degree (p world (10.6%); number of TB cases in Brazil (36.4%); contagiousness of latent TB infection (LTBI) (28.8%); and definition of active case finding (45.5%). Course feedback was mostly positive, with majority of users saying they were satisfied or totally satisfied. A brief DL course on TB was associated with some improvement in knowledge among nurses. The baseline knowledge was low regarding TB epidemiologic data, concepts on LTBI, and active case finding. This finding emphasizes the need to further improve the competencies and knowledge of nurses.

  17. Librarian instruction-delivery modality preferences for professional continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Valerie A; Bose, Arpita; Boehmer, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Attending professional continuing education (CE) is an important component of librarianship. This research study identified librarians' preferences in delivery modalities of instruction for professional CE. The study also identified influential factors associated with attending CE classes. Five instruction-delivery modalities and six influential factors were identified for inclusion in an online survey. The survey completed by members of the American Library Association (ALA), Special Libraries Association (SLA), and Medical Library Association (MLA) provided the data for analysis of librarian preferences and influential factors. The majority of respondents were MLA members, followed by ALA and SLA members. Librarians from all three library associations preferred the face-to-face instructional modality. The most influential factor associated with the decision to attend a professional CE class was cost. All five instruction-delivery modalities present useful structures for imparting professional CE. As librarians' experience with different modalities increases and as technology improves, preferences in instruction delivery may shift. But at present, face-to-face remains the most preferred modality. Based on the results of this study, cost was the most influential factor associated with attending a CE class. This may change as additional influential factors are identified and analyzed in future studies.

  18. Development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, John D; Williams, Jonathan P; Barnes, Julie F; Greenlee, Katie M; Cardiology, Bcps-Aq; Leonard, Mandy C

    2017-07-15

    The development of a pharmacy resident rotation to expand decentralized clinical pharmacy services is described. In an effort to align with the initiatives proposed within the ASHP Practice Advancement Initiative, the department of pharmacy at Cleveland Clinic, a 1,400-bed academic, tertiary acute care medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, established a goal to provide decentralized clinical pharmacy services for 100% of patient care units within the hospital. Patient care units that previously had no decentralized pharmacy services were evaluated to identify opportunities for expansion. Metrics analyzed included number of medication orders verified per hour, number of pharmacy dosing consultations, and number of patient discharge counseling sessions. A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of this service and potential resident learning opportunities. A learning experience description was drafted, and feedback was solicited regarding the development of educational components utilized throughout the rotation. Pharmacists who were providing services to similar patient populations were identified to serve as preceptors. Staff pharmacists were deployed to previously uncovered patient care units, with pharmacy residents providing decentralized services on previously covered areas. A rotating preceptor schedule was developed based on geographic proximity and clinical expertise. An initial postimplementation assessment of this resident-driven service revealed that pharmacy residents provided a comparable level of pharmacy services to that of staff pharmacists. Feedback collected from nurses, physicians, and pharmacy staff also supported residents' ability to operate sufficiently in this role to optimize patient care. A learning experience developed for pharmacy residents in a large medical center enabled the expansion of decentralized clinical services without requiring additional pharmacist full-time equivalents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  19. Effect of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience on Medication Therapy Management Services in a Centralized Retail Pharmacy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vande Griend, Joseph P; Rodgers, Melissa; Nuffer, Wesley

    2017-05-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) delivery is increasingly important in managed care. Successful delivery positively affects patient health and improves Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services star ratings, a measure of health plan quality. As MTM services continue to grow, there is an increased need for efficient and effective care models. The primary objectives of this project were to describe the delivery of MTM services by fourth-year Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) students in a centralized retail pharmacy system and to evaluate and quantify the clinical and financial contributions of the students. The secondary objective was to describe the engagement needed to complete comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) and targeted interventions. From May 2015 to December 2015, thirty-five APPE students from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy provided MTM services at Albertsons Companies using the OutcomesMTM and Mirixa platforms. Students delivered patient care services by phone at the central office and provided face-to-face visits at pharmacies in the region. With implementation of the MTM APPE in 2015, the team consisted of 2 MTM pharmacists and pharmacy students, as compared with 1 MTM pharmacist in 2014. The number of CMRs and targeted interventions completed and the estimated additional revenue generated during the 2015 time period were compared with those completed from May through December 2014. The patient and provider engagement needed to complete the CMRs and targeted interventions was summarized. 125 CMRs and 1,918 targeted interventions were billed in 2015, compared with 13 CMRs and 767 targeted interventions in 2014. An estimated $16,575-$49,272 of additional revenue was generated in 2015. To complete the interventions in 2015, the team engaged in 1,714 CMR opportunities and 4,686 targeted intervention opportunities. In this MTM rotation, students provided real-life care to patients, resulting in financial and clinical

  20. RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PANORAMA OF MODERNIZATION OF TRAINING TEACHERS OF CONTINUOUS VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Dorozhkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, there is no evidence-based strategy of upgrade of system of preparation of pedagogical personnel for continuous professional education in the Russian Federation. At the same time, scientists recognize that smoothly running regular high-quality replenishment of education by the skilled heads and teachers having fundamental psychology and pedagogical knowledge and being specialists in one of economic industries has crucial importance for successful development of post-industrial society. Hence, the need for creation of multichannel system of professional and pedagogical preparation has emerged.The aim of the present publication is to provide the complex overview of problems of reforming of professional pedagogical education and to show possible ways of their decision.Methods. The methodological basis of the study involves the concept of professional development of an individual; the thesis on the integration of the system-based, process and project approaches; the principles for the development of professional pedagogical education. Panoramic approach to the discussed problems of modernization of professional and pedagogical school has defined the logic of our research.Results. Psychological and pedagogical problems of professional education are analysed. Multidimensional metaprofessional qualities of teachers of vocational school are considered. The conceptual model of vocational structure of preparation of pedagogical personnel is developed for the system of continuous professional education.The debatable aspect of the research is reflected in the project of a psychological and pedagogical platform – the autonomous modular educational program including massive open online courses, management systems of educational process, supports of innovative infrastructure of education, humanitarian technologies of high education.Practical significance. The vocational structure of training of teachers of vocational

  1. Nuclear pharmacy certificate program: distance learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Pharmacy Certificate Program (NPCP) was developed to meet the need for licensed pharmacists wishing to change career paths and enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy. Additionally, the NPCP benefits employers that wish to employ a nuclear pharmacist in lieu of waiting for graduates that are available only at one time yearly from a college of pharmacy. The NPCP is not intended to replace traditional nuclear pharmacy education in academic institutions, but to offer an another option to pharmacists and potential employers. The NPCP is divided into two components. One component involves over 130 hours of instruction through videotapes and accompanying workbooks. This component is completed while working in a nuclear pharmacy and with the assistance of a nuclear pharmacist serving as a supervisor. The nuclear pharmacist is available to answer questions and to administer examinations over the videotape material. Examinations are prepared by Purdue faculty and returned for grading. Scores on exams must reflect learning to the same degree as in an academic environment. In the second component of the NPCP, the trainee attends a two-week session in the School of Pharmacy at Purdue University. the trainee must complete a significant portion of the videotape material before the on-campus session. In the on-campus component, videotape material is reinforced and expanded by laboratory exercises and lectures in dedicated, fully-equipped laboratories employed in the School of Pharmacy undergraduate program in nuclear pharmacy. Nuclear pharmacy faculty and consultants provide individualized instruction to each trainee. Assimilation of lecture and laboratory material is determined through several examinations. A comprehensive examination is administered which includes content from the videotape-workbook component of the NPCP. Certification is awarded to trainees who have completed the program and demonstrated their knowledge and competence by examination. Almost 200

  2. Web-based learning for continuing nursing education of emergency unit staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Eija; Salminen-Tuomaala, Mari

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a Web-based continuing education course focusing on patient counseling in an emergency department. Course materials were developed based on data collected from the department's patients and their family members and on earlier findings on counseling. Web-based education is an appropriate method for continuing education in a specific hospital department. This puts special demands for nurse managers in arranging, designing, and implementing the education together with educators.

  3. Evaluating the purpose and benefits of continuing education in nursing and the implications for the provision of continuing education for cancer nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, A

    1994-04-01

    In the light of increasing emphasis upon mandatory continuing education in nursing, the need for cancer nurses to update and improve their knowledge and skills is heightened. The challenges lie in how to keep nurses up-to-date, broaden their outlook and ensure that patients benefit. In this paper the literature on the purpose and benefits of continuing education is reviewed, and the implications of the Post-Registration Education and Practice Project (PREPP) for cancer nurses are addressed. Arguments about a definition of 'continuing learning' rather than 'continuing education' are discussed, since outcomes vary depending upon the definition adopted. Inconsistencies between the benefits claimed and those measured are highlighted. Attention is drawn to the inconclusive nature of the studies that have measured impact; some of the problems encountered in the provision of adequate education and its accessibility to nurses; and the continuing discrepancy of perceived need between nurse and manager. Specific impact evaluation studies relating to continuing education in cancer nursing are reviewed. Recommendations for providing education with measurable outcomes are drawn from the literature, while a case is made for the alternative perspective of lifelong learning where outcomes are neither specific nor measurable. In conclusion, the questions of who should be responsible for education and the need for further development of impact evaluation tools are addressed.

  4. AN ANALYSIS OF PHARMACY SERVICES BY PHARMACIST IN COMMUNITY PHARMACY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-03-01

    Indonesian Pharmacists Association, Provincial and District Health Offices. To practise such as stated by the Indonesian Health Law No. 36 of 2009, the Government Regulation No. 51 of 2009. Conclusion: The Standards of Pharmaceutical Services and GPP requires prevailing role of pharmacists in community pharmacy in terms of time and capability Training or continuing development is also needed through upgrading, seminars, socialization and supervision in the community pharmacy practices which may involve cooperation with professional organizations needs to be improved. Key words: Pharmacist, Qualification, Community Pharmacy, Pharmacy Practices ABSTRAK Latar Belakang: Di lndonesia sampai saat ini terdapat lebih dari 60 Perguruan Tinggi Farmasi dengan berbagai tingkat akreditasi. Penelitian sebelumnya menemukan bahwa Standard Pelayanan Farmasi belum dapat dilaksanakan sepenuhnya pada berbagai fasilitas pelayanan kesehatan (rumah sakit, puskesmas dan apotek karena keterbatasan kompetensi apoteker. Studi ini bertujuan mengidentifikasi kualifikasi apoteker yang melakukan pelayanan farmasi di apotek komunitas dalam rangka memenuhi ketentuan Undang-Undang RI No. 36 tahun 2009 tentang Kesehatan. Sebagaimana diamanatkan oleh Undang-Undang pemerintah berkewajiban persyaratan mimimum yang harus dimiliki. Metode: Penelitian potong lintang ini dilaksanakan dalam tahun 2010 pada masing-masing 2 apotek komunitas di 3 kota, yaitu Bandung, DI Yogyakarta dan Surabaya. Sebagai responden penelitian selain 10 orang apoteker apotek komunitas juga diambil 6 apoteker dari 6 PT Farmasi, 3 apoteker dari Pengurus Ikatan Apoteker lndonesia dan 6 apoteker dari Dinas Kesehatan Provinsi dan Kota. Di samping data primer dikumpulkan melalui wawancara mendalam dan observasi dengan menggunakan daftar tilik di unit apotek, juga dikumpulkan data sekunder tentang SOP pelayanan farmasi, dokumentasi monitoring dan kurikulum PT Farmasi. Hasil: Analisis data secara kualitatif deskriptif menunjukkan bahwa kualifikasi

  5. CONTINUOUS ECONOMIC EDUCATION AS THE FACTOR OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Lomakina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of continuous economic education of future professionals is caused by importance of forming correct understanding of the economic reality, of comprehension of economic basic laws, of understanding of global and national tendencies in economic development; the growing role of continuous economic education as a major factor of formation and development of a postindustrial society is shown; the reasons and circumstances of the active reference of the domestic pedagogical science and practice to problems of economic education are emphasized; the factors influencing development of continuous economic education are established in the article. Continuous economic education is considered as a part of continuous education promoting the formation of a competitive expert in conditions of market economy, demanded on labour market and directed on formation of economic competencies depending on the type of preparation (economic and not economic at different educational levels according to models of the graduate and the teacher and realized by means of economic training and economic education.

  6. Learning science as a potential new source of understanding and improvement for continuing education and continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Thomas J; Doyle, Terrence J

    2018-01-15

    Learning science is an emerging interdisciplinary field that offers educators key insights about what happens in the brain when learning occurs. In addition to explanations about the learning process, which includes memory and involves different parts of the brain, learning science offers effective strategies to inform the planning and implementation of activities and programs in continuing education and continuing professional development. This article provides a brief description of learning, including the three key steps of encoding, consolidation and retrieval. The article also introduces four major learning-science strategies, known as distributed learning, retrieval practice, interleaving, and elaboration, which share the importance of considerable practice. Finally, the article describes how learning science aligns with the general findings from the most recent synthesis of systematic reviews about the effectiveness of continuing medical education.

  7. Continuous glucose monitoring technology for personal use: an educational program that educates and supports the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evert, Alison; Trence, Dace; Catton, Sarah; Huynh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of an educational program for the initiation of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology for personal use, not 3-day CGMS diagnostic studies. The education program was designed to meet the needs of patients managing their diabetes with either diabetes medications or insulin pump therapy in an outpatient diabetes education center using a team-based approach. Observational research, complemented by literature review, was used to develop an educational program model and teaching strategies. Diabetes educators, endocrinologists, CGM manufacturer clinical specialists, and patients with diabetes were also interviewed for their clinical observations and experience. The program follows a progressive educational model. First, patients learn in-depth about real-time CGM technology by attending a group presensor class that provides detailed information about CGM. This presensor class facilitates self-selection among patients concerning their readiness to use real-time CGM. If the patient decides to proceed with real-time CGM use, CGM initiation is scheduled, using a clinic-centered protocol for both start-up and follow-up. Successful use of real-time CGM involves more than just patient enthusiasm or interest in a new technology. Channeling patient interest into a structured educational setting that includes the benefits and limitations of real-time CGM helps to manage patient expectations.

  8. Factors influencing the current practice of self-medication consultations in Eastern Indonesian community pharmacies: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brata, Cecilia; Fisher, Colleen; Marjadi, Brahmaputra; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda M

    2016-05-13

    Research has shown that the current practice of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in Indonesia is suboptimal. To improve the performance of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in community pharmacies, the factors that influence current practice need to be understood. The aim of this study is to identify the factors that influence current practice of pharmacy staff when handling self-medication consultations in Eastern Indonesian community pharmacies. Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted with pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, pharmacy owners, and counter attendants. Thematic analysis was used to generate findings. The current practice of pharmacy staff when handling self-medication consultations is directly influenced by the professionalism of pharmacy staff and patient responses to the consultations. These factors are in turn affected by the organisational context of the pharmacy and the external pharmacy environment. The organisational context of the pharmacy includes staffing, staff affordability, and the availability of time and facilities in which to provide consultations. The external pharmacy environment includes the number of trained pharmacy staff in the research setting, the relevance of pharmacy education to the needs of pharmacy practice, the support offered by the Indonesian Pharmacists Association, a competitive business environment, and the policy environment. Complex and inter-related factors influence the current practice of pharmacy staff when providing self-medication consultations in community pharmacies in this research setting. Multiple strategies will be required to improve consultation practices.

  9. Continuing medical education in Brazil: what about obstetricians and gynecologists?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Sass

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In Brazil, obstetricians and gynecologists are not required to submit to periodical evaluations to ascertain their professional competence in dealing with new concepts and therapies. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of a group of obstetricians and gynecologists on a written evidence-based obstetrics test and determine their opinions and use of systematic reviews. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective cohort. SETTING: Brazilian Obstetrics and Gynecology Congress 2001. METHODS: 230 doctors agreed to participate in the study during a national obstetrics and gynecology congress. Participants took an individual anonymous written multiple-choice test with seven questions on clinical obstetrics, one question on the interpretation of a meta-analysis graph and two questions on their opinions and actual use of systematic reviews. Scores were analyzed and compared after grouping the participants according to year of graduation, residence training, doctoral program and faculty status. RESULTS: The general average score was 49.2 ± 17.4. The scores tended to decline as the years since graduation advanced. Doctors who graduated in the last five years had higher scores than those who graduated over 25 years ago (52.2 versus 42.9. The performance did not vary according to medical residence, postgraduate program or teaching status. While 98.2% considered systematic reviews relevant, only 54.9% said that they routinely used this source of information. DISCUSSION: The participants' average score was low, even though they were highly qualified and trained. Despite the limitations of the study, the results are worrisome. If motivated physicians participating in a national congress obtained such low scores, we can speculate that the results might be even worse among other doctors that do not attend these events. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that Brazilian obstetricians and gynecologists could benefit from continuing medical education and raise questions

  10. Effective didactic skills training for teachers in continuing medical education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, M.; Abanador, N.; Moedder, U.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To develop, test, evaluate and implement effective state-of-the-art teacher training in didactic skills and methods. The training concept should be designed and beneficial for medical teachers' postgraduate medical education (CME). Materials and methods: A 5-day workshop with 12 theoretical and 9 'hands-on' modules was designed and stepwise improved, according to the trainees' feedback. All trainees were trained in small groups (6 to 10 participants per workshop). The workshops consisted of mini-lectures, repeated micro teaching exercises and video-supported feedback concerning the following key-competencies: Communication of goals; methods to trigger interactivity; design of slides in power point presentations; effective feedback-techniques; and use of media, time-management, skills teaching, assessment methods (e.g. OSCE and others), evaluation and general presentation skills. The evaluation was based on two components: (A) trainees' scores in two objective structured teaching exercises (OSTEs) at the beginning and end of workshop, with the ratings of 15 to 20 external observers checked for significant trends (Pearson's X 2 test) in 17 givencriteria for high teaching effectiveness; (B) the trainees rated 20 teaching competencies in a retrospective 'pre-post-analysis' (self-assessment questionnaire) at the end of each workshop and after 6 to 12 months later. Results: The results revealed highly significant (p<0.01) improvements in 13 of 16 OSTE-criteria and in 12 of 13 items of the pre-post-analysis, predominantly estimated to be 'persistent'. Overall, trainees' feedback has been highly encouraging to continue and broaden the program. The discussion covers potential factors for the training success as well as pitfalls and the controversial issue of fees. (orig.)

  11. The future of pain pharmacy: driven by need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkinson TJ

    2016-04-01

    programs require 2 months of chronic pain management; however, only two of the eleven programs identify chronic pain management as a primary practice setting. Discussion: Pain specialists in all fields are in high demand; however, the need for health care professionals specialized in chronic pain management probably exceeds that for professionals specialized in acute pain management and palliative care combined. This disparity between disease prevalence and specialty training programs is not reflected in the current residency training structure, nor have additional training programs arisen to fill this critical need. Conclusion: Health care systems will continue to struggle to meet the demands of patients with chronic pain until significant emphasis is placed on the education and training of health care professionals in this area. Clinical pharmacy should aim to meet this demand through the expansion of PGY-2 training programs and improved didactic education in pharmacy school that reflects the increased need for chronic pain specialists. Keywords: pain management, clinical pharmacists, pharmacy pain specialists, training programs

  12. A Model for University-Community Engagement: Continuing Education's Role as Convener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Judy; Wang, Tiffany R.

    2010-01-01

    Administrators are continually seeking university-community engagement. Continuing education departments are in a unique position to further these initiatives by connecting academic faculty, staff, and students with emerging community needs. This article provides a model to demonstrate the significant role continuing educators can play in…

  13. Continuing Education of Women, Report of a Seminar (Toronto, Canada, March 1, 2, 3, 1973).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Association for Adult Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    A report of a Seminar on Continuing Education of Women, held in March 1973 for Canadian women, is provided. The seminar was held to explore key issues in continuing education of women and to give guidelines to the Canadian Association for Adult Education (CAAE) as to relevant action that could be taken by the association. The contents of the…

  14. Academe Makes for Strange Bedfellows: How Continuing Education and Schools of Management Collide and Cooperate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfond, Jay A.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    A significant component of continuing education involves teaching management, especially through the array of academic degree programs offered to part-time older students. In fact, the ability to offer management education is critical for the viability of continuing education. Co-existing amicably with its institution's business schools is the…

  15. What Do Trade Unions Think about Continuing Education for Teachers in Galicia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampudia, Baena; Tilve, Ana Ma. Fernandez; Dolores, Ma.

    2016-01-01

    The common ups and downs of school agendas coupled with the existence of new educational challenges have created a complicated scenario that places the issue of continuing education for teaching staff directly under the spotlight. As a consequence, the role of teachers' trade unions as with other requirements of continuing education is now put…

  16. Recent and Continuing Initiatives and Practices in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Alice-Ann; Adamek, Mary S.

    2017-01-01

    A number of initiatives in special education have occurred in the United States over the years, some mandated by amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Having a working knowledge of these initiatives allows music educators to have informed discussions with colleagues and parents and participate more fully in Individualized…

  17. Effective Continuing Education for Licensed Real Estate Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Wendy A.

    2004-01-01

    Mandatory real estate education has been intensely debated for many years. New Jersey is the only state in the nation that does not require licensed real estate agents to attend an ongoing educational event after securing a license to practice. A bill was proposed to the legislature to mandate real estate education in June of 2001. (It was…

  18. Is a Pharmacy Student the Customer or the Product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Academic entitlement and student consumerism have been described as a cause for unprofessional behavior in higher education. Colleges and schools of pharmacy may inadvertently encourage student consumerism and academic entitlement by misunderstanding who is the primary customer of pharmacy education. Pharmacy colleges and schools who view students as the primary customer can unintentionally pressure faculty members to relax expectations for professionalism and academic performance and thereby cause a general downward spiral in the quality of pharmacy graduates. In contrast, this paper argues that the primary customer of pharmacy education is the patient. Placing the patient at the center of the educational process is consistent with the concepts of pharmaceutical care, medication therapy management, the patient-centered home, and the oath of the pharmacist. Emphasizing the patient as the primary customer discourages academic entitlement and student consumerism and encourages an emphasis on learning how to serve the medication-related needs of the patient. PMID:24558271

  19. Impact of a pilot pharmacy health-care professional out-of-school time physical activity and nutrition education program with exercise on fourth and fifth graders in a rural Texas community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Janie; Gutierrez, Ashley; Seifert, Charles F

    2014-01-01

    Childhood obesity continues to be a problem. Children in rural populations are more likely to be overweight or obese and a lack of resources in those areas may contribute to this problem. We aimed to assess the impact of a pilot pharmacy health-care professional out-of-school time vigorous physical activity and nutrition education program on fourth and fifth graders in a rural Texas community. We conducted a prospective 12-week cohort study from August to November 2012. Thirty-three children, aged 8-11 years, in Bailey County, Texas, were enrolled in the study. Body mass index, body mass index percentile, blood pressure, waist circumference, and a diet preferences and activities knowledge survey were obtained at 0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Study participants completed a twice weekly physical activity and nutrition education program with exercise over weeks 1-4 with no intervention during weeks 5-12. Thirty-one (94%) of the 33 children, predominately Hispanic girls, completed the program. Body mass index (-0.30 (95% confidence interval, -0.44 to -0.17); P = <0.0001), body mass index percentile (-2.75 (95% confidence interval, -4.89 to -0.62); P = 0.0026), systolic blood pressure (-1.9 (95% confidence interval, -2.9 to -0.9); P = <0.0001), and waist circumference (-0.47 (95% confidence interval, -0.85 to -0.10); P = <0.0001) mean change decreased between baseline and week 12 with no intervention for 8 weeks. Positive survey results at 3 months indicated a decrease in fried/sweet foods; increase in exercise; decreases in video games and computer use; and a change in knowledge regarding the selection of the most healthy food group servings per day. In this pharmacy health-care directed pilot study, participants had a reduction of body mass index, body mass index percentile, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and improvement in certain survey results at the end of 12 weeks despite no further intervention after 4 weeks.

  20. Impact of a pilot pharmacy health-care professional out-of-school time physical activity and nutrition education program with exercise on fourth and fifth graders in a rural Texas community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janie Robles

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Childhood obesity continues to be a problem. Children in rural populations are more likely to be overweight or obese and a lack of resources in those areas may contribute to this problem. We aimed to assess the impact of a pilot pharmacy health-care professional out-of-school time vigorous physical activity and nutrition education program on fourth and fifth graders in a rural Texas community. Methods: We conducted a prospective 12-week cohort study from August to November 2012. Thirty-three children, aged 8–11 years, in Bailey County, Texas, were enrolled in the study. Body mass index, body mass index percentile, blood pressure, waist circumference, and a diet preferences and activities knowledge survey were obtained at 0, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Study participants completed a twice weekly physical activity and nutrition education program with exercise over weeks 1–4 with no intervention during weeks 5–12. Results: Thirty-one (94% of the 33 children, predominately Hispanic girls, completed the program. Body mass index (−0.30 (95% confidence interval, −0.44 to −0.17; P = <0.0001, body mass index percentile (−2.75 (95% confidence interval, −4.89 to −0.62; P = 0.0026, systolic blood pressure (−1.9 (95% confidence interval, −2.9 to −0.9; P = <0.0001, and waist circumference (−0.47 (95% confidence interval, −0.85 to −0.10; P = <0.0001 mean change decreased between baseline and week 12 with no intervention for 8 weeks. Positive survey results at 3 months indicated a decrease in fried/sweet foods; increase in exercise; decreases in video games and computer use; and a change in knowledge regarding the selection of the most healthy food group servings per day. Conclusion: In this pharmacy health-care directed pilot study, participants had a reduction of body mass index, body mass index percentile, systolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and improvement in certain survey results at the

  1. Continuing education for primary health care nurse practitioners in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Pamela; DiCenso, Alba; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Opsteen, Joanne; Chambers, Tracey

    2013-04-01

    The Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing offers a nine-university, consortium-based primary health care nurse practitioner education program and on-line continuing education courses for primary health care nurse practitioners. Our study sought to determine the continuing education needs of primary health care nurse practitioners across Ontario, how best to meet these needs, and the barriers they face in completing continuing education. Surveys were completed by 83 (40%) of 209 learners who had participated in continuing education offered by the Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing between 2004 and 2007. While 83% (n=50) of nurse practitioners surveyed indicated that continuing education was extremely important to them, they also identified barriers to engaging in continuing education offerings including; time intensity of the courses, difficulty taking time off work, family obligations, finances and fatigue. The most common reason for withdrawal from a continuing education offering was the difficulty of balancing work and study demands. Continuing education opportunities are important to Ontario primary health care nurse practitioners, and on-line continuing education offerings have been well received, but in order to be taken up by their target audience they must be relevant, readily accessible, flexible, affordable and offered over brief, intense periods of time using technology that is easy to use and Internet sites that are easily navigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Survey and Research on Continuing Education Curriculum Construction for Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Chao; Yu Mingjiu

    2015-01-01

    Continuing education curriculum construction is the key work to complete the teachers’ continuing education system, it is also an important part of the teachers’ specialization. This study aims to master the main problems of the current primary and secondary school teachers’ continuing education curriculum construction and put forward the corresponding improvement countermeasures. Research in Yunnan province of China as a case, through the Questionnaire Method, Interview Method and Factors An...

  3. South Dakota continuing dental education using open-circuit television: two-year report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Frances H.; Ludeman, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Establishment of an effective communication system, quality programing material, and development of viewer expectation of the programs are essential for the use of educational television in continuing dental education. (Editor)

  4. Pharmacy settles suit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-02

    A suit was filed by an HIV-positive man against a pharmacy that inadvertently disclosed his HIV status to his ex-wife and children. His ex-wife tried to use the information in a custody battle for their two children. The suit against the pharmacy was settled, but the terms of the settlement remain confidential.

  5. Essays on the Future of Continuing Education Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Warren L., Ed.

    Topics chosen for these eight seminar papers divide basically into three categories: discussions on processes and methods for planning for the future of adult education; attempts to project into the future such worldwide problems as urbanism, conflict, the population explosion, and specific adult education trends; and discussion of the current…

  6. Continuous Improvement and Quality: Implications for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlee, Brian

    This paper reviews the literature pertaining to Total Quality Management (TQM) and its application in educational settings, especially at institutions of higher education. The review is organized into the following topical areas: the concept of "quality" (usually involving customer satisfaction, executive-level leadership, and employee…

  7. Applied Ethics in Adult and Continuing Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sork, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    To someone who has been intrigued by the role of ethics in adult education for many years, it has been heartening to see how the field has responded to calls to address the ethical dimensions of practice. Although adult education may have been a little later than some in coming to terms with ethics, these developments occurred during a time when…

  8. Post Modernity and Continuing Education: Becoming Critical Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, Barry

    The social condition known as postmodernity has an impact upon education in that it creates global marketplaces, increased marginalization of more workers, and privatization of institutions, including educational institutions. The postmodern culture revolves around the excesses of marketing and consumption and the social relations of…

  9. A Comparative Study to Evaluate the Educational Impact of E-Learning Tools on Griffith University Pharmacy Students’ Level of Understanding Using Bloom’s and SOLO Taxonomies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Karaksha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To design a series of e-learning tools within the framework of a defined educational pedagogy to complement the conventional pharmacology curriculum at Griffith University and evaluate the impact of this strategy on student level of understanding through taxonomic classification of student final exam answers. Methods. A series of 148 e-learning tools was designed for 3rd year undergraduate pharmacy students and incorporated into their curriculum during 2012. The educational benefits of the e-learning tools were evaluated by analyses of student level of understanding (by SOLO taxonomy at the final exams between the control group (standard curricula in 2011 and the intervention group (standard curricula + e-learning tools in 2012. Results. Backward linear regression analysis demonstrated GPA to be the most significant predictor of level of understanding, while the intervention group was a highly significant predictor for greater level of understanding in semester two. Conclusion. E-learning tools appeared to significantly improve student level of understanding as scored by the SOLO taxonomy when students engaged highly with the tools.

  10. Students' Satisfaction with a Web-Based Pharmacy Program in a Re-Regulated Pharmacy Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Maria; Mattsson, Sofia; Gallego, Gisselle

    2017-08-25

    In response to the shortage of pharmacists in Northern Sweden, a web-based Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy program was established at Umeå University in 2003. In 2009, the Swedish pharmacy market was re-regulated from a state monopoly to an open market, but it is unknown what impact this has had on education satisfaction. The objectives of this study were to examine the level of satisfaction among graduates from a web-based pharmacy program and to describe what subjects and skills students would have liked more or less of in their education. A secondary objective was to compare the level of satisfaction before and after the Swedish pharmacy market was re-regulated. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2015 with all alumni who had graduated from the pharmacy program between 2006 and 2014 ( n = 511), and responses to questions about graduates' satisfaction with the program were analyzed ( n = 200). Most graduates (88%) agreed or strongly agreed that the knowledge and skills acquired during their education were useful in their current job. The graduates stated that they would have wanted more applied pharmacy practice and self-care counselling, and fewer social pharmacy and histology courses. Further, 82% stated that they would start the same degree program if they were to choose again today, and 92% agreed or strongly agreed that they would recommend the program to a prospective student. Graduates were more likely to recommend the program after the re-regulation ( p = 0.007). In conclusion, pharmacy graduates were very satisfied with their education, and no negative effects of the re-regulation could be observed on program satisfaction.

  11. Alcohol use behaviors among pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Wesley; McGuffey, Grant; Westrick, Salisa C; Jungnickel, Paul W; Correia, Christopher J

    2014-03-12

    To identify reasons for drinking, determine the patterns of alcohol abuse, and explore relationships between drinking motives and alcohol abuse patterns in pharmacy students. A cross-sectional anonymous, voluntary, self-administered paper survey instrument was administered to first-year (P1) through third-year (P3) pharmacy students as part of a professional seminar. Survey instruments were completed by 349 pharmacy students (95.9% cooperation rate). Using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test criteria, 23.2% of students reported hazardous or harmful use and 67.2% of students reported consuming alcohol at hazardous levels during the past year. Students who were male (37.0%), single (25.3%), and attended the main campus (26.2%) were more likely than their counterparts to report hazardous or harmful alcohol use. Pharmacy students reported social motives as the most common reason for drinking; however, coping and enhancement motives were more predictive of harmful or hazardous alcohol use. Approximately 1 in 4 pharmacy students (23%) reported hazardous or harmful alcohol use. Education about the dangers of alcohol abuse and intervention programs from colleges and schools of pharmacy are recommended to help address this issue.

  12. Alcohol Use Behaviors Among Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Wesley; McGuffey, Grant; Westrick, Salisa C.; Jungnickel, Paul W.; Correia, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify reasons for drinking, determine the patterns of alcohol abuse, and explore relationships between drinking motives and alcohol abuse patterns in pharmacy students. Methods. A cross-sectional anonymous, voluntary, self-administered paper survey instrument was administered to first-year (P1) through third-year (P3) pharmacy students as part of a professional seminar. Results. Survey instruments were completed by 349 pharmacy students (95.9% cooperation rate). Using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test criteria, 23.2% of students reported hazardous or harmful use and 67.2% of students reported consuming alcohol at hazardous levels during the past year. Students who were male (37.0%), single (25.3%), and attended the main campus (26.2%) were more likely than their counterparts to report hazardous or harmful alcohol use. Pharmacy students reported social motives as the most common reason for drinking; however, coping and enhancement motives were more predictive of harmful or hazardous alcohol use. Conclusion. Approximately 1 in 4 pharmacy students (23%) reported hazardous or harmful alcohol use. Education about the dangers of alcohol abuse and intervention programs from colleges and schools of pharmacy are recommended to help address this issue. PMID:24672063

  13. Capacity to deliver pharmaceutical care by community pharmacies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacy practice has transcended from largely a dispensary practice to pharmaceutical care practice. The capacity of community pharmacies to deliver pharmaceutical care was studied using pretested self survey methods. Ninety five percent (95%) of the respondents always educated customers on drug related needs, ...

  14. The Quality of Pharmacy Practice Among Dispensers in Private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of pharmacy practice provided by dispensers in private pharmacies was studied. Parameters used include levels of education of the dispensers, access to health information, knowledge and practice regarding dispensing of drugs to patients, and disposal of expired drugs. A total of 150 dispensers selected from ...

  15. Game on: The gamification of the pharmacy classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Leah; Wheeler, Erin

    Gamification is the use of game mechanics to promote engagement and enjoyment of problem-solving in non-game situations. Gamification has been used widely in recent years in industry and academia as a tool for training and education. The aims of this paper are to provide an overview of gamification and digital game-based learning (DGBL), review the use of digital games in health professional education, and provide suggestions for future use in pharmacy curricula. Many examples of game-based learning in pharmacy and other health professional curricula have been published, however the body of literature on DGBL is less developed. Overall, evaluations of these techniques show that students find them engaging and enjoyable. A recent meta-analysis of studies comparing DGBL to non-game based learning in primary, secondary, post-secondary education found that DGBL significantly enhances learning. Challenges to implementing game-based learning are financial, cultural, and technological. Many areas of the pharmacy curriculum could be appropriate for digital gamification. With more students entering pharmacy school familiar with video games and game-based living the time has come for pharmacy educators to explore how these instructional technologies could benefit a new generation of pharmacy students. As serious games are developed and researched in pharmacy curricula, test scores, student confidence in knowledge and skills, and retention of knowledge and skills are all outcomes that, if published, will help advance the adoption of DGBL into the pharmacy school classroom. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. aculty of Pharmacy, Muhirnbili University College of Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality of pharmacy practice provided by dispensers in private pharmacies was studied. Parameters used include levels of education of the dispensers, access to health information, knowledge and practice regarding dispensing of drugs to patients, and disposal of expired drugs. A total of 150 dispensers selected from ...

  17. Wikis and blogs: consider the possibilities for continuing nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2009-12-01

    Wikis and blogs are software programs that promote communication and collaboration through the development of written documents. Nurse educators can use them to facilitate teaching and learning in a variety of health care settings. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Improving the review of standard operating procedures: a novel electronic system for compounding pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brensel, Robert; Brensel, Scott; Ng, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Since the New England Compounding Center disaster in 2012, the importance of following correct procedures during every phase of customized pharmacy has been a focus of governmental interest and action as well as public scrutiny. Many pharmacies rely on the rote review of standard operating procedures to ensure that staff members understand and follow protocols that ensure the safety and potency of all compounds prepared, but that approach to continuing education can be cumbersome and needlessly time-consuming. In addition, documenting and retrieving evidence of employee competence can be difficult. In this article, we describe our use of online technology to improve our methods of educating staff about the full range of standard operating procedures that must be followed in our pharmacy. The system we devised and implemented has proven to be effective, easy to update and maintain, very inexpensive, and user friendly. Its use has reduced the time previously required for a read-over review of standard operating procedures from 30 or 40 minutes to 5 or 10 minutes in weekly staff meetings, and we can now easily document and access proof of employees' comprehension of that content. It is our hope that other small compounding pharmacies will also find this system of online standard operating procedure review helpful.

  19. CTSA approach in education: opportunities and challenges in continuing education teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Camilo Figueiredo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to initiate the formation of critical citizens from the Basic Education, this research aimed to investigate how a group of teachers from the local public from Londrina in Parana conceives of Science-Technology-Society-Environment Approach (CTSA for the teaching of scientific content. Data were collected through questionnaires and speeches from the participating during a course entitled Science-Technology-Society, offered in the course of Specialization in Education and Technology of the Federal Technological University of Paraná, Brazil. According to the data obtained initially unaware of this entire group approach to teaching. Soon, they were not as elaborate, plan and develop scientific content prioritizing CTSA relations. Therefore, this research promoted participants the innovation pedagogical and methodological knowledge to work the CTSA relationships in the classroom, because teachers revealed in his speeches understanding of how important it is to develop the contents prioritizing CTSA relations to form citizens critical to society. Based on these data, we stress the importance of teaching continuing education that enables the study of the CTSA approach to mobilize a more qualitative basic education.

  20. Perceived Value of University-Based Continuing Education Leadership Development Programs for Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Geri L.; Major, Claire H.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study, which involved development of a Value Creation Survey, examined the perceived value of leadership development programs (LDPs) provided by continuing higher education for administrators in colleges and universities. Participants were administrators at Association for Continuing Higher Education (ACHE) member institutions.…

  1. Whole-Grain Continuing Education for School Foodservice Personnel: Keeping Kids from Falling Short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Yousey, Lori; Barno, Trina; Caskey, Mary; Asche, Kimberly; Reicks, Marla

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this project was to develop and test whole-grain continuing education for school foodservice personnel. Methods: A continuing education program was developed to address planning, purchasing, preparing, and serving whole-grain food in schools. Participants completed a pre-post questionnaire to assess changes in knowledge,…

  2. Online Continuing Education for Health Professionals: Does Sticky Design Promote Practice-Relevance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghab, Roxanne Ward; Maldonado, Carlos; Whitehead, Dongsook; Bartlett, Felicia; de Bittner, Magaly Rodriguez

    2015-01-01

    Online continuing education (CE) holds promise as an effective method for rapid dissemination of emerging evidence-based practices in health care. Yet, the field of CE continues to develop and delivery is predominately face-to-face programs. Practice-oriented online educational methods and e-learning platforms are not fully utilized. Educational…

  3. Adult Continuing Education and Human Resource Development: Present Competitors, Potential Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas H.

    2013-01-01

    "Author's Note": In May 1989, this article was published in "Livelong Learning," the monthly practitioner journal of the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (Vol. 12, No. 7, pp. 13-17). Now viewed as a period reference article, it presents the relationship of adult and continuing education (ACE) and…

  4. Continuing education in athletic training: an alternative approach based on adult learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitney, W A

    1998-01-01

    To offer an alternative perspective on current continuing education practices and to propose a model for facilitating continuing education in the athletic training workplace. Professional knowledge can quickly become outdated, and the personal/professional contexts of allied medical fields such as athletic training are becoming increasingly more complex, making continuing education paramount. Adult learning theory suggests that individuals are self- directed, autonomous learners in nature and that experience is a rich source for learning, subsequently making the workplace a fruitful environment in which to engage in continuing education. Unfortunately, mandating continuing education may violate the voluntary nature of adult learning, making the practice questionable. Therefore, alternative aspects of continuing education may be helpful. This article consists of a brief synthesis of related literature that offers an alternative perspective of continuing education and proposes a model for facilitating continuing education in the workplace. The model's foundation includes preparing an environment conducive to learning and then focuses on identifying learning needs, setting goals, implementing specific strategies to facilitate self-directed learning, and assessing leaming. Additionally, the model suggests that ongoing reflection is a key factor in enhancing the identification of learning needs, goals, and strategies. The model may best be used by clinical coordinators, directors, and supervisors to better facilitate employee learning and subsequently improve patient care delivery.

  5. The Dynamic Flux of Continuing Higher Education: Redefining the New Roles, Responsibilities, and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    Continuing higher education has undergone a significant transformation in recent years, illustrated by such innovations as MOOCs, globalization, strategic collaborations with government and industry, and increased entrepreneurship. As a result, continuing education (CE) units have experienced a fundamental shift in the way they conduct business in…

  6. The Status of Continuing Higher Education at German Universities: A Metaphor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Melanie; Feld, Timm C.

    2015-01-01

    Many European countries are currently witnessing an increased development and expansion of continuing higher education at universities. In Germany, this development has until now been rather modest in comparison to countries such as England, France, Finland and the United States. The status of continuing education still seems just as unclear as…

  7. Continuing Professional Education, Organizational Support, and Professional Competence: Dilemmas of Rural Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 199 rural Pennsylvania nurses showed that 86% had participated in recent continuing education. Deterrents included lack of support from supervisors/spouses, inflexible schedules, money, time, and travel. Administrators believed nurses were supported for professional development. Little money was available for continuing education.…

  8. Continuous Improvement in Education. Advancing Teaching--Improving Learning. White Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sandra; Hironaka, Stephanie; Carver, Penny; Nordstrum, Lee

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, "continuous improvement" has become a popular catchphrase in the field of education. However, while continuous improvement has become commonplace and well-documented in other industries, such as healthcare and manufacturing, little is known about how this work has manifested itself in education. This white paper attempts…

  9. Palestinian Continuing Education under Occupation:Images of Distress and Possibilities for Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how aspects of a militarily enforced occupation have influenced continuing education at Palestinian universities. It focuses on three influences: the impact of the politics of occupation on the history of continuing education; the effect of travel restriction, violence, and a damaged economy on participation; and the influence…

  10. Lessons from a New Continuing Education Mandate: The Experience of NASW-NYC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachter, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The New York City Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW-NYC), one of the largest in the country, launched a continuing education initiative in 2015 in response to passage of a new statute mandating that all MSW-level state licensed social workers begin accumulating approved hours of continuing education as a requirement for…

  11. Four Members of the International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame Reflect on Their Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Lorilee R.; Miller, Gary E.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on collective experience of over 200 years, four members of the International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame were panelists in a session at the 2010 National Outreach Scholarship Conference. As the panelists reflected on careers in the field of adult and continuing education, four sustaining themes emerged: commitment,…

  12. California Dreaming: The Past, Present, and Future of Continuing and Higher Education in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkin, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, Gary Matkin, Dean of Continuing Education, Distance Learning, and Summer Session at the University of California, Irvine and long-time member of UPCEA, talks about his experience with higher and continuing education in California. The situation of public universities has changed considerably, and his 43 years as an undergraduate,…

  13. The Relationship between Continuing Education and Perceived Competence, Professional Support, and Professional Value among Clinical Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Stacy; Drapeau, Martin; DeStefano, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing education is one of the means by which professionals maintain and increase their level of competence. However, the relationship between continuing education and the professional's sense of personal competence and other practice-related variables remains unclear. This study examined practicing psychologists' continuing…

  14. [Survey on the needs expressed by primary care doctors for continuing education in drug therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, D; Llop, R; Barceló, M E; Cucurull, E; Vallés, J A; Diogène, E; García, N; Fernández, E; Sabaté, N; Simó, E; Casadevall, J

    2002-12-01

    To describe the aspects of continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics considered as most relevant by the primary health care physicians. Observational study.Setting. Physicians filled-up the questionnaires during 45 minutes at their primary health care centres. Primary health care physicians involved in the Fundation Institut Català de Farmacologia continuing education activities since 1997 were selected. A specific questionnaire was designed to collect the physicians' opinion on different topics regarding continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics. 180 physicians from 21 primary health care centres answered the questionnaire. 68% of the responding physicians considered that continuing education has to be useful to improve routine clinical practice. Regular seminars and methods stimulating active participation administered by primary health care professionels are preferred. Continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics should be focused to health problems rather than being drug-oriented. They referred being more interested in drug selection issues and in the role of new drug in comparison with the existing alternatives rather than in regulation and drug consumption issues. 66,3% of the responding physicians considered that continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics should be compulsory. Public health authorities and primary health care physicians should share the responsibility in setting-up continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics programs, according to the opinion of almost 70% of the physicians. Primary health care physicians are interested in continuing education in pharmacological therapeutics as far as it is practical and useful to solve problems of their routine clinical practice.

  15. Excellence in Minority Health Education and Care Act. Hearing on H.R. 954, A Bill to Amend the Public Health Service Act to Authorize Assistance for Centers for Minority Medical Education, Minority Pharmacy Education, Minority Veterinary Medicine Education, and Minority Dentistry Education, before the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

    This document comprises testimony and materials presented at a hearing on H.R. 954, a bill which would provide assistance for centers for minority education in medicine, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, and dentistry. The following individuals presented testimony: (1) Lindy Boggs, a Representative from Louisiana; (2) William Hill Boner, a…

  16. Evaluating the effectiveness of a peer-led education intervention to improve the patient safety attitudes of junior pharmacy students: a cross-sectional study using a latent growth curve modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpola, Ramesh L; Fois, Romano A; McLachlan, Andrew J; Chen, Timothy F

    2015-12-08

    Despite the recognition that educating healthcare students in patient safety is essential, changing already full curricula can be challenging. Furthermore, institutions may lack the capacity and capability to deliver patient safety education, particularly from the start of professional practice studies. Using senior students as peer educators to deliver practice-based education can potentially overcome some of the contextual barriers in training junior students. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-led patient safety education programme for junior pharmacy students. A repeat cross-sectional design utilising a previously validated patient safety attitudinal survey was used to evaluate attitudes prior to, immediately after and 1 month after the delivery of a patient safety education programme. Latent growth curve (LGC) modelling was used to evaluate the change in attitudes of first-year students using second-year students as a comparator group. Undergraduate university students in Sydney, Australia. 175 first-year and 140 second-year students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy programme at the University of Sydney. An introductory patient safety programme was implemented into the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy curriculum at the University of Sydney. The programme covered introductory patient safety topics including teamwork, communication skills, systems thinking and open disclosure. The programme consisted of 2 lectures, delivered by a senior academic, and a workshop delivered by trained final-year pharmacy students. A full LGC model was constructed including the intervention as a non-time-dependent predictor of change (χ(2) (51)=164.070, root mean square error of approximation=0.084, comparative fit index=0.913, standardised root mean square=0.056). First-year students' attitudes significantly improved as a result of the intervention, particularly in relation to internalising errors (p=0.010), questioning behaviours (pimprove

  17. Learning Transfer and Its Intentionality in Adult and Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Jeffrey M.; Kaiser, Leann M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Broad (1997) defined learning transfer as the "effective and continuing application by learners--to their performance of jobs or other individual, organizational, or community responsibilities--of knowledge and skills gained in the learning activities" (p. 2). This chapter offers an introduction to learning transfer and the major concepts related…

  18. Online Scholarly Discourse: Lessons Learned for Continuing and Nurse Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Lorraine; Rukholm, Ellen

    2002-01-01

    A study of registered nurses participating in an Internet-based cardiac education program included analysis of online discussion forums. Comments about evidence-based theory and discipline-specific wiring indicated that the environment facilitated online scholarly discourse. Interactions provided moral, technical, and academic support to…

  19. Continuing Challenges and Potential for Collaborative Approaches to Education Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodilly, Susan J.; Karam, Rita; Orr, Nate

    2011-01-01

    The Ford Foundation began the Collaborating for Education Reform Initiative (CERI) in 1997-1998 by issuing grants and providing grantees with funds, guidance, and technical assistance to develop collaboratives and carry out activities to improve teaching and learning. CERI's collaborative activities were directed at three possible community…

  20. Social Maladjustment and Special Education: State Regulations and Continued Controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloth, Allison H.; Evans, Steven W.; Becker, Stephen P.; Paternite, Carl E.

    2014-01-01

    The federal definition of emotional disturbance (ED) includes a social maladjustment (SM) exclusion clause that stipulates that students are not eligible for special education services if they are determined to be "socially maladjusted" and not also meeting criteria for ED. This clause has long been criticized for being ambiguous and…

  1. Sexual Orientation and Music Education: Continuing a Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergonzi, Louis

    2014-01-01

    This article offers an overview of sexual orientation and music education, in particular how sexual orientation--specifically, heterosexuality--has been dominant in the teaching of music in the United States. Scenarios of heterosexual privilege related to music students, music teachers, and instructional content are presented. After acknowledging…

  2. Historical continuities in the education policy discourses of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hennie

    This article considers the nature and trajectory of the African National Congress's (ANC) education policy discourses from its founding in 1912, until its repatriation ..... many disadvantages for blacks. The insistence that primary school ... schools, colleges or universities, or to embark on action to challenge it (Lodge, 1983).

  3. Designing for Dialogue and Digitality in Higher and Continuing Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Kjærgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates and contrasts three scenarios of further education; presence lessons and two types of blended learning. It addresses the conceptual challenge of creating learning designs for online learning communities of practice (COPs) with a focus on 'collaborative digital dialogue as ...

  4. The study of informational professional field of pharmacy specialists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Tkachenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Today professionalism is important not only for the characteristics of an individual, but also for the manifestation of professional activities. Self-education, self-training and training on the working place are integral elements of the whole continuous professional development. Various components of professionalism form the social responsibility of pharmacist in contemporary conditions. During all professional activities of pharmacists the continuous formation of administrative, economic, legal, communication, social and information competence takes place. Professionally oriented periodical publications, scientific and practical activities act as assistants in it. The aim of this work was to study the sources of the information professional field of pharmaceutical establishments’ staff in the South-eastern region of Ukraine and to determine the frequency of their use and orientation. Gathering of information was carried out using questionnaires. The structure of the developed questionnaire provided conventional separation of questions into two blocks. The first set of questions in the questionnaire provided respondents’ characteristics by demographic and psychological criteria: age, position, length of service, type of enterprise’s ownership. The second set of questions provided the opportunity to identify the main sources of professional information of the specialists in the region, the frequency of their use and the orientation of information for practical activities. Results and discussion. The respondents were proposed the list of periodicals, which today pharmacy specialists are guided by for understanding of modern trends in medicine and pharmacy. The survey results made it possible to determine the most required in practice, sources of information on modern medicine and pharmacy: special edition "Mister blister", "Weekly Drugstore" and "Pharmacist Practical worker". Experts of various levels of pharmacy management use these

  5. Interprofessional immersion: Use of interprofessional education collaborative competencies in side-by-side training of family medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and counselling psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Daubney Harper; Scott, Mary Alice; Kim, Helen; White, Traci; Adams, Eve

    2016-11-01

    While supported by the Affordable Care Act, in the United States, interprofessional training often takes place after healthcare providers graduate and are practicing in the field. This article describes the implementation and evaluation of an interprofessional training for graduate-level healthcare trainees. A group of interprofessional healthcare faculty provided a weeklong interprofessional immersion for doctoral-level healthcare trainees (n = 24) in Pharmacy, Counselling Psychology, Nursing, and Family Medicine residents. Healthcare faculty and staff from each profession worked side-by-side to provide integrated training utilising the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competency domains. Trainees were placed into small teams with representatives from each profession; each team observed, learned, and practiced working within teams to provide quality patient care. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected to identify the effect of the training on trainees' self-reported team skills, as well as the extent to which the trainees learned and utilised the competencies. The results suggest that after completing the training, trainees felt more confident in their ability to work within an interprofessional team and more likely to utilise a team-based approach in the future.

  6. From Access to Excess: Changing Roles and Relationships for Distance Education, Continuing Education, and Academic Departments in American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcroft, Judy Copeland

    2013-01-01

    In American universities, early distance education needed both continuing education and academic departments for establishing institutional cooperation, developing quality standards, adapting to change, and finding a funding model. Today, the Internet and the need for additional revenue are driving new distance education models.

  7. An online spaced-education game for global continuing medical education: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, B Price; Baker, Harley

    2012-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of a "spaced-education" game as a method of continuing medical education (CME) among physicians across the globe. The efficacy of educational games for the CME has yet to be established. We created a novel online educational game by incorporating game mechanics into "spaced education" (SE), an evidence-based method of online CME. This 34-week randomized trial enrolled practicing urologists across the globe. The SE game consisted of 40 validated multiple-choice questions and explanations on urology clinical guidelines. Enrollees were randomized to 2 cohorts: cohort A physicians were sent 2 questions via an automated e-mail system every 2 days, and cohort B physicians were sent 4 questions every 4 days. Adaptive game mechanics re-sent the questions in 12 or 24 days if answered incorrectly and correctly, respectively. Questions expired if not answered on time (appointment dynamic). Physicians retired questions by answering each correctly twice-in-a-row (progression dynamic). Competition was fostered by posting relative performance among physicians. Main outcome measures were baseline scores (percentage of questions answered correctly upon initial presentation) and completion scores (percentage of questions retired). A total of 1470 physicians from 63 countries enrolled. Median baseline score was 48% (interquartile range [IQR] 17) and, in multivariate analyses, was found to vary significantly by region (Cohen dmax = 0.31, P = 0.001) and age (dmax = 0.41, P games. An online SE game can substantially improve guidelines knowledge and is a well-accepted method of global CME delivery.

  8. Refer-To-Pharmacy: Pharmacy for the Next Generation Now! A Short Communication for Pharmacy

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    Refer-to-Pharmacy is the first fully integrated hospital to community pharmacy referral system. This article explains the importance of these referrals for patients and health economies to improve medicines optimisation, and how Refer-to-Pharmacy works in both hospital and community pharmacies.

  9. Multisite Assessment of Nursing Continuing Education Learning Needs Using an Electronic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Susan; Jackson, Stephanie; Cook, Lesley; Reed, Joanne Williams; Blakeney, Keshia; Zimbro, Kathie; Parker, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    A continued education needs assessment and associated education plan are required for organizations on the journey for American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet® designation. Leveraging technology to support the assessment and analysis of continuing education needs was a new venture for a 12-hospital regional health system. The purpose of this performance improvement project was to design and conduct an enhanced process to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of gathering data on nurses' preferences and increase nurse satisfaction with the learner assessment portion of the process. Educators trialed the use of a standardized approach via an electronic survey tool to replace the highly variable processes previously used. Educators were able to view graphical summary of responses by category and setting, which substantially decreased analysis and action planning time for education implementation plans at the system, site, or setting level. Based on these findings, specific continuing education action plans were drafted for each category and classification of nurses. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Why ePortfolios? Student Perceptions of ePortfolio Use in Continuing Education Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuetherick, Brad; Dickinson, John

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been an increased exploration of ePortfolios in higher education across disciplines at both the undergraduate and graduate level. ePortfolios have been significantly under-explored, however, in the context of non-traditional continuing education environments within higher education. This paper explores students'…

  11. Partnering with Industry to Deliver Continuing Education to Florida's Licensed Pesticide Applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Partnering with private industry can empower Extension educators to enhance their educational outreach efforts. Since 2011, UF/IFAS has cooperated with the Florida Turfgrass Association in conducting a 1-day statewide Polycom® event for providing continuing education to licensed pesticide applicators employed primarily in the ornamental and…

  12. A Self-Ethnographic Investigation of Continuing Education Program in Engineering Arising from Economic Structural Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaihlavirta, Auri; Isomöttönen, Ville; Kärkkäinen, Tommi

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a self-ethnographic investigation of a continuing education program in engineering in Central Finland. The program was initiated as a response to local economic structural change, in order to offer re-education possibilities for a higher educated workforce currently under unemployment threat. We encountered considerable…

  13. Public Universities Non-Credit Continuing Education Programs: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLalla, John, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Capitalism and education can appear like unlikely friends at first, yet for-profit educational ventures continue to grow in size and revenue year after year in the United States. How can the government-controlled (and partially funded) educational institutions capitalize upon the opportunity without modifying the mission and vision of the…

  14. Continuing Education and Training Models and Strategies: An Initial Appraisal. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen; Henderson, Amanda; Choy, Sarojni; Dymock, Darryl; Kelly, Ann; Smith, Ray; James, Ian; Beven, Fred; Lewis, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Continuing education and training is an emerging priority for the nation's tertiary education and training system. Changing work, new work requirements, an ageing workforce and lengthening working lives are some of the factors now influencing this priority. Yet, many of the purposes and processes of the Australian tertiary education and training…

  15. Business as Usual? A Review of Continuing Professional Education and Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittnebel, Leo

    2012-01-01

    The commodification of education in all forms has created a lucrative trade, particularly within the realm of continuing professional education. Mandated across a wide spectrum of industries, and particularly salient in healthcare due to rapid advances in medicine and technology, professional education is said to be the vehicle that keeps…

  16. Student's Research Work as the Condition of Continuity of General and Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedishenkova, Marina V.; Efimova, Elena V.; Ryabova, Ekaterina V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem in question is necessitated by the contradictions between requirements of successive educational process of general and professional education and the absence of new mechanisms of providing the continuity of education which is effective under modern conditions. The aim of the article in question is to provide the potential of the…

  17. Community college: Two-year and continuing education programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    In response to educational needs in the waste management industry that were expressed by companies located in Oak Ridge and Knoxville, Tennessee, Roane State Community College has developed an associate degree program in environmental health technology as well as related noncredit programs offered by the Waste Management Training Center. The degree program contains three options: health physics, industrial hygiene, and waste management technologies. Roane State's involvement in these programs was a direct response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) model concept. This model brings together the resources of the DOE, regulatory agencies, private industry, higher education, and various contractors to resolve waste disposal and waste cleanup problems. Firms such as International Technology, Scientific Ecology Group, and Bechtel National enhanced Roane State's awareness of the nature of some of the environmental problems these and many other firms are working to resolve

  18. [Continuum, the continuing education platform based on a competency matrix].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Sangrador, C; Villaizán Pérez, C; González de Dios, J; Hijano Bandera, F; Málaga Guerrero, S

    2016-04-01

    Competency-Based Education is a learning method that has changed the traditional teaching-based focus to a learning-based one. Students are the centre of the process, in which they must learn to learn, solve problems, and adapt to changes in their environment. The goal is to provide learning based on knowledge, skills (know-how), attitude and behaviour. These sets of knowledge are called competencies. It is essential to have a reference of the required competencies in order to identify the need for them. Their acquisition is approached through teaching modules, in which one or more skills can be acquired. This teaching strategy has been adopted by Continuum, the distance learning platform of the Spanish Paediatric Association, which has developed a competency matrix based on the Global Paediatric Education Consortium training program. In this article, a review will be presented on the basics of Competency-Based Education and how it is applied in Continuum. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Maternal and child health graduate and continuing education needs: a national assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Greg R; Chadwick, Cathy; Slay, Martha; Petersen, Donna J; Pass, MaryAnn

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the methodology and results of a recent national assessment of long-term graduate and short-term continuing education needs of public health and health care professionals who serve or are administratively responsible for the U.S. maternal and child health population and also to offer recommendations for future training initiatives. The target of this needs assessment was all directors of state MCH, CSHCN and Medicaid agencies, as well as a 20% random sample of local public health departments. A 7-page needs assessment form was used to assess the importance of and need for supporting graduate and continuing education training in specific skill and content areas. The needs assessment also addressed barriers to pursuing graduate and continuing education. Respondents (n = 274) were asked to indicate the capacity of their agency for providing continuing education as well as their preferred modalities for training. Regardless of agency type, i.e., state MCH, CSHCN, Medicaid or local health department, having employees with a graduate education in MCH was perceived to be of benefit by more than 70% of the respondents. Leadership, systems development, management, administration, analytic, policy and advocacy skills, as well as genetics, dentistry, nutrition and nursing, were all identified as critical unmet needs areas for professionals with graduate training. Education costs, loss of income, and time constraints were the identified barriers to graduate education. More than 90% of respondents from each agency viewed continuing education as a benefit for their staff, although the respondents indicated that their agencies have limited capacity to either provide such training or to assess their staffs need for continuing education. Program managers and staff were perceived in greatest need of continuing education and core public health skills, leadership, and administration were among the most frequently listed topics to receive

  20. OneVA Pharmacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The OneVA Pharmacy application design consists of 3 main components: VistA Medication Profile screen, Health Data Record Clinical Data Service (HDR/CDS), and OneVA...