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Sample records for container leakage testing

  1. New Belgian position on containment leakage testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boeck, B.

    1986-01-01

    The containment leakage testing requirements (up to now 10 CFR 50 App. J) have recently been reevaluated in Belgium. The criterion for type A tests at half the accident pressure has been strengthened, but the periodicity has been relaxed. New overall leakage test at very low overpressure have been required after each extended cold shutdown period. A few items of the procedure for type A tests have been modified. It is felt that the new requirements improve the safety but also lower the burden of the containment leakage tests. Experimental results from tests performed in 1985 at Tihange reactor and Doel unit 3 are presented

  2. Primary containment intergrated leakage rate testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-04-01

    Primary containment integrated leakage rate tests (ILRTs) have previously been conducted with a minimum duration of 24 hr. However, analysis of data from recent ILRTs has shown that a test duration considerably less than 24 hr would have been sufficient. This report summarizes these recent ILRTs and analyzes and discusses the test results. Test and analytical methods, including the LEAKFIT computer program, are also discussed. The conclusion is reached that an ILRT with a duration of 6 hr and at least 20 data points is sufficient

  3. Development of Wireless System for Containment Integrated Leakage Rate Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang-Dae; Oh, Eung-Se; Yang, Seung-Ok

    2006-01-01

    The containment system leakage rate should be estimated periodically with reliable test equipment. In light-water reactor nuclear power plants, ANSI/ANS- 56.8 is a basis for determining leakage rates. Two types of data acquisition system, centralized type and networked type, has been used. In centralized type, all sensors are connected directly from sensors in the containment to the measuring equipment outside the building. The other hand, the networked type has several branch chains which connect one group of the network-sensors together. To test leakage rate, more than 20 temperature sensors and 6 humidity sensors, which are different for each plant, should be installed on a specific level in the containment. A wireless technology gives the benefits such as reducing installation efforts, making pretest easy, so it is widely used more and more in the plant monitoring. As the containment system has many kinds of complex barriers to the radio frequency, the radio power and frequency band for better transmission rate as well as the interference by the radio frequency should be considered. The overview of the wireless sensor system for the containment leakage rate test is described here and the test results on Yonggwang unit 4 PWR plant is presented

  4. Leakage tests of wall segments of reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizkalla, S.H.; Simmonds, S.H.; MacGregor, J.G.

    1979-10-01

    Two prestressed concrete wall segments simulating portions of containment walls were loaded by axial tensile forces to cause cracking of the concrete. At each load increment air pressure was applied in steps up to 21 psi to one side of the segment and the rate of leakage of air through the cracked concrete section was measured. A theoretical equation for the flow of air through concrete cracks is developed and the results from one leakage test are used to determine the dimensionless constant required for this equation. (author)

  5. Leakage tests of the wall segments of a prestressed concrete containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Cho, Nam So

    2005-01-01

    Containment buildings have to maintain their air tightness under extreme loading conditions such as earthquakes, missile impact, and severe accidents to maintain their functional integrity. For evaluating the functional failure of containment buildings, it is important to predict the leakage level through cracked concrete walls. The leakage through concrete cracks has been studied since 1972. Buss examined the flow rate of air through a pre-existing crack in a slab under air pressure. Rizkalla el al. initiated an experimental study for the leakage of prestressed concrete building segments under uniaxial and biaxial loadings to simulate the loading condition of containment buildings under an internal pressure. Recently, Salmon el al. initiated an experimental program for determining the leak rates in typical reinforced concrete shear walls subjected to beyond design basis earthquakes. This study determined the leak rate for the wall segments of a prestressed concrete containment building through leakage tests

  6. Pre-operational proof and leakage rate testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This Standard provides the requirements for pre-operational proof tests and leakage rate tests of concrete containment structures of a containment system designed as Class Containment components. 1 fig

  7. Pickering unit 1 containment leakage characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaib, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the design pressure test carried out on Pickering Reactor Building number 1 during late 1992 showed that the leakage rate of the building was close to the safety analysis value of 2.7% contained mass per hour at the design pressure of 41.4 kPa(g) and was significantly higher than that reported after the previous test conducted in the spring of 1987. This unexpected finding initiated the longest and the most comprehensive containment leakage investigation ever undertaken by Ontario Hydro. A thorough investigation of leakage behaviour by repeated testing, inspections, leak search and analysis was launched. The extensive leak search effort included items such as: leak source detection by soap solution application, use of ultrasonic detectors, fogging and tracer gas techniques, systematic systems isolation, thermal imaging of the exterior, and quantification of leak sites by flowmeter and bagging. Using a specially designed volumetric technique, the root cause of the problem was finally confirmed as being due to 'pressure dependent laminar leakage' through the hairline cracks in the dome concrete. Structural analysis indicated that the thermal gradients and pressure loading combined to cause the cracking early in the structure's operating history and that overall structural integrity has not been compromised. Leakage rate analysis using a new fluid mechanics model augmented by the effect of thermal strains indicated that the leakage could be significantly less under certain transient temperature gradient conditions. Several options for repairing the dome were considered by a multidisciplinary team and it was finally decided to apply a specially engineered multilayer elastomeric coating to the exterior concrete surface. When the unit was re-tested in October 1993, a dramatic ten-fold improvement in leakage rate (down to 0.25%/h at design pressure) was observed. This is lower than even the commissioning results and comparable to the performance of newer units

  8. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  9. Decision Analysis and Its Application to the Frequency of Containment Integrated Leakage Rate Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolakis, George E.; Koser, John P.; Sato, Gaku

    2004-01-01

    For nuclear utilities to become competitive in a deregulated electricity market, costs must be reduced, safety must be maintained, and interested stakeholders must remain content with the decisions being made. One way to reduce costs is to reduce the frequency of preventive maintenance and testing. However, these changes must be weighed against their impact on safety and stakeholder relations. We present a methodology that allows the evaluation of decision options using a number of objectives that include safety, economics, and stakeholder relations. First, the candidate decision options are screened to make sure that they satisfy the relevant regulatory requirements. The remaining options are evaluated using multiattribute utility theory. The results of the formal analysis include a ranking of the options according to their desirability as well as the major reasons that explain this ranking. These results are submitted to a deliberative process in which the decision makers scrutinize the results to ensure that they are meaningful. During the deliberation, new decision options may be formulated based on the insights that the formal analysis provides, as happened in the case study of this paper. This case study deals with the reduction in frequency of the containment integrated leak rate test of a boiling water reactor

  10. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  11. Experimental investigation on air leakage characteristics of containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyungtae Kim; Namso Cho; Youngsun Choun; Namsik Kim

    2005-01-01

    Facilities such as nuclear power plants have containments as atomic reactor which are subjected to high internal pressure. The internal pressure induces tensile stress in the containments. The tensile stress can cause generation and propagation of cracks through which the gas contaminated radioactively may leak. Supposing that a potential leakage accident happened, an experimental study on air leakage characteristics of containments was carried out. Two reinforced concrete specimens which reflect a wall of the containment were manufactured. Then the specimens were subjected to tensile load to generate cracks and air penetration tests were performed. During the air leakage test, the air pressure of inlet and outlet, the flow rate of outlet and the sum of crack widths were measured. The individual factors of the specific crack shape, the wall roughness and the flow coefficient, could be estimated from these experimental data. The factors are expressed as functions in terms of the sum of crack widths by regression analysis. The measured flow rates were compared with the predictive values obtained using the regression curves. Then flow rates according to pressure gradient and crack width were estimated. It was verified that the predicted flow rates agree with the measured flow rates statistically, that is, the estimated functions predicting the wall roughness and the flow coefficient are suitable. Once the sum of crack widths and inlet pressure of concrete wall are known, thus, the air flow rate can be predicted. The relationship among crack width, pressure and flow rate will serve as a criterion for air leakage characteristics of containments. (authors)

  12. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-Cooled Power Reactors J Appendix J to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. J Appendix J to Part 50—Primary Reactor Containment... basis accident and specified either in the technical specification or associated bases. J. Pt (p.s.i.g...

  13. Nuclear power plant prestressed concrete containment vessel structure monitoring during integrated leakage rate test using three kinds of fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kaixing; Li, Jinke; Kong, Xianglong; Sun, Changsen; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2017-04-01

    After years of operation, the safety of the prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) structure of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is an important aspect. In order to detect the strength degradation and the structure deformation, several sensors such as vibrating wire strain gauge, invar wires and pendulums were installed in PCCV. However, the amounts of sensors above are limited due to the cost. Due to the well durability of fiber optic sensors, three kinds of fiber optic sensors were chosen to install on the surface of PCCV to monitor the deformation during Integrated Leakage Rate Test (ILRT). The three kinds of fiber optic sensors which had their own advantages and disadvantages are Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG), white light interferometry (WLI) and Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA). According to the measuring data, the three fiber optic sensors worked well during the ILRT. After the ILRT, the monitoring strain was recoverable thus the PCCV was still in the elastic stage. If these three kinds of fiber optic sensors are widely used in the PCCV, the unusual deformations are easier to detect. As a consequence, the three fiber optic sensors have good potential in the structure health monitoring of PCCV.

  14. Instrumentation with real-world considerations for integrated leakage testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, L.D.; Carp, J.

    1982-01-01

    In measuring leakage of containment structures, the precise determination of pressure, temperature, dewpoint and flow rate parameters is of critical importance. The change in these values over a specified test period provides the basis for computation of the leakage for a given pressurized volume. The performance of an Integrated Leak Rate Test (ILRT) on the containment is generally a critical path event that must be planned far in advance. The very nature of the test requires rapid, efficient acquisition and processing of data for determination, and sometimes correction, of leakages. Equipment selection is an important consideration which can directly affect the outcome of the test. The intent of this paper is to shed some light on the concerns of choosing an instrumentation package for the ILRT

  15. Examination of leakage aspects through concrete - steel interfaces at and around containment penetration assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabarti, S.K.; Sai, A.S.R.; Basu, P.C.

    1994-01-01

    Penetration assemblies are parts required to be provided in the containment wall/dome to permit piping, mechanical devices, equipments, electrical cables, personnel movements etc. Integrity of arrangements with respect to leak tightness at or around these penetration assemblies, is of utmost importance for achieving safe functioning of containment. Considering the feasibilities in controlling leakages along different possible paths, it has been found necessary to examine in detail the leakage possibilities at concrete - steel interfaces at and around penetration assemblies. The present paper addresses this issue with respect to the important related aspects like constructional details, testing conditions, normal operating conditions, and the accidental situation associated with containment structures. (author)

  16. Early localization of containment leakage during an accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepin, P.; Chauliac, C.; Libmann, M.; Martinez, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    In case of an accident in a nuclear plant, checking the containment leaktightness would be a fundamental step for the diagnosis and prognosis of the radiological consequences. Significant help in this task can be provided by softwares. For that purpose, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is developing an expert system which can provide early in the accident a classification of the possible leakage paths and help understanding the necessary corrections which have to be undertaken by the utility. This software will be used at the Emergency Technical Center of the CEA. Its basic principles are described in this paper

  17. Control of Leakage in the Triaxial Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-03-01

    greased and tightly compressed by the bonnet nut (see Fig. H-10). The rates of leakage of all valves that are sealed by O-Rings are compared in Table 8-5...34 H-10 6 3 Klinger(packing boiled in distilled water and greased and bonnet nut screwed down as far as It would go) 0.20 45 123 2.0 0.05 11...measured a total flow of only 20 mm3 in 10 days through either a silicone-oil-soaked or an unsoaked mem- brane of the type he used. This is about the

  18. Regulatory concerns for leakage testing of packagings with three O-ring closure seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oras, J.J.; Towell, R.H.; Wangler, M.E.

    1997-01-01

    The American National Standard for Radioactive Materials--Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment (ANSI N14.5) provides guidance for leakage rate testing to show that a particular packaging complies with regulatory requirements and also provides guidance in determining appropriate acceptance criteria. Recent radioactive packagings designs have incorporated three O-ring closure seals, the middle O-ring being the containment seal. These designs have the potential for false positive results of leakage rate tests. The volume between the containment O-ring and the inner O-ring is used for the helium gas required for the leakage rate tests to reduce both the amount of helium used and the time required to conduct the tests. A leak detector samples the evacuated volume between the outer O-ring and the containment O-ring. False positive results can be caused in two ways, a large leakage in the containment seal or leakage in the inner seal. This paper will describe the problem together with possible solutions/areas that need to be addressed in a Safety Analysis Report for Packagings before a particular packaging design can be certified for transport

  19. Testing to determine the leakage behavior of inflatable seals subject to severe accident loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Sandia National Laboratories is currently developing test validated methods to predict the pressure capacity, at elevated temperatures, of light water reactor (LWR) nuclear containment vessels subject to loads well beyond their design basis - the so-called severe accident. Scale model tests of containments with the major penetrations represented have been carried to functional failure by internal pressurization. Also, combined pressure and elevated temperature tests of typical compression seals and gaskets, a full size personnel airlock, and of typical electrical penetration assemblies (EPAs), have been conducted in order to better understand the leakage behavior of containment penetrations. Because inflatable seals are also a part of the pressure boundary of some containments, it is important to understand their leakage behavior as well. This paper discusses the results of tests that were performed to better define the leakage behavior of inflatable seals when subjected to loads well beyond their design basis

  20. Evaluation of leakage from fume hoods using tracer gas, tracer nanoparticles and nanopowder handling test methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kevin H; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R; Bennett, James S; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 ft/min) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust airflows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  1. Methods, means and results from containment leakage decrease in unit 2 at Kozloduy NPP with international participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demireva, E.; Grigorov, D.; Balabanov, E.

    1995-01-01

    A study of the Kozloduy NPP Unit 2 containment improvement has been carried out. The following objectives are identified: to assess confinement tightness (local tests); to improve tightness; to perform the most urgent repair works; to develop global test procedures including leak tightness at nominal and reduced pressure, structural integrity test and venting flaps reliability test. Nine groups of potential leakage paths have been determined. The ventilation system has been found as the major source of expected leakage having 60 penetrations with size above 250 mm. Proposed modifications of the ventilation system include reduction of the number of inflow and suction valves, replacement of some valves with a better quality ones and installation of isolating valves. It is planned to transfer the experience and results of this study to the other WWER-440 units. 1 ref

  2. Aroma Leakage from Orange Juice Packed in Gable-Top Paper Containers for Chilled Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Risa; Tokuda, Aika; Shigemura, Yasutaka; Mineki, Machiko; Sato, Yoshio

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a study to examine aroma leakage from orange juice packed in gable-top paper containers for chilled distribution. Limonene, an aromatic component of orange juice, was considered as an index compound of aroma leakage, and its seepage on the surface of the container and concentration in the orange juice were measured by GC-MS for 12 commercial samples. After 3 days of storage, limonene was detected on the surface of 8 orange juice containers, and the concentration of limonene in the orange juice was found to have decreased. Thus, limonene leaked through the container within a few days, and the extent of leakage differed between containers, presumably depending upon their barrier properties. In addition, limonene was detected in green tea and milk that was stored together with the unopened orange juice containers at 4℃. The transference of orange aroma into milk was significant, because the contamination of the milk was confirmed by subjective sensory evaluation. This study suggests the possibility of transfer of aroma compounds through paper containers to other beverages.

  3. Uncertainty Analysis of In leakage Test for Pressurized Control Room Envelop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    In leakage tests for control room envelops(CRE) of newly constructed nuclear power plants are required to prove the control room habitability. Results of the in leakage tests should be analyzed using an uncertainty analysis. Test uncertainty can be an issue if the test results for pressurized CREs show low in leakage. To have a better knowledge of the test uncertainty, a statistical model for the uncertainty analysis is described here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test is presented. A statistical method for analyzing the uncertainty of the in leakage test is presented here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test was performed. By using the statistical method we can evaluate the test result with certain level of significance. This method can be more helpful when the difference of the two mean values of the test result is small

  4. Analytical methods of leakage rate estimation from a containment under a LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    Three most outstanding maximum flow rate formulas are identified from many existing models. Outlines of the three limiting mass flow rate models are given along with computational procedures to estimate approximate amount of fission products released from a containment to environment for a given characteristic hole size for containment-isolation failure and containment pressure and temperature under a loss of coolant accident. Sample calculations are performed using the critical ideal gas flow rate model and the Moody's graphs for the maximum two-phase flow rates, and the results are compared with the values obtained from then mass leakage rate formula of CONTEMPT-LT code for converging nozzle and sonic flow. It is shown that the critical ideal gas flow rate formula gives almost comparable results as one can obtain from the Moody's model. It is also found that a more conservative approach to estimate leakage rate from a containment under a LOCA is to use the maximum ideal gas flow rate equation rather than the mass leakage rate formula of CONTEMPT-LT. (author)

  5. Inward contaminant leakage tests of the S-Tron Corporation emergency escape breathing device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    At the request of S-Tron Corporation, to support their contract with the U.S. Navy, performance tests of the Emergency Escape Breathing Device (EEBD) were conducted in the Environmental Physiology Research Section contaminant leakage chamber. Sulfur ...

  6. 42 CFR 84.1150 - Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1150 Exhalation valve leakage test; minimum requirements. (a) Dry exhalation valves...

  7. Retention, marginal leakage, and cement solubility of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cement containing stannous fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Gelfand, Katerina; Cardash, Harold; Pilo, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the (1) retention and microleakage of provisional crowns cemented with temporary cements to which stannous fluoride (SnF2) was added, and (2) solubility of these cements. Provisional crowns were constructed of acrylic resin with shoulder preparations for 12 molars. The crowns were luted with Tempbond, Tempbond NE, and Freegenol temporary cements, and also with SnF2 added to these cements. Specimens were thermocycled 100 times, stored for 6 days, and immersed in 0.5% basic fuschin. Seven days after cementation, crown removal (retention) tests were conducted. Marginal leakage was assessed using a five-level scale to score dye penetration. Solubility in water of the cements with and without SnF2 was assessed using cement disks. Freegenol was more retentive than the other cements. The incorporation of SnF2 significantly increased the retention capacity of Freegenol and Tempbond NE but had no effect on Tempbond. Tempbond showed significantly higher dye penetration than Freegenol. The addition of SnF2 did not alter the dye penetration of the cements. There were no significant differences in the solubility of the cements. However, the incorporation of SnF2 increased the solubility of Freegenol and Tempbond NE (P crowns cemented with Tempbond NE and Freegenol but did not affect the retention of those cemented with Tempbond. The marginal leakage of crowns cemented with the tested temporary cements with and without the incorporation of SnF2 was similar. However, the addition of SnF2 increased the solubility of the cements.

  8. Control room habitability assessment and in-leakage test for Korean NPP - 15510

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, D.S.; Lee, J.B.; Ha, S.J.; Seong, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of control room habitability for Wolsung unit 1 was performed based on GL 2003-01 and Reg. Guide 1.197. The control room habitability program including Control Room Envelope (CRE) in-leakage test procedures, self assessment guidance, CRE boundary control program, CRE maintenance/sealing program was developed for Wolsung unit 1. The integrated CRE test was performed utilizing ASTM E741. There are two operating modes of pressurization and isolation for CRE ventilation test, and four tests were performed using each of the control room HVAC sub-trains. The control room HVAC system lineup of pressurization mode test was based upon a lineup that encompassed the design basis radiological analyses. The other control room HVAC system lineup of isolation mode test was based on an operation mode that considers toxic gas. The in-leakage testing was performed in accordance with CRE in-leakage test procedures. In the pressurization mode, measured unfiltered in-leakage rates for train A and train B were 0 CFM and 405 CFM respectively. In the isolation mode, measured unfiltered in-leakage rates for train A and train B were 1,739 CFM and 1,502 CFM, respectively. Maximum concentration of ammonia at the control room HVAC intake is calculated to be 0.027 g/m 3 (39 ppm), and satisfied the toxicity limit of 300 ppm. The test result shows that the measured unfiltered in-leakage is bounded by the regulatory criteria assumed in the design basis radiological analyses. (authors)

  9. Atmospheric Tracer Depletion Testing for Unfiltered Air In-Leakage Determination at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wilke, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roberts, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vignato, G. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric Tracer Depletion tests were conducted at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant to quantify the unfiltered in-leakage (UI) into the Control Room (CR), Control Building (CB), and Equipment Rooms (ER) at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Wolf Creek has two independent charcoal filter Emergency Ventilation Systems (EVS) that can be used to purify air entering the control building and control room. The Bravo System contains a filtration system in Room 1501 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02B) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building. The Alpha system contains a filtration system in Room 1512 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02A) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building. The Atmospheric Tracer Depletion (ATD) test is a technique to measure in-leakage using the concentration of perfluorocarbon compounds that have a constant atmospheric background. These levels are present in the Control Room and Control Building under normal operating conditions. When air is supplied by either of the EVS, most of the PFTS are removed by the charcoal filters. If the concentrations of the PFTs measured in protected areas are the same as the levels at the output of the EVS, the in-leakage of outside air into the protected area would be zero. If the concentration is higher in the protected area than at the output of the filter system, there is in-leakage and the in-leakage can be quantified by the difference. Sampling was performed using state-of-the-art Brookhaven Atmospheric Tracer Samplers (BATS) air sampling equipment and analysis performed on Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) dedicated PFT analytical systems. In the Alpha test two tracers PMCH and mcPDCH were used to determine in-leakage into the control building. The analytical system was tuned to maximize sensitivity after initial analysis of the Alpha test. The increased sensitivity permitted accurate quantification of

  10. Atmospheric Tracer Depletion Testing for Unfiltered Air In-Leakage Determination at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wilke, R. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roberts, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vignato, G. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric Tracer Depletion tests were conducted at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant to quantify the unfiltered in-leakage (UI) into the Control Room (CR), Control Building (CB), and Equipment Rooms (ER) at the Wolf Creek Nuclear Power Plant. Wolf Creek has two independent charcoal filter Emergency Ventilation Systems (EVS) that can be used to purify air entering the control building and control room. The Bravo System contains a filtration system in Room 1501 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02B) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building. The Alpha system contains a filtration system in Room 1512 in the Auxiliary Building for the Control Room and another filtration system (FGK02A) on Elevation 2016 for the Control Building.The Atmospheric Tracer Depletion (ATD) test is a technique to measure in-leakage using the concentration of perfluorocarbon compounds that have a constant atmospheric background. These levels are present in the Control Room and Control Building under normal operating conditions. When air is supplied by either of the EVS, most of the PFTS are removed by the charcoal filters. If the concentrations of the PFTs measured in protected areas are the same as the levels at the output of the EVS, the in-leakage of outside air into the protected area would be zero. If the concentration is higher in the protected area than at the output of the filter system, there is in-leakage and the in-leakage can be quantified by the difference.Sampling was performed using state-of-the-art Brookhaven Atmospheric Tracer Samplers (BATS) air sampling equipment and analysis performed on Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) dedicated PFT analytical systems. In the Alpha test two tracers PMCH and mcPDCH were used to determine in-leakage into the control building. The analytical system was tuned to maximize sensitivity after initial analysis of the Alpha test. The increased sensitivity permitted accurate quantification of five

  11. Error analysis for duct leakage tests in ASHRAE standard 152P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.W.

    1997-06-01

    This report presents an analysis of random uncertainties in the two methods of testing for duct leakage in Standard 152P of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). The test method is titled Standard Method of Test for Determining Steady-State and Seasonal Efficiency of Residential Thermal Distribution Systems. Equations have been derived for the uncertainties in duct leakage for given levels of uncertainty in the measured quantities used as inputs to the calculations. Tables of allowed errors in each of these independent variables, consistent with fixed criteria of overall allowed error, have been developed.

  12. Preventive testing and leakage detection in pipe-lines of steam condensers and generators of a PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canalini, A.; Carvalho, N.C. de

    1985-01-01

    The non-destructive methods: Spum, Helium and Hydrostatic used in leakage detection in condenser pipelines for PWR type reactors are presented. The time, costs, sensitivity, resources necessary and personnel development factors are considered to choose adequated method, in function of nuclear power plant conditions. The leakage tests are applied in pressurized systems or vacuum. Eddy Current testing is used in condensers and steam generators aiming to avoid leakage in these equipments. The spume testing for leakage detection in condenser pipelines - which operation - and hydrostatic testing for leakage detection through reaming with shutdown - were most efficients. The Helium testing applied in pressurized systems or submitted to vacuum systems presented satisfactory results. The Eddy Current testing in condenser and steam generator pipelines reached desired objective, reducing leakage in the first and preserving the integrity in the second. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Characterization of aqueous silver nitrate solutions for leakage tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ferreira Costa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the pH over a period of 168 h and the ionic silver content in various concentrations and post-preparation times of aqueous silver nitrate solutions. Also, the possible effects of these factors on microleakage test in adhesive/resin restorations in primary and permanent teeth were evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A digital pHmeter was used for measuring the pH of the solutions prepared with three types of water (purified, deionized or distilled and three brands of silver nitrate salt (Merck, Synth or Cennabras at 0, 1, 2, 24, 48, 72, 96 and 168 h after preparation, and storage in transparent or dark bottles. Ionic silver was assayed according to the post-preparation times (2, 24, 48, 72, 96, 168 h and concentrations (1, 5, 25, 50% of solutions by atomic emission spectrometry. For each sample of each condition, three readings were obtained for calculating the mean value. Class V cavities were prepared with enamel margins on primary and permanent teeth and restored with the adhesive systems OptiBond FL or OptiBond SOLO Plus SE and the composite resin Filtek Z-250. After nail polish coverage, the permanent teeth were immersed in 25% or 50% AgNO3 solution and the primary teeth in 5% or 50% AgNO3 solutions for microleakage evaluation. ANOVA and the Tukey's test were used for data analyses (α=5%. RESULTS: The mean pH of the solutions ranged from neutral to alkaline (7.9±2.2 to 11.8±0.9. Mean ionic silver content differed depending on the concentration of the solution (4.75±0.5 to 293±15.3 ppm. In the microleakage test, significant difference was only observed for the adhesive system factor (p=0.000. CONCLUSIONS: Under the tested experimental conditions and based on the obtained results, it may be concluded that the aqueous AgNO3 solutions: have neutral/alkaline pH and service life of up to 168 h; the level of ionic silver is proportional to the concentration of the solution; even at 5% concentration, the solutions were

  14. Investigation of moment of friction and leakage by testing P/M materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Tolstrup

    1996-01-01

    A comparison is made between forged steel and sintered material with respect to wear, moment of friktion and leakage between the two parts in a friktion test.The investigation have been performed with loading conditions at the same level as used under practical circumstances.Results are presented...

  15. Present status of containment integrity tests at NUPEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Hideo [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    Objectives of Containment Integrity Tests (CIT) conducted at NUPEC are to demonstrate reactor containment vessel integrity during severe accident and to respond to Phase II accident management (AM) concerns regarding uncertainty of phenomena, raised by Japan Atomic Energy Safety Commission. CIT consists of experiments and analysis of debris cooling phenomena, hydrogen combustion behavior, fission products transport behavior and containment structural behavior. This paper summarizes the present status of CIT focusing the progress during fiscal year 1996. The progress is: a; UO{sub 2} debris falling jet behavior test to support ex-vessel debris cooling tests completed and the evaluation of typical FCI (fuel-coolant interactions) tests of debris dropping into pool under the most dominant severe accident scenarios under way, b; 1/10 scale BWR II containment vessel structural test completed, c; evaluation of tendon tensile force distribution based on a newly proposed friction coefficient to better predict 1/4 scale prestressed concrete containment vessel structural test completed, d; test facility modification of GIRAFFE-FP aiming at demonstration of effective aerosol FP (fission products) removal by containment spray under Phase II AM completed and the evaluation of preliminary test results under way, e; no leakage failure of any containment penetration below 500K and favorable FP trapping effect at leakage path confirmed, and f; large scale hydrogen combustion tests under AM conditions simulating transient hydrogen and steam generation completed. (J.P.N.)

  16. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jianbo; Fang, Hui; Li, Long; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xiaoming; Kang, Yihua; Sun, Yanhua; Tang, Chaoqing

    2017-01-01

    To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage) inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatabilit...

  17. The study of human bodies' impedance networks in testing leakage currents of electrical equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohui; Wang, Xiaofei

    2006-11-01

    In the testing of electrical equipments' leakage currents, impedance networks of human bodies are used to simulate the current's effect on human bodies, and they are key to the preciseness of the testing result. This paper analyses and calculates three human bodies' impedance networks of measuring electric burn current, perception or reaction current, let-go current in IEC60990, by using Matlab, compares the research result of current effect thresholds' change with sine wave's frequency published in IEC479-2, and amends parameters of measuring networks. It also analyses the change of perception or reaction current with waveform by Multisim.

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for changing feedwater check valve leakage rate testing methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, R.; Harrell, J.

    1996-12-01

    The current design and testing requirements for the feedwater check valves (FWCVs) at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station are established from original licensing requirements that necessitate extremely restrictive air testing with tight allowable leakage limits. As a direct result of these requirements, the original high endurance hard seats in the FWCVs were modified with elastomeric seals to provide a sealing surface capable of meeting the stringent air leakage limits. However, due to the relatively short functional life of the elastomeric seals compared to the hard seats, the overall reliability of the sealing function actually decreased. This degraded performance was exhibited by frequent seal failures and subsequent valve repairs. The original requirements were based on limited analysis and the belief that all of the high energy feedwater vaporized during the LOCA blowdown. These phenomena would have resulted in completely voided feedwater lines and thus a steam environment within the feedwater leak pathway. To challenge these criteria, a comprehensive design basis accident analysis was developed using the RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic code. Realistic assumptions were used to more accurately model the post-accident fluid conditions within the feedwater system. The results of this analysis demonstrated that no leak path exists through the feedwater lines during the reactor blowdown phase and that sufficient subcooled water remains in various portions of the feedwater piping to form liquid water loop seals that effectively isolate this leak path. These results provided the bases for changing the leak testing requirements of the FWCVs from air to water. The analysis results also established more accurate allowable leakage limits, determined the real effective margins associated with the FWCV safety functions, and led to design changes that improved the overall functional performance of the valves.

  19. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbo; Fang, Hui; Li, Long; Wang, Jie; Huang, Xiaoming; Kang, Yihua; Sun, Yanhua; Tang, Chaoqing

    2017-01-21

    To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage) inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety.

  20. A Lift-Off-Tolerant Magnetic Flux Leakage Testing Method for Drill Pipes at Wellhead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the great needs for MFL (magnetic flux leakage inspection of drill pipes at wellheads, a lift-off-tolerant MFL testing method is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, a Helmholtz coil magnetization method and the whole MFL testing scheme are proposed. Then, based on the magnetic field focusing effect of ferrite cores, a lift-off-tolerant MFL sensor is developed and tested. It shows high sensitivity at a lift-off distance of 5.0 mm. Further, the follow-up high repeatability MFL probing system is designed and manufactured, which was embedded with the developed sensors. It can track the swing movement of drill pipes and allow the pipe ends to pass smoothly. Finally, the developed system is employed in a drilling field for drill pipe inspection. Test results show that the proposed method can fulfill the requirements for drill pipe inspection at wellheads, which is of great importance in drill pipe safety.

  1. Risk of leakage and tissue dissemination with various contained tissue extraction (CTE) techniques: an in vitro pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sarah L; Greenberg, James A; Wang, Karen C; Srouji, Serene S; Gargiulo, Antonio R; Pozner, Charles N; Hoover, Nicholas; Einarsson, Jon I

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate risk of leakage and tissue dissemination associated with various contained tissue extraction (CTE) techniques. In vitro study (Canadian Task Force classification: II-1). Academic hospital simulation laboratory. Beef tongue specimens weighing 400 to 500 g were stained using 5 mL indigo carmine dye and morcellated under laparoscopic guidance within a plastic box trainer. CTE was performed via 3 different techniques: a stitch-sealed rip-stop nylon bag and multi-port approach; a one-piece clear plastic 50 × 50-cm isolation bag and multi-port approach; or a 1-piece clear plastic 50 × 50-cm isolation bag and single-site approach. Four trials of each CTE method were performed and compared with an open morcellation control. All bags were insufflated to within 10 to 25 mmHg pressure with a standard CO2 insufflator. Visual evidence of spilled tissue or dye was recorded, and fluid washings of the box trainer were sent for cytologic analysis. Blue dye spill was noted in only 1 of 12 CTE trials. Spillage was visualized from a seam in 1 of the 4 stitch-sealed rip-stop nylon bags before morcellation of the specimen. The only trial in which gross tissue chips were visualized in the box trainer after morcellation was the open morcellation control. However, cytologic examination revealed muscle cells in the open morcellation washings and in the washings from the trial with dye spill. Muscle cells were not observed at cytologly in any of the other samples. CTE did not result in any leakage or tissue dissemination with use of the single-site or multi-port approach when using a 1-piece clear plastic 50 × 50-cm isolation bag. Further studies are needed to corroborate these findings in an in vivo context and to evaluate use of alternate bag options for specimen containment. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Present status of Containment Integrity Tests at NUPEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Hideo [Systems Safety Department, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of CIT focusing the progress during fiscal year 1997. The detail informations are available in the papers cited below in the present conference. The major progress is: (a) Steam explosion was not observed under typical ex-vessel FCI conditions of UO{sub 2} mixture, low water subcooling, shallow pool and low pressure. (Fig. 1) (b) MCCI using UO{sub 2} mixture was suppressed by ex-vessel debris cooling, which was attributed to the initial higher porosity of debris due to simulation of debris falling process, water ingression via eroded concrete side wall and the interruption of concrete floor erosion due to the existence of pebbles inside concrete. (Fig. 2) (c) Combustion model in MELCOR code was improved based on five different flame front models, which was verified by Battelle multi-compartment hydrogen combustion tests. (Fig. 3) (d) Post-test analysis well predicted 1/10 scale BWR II containment vessel structural test up to failure. (Fig. 4) (e) GIRAFFE-FP demonstrated effective aerosol FP removal by containment spray under Phase II AM for several severe accident scenarios. (Fig. 5) (f) Margin to leakage failure of containment penetration under AM conditions and quantitative FP trapping effect at leakage were evaluated. (Fig. 6). (author)

  3. Investigation of conditions inside the reactor building annulus of a PWR plant of KONVOI type in case of severe accidents with increased containment leakages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakalov, Ivan; Sonnenkalb, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Improvements of the implemented severe accident management (SAM) concepts have been done in all operating German NPPs after the Fukushima Daiichi accidents following recommendations of the German Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) and as a result of the stress test being performed. The efficiency of newly developed severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for a PWR KONVOI reference plant related to the mitigation of challenging conditions inside the reactor building (RB) annulus due to increased containment leakages during severe accidents have been assessed. Based on two representative severe accident scenarios the releases of both hydrogen and radionuclides into the RB annulus have been predicted with different boundary conditions. The accident scenarios have been analysed without and with the impact of several SAM measures (already planned or proposed in addition), which turned out to be efficient to mitigate the consequences. The work was done within the frame of a research project financially supported by the Federal Ministry BMUB.

  4. Application of Buckmaster Electrolyte Ion Leakage Test to Woody Biofuel Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Thomas F [Forest Concepts, LLC; Dooley, James H [Forest Concepts, LLC

    2014-08-28

    In an earlier ASABE paper, Buckmaster reported that ion conductivity of biomass leachate in aqueous solution was directly correlated with activity access to plant nutrients within the biomass materials for subsequent biological or chemical processing. The Buckmaster test involves placing a sample of the particles in a beaker of constant-temperature deionized water and monitoring the change in electrical conductivity over time. We adapted the Buckmaster method to a range of woody biomass and other cellulosic bioenergy feedstocks. Our experimental results suggest differences of electrolyte leakage between differently processed woody biomass particles may be an indicator of their utility for conversion in bioenergy processes. This simple assay appears to be particularly useful to compare different biomass comminution techniques and particle sizes for biochemical preprocessing.

  5. Microbial stimulation and succession following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into a shallow Newark basin aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullan, Gregory; Dueker, M Elias; Clauson, Kale; Yang, Qiang; Umemoto, Kelsey; Zakharova, Natalia; Matter, Juerg; Stute, Martin; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to efforts aimed at reducing anthropogenic production of greenhouse gases, geological storage of CO2 is being explored as a strategy to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas emission and mitigate climate change. Previous studies of the deep subsurface in North America have not fully considered the potential negative effects of CO2 leakage into shallow drinking water aquifers, especially from a microbiological perspective. A test well in the Newark Rift Basin was utilized in two field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2-saturated water into an isolated aquifer interval, simulating a CO2 leakage scenario. A decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), and increased bacterial cell concentrations in the recovered water. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence libraries from samples collected before and after the test well injection were compared to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injections, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia and microbial taxa often noted to be associated with iron and sulfate reduction. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentrations and rapid microbial community succession indicate significant changes in aquifer microbial communities immediately following the experimental CO2 leakage event. Samples collected one year post-injection were similar in cell number to the original background condition and community composition, although not identical, began to revert toward the pre-injection condition, indicating microbial resilience following a leakage disturbance. This study provides a first glimpse into the in situ successional response of microbial communities to CO2 leakage after subsurface

  6. Effects of surface roughness on magnetic flux leakage testing of micro-cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhiyang; Sun, Yanhua; Yang, Yun; Kang, Yihua

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic flux leakage (MFL) testing owns the advantages of high inspection sensitivity and stability, but its testing results are always affected by surface roughness. The relationship between the surface roughness ({{R}a} ) and detection signals for surface-breaking cracks is mainly discussed. The existence of roughness magnetic compression effect (RMCE) in present MFL testing is specially pointed out and its relevant theory is also analyzed, which manifest themselves in the compression of MFL signal in its peak value and the baseline drifts mixed with noise. An experimental investigation on surface comparators with different arithmetic average height ({{R}a} ) and artificial notch size, is performed to analyze the effects of surface roughness on detection signals of cracks. The detection limit (DL) of micro-crack is analyzed by comparing the {{B}y} noise-signal ratio ({{S}y} ) and peak-peak signals of the cracks. Meanwhile, {{S}y} increases with the {{R}a} and R{{S}m} , in this case, relatively shallow defects cannot be clearly distinguished at determined rough surface. Afterwards, a series of simulations are designed and performed to verify the effects of surface roughness on characteristic {{B}y} of the electromagnetic field, and a theoretical DL of micro-crack is presented as: DL=2.88{{R}a}+7.00 . Furthermore, the optimal lift-off value is selected for the micro-cracks’ detection to weaken the negative magnetic compression effect. MFL signals cannot reflect the accurate sizes of the cracks on rough surface due to the RMCE and its relevant phenomenon. The discovery and results will benefit the quantitative evaluation of the MFL testing.

  7. Integrated leak rate testing of the fast flux test facility reactor containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, E.B.; Farabee, O.A.; Bliss, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The initial Integrated Leak Rate Test (ILRT) of the Fast Flux Test Facility containment building was performed from May 27 to June 2, 1978. The test was conducted in air with systems vented and with the containment recirculating coolers in operation. 10 psig and 5 psig tests were run using the absolute pressure test method. The measured leakage rates were .033% Vol/24 hr. and -.0015% Vol/24 hrs. respectively. Subsequent verification tests at both 10 psig and 5 psig proved that the test equipment was operating properly and it was sensitive enough to detect leaks at low pressures. This ILRT was performed at a lower pressure than any previous ILRT on a reactor containment structure in the United States. While the initial design requirements for ice condenser containments called for a part pressure test at 6 psig, the tests were waived due to the apparent statistical problems of data analysis and the repeatability of the data itself at such low pressure. In contrast to this belief, both the 5 and 10 psig ILRT's were performed in a successful manner at FFTF

  8. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  9. A seal analyzer for testing container integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, P.; Jenkins, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of laboratory and production seal analyzer that offers a rapid, nondestructive method of assuring the seal integrity of virtually any type of single or double sealed container. The system can test a broad range of metal cans, drums and trays, membrane-lidded vessels, flexible pouches, aerosol containers, and glass or metal containers with twist-top lids that are used in the chemical/pesticide (hazardous materials/waste), beverage, food, medical and pharmaceutical industries

  10. Performance tests of the reactor containment structures of HTTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakaba, Nariaki; Iigaki, Kazuhiko; Kawaji, Satoshi; Iyoku, Tatsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    The containment structures of the HTTR consist of the reactor containment vessel (CV), service area (SA) and emergency air purification system, which minimize the release of FPs in the postulated accidents with FP release from the reactor facilities. The CV is designed to withstand the temperature and pressure transients and to be leak-tight within the specified leakage limit even in the case of a rupture of the primary concentric hot gas duct. The pressure of inside of the SA should be maintained slightly lower than that of atmosphere by the emergency air purification system. The radioactive materials are released from the stack to environment via the emergency air purification system under the accident condition. Then the emergency air purification system should remove airborne radio-activities and should maintain proper pressure in the SA. We established the method to measure leak rate of the CV with closed reactor coolant pressure boundary although it is normally measured under opened reactor coolant pressure boundary as employed in LWRs. The CV leak rate test was carried out by the newly developed method and the expected performance was obtained. The SA and emergency air purification system were also confirmed by the performance test. We concluded that the reactor containment structures were fabricated to minimize the release of FPs in the postulated accidents with FP release from the reactor facilities. (author)

  11. Design and construction of a large reinforced concrete containment model to be tested to failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucciferro, J.J.; Horschel, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is investigating the performance of LWR containments subjected to severe accidents. This work is being performed by the Containment Integrity Division at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia). The latest research effort involves the testing of a 1/6-scale reinforced concrete containment model. The containment, which was designed and constructed by United Engineers and Constructors, is the largest and most complex model of its kind. The design and construction of the containment model are the subject of this paper. The objective of the containment model tests is to generate data that can be used to qualify methods for reliably predicting the response of LWR containment buildings to severe accident loads. The data recorded during testing include deformations and leakage past sealing surfaces, as well as strains and displacements of the containment shell

  12. ATR confinement leakage determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, P.; Buescher, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    The air leakage rate from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) confinement is an important parameter in estimating hypothesized accidental releases of radiation to the environment. The leakage rate must be determined periodically to assure that the confinement has not degraded with time and such determination is one of the technical safety requirements of ATR operation. This paper reviews the methods of confinement leakage determination and presents an analysis of leakage determination under windy conditions, which can complicate the interpretation of the determined leakage rates. The paper also presents results of analyses of building air exchange under windy conditions. High wind can enhance air exchange and this could increase the release rates of radioisotopes following an accident

  13. Tension tests of concrete containment wall elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.M.; Julien, J.T.; Russel, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    Tension tests of concrete containment wall elements were conducted as part of a three-phase research program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of the EPRI experimental/analytical program is twofold. The first objective is to provide the utility industry with a test-verified analytical method for making realistic estimates of actual capacities of reinforced and prestressed concrete containments under internal over-pressurization from postulated degraded core accidents. The second objective is to determine qualitative and quantitative leak rate characteristics of typical containment cross-sections with and without penetrations. This paper covers the experimental portion to the EPRI program. The testing program for Phase 1 included eight large-scale specimens representing elements from the wall of a containment. Each specimen was 60-in (1525-mm) square, 24-in (610-mm) thick, and had full-size reinforcing bars. Six specimens were representative of prototypical reinforced concrete containment designs. The remaining two specimens represented prototypical prestressed containment designs. Various reinforcement configurations and loading arrangements resulted in data that permit comparisons of the effects of controlled variables on cracking and subsequent concrete/reinforcement/liner interaction in containment elements. Subtle differences, due to variations in reinforcement patterns and load applications among the eight specimens, are being used to benchmark the codes being developed in the analytical portion of the EPRI program. Phases 2 and 3 of the test program will examine leak rate characteristics and failure mechanisms at penetrations and structural discontinuities. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of the Sealing Ability of Three Obturation Techniques Using a Glucose Leakage Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Olczak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of three different canal filling techniques. Sixty-four roots of extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were prepared using ProTaper® rotary instruments. The specimens were then randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n=16 and 2 control groups (n=8. The root canals were filled using cold lateral compaction (CLC group, continuous wave condensation technique using the Elements Obturation Unit® (EOU group, and ProTaper obturators (PT group. For the negative control group, 8 roots were filled using lateral compaction as in the CLC group, and the teeth were covered twice with a layer of nail varnish (NCG group. Another 8 roots were filled using lateral compaction, but without sealer, and these were used as the positive control (PCG group. A glucose leakage model was used for quantitative evaluation of microleakage for 24 hours and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 weeks. No significant difference in the cumulative amount of leakage was found between the three experimental groups at all observation times. The lateral condensation of cold gutta-percha can guarantee a similar seal of canal fillings as can be achieved by using thermal methods, in the round canals.

  15. Microbial succession and stimulation following a test well injection simulating CO2 leakage into shallow Newark Basin aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueker, M.; Clauson, K.; Yang, Q.; Umemoto, K.; Seltzer, A. M.; Zakharova, N. V.; Matter, J. M.; Stute, M.; Takahashi, T.; Goldberg, D.; O'Mullan, G. D.

    2012-12-01

    Despite growing appreciation for the importance of microbes in altering geochemical reactions in the subsurface, the microbial response to geological carbon sequestration injections and the role of microbes in altering metal mobilization following leakage scenarios in shallow aquifers remain poorly constrained. A Newark Basin test well was utilized in field experiments to investigate patterns of microbial succession following injection of CO2 saturated water into isolated aquifer intervals. Additionally, laboratory mesocosm experiments, including microbially-active and inactive (autoclave sterilized) treatments, were used to constrain the microbial role in mineral dissolution, trace metal release, and gas production (e.g. hydrogen and methane). Hydrogen production was detected in both sterilized and unsterilized laboratory mesocosm treatments, indicating abiotic hydrogen production may occur following CO2 leakage, and methane production was detected in unsterilized, microbially active mesocosms. In field experiments, a decrease in pH following injection of CO2 saturated aquifer water was accompanied by mobilization of trace elements (e.g. Fe and Mn), the production of hydrogen gas, and increased bacterial cell concentrations. 16S ribosomal RNA clone libraries, from samples collected before and after the test well injection, were compared in an attempt to link variability in geochemistry to changes in aquifer microbiology. Significant changes in microbial composition, compared to background conditions, were found following the test well injection, including a decrease in Proteobacteria, and an increased presence of Firmicutes, Verrucomicrobia, Acidobacteria and other microbes associated with iron reducing and syntrophic metabolism. The concurrence of increased microbial cell concentration, and rapid microbial community succession, with increased concentrations of hydrogen gas suggests that abiotically produced hydrogen may serve as an ecologically-relevant energy

  16. Testing of a steel containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Costello, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    A mixed-scale containment vessel model, with 1:10 in containment geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness, was fabricated to represent an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment vessel. A contact structure, installed over the model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. This paper describes the pretest preparations and the conduct of the high pressure test of the model performed on December 11-12, 1996. 4 refs., 2 figs

  17. Observations on analysis, testing and failure of prestressed concrete containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, D.W.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reviews the mechanics which indicate that a bursting failure with large energy release is the failure mechanism to be expected from ductile lined containment structures pressurized to failure. It reviews a study which shows that, because of leakage, this is not the case for unlined prestressed containments. It argues that current practice, since it does not specifically address the bursting failure problem for lined prestressed containments, is inadequate to ensure that this type of failure could not occur. It concludes that, in view of the inadequacy of the current state-of-the-art to predict leakage from lined structures, the logical remedy is to eliminate all possibility of bursting failure by making provision for venting of containments. (orig.)

  18. Mass extraction container closure integrity physical testing method development for parenteral container closure systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seung-Yil; Sagi, Hemi; Goldhammer, Craig; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Container closure integrity (CCI) is a critical factor to ensure that product sterility is maintained over its entire shelf life. Assuring the CCI during container closure (C/C) system qualification, routine manufacturing and stability is important. FDA guidance also encourages industry to develop a CCI physical testing method in lieu of sterility testing in a stability program. A mass extraction system has been developed to check CCI for a variety of container closure systems such as vials, syringes, and cartridges. Various types of defects (e.g., glass micropipette, laser drill, wire) were created and used to demonstrate a detection limit. Leakage, detected as mass flow in this study, changes as a function of defect length and diameter. Therefore, the morphology of defects has been examined in detail with fluid theories. This study demonstrated that a mass extraction system was able to distinguish between intact samples and samples with 2 μm defects reliably when the defect was exposed to air, water, placebo, or drug product (3 mg/mL concentration) solution. Also, it has been verified that the method was robust, and capable of determining the acceptance limit using 3σ for syringes and 6σ for vials. Sterile products must maintain their sterility over their entire shelf life. Container closure systems such as those found in syringes and vials provide a seal between rubber and glass containers. This seal must be ensured to maintain product sterility. A mass extraction system has been developed to check container closure integrity for a variety of container closure systems such as vials, syringes, and cartridges. In order to demonstrate the method's capability, various types of defects (e.g., glass micropipette, laser drill, wire) were created in syringes and vials and were tested. This study demonstrated that a mass extraction system was able to distinguish between intact samples and samples with 2 μm defects reliably when the defect was exposed to air, water

  19. Human subject testing of leakage in a loose-fitting PAPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.T.; Koh, F.C.; Jamshidi, S.; Rehak, T.E. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Leakage from loose-fitting PAPRs (powered air-purifying respirators) can compromise the safety of wearers. The Martindale Centurion MAX multifunction PAPR is a loose-fitting PAPR that also incorporates head, eye, and ear protection. This respirator is used in mines where coal dust usually is controlled by ventilation systems. Should the respirator be depended on for significant respiratory protection? Ten human volunteers were asked to wear the Centurion MAX inside a fog-filled chamber. Their inhalation flow rates were measured with small pitot-tube flowmeters held inside their mouths. They were video imaged while they breathed deeply, and the points at which the fog reached their mouths were determined. Results showed that an average of 1.1 L could be inhaled before contaminated air reached the mouth. As long as the blower purges contamination from inside the face piece during exhalation, the 1.1 L acts as a buffer against contaminants leaked due to overbreathing of blower flow rate.

  20. Full-scale testing of leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room exposed to external air blast loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codina, R.; Ambrosini, D.

    2018-03-01

    For the last few decades, the effects of blast loading on structures have been studied by many researchers around the world. Explosions can be caused by events such as industrial accidents, military conflicts or terrorist attacks. Urban centers have been prone to various threats including car bombs, suicide attacks, and improvised explosive devices. Partially vented constructions subjected to external blast loading represent an important topic in protective engineering. The assessment of blast survivability inside structures and the development of design provisions with respect to internal elements require the study of the propagation and leakage of blast waves inside buildings. In this paper, full-scale tests are performed to study the effects of the leakage of blast waves inside a partially vented room that is subjected to different external blast loadings. The results obtained may be useful for proving the validity of different methods of calculation, both empirical and numerical. Moreover, the experimental results are compared with those computed using the empirical curves of the US Defense report/manual UFC 3-340. Finally, results of the dynamic response of the front masonry wall are presented in terms of accelerations and an iso-damage diagram.

  1. Biaxial Loading Tests for steel containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, T.; Wright, D.J.; Arai, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a 1/10 scale of the steel containment vessel (SCV) test for the understanding of ultimate structural behavior beyond the design pressure condition. Biaxial Loading Tests were supporting tests for the 1/10 scale SCV model to evaluate the method of estimating failure conditions of thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions. The tentative material models of SGV480 and SPV490 were obtained. And the behavior of SGV480 and SPV490 thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions could be well simulated by FE-Analyses with the tentative material models and Mises constitutive law. This paper describes the results and the evaluations of these tests. (author)

  2. Experimental investigation of localized stress-induced leakage current distribution in gate dielectrics using array test circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeonwoo; Teramoto, Akinobu; Kuroda, Rihito; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2018-04-01

    Localized stress-induced leakage current (SILC) has become a major problem in the reliability of flash memories. To reduce it, clarifying the SILC mechanism is important, and statistical measurement and analysis have to be carried out. In this study, we applied an array test circuit that can measure the SILC distribution of more than 80,000 nMOSFETs with various gate areas at a high speed (within 80 s) and a high accuracy (on the 10-17 A current order). The results clarified that the distributions of localized SILC in different gate areas follow a universal distribution assuming the same SILC defect density distribution per unit area, and the current of localized SILC defects does not scale down with the gate area. Moreover, the distribution of SILC defect density and its dependence on the oxide field for measurement (E OX-Measure) were experimentally determined for fabricated devices.

  3. Detection of small leakages by a combination of dedicated Kalman filters and an extended version of the binary sequential probability ratio test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Racz, A.

    1993-01-01

    During the last two decades, Kalman filter-based process monitoring techniques have been rediscovered and widely applied in different areas of control and signal validation. When the physical model of the underlying system is known, the Kalman filter is sensitive enough to indicate small, unexpected changes either in the plant or in the measurement models. Although the innovation process that is generated by Kalman filters contains all the necessary statistical information for detecting certain malfunctions, performance degradation, or off-normal operation conditions, skillful hypothesis testing methods are needed for proper interpretation of the innovation's behavior. The classical binary sequential probability ratio test (SPRT), developed by Wald, is an optimal tool to judge between two concurring hypotheses. For more than two alternatives, the multiple-hypothesis testing method, the so-called M-ary SPRT, is recommended. In many cases, the situation cannot be represented as simply as a binary problem, however, and the M-ary scheme would be an overcomplication. For an illustration, consider leakage detection when the exact amount of the loss is not of interest. In such a case, the problem can be treated by a properly chosen binary test, and Wald's classical SPRT framework can be applied. Thus, any binary SPRT and computer code can be used without any modification

  4. Container Closure Integrity Testing of Prefilled Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Sarah S; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Matter, Anja; Koulov, Atanas; Singh, Satish K; Germershaus, Oliver; Mathaes, Roman

    2018-04-04

    Prefilled syringes (PFSs) are increasingly preferred over vials as container closure systems (CCSs) for injectable drug products when facilitated or self-administration is required. However, PFSs are more complex compared to CCSs consisting of vial, rubber stopper and crimp cap. Container closure integrity (CCI) assurance and verification has been a specific challenge for PFSs as they feature several sealing areas. A comprehensive understanding of the CCS is necessary for an appropriate CCI assessment as well as for packaging development and qualification. A comprehensive CCI assessment of six different PFSs from three different manufacturers (including one polymeric PFS) was conducted using helium leak testing. PFS components were manipulated to systematically assess the contribution of the different sealing areas to CCI, namely rigid needle shield (RNS)/needle, RNS/tip cone and the individual ribs of a syringe plunger. The polymeric PFS required an equilibrium measurement for accurate CCIT. The different sealing areas and a single plunger rib were shown to provide adequate CCI. Acceptable tip cap movement until the point of CCI failure was estimated. The assessment of acceptable tip cap movement demonstrated the importance of considering the RNS/tip cone seal design to ensure CCI of the PFS upon post assembly possesses and shipment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Leaktightness definitions for and leakage tests on packages for the transport of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanguy, L.

    1989-07-01

    In 1986, the International Organization for Standardization asked a group of experts representing some fifteen countries to draft a standard for the leaktightness of packagings used for the transport of radioactive materials. Progress of work and test before shipping of packages are reviewed

  6. Assessing Potential Impacts of CO2 Leakage on Shallow Groundwater Quality in the SECARB Phase III Early Test site Using Single-well Push-Pull Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C.; Mickler, P. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Scanlon, B. R.

    2012-12-01

    A single-well push-pull test was conducted in the Cranfield shallow aquifer, the SECARB Phase III early test site, for assessing potential impacts of CO2 leakage on groundwater quality. A total of 3800 liter of groundwater equilibrated with CO2 gas at a partial pressure of 1.105 Pa was injected into a confined sand interval at ~ 70 m depth. NaBr solution was added to the injected solution as tracer. The injected groundwater incubated within the interval for about two days. Chemical parameters (pH, temperature, alkalinity, and electric conductivity) were measured on-site and water samples were collected for chemical (major ions, trace elements, and dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC) as well as for stable carbon isotopic analyses. Mineralogical analyses using XR-D and SEM techniques indicate that aquifer sediments are dominated by silicates. Concentrations of the Br tracer in the recovered samples show mixing of background water with the injected solution. Major ions, especially, Ca, Mg, K, and Si show obvious enrichment, indicating that mobilization of these ions occurred from aquifer sediments to groundwater and may be dominated by dissolution of silicates and possible carbonate minerals. δ13C of DIC of the recovered samples may also suggest potential dissolution of carbonates. Concentrations of trace elements show mobilization after injection of CO2 enriched groundwater. Mobilization of trace elements could be due to co-dissolution of silicates and carbonates and desorption from the surface of aquifer sediments. However, mass balance calculations suggest that ion mobilization is limited and; therefore, potential risks of CO2 are low, especially for arsenic and lead with concentrations in the recovered samples ~30 times less than the EPA maximum contamination level. Results of the single-well push-pull test were also compared to a laboratory batch experiment of water-rock-CO2 interactions. Overall reaction rates of most ions estimated are higher in the batch

  7. Testing waste forms containing high radionuclide loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is obtaining information on radioactive waste during NRC-prescribed tests and in a disposal environment. This paper describes the resin solidification task of that program, including the present status and results to date

  8. Design and testing of wood containers for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.S.; Barry, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    A wood container for shipping and storing radioactive waste was designed to eliminate the problems caused by the weight, cost, and shape of the steel containers previously used. Tests specified by federal regulations (compression, free-drop, penetration, and vibration) were conducted on two of the containers, one loaded to 2500 lb and one loaded to 5000 lb. The 5000-lb container failed the free-drop test, but the 2500-lb container easily passed the tests and therefore qualifies as a Type A container. Its simplicity of design, low weight, and ease in handling have proved to be time-saving and cost-effective

  9. Testing waste forms containing high radionuclide loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is obtaining information on radioactive waste during NRC-prescribed tests and in a disposal environment. This paper describes the resin solidification task of that program, including the present status and results to date. An unusual aspect of this investigation is the use of commercial grade, ion exchange resins that have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. The objective of the resin solidification task is to determine the adequacy of test procedures specified by NRC for ion exchange resins having high radionuclide loadings

  10. Over-pressure test on BARCOM pre-stressed concrete containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, R.M.; Singh, Tarvinder; Thangamani, I.; Trivedi, Neha; Singh, Ram Kumar, E-mail: rksingh@barc.gov.in

    2014-04-01

    Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has organized an International Round Robin Analysis program to carry out the ultimate load capacity assessment of BARC Containment (BARCOM) test model. The test model located in BARC facilities Tarapur; is a 1:4 scale representation of 540 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) pre-stressed concrete inner containment structure of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS) unit 3 and 4. There are a large number of sensors installed in BARCOM that include vibratory wire strain gauges of embedded and spot-welded type, surface mounted electrical resistance strain gauges, dial gauges, earth pressure cells, tilt meters and high resolution digital camera systems for structural response, crack monitoring and fracture parameter measurement to evaluate the local and global behavior of the containment test model. The model has been tested pneumatically during the low pressure tests (LPTs) followed by proof test (PT) and integrated leakage rate test (ILRT) during commissioning. Further the over pressure test (OPT) has been carried out to establish the failure mode of BARCOM Test-Model. The over-pressure test will be completed shortly to reach the functional failure of the test model. Pre-test evaluation of BARCOM was carried out with the results obtained from the registered international round robin participants in January 2009 followed by the post-test assessment in February 2011. The test results along with the various failure modes related to the structural members – concrete, rebars and tendons identified in terms of prescribed milestones are presented in this paper along with the comparison of the pre-test predictions submitted by the registered participants of the Round Robin Analysis for BARCOM test model.

  11. Measuring subtle leakage of the blood-brain barrier in cerebrovascular disease with DCE-MRI: Test-retest reproducibility and its influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sau May; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Zhang, C Eleana; Staals, Julie; Hofman, Paul A M; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Backes, Walter H

    2017-07-01

    Increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability has been shown to play a significant role in the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease and it may provide an early functional marker of progression or treatment effects. The aim of the study was to investigate the test-retest reproducibility and influencing factors of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in measuring subtle leakage in patients with cerebrovascular disease. DCE-MRI (3T) was performed on two separate days in 16 patients (age 66 ± 9 years) with cerebrovascular disease, prospectively. The leakage rate was quantified for white matter (WM) and gray matter (GM) using the Patlak graphical approach with individual vascular input functions (VIFs). Furthermore, the influence of session-averaged VIFs, the average of the VIFs obtained on two days, and shorter scan times (range 5-25 minutes) on the reproducibility were evaluated in WM and GM. Coefficients of variation (CV) ≤14.4% (WM and GM), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of 0.77 (WM) and 0.49 (GM), were observed for the leakage rate. Session-averaged VIFs hardly affected these results (CV ≤13.4%). The repeatability coefficients (RCs) of the leakage rate decreased from 2.7·10 -3 to 0.4·10 -3 min -1 in WM (P < 0.01) and 4.4·10 -3 to 0.9·10 -3 min -1 in GM (P < 0.01) with increasing scan time (range 5-25 minutes). Based on the moderate CVs and moderate-to-excellent ICCs, we demonstrate that measuring subtle BBB leakage using DCE-MRI is moderate-to-excellent reproducible. Longer scan times improve the reproducibility. The provided RCs at various scan times may assist future clinical studies investigating BBB leakage using DCE-MRI. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:159-166. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Air Leakage of US Homes: Regression Analysis and Improvements from Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Wanyu R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Joh, Jeffrey [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    LBNL Residential Diagnostics Database (ResDB) contains blower door measurements and other diagnostic test results of homes in United States. Of these, approximately 134,000 single-family detached homes have sufficient information for the analysis of air leakage in relation to a number of housing characteristics. We performed regression analysis to consider the correlation between normalized leakage and a number of explanatory variables: IECC climate zone, floor area, height, year built, foundation type, duct location, and other characteristics. The regression model explains 68% of the observed variability in normalized leakage. ResDB also contains the before and after retrofit air leakage measurements of approximately 23,000 homes that participated in weatherization assistant programs (WAPs) or residential energy efficiency programs. The two types of programs achieve rather similar reductions in normalized leakage: 30% for WAPs and 20% for other energy programs.

  13. Remote sensing and hydrogeological methodologies for irrigation canal leakage detection: the Osasco and Fossano test sites (NorthWestern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Luigi; Clemente, Paolo; De Luca, Domenico Antonio; Dino, Giovanna; Lasagna, Manuela

    2013-04-01

    Seventy percent of global fresh water is usually used for irrigation. This rate is three times the amount of water used by industry and ten times the amount used in domestic and urban environment (Hotchkiss et al., 2001). However, the average efficiency of the water transport for agricultural purposes in different contexts (at world scale) is variable between 30% and 80%. Studies conducted in Italy confirms that rates are similar from the case studies abroad. In this research, satellite image analysis and hydrological-hydrogeological methods were used in two pilot sites (Osasco channel and Fossano channel, in the Noth-Western Italy) to identify the areas most prone to this problem and to quantify the losses. The aim of the study is to define a multidisciplinary approach in order to identify the critical situations of irrigation channels for a sustainable water resource use and management. The use of remote sensing techniques can identify, on a regional scale and at relative low cost, the channels section potentially critical upon which focus the attention and perform in-situ investigation. The presence of leakage from the irrigation canals, indeed, tends to induce variations of moisture on the surface ground. These variations affect the vegetation (e.g. vegetation state), and certain physical characteristics of the soil (e.g. the capacity and thermal conductivity). The analysis of these anomalies, conducted with digital image processing techniques (with infrared spectrum bands particularly sensitive to the above indicators) help to identify those areas with anomalies related to increased losses (Huang and Fipps, 2002). The use of satellite imagery in the proposed approach is an innovative application of Earth Observation for land and water monitoring (Huang et al., 2005). After the identification of anomalies, hydrological-hydrogeological methods were applied to evaluate the losses. At fist an hydrogeological characterisation of the study area and the bottom of the

  14. An assessment of the reported leakage of anthropogenic radionuclides from the underground nuclear test sites at Amchitka Island, Alaska, USA to the surface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasher, Douglas; Hanson, Wayne; Read, Stan; Faller, Scott; Farmer, Dennis; Efurd, Wes; Kelley, John; Patrick, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Three underground nuclear tests representing approximately 15-16% of the total effective energy released during the United States underground nuclear testing program from 1951 to 1992 were conducted at Amchitka Island, Alaska. In 1996, Greenpeace reported that leakage of radionuclides, 241Am and 239+240Pu, from these underground tests to the terrestrial and freshwater environments had been detected. In response to this report, a federal, state, tribal and non-governmental team conducted a terrestrial and freshwater radiological sampling program in 1997. Additional radiological sampling was conducted in 1998. An assessment of the reported leakage to the freshwater environment was evaluated by assessing 3H values in surface waters and 240Pu/239Pu ratios in various sample media. Tritium values ranged from 0.41 Bq/l +/- 0.11 two sigma to 0.74 Bq/1 +/- 0.126 two sigma at the surface water sites sampled, including the reported leakage sites. Only at the Long Shot test site, where leakage of radioactive gases to the near-surface occurred in 1965. were higher 3H levels of 5.8 Bq/1 +/- 0.19 two sigma still observed in 1997, in mud pit #3. The mean 240Pu/239Pu for all of the Amchitka samples was 0.1991 +/- 0.0149 one standard deviation, with values ranging from 0.1824 +/- 1.43% one sigma to 0.2431 +/- 6.56% one sigma. The measured 3H levels and 240Pu/239Pu ratios in freshwater moss and sediments at Amchitka provide no evidence of leakage occurring at the sites reported by Buske and Miller (1998 Nuclear-Weapons-Free America and Alaska Community Action on Toxics, Anchorage, Ak, p.38) and Miller and Buske (1996 Nuclear Flashback: The Return to Anchitka, p.35). It was noted that the marine sample; 240Pu/239Pu ratios are statistically different than the global fallout ratios presented by Krey et al. (1976) and Kelley, Bond, and Beasley (1999). The additional non-fallout component 240Pu/239Pu ratio, assuming a single unique source, necessary to modify the global fallout 240Pu/239

  15. Fuel containment and damage tolerance in large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 2: Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, J. P.; Denny, A.; Wood, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Technical issues associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite wing structures for transport aircraft were investigated. Material evaluation tests were conducted on two toughened resin composites: Celion/HX1504 and Celion/5245. These consisted of impact, tension, compression, edge delamination, and double cantilever beam tests. Another test series was conducted on graphite/epoxy box beams simulating a wing cover to spar cap joint configuration of a pressurized fuel tank. These tests evaluated the effectiveness of sealing methods with various fastener types and spacings under fatigue loading and with pressurized fuel. Another test series evaluated the ability of the selected coatings, film, and materials to prevent fuel leakage through 32-ply AS4/2220-1 laminates at various impact energy levels. To verify the structural integrity of the technology demonstration article structural details, tests were conducted on blade stiffened panels and sections. Compression tests were performed on undamaged and impacted stiffened AS4/2220-1 panels and smaller element tests to evaluate stiffener pull-off, side load and failsafe properties. Compression tests were also performed on panels subjected to Zone 2 lightning strikes. All of these data were integrated into a demonstration article representing a moderately loaded area of a transport wing. This test combined lightning strike, pressurized fuel, impact, impact repair, fatigue and residual strength.

  16. Instrumentation and testing of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessheimer, M.F.; Pace, D.W.; Klamerus, E.W.

    1997-01-01

    Static overpressurization tests of two scale models of nuclear containment structures - a steel containment vessel (SCV) representative of an improved, boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II design and a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) for pressurized water reactors (PWR) - are being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This paper discusses plans for instrumentation and testing of the PCCV model. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Basic tests on integrity evaluation for natural hexafluoride transporting container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Yoshio; Yamakawa, Hidetsugu; Kato, Osamu; Kobayashi, Seiichi

    1990-01-01

    In this study, the affected factors that needed to integrity evaluation for UF 6 transporting 48Y cylinder, were confirmed by basic tests and preliminary analysis. The factors were the sealing parts and external surface emissivity that ruled both the behavior under fire accident condition and the fire resistance capability of the cylinder, and the external pressure resistance capability at the sunk accident. The results obtained as follows. (1) Confirming tests for fire resistance of cylinder valve and plug, seat leakage of the valve caused at 150 degrees C. by unequal thermal expansion between the valve body and the stem. The tin-lead solder coating the tapered thread of valve and plug, melted at 200 degrees C., then the sealing boundary broke. (2) An external emissivity influence to radiation heat transfer measured with test pieces heated by electric oven. The covered paints of the specimen burned and separated, the emissivity changed 0.4 to 0.6, dependent on the surrounding temperature. Type 48Y cylinder filled with 12.5 tons of UF 6 and the measured emissivity was used the computer code analysis. The hydraulic breaking did not happen under the fire accident condition at 800 degrees C., for 30 minutes. (3) The external pressure test of the valve endured the hydrostatic pressure at 3000 meters, which corresponded to about five times the cylinder body buckling strength. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing TechniqueIncluding Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerhoff, Darryl; Walker, Iain

    2008-08-01

    The DeltaQ test is a method of estimating the air leakage from forced air duct systems. Developed primarily for residential and small commercial applications it uses the changes in blower door test results due to forced air system operation. Previous studies established the principles behind DeltaQ testing, but raised issues of precision of the test, particularly for leaky homes on windy days. Details of the measurement technique are available in an ASTM Standard (ASTM E1554-2007). In order to ease adoption of the test method, this study answers questions regarding the uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (particularly changes in wind speed) and the applicability to low leakage systems. The first question arises because the building envelope air flows and pressures used in the DeltaQ test are influenced by weather induced pressures. Variability in wind induced pressures rather than temperature difference induced pressures dominates this effect because the wind pressures change rapidly over the time period of a test. The second question needs to answered so that DeltaQ testing can be used in programs requiring or giving credit for tight ducts (e.g., California's Building Energy Code (CEC 2005)). DeltaQ modeling biases have been previously investigated in laboratory studies where there was no weather induced changes in envelope flows and pressures. Laboratory work by Andrews (2002) and Walker et al. (2004) found biases of about 0.5% of forced air system blower flow and individual test uncertainty of about 2% of forced air system blower flow. The laboratory tests were repeated by Walker and Dickerhoff (2006 and 2008) using a new ramping technique that continuously varied envelope pressures and air flows rather than taking data at pre-selected pressure stations (as used in ASTM E1554-2003 and other previous studies). The biases and individual test uncertainties for ramping were found to be very close (less than 0.5% of air handler flow) to those

  19. Integrated leak rate test results of JOYO reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, M.; Endo, J.

    1982-02-01

    Integrated leak rate tests of JOYO after the reactor coolant system had been filled with sodium have been performed two times since 1978 (February 1978 and December 1979). The tests were conducted with the in-containment sodium systems, primary argon cover gas system and air conditioning systems operating. Both the absolute pressure method and the reference chamber method were employed during the test. The results of both tests confirmed the functioning of the containment vessel, and leak rate limits were satisfied. In Addition, the adequancy of the test instrumentation system and the test method was demonstrated. Finally the plant conditions required to maintain reasonable accuracy for the leak rate testing of LMFBR were established. In this paper, the test conditions and the test results are described. (author)

  20. Evaluation of the leakage behavior of inflatable seals subject to severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, M.B.

    1989-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, under the sponsorship of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is currently developing test validated methods to predict the pressure capacity of light water reactor containment buildings when subjected to postulated severe accident conditions. These conditions are well beyond the design basis. Scale model tests of steel and reinforced concrete containments have been conducted as well as tests of typical containment penetrations. As a part of this effort, a series of tests was recently conducted to determine the leakage behavior of inflatable seals. These seals are used to prevent leakage around personnel and escape lock doors of some containments. The results of the inflatable seals tests are the subject of this report. Inflatable seals were tested at both room temperature and at elevated temperatures representative of postulated severe accident conditions. Both aged (radiation and thermal) and unaged seals were included in the test program. The internal seal pressure at the beginning of each test was varied to cover the range of seal pressures actually used in containments. For each seal pressure level, the external (containment) pressure was increased until significant leakage past the seals was observed. Parameters that were monitored and recorded during the tests were the internal seal pressure, chamber pressure, leakage past the seals, and temperature of the test chamber and fixture to which the seals were attached. 8 refs., 34 figs., 7 tabs

  1. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  2. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1995-10-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ''like-new'' condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ''like-new'' condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report

  3. ACE puts containment venting systems to the test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merilo, M.

    1990-01-01

    Filtered venting of reactor containments has received considerable attention recently as a method for avoiding containment failure due to overpressure during severe accidents. Several proposed filtration devices have been tested in the internationally sponsored Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) programme, such that a self consistent comparison of the aerosol removal characteristics of these systems could be obtained. Considering the different design, requirements and operating conditions of the filter devices, a direct comparison is not possible, nor appropriate. Nevertheless, large scale models, using full scale elements of the various devices whenever feasible, have been tested with consistent mixtures of aerosols and carrier gases. (author)

  4. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faakye, Omari [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Griffiths, Dianne [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-05-08

    “The cost for blower testing is high, because it is labor intensive, and it may disrupt occupants in multiple units. This high cost and disruption deter program participants, and dissuade them from pursuing energy improvements that would trigger air leakage testing, such as improvements to the building envelope.” This statement found in a 2012 report by Heschong Mahone Group for several California interests emphasizes the importance of reducing the cost and complexity of blower testing in multifamily buildings. Energy efficiency opportunities are being bypassed. The cost of single blower testing is on the order of $300. The cost for guarded blower door testing—the more appropriate test for assessing energy savings opportunities—could easily be six times that, and that’s only if you have the equipment and simultaneous access to multiple apartments. Thus, the proper test is simply not performed. This research seeks to provide an algorithm for predicting the guarded blower door test result based upon a single, total blower door test.

  5. Simulation of the drop impact test for moulded thermoplastic containers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, P.E.; Breedveld, G.; Lim, B.C.

    2000-01-01

    An analysis is made of the drop impact test for moulded plastics containers, as a first step towards the simulation of the impact event for design and development purposes. Experimental data are analysed from instrumented base drop impact testing of water-filled blow-moulded bottles, 20 and 210 l

  6. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Austin Douglas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Runnels, Joel T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair

  7. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faakye, O.; Arena, L.; Griffiths, D.

    2013-07-01

    The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

  8. Simulation of containment phenomena during the Phebus FPT1 test with the CONTAIN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kljenak, I.; Mavko, B.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic and aerosol phenomena which occurred in the containment vessel of the Phebus integral experimental facility during the first 30000 s of the Phebus FPT1 test were simulated with the CONTAIN thermal-hydraulic computer code. A single-cell input model of the vessel was developed, and boundary and initial conditions that were determined during the experiment were applied. The comparison of experimental and calculated results shows that, although the atmosphere temperature was well simulated, the calculated condensation rate was apparently too high, resulting in a lower pressure of the containment atmosphere. The aerosol deposition process was well simulated.(author)

  9. Containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    The primary mission of the Containment Group is to ensure that underground nuclear tests are satisfactorily contained. The main goal is the development of sound technical bases for containment-related methodology. Major areas of activity include siting, geologic description, emplacement hole stemming, and phenomenological predictions. Performance results of sanded gypsum concrete plugs on the Jefferson, Panamint, Cornucopia, Labquark, and Bodie events are given. Activities are also described in the following areas: computational capabilities site description, predictive modeling, and cavity-pressure measurement. Containment publications are listed. 8 references

  10. Radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahham, A.; Sharabati, A.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents data on the amount of radiation leakage from 117 microwave ovens in domestic and restaurant use in the West Bank, Palestine. The study of leakage is based on the measurements of radiation emissions from the oven in real-life conditions by using a frequency selective field strength measuring system. The power density from individual ovens was measured at a distance of 1 m and at the height of centre of door screen. The tested ovens were of different types, models with operating powers between 1000 and 1600 W and ages ranging from 1 month to >20 y, including 16 ovens with unknown ages. The amount of radiation leakage at a distance of 1 m was found to vary from 0.43 to 16.4 μW cm -1 with an average value equalling 3.64 μW cm -2 . Leakages from all tested microwave ovens except for seven ovens (∼6 % of the total) were below 10 μW cm -2 . The highest radiation leakage from any tested oven was ∼16.4 μW cm -2 , and found in two cases only. In no case did the leakage exceed the limit of 1 μWcm -1 recommended by the ICNIRP for 2.45-GHz radiofrequency. This study confirms a linear correlation between the amount of leakage and both oven age and operating power, with a stronger dependence of leakage on age. (authors)

  11. Project W320 52-inch diameter equipment container load test: Test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellomy, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    This test report summarizes testing activities and documents the results of the load tests performed on-site and off-site to structural qualify the 52-inch equipment containers designed and fabricated under Project W-320

  12. Small gas leakage rate measuring and monitoring system for spent fuel transport/storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Ryoji [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Aritomi, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Mitsuo; Kawa, Tsunemichi

    1997-12-01

    A containment function of transport and/or storage casks of radioactive materials is essential to prevent the materials from being released excessively into the environment. It is not practical for containment tests to measure directly the radioactivity release so that gas volumetric leakage rates are usually assessed and gas pressure decrease or increase method is usually applied. As gas flow model for evaluation, the ISO standards has deleted the concept of choked flow which is adopted by ANSI N14.5. Provided that the choked flow is not adopted to the leakage rate evaluation, the criteria of the test should be severe, and a new leakage rate measuring system with high accuracy and reasonable measuring time is required. Transport casks are often inspected in a temporary cask-storage facility where simultaneous measurement of many casks is required. In a storage cask system, multiple casks are monitored on their containment function during a storage period, and the method for simultaneous monitoring at many points for long term is required. In this study, two kinds of small gas leakage rate measuring systems are developed. One is to measure gas leakage rates directly and is called `flow measuring system`, which can measure gas leakage rate of 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -2} cm{sup 3}/s with high accuracy and short measuring time. The other is to measure the pressure decreasing rate and is called `pressure decreasing rate measuring system`, which can monitor the pressure change at many points simultaneously. (author)

  13. Microbial leakage of MTA, Portland cement, Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol as root-end filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Estrada-Bernabé, Pedro-Felício; de Almeida-Decurcio, Daniel; Almeida-Silva, Julio; Rodrigues-Araújo-Estrela, Cyntia; Poli-Figueiredo, José-Antonio

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Portland cement (PC), Sealapex and zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) as root-end filling materials. An in vitro microbial leakage test (MLT) with a split chamber was used in this study. A mixture of facultative bacteria and one yeast (S. aureus+E. faecalis+P. aeruginosa+B. subtilis+C. albicans) was placed in the upper chamber and it could only reach the lower chamber containing Brain Heart Infusion broth by way of leakage through the root-end filling. Microbial leakage was observed daily for 60 days. Sixty maxillary anterior human teeth were randomly assigned to different groups--MTA and PC (gray and white), Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE, control groups and subgroups to evaluate the influence of EDTA for smear layer removal. These materials were further evaluated by an agar diffusion test (ADT) to verify their antimicrobial efficacy. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test. In the MLT, Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show evidence of microbial leakage over the 60-day experimental period. The other materials showed leakage from the 15th day. The presence of smear layer influenced microbial leakage. Microbial inhibition zones were not observed in all samples tested by ADT. Sealapex+zinc oxide and ZOE did not show microbial leakage over the experimental period, whereas it was verified within 15 to 45 days in MTA and Portland cement.

  14. Land-use Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  15. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  16. LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program and initial test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhlestein, L.D.; Hilliard, R.K.; Bloom, G.R.; McCormack, J.D.; Rahn, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    The LWR aerosol containment experiments (LACE) program is described. The LACE program is being performed at the Hanford Engineer Development Laboratory (operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company) and the initial tests are sponsored by EPRI. The objectives of the LACE program are: to demonstrate, at large-scale, inherent radioactive aerosol retention behavior for postulated high consequence LWR accident situations; and to provide a data base to be used for aerosol behavior . Test results from the first phase of the LACE program are presented and discussed. Three large-scale scoping tests, simulating a containment bypass accident sequence, demonstrated the extent of agglomeration and deposition of aerosols occurring in the pipe pathway and vented auxiliary building under realistic accident conditions. Parameters varied during the scoping tests were aerosol type and steam condensation

  17. Dissolution test of herbal medicines containing Passiflora sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane R. T. Costa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution test is an essential tool to assess the quality of herbal medicines in the solid dosage form for oral use. This work aimed to evaluate the dissolution behavior of three herbal medicines in the form of capsules and tablet containing Passiflora, produced with powder or dried extract. Assay of total flavonoids and dissolution methods were validated and obtained results allowed the quantification of flavonoids with precision, accuracy and selectivity. The percentage of total flavonoids found was 2% for capsule A (containing only powder, 0.97% for capsule B (containing only dried extract and 5.5% for tablet. Although the content was lower, the release of flavonoids present in the capsule containing dried extract was 12% higher over 30 min, with dissolved percentage values of 87 and 75, for the capsules containing extract and powder, respectively. The tablet containing dried extract presented dissolution of 76%, despite the higher content of flavonoids, which may be due to pharmacotechnical problems. Obtained data demonstrated the need to implement these tests in the quality control of herbal medicines, confirming the release of the active ingredients that underlie the pharmacological action of these medicines.

  18. Model for Electromagnetic Information Leakage

    OpenAIRE

    Mao Jian; Li Yongmei; Zhang Jiemin; Liu Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic leakage will happen in working information equipments; it could lead to information leakage. In order to discover the nature of information in electromagnetic leakage, this paper combined electromagnetic theory with information theory as an innovative research method. It outlines a systematic model of electromagnetic information leakage, which theoretically describes the process of information leakage, intercept and reproduction based on electromagnetic radiation, and ana...

  19. Full scale leak test of the MEGAPIE containment hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samec, K.

    2006-07-01

    The Full Scale Leak Test (FSLT) experiment is designed to replicate an accidental leak of Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) liquid metal from the MEGAPIE neutron spallation source. The neutron source is totally encased in an aluminum containment hull cooled by heavy water. Any liquid metal which would, in a hypothetical accident, leak into the helium-filled insulation gap between the source and the aluminum containment hull, would immediately impact the hull. Furthermore, during irradiation in the PSI SINQ facility, the LBE in the MEGAPIE Lower Liquid Metal Container (LLMC) accumulates radio-active substances which, in the event of a leak, must be cooled and contained under controlled conditions, as they may otherwise contaminate the facility. The FSLT experiment has been devised to fully test the structural integrity of the containment hull against a sudden liquid metal leak, and in addition, to resolve the peak temperature of he coolant, to validate the sensors used in detecting a leak and of proof-test the analytical methods used in predicting the consequences of a leak. The FSLT experiment has been analysed ahead of the test, and both thermal and structural aspects calculated using commercial codes. The predictions applied conservative assumptions to the analysis of the thermal shock so as to preclude the likelihood of an unforeseen failure of the hull. In this document, these initial predictions are compared to the temperature and strain data recorded in the experiment. Further analysis, to be published at a later stage, will focus on applying actual conditions realised in the experiment, as opposed to the envelope case used in the test predictions. The integrity of the containment hull under loads resulting from liquid metal-leak is therefore the focal point of the experiment described in the current document, and serves as a key reference test for the Iicensing of the facility. The data recorded during the SLT experiment shows that the MEGAPIE containment hull is

  20. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    of this thesis was to: Clarify the best suited animal to model clinical anastomotic leakage in humans; Create animal models mimicking anastomotic leakage in humans induced by insufficient surgical technique and tissue ischemia; Determine the best suited coating materials to prevent anastomotic leakage. STUDY 1......, ischemia and insufficient surgical technique have been suggested to play a central role. Animal models are valuable means to evaluate pathophysiological mechanisms and may be used to test preventive measures aiming at reducing the risk of anastomotic leakage, such as external anastomotic coating. The aim...... of experimental animals were identified. The results indicated that the mouse and the pig are the best suited animals to evaluate clinical anastomotic leakage. However, the pig model is less validated and more costly to use compared with the mouse. Most frequently, rats are used as models. However, extreme...

  1. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100 degrees C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  2. Accidental Bowel Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve stimulation, injections, and surgery. What types of lifestyle changes can help treat accidental bowel leakage? Having ... Journal Clinical Updates Practice Management Coding Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality ...

  3. A Hydrogen Containment Process for Nuclear Thermal Engine Ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Stewart, Eric; Canabal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to propose a new total hydrogen containment process to enable the testing required for NTP engine development. This H2 removal process comprises of two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a shell-and-tube type of heat exchanger. This new process is demonstrated by simulation of the steady state operation of the engine firing at nominal conditions.

  4. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I & II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. However, POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a new series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016, and described herein, were done in two phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I and II, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  5. Pipe Overpack Container Fire Testing: Phase I II & III.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, Victor G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, Douglas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lopez, Carlos [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The Pipe Overpack Container (POC) was developed at Rocky Flats to transport plutonium residues with higher levels of plutonium than standard transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. In 1996 Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a series of tests to determine the degree of protection POCs provided during storage accident events. One of these tests exposed four of the POCs to a 30-minute engulfing pool fire, resulting in one of the 7A drum overpacks generating sufficient internal pressure to pop off its lid and expose the top of the pipe container (PC) to the fire environment. The initial contents of the POCs were inert materials, which would not generate large internal pressure within the PC if heated. POCs are now being used to store combustible TRU waste at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. At the request of DOE’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), starting in 2015 SNL conducted a series of fire tests to examine whether PCs with combustibles would reach a temperature that would result in (1) decomposition of inner contents and (2) subsequent generation of sufficient gas to cause the PC to over-pressurize and release its inner content. Tests conducted during 2015 and 2016 were done in three phases. The goal of the first phase was to see if the PC would reach high enough temperatures to decompose typical combustible materials inside the PC. The goal of the second test phase was to determine under what heating loads (i.e., incident heat fluxes) the 7A drum lid pops off from the POC drum. The goal of the third phase was to see if surrogate aerosol gets released from the PC when the drum lid is off. This report will describe the various tests conducted in phase I, II, and III, present preliminary results from these tests, and discuss implications for the POCs.

  6. Seismic proof test of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirama, Toshihiko; Goto, Masashi; Shiba, Keiji; Kobayashi, Toshio; Tanaka, Ryozo; Tsurumaki, Shizuo; Takiguchi, Katsuki; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    A 1/8-scale model was constructed of a reinforced concrete containment vessel (RCCV) used in the latest advanced boiling water reactors (ABWR). Shaking table tests were conducted on it with input motions corresponding to or exceeding a design earthquake assumed for a real Nuclear Power Plant. The objectives of the tests were to verify the structural integrity and the leak-proof functional soundness of the RCCV subjected to design earthquakes, and to determine the ultimate strength and seismic margin by an excitation that led to the model's collapse. The model, the test sequence and the pressure and leak test results were addressed in Part 1. The shaking table test method, the input motions and the test results, including the transition of the model's stiffness, natural frequencies and damping factors and the effects of vertical input motions and internal pressure on the model's characteristics and behavior, the load-deformation, the ultimate strength, the failure mode of the reinforced concrete portion and the liner plate are described here. The seismic safety margin that was evaluated by the energy input during the failure test to a design basis earthquake will be described in Part 3. The analytical results of simulation using the multi-lumped mass model will be described in Part 4

  7. Method to detect steam generator tube leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Kiyomi

    1994-01-01

    It is important for plant operation to detect minor leakages from the steam generator tube at an early stage, thus, leakage detection has been performed using a condenser air ejector gas monitor and a steam generator blow down monitor, etc. In this study highly-sensitive main steam line monitors have been developed in order to identify leakages in the steam generator more quickly and accurately. The performance of the monitors was verified and the demonstration test at the actual plant was conducted for their intended application to the plants. (author)

  8. Non destructive Testing (NDT) of concrete containing hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Noor Azreen Masenwat; Suhairy Sani; Nasharuddin Isa; Mohamad Haniza Mahmud

    2014-01-01

    This paper described the results of Non-destructive ultrasonic and rebound hammer measurements on concrete containing hematite. Local hematite stones were used as aggregates to produce high density concrete for application in X-and gamma shielding. Concrete cube samples (150 mm x 150 mm x 150 mm) containing hematite as coarse aggregates were prepared by changing mix ratio, water to cement ratio (w/c) and types of fine aggregate. All samples were cured in water for 7 days and then tested after 28 days. Density, rebound number(N) and ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) of the samples were taken before compressed to failure. The measurement results are explained and discussed. (author)

  9. Investigation, Analysis, and Testing of Self-contained Oxygen Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, Christopher P.; Haas, Jon P.; Starritt, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Self Contained Oxygen Generators (SCOGs) have widespread use in providing emergency breathing oxygen in a variety of environments including mines, submarines, spacecraft, and aircraft. These devices have definite advantages over storing of gaseous or liquid oxygen. The oxygen is not generated until a chemical briquette containing a chlorate or perchlorate oxidizer and a solid metallic fuel such as iron is ignited starting a thermal decomposition process allowing gaseous oxygen to be produced. These devices are typically very safe to store, easy to operate, and have primarily only a thermal hazard to the operator that can be controlled by barriers or furnaces. Tens of thousands of these devices are operated worldwide every year without major incident. This report examines the rare case of a SCOG whose behavior was both abnormal and lethal. This particular type of SCOG reviewed is nearly identical to a flight qualified version of SCOG slated for use on manned space vehicles. This Investigative Report is a compilation of a NASA effort in conjunction with other interested parties including military and aerospace to understand the causes of the particular SCOG accident and what preventative measures can be taken to ensure this incident is not repeated. This report details the incident and examines the root causes of the observed SCOG behavior from forensic evidence. A summary of chemical and numerical analysis is provided as a background to physical testing of identical SCOG devices. The results and findings of both small scale and full scale testing are documented on a test-by-test basis along with observations and summaries. Finally, conclusions are presented on the findings of this investigation, analysis, and testing along with suggestions on preventative measures for any entity interested in the safe use of these devices.

  10. Testing of tunnel support: dynamic load testing of rock support containment systems (eg wire mesh).

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ortlepp, WD

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this project was to determine the performance characteristics of containment elements of tunnel support in common use in South African mines under dynamic loading. The magnitude of the energy levels in this testing had...

  11. SWR 1000 related containment cooling system tests in PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1991 the Paul Scherrer Institute has participated in the investigations of several of the new passive Advanced Light Water Reactor designs proposed world-wide. The current phase of the project, ALPHA-II, is focused on both the boiling water and the pressurized water reactor passive designs and consists of three projects under the sponsorship of the European Commission. The paper describes the performed PANDA transient system tests related to one of these projects, called 'BWR R and D Cluster for Innovative Passive Safety Systems (IPSS)', and details the PSI contribution to the experimental investigation of passive containment cooling by a Building Condenser system which is part of the advanced Boiling Water Reactor SWR 1000 designed by Siemens. First, a short description of the relevant systems of the SWR 1000 design and its simulation in the PANDA facility are presented. After the description of the experimental programme for the large-scale integral system test investigations in the PANDA facility, the main results of the performed tests are also given. Finally, the main conclusions, based on the to date available experimental results and their analysis, are summarised. (author)

  12. Assessing Agulhas leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sebille, E.

    2009-01-01

    Agulhas leakage, the water that flows from the Indian Ocean to the Atlantic Ocean, plays an important role in the circulation of the Atlantic Ocean. The magnitude of this flux of warm and saline Indian Ocean water into the much colder and fresher Atlantic Ocean can be related to the strength of the

  13. Numerical and experimental study of the leakage flow in guide vanes with different hydrofoils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailesh Chitrakar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Clearance gaps between guide vanes and cover plates of Francis turbines tend to increase in size due to simultaneous effect of secondary flow and erosion in sediment affected hydropower plants. The pressure difference between the two sides of the guide vane induces leakage flow through the gap. This flow enters into the suction side with high acceleration, disturbing the primary flow and causing more erosion and losses in downstream turbine components. A cascade rig containing a single guide vane passage has been built to study the effect of the clearance gap using pressure sensors and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry technique. This study focuses on developing a numerical model of the test rig, validating the results with experiments and investigating the behavior of leakage flow numerically. It was observed from both CFD and experiment that the leakage flow forms a passage vortex, which shifts away from the wall while travelling downstream. The streamlines contributing to the formation of this vortex have been discussed. Furthermore, the reference guide vane with symmetrical hydrofoil has been compared with four cambered profiles, in terms of the guide vane loading and the consequent effect on the leakage flow. A dimensionless term called Leakage Flow Factor (Lff has been introduced to compare the performances of hydrofoils. It is shown that the leakage flow and its effect on increasing losses and erosion can be minimized by changing the pressure distribution over the guide vane.

  14. Full scale BWR containment LOCA response test at the INKA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Thomas; Leyer, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    KERENA is an innovative boiling water reactor concept with passive safety systems (Generation III+) of AREVA. The reactor is an evolutionary design of operating BWRs (Generation II). In order to verify the functionality and performance of the KERENA safety concept required for the transient and accident management, the test facility “Integral Teststand Karlstein” (INKA) was built at Karlstein (Germany). It is a mock-up of the KERENA boiling water reactor containment, with integrated pressure suppression system. The complete chain of passive safety components is available. The passive components and the levels are represented in full scale. The volume scaling of the containment compartments is approximately 1:24. The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is simulated via the steam accumulator of the Karlstein Large Valve Test Facility. This vessel provides an energy storage capacity of approximately 1/6 of the KERENA RPV and is supplied by a Benson boiler with a thermal power of 22 MW. With respect to the available power supply, the containment- and system-sizing of the facility is by far the largest one of its kind worldwide. From 2009 to 2012, several single component tests were conducted (Emergency Condenser, Containment Cooling Condenser, Core Flooding System etc.). On March 21st, 2013, the worldwide first large-scale only passively managed integral accident test of a boiling water reactor was simulated at INKA. The integral test measured the combined response of the KERENA passive safety systems to the postulated initiating event was the “Main Steam Line Break” (MSLB) inside the Containment with decay heat simulation. The results of the performed integral test (MSLB) showed that the passive safety systems alone are capable to bring the plant to stable conditions meeting all required safety targets with sufficient margins. Therefore the test verified the function of those components and the interplay between them as response to an anticipated accident scenario

  15. Benchmark calculations for evaluation methods of gas volumetric leakage rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, R.; Aritomi, M.; Matsuzaki, M.

    1998-01-01

    A containment function of radioactive materials transport casks is essential for safe transportation to prevent the radioactive materials from being released into environment. Regulations such as IAEA standard determined the limit of radioactivity to be released. Since is not practical for the leakage tests to measure directly the radioactivity release from a package, as gas volumetric leakages rates are proposed in ANSI N14.5 and ISO standards. In our previous works, gas volumetric leakage rates for several kinds of gas from various leaks were measured and two evaluation methods, 'a simple evaluation method' and 'a strict evaluation method', were proposed based on the results. The simple evaluation method considers the friction loss of laminar flow with expansion effect. The strict evaluating method considers an exit loss in addition to the friction loss. In this study, four worked examples were completed for on assumed large spent fuel transport cask (Type B Package) with wet or dry capacity and at three transport conditions; normal transport with intact fuels or failed fuels, and an accident in transport. The standard leakage rates and criteria for two kinds of leak test were calculated for each example by each evaluation method. The following observations are made based upon the calculations and evaluations: the choked flow model of ANSI method greatly overestimates the criteria for tests ; the laminar flow models of both ANSI and ISO methods slightly overestimate the criteria for tests; the above two results are within the design margin for ordinary transport condition and all methods are useful for the evaluation; for severe condition such as failed fuel transportation, it should pay attention to apply a choked flow model of ANSI method. (authors)

  16. Evaluation of Cold Tolerance in Field Grown Mentha (Mentha piperita‎‏ L.‎ under ‎Laboratory Conditions by Electrolyte Leakage Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Kheirkhah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine cold tolerance of field grown Mentha (Mentha Piperita L. under controlled conditions, using electrolyte leakage index, an experiment was carried out at the College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, based on a completely randomized design with four replications. Experimental factors included six freezing temperatures (Zero, -4, -8, -12, -16 and -20 °C, seven harvest ‎time (November, December, January, February, March, April and May and ‎four Peppermint organs (leaves, Stems, Stolons and Rhizomes. So, field grown ‎and acclimated Pepermint was harvested from the faculty field every month. ‎After separating the Peppermint organs, they were subjected to freezing ‎temperatures. The membrane stability index was measured through ‎electrolyte leakage (EL and also lethal temperature 50 ‎according to EL (LT50el was determined. The results showed that electrolyte leakages were affected significantly by freezing temperature. By reduction of freezing temperature electrolyte leakages percentage increased. Among different organs of peppermint, stolon and leaf were the most cold tolerant and the most cold sensitive according to EL and LT50el , respectively. Also cold tolerance varied according to different harvest time in all organs. However, in May, all organs had lowest cold tolerance. Also leaves and stolons had the highest and the lowest LT50el, respectively. For all organs the highest LT50el‎ was observed in May. According to the high correlation between electrolyte leakages percent and LT50el (r = 0.96**, it seems that using this index for evaluation of freezing tolerance injury in Mentha piperita could be useful.

  17. TRACG post-test analysis of panthers prototype tests of SBWR passive containment condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, J.R.; Billig, P.F.; Abdollahian, D.; Masoni, P.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the validation effort for application of the TRACG code to the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR), calculations have been performed for the various test facilities which are part of the SBWR design and technology certification program. These calculations include post-test calculations for tests in the PANTHERS Passive Containment Condenser (PCC) test program. Sixteen tests from the PANTHERS/PCC test matrix were selected for post-test analysis. This set includes three steady-state pure-steam tests, nine steady-state steam-air tests, and four transient tests. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the results of the post-test analysis. The author includes a brief description of the PANTHERS/PCC test facility and test matrix, a description of the PANTHERS/PCC post-test TRACG model and the manner in which the various types of tests in the post-test evaluation were simulated, and a presentation of the results of the TRACG simulation

  18. STABILIZATION AND TESTING OF MERCURY CONTAINING WASTES: BORDEN SLUDGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report details the stability assessment of a mercury containing sulfide treatment sludge. Information contained in this report will consist of background data submitted by the geneerator, landfill data supplied by EPA and characterization and leaching studies conducted by UC...

  19. Abutment Coating With Diamond-Like Carbon Films to Reduce Implant-Abutment Bacterial Leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Mayra; Sangalli, Jorgiana; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares; Nogueira, Lafayette

    2016-02-01

    The influence of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films on bacterial leakage through the interface between abutments and dental implants of external hexagon (EH) and internal hexagon (IH) designs was evaluated. Film deposition was performed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Sets of implants and abutments (n = 30 per group, sets of 180 implants) were divided according to connection design and treatment of the abutment base: 1) no treatment (control); 2) DLC film deposition; and 3) Ag-DLC film deposition. Under sterile conditions, 1 μL Enterococcus faecalis was inoculated inside the implants, and abutments were tightened. The sets were tested for immediate external contamination, suspended in test tubes containing sterile culture broth, and followed for 5 days. Turbidity of the broth indicated bacterial leakage. At the end of the period, the abutments were removed and the internal content of the implants was collected with paper points and plated in Petri dishes. After 24-hour incubation, they were assessed for bacterial viability and colony-forming unit counting. Bacterial leakage was analyzed by χ(2) and Fisher exact tests (α = 5%). The percentage of bacterial leakage was 16.09% for EH implants and 80.71% for IH implants (P DLC and Ag-DLC films do not significantly reduce the frequency of bacterial leakage and bacteria load inside the implants.

  20. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, E.

    1997-01-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack

  1. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  2. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions. Volume 1, Results from bellows tested in 'like-new' conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Sandia National Laboratories. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen bellows have been tested, all in the 'like-new' condition. (Additional tests are planned of bellows that have been subjected to corrosion.) The tests showed that bellows are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  3. Leakage resilient password systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yingjiu; Deng, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates tradeoff between security and usability in designing leakage resilient password systems (LRP) and introduces two practical LRP systems named Cover Pad and ShadowKey. It demonstrates that existing LRP systems are subject to both brute force attacks and statistical attacks and that these attacks cannot be effectively mitigated without sacrificing the usability of LRP systems. Quantitative analysis proves that a secure LRP system in practical settings imposes a considerable amount of cognitive workload unless certain secure channels are involved. The book introduces a secur

  4. [Psychological containment put to the test by a crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grison-Curinier, Juliete; Limongi, Marc; Bocoum, Amadou

    2014-01-01

    In the first-time admission unit, psychological containment is based essentially on receivingthe patient in crisis. While the management of the crisis is inseparable from containment, the drawing up of the patient's history, centred on observation, transfer and the clinical aspect, is a key stage in the patient's care. In an institution, the nursing team will, through its creativity, invent the care, seeking a possible alliance.

  5. Leakage monitoring. Acoustic leakage monitoring by means of neural networks in complex pressurized plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hessel, G.; Schmitt, W.; Vorst, K. van der; Weiss, F.P.

    1996-01-01

    A leakage detection and leakage rate assessment method developed for pressurized plants characterized by a complex three-dimensional topology is introduced. It is based on the features of leak-induced structure-borne or air-borne noise and uses neural networks for pattern recognition. The sound patterns required for neural network instruction can be generated by simulating leaks in the original structure. The method described can also be applied when leakage detection based on skews or damping differences fails. A prototype was developed and tested for a WWER-type reactor. Coherence values of highfrequency microphone signals or the effective values of sound emission sensor signals were used as features for characterization of the leak. The leakage rate assessment features were derived from these effective values. Neural networks allow one to easily adapt the method to pressurized plants of different topologies. (orig.) [de

  6. Calculation of transformers leakage reactance using electromagnetic energy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiz, J.; Mohseni, H.; Sabet Marzooghi, S.; Naderian Jahromi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Determination of transformer leakage reactance using magnetic cores has long been an area of interest to engineers involved in the design of power and distribution transformers. This is required for predicting the performance of transformers before actual assembly of the transformers. In this paper a closed form solution technique applicable to the leakage reactance calculations for transformers is presented. An emphasis is on the development of a simple method to calculate the leakage reactance of the distribution transformers and smaller transformers. Energy technique procedure for computing the leakage reactances in distribution transformers is presented. This method is very efficient compared with the use of flux element and image technique and is also remarkably accurate. Examples of calculated leakage inductances and the short circuit impedance are given for illustration. For validation, the results are compared with the results obtained using test. This paper presents a novel technique for calculation of the leakage inductance in different parts of the transformer using the electromagnetic stored energy

  7. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Cotton, Helene; Jessurun, Christina; Sembower, Mark A; Pype, Steve; Phillips, Jerry

    2016-01-27

    Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults ( n = 300) were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of "acetaminophen" ("Ac", "Ace", "Acm") were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on "APAP" or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC) labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  8. Testing of Candidate Icons to Identify Acetaminophen-Containing Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Shiffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding icons on labels of acetaminophen-containing medicines could help users identify the active ingredient and avoid concomitant use of multiple medicines containing acetaminophen. We evaluated five icons for communication effectiveness. Adults (n = 300 were randomized to view a prescription container label or over-the-counter labels with either one or two icons. Participants saw two icon candidates, and reported their interpretation; experts judged whether these reflected critical confusions that might cause harm. Participants rated how effectively each icon communicated key messages. Icons based on abbreviations of “acetaminophen” (“Ac”, “Ace”, “Acm” were rated less confusing and more effective in communicating the active ingredient than icons based on “APAP” or an abstract symbol. Icons did not result in critical confusion when seen on a readable medicine label. Icon implementation on prescription labels was more effective at communicating the warning against concomitant use than implementation on over-the-counter (OTC labels. Adding an icon to a second location on OTC labels did not consistently enhance this communication, but reduced rated effectiveness of acetaminophen ingredient communication among participants with limited health literacy. The abbreviation-based icons seem most suitable for labeling acetaminophen-containing medications to enable users to identify acetaminophen-containing products.

  9. The Leakage determination on corrosion fretting machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Hafid, Abdul; Febrianto; Prasetio, Joko; Abtokhi; Sumarno, Edy; Handoyo, Ismu; Hidayati, Nur Rahmah; Histori

    1998-01-01

    Fretting machine is an experimental loop to learn fretting corrosion phenomena wich is caused by loading and vibration. On the steam generator, one of the corrosion process that's occurred, it can be caused by vibration between tubes and bending material. Because of high flow rate inside the tube, the high frequency vibration will appeared so it can make the corrosion on bending material more faster. This process can be simulate by fretting machine. This machine has already damage because of leakage. So it will be repaired by dismantling, radiography testing and redrawing. from the result of radiography, the leakage is caused by cracking on bellows seals of the dynamic main support

  10. Leakage current measurement in transformerless PV inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerekes, Tamas; Sera, Dezso; Mathe, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) installations have seen a huge increase during the last couple of years. Transformerless PV inverters are gaining more share of the total inverter market, due to their high conversion efficiency, small weight and size. Nevertheless safety should have an important role in case...... of these tranformerless systems, due to the missing galvanic isolation. Leakage and fault current measurement is a key issue for these inverter topologies to be able to comply with the required safety standards. This article presents the test results of two different current measurement sensors that were suggested...... to be used in commercial PV inverters for the measurement of leakage and fault ground currents. The German VDE0126–1–1 standard gives the limit for fault and leakage ground currents and all grid connected PV inverters have to comply with these limits and disconnect from the grid in case of a fault....

  11. Juvenile Delinquency Explained? A Test of Containment Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, William E.; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the extent to which variation in self-reported delinquency is explained by the seven containment variables (favorable self-concept, goal orientation, frustration tolerance, retention of norms, internalization of rules, availability of meaningful roles, and group reinforcement), and focuses on racial and sex differences in self-reported…

  12. Testing protocols for evaluating monolithic waste forms containing mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Sams, T.L.; Pitt, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    Test protocols have been presented which can be used as a guide in cement-based grout formulation development studies. Based on experience at ORNL, these six tests are generally sufficient to develop a grout product which will meet all applicable DOE, NRC, and EPA performance criteria. As such, these tests can be used to minimize the time required to tailor a grout to be compatible with both the waste stream and the process disposal scenario. 9 refs

  13. On the scaling of gas leakage from static seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chivers, T.C.; Hunt, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    The interaction between gas leakage from static seals and eight potential variables is discussed. From a consideration of the interaction of these various parameters and the mechanical design of the seal system the importance of correctly interpreting leakage data is demonstrated. Given a situation where model experiments are necessary, this document forms a basis for the definition and interpretation of a test programme. (author)

  14. Burst tests on pipeline containing short uniform depth corrosion defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, Adilson C. [PETROBRAS R and D Center, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Freire, Jose Luiz de F.; Domingues, Ronaldo D.; Diniz, Jorge L.C. [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper the burst tests of three tubular specimens are presented. In these tests the tubular specimens were loaded with internal pressure only. The specimens were cut from a longitudinal welded tube made of API 5L X80 steel with a nominal outside diameter of 457.2 mm (18 in) and a nominal wall thickness of 7.93 mm (0.312 in). Each of the three specimens had one external short uniform depth corrosion defect, machined using spark erosion. Measurements were carried out in order to determine the actual dimensions of each tubular specimen and its respective defect. Tensile specimens and impact test specimens were tested to determine material properties. The failure pressures measured in the laboratory tests are compared with those predicted by four assessments methods, namely: the ASME B31G method, the RSTRENG 085dL method, the DNV RP-F101 method for single defects and the RPA method. (author)

  15. Oxygen Containment System Options for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — All nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) ground testing conducted in the 1950s and 1960s during the ROVER/(Nuclear Engine Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) program...

  16. 10 CFR 32.103 - Schedule D-prototype tests for ice detection devices containing strontium-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... visible evidence of physical contact between the water and the strontium-90. Absolute pressure of the air... water and the strontium-90 shall be considered leakage. (e) Observations. After each of the tests... of strontium-90 per 100 square centimeters of surface wiped or in the water of more than 0.1 percent...

  17. Design and hydrodynamic testing of an oil slick containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen-Jones, J.

    1997-01-01

    Aspects of mechanical containment of spilled oil were studied. The focus was on design problems and the development of a model for global loading on a horizontal catenary of a previously defined form. The result is then compared with existing theoretical formulations and an approximate model is developed for the effect of flow through the system in deep water. The modified result is again compared with accepted formulations and with sea-trial data. The leading edge of the skirt was observed to oscillate sinusoidally. Experimental results obtained from pressure transducer data and calibrated underwater video measurements show that the oscillation period diminishes with increases in tow speed. In contrast, the magnitude of the oscillation increases while mean deviation from datum draught returns to zero. 14 refs., 5 tabs., 31 figs

  18. North Korea’s 2009 Nuclear Test: Containment, Monitoring, Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    hydroacoustic ), Earth (seismic), or atmosphere (infrasound); a fourth detects radioactive material from a nuclear test. Scientists concur that... Laboratory report LA-12942-MS, UC-700 and UC-703, June 1995, pp. 89-92, http://www.osti.gov/ bridge/servlets/purl/72900-YlaqIV/webviewable/72900.pdf...Seismic Results from DOE’s Non-Proliferation Experiment: A Comparison of Chemical and Nuclear Explosions,” Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  19. Current developments in container design testing for the Konrad repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voelzke, Holger; Nieslony, Gregor; Noack, Volker; Hagenow, Peter; Kovacs, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, the Konrad repository was licensed as a repository for radioactive waste generating no heat. That permit subsequently became the object of litigation and was confirmed by a court of last resort as late as in 2007. The Federal Office of Radiation Protection (BfS) then started planning and converting the former iron ore mine into a repository. The licensed repository volume is 303,000 m 3 based on estimates of expected waste arisings. The mine proper would offer a much larger volume. However, cask emplacement can be started only after completion of the repository which, according to the present status, will not be before the end of this decade. Nevertheless, there is great interest even now in conditioning and packaging for repository storage of the radioactive waste planned for Konrad, which also requires casks type tested by the Federal Institute of Materials Testing (BAM) and approved by the BfS. The key items in the license for the repository are comprehensive requirements to be met by waste forms and casks. As far as continuous revision of repository requirements and consideration of materials hazardous to water are concerned, it is assumed that the key requirements applying to type tests of casks with respect to waste forms and casks will be affected by this either not at all or only very slightly. (orig.)

  20. Leakage of caesium braquitherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozada, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    In several Venezuelan public hospitals where cervix uteri tumours are treated by intracavitary radiotherapy, that use manual after loading Fletcher method, with Caesium 137 sources, the use of improper source holders, locally manufactured from pieces of drainage plastic tubing, which deteriorated and created a corrosive environment all around the sources, omission of manufacturer's recommendations regarding corrosion information, source storage, inspection and testing, violation of International Atomic Energy Agency Radiation Protection Procedures, and lack of proper regulatory control, resulted integrity damage to about sixty special form sources (ISO2919 C 63322), leakage of Cs-137 from a supposed insoluble refractory active content (caesium silicoaluminate), and contamination of applicators, floors and bedding. When the situation was detected by means removal contamination tests, after routine inspections, the sources were removed from the hospitals, decontaminated by means of immersion in 3% EDTA solution in ultrasonic bath, subjected to leaking assessment tests, and the ones that passed were placed in low cost stainless steel source holders, designed and built by the instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC) returned to the hospitals. The leaking sources were removed from use and considered radioactive waste. In order to avoid the occurrence of similar situations, all the importers of such sources are now required to send them to IVIC for testing and placement in proper source holders, before they are shipped to the hospitals. (author)

  1. Leakage monitoring device and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji; Fujimori, Haruo.

    1995-01-01

    In a water leakage monitor for a steam generator, output signals from an acoustic sensor disposed in the vicinity of a region to be monitored is subjected to phasing calculation (beam forming calculation) to determine the distribution of a sound source intensity distribution. A peak is retrieved based on the distribution of the sound source intensity distribution. A correction coefficient depending on the position of the peak is multiplied to the sound source intensity. The presence or absence of leakage is determined based on the degree of the sound source intensity after the completion of correction. Namely, a relative value of sound source intensity for each of the portions in the region to be monitored is determined, and the point of the greatest sound source intensity is assumed as a leaking point, to determine the position of the leakage. An absolute value of the sound source intensity at the leaking point is determined by such a constitution that a correction coefficient depending on the position is multiplied to the intensity of the position of the peak in the distribution of the sound intensity. A threshold value for the determination of the presence or absence of the leakage can be set if a relation between an amount of the leakage previously determined experimentally and the intensity of the sound source. Then, a countermeasure can easily be taken after the detection of the leakage and a restoring operation can be carried out rapidly after the occurrence of leakage while avoiding unnecessary shutdown. (N.H.)

  2. Failure analysis of leakage current in plastic encapsulated packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S. J.; Cheang, F. T.

    1990-11-01

    Plastic encapsulated packages exhibit high leakage currents after a few hundred hours in the steam pressure pot test (SPP). The present study investigates two possible causes of leakage current. These are: (a) mold compound, (b) the polyimide tape used for co-planarity of lead frame fingers. The results of this study indicate that the leakage cur-rent is independent of the frame and is not caused by the mold compound. The data indicates that it is the ionic content and acrylic-based adhesive layer of the polyimide tape which cause the leakage current. To eliminate the leakage current, polyimide tape with low ionic content and non acrylic-based adhesive should be used.

  3. PA171 Containers on a Wood Pallet with Metal Top Adapter, Air Pressure Tests During MIL-STD-1660 Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ... (PM-MAS) to conduct Air Pressure Tests during MIL-STD-1660, "Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads" testing on the PA171 containers on a wood pallet with metal top adapter as manufactured by Alliant Tech...

  4. Design and testing of Type A containers for packaging radioactive waste. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, C.L.

    1983-08-01

    The Toxic Waste Control Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory tested numerous Type A containers for use in the shipping of retrievable and disposable radioactive waste, specifically Transuranic waste, to identify and adopt a container that meets test criteria established by the Department of Transportation (49 CFR 173.398). This report summarizes the test results. Several containers passed DOT tests, but were unacceptable for use because of cost, maneuverability, size or shape, weight, or potential fire hazard during closure. The TX-4 passed all DOT tests and met LLNL requirements for handling, safety, and cost

  5. Procedure to carry out leakage test in beta radiation sealed sources emitters of {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y; Procedimiento para realizar prueba de fuga en fuentes selladas de radiacion beta emisoras de {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J. T., E-mail: trinidad.alvarez@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    In the alpha-beta room of the Secondary Laboratory of Dosimetric Calibration of the Metrology Department of Ionizing Radiations ophthalmic applicators are calibrated in absorbed dose terms in water D{sub w}; these applicators, basically are emitter sealed sources of pure beta radiation of {sup 90}Sr / {sup 90}Y. Concretely, the laboratory quality system indicates to use the established procedure for the calibration of these sources, which establishes the requirement of to carry out a leakage test, before to calibrate the source. However, in the Laboratory leakage test certificates sent by specialized companies in radiological protection services have been received, in which are used gamma spectrometry equipment s for beta radiation leakage tests, since it is not reliable to detect pure beta radiation with a scintillating detector with NaI crystal, (because it could detect the braking radiation produced in the detector). Therefore the Laboratory has had to verify the results of the tests with a correct technique, with the purpose of determining the presence of sources with their altered integrity and radioactive material leakage. The objective of this work is to describe a technique for beta activity measurement - of the standard ISO 7503, part 1 (1988) - and its application with a detector Gm plane (type pankage) in the realization of leakage tests in emitter sources of pure beta radiation, inside the mark of quality assurance indicated by the report ICRU 76. (Author)

  6. Microbial leakage through the implant-abutment interface of Morse taper implants in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, João Pedro; Curcio, Ricardo; Laporta, Marcia Zorello; Rossi, Liliane; da Silva, Adriana Madeira Alvares; Rapoport, Abrão

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare the frequency of bacterial leakage of Streptococcus sanguinis biotype II along the implant-abutment interface between two systems of morse taper dental implants. Different methods of activation of the taper abutments were used: tapped-in (Bicon) and screwed-in (Ankylos). Twenty sterile assemblies were used and attached, 10 Bicon and 10 Ankylos implants, according to manufacturers' specifications. They were then totally immersed within 20 test tubes containing a sterile nutrient solution brain-heart infusion (BHI). The internal part of the 20 implants was previously inoculated with 0.1 microl of S. sanguinis II (ATCC 10557) and then connected to the respective abutments. The assemblies were incubated under anaerobic conditions for 14 days in an autoclave at 37 degrees C. They were monitored daily for solution cloudiness resultant from microbial leakage on the interface of the assemblies. For statistical analysis, the Fisher test was applied and significance was assigned at the 5% level. There was solution cloudiness, indicating the finding of bacterial growth inside two Bicon assemblies and two Ankylos assemblies 48 h after incubation. Microbial leakage was further substantiated by testing the suspension for the presence of Streptococcus sp. None of the sterility controls were contaminated. The frequency of bacterial leakage along the implant-abutment interface, with the two different morse taper implant systems, was 20% of the assemblies of each system. There were no statistical differences between them. Irrespective of which of the two morse taper implant connection systems of activation was analyzed, tapped-in (Bicon) or screwed-in (Ankylos), this in vitro experiment showed bacterial leakage along the implant-abutment interface.

  7. 14 CFR 33.94 - Blade containment and rotor unbalance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... critical compressor or fan blade while operating at maximum permissible r.p.m. The blade failure must occur... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Blade containment and rotor unbalance tests... Blade containment and rotor unbalance tests. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, it...

  8. A method for biological testing of containment systems for viral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, N E; Lincoln, T A; Otten, J A; Porter, W E

    1976-07-01

    A technique utilizing coliphage as the test material has been developed and employed to evaluate the effectiveness of a containment system for zonal centrifugation of hepatits viruses. An Andersen Viable Particle Sampler which had been loaded with plates containing a base layer of agar nutrient with an overlay of E. coli- agar suspension was used to sample the test air. The containment system, which includes a HEPA filter, was challenged with an aerosolized suspension of coliphage.

  9. Using An Adapter To Perform The Chalfant-Style Containment Vessel Periodic Maintenance Leak Rate Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-01-01

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT and PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT and PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  10. Test concept for weld seam testing by means of ultrasonics on the core containment vessel of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappes, W.; Rockstroh, B.; Walte, F.; Huebschen, G.; D'Annucci, F.; Bonitz, F.; Franke, H.

    1996-01-01

    A test solution was found for the mechanised ultrasonic testing of Austenitic X weld seams on the core containment vessel of pressurised water reactors in the combination of the piezo-electric test heads 55SEL3 and SEK3, with which the necessary sensitivity of detection is achieved. Different variants of the test head system were tested, where the systems produced with piezo-electric composite test heads with a height of 15 mm are suitable for use in narrow gaps between the core containment vessel and the thermal shield. The test head materials were selected with regard to compliance with the required resistance to radiation. A further variant is based on EMUS group radiators for exciting SH waves which, owing to the low effect on the SH wave of the weld seam structure and the electronic setting of the sounding angle, make a simple test head system consisting of only two test heads possible. (orig./MM) [de

  11. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  12. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Rodney S.

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  13. Design and testing of the TX-4 Type A container for packaging radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.S.; Perkins, C.L.

    1983-01-01

    The Toxic Waste Control Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has designed and tested the TX-4, a Type A steel container for shipping and storing radioactive waste. We designed the TX-4 to eliminate the safety, maneuverability, weight, and cost problems experienced by other hazards waste containers. Our design meets the test criteria set by the Department of Transportation (49 CFR 173.398). The TX-4 container passed all tests when loaded to 7000 lb gross weight and effectively solved the above problems. Its simplicity of design, low weight, and ease in handling have proved to be timesaving and cost-effective. This report summarizes our testing of the TX-4 and past and present radioactive waste containers used by defense-related operations. Based on our results, we believe the TX-4 is a superior container for the hazardous waste industry. 10 figures, 1 table

  14. Multifamily Envelope Leakage Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faakye, O. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States); Griffiths, D. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the 2013 research project was to develop the model for predicting fully guarded test results (FGT), using unguarded test data and specific building features of apartment units. The model developed has a coefficient of determination R2 value of 0.53 with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.13. Both statistical metrics indicate that the model is relatively strong. When tested against data that was not included in the development of the model, prediction accuracy was within 19%, which is reasonable given that seasonal differences in blower door measurements can vary by as much as 25%.

  15. Control of quality in the tests of systems of containment of vehicles. Intercomparison of the results of the tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Ramos, S.

    2009-01-01

    This article tries to offer information on how Central Laboratory of Structures and Materials are made the tests for Marca N of AENOR of the systems of containment of vehicles and its control of external quality. (Author) 15 refs

  16. Containment integrity and leak testing. Procedures applied and experiences gained in European countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Containment systems are the ultimate safety barrier for preventing the escape of gaseous, liquid and solid radioactive materials produced in normal operation, not retained in process systems, and for keeping back radioactive materials released by system malfunction or equipment failure. A primary element of the containment shell is therefore its leak-tight design. The report describes the present containment concepts mostly used in European countries. The leak-testing procedures applied and the experiences gained in their application are also discussed. The report refers more particularly to pre-operational testing, periodic testing and extrapolation methods of leak rates measured at test conditions to expected leak rates at calculated accident conditions. The actual problems in periodic containment leak rate testing are critically reviewed. In the appendix to the report a summary is given of the regulations and specifications applied in different member countries

  17. Plan on test to failure of a prestressed concrete containment vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takumi, K.; Nonaka, A.; Umeki, K.; Nagata, K.; Soejima, M.; Yamaura, Y.; Costello, J.F.; Riesemann, W.A. von.; Parks, M.B.; Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of the plans to test a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) model to failure is provided in this paper. The test will be conducted as a part of a joint research program between the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The containment model will be a scaled representation of a PCCV for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the test, the model will be slowly pressurized internally until failure of the containment pressure boundary occurs. The objectives of the test are to measure the failure pressure, to observe the mode of failure, and to record the containment structural response up to failure. Pre- and posttest analyses will be conducted to forecast and evaluate the test results. Based on these results, a validated method for evaluating the structural behavior of an actual PWR PCCV will be developed. The concepts to design the PCCV model are also described in the paper

  18. Acceptance test procedure for a portable, self-contained nitrogen supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0249 Rev. 1 and ECN 606112. The equipment being tested is a Portable, Self-Contained Nitrogen Supply. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The Functional Test was written by the Seller and is contained in Appendix A. The Functional test will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company performing inspection and witnessing the functional test at the Seller's location

  19. Acceptance test procedure for a portable, self-contained nitrogen supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-10-04

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0249 Rev. 1 and ECN 606112. The equipment being tested is a Portable, Self-Contained Nitrogen Supply. The unit was purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity. The Functional Test was written by the Seller and is contained in Appendix A. The Functional test will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company performing inspection and witnessing the functional test at the Seller`s location.

  20. Simulation of atmosphere stratification in the HDR test facility with the CONTAIN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skerlavaj, A.; Mavko, B.; Kljenak, I.

    2001-01-01

    The test E11.2 'Hydrogen distribution in loop flow geometry', which was performed in the Heissdampf Reaktor containment test facility in Germany, was simulated with the CONTAIN computer code. The predicted pressure history and thermal stratification are in relatively good agreement with the measurements. The compositional stratification within the containment was qualitatively well predicted, although the degree of the stratification in the dome area was slightly underestimated. The analysis of simulation results enabled a better understanding of the physical phenomena during the test.(author)

  1. IMPACT OF DUCT LEAKAGE PRESSURES ON THE SHAPE OF THE DELTA Q CURVE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, J.W.

    2002-01-01

    The question of whether and to what extent information on the pressures driving duct leaks can be extracted from the data taken during the Delta Q test for duct leakage is investigated. Curves of Delta Q vs. house pressure are generated for sets of cases where the supply and return leakage rates to/from outside are held constant while the leakage pressures are varied. It is found that the Delta Q curve takes on two qualitatively different shapes, one for leakage pressures within the range of house pressures used in the Delta Q test (i.e., -25 Pa to +25 Pa) and the other for leakage pressures well outside this range. These effects are seen in experimental data taken with leakage at known pressures. However, extracting the signal of the leakage pressure from the surrounding noise caused by random measurement variation is likely to be a difficult problem in many cases

  2. Low leakage mechanical joint development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crago, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    As a consequence of the development programs described, certain recommendatons for design of mechanial joints have been proposed. These include: 1. Spiral wound gaskets filled with chrysotile asbestos are adequate for primary heat transport system fluid conditions. 2. Spiral wound gaskets should be seated under a stress of 110 to 125 MPa for low leakage performance. 3. Load maintenance, while perhaps reducing leakage, introduces more complex hardware, and is of unproven benefit. 4. Uniform circumferential load application requires the use of hydraulic stud tensioners to ensure satisfactory performance from large size mechanical joints. (author)

  3. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horschel, D.S.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix

  4. Experimental results from pressure testing a 1:6-scale nuclear power plant containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horschel, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the testing of a 1:6-scale, reinforced-concrete containment building at Sandia National Laboratories, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The scale-model, Light Water Reactor (LWR) containment building was designed and built to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) code by United Engineers and Constructors, Inc., and was instrumented with over 1200 transducers to prepare for the test. The containment model was tested to failure to determine its response to static internal overpressurization. As part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s program on containment integrity, the test results will be used to assess the capability of analytical methods to predict the performance of containments under severe-accident loads. The scaled dimensions of the cylindrical wall and hemispherical dome were typical of a full-size containment. Other typical features included in the heavily reinforced model were equipment hatches, personnel air locks, several small piping penetrations, and a ihin steel liner that was attached to the concrete by headed studs. In addition to the transducers attached to the model, an acoustic detection system and several video and still cameras were used during testing to gather data and to aid in the conduct of the test. The model and its instrumentation are briefly discussed, and is followed by the testing procedures and measured response of the containment model. A summary discussion is included to aid in understanding the significance of the test as it applies to real world reinforced concrete containment structures. The data gathered during SIT and overpressure testing are included as an appendix.

  5. In situ testing of titanium and mild steel nuclear waste containers at the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in situ tests on the corrosion of titanium and mild steel for high level waste containers is presented. The tests at Sandia have moved out of the laboratory into a test underground facility in order to evaluate the performance of the waste package material. The tests are being performed under both near-reference and accelerated salt repository conditions. Some containers are filled with high level waste glass (non-radioactive); others contain electric heaters. Backfill material is either bentonite/sand or crushed salt. In other tests metals and glasses are exposed directly to brine. The tests are designed to study the corrosion and metallurgy of the canister and overpack materials; the feasibility and performance of backfill materials; and near-field effects such as brine migration

  6. Examination and testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This Standard provides the examination and testing requirements that will apply to the work of any organization participating in the construction, installation, and fabrication of parts or components of concrete containment structures, or both, that are defined as class containment. 2 tabs

  7. 40 CFR 59.653 - How do I test portable fuel containers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... other factors (such as vibration or thermal expansion). If your container cannot be tested using the... described in your application, with the applicable spout attached except as otherwise noted. Tighten...

  8. Magnetic leakage shield of septum magnet for SPring-8 synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Aoki, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Kenji

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes magnetic field measurements of the prototype septum magnet and countermeasure for reducing the leakage magnetic fields in the incidence and the extraction parts of the SPring-8 synchrotron. We studied and developed 'leakage magnetic shield' on the basis of the tests data got in these measurements. Consequentially, it succeeded in reducing effects of the leakage field to about 50% by installing the shield board in the magnet main body. Then, it was possible to manufacture the magnet which sufficiently held the effect of the leakage field for the electron and positron beam. In this examination, we confirmed the reproduction with the magnetic field distribution of the magnet measured in the manufacturer. We developed and produced of the septum magnets which were carried out determination of the shapes of the magnetic shielding. (author)

  9. Considerations for Storage of High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Utilizing Non-Metal Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robin E.; Scott, Joseph P.; Wise, Harry

    2005-01-01

    When working with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, it is critical that the storage container be constructed of the proper materials, those which will not degrade to the extent that container breakdown or dangerous decomposition occurs. It has been suggested that the only materials that will safely contain the peroxide for a significant period of time are metals of stainless steel construction or aluminum use as High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Containers. The stability and decomposition of HTP will be also discussed as well as various means suggested in the literature to minimize these problems. The dangers of excess oxygen generation are also touched upon.

  10. Development of methodology for certification of Type B shipping containers using analytical and testing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R.; Varley, D.T.

    1993-01-01

    The use of multidisciplinary teams to develop Type B shipping containers improves the quality and reliability of these reusable packagings. Including the people involved in all aspects of the design, certification and use of the package leads to more innovative, user-friendly containers. Concurrent use of testing and analysis allows engineers to more fully characterize a shipping container's responses to the environments given in the regulations, and provides a strong basis for certification. The combination of the input and output of these efforts should provide a general methodology that designers of Type B radioactive material shipping containers can utilize to optimize and certify their designs. (J.P.N.)

  11. Patch test reactivity to feverfew-containing creams in feverfew-allergic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Evy; Christensen, Lars P; Fretté, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    anti-inflammatory properties has been developed for use in cosmetics. Objective: The aim of the study was to test, on the basis of patch test reactions, whether persons with contact allergy to feverfew could tolerate creams containing this feverfew extract. Patients/Materials/Methods: Seven patients...... with simultaneous positive reactions to parthenolide. This cream was analysed about 2 years later, and no parthenolide was detected, probably because of degradation of the compound. Conclusions: Topical products containing parthenolide-depleted feverfew extracts may elicit positive patch test reactions in feverfew...... with feverfew contact allergy were patch tested with two creams containing the feverfew extract. Subsequently, the creams were analysed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to detect parthenolide. Results: Four of the patients tested positive to one of the creams; reactivity was associated...

  12. Water Ingress Testing of the Turbula Jar and U-233 Lead Pig Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Karns, Tristan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Understanding the water ingress behavior of containers used at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility has significant implications for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to document the water ingress behavior of the Turbula Jar with Bakelite lid and Viton gaskets (Turbula Jar) used in oxide blending operations and the U-233 lead pig container used to store and transport U-233 material. The technical basis for water resistant containers at TA-55 is described in LA-UR-15-22781, “Water Resistant Container Technical Basis Document for the TA-55 Criticality Safety Program.” Testing of the water ingress behavior of various containers is described in LA-CP-13-00695, “Water Penetration Tests on the Filters of Hagan and SAVY Containers,” LA-UR-15-23121, “Water Ingress into Crimped Convenience Containers under Flooding Conditions,” and in LA-UR- 16-2411, “Water Ingress Testing for TA-55 Containers.” Water ingress criteria are defined in TA55-AP-522 “TA-55 Criticality Safety Program”, and in PA-RD-01009 “TA55 Criticality Safety Requirements.” The water ingress criteria for submersion is no more than 50 ml of water ingress at a 6” water column height for a period of 2 hours.

  13. An Experimental Study of Emission and Combustion Characteristics of Marine Diesel Engine in Case of Cylinder Valves Leakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Jerzy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper shows the results of the laboratory tests on the relationship between throttling of both air intake duct and exhaust gas duct and a gaseous emission from the marine engine. The object of research is a laboratory, four-stroke, DI diesel engine, operated at loads from 50 kW to 250 kW at a constant speed equal to 750 rpm. During the laboratory tests over 50 parameters of the engine were measured with its technical condition recognized as a „working properly” and with simulated leakage of both air intake valve and exhaust gas valve on the second cylinder. The results of this laboratory research confirm that the leakage of cylinder valves causes no significant changes of the thermodynamic parameters of the engine. Simulated leakages through the inlet and exhaust valve caused a significant increase in fuel consumption of the engine. Valve leakages cause an increase of the exhaust gas temperature behind the cylinder with leakage and behind other cylinders. The exhaust gas temperature increase is relatively small and clearly visible only at low loads of the engine. The increase of the temperature and pressure of the charging air behind the intercooler were observed too. Charging air temperature is significantly higher during the engine operation with inlet valve leakage. The study results show significant increases of the CO, NOx and CO2 emission for all the mentioned malfunctions. The conclusion is that the results of measurements of the composition of the exhaust gas may contain valuable diagnostic information about the technical condition of the air intake duct and the exhaust gas duct of the marine engine.

  14. Separate effects tests on hydrogen combustion during direct containment heating events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, L.; Albrecht, G.; Kirstahler, M.; Schwall, M.; Wachter, E.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of severe accident research for light water reactors Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK/IKET) operates the facilities DISCO-C and DISCO-H since 1998, conceived to investigate the direct containment heating (DCH) issue. Previous DCH experiments have investigated the corium dispersion and containment pressurization during DCH in different European reactor geometries using an iron-alumina melt and steam as model fluids. The analysis of these experiments showed that the containment was pressurized by the debris-to-gas heat transfer but also to a large part by hydrogen combustion. The need was identified to better characterize the hydrogen combustion during DCH. To address this issue separate effect tests in the DISCO-H facility were conducted. These tests reproduced phenomena occurring during DCH (injection of a hot steam-hydrogen mixture jet into the containment and ignition of the air-steam-hydrogen mixture) with the exception of corium dispersion. The effect of corium particles as igniters was simulated using sparkler systems. The data will be used to validate models in combustion codes and to extrapolate to prototypic scale. Tests have been conducted in the DISCO-H facility in two steps. First a small series of six tests was done in a simplified geometry to study fundamental parameters. Then, two tests were done with a containment geometry subdivided into a subcompartment and the containment dome. The test conditions were as follows: As initial condition in the containment an atmosphere was used either with air or with a homogeneous air-steam mixture containing hydrogen concentrations between 0 and 7 mol%, temperatures around 100 C and pressure at 2 bar (representative of the containment atmosphere conditions at vessel failure). Injection of a hot steam-hydrogen jet mixture into the reactor cavity pit at 20 bar, representative of the primary circuit blow down through the vessel and hydrogen produced during this phase. The most important variables

  15. USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

    2011-06-03

    Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

  16. System for routine testing of self-contained and airline breathing equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, H.J.; Hermens, G.A.

    1980-07-01

    A system for routine testing of self-contained and airline breathing equipment, developed by Shell Oil Co., for testing breathing equipment at one of its refineries, consists of an 80 psig air supply for airline respirators; a 500-2100 psig air supply for self-contained units; a regulator test system which uses a mannequin head that simulates human inhalation and which tests the ability of the regulator to keep the mask interior at the correct positive pressure; and an exhalation valve test system which identifies a leaky or sticking valve. The testing system has been in use for about 30 mo and has led to increased acceptance of respiratory protective equipment by workers.

  17. Fuel containment and damage tolerance for large composite primary aircraft structures. Phase 1: Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandifer, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Technical problems associated with fuel containment and damage tolerance of composite material wings for transport aircraft were identified. The major tasks are the following: (1) the preliminary design of damage tolerant wing surface using composite materials; (2) the evaluation of fuel sealing and lightning protection methods for a composite material wing; and (3) an experimental investigation of the damage tolerant characteristics of toughened resin graphite/epoxy materials. The test results, the test techniques, and the test data are presented.

  18. Final report on special impact tests of plutonium shipping containers description of test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzon, L.L.

    1977-02-01

    The results from tests conducted to determine the structural response of the LLD-1, Model 1518-6M, and FL-10 plutonium shipping packages when subjected to high-speed impacts (170 to 760 ft/sec) onto unyielding, concrete, and soil targets are presented

  19. Test results employed by General Electric for boiling water reactor containment and vertical vent loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, T.Y.; Singh, A.; James, A.J.; Winkler, W.D.; Walenciak, M.R.; Rosa, J.M.

    1975-10-01

    During a safety relief valve blowdown, air contained in the relief line discharges into the suppression pool with the resulting oscillations of the air bubble causing dynamic loading on the containment. The magnitude and characteristics of such loading depend upon the geometry of the discharge device at the end of the safety relief line. Extensive small scale and large scale testing was performed to evaluate the performance of a four-arm quencher discharge device. Results of these tests, description of test facility, instrumentation and test procedures are described. During a loss-of-coolant accident, steam flows through vertical vent pipes such as employed in Mark I and II Containments and condenses in the suppression pool at the vent exit. During this condensation process, a steam bubble which forms at the vent exit will collapse irregularly leading to water impingement on the vent pipe. The water impingement phenomenon causes lateral loading on the vertical vents. The loading phenomena and series of tests performed to evaluate the load magnitudes are described. During a later part of the safety relief valve blowdown, steam discharges into the suppression pool through the safety relief line end discharge device. Extensive tests were carried out to investigate the high temperature condensation phenomenon and the temperature threshold limits for the occurrence of condensation vibrations for various configurations including the quencher configuration, of the relief line and discharge device. Results of these tests including a description of the test facility, instrumentation and test procedures have been included

  20. Issues behind Competitiveness and Carbon Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This report explores the vulnerability of heavy industry to carbon leakage and competitiveness loss. It reviews the existing literature on competitiveness and carbon leakage under uneven climate policies. It also suggests a statistical method to track carbon leakage, and applies this methodology to Phase I of the EU emissions trading scheme, for various industrial activities: iron and steel, cement, aluminium and refineries. Finally, it reviews measures to mitigate carbon leakage, as discussed in Australia, Canada, Europe, New Zealand and the US.

  1. Simulation of leakage through mechanical sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomorov, V. P.; Gorlenko, O. A.; Izmerov, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The procedure of mathematical modeling of leakage through the mechanical seal taking into account waviness and roughness is considered. The percolation process is represented as the sum of leakages through a gap between wavy surfaces and percolation through gaps formed by fractal roughness, i.e. the total leakage is determined by the slot model and filtration leakage. Dependences of leaks on the contact pressure of corrugated and rough surfaces of the mechanical seal elements are presented.

  2. Development and testing of techniques for in-ground stabilization, size reduction, and safe removal of radioactive wastes stored in containments buried in ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliwell, Stephen; Christodoulou, Apostolos

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1950's radioactive wastes from a number of laboratories have been stored below ground at the Hanford site, Washington State, USA, in vertical pipe units (VPUs) made of five 200 litre drums without tops or bottoms, and in caissons, made out of corrugated pipe, or concrete and typically 2,500 mm in diameter. The VPU's are buried of the order of 2,100 mm below grade, and the caissons are buried of the order of 6,000 mm below grade. The waste contains fuel pieces, fission products, and a range of chemicals used in the laboratory processes. This can include various energetic reactants such as un-reacted sodium potassium (NaK), potassium superoxide (KO 2 ), and picric acid, as well as quantities of other liquids. The integrity of the containments is considered to present unacceptable risks from leakage of radioactivity to the environment. This paper describes the successful development and full scale testing of in-ground augering equipment, grouting systems and removal equipment for remediation and removal of the VPUs, and the initial development work to test the utilization of the same basic augering and grouting techniques for the stabilization, size reduction and removal of caissons. (authors)

  3. Heat exchanger leakage problem location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent compact heat exchangers are very often assembled from numerous parts joined together to separate heat transfer fluids and to form the required heat exchanger arrangement. Therefore, the leak tightness is very important property of the compact heat exchangers. Although, the compact heat exchangers have been produced for many years, there are still technological problems associated with manufacturing of the ideal connection between the individual parts, mainly encountered with special purpose heat exchangers, e.g. gas turbine recuperators. This paper describes a procedure used to identify the leakage location inside the prime surface gas turbine recuperator. For this purpose, an analytical model of the leaky gas turbine recuperator was created to assess its performance. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data which were acquired during the recuperator thermal performance analysis. The differences between these two data sets are used to indicate possible leakage areas.

  4. Electrolyte leakage as an indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ahmad nezami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the electrolyte leakage as an indicator of freezing injury in colza (Brassica napus L. genotypes under controlled conditions, a trial carried out at the green house of College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. In this study 10 rapeseed genotypes, with 5 temperatures (0, -4, -8, -12 and -16 °C on subplot and acclimation and non acclimation on main plot were evaluated on RCD factorial split plot with two replications. Plants were kept until 3-5 leaf stage in green house condition with 23/16 2 °C (day/night and natural photoperiod. Pots were subjected to acclimation (for three weeks or non acclimation that plants immediately frozen.For acclimation treatment after three weeks freezing was done in thermogradient freezer. The cell membrane integrity was measured through electrolyte leakage and the lethal temperature 50 (LT50 of samples also were determined. There were significant differences (p

  5. Concept study of a hydrogen containment process during nuclear thermal engine ground testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ten-See Wang

    Full Text Available A new hydrogen containment process was proposed for ground testing of a nuclear thermal engine. It utilizes two thermophysical steps to contain the hydrogen exhaust. First, the decomposition of hydrogen through oxygen-rich combustion at higher temperature; second, the recombination of remaining hydrogen with radicals at low temperature. This is achieved with two unit operations: an oxygen-rich burner and a tubular heat exchanger. A computational fluid dynamics methodology was used to analyze the entire process on a three-dimensional domain. The computed flammability at the exit of the heat exchanger was less than the lower flammability limit, confirming the hydrogen containment capability of the proposed process. Keywords: Hydrogen decomposition reactions, Hydrogen recombination reactions, Hydrogen containment process, Nuclear thermal propulsion, Ground testing

  6. Containment long-term operational integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammataro, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Periodic integrated leak rate tests are required to assure that containments continue to meet allowable leakage limits. Although overall performance has been quite good to date, several major containment aging and degradation mechanisms have been identified. Two pilot plant life extension (PLEX) studies serve as models for extending the operational integrity of present containments for light-water cooled nuclear power plants in the United States. One study is for a Boiling-Water Reactor (BWR) and the second is for a Pressurized-Water Reactor (PWR). Research and testing programs for determining the ultimate pressure capacity and failure mechanisms for containments under severe loading conditions and studies for extending the life of current plants beyond the present 40-year licensed lifetime are under way. This paper presents an overview of containment designs in the United States. Also presented are a discussion of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (ASME Code) and regulatory authority requirements for the design, construction, inservice inspection, leakage testing and repair of steel and concrete containments. Findings for containments from the pilot PLEX studies and continuing containment integrity research and testing programs are discussed. The ASME Code and regulatory requirements together with recommendations from the PLEX studies and containment integrity research and testing provide a basis for continued containment long-term operational integrity. (orig./GL)

  7. 42 CFR 84.1153 - Dust, fume, mist, and smoke tests; canister bench tests; gas masks canisters containing filters...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1153 Dust... tests; gas masks canisters containing filters; minimum requirements. 84.1153 Section 84.1153 Public...

  8. Concrete containment tests: Phase 2, Structural elements with liner plates: Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, N.W.; Roller, J.J.; Schultz, D.M.; Julien, J.T.; Weinmann, T.L.

    1987-08-01

    The tests described in this report are part of Phase 2 of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) program. The overall objective of the EPRI program is to provide a test-verified analytical method of estimating capacities of concrete reactor containment buildings under internal overpressurization from postulated degraded core accidents. The Phase 2 testing included seven large-scale specimens representing structural elements from reinforced and prestressed concrete reactor containment buildings. Six of the seven test specimens were square wall elements. Of these six specimens, four were used for biaxial tension tests to determine strength, deformation, and leak-rate characteristics of full-scale wall elements representing prestressed concrete containment design. The remaining two square wall elements were used for thermal buckling tests to determine whether buckling of the steel liner plate would occur between anchorages when subjected to a sudden extreme temperature differential. The last of the seven test specimens for Phase 2 represented the region where the wall and the basemat intersect in a prestressed concrete containment building. A multi-directional loading scheme was used to produce high bending moments and shear in the wall/basemat junction region. The objective of this test was to determine if there is potential for liner plate tearing in the junction region. Results presented include observed behavior and extensive measurements of deformations and strains as a function of applied load. The data are being used to confirm analytical models for predicting strength and deformation of containment structures in a separate parallel analytical investigation sponsored by EPRI

  9. Introduction to Large-sized Test Facility for validating Containment Integrity under Severe Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Young Su; Hong, Seongwan; Hong, Seongho; Min, Beongtae

    2014-01-01

    An overall assessment of containment integrity can be conducted properly by examining the hydrogen behavior in the containment building. Under severe accidents, an amount of hydrogen gases can be generated by metal oxidation and corium-concrete interaction. Hydrogen behavior in the containment building strongly depends on complicated thermal hydraulic conditions with mixed gases and steam. The performance of a PAR can be directly affected by the thermal hydraulic conditions, steam contents, gas mixture behavior and aerosol characteristics, as well as the operation of other engineering safety systems such as a spray. The models in computer codes for a severe accident assessment can be validated based on the experiment results in a large-sized test facility. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is now preparing a large-sized test facility to examine in detail the safety issues related with hydrogen including the performance of safety devices such as a PAR in various severe accident situations. This paper introduces the KAERI test facility for validating the containment integrity under severe accidents. To validate the containment integrity, a large-sized test facility is necessary for simulating complicated phenomena induced by an amount of steam and gases, especially hydrogen released into the containment building under severe accidents. A pressure vessel 9.5 m in height and 3.4 m in diameter was designed at the KAERI test facility for the validating containment integrity, which was based on the THAI test facility with the experimental safety and the reliable measurement systems certified for a long time. This large-sized pressure vessel operated in steam and iodine as a corrosive agent was made by stainless steel 316L because of corrosion resistance for a long operating time, and a vessel was installed in at KAERI in March 2014. In the future, the control systems for temperature and pressure in a vessel will be constructed, and the measurement system

  10. Functions and requirements for single-shell tank leakage mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for the leakage mitigation mission applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. A Mission Analysis has been completed, this document reflects the next step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The functions and requirements in this document apply to mitigative actions to be taken regarding below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage mitigation is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities

  11. Fission product aerosol removal test by containment spray under accident management conditions (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Nagasaka, Hideo; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2000-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the effective FP aerosol removal by containment spray under Japanese AM conditions, two system integral tests and two separate effect tests were carried out using a full-height simulation test facility. In case of PWR LOCA, aerosol concentration in the upper containment vessel decreased even under low spray flow rate. In case of BWR LOCA with water injection into RPV, the aerosol concentration in the entire vessel also decreased rapidly after aerosol supply stopping. In both cases, the removal rate estimated from the NUREG-1465 was coincided with test results. The aerosol washing effect by spray was confirmed to be predominant by conducting suppression chamber isolation test. It turned out that the effect of aerosol solubility and density on aerosol removal by spray was quite small by conducting insoluble aerosol injection test. After the modification of aerosol removal model by the spray and hygroscopic aerosol model in original MELCOR 1.8.4, calculated aerosol concentration transient in the containment vessel agreed well with the test data. (author)

  12. Effect of a fluoride varnish on the margin leakage and retention of luted provisional crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Fuhrer, Nitzan; Ganor, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    Provisional crowns cemented with provisional luting agents are susceptible to washout, margin leakage, and secondary caries when placed for a prolonged period. This study was conducted to determine the effect of combining a varnish containing 2.26% NaF with 2 provisional luting agents on the margin leakage and retention of provisional crowns. Acrylic resin provisional crowns were fabricated for 8 shoulder-prepared molars. The eight provisional (N=24) crowns were luted individually with Temp-Bond (TB), Freegenol (FG), or Duraphat (DU). Specimens were thermocycled 500 times (5 degrees and 60 degrees C) with a 1-minute dwell time, stored in 100% relative humidity at 37 degrees C for 6 days, and then immersed in a 0.5% Gentian violet solution for 24 hours. Seven days after cementation, a removal test of the crowns (shear retention test) was conducted with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Retention was determined as the maximum recorded force needed for crown dislodgment. DU varnish was applied to the inner surface of the dislodged crowns with no removal of the cement layer TB, FG (N=16). The crowns were relined with a 0.5-mm layer of acrylic resin and luted with a combination of luting agent and DU (TB, FG) N=16. No luting agent (NC) served as the control (N=8). Results were analyzed with the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. Leakage at the margins was assessed with a 4-level dye penetration scale, and statistical differences were identified with a chi(2) test. All hypothesis testing was conducted at the 95% level of confidence. The mean 7-day retention forces were as follows: 44.5 N (Temp-Bond), 51.6 N (Freegenol), and 35.9 N (Duraphat). There were no significant differences among these values. Duraphat combined with Freegenol decreased the retention of provisional crowns, but Duraphat combined with Temp-Bond increased the retention of provisional crowns by 69-145%. Duraphat alone and in combination with both provisional luting

  13. Round Robin Posttest analysis of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel Model Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komine, Kuniaki; Konno, Mutsuo

    1999-01-01

    NUPEC and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) have been jointly sponsoring 'Structural Behavior Test' at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) in Cooperative Containment Research Program'. As one of the test, a test of a mixed scaled SCV model with 1/10 in the geometry and 1/4 in the shell thickness. Round Robin analyses of a 1/10-scale Steel Containment Vessel (SCV) Model Test were carried out to obtain an adequate analytical method among seven organizations belonged to five countries in the world. As one of sponsor, Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) filled the important role of a posttest analysis of SCV model. This paper describes NUPEC's analytical results in the round robin posttest analysis. (author)

  14. Eddy-Current Testing of Welded Stainless Steel Storage Containers to Verify Integrity and Identity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolk, Keith M.; Stoker, Gerald C.

    1999-01-01

    An eddy-current scanning system is being developed to allow the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to verify the integrity of nuclear material storage containers. Such a system is necessary to detect attempts to remove material from the containers in facilities where continuous surveillance of the containers is not practical. Initial tests have shown that the eddy-current system is also capable of verifying the identity of each container using the electromagnetic signature of its welds. The DOE-3013 containers proposed for use in some US facilities are made of an austenitic stainless steel alloy, which is nonmagnetic in its normal condition. When the material is cold worked by forming or by local stresses experienced in welding, it loses its austenitic grain structure and its magnetic permeability increases. This change in magnetic permeability can be measured using an eddy-current probe specifically designed for this purpose. Initial tests have shown that variations of magnetic permeability and material conductivity in and around welds can be detected, and form a pattern unique to the container. The changes in conductivity that are present around a mechanically inserted plug can also be detected. Further development of the system is currently underway to adapt the system to verifying the integrity and identity of sealable, tamper-indicating enclosures designed to prevent unauthorized access to measurement equipment used to verify international agreements

  15. Abrasion Testing of Products Containing Nanomaterials, SOP-R-2: Scientific Operating Procedure Series: Release (R)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Deployment) framework for testing the exposure and hazard of nanotechnology Environmental Health and Safety (EHS). The technical monitor was Dr...ER D C SR -1 6- 2 Environmental Consequences of Nanotechnologies Abrasion Testing of Products Containing Nanomaterials, SOP-R-2...ERDC online library at http://acwc.sdp.sirsi.net/client/default. Environmental Consequences of Nanotechnologies ERDC SR-16-2 April 2016

  16. Prompt report of leak test for containment vessel of Joyo reactor after sodium charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Iwao

    1978-01-01

    The leak tests for the containment vessel of ''Joyo'' were conducted three times: after the construction at first, before sodium charge for the second time, and after sodium charge for the third time. As for the last one, the absolute pressure method and the standard vessel method were adopted. Nitrogen gas was filled up in the containment vessel, so as to attain oxygen concentration of about 2%. The test conditions are as follows: the temperature of Sodium in the primary and secondary cooling systems 200 deg C, the test pressure 0.675 kg/cm 2 g, the measurement interval 30 min, and the measuring time 48 Hr. The leak rate was 0.206%/day by the absolute pressure method and 0.203%/day by the standard vessel method, on the other hand, the permissible leak rate is 1.90%/day. This containment vessel has the dimensions of about 28 m inner diameter and about 54 m total height. The design pressure is 1.35kg/cm 2 g and temperature is 150 deg C. The test procedure, the measuring instrumentations, the test schedule and the test results are explained in detail. (Nakai, Y.)

  17. Quantifying the adsorption of ionic silver and functionalized nanoparticles during ecotoxicity testing: Test container effects and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Ryo; Khurana, Kanupriya; Vasilev, Krasimir; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are used in a wide variety of products, prompting concerns regarding their potential environmental impacts. To accurately determine the toxicity of Ag-NPs it is necessary to differentiate between the toxicity of the nanoparticles themselves and the toxicity of ionic silver (Ag) released from them. This is not a trivial task given the reactive nature of Ag in solution, and its propensity for both adsorption and photoreduction. In the experiments reported here, we quantified the loss of silver from test solutions during standard ecotoxicity testing conducted using a variety of different test container materials and geometries. This sensitive (110m)Ag isotope tracing method revealed a substantial underestimation of the toxicity of dissolved Ag to the green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata when calculated only on the basis of the initial test concentrations. Furthermore, experiments with surface-functionalized Ag-NPs under standard algal growth inhibition test conditions also demonstrated extensive losses of Ag-NPs from the solution due to adsorption to the container walls, and the extent of loss was dependent on Ag-NP surface-functionality. These results hold important messages for researchers engaged in both environmental and human nanotoxicology testing, not only for Ag-NPs but also for other NPs with various tailored surface chemistries, where these phenomena are recognized but are also frequently disregarded in the experimental design and reporting.

  18. Pulsed magnetic flux leakage method for hairline crack detection and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Chukwunonso K.; Meydan, Turgut

    2018-04-01

    The Magnetic Flux leakage (MFL) method is a well-established branch of electromagnetic Non-Destructive Testing (NDT), extensively used for evaluating defects both on the surface and far-surface of pipeline structures. However the conventional techniques are not capable of estimating their approximate size, location and orientation, hence an additional transducer is required to provide the extra information needed. This research is aimed at solving the inevitable problem of granular bond separation which occurs during manufacturing, leaving pipeline structures with miniature cracks. It reports on a quantitative approach based on the Pulsed Magnetic Flux Leakage (PMFL) method, for the detection and characterization of the signals produced by tangentially oriented rectangular surface and far-surface hairline cracks. This was achieved through visualization and 3D imaging of the leakage field. The investigation compared finite element numerical simulation with experimental data. Experiments were carried out using a 10mm thick low carbon steel plate containing artificial hairline cracks with various depth sizes, and different features were extracted from the transient signal. The influence of sensor lift-off and pulse width variation on the magnetic field distribution which affects the detection capability of various hairline cracks located at different depths in the specimen is explored. The findings show that the proposed technique can be used to classify both surface and far-surface hairline cracks and can form the basis for an enhanced hairline crack detection and characterization for pipeline health monitoring.

  19. Design and testing of Spec 7A containers for packaging radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.S.; Perkins, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    For a variety of reasons, the containers that have or currently are being used for packaging radioactive waste have drawbacks which has motivated LLNL to investigate, design and destructively test different Type A containers. The result of this work is manifested in the TX-4, which is comparatively lightweight, increases the net payload, and the simplicity of the design and ease in handling have proved to be timesaving. The TX-4 is readily available, relatively inexpensive and practical to use. It easily meets Type A packaging specifications with a gross payload of 7000 pounds. Although no tests were performed at a higher weight, we feel that the TX-4 could pass the tests at higher gross weights if the need arises. 20 figures

  20. Severe accident testing of a personnel airlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauss, D.B.; Parks, M.B.; Julien, J.T.; Peters, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) is investigating the leakage potential of mechanical penetrations as part of a research program on containment integrity under severe accident loads for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Barnes et al. (1984) and Shackelford et al. (1985) identified leakage from personnel airlocks as an important failure mode of containments subject to severe accident loads. However, these studies were based on relatively simple analysis methods. The complex structural interaction between the door, gasket, and bulkhead in personnel airlocks makes analytical evaluation of leakage difficult. In order to provide data to validate methods for evaluating the leakage potential, a full-size personnel airlock was subject to simulated severe accident loads consisting of pressure and temperature up to 300 psig and 800 degrees F. The test was conducted at Chicago Bridge and Iron under contract to Sandia. The authors provide a detailed report on the test program

  1. Impact testing of the H1224A shipping/storage container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, D.C.; Bobbe, J.G.; Stenberg, D.R.; Arviso, M.

    1994-05-01

    H1224A weapons containers have been used for years by the Department of Energy and Department of Defense to transport and store W78 warhead midsections. Although designed to protect these midsections only in low-energy handling drop and impact accidents, a recent transportation risk assessment effort has identified a need to evaluate the container`s ability to protect weapons in higher-energy environments. Four impact tests were performed on H1224A containers with W78 Mod 6c mass mockup midsections inside, onto an essentially unyielding target. Dynamic acceleration and strain levels were recorded during the side-on and end-on impacts, each at 12.2 m/s (40 ft/s) and 38.1 m/s (125 ft/s). Measured peak accelerations experienced by the midsections during lower velocity impacts ranged from 250 to 600 Gs for the end-on impact and 350 to 600 Gs for the side-on impact. Measured peak accelerations of the midsections during the higher velocity impacts ranged from 3,000 to 10,000 Gs for the end-on impact and 8,000 to 10,000 Gs for the side-on impact. Deformations in the H1224A container ranged from minimal to severe buckling and weld tearing. At higher impact velocities, the H1224A container may not provide significant energy absorption for the re-entry vehicle midsection but can provide some confinement of potentially damaged components.

  2. Extrapolation of model tests measurements of whipping to identify the dimensioning sea states for container ships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storhaug, Gaute; Andersen, Ingrid Marie Vincent

    2015-01-01

    to small storms. Model tests of three container ships have been carried out in different sea states under realistic assumptions. Preliminary extrapolation of the measured data suggested that moderate storms are dimensioning when whipping is included due to higher maximum speed in moderate storms......Whipping can contribute to increased fatigue and extreme loading of container ships, and guidelines have been made available by the leading class societies. Reports concerning the hogging collapse of MSC Napoli and MOL Comfort suggest that whipping contributed. The accidents happened in moderate...

  3. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohigashi, N. [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Tsunawaki, Y. [Osaka Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Imasaki, K. [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  4. Topological qubit design and leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, R; Slingerland, J K, E-mail: robert.ainsworth@nuim.ie, E-mail: joost@thphys.nuim.ie [Department of Mathematical Physics, National University of Ireland Maynooth, Co. Kildare (Ireland)

    2011-06-15

    We examine how best to design qubits for use in topological quantum computation. These qubits are topological Hilbert spaces associated with small groups of anyons. Operations are performed on these by exchanging the anyons. One might argue that in order to have as many simple single-qubit operations as possible, the number of anyons per group should be maximized. However, we show that there is a maximal number of particles per qubit, namely 4, and more generally a maximal number of particles for qudits of dimension d. We also look at the possibility of having topological qubits for which one can perform two-qubit gates without leakage into non-computational states. It turns out that the requirement that all two-qubit gates are leakage free is very restrictive and this property can only be realized for two-qubit systems related to Ising-like anyon models, which do not allow for universal quantum computation by braiding. Our results follow directly from the representation theory of braid groups, which implies that they are valid for all anyon models. We also make some remarks about generalizations to other exchange groups.

  5. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective sheathing of the pipe; this paper aims at testing the feasibility of detecting leakages with temporary introduced fiber optic cable inside the pipe. The detection and localization were tested in a laboratory experiment. The intrusion of water from leakages into the pipe, producing a local temperature drop, served as indicator for leakages. Measurements were taken under varying measurement conditions, including the number of leakages as well as the positioning of the fiber optic cable. Experiments showed that leakages could be detected accurately with the proposed methodology, when measuring resolution, temperature gradient and measurement time were properly selected. Despite the successful application of DTS for leakage detection in this lab environment, challenges in real system applications may arise from temperature gradients within the pipe system over longer distances and the placement of the cable into the real pipe system.

  6. Fire tests of five-gallon containers used for storage in underground coal mines. Report of Investigations/1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perzak, F.J.; Kubala, T.A.; Lazzara, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Bureau of Mines conducted a study to develop a standard fire test for 5-gal containers used for storing combustible fluids in underground coal mines. A standard test method was developed which evaluates the performance of the container in a 4-min tray fire. Bureau investigators used the standard test method to evaluate several types of closed 5-gal plastic and metal cans in outdoor tests. Each can tested contained 1 gal of nonfire-resistant (NFR) hydraulic oil. A container failed the test if it lost its contents in any of seven trials. Contents spilled either as a result of thermal rupture or melting.

  7. The development and testing of a modular containment system under plutonium active conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, M.J.; Pengelly, M.G.A.

    1984-05-01

    A Modular Containment System has been designed, constructed and tested under plutonium active conditions at AEE Winfrith. The unit consists of a portable self-contained pressurised suit area, complete with shower entry tunnel and ventilation plant which can be assembled to enclose active plant to enable active operations to be carried out safely by operators dressed in standard pressurised suits. A fundamental feature of the system is the use of strippable coatings which are used to treat the interior surfaces prior to active operations to prevent permanent contamination of the structure. Details of construction are given together with results of trials. Whilst this report describes work with plutonium, the system has clear applications wherever temporary containment of radioactive or toxic materials is needed. (U.K.)

  8. 49 CFR 192.723 - Distribution systems: Leakage surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... following minimum requirements: (1) A leakage survey with leak detector equipment must be conducted in business districts, including tests of the atmosphere in gas, electric, telephone, sewer, and water system... survey with leak detector equipment must be conducted outside business districts as frequently as...

  9. Leakage Resilient Secure Two-Party Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Hazay, Carmit; Patra, Arpita

    2012-01-01

    we initiate the study of {\\em secure two-party computation in the presence of leakage}, where on top of corrupting one of the parties the adversary obtains leakage from the content of the secret memory of the honest party. Our study involves the following contributions: \\BE \\item {\\em Security...... {\\em Leakage resilient oblivious transfer.} We present the first construction for 1-out-of-2 oblivious transfer with security against leakage of a constant fraction of the honest party's memory. Our protocol is based on the OT construction presented by Peikert et al.~\\cite{PeikertVW08}. \\item {\\em...... Leakage resilient Yao's Garbled Circuit~\\cite{Yao82}.} We provide the first general construction for secure two-party computation and show how to adapt the proof from~\\cite{LP09} of Yao's protocol into the leakage resilient setting. Our result holds for a restricted set of functions due to technicalities...

  10. An evaluation of propane as a fuel for testing fire-resistant oil spill containment booms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, W. D.; Twilley, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted to measure and compare the thermal exposure to a fire-resistant boom from liquid hydrocarbon fuel and propane fires. The objective was to test the potential of propane fueled fires as a fire source for testing fire-resistant oil spill containment booms.Thermal exposure from propane fires have been measured with and without waves. Results indicated that although propane diffusion flames on water look like liquid hydrocarbon fuel flames and produce very little smoke, the heat flux at the boom location from propane fires is about 60 per cent of that from liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires. Despite the attractive features in terms of ease of application, control and smoke emissions, it was concluded that the low heat flux would preclude the application of propane as a fuel for evaluating fire resistant containment booms. 2 refs., 7 figs

  11. Specification of test criteria for containers to be used in the air transport of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Edwards, A.R.; Hall, S.F.

    1980-01-01

    Potential accidents in the transport by aeroplane of plutonium are considered. Past literature on the subject is reviewed. Civilian air accident statistics are surveyed: impact and fire are shown to be the major threats. Probabilities (given an accident) are derived for encountering and impact of above any given speed as a function of speed, and a fire of above any given duration, as a function of duration. The crash of two typical jet cargo aircraft (BAC-111, Boeing-707) against a rigid normal surface is considered and cargo hold decelerations derived from a one-dimensional model. The response of a cargo to such decelerations is calculated for loads of two typical containers, and related to the velocity of impact into a hard target necessary to produce similar damage in single containers. Free fall of containers and the effect on the surface struck are discussed. The response of two typical containers to a fire is calculated, allowing for the charring of insulating/shock absorbing material. Calculations without charring appear pessimistic. The consequences of plutonium release are estimated and risk spectra derived for two failure assumptions. The implications for container test criteria are discussed, and recommendations made

  12. Evaporation over sump surface in containment studies: code validation on TOSQAN tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.; Gelain, T.; Degrees du Lou, O.; Daru, V.

    2011-01-01

    During the course of a severe accident in a Nuclear Power Plant, water can be collected in the sump containment through steam condensation on walls and spray systems activation. The objective of this paper is to present code validation on evaporative sump tests performed on the TOSQAN facility. The ASTEC-CPA code is used as a lumped-parameter code and specific user-defined-functions are developed for the TONUS-CFD code. The tests are air-steam tests, as well as tests with other non-condensable gases (He, CO 2 and SF 6 ) under steady and transient conditions. The results show a good agreement between codes and experiments, indicating a good behaviour of the sump models in both codes. (author)

  13. Anti-inflammatory potential of a lipolotion containing coriander oil in the ultraviolet erythema test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Juliane; Huyke, Constance; Casetti, Federica; Theek, Carmen; Frank, Uwe; Augustin, Matthias; Schempp, Christoph

    2008-10-01

    Coriander oil is used as an antimicrobial agent and as a natural fragrance. The present study investigated the anti-inflammatory potency of coriander oil in the ultraviolet (UV) erythema test in vivo. 40 volunteers were enrolled in this monocentric,randomized,placebo-controlled double-blind study.Test areas on the back were irradiated with the 1.5 fold minimal erythema dose UV-B. Subsequently, the test areas were treated under occlusion for 47 hours with a lipolotion containing 0.5% or 1.0% essential coriander oil. Hydrocortisone (1.0%) and betamethasone valerate (0.1%) in the vehicle served as positive controls.The vehicle was used as place-bo.The effect of the test substances on the UV-induced erythema was measured photometrically after 48 hours.Additionally,the skin tolerance of the test preparations was assessed on non-irradiated skin. Compared to placebo, the lipolotion with 0.5% coriander oil significantly reduced the UV-induced erythema, but it was not as effective as hydrocortisone. The skin tolerance of both coriander oil concentrations was excellent. The lipolotion containing coriander oil displayed a mild antiinflammatory effect in this study. It could be useful in the concomitant treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  14. Practical Leakage-Resilient Symmetric Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faust, Sebastian; Pietrzak, Krzysztof; Schipper, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    construction may already suffice to protect against realistic side-channel attacks. In this paper, we show that indeed for simpler constructions leakage-resilience can be obtained when we aim for relaxed security notions where the leakage-functions and/or the inputs to the primitive are chosen non......-adaptively. For example, we show that a three round Feistel network instantiated with a leakage resilient PRF yields a leakage resilient PRP if the inputs are chosen non-adaptively (This complements the result of Dodis and Pietrzak [CRYPTO’10] who show that if a adaptive queries are allowed, a superlogarithmic number...

  15. Comparison of pre-test analyses with the Sizewell-B 1:10 scale prestressed concrete containment test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Parks, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes pretest analyses of a one-tenth scale model of the 'Sizewell-B' prestressed concrete containment building. The work was performed by ANATECH Research Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Hydraulic testing of the model was conducted in the United Kingdom by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). In order to further their understanding of containment behavior, the USNRC, through an agreement with the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), also participated in the test program with SNL serving as their technical agent. The analyses that were conducted included two global axisymmetric models with 'bonded' and 'unbonded' analytical treatment of meridional tendons, a 3D quarter model of the structure, an axisymmetric representation of the equipment hatch region, and local plane stress and r-θ models of a buttress. Results of these analyses are described and compared with the results of the test. A global hoop failure at midheight of the cylinder and a shear/bending type failure at the base of the cylinder wall were both found to have roughly equal probability of occurrence; however, the shear failure mode had higher uncertainty associated with it. Consequently, significant effort was dedicated to improving the modeling capability for concrete shear behavior. This work is also described briefly. (author)

  16. Comparison of pre-test analyses with the Sizewell-B 1:10 scale prestressed concrete containment test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dameron, R.A.; Rashid, Y.R.; Parks, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes pretest analyses of a one-tenth scale model of the Sizewell-B prestressed concrete containment building. The work was performed by ANATECH Research Corp. under contract with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Hydraulic testing of the model was conducted in the United Kingdom by the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). In order to further their understanding of containment behavior, the USNRC, through an agreement with the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), also participated in the test program with SNL serving as their technical agent. The analyses that were conducted included two global axisymmetric models with ''bonded'' and ''unbonded'' analytical treatment of meridional tendons, a 3D quarter model of the structure, an axisymmetric representation of the equipment hatch region, and local plan stress and r-θ models of a buttress. Results of these analyses are described and compared with the results of the test. A global hoop failure at midheight of the cylinder and a shear/bending type failure at the base of the cylinder wall were both found to have roughly equal probability of occurrence; however, the shear failure mode had higher uncertainty associated with it. Consequently, significant effort was dedicated to improving the modeling capability for concrete shear behavior. This work is also described briefly. 5 refs., 7 figs

  17. Valve packing leakage monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezekoye, L.I.

    1985-01-01

    A device for monitoring leakage of fluid across a seal in a component connected to a pressurized fluid system including a housing having a chamber with an inlet for receiving fluid leaking across the seal and an outlet. A positioning means is connected to an orifice plug so as to move the plug for permitting the fluid to be discharged through the orifice at the same rate at which it enters the first chamber and means for detecting the movement of the plug is provided to produce and output signal corresponding to the distance moved by the plug and thereby indicate flow rate. The positioning means compromise a piston attached to the plug by a hollow tube and springs, which at low flow rates locate the piston. When flow increases sufficiently pressure increases and urges the piston upwards. A magnetic portion of tube actuates a succession of proximity switches to indicate flow rate. (author)

  18. Artificial Leaks in Container Closure Integrity Testing: Nonlinear Finite Element Simulation of Aperture Size Originated by a Copper Wire Sandwiched between the Stopper and the Glass Vial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Adler, Michael; Chalus, Pascal; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against possible contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the container closure system with microorganisms under specified testing conditions. Physical CCI uses surrogate endpoints, such as coloration by dye solution ingress or gas flow (helium leakage testing). In order to correlate microbial CCI and physical CCI test methods and to evaluate the methods' capability to detect a given leak, artificial leaks are being introduced into the container closure system in a variety of different ways. In our study, artificial leaks were generated using inserted copper wires between the glass vial opening and rubber stopper. However, the insertion of copper wires introduces leaks of unknown size and shape. With nonlinear finite element simulations, the aperture size between the rubber stopper and the glass vial was calculated, depending on wire diameter and capping force. The dependency of the aperture size on the copper wire diameter was quadratic. With the data obtained, we were able to calculate the leak size and model leak shape. Our results suggest that the size as well as the shape of the artificial leaks should be taken into account when evaluating critical leak sizes, as flow rate does not, independently, correlate to hole size. Capping force also affected leak size. An increase in the capping force from 30 to 70 N resulted in a reduction of the aperture (leak size) by approximately 50% for all wire diameters. From 30 to 50 N, the reduction was approximately 33%. Container closure integrity (CCI) testing is required by different regulatory authorities in order to provide assurance of tightness of the container closure system against contamination, for example, by microorganisms. Microbial ingress CCI testing is performed by incubation of the

  19. Fission product aerosol removal test by containment spray under accident management conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Hideo [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yokobori, Seiichi

    1998-05-01

    This paper summarizes the test results of fission product (FP) removal by containment spray simulating accident management (AM) condition. The features of AM conditions concerning FP transport are characterized by (1) low flow spray affecting the steam condensation degradation due to larger water droplets, (2) high humidity condition due to steam generation as a result of debris cooling and (3) continual fresh water supply from outside water source. The objectives of the test program are to provide data demonstrating the effective aerosol removal by the containment spray and to provide the data for qualification of the integral system analysis code such as MELCOR. The Tests were conducted using full-height simulation containment vessels of GIRAFFE (1/720 volumetric scaling ratio) so that real FP removal phenomena was preserved as in a reactor. Vessel heat loss was compensated by heaters on the outer surface of the vessels. CsI was selected as a typical FP aerosol. Steam generated by decay heat, CsI aerosol and spray water were supplied continuously to the drywell as transient boundary conditions. A system integration test simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence during about 10 hours were successfully accomplished. Even under low spray flow condition, maximum drywell pressure was kept relatively low, though it was a little bit higher than the design pressure. After spray initiation, aerosol concentration decreased rapidly in the entire region of drywell. In the upper drywell, aerosol was removed by diffusiophoresis associated with steam condensation, while in the lower drywell it was removed by impaction. By modifying the FP removal model in the MELCOR, calculated FP concentration transient as well as pressure transient agreed well with test data. (J.P.N.)

  20. VISUAL INSPECTION OF WATER LEAKAGE FROM GROUND PENETRATING RADAR RADARGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Halimshah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Water loss in town and suburban is currently a significant issue which reflect the performance of water supply management in Malaysia. Consequently, water supply distribution system has to be maintained in order to prevent shortage of water supply in an area. Various techniques for detecting a mains water leaks are available but mostly are time-consuming, disruptive and expensive. In this paper, the potential of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR as a non-destructive method to correctly and efficiently detect mains water leaks has been examined. Several experiments were designed and conducted to prove that GPR can be used as tool for water leakage detection. These include instrument validation test and soil compaction test to clarify the maximum dry density (MDD of soil and simulation studies on water leakage at a test bed consisting of PVC pipe burying in sand to a depth of 40 cm. Data from GPR detection are processed using the Reflex 2D software. Identification of water leakage was visually inspected from the anomalies in the radargram based on GPR reflection coefficients. The results have ascertained the capability and effectiveness of the GPR in detecting water leakage which could help avoiding difficulties with other leak detection methods.

  1. MELCOR 1.8.2 Assessment: IET direct containment heating tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetyk, L.N.

    1993-10-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRS. As part of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze several of the IET direct containment heating experiments done at 1:10 linear scale in the Surtsey test facility at Sandia and at 1:40 linear scale in the corium-water thermal interactions (CWTI) COREXIT test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. These MELCOR calculations were done as an open post-test study, with both the experimental data and CONTAIN results available to guide the selection of code input. Basecase MELCOR results are compared to test data in order to evaluate the new HPME DCH model recently added in MELCOR version 1.8.2. The effect of various user-input parameters in the HPME model, which define both the initial debris source and the subsequent debris interaction, were investigated in sensitivity studies. In addition, several other non-default input modelling changes involving other MELCOR code packages were required in our IET assessment analyses in order to reproduce the observed experiment behavior. Several calculations were done to identify whether any numeric effects exist in our DCH IET assessment analyses.

  2. Odor Control Test Plan of the Urine Containment Bag (UCB) for Orion Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Stephanie; Williams, Nicole M. M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this test is to evaluate the odor containment of the urine containment bag (UCB), P/N SDD46107234-306 in an environment simulating a spacecraft capsule. The goal is to determine the time of odor break through and the acceptability of the odor, once break through occurs. The goal is to simulate, as close as possible, the volume ratio (trash to free volume), trash content (vomit, urine, feces, and food trash), humidity and temperature of the capsule. The goal for minimum break through is 48 hours (Orion Block 0) from the start of the test. The goal for acceptability of odor is 2 weeks (including docked ISS time for Orion Block 0). Two UCB's will be tested simultaneously in different chambers. The one UCB will be tested empty, serving as a control. Odor break through will be based upon the when the filled UCB total organics exceeds that of the control (empty UCB) by a level detectable by a human panel (approximately 2 ppm).

  3. On camera-based smoke and gas leakage detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyboe, Hans Olav

    1999-07-01

    Gas detectors are found in almost every part of industry and in many homes as well. An offshore oil or gas platform may host several hundred gas detectors. The ability of the common point and open path gas detectors to detect leakages depends on their location relative to the location of a gas cloud. This thesis describes the development of a passive volume gas detector, that is, one than will detect a leakage anywhere in the area monitored. After the consideration of several detection techniques it was decided to use an ordinary monochrome camera as sensor. Because a gas leakage may perturb the index of refraction, parts of the background appear to be displaced from their true positions, and it is necessary to develop algorithms that can deal with small differences between images. The thesis develops two such algorithms. Many image regions can be defined and several feature values can be computed for each region. The value of the features depends on the pattern in the image regions. The classes studied in this work are: reference, gas, smoke and human activity. Test show that observation belonging to these classes can be classified fairly high accuracy. The features in the feature set were chosen and developed for this particular application. Basically, the features measure the magnitude of pixel differences, size of detected phenomena and image distortion. Interesting results from many experiments are presented. Most important, the experiments show that apparent motion caused by a gas leakage or heat convection can be detected by means of a monochrome camera. Small leakages of methane can be detected at a range of about four metres. Other gases, such as butane, where the densities differ more from the density of air than the density of methane does, can be detected further from the camera. Gas leakages large enough to cause condensation have been detected at a camera distance of 20 metres. 59 refs., 42 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Design, fabrication and testing of a prototype stressed-shell fuel isolation container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosthwaite, J.L.; Barrie, J.N.; Nuttall, K.

    1982-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is conducting and coordinating research into the development of engineered barriers for the disposal of unreprocessed irradiated fuel within a deep, stable geologic vault. In one approach, a containment shell of corrosion-resistant metal is proposed as the principal barrier to radionuclide release, giving a high probability of containment for at least 300 years, thus ensuring isolation of nearly all fission products for their hazardous lives. The simplest concept is the 'stressed-shell' container, designed with sufficient shell thickness to withstand the hydrostatic pressure within a 1000-m deep disposal vault postulated to have flooded with groundwater. This report describes the design, fabrication, analysis and hydrostatic testing of a full-scale stressed-shell prototype. The report concludes that the deformation and collapse performance of stressed-shell designs, based on short-term mechanical properties be modelled adequately by BOSOR 5, a commercially available stress-strain computer program. If the stressed-shell concept is retained as a viable fuel isolation concept, future analyses should include an assessment of the role of material creep on long-term container performance

  5. Overview of observations of water coverage on the AP600 tests for passive containment cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodcock, J.; Spencer, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    Because the ability of the AP600 Passive Containment Cooling System to remove heat at a given containment pressure (temperature) is largely dependent on the amount of water applied to the outer shell and the surface area that is wetted, the method of water application and the behavior and stability of the liquid film are important. The total evaporation rate from the external shell is the dominant means of removing heat from the containment. Total evaporation rate is equal to the integral of the mass flux over the covered, or wetted, area. Since the containment response evaluation model conservatively neglects credit for evaporation until a quasi-steady coverage is achieved, the focus for evaluation model validation is the influence of surface temperature and heat flux on steady-state coverage. This paper describes observations of the wetted area of the external heated shell surface of the AP600 PCCS Large Scale Test, and places the observations into the context of stability effects of flowing liquid films. A summary of the most relevant literature findings on film stability is provided. A discussion of the contact wetting angle shows that the liquid film stability of the coated surface is much improved relative to polished surfaces typically studied in the literature. (author)

  6. Experimental tests and calculation methods for missile crashing effects on a reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, S.; Berriaud, C.

    1975-01-01

    In the analysis of missile crashing on a reactor containment there are two main effects to be taken into account: the overall behavior of the building; the local perforation. The overall behavior of the building is easily calculated when the applied force as a function of time is known. Two calculation examples are presented. The local perforation is a much more difficult problem and experimental work is necessary. The report presents a series of perforation tests of concrete plates by cylindrical missiles with a flat nose. The aim of these tests is to extrapolate for the lower speeds the existing experimental correlations (Petry, HN-NDRC, BRL...) and to check the calculation methods. The calculations are made with the PASTEL Code (Finite elements, implicit integration), with elastoplasticity of the reinforcing steel bars and the concrete. Various plastification and fracturation laws will be tested

  7. Full scale impact testing for environmental and safety control of energy material shipping container systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seagren, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Heavily-shielded energy material shipping systems, similar in size and weight to those presently employed to transport irradiated reactor fuel elements, are being destructively tested under dynamic conditions. In these tests, the outer and inner steel shells interact in a complex manner with the massive biological shielding in the system. Results obtained from these tests provide needed information for new design concepts. Containment failure (and the resulting release of radioactive material to the environment which might occur in an extremely severe accident) is most likely through the seals and other ancillary features of the shipping systems. Analyses and experiments provide engineering data on the behavior of these shipping systems under severe accident conditions and information for predicting potential survivability and environmental control with a rational margin of safety

  8. The optimum shielding around a test charge in plasmas containing two negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslem, W. M.; Sabry, R.; Shukla, P. K.

    2011-10-01

    This paper focuses on the progress in understanding the shielding around a test charge in the presence of ion-acoustic waves in multispecies plasmas, whose constituents are positive ions, two negative ions, and Boltzmann distributed electrons. By solving the linearized Vlasov equation with Poisson equation, the Debye-Hückel screening potential and wakefield (oscillatory) potential distribution around a test charge particle are derived. It is analytically found that both the Debye-Hückel potential and the wakefield potential are significantly modified due to the presence of two negative ions. The present results might be helpful to understand and to form new materials from plasmas containing two negative ions such as Xe+ - F- - SF-6 and Ar+ - F- - SF-6 plasmas, as well as to tackle extension of the test charge problem in multinegative ions' coagulation/agglomeration.

  9. Geotechnical studies relevant to the containment of underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1982-05-01

    The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense are actively pursuing a program of nuclear weapons testing by underground explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Over the past 11 years, scores of tests have been conducted and the safety record is very good. In the short run, emphasis is put on preventing the release of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. In the long run, the subsidence and collapse of the ground above the nuclear cavities also are matters of interest. Currently, estimation of containment is based mostly on empiricism derived from extensive experience and on a combination of physical/mechanical testing and numerical modeling. When measured directly, the mechanical material properties are obtained from short-term laboratory tests on small, conventional samples. This practice does not determine the large effects of scale and time on measured stiffnesses and strengths of geological materials. Because of the limited data base of properties and in situ conditions, the input to otherwise fairly sophisticated computer programs is subject to several simplifying assumptions; some of them can have a nonconservative impact on the calculated results. As for the long-term, subsidence and collapse phenomena simply have not been studied to any significant degree. This report examines the geomechanical aspects of procedures currently used to estimate containment of undergroung explosions at NTS. Based on this examination, it is concluded that state-of-the-art geological engineering practice in the areas of field testing, large scale laboratory measurements, and numerical modeling can be drawn upon to complement the current approach.

  10. Geotechnical studies relevant to the containment of underground nuclear explosions at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1982-05-01

    The Department of Energy and the Department of Defense are actively pursuing a program of nuclear weapons testing by underground explosions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Over the past 11 years, scores of tests have been conducted and the safety record is very good. In the short run, emphasis is put on preventing the release of radioactive materials into the atmosphere. In the long run, the subsidence and collapse of the ground above the nuclear cavities also are matters of interest. Currently, estimation of containment is based mostly on empiricism derived from extensive experience and on a combination of physical/mechanical testing and numerical modeling. When measured directly, the mechanical material properties are obtained from short-term laboratory tests on small, conventional samples. This practice does not determine the large effects of scale and time on measured stiffnesses and strengths of geological materials. Because of the limited data base of properties and in situ conditions, the input to otherwise fairly sophisticated computer programs is subject to several simplifying assumptions; some of them can have a nonconservative impact on the calculated results. As for the long-term, subsidence and collapse phenomena simply have not been studied to any significant degree. This report examines the geomechanical aspects of procedures currently used to estimate containment of undergroung explosions at NTS. Based on this examination, it is concluded that state-of-the-art geological engineering practice in the areas of field testing, large scale laboratory measurements, and numerical modeling can be drawn upon to complement the current approach

  11. Phase II test plan for the evaluation of the performance of container filling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The PHMC will provide tank wastes for final treatment by BNFL from Hanford's waste tanks. Concerns about the ability for ''grab'' sampling to provide large volumes of representative waste samples has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. Preferred concepts for filling sample containers that meet RCRA organic sample criteria were identified by a PHMC Decision Board. These systems will replace the needle based sampling ''T'' that is currently on the sampling system. This test plan document identifies cold tests with simulants that will demonstrate the preferred bottle filling concepts abilities to provide representative waste samples and will meet RCRA criteria. Additional tests are identified that evaluate the potential for cross-contamination between samples and the ability for the system to decontaminate surfaces which have contacted tank wastes. These tests will be performed with kaolidwater and sand/water slurry simulants in the test rig that was used by AEAT to complete Phase 1 tests in FY 1999

  12. Development of deterioration models and tests of structural materials for nuclear containment structures(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Byung Hwan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    The nuclear containment structures are very important infrastructures which require much cost for construction and maintenance. If these structures lose their functions and do not ensure their safety, great losses of human lives and properties will result. Therefore, the nuclear containment structures should secure appropriate safety and functions during these service lives. The nuclear concrete structures start to experience deterioration due to severe environmental condition, even though the concrete structures exhibit generally superior durability. It is, therefore, necessary to take appropriate actions at each stage of planning, design and construction to secure safety and functionability. Thorough examination of deterioration mechanism and comprehensive tests have been conducted to explore the durability characteristics of nuclear concrete structures. 88 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  13. Leakage Currents and Gas Generation in Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Currently, military grade, established reliability wet tantalum capacitors are among the most reliable parts used for space applications. This has been achieved over the years by extensive testing and improvements in design and materials. However, a rapid insertion of new types of advanced, high volumetric efficiency capacitors in space systems without proper testing and analysis of degradation mechanisms might increase risks of failures. The specifics of leakage currents in wet electrolytic capacitors is that the conduction process is associated with electrolysis of electrolyte and gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure in the parts. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. In this work, in Part I, leakages currents in various types of tantalum capacitors have been analyzed in a wide range of voltages, temperatures, and time under bias. Gas generation and the level of internal pressure have been calculated in Part II for different case sizes and different hermeticity leak rates to assess maximal allowable leakage currents. Effects related to electrolyte penetration to the glass seal area have been studied and the possibility of failures analyzed in Part III. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  14. Leakage-resilient cryptography from minimal assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazay, Carmit; López-Alt, Adriana; Wee, Hoeteck

    2013-01-01

    We present new constructions of leakage-resilient cryptosystems, which remain provably secure even if the attacker learns some arbitrary partial information about their internal secret key. For any polynomial ℓ, we can instantiate these schemes so as to tolerate up to ℓ bits of leakage. While the...

  15. Quantifying Information Leakage of Randomized Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio; Wasowski, Andrzej; Legay, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The quantification of information leakage provides a quantitative evaluation of the security of a system. We propose the usage of Markovian processes to model and analyze the information leakage of deterministic and probabilistic systems. We show that this method generalizes the lattice of inform...... and non-timed attacks on the Onion Routing protocol....

  16. Leakage-Resilient Circuits without Computational Assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziembowski, Stefan; Faust, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Physical cryptographic devices inadvertently leak information through numerous side-channels. Such leakage is exploited by so-called side-channel attacks, which often allow for a complete security breache. A recent trend in cryptography is to propose formal models to incorporate leakage...... into the model and to construct schemes that are provably secure within them. We design a general compiler that transforms any cryptographic scheme, e.g., a block-cipher, into a functionally equivalent scheme which is resilient to any continual leakage provided that the following three requirements are satisfied......: (i) in each observation the leakage is bounded, (ii) different parts of the computation leak independently, and (iii) the randomness that is used for certain operations comes from a simple (non-uniform) distribution. In contrast to earlier work on leakage resilient circuit compilers, which relied...

  17. Leakage experiences with 1 MW steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, A.; Kawara, M.; Sano, A.

    1975-01-01

    An 1 MW steam generator was tested from October, 1971 and completed with the first series of experiments by May, 1972 after 3600 hours of operation. During these tests, unextraordinary heat absorption was experienced in the downcomer region, which led to shortage of heat transfer area to attain the rated steam temperature and to one of the reasons of flow instabilities. The steam generator was disassembled to get test pieces for structure as well as material examinations and then it was reassembled to proceed the second series of tests. Before it was done, a modification was provided to insulate the downcomer region by putting a gas space around the downcomer tube. The gas space was provided by a dual tube and spacers were welded on the inner tube and an end plate was welded on upper parts between the two to seal the gap by means of fillet welding. After the modified steam generator was put into operation, water happened to leak into a sodium side two times through these additional welding spots for the gas insulation. This paper presents operating conditions and behaviors of monitors at the time of the leakages, identifications of leaked spots, an evaluation of causes and a treatment or a precaution for them

  18. Climate Policy and Carbon Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This report explores the effects of the EU emissions trading scheme on the aluminium sector (i.e. competitiveness loss and carbon leakage). With its very high electricity intensity, primary aluminium stands out in the heavy industry picture: a sector whose emissions are not capped in the present EU ETS, European aluminium smelters still stand to lose profit margins and, possibly, market shares, as electricity prices increase following CO2 caps on generators' emissions - the famous pass-through of CO2 prices into electricity prices. The analysis includes a method of quantification of this issue, based on two indicators: profit margins and trade flows. As the EU is at the forefront of such policy, the paper provides policy messages to all countries on how trade exposed energy-intensive industries can be 'moved' by carbon constraint. This also is a contentious topic in Australia, Japan, New Zealand, and the US, where ambitious climate policies -- including cap-and-trade systems -- are currently debated.

  19. Procedure Developed for Ballistic Impact Testing of Composite Fan Containment Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Melis, Matthew E.

    1998-01-01

    The fan-containment system in a jet engine is designed to prevent a fan blade from penetrating the engine case in the event that the blade or a portion of the blade separates from the rotor during operation. Usually, these systems consist of a thick metal case that is strong enough to survive such an impact. Other systems consist of a dry aramid fabric wrapped around a relatively thin metal case. In large turbofan engines, metal-containment systems can weigh well over 300 kg, and there is a strong impetus to reduce their weight. As a result, the NASA Lewis Research Center is involved in an effort to develop polymer matrix composite (PMC) fan-containment systems to reduce the weight and cost while maintaining the high levels of safety associated with current systems. Under a Space Act Agreement with AlliedSignal Aircraft Engines, a new ballistic impact test procedure has been developed to quantitatively evaluate the performance of polymer matrix composite systems.

  20. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-21

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters.

  1. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters

  2. The PANDA tests for the SWR 1000 passive containment cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J.; Meseth, J.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1992, Siemens has been developing the SWR 1000, a new boiling water reactor with passive safety features. This development has been performed in close co-operation with the German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners. Within the European Union sponsored project 'BWR R and D Cluster for Innovative Passive Safety Systems' and a bilateral contract between Siemens and the Paul Scherrer Institute, the passive containment cooling system of the SWR 1000 design has been investigated in the large-scale PANDA test facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute. A series of six tests were performed to simulate transients selected to cover a range of failure assumptions and accident severity, including core heat up and hydrogen generation. The results graphically demonstrate the self regulating character of the passive heat removal systems and their effectiveness, even under severe load, in limiting the containment pressurisation. Some tentative conclusions for the SWR1000 are drawn, to be established by detailed analyses of the data, to support models and codes for application to plant transients. (author)

  3. The PANDA tests for the SWR 1000 passive containment cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreier, J.; Aubert, C.; Huggenberger, M.; Strassberger, H.J.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1992, Siemens has been developing the SWR 1000, a new boiling water reactor with passive safety features. This development has been performed in close co-operation with the German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners. Within the European Union sponsored project 'BWR R+D Cluster for Innovative Passive Safety Systems' and a bilateral contract between Siemens and the Paul Scherrer Institute, the passive containment cooling system of the SWR 1000 design has been investigated in the large-scale PANDA test facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute. A series of six tests were performed to simulate transients selected to cover a range of failure assumptions and accident severity, including core heat up and hydrogen generation. The results graphically demonstrate the self regulating character of the passive heat removal systems and their effectiveness, even under severe load, in limiting the containment pressurisation. Some tentative conclusions for the SWR 1000 are drawn, to be established by detailed analyses of the data, to support models and codes for application to plant transients. (author)

  4. Structural and leakage integrity assessment of WWER steam generator tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splichal, K.; Otruba, J.; Keilova, E.; Krhounek, V.; Turek, J.

    1996-01-01

    The leakage and plugging limits were derived for WWER steam generators based on leak and burst tests using tubes with axial part-through and through-wall defects. The following conclusions were arrived at: (i) The permissible primary-to-secondary leak rate with respect to the permissible through-wall defect size of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 steam generator tubes is 8 l/h. (ii) The primary-to-secondary leak rate is reduced by the blocking of the tube cracks by corrosion product particles and other substances. (iii) The rate of crack penetration through the tube wall is higher than the crack widening. (iv) The validity of the criterion of instability for tubes with through-wall cracks was confirmed experimentally. For the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 steam generators, the critical size of axial through-wall cracks, for the threshold primary-to-secondary pressure difference, is 13.8 and 12.0 mm, respectively. (v) The calculated leakage for the rupture of one tube and for the assumed extreme defects is two orders and one order of magnitude, respectively, higher than the proposed primary water leakage limit of 8 l/h. (vi) The experiments gave evidence that the use of the permissible thinning limit of 80% for the heat exchange tube plugging does not bring about uncontrollable leakage or unstable crack growth. This is consistent with experience gained at WWER-440 type nuclear power plants. 4 tabs., 5 figs., 9 refs

  5. Effect of Surface Treatments on Leakage of Zirconium Oxide Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göknil Alkan Demetoğlu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effects of pretreatments on leakage of zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods: The speciments divided into 6 groups that were subsequently treated as follows: group 1, no treatment (control; group 2, the ceramic surfaces were airborne-particle abraded with 110 μm aluminum-oxide (Al2O3 particles; group 3, after abrasion of the surfaces with 110 μm Al2O3 particles, silica coating using 30 μm (Al2O3 particles modified by silica (rocatec system and application of the silane coupling agent (espe-sil; group 4, ceramic surfaces irritated with neodymium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG laser [fidelis plus 3 foton (Ljubljana, Slovenia] at 20 hz, 100 mj, 2 w, 100 μs; group 5, ceramic surfaces irritated with Nd:YAG laser at fidelis plus 3 fotona (Ljubljana, Slovenia at 20 hz, 100 mj, 2 w, 100 μs; group 6; application of a zirconia primer (z-prime plus bisco, IL, USA agent. And all ceramics tested for leakage. Results: For marginal leakage, score 0 was found in all groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were found in marginal leakage under all conditions.

  6. Hypothetical accident conditions, free drop and thermal tests: Specification 6M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenship, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The 30 gallon Specification 6M shipping container with rolled-top food pack cans as inner containers is evaluated under conditions required by 10 CFR 71.42. One kilogram of depleted uranium as UO 2 was packaged in each of the inner containers. After completion of a free drop test and a simulated thermal test, the maximum observed leakage of UO 2 for the following week was 3.2 μg. This leakage is well below the allowable leakage per week for most plutonium isotopic mixtures. Using the examples provided, any plutonium isotopic mixture can be easily compared with the allowable leakage per week. Test conditions and results are reported

  7. Hypothetical accident conditions free drop and thermal tests USA/5791/BLF (ERDA-AL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenship, R.W.

    1980-05-01

    The USA/5791/BLF (ERDA-AL) shipping container with rolled-top food pack cans as inner containers is evaluated under conditions required by 10 CFR 71.42. One kilogram of depleted uranium as UO 2 was packaged in each of the inner containers. After completion of a free drop test and a simulated thermal test, the maximum observed leakage of UO 2 for the following week was 3.0 μg. This leakage is well below the allowable leakage per week for most plutonium isotopic mixtures. Using the examples provided, any plutonium isotopic mixture can be easily compared with the allowable leakage per week. Test conditions and results are reported

  8. Corrosion Testing of 304L SS 3013 Inner Container and Teardrop Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokash, Justin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lillard, Scott [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Joyce, Stephen Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tegtmeier, Eric Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) 3013 Standard specifies a minimum of two containers to be used for the storage of plutonium-bearing materials containing at least 30 wt.% plutonium and uranium. Three nested containers are typically used, the outer, inner, and convenience containers, shown in Figure 1. Both the outer and inner containers are sealed with a weld while the innermost convenience container must not be sealed. Lifetime of the containers is expected to be fifty years. The containers are fabricated of austenitic stainless steels (SS) due to their high corrosion resistance. Potential failure mechanisms of the storage containers have been examined by Kolman and Lillard et al.

  9. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Westford, MA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed.

  10. Leakage detection algorithm integrating water distribution networks hydraulic model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adedeji, K

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available and estimation is vital for effective water service. For effective detection of background leakages, a hydraulic analysis of flow characteristics in water piping networks is indispensable for appraising such type of leakage. A leakage detection algorithm...

  11. Leakage Characteristics of Dual-Cannula Fenestrated Tracheostomy Tubes during Positive Pressure Ventilation: A Bench Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Berlet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the leakage characteristics of different types of dual-cannula fenestrated tracheostomy tubes during positive pressure ventilation. Fenestrated Portex® Blue Line Ultra®, TRACOE® twist, or Rüsch® Traceofix® tracheostomy tubes equipped with nonfenestrated inner cannulas were tested in a tracheostomy-lung simulator. Transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates were measured during positive pressure ventilation. The impact of different ventilation modes, airway pressures, temperatures, and simulated static lung compliance settings on leakage characteristics was assessed. We observed substantial differences in transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates. The leakage rates of the best performing tubes were <3.5% of the delivered minute volume. At body temperature, the leakage rates of these tracheostomy tubes were <1%. The tracheal tube design was the main factor that determined the leakage characteristics. Careful tracheostomy tube selection permits the use of fenestrated tracheostomy tubes in patients receiving positive pressure ventilation immediately after stoma formation and minimises the risk of complications caused by transfenestration gas leakage, for example, subcutaneous emphysema.

  12. Biomechanical testing of new meniscal repair techniques containing ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, F Alan; Herbert, Morley A; Schroeder, F Alexander; Aziz-Jacobo, Jorge; Sutker, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical characteristics of current meniscal repair techniques containing ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture with and without cyclic loading. Vertical longitudinal cuts made in porcine menisci were secured with a single repair device. Noncycled and cycled (500 cycles) biomechanical tests were performed on the following groups: group 1, No. 2-0 Mersilene vertical suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ); group 2, No. 2-0 Orthocord vertical suture (DePuy Mitek, Westwood, MA); group 3, No. 0 Ultrabraid vertical suture (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, Andover, MA); group 4, No. 2-0 FiberWire vertical suture (Arthrex, Naples, FL); group 5, vertically oriented mattress suture by use of an Ultra FasT-Fix device (Smith & Nephew Endoscopy) with No. 0 Ultrabraid; group 6, vertically oriented mattress suture by use of a RapidLoc A2 device (DePuy Mitek) with No. 2-0 Orthocord suture; group 7, vertically oriented stitch by use of a MaxFire device with MaxBraid PE suture (Biomet Sports Medicine, Warsaw, IN); and group 8, an obliquely oriented stitch of No. 0 UHMWPE suture inserted by use of a CrossFix device (Cayenne Medical, Scottsdale, AZ). Endpoints were failure loads, failure modes, stiffness, and cyclic displacement. Mean single-pull loads were calculated for Ultra FasT-Fix (121 N), FiberWire (110 N), MaxFire (130 N), Mersilene (84 N), Orthocord (124 N), RapidLoc A2 (86 N), CrossFix (77 N), and Ultrabraid (109 N). After 500 cyclic loads, the Orthocord (222 N) repair was stronger than the others: Ultra FasT-Fix (110 N), FiberWire (117 N), MaxFire (132 N), Mersilene (89 N), RapidLoc A2 (108 N), CrossFix (95 N), and Ultrabraid (126 N) (P Fix, RapidLoc A2, and MaxFire) were comparable to the isolated UHMWPE-containing suture repairs on single-failure load testing. UHMWPE-containing suture repairs are stronger than braided polyester suture repairs, but pure UHMWPE suture (Ultrabraid) elongated more during cycling. Orthocord suture is significantly

  13. Modelling of Consequences of Biogas Leakage from Gasholder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Trávníček

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes modelling of consequences of biogas leakage from a gasholder on agricultural biogas station. Four scenarios were selected for the purpose of this work. A rupture of gasholders membrane and instantaneous explosion of gas cloud, blast of gas with delay, emptying of whole volume of gas (without initiation and initiation of gas with Jet-Fire. Leakage of gas is modelled by special software and consequences are determined on the basis of results. The first scenario was modelled with help of equations because used software does not include an appropriate model. A farm with high building density was chosen as a model case. Biogas is replaced by methane because used software does not support modelling of dispersion of mixtures. From this viewpoint, a conservative approach is applied because biogas contains “only” approximately 60% of methane (in dependence on technology and processed material.

  14. Evaluation of seismic behavior of soils under nuclear containment structures via dynamic centrifuge test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jeong Gon; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A series of dynamic centrifuge tests were performed for NPP structure to investigate the soil–foundation-structure interaction with various soil conditions from loose sand to weathered rock. • SFSI phenomena for NPP structure were observed directly using experimental method. • Effect of the soil stiffness and nonlinear characteristics on SFSI was estimated. • There are comparisons of the control motions for seismic design of a NPP structure. • Subsoil condition, earthquake intensity and control motion affected to seismic load. - Abstract: To evaluate the earthquake loads for the seismic design of a nuclear containment structure, it is necessary to consider the soil–foundation-structure interaction (SFSI) due to their interdependent behavior. Especially, understanding the effects of soil stiffness under the structure and the location of control motion to SFSI are very important. Motivated by these requirements, a series of dynamic centrifuge tests were performed with various soil conditions from loose sand to weathered rock (WR), as well as different seismic intensities for the bedrock motion. The different amplification characteristics in peak-accelerations profile and effects of soil-nonlinearity in response spectrum were observed. The dynamic behaviors were compared between surface of free-field and foundation of the structure for the evaluation of the control motion for seismic design. It was found that dynamic centrifuge test has potentials to estimate the seismic load considering SFSI

  15. Development of dual field magnetic flux leakage (MFL) inspection technology to detect mechanical damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This report details the development and testing of a dual magnetization in-line inspection (ILI) : tool for detecting mechanical damage in operating pipelines, including the first field trials of a : fully operational dual-field magnetic flux leakage...

  16. Turbulent jet erosion of a stably stratified gas layer in a nuclear reactor test containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishay, Liel [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Bieder, Ulrich [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives, Centre de SACLAY DEN/SAC/DANS/DM2S/STMF/LMSF, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ziskind, Gennady [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Rashkovan, Alex, E-mail: rashbgu@gmail.com [Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center Negev (NRCN), PO Box 9001, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We model stably stratified layer erosion by vertical turbulent round jet. • Separate effect studies are performed as a platform for choosing modeling approach. • A test performed in MISTRA facility, CEA, Saclay is modeled using Fluent and Trio-U codes. • The proposed modeling approach showed good agreement with the MISTRA facility LOWMA-3 test. - Abstract: A number of integral and separate effect experiments were performed in the last two decades for validation of containment computational tools. The main goal of these benchmark experiments was to assess the ability of turbulence models and computational fluid dynamics codes to predict hydrogen concentration distribution and steam condensation rate in a nuclear reactor containment in the course of severe accidents. It appears from the published literature that the predictive capability of the existing computational tools still needs to be improved. This work examines numerically the temporal evolution of helium concentration in the experiment called LOWMA-3, performed in the MISTRA facility of CEA-Saclay, France. In the experiment, helium is used to mimic hydrogen of a real-case accident. The aim of this separate effect experiment, where steam condensation was not involved, is to predict helium concentration field. The conditions of the experiment are such that both the momentum transport and molecular diffusion contributions to the mixing process are of the same order of magnitude (Fr ∼ 1). A commercial CFD code, Fluent, and a CEA in-house code, Trio-U, are used for flow and helium concentration fields temporal evolution prediction in the present study. The preliminary separate effect studies provide guidance to an optimal modeling approach for the LOWMA-3 experiment. Temporal evolution of helium concentration in the stratification layer is shown, and a comparison to the experiment is discussed. It is shown that correct modeling of the round jet flowfield is essential for a reliable

  17. Turbulent jet erosion of a stably stratified gas layer in a nuclear reactor test containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishay, Liel; Bieder, Ulrich; Ziskind, Gennady; Rashkovan, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We model stably stratified layer erosion by vertical turbulent round jet. • Separate effect studies are performed as a platform for choosing modeling approach. • A test performed in MISTRA facility, CEA, Saclay is modeled using Fluent and Trio-U codes. • The proposed modeling approach showed good agreement with the MISTRA facility LOWMA-3 test. - Abstract: A number of integral and separate effect experiments were performed in the last two decades for validation of containment computational tools. The main goal of these benchmark experiments was to assess the ability of turbulence models and computational fluid dynamics codes to predict hydrogen concentration distribution and steam condensation rate in a nuclear reactor containment in the course of severe accidents. It appears from the published literature that the predictive capability of the existing computational tools still needs to be improved. This work examines numerically the temporal evolution of helium concentration in the experiment called LOWMA-3, performed in the MISTRA facility of CEA-Saclay, France. In the experiment, helium is used to mimic hydrogen of a real-case accident. The aim of this separate effect experiment, where steam condensation was not involved, is to predict helium concentration field. The conditions of the experiment are such that both the momentum transport and molecular diffusion contributions to the mixing process are of the same order of magnitude (Fr ∼ 1). A commercial CFD code, Fluent, and a CEA in-house code, Trio-U, are used for flow and helium concentration fields temporal evolution prediction in the present study. The preliminary separate effect studies provide guidance to an optimal modeling approach for the LOWMA-3 experiment. Temporal evolution of helium concentration in the stratification layer is shown, and a comparison to the experiment is discussed. It is shown that correct modeling of the round jet flowfield is essential for a reliable

  18. Apparatus for detecting leakage of liquid sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting the leakage of liquid sodium includes a cable-like sensor adapted to be secured to a wall of piping or other equipment having sodium on the opposite side of the wall, and the sensor includes a core wire electrically connected to the wall through a leak current detector and a power source. An accidental leakage of the liquid sodium causes the corrosion of a metallic layer and an insulative layer of the sensor by products resulted from a reaction of sodium with water or oxygen in the atmospheric air so as to decrease the resistance between the core wire and the wall. Thus, the leakage is detected as an increase in the leaking electrical current. The apparatus is especially adapted for use in detecting the leakage of liquid sodium from sodium-conveying pipes or equipment in a fast breeder reactor.

  19. The update of resist outgas testing for metal containing resists at EIDEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiobara, Eishi; Mikami, Shinji

    2017-10-01

    The metal containing resist is one of the candidates for high sensitivity resists. EIDEC has prepared the infrastructure for outgas testing in hydrogen environment for metal containing resists at High Power EUV irradiation tool (HPEUV). We have experimentally obtained the preliminary results of the non-cleanable metal contamination on witness sample using model material by HPEUV [1]. The metal contamination was observed at only the condition of hydrogen environment. It suggested the generation of volatile metal hydrides by hydrogen radicals. Additionally, the metal contamination on a witness sample covered with Ru was not removed by hydrogen radical cleaning. The strong interaction between the metal hydride and Ru was confirmed by the absorption simulation. Recently, ASML announced a resist outgassing barrier technology using Dynamic Gas Lock (DGL) membrane located between projection optics and wafer stage [2], [3]. DGL membrane blocks the diffusion of all kinds of resist outgassing to the projection optics and prevents the reflectivity loss of EUV mirrors. The investigation of DGL membrane for high volume manufacturing is just going on. It extends the limitation of material design for EUV resists. However, the DGL membrane has an impact for the productivity of EUV scanners due to the transmission loss of EUV light and the necessity of periodic maintenance. The well understanding and control of the outgassing characteristics of metal containing resists may help to improve the productivity of EUV scanner. We consider the outgas evaluation for the resists still useful. For the improvement of resist outgas testing by HPEUV, there are some issues such as the contamination limited regime, the optimization of exposure dose to obtain the measurable contamination film thickness and the detection of minimum amount of metal related outgas species generated. The investigation and improvement for these issues are ongoing. The updates will be presented in the conference. This

  20. Maintaining leak tightness capability of Caorso BWR containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barsanti, P.; Di Palo, L.; Grimaldi, G.

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 the local leak rate test (LLRT) results of the primary containment were revised, with the following main goals: to highlight recurring problems, leading to lack of leak tightness of the primary containment; to individuate the pertinent degradation mechanisms; to assess the corrective actions already implemented and to plan further improvements, if necessary; and to optimize the preventive maintenance program on the containment, particularly the inspection frequency. All LLRTs in the past operating period, both before (as found) and after (as left) maintenance were analyzed, in terms of leakage rate and equivalent area of leak, for each penetration. Corrective actions already implemented included replacement of some valves with better quality type one, passivation of the carbon steel pipes and improvement of the pertinent surveillance procedures. Long term corrective actions, now under consideration, will include the following: more extensive passivation of pipes, carrying humid air, so that oxidation could be drastically reduced; better chemistry control in fluid systems; extensive replacement of the butterfly valves presently used; implementation of the LLRT practice, such to quantitatively measure the leakage rate, also in presence of large leak; and reduction of the time interval between periodical tests, on the basis of the results of the previous ones. Following these guidelines, future overall leakage tests would be performed in as found condition, aimed to verify the effectiveness of the entire maintenance and testing program of the primary containment and of its capability to maintain leak tightness during the time between two subsequent tests

  1. Correlating antimicrobial activity and model membrane leakage induced by nylon-3 polymers and detergents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakeemian, Sara G; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Heerklotz, Heiko

    2015-09-14

    Most antimicrobial peptides act upon target microorganisms by permeabilizing their membranes. The mode of action is often assessed by vesicle leakage experiments that use model membranes, with the assumption that biological activity correlates with the permeabilization of the lipid bilayer. The current work aims to extend the interpretation of vesicle leakage results and examine the correlation between vesicle leakage and antimicrobial activity. To this end, we used a lifetime-based leakage assay with calcein-loaded vesicles to study the membrane permeabilizing properties of a novel antifungal polymer poly-NM, two of its analogs, and a series of detergents. In conjunction, the biological activities of these compounds against Candida albicans were assessed and correlated with data from vesicle leakage. Poly-NM induces all-or-none leakage in polar yeast lipid vesicles at the polymer's MIC, 3 μg mL(-1). At this and higher concentrations, complete leakage after an initial lag time was observed. Concerted activity tests imply that this polymer acts independently of the detergent octyl glucoside (OG) for both vesicle leakage and activity against C. albicans spheroplasts. In addition, poly-NM was found to have negligible activity against zwitterionic vesicles and red blood cells. Our results provide a consistent, detailed picture of the mode of action of poly-NM: this polymer induces membrane leakage by electrostatic lipid clustering. In contrast, poly-MM:CO, a nylon-3 polymer comprised of both cationic and hydrophobic segments, seems to act by a different mechanism that involves membrane asymmetry stress. Vesicle leakage for this polymer is transient (limited to nylon-3 polymers we examined act via similar mechanisms; it is surprising that their mechanisms are so distinct. Some, but not all mechanisms of vesicle permeabilization allow for antimicrobial activity.

  2. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  3. Safety analysis report: packages. Argonne National Laboratory SLSF test train shipping container, P-1 shipment. Fissile material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.A.

    1975-06-01

    The package is used to ship an instrumented test fuel bundle (test train) containing fissile material. The package assembly is Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Model R1010-0032. The shipment is fissile class III. The packaging consists of an outer carbon steel container into which an inner container is placed; the inner container is separated from the outer container by urethane foam cushioning material. The test train is supported in the inner container by a series of transverse supports spaced along the length of the test train. Both the inner and outer containers are closed with bolted covers. The covers do not seal the containers in a leaktight manner. The gross weight of the shipment is about 8350 lb. The unirradiated fissile material content is less than 3 kg of UO 2 of up to 93.2 percent enrichment. This is a Type A quantity (transport group III and less than 3 curies) of radioactive material which does not require shielding, cooling or heating, or neutron absorption or moderation functions in its packaging. The maximum exterior dimensions of the container are 37 ft 11 in. long, 24 1 / 2 in. wide, and 19 3 / 4 in. high

  4. Behaviour of prestressed concrete containment structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, J.G.; Murray, D.W.; Simmonds, S.H.

    1980-05-01

    The most significant finds from a study to assess the response of prestressed concrete secondary containment structures for nuclear reactors under the influence of high internal overpressures are presented. A method of analysis is described for determining the strains and deflections including effects of inelastic behaviour at various points in the structure resulting from increasing internal pressures. Experimentally derived relationships between the strains and crack spacing, crack width and leakage rate are given. These procedures were applied to the Gentilly-2 containment building to obtain the following results: (1) The first through-the-wall cracks would occur in the dome at 48 psi or 2.3 times the proof test pressure. (2) At this pressure leakage would begin and would increase exponentially as the pressure increases such that at 93% of the predicted failure load the calculated leakage rate would be approximately equal to the volume of the containment each second. (3) Assuming the pressurizing medium could be supplied sufficiently rapidly, failure would occur due to rupture of the horizontal tendons at approximately 77 psi. (author)

  5. Comparison of predicted and measured drop test responses to Type B shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counts, J.; Payne, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The dynamic response of full-scale and scale model impacting shipping containers predicted by the computer code IMPAC2 is compared with available experimental results. A more accurate mathematical model proposed for impacting containers is discussed

  6. Influence of thermal aging on AC leakage current in XLPE insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Pulong; Song, Jiancheng; Tian, Muqin; Lei, Zhipeng; Du, Yakun

    2018-02-01

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) has been widely used as cable insulation material because of its excellent dielectric properties, thermal stability and solvent resistance. To understand the influence of thermal aging on AC leakage current in XLPE insulation, all XLPE specimens were aged in oven in temperature range from 120 °C to 150 °C, and a series of tests were conducted on these XLPE specimens in different aging stages to measure the characteristic parameters, such as complex permittivity, leakage current and complex dielectric modulus. In the experiments, the effects of thermal aging, temperature and frequency on the AC leakage current in XLPE insulation were studied by analyzing complex dielectric constant and dielectric relaxation modulus spectrum, the change of relaxation peak and activation energy. It has been found that the active part of leakage current increases sharply with the increase of aging degree, and the test temperature and frequency have an influence on AC leakage current but the influence of test temperature is mainly reflected in the low frequency region. In addition, it has been shown by the experiments that the reactive part of leakage current exhibits a strong frequency dependent characteristic in the testing frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 105 Hz, but the influence of test temperature and thermal aging on it is relatively small.

  7. Influence of thermal aging on AC leakage current in XLPE insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulong Geng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE has been widely used as cable insulation material because of its excellent dielectric properties, thermal stability and solvent resistance. To understand the influence of thermal aging on AC leakage current in XLPE insulation, all XLPE specimens were aged in oven in temperature range from 120 °C to 150 °C, and a series of tests were conducted on these XLPE specimens in different aging stages to measure the characteristic parameters, such as complex permittivity, leakage current and complex dielectric modulus. In the experiments, the effects of thermal aging, temperature and frequency on the AC leakage current in XLPE insulation were studied by analyzing complex dielectric constant and dielectric relaxation modulus spectrum, the change of relaxation peak and activation energy. It has been found that the active part of leakage current increases sharply with the increase of aging degree, and the test temperature and frequency have an influence on AC leakage current but the influence of test temperature is mainly reflected in the low frequency region. In addition, it has been shown by the experiments that the reactive part of leakage current exhibits a strong frequency dependent characteristic in the testing frequency range from 10-2 Hz to 105 Hz, but the influence of test temperature and thermal aging on it is relatively small.

  8. Qualification Testing of Redesigned F-15/F-4 600 Gallon BI-PAC Fuel Tank Container,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    RING: FRONT VIEW .... 20 FIGURE 18, REDESIGNED CONTAINER NESTED IN CONTAINER DESIGN CURRENTLY IN SISTEM ............................. .21 FIGURE 19...required to prevent overnesting of the containers. 3. An adhesive such as "loctite" should be applied to the lan- yard attachment screws to ensure

  9. Containment long-term operational integrity--a 1988 status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammataro, R.F.

    1988-01-01

    Design and in-service codes and standards provide a comprehensive set of requirements for containment design, construction, inspection, testing and repair. Metal and concrete containments must be designed, fabricated, constructed, inspected, tested and maintained to quality standards commensurate with the importance of the safety function to be performed. Periodic integrated leak rate tests are required to assure that containments continue to meet allowable leakage limits. Although overall performance has been quite good to date, several major containment aging and degradation mechanisms have been identified. Two pilot plant life extension studies, one for a boiling water reactor and one for a pressurized water reactor, serve as models for extending the operational integrity of present containments in the United States. Research and testing programs for determining the ultimate pressure capacity and failure mechanisms for containments under severe loading conditions and studied for extending the life of current plants beyond the present 40 year licensed lifetime are underway. This paper presents an overview of containment designs in the USA and a discussion of the regulatory and ASME Code requirements for the design, construction, in-service inspection, testing and repair for containments. Findings for containments from the pilot plant life extension studies and the ongoing containment research and testing programs are also discussed. The regulatory and ASME Code requirements for design, construction, in-service inspection and periodic integrated leakage testing together with recommendations from the plant life extension studies and containment integrity research and testing provide a basis for continued containment long-term operational integrity

  10. Binding and leakage of barium in alginate microbeads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, Yrr A; Qi, Meirigeng; Gundersen, Per Ole M; Formo, Kjetil; Lacik, Igor; Skjåk-Braek, Gudmund; Oberholzer, Jose; Strand, Berit L

    2012-11-01

    Microbeads of alginate crosslinked with Ca(2+) and/or Ba(2+) are popular matrices in cell-based therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify the binding of barium in alginate microbeads and its leakage under in vitro and accumulation under in vivo conditions. Low concentrations of barium (1 mM) in combination with calcium (50 mM) and high concentrations of barium (20 mM) in gelling solutions were used for preparation of microbeads made of high-G and high-M alginates. High-G microbeads accumulated barium from gelling solution and contained higher concentrations of divalent ions for both low- and high-Ba exposure compared with high-G microbeads exposed to calcium solely and to high-M microbeads for all gelling conditions. Although most of the unbound divalent ions were removed during the wash and culture steps, leakage of barium was still detected during storage. Barium accumulation in blood and femur bone of mice implanted with high-G beads was found to be dose-dependent. Estimated barium leakage relevant to transplantation to diabetic patients with islets in alginate microbeads showed that the leakage was 2.5 times lower than the tolerable intake value given by WHO for high-G microbeads made using low barium concentration. The similar estimate gave 1.5 times higher than is the tolerable intake value for the high-G microbeads made using high barium concentration. To reduce the risk of barium accumulation that may be of safety concern, the microbeads made of high-G alginate gelled with a combination of calcium and low concentration of barium ions is recommended for islet transplantation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Correlation among ESDD, NSDD and leakage current in distribution insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.; Ramirez, I.; Montoya, J.I.

    2004-01-01

    The maintenance of distribution networks is more effective if the insulation contamination levels are known. The selection of measuring methods of pollution levels is then crucial. The relationship between several evaluation methods of pollution levels and the operating behaviour of several insulator profiles in a polluted zone is described. Laboratory tests were carried out to reproduce pollution levels found in the field. The quantity of non-soluble materials deposited over the insulators' surface affect the magnitude of the leakage current generated over a contaminated insulator. The relationship that defines leakage current with respect to the equivalent salt deposit density (ESDD) level for a specific non-soluble material level is almost linear, from which it is possible to develop a relationship between them for each insulator. (author)

  12. Bacterial leakage in roots filled with different medicaments and sealed with Cavit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Claudia R; Zaritzki, Felix F; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Zimmer, Stefan

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the time required by four different root canal medications coupled with the temporary filling material Cavit (ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) to prevent penetration of bacteria into the root canal. There were 145 roots prepared in a standardized manner. Four groups with 15 samples each were dressed with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)), a 5% chlorhexidine gel (CHX), a chloromono-campherphenolic compound (ChKM), and Ledermix (LM), respectively, and sealed with Cavit. Four control groups contained identical medications but the roots were left unsealed. The 25 remaining roots served as additional controls. A standard setup for bacterial leakage studies was chosen with Staphylococcus epidermidis as test strain. Cavit application resulted in a significantly better seal compared with the unsealed groups. In the Cavit-sealed groups, all groups differed significantly from one another except for the CHX and the ChKM groups. The Ca(OH)(2) medicated roots provided the longest protection (median of 36 days), followed by the Ledermix-group (27 days) and the CHX (18 days) or ChKM groups (19 days). It may be concluded that Cavit-sealed and medicated root canals do not provide adequate protection against bacterial leakage for more than 1 month.

  13. Testing of Flame Sprayed Al2O3 Matrix Coatings Containing TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czupryński A.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the properties of flame sprayed ceramic coatings using oxide ceramic materials coating of a powdered aluminium oxide (Al2O3 matrix with 3% titanium oxide (TiO2 applied to unalloyed S235JR grade structural steel. A primer consisting of a metallic Ni-Al-Mo based powder has been applied to plates with dimensions of 5×200×300 mm and front surfaces of Ø40×50 mm cylinders. Flame spraying of primer coating was made using a RotoTec 80 torch, and an external coating was made with a CastoDyn DS 8000 torch. Evaluation of the coating properties was conducted using metallographic testing, phase composition research, measurement of microhardness, substrate coating adhesion (acc. to EN 582:1996 standard, erosion wear resistance (acc. to ASTM G76-95 standard, and abrasive wear resistance (acc. to ASTM G65 standard and thermal impact. The testing performed has demonstrated that flame spraying with 97% Al2O3 powder containing 3% TiO2 performed in a range of parameters allows for obtaining high-quality ceramic coatings with thickness up to ca. 500 µm on a steel base. Spray coating possesses a structure consisting mainly of aluminium oxide and a small amount of NiAl10O16 and NiAl32O49 phases. The bonding primer coat sprayed with the Ni-Al-Mo powder to the steel substrate and external coating sprayed with the 97% Al2O3 powder with 3% TiO2 addition demonstrates mechanical bonding characteristics. The coating is characterized by a high adhesion to the base amounting to 6.5 MPa. Average hardness of the external coating is ca. 780 HV. The obtained coatings are characterized by high erosion and abrasive wear resistance and the resistance to effects of cyclic thermal shock.

  14. Calculation of Leakage Inductance for High Frequency Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Jun, Zhang; Hurley, William Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dependent leakage inductance is often observed. High frequency eddy current effects cause a reduction in leakage inductance. The proximity effect between adjacent layers is responsible for the reduction of leakage inductance. This paper gives a detailed analysis of high frequency leakag...

  15. Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs

  16. Compilation of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrant, M.M.; Ottinger, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the features that affect the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings currently certified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report is based on a review of current literature on seals, closures, and leakage for radioactive material packagings. Federal regulations that relate to the sealing capability of radioactive material packagings, as well as basic equations for leakage calculations and some of the available leakage test procedures are presented. The factors which affect the sealing capability of a closure, including the properties of the sealing surfaces, the gasket material, the closure method and the contents are discussed in qualitative terms. Information on the general properties of both elastomer and metal gasket materials and some specific designs are presented. A summary of the seal material, closure method, and leakage tests for currently certified packagings with large diameter seals is provided. 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. A new on-line leakage current monitoring system of ZnO surge arresters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bok-Hee; Kang, Sung-Man

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new on-line leakage current monitoring system of zinc oxide (ZnO) surge arresters. To effectively diagnose the deterioration of ZnO surge arresters, a new algorithm and on-line leakage current detection device, which uses the time-delay addition method, for discriminating the resistive and capacitive currents was developed to use in the aging test and durability evaluation for ZnO arrester blocks. A computer-based measurement system of the resistive leakage current, the on-line monitoring device can detect accurately the leakage currents flowing through ZnO surge arresters for power frequency ac applied voltages. The proposed on-line leakage current monitoring device of ZnO surge arresters is more highly sensitive and gives more linear response than the existing devices using the detection method of the third harmonic leakage currents. Therefore, the proposed leakage current monitoring device can be useful for predicting the defects and performance deterioration of ZnO surge arresters in power system applications

  18. Sustainable management of leakage from wastewater pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, D; Burn, S; Tjandraatmadja, G; Moglia, M; Davis, P; Wolf, L; Held, I; Vollertsen, J; Williams, W; Hafskjold, L

    2005-01-01

    Wastewater pipeline leakage is an emerging concern in Europe, especially with regards to the potential effect of leaking effluent on groundwater contamination and the effects infiltration has on the management of sewer reticulation systems. This paper describes efforts by Australia, in association with several European partners, towards the development of decision support tools to prioritize proactive rehabilitation of wastewater pipe networks to account for leakage. In the fundamental models for the decision support system, leakage is viewed as a function of pipeline system deterioration. The models rely on soil type identification across the service area to determine the aggressiveness of the pipe environment and for division of the area into zones based on pipe properties and operational conditions. By understanding the interaction between pipe materials, operating conditions, and the pipe environment in the mechanisms leading to pipe deterioration, the models allow the prediction of leakage rates in different zones across a network. The decision support system utilizes these models to predict the condition of pipes in individual zones, and to optimize the utilization of rehabilitation resources by targeting the areas with the highest leakage rates.

  19. Cause elucidation of sodium leakage incident at `Monju` reactor. Vibration of thermometer due to fluid force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Koji; Wada, Yusaku; Morishita, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Akira; Ichimiya, Masakazu [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-01-01

    This is a report of summarized results of investigation and analysis on fracture of thermometer which is direct reason of sodium leakage incident at the second main cooling system of fast breeder reactor `Monju`. Various surveys such as on various damage factors, on flowing power vibrational features containing flowing power vibrational test of thermometer, on evaluation of high cycle fatigue due to flowing power vibration and details on propagation of and fracture due to fatigue crack, on why only said thermometer damaged, and so forth were executed. As results of these examinations, a decision was arrived that high cycle fatigue due to vibration formed by fluid force (fluid force vibration) was a direct cause of the thermometer damage. (G.K.)

  20. Reactor container and method of constructing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Muramatsu, Yutaka.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the construction term when constructing a reactor container and also alleviate the temperature requirements for the shielding wall by concurrently forwarding the work of constructing the reactor container and the shielding wall. Constitution: When constructing a reactor container, a shielding wall is constructed from lower layers on the outer side of the reactor container via a gap therefrom concurrently with the work of building the steel container. After the construction of the reactor container is completed, the reactor container is subjected to a pressure resistance test, leakage test, welding inspection and so forth. After the various tests and inspections are completed, concrete blocks as a protective material are stacked on the inner side of a steel frame mounted on the inner wall of the shielding wall, and they are secured to each other and also to the steel frame by concrete block holding members. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-01-01

    : This study is a systematic review using the databases MEDLINE and Rex. MEDLINE was searched up to October 2010 to identify studies on experimental animal models of clinical colon anastomotic leakage. From the Rex database, textbooks on surgical aspects as well as gastrointestinal physiology and anatomy...... interventions are needed to create clinical leakage in these animals. The knowledge from this study formed the basis for selecting the animal species most suited for the models in the next studies. STUDY 2: In this experimental study, technically insufficient colonic anastomoses were performed in 110 C57BL/6...... instead of clinical leakage. However, anastomotic breaking strength was reduced in the ischemic anastomoses. STUDY 4: In this systematic review MEDLINE, Embase and Cinahl were searched up to September 2011 to identify studies evaluating external coating of colonic anastomoses. Most studies were...

  2. Loneliness, social integration and consumption of sugar-containing beverages: testing the social baseline theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Ekeberg Henriksen

    Full Text Available Social Baseline Theory (SBT proposes that close relationships aid in metabolic resource management and that individuals without significant relationships may experience more demands on their own neural metabolic resources on a daily basis when solving problems, remaining vigilant against potential threats and regulating emotional responses. This study tests a hypothesised consequence derived from SBT: relative social isolation leads to increased levels of sugar intake.Based on cross-sectional, self-reported data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (N = 90 084, information on social integration and the consumption of both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened sodas and juices was obtained from a large number of women in early pregnancy. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess whether loneliness, marital status, relationship satisfaction, advice from others than partner, and cohesion at work is associated with consumption of sodas and juices.Perceived loneliness was associated with elevated intake of all sugary beverages, while relationship satisfaction was negatively associated with all sugary beverages. Being married or cohabitating, having supportive friends, and having a sense of togetherness at work were associated with lower intake of two out of three sugar-containing beverages. These associations were significant, even after controlling for factors such as body mass index, weight related self-image, depression, physical activity, educational level, age and income. In comparison, a statistically significant relationship emerged between relationship satisfaction and artificially sweetened cola. No other predictor variables were significantly associated with any type of artificially sweetened beverage.This study indicates that loneliness and social integration influence the level of consumption of sugary beverages. The results support the hypothesis derived from the Social Baseline Theory that relative social

  3. Loneliness, social integration and consumption of sugar-containing beverages: testing the social baseline theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Roger Ekeberg; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Thuen, Frode

    2014-01-01

    Social Baseline Theory (SBT) proposes that close relationships aid in metabolic resource management and that individuals without significant relationships may experience more demands on their own neural metabolic resources on a daily basis when solving problems, remaining vigilant against potential threats and regulating emotional responses. This study tests a hypothesised consequence derived from SBT: relative social isolation leads to increased levels of sugar intake. Based on cross-sectional, self-reported data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (N = 90 084), information on social integration and the consumption of both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened sodas and juices was obtained from a large number of women in early pregnancy. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to assess whether loneliness, marital status, relationship satisfaction, advice from others than partner, and cohesion at work is associated with consumption of sodas and juices. Perceived loneliness was associated with elevated intake of all sugary beverages, while relationship satisfaction was negatively associated with all sugary beverages. Being married or cohabitating, having supportive friends, and having a sense of togetherness at work were associated with lower intake of two out of three sugar-containing beverages. These associations were significant, even after controlling for factors such as body mass index, weight related self-image, depression, physical activity, educational level, age and income. In comparison, a statistically significant relationship emerged between relationship satisfaction and artificially sweetened cola. No other predictor variables were significantly associated with any type of artificially sweetened beverage. This study indicates that loneliness and social integration influence the level of consumption of sugary beverages. The results support the hypothesis derived from the Social Baseline Theory that relative social isolation leads

  4. Separate effects testing and analyses to investigate liner tearing of the 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spletzer, B.L.; Lambert, L.D.; Bergman, V.L.

    1995-06-01

    The overpressurization of a 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment building demonstrated that liner tearing is a plausible failure mode in such structures under severe accident conditions. A combined experimental and analytical program was developed to determine the important parameters which affect liner tearing and to develop reasonably simple analytical methods for predicting when tearing will occur. Three sets of test specimens were designed to allow individual control over and investigation of the mechanisms believed to be important in causing failure of the liner plate. The series of tests investigated the effect on liner tearing produced by the anchorage system, the loading conditions, and the transition in thickness from the liner to the insert plate. Before testing, the specimens were analyzed using two- and three-dimensional finite element models. Based on the analysis, the failure mode and corresponding load conditions were predicted for each specimen. Test data and post-test examination of test specimens show mixed agreement with the analytical predictions with regard to failure mode and specimen response for most tests. Many similarities were also observed between the response of the liner in the 1:6-scale reinforced concrete containment model and the response of the test specimens. This work illustrates the fact that the failure mechanism of a reinforced concrete containment building can be greatly influenced by details of liner and anchorage system design. Further, it significantly increases the understanding of containment building response under severe conditions

  5. Space Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering Subsystem (OMS) Engine Propellant Leakage Ball-Valve Shaft Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueders, Kathy; Buntain, Nick; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Evidence of propellant leakage across ball-valve shaft seals has been noted during the disassembly of five flight engines and one test engine at the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, White Sands Test Facility. Based on data collected during the disassembly of these five engines, the consequences of propellant leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals can be divided into four primary areas of concern: Damage to the ball-valve pinion shafts, damage to sleeved bearings inside the ball-valve and actuator assemblies, degradation of the synthetic rubber o-rings used in the actuator assemblies, and corrosion and degradation to the interior of the actuator assemblies. The exact time at which leakage across the ball-valve shaft seals occurs has not been determined, however, the leakage most likely occurs during engine firings when, depending on the specification used, ball-valve cavity pressures range as high as 453 to 550 psia. This potential pressure range for the ball-valve cavities greatly exceeds the acceptance leakage test pressure of 332 psia. Since redesign and replacement of the ball-valve shaft seals is unlikely, the near term solution to prevent damage that occurs from shaft-seal leakage is to implement a routine overhaul and maintenance program for engines in the fleet. Recommended repair, verification, and possible preventative maintenance measures are discussed in the paper.

  6. Studies of water leakage in dams. Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordero-Calderon, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    With this training about the study of Water Leakage in Dams and Damming, the institutional worker will have the necessary criteria in this topic, and also an opportunity to analyze the impact of this engineering work at national level. This course permits to transmit part of the knowlege acquired by the Arcal XVIII RLA/8/018, Application of Tracer Techniques for Leakage in Dams and Damming Project, where ICE participates in agreement with Atomic Energy Commission of Costa Rica, sponsored by the International Organization of Atomic Energy. (author). 14 charts, 36 figs, 2 maps, 6 tabs

  7. Inward Leakage in Tight-Fitting PAPRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C. Koh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of local flow measurement techniques and fog flow visualization was used to determine the inward leakage for two tight-fitting powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs, the 3M Breathe-Easy PAPR and the SE 400 breathing demand PAPR. The PAPRs were mounted on a breathing machine head form, and flows were measured from the blower and into the breathing machine. Both respirators leaked a little at the beginning of inhalation, probably through their exhalation valves. In both cases, the leakage was not enough for fog to appear at the mouth of the head form.

  8. Feasibility of Using Fluorescence Spectrophotometry to Develop a Sensitive Dye Immersion Method for Container Closure Integrity Testing of Prefilled Syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xujin; Lloyd, David K; Klohr, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted for a sensitive and robust dye immersion method for the measurement of container closure integrity of unopened prefilled syringes using fluorescence spectrophotometry as the detection method. A Varian Cary Eclipse spectrofluorometer was used with a custom-made sample holder to position the intact syringe in the sample compartment for fluorescence measurements. Methylene blue solution was initially evaluated as the fluorophore in a syringe with excitation at 607 nm and emission at 682 nm, which generated a limit of detection of 0.05 μg/mL. Further studies were conducted using rhodamine 123, a dye with stronger fluorescence. Using 480 nm excitation and 525 nm emission, the dye in the syringe could be easily detected at levels as low as 0.001 μg/mL. The relative standard deviation for 10 measurements of a sample of 0.005 μg/mL (with repositioning of the syringe after each measurement) was less than 1.1%. A number of operational parameters were optimized, including the photomultiplier tube voltage, excitation, and emission slit widths. The specificity of the testing was challenged by using marketed drug products and a protein sample, which showed no interference to the rhodamine detection. Results obtained from this study demonstrated that using rhodamine 123 for container closure integrity testing with in-situ (in-syringe) fluorescence measurements significantly enhanced the sensitivity and robustness of the testing and effectively overcame limitations of the traditional methylene blue method with visual or UV-visible absorption detection. Ensuring container closure integrity of injectable pharmaceutical products is necessary to maintain quality throughout the shelf life of a sterile drug product. Container closure integrity testing has routinely been used to evaluate closure integrity during product development and production line qualification of prefilled syringes, vials, and devices. However, container closure integrity testing

  9. HUMOS monitoring system of leaks into the containment atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Zaloudek, J.; Matal, O. Jr.; Klinga, J.; Brom, J.

    1997-01-01

    The detection and monitoring of coolant leaks into the containment atmosphere during reactor operation is a major safety measure. Using the HUMOS monitoring system, leaks can be detected in pressure tests of integrity and in any other mode of operation when the reactor ventilation system is operating and the primary circuit and its components are pressurized. Performance tests, the design, hardware and software of the HUMOS system are briefly described. A test was performed to demonstrate that a small amount of humidity released by leakage into the containment air can be detected. (M.D.)

  10. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, A.

    2014-09-01

    This research project focused on evaluation of air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multi-point fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing characterized the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the Baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  11. 40 CFR 795.70 - Indirect photolysis screening test: Sunlight photolysis in waters containing dissolved humic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... background information on this test guideline the following references should be consulted. (1) Cooper W.J... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Indirect photolysis screening test... TEST GUIDELINES Provisional Chemical Fate Guidelines § 795.70 Indirect photolysis screening test...

  12. SU-F-J-144: Scatter and Leakage Survey of An Integrated MR-Linac System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J; Bosco, G; Darenbourg, B; Ibbott, G [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess the scatter and leakage radiation of an integrated 1.5T MRI-Linac system. Methods: A 150cc chamber (model 96020C, Inovision) was used in all the scatter and leakage measurements, after being recalibrated for MV energy by the Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory at MD Anderson. The scatter radiation was measured by placing a 25 cm stack of solid-water materials at iso-center on the patient couch to simulate patient scatter. Gantry angles were positioned at 0 degree (beam pointing downward) and 270 (beam pointing laterally). Scatter radiation was measured at selective locations inside the RF room. Beam stopper leakage was measured at the exterior panel of the gantry. The head leakage was measured at 1 meter away from the Linac head in the direction which was determined to be the area of maximum leakage by wrapped films test. All measurements were repeated with the 1.5T magnetic field turned off to study the effect of magnetic field. Results: When the magnet was on (B=1.5T), the maximum head leakage at 1 meter was 191.6mR/1000MU. The scatter radiation at 1 meter from the iso-center was 1.091R/1000MU when the radiation beam was pointing downward, 1.296R/1000MU when the beam pointed laterally. The beam stopper leakage was measured as 299.4 mR/1000MU at the exterior panel of the gantry. When magnet was off (B=0), the head leakage was measured as 198.6mR/1000MU. The scatter radiation at 1 meter was 1.153R/1000MU when beam pointed downward, 1.287R/1000MU when beam pointed laterally. The beam stopper leakage was measured as 309.4 mR/1000MU at the exterior panel of the gantry. Conclusion: The measurements indicate that the scatter and leakage radiation from the integrated MR-Linac system are in-line with the expected values. The beam stopper leakage is approximately 300 mR/1000MU. The leakage and scatter difference with the magnetic field ON and OFF was within 5%. The authors received a corporate sponsored grant from Elekta which is the vendor of

  13. A Modified Time-Delay Addition Method to Extract Resistive Leakage Current of MOSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodsuz, Masume; Mirzaie, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Metal oxide surge arresters are one of the most important equipment for power system protection against switching and lightning over-voltages. High-energy stresses and environmental features are the main factors which degrade surge arresters. In order to verify surge arresters good condition, their monitoring is necessary. The majority of surge arrester monitoring techniques is based on total leakage current decomposition of their capacitive and resistive components. This paper introduces a new approach based on time-delay addition method to extract the resistive current from the total leakage current without measuring voltage signal. Surge arrester model for calculating leakage current has been performed in ATP-EMTP. In addition, the signal processing has been done using MATLAB software. To show the accuracy of the proposed method, experimental tests have been performed to extract resistive leakage current by the proposed method.

  14. Evaluation of Winter Hardiness in Peppermint (Mentha piperita L. by Electrolyte Leakage Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nezami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peppermint or Mentha is an aromatic, medicinal and perennial herb from Lamiaceae family which has been used for healing a variety of diseases such as common cold, bronchitis, nausea, flatulence, diarrhea, vomiting, indigestion, stomach cramps, menstrual cramps and parasitoids. Peppermint is largely cultivated in Indiana, Mexican and California for the production of peppermint oil. Mentha reveals suitable winter hardiness in warm and temperate regions, But in cold areas, it confronts with winter stresses particularly freezing stress. So recognizing the freeze tolerance of peppermint for successful planting and using of this plant in cold regions such as Mashhad, Iran where peppermint is cultivated now is important. Among the many laboratory methods which have been developed to evaluate freez ing tolerance of plants, electrolyte leakage (EL test is widely used. This test is based on this principle that any damage to the cell membranes results in enhanced leakage of solutes into the apoplastic water, hence measuring the amount of leakage after stress treatments provides an estimation of tissue injury. Often, the 50% level of relative EL, or index of injury, is simply equaled to 50% sample mortality. This study was done to evaluate the freeze tolerance of peppermint organs by electrolyte leakage test and also to determine the winter survival ability of this plant by lethal temperature at which 50% of electrolytes leaked from the cell (LT50el. Materials and methods: In order to evaluate the cold tolerance of peppermint, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with four replications was carried out under controlled conditions. For this aim samples from stolon and rhizome of peppermint were selected monthly (December 2010 to April 2011 from Research Field, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and were exposed to low temperatures (from 0 to -20°C with 4°C intervals in a thermo gradient freezer at

  15. Monitoring underground water leakage pattern by ground penetrating radar (GPR) using 800 MHz antenna frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, T. S. T.; Ismail, M. P.; Ahmad, M. R.; Amin, M. S. M.; Ismail, M. A.; Sani, S.; Masenwat, N. A.; Basri, N. S. M.

    2018-01-01

    Water is the most treasure natural resources, however, a huge amount of water are lost during its distribution that leads to water leakage problem. The leaks meant the waste of money and created more economic loss to treat and fix the damaged pipe. Researchers and engineers have put tremendous attempts and effort, to solve the water leakage problem especially in water leakage of buried pipeline. An advanced technology of ground penetrating radar (GPR) has been established as one of the non-destructive testing (NDT) method to detect the underground water pipe leaking. This paper focuses on the ability of GPR in water utility field especially on detection of water leaks in the underground pipeline distribution. A series of laboratory experiments were carried out using 800-MHz antenna, where the performance of GPR on detecting underground pipeline and locating water leakage was investigated and validated. A prototype to recreate water-leaking system was constructed using a 4-inch PVC pipe. Different diameter of holes, i.e. ¼ inch, ½ inch, and ¾ inch, were drilled into the pipe to simulate the water leaking. The PVC pipe was buried at the depth of 60 cm into the test bed that was filled with dry sand. 15 litres of water was injected into the PVC pipe. The water leakage patterns in term of radargram data were gathered. The effectiveness of the GPR in locating the underground water leakage was ascertained, after the results were collected and verified.

  16. Pressure Gauges Monitor Leakage Past Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven A.

    1990-01-01

    Method devised to measure leakage of gas past each of two sets of primary and secondary seals into common volume from which aggregate flow measured. Although method applicable only to specific combination of flow configuration and thermal conditions, it serves as example of more general approach involving use of statistical analysis to extract additional information from measurements.

  17. Quantifying information leakage of randomized protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio; Legay, Axel; Malacaria, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of information leakage provides a quantitative evaluation of the security of a system. We propose the usage of Markovian processes to model deterministic and probabilistic systems. By using a methodology generalizing the lattice of information approach we model refined attacker...... on the Onion Routing protocol....

  18. Solving the problem of valve stem leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.

    1976-01-01

    Engineering solutions to valve stem leakage, in systems carrying expensive heavy water under pressure, have progressed from changing packing brands (failure) to leak collection (partial success) to elimination of small packed valves and an improved valve packing strategy involving stable packing materials, live Belleville spring-loading of packing, and issuance of a detailed stuffing box specification (success). (E.C.B.)

  19. The research of the test-class method based on interface object in the software integration test of the large container inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shaohua; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Gao Wenhuan; Kang Kejun

    2000-01-01

    Software test is the important stage in software process. The has been mature theory, method and model for unit test in practice. But for integration test, there is not regular method to adhere to. The author presents a new method, developed during the development of the large container inspection system, named test class method based on interface object. In this method a set of basic test-class based on the concept of class in the object-oriented method is established and the method of combining the interface graph and the class set is used to describe the test process. So the strict control and the scientific management for the test process are achieved. The conception of test database is introduced in this method, thus the traceability and the repeatability of test process are improved

  20. The research of the test-class method based on interface object in the software integration test of the large container inspection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shaohua; Chen Zhiqiang; Zhang Li; Gao Wenhuan; Kang Kejun

    2001-01-01

    Software test is the important stage in software process. There has been mature theory, method and model for unit test in practice. But for integration test, there is not regular method to adhere to. The author presents a new method, developed during the development of the large container inspection system, named test-class method based on interface object. A set of basis test-class based on the concept of class in the object-oriented method is established and the method of combining the interface graph and the class set is used to describe the test process. So the strict control and the scientific management for the test process are achieved. The conception of test database is introduced in this method, thus the traceability and the repeatability of test process are improved

  1. Large-scale, multi-compartment tests in PANDA for LWR-containment analysis and code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paladino, Domenico; Auban, Olivier; Zboray, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale thermal-hydraulic PANDA facility has been used for the last years for investigating passive decay heat removal systems and related containment phenomena relevant for next-generation and current light water reactors. As part of the 5. EURATOM framework program project TEMPEST, a series of tests was performed in PANDA to experimentally investigate the distribution of hydrogen inside the containment and its effect on the performance of the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) designed for the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). In a postulated severe accident, a large amount of hydrogen could be released in the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) as a consequence of the cladding Metal- Water (M-W) reaction and discharged together with steam to the Drywell (DW) compartment. In PANDA tests, hydrogen was simulated by using helium. This paper illustrates the results of a TEMPEST test performed in PANDA and named as Test T1.2. In Test T1.2, the gas stratification (steam-helium) patterns forming in the large-scale multi-compartment PANDA DW, and the effect of non-condensable gas (helium) on the overall behaviour of the PCCS were identified. Gas mixing and stratification in a large-scale multi-compartment system are currently being further investigated in PANDA in the frame of the OECD project SETH. The testing philosophy in this new PANDA program is to produce data for code validation in relation to specific phenomena, such as: gas stratification in the containment, gas transport between containment compartments, wall condensation, etc. These types of phenomena are driven by buoyant high-momentum injections (jets) and/or low momentum injection (plumes), depending on the transient scenario. In this context, the new SETH tests in PANDA are particularly valuable to produce an experimental database for code assessment. This paper also presents an overview of the PANDA SETH tests and the major improvements in instrumentation carried out in the PANDA

  2. Acoustic control of sodium leakage in valve gates of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trykov, E.L.; Kovtun, S.N.; Anan'ev, A.A.; Yugov, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    Short description of sodium bench and acoustic investigation results on leakage monitoring of valves DN10 and DN40 are given. It is shown that acoustic method can be used successfully to control the leakages of sodium valves. Leakages on both type of valves increase the acoustic signal dispersion by 2-3 orders. For each type of valve acoustic system of leakage determination allows to conduct the preliminary graduation of signal dispersion on the sodium discharge rate. It make possible not only to record the leakage presence but also to determine the sodium discharge rate through the valve during the leakage [ru

  3. Test plan for immobilization of salt-containing surrogate mixed wastes using polyester resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyani, R.K.; Douglas, J.C.; Hendrickson, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Past operations at many Department of Energy (DOE) sites have resulted in the generation of several waste streams with high salt content. These wastes contain listed and characteristic hazardous constituents and are radioactive. The salts contained in the wastes are primarily chloride, sulfate, nitrate, metal oxides, and hydroxides. DOE has placed these types of wastes under the purview of the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). The MWFA has been tasked with developing and facilitating the implementation of technologies to treat these wastes in support of customer needs and requirements. The MWFA has developed a Technology Development Requirements Document (TDRD), which specifies performance requirements for technology owners and developers to use as a framework in developing effective waste treatment solutions. This project will demonstrate the use of polyester resins in encapsulating and solidifying DOE's mixed wastes containing salts, as an alternative to conventional and other emerging immobilization technologies

  4. Retention and marginal leakage of provisional crowns cemented with provisional cements enriched with chlorhexidine diacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Chweidan, Harry; Matalon, Shlomo; Pilo, Raphael

    2007-11-01

    Provisional crowns cemented with provisional luting agents are susceptible to washout, marginal leakage, and secondary caries when placed for a prolonged period. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of incorporating chlorhexidine diacetate (antibacterial agent) into provisional cements on retention and marginal leakage of provisional crowns in vitro. Provisional crowns of acrylic resin (Duralay) were fabricated for 12 intact human molars with rounded-shoulder preparations. The 12 provisional crowns were luted individually with Temp Bond, Temp Bond NE, and Freegenol provisional cements with and without incorporation of chlorhexidine diacetate (CHDA) salt. Each test group included the same 12 specimens. Specimens with no luting agent served as the control (n=12). Specimens were thermal cycled 100 times (5 degrees C and 55 degrees C) with a 10-second dwell time, stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 6 days, and then immersed in a 0.5% basic fuchsin at 37 degrees C for 6 hours. Seven days after cementation, removal test of the crowns (tensile retention test) was conducted with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Marginal leakage was assessed with a 5-level dye penetration scale. Results of the retention test were subjected to a 2-way ANOVA with repeated measures. A Bonferroni test was used to compare the means. Marginal leakage data were subjected to a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed ranks test. All hypothesis testing was conducted at the 95% level of confidence. Retention of provisional crowns cemented with Freegenol enriched with CHDA increased 3-fold to an average level of 80.9 N. However, incorporation of CHDA into Temp Bond or Temp Bond NE did not affect retention. CHDA incorporated into the cements had no significant effect on the marginal leakage of all the tested cements. The addition of CHDA increased retention of Freegenol and had no significant effect on the marginal leakage of the tested cements.

  5. Endurance test report of rubber sealing materials for the containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, R.; Watanabe, K.; Hanashima, K.

    2015-01-01

    In the event of a nuclear power plant accident such as a core meltdown and a cooling system failure, the containment contains radioactive materials released from the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the activity of the radioactive materials and the effects of radiation in the vicinity of the plant. Since high sealing performance and high pressure resistance are required of the containment, a silicone or EPDM rubber gasket with high heat and radiation resistance is used for the sealing of the sealing boundary of the containment. In recent years, it has been shown that a large amount of steam is released into the containment in the case of a severe accident. Consequently, radiation resistance at high temperature as well as steam resistance is required of the rubber gasket placed at the sealing boundary. However, the steam resistance of silicone rubber is not necessarily as good as that of EPDM rubber. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the sealing characteristics of rubber gaskets in such a degrading environment in a severe accident. O. Kato et al. [1] conducted a study on the degradation status of rubber gaskets and their application limits at high temperature. However, few studies have evaluated rubber gaskets in high-temperature radiation and steam environments. In this study, we degraded silicone rubber and EPDM rubber used for the containment in the high-temperature radiation and steam environments expected to occur in a severe accident and evaluated the useful life of the rubber as a sealing material by estimating the change in its performance as a sealing material from the change in permanent compressive strain in the rubber. (author)

  6. Probabilistic finite element investigation of prestressing loss in nuclear containment wall segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balomenos, Georgios P., E-mail: gbalomen@uwaterloo.ca; Pandey, Mahesh D., E-mail: mdpandey@uwaterloo.ca

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Probabilistic finite element framework for assessing concrete strain distribution. • Investigation of prestressing loss based on concrete strain distribution. • Application to 3D nuclear containment wall segments. • Use of ABAQUS with python programing for Monte Carlo simulation. - Abstract: The main function of the concrete containment structures is to prevent radioactive leakage to the environment in case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The Canadian Standard CSA N287.6 (2011) proposes periodic inspections, i.e., pressure testing, in order to assess the strength and design criteria of the containment (proof test) and the leak tightness of the containment boundary (leakage rate test). During these tests, the concrete strains are measured and are expected to have a distribution due to several uncertainties. Therefore, this study aims to propose a probabilistic finite element analysis framework. Then, investigates the relationship between the concrete strains and the prestressing loss, in order to examine the possibility of estimating the average prestressing loss during pressure testing inspections. The results indicate that the concrete strain measurements during the leakage rate test may provide information with respect to the prestressing loss of the bonded system. In addition, the demonstrated framework can be further used for the probabilistic finite element analysis of real scale containments.

  7. Probabilistic finite element investigation of prestressing loss in nuclear containment wall segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balomenos, Georgios P.; Pandey, Mahesh D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Probabilistic finite element framework for assessing concrete strain distribution. • Investigation of prestressing loss based on concrete strain distribution. • Application to 3D nuclear containment wall segments. • Use of ABAQUS with python programing for Monte Carlo simulation. - Abstract: The main function of the concrete containment structures is to prevent radioactive leakage to the environment in case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The Canadian Standard CSA N287.6 (2011) proposes periodic inspections, i.e., pressure testing, in order to assess the strength and design criteria of the containment (proof test) and the leak tightness of the containment boundary (leakage rate test). During these tests, the concrete strains are measured and are expected to have a distribution due to several uncertainties. Therefore, this study aims to propose a probabilistic finite element analysis framework. Then, investigates the relationship between the concrete strains and the prestressing loss, in order to examine the possibility of estimating the average prestressing loss during pressure testing inspections. The results indicate that the concrete strain measurements during the leakage rate test may provide information with respect to the prestressing loss of the bonded system. In addition, the demonstrated framework can be further used for the probabilistic finite element analysis of real scale containments.

  8. Radioactive particulate release associated with the DOT specification 6M container under hypothetical accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.; Raney, P.J.

    1986-02-01

    A testing program was conducted to determine the leakage of depleted uranium dioxide powder (DUO) from the inner containment components of the US Department of Transportation's (DOT) specification 6M container under hypothetical accident conditions. Depleted uranium dioxide was selected as a surrogate for plutonium oxide because of the similarities in the powder characteristics, density and particle size, and because of the special handling and special facilities required for plutonium oxide. The DUO was packaged inside food pack cans in three different configurations inside the 2R vessel of the 6M container. The amount of DUO powder leakage ranged from none detectable ( -7 g) to a high of 1 x 10 -3 g. The combination of gravity, vibration and pressure produced the highest leakage of DUO. Containers that had hermetic seals (leak rates -4 atm cc/min) did not leak any detectable amount ( -7 g) of DUO under the test conditions. Impact forces had no effect on the leakage of particles with the packaging configurations used. 23 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Decreased Leakage Rate of Colonic Anastomoses by Tachosil Coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal anastomotic coating has been proposed as a means to lower the leakage rate. Prior to clinical testing, coating materials need thorough experimental evaluation to ensure safety and efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate Tachosil as an anastomotic coating agent. Technically...... coating (10/40 versus 20/40 in controls; P=0.037). However, more cases of large bowel obstruction were found in the Tachosil group (12/40 versus 0/40 in controls; P... studies are needed to clarify the efficacy of Tachosil anastomotic coating....

  10. Treatment of sodium spills and leakage detection at loop-type fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, K.; Fortmann, M.; Lang, H.; Moellerfeld, H.

    1979-01-01

    Sodium spills are of great importance in the safety analysis for sodium cooled nuclear plants. Large leakages can lead to a depletion of the heat transfer system and cause the loss of cooling of the reactor. Further the hot sodium may attack structural materials. In areas with air atmosphere large amounts of sodium can burn and cause great damages. Therefore the control of large leakages is an indispensable task in design and construction of sodium cooled reactor systems. Because of the typical arrangement of widespread long pipe systems loop type plants are subject to a gradually greater risk of damage than pool type plants. The sodium catching devices of the SNR-300 are described and their function is illustrated as an example for the treatment of large spills. Since the equipment for the control of large amounts of leaking sodium is very expensive, great efforts are made in order to save costs and to decrease safety problems. It is aimed to minimize the probability of such events to a degree that they no longer are to be considered realistic. The advantageous operating conditions and the favourable material properties support this aim. Under the well known keyword 'leak-before-rupture' criterion this task is pursued. Crack growth measurements are made at structural materials under LMFBR conditions, and leakage detecting systems are being developed. Some test results concerning this task are described. Despite the fact that there are good chances to verify the leak-before-rupture criterion it is assumed that certain hypothetical accidents occur, which are to be considered in the design of the reactor plant. The extremely improbable Bethe-Tait-accident (HCDA) is such an event. It would lead to a super spill, that means to the complete depletion of the reactor tank. For the SNR-300 plant a system is provided that is able to catch this super spill and the core melt. This core catcher must withstand the high temperatures and remove the decay heat. The purpose of this

  11. Current Status of Aerosol Generation and Measurement Facilities for the Verification Test of Containment Filtered Venting System in KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; An, Sang Mo; Ha, Kwang Soon; Kim, Hwan Yeol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the design of aerosol generation and measurement systems are explained and present circumstances are also described. In addition, the aerosol test plan is shown. Containment Filtered Venting System (FCVS) is one of the safety features to reduce the amount of released fission product into the environment by depressurizing the containment. Since Chernobyl accident, the regulatory agency in several countries in Europe such as France, Germany, Sweden, etc. have been demanded the installation of the CFVS. Moreover, the feasibility study on the CFVS was also performed in U.S. After the Fukushima accident, there is a need to improve a containment venting or installation of depressurizing facility in Korea. As a part of a Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy (MOTIE) project, KAERI has been conducted the integrated performance verification test of CFVS. As a part of the test, aerosol generation system and measurement systems were designed to simulate the fission products behavior. To perform the integrated verification test of CFVS, aerosol generation and measurement system was designed and manufactured. The component operating condition is determined to consider the severe accident condition. The test will be performed in normal conditions at first, and will be conducted under severe condition, high pressure and high temperature. Undesirable difficulties which disturb the elaborate test are expected, such as thermophoresis on the pipe, vapor condensation on aerosol, etc.

  12. Carbon Leakage, Free Allocation and Linking Emissions Trading Schemes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiche, Fitsum G.; Weishaar, Stefan E.; Couwenberg, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    A sub-global emissions trading scheme (ETS) risks harming competitiveness and causing carbon leakage. These concerns cast doubt on the efficiency and environmental effectiveness of unilateral climate policies. ETSs implemented thus far include measures to address competitiveness and leakage

  13. Influence of the internal anatomy on the leakage of root canals filled with thermoplastic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jadaa, Anas; Attin, T; Peltomäki, T; Heumann, C; Schmidlin, P R; Paquè, F

    2017-10-11

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of the internal anatomy on the leakage of root canals filled with the thermoplastic technique. The upper central incisors (UCI) and mesial roots of the lower molars (MRLM) (n = 12 each) were tested regarding leakage using the gas-enhanced permeation test (GEPT) after root filling. The quality of the root fillings was assessed using micro-computed tomography (μCT) by superimposing scans before and after treatment to calculate unfilled volume. The calculated void volume was compared between the groups and correlated to the measured leakage values. Data were analyzed using t test and Pearson's correlation tests (p UCI and MRLM (13.7 ± 6.2% vs. 14.2 ± 6.8%, respectively). However, significantly more leakage was evident in the MRLM (p UCI (R 2  = 0.467, p = 0.126). MRLM showed higher leakage values, which correlated to the void volume in the root canal fillings. Care should always be taken while doing root canal treatments, but attention to teeth with known/expected complex root canal anatomy should be considered.

  14. Testing of the structure of macromolecular polymer films containing solid active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelcskei, E. [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Eoetvoes u. 6 (Hungary); Suevegh, K. [Laboratory of Nuclear Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Marek, T. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Research Group for Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry, Eoetvoes Lorand University, H-1518 Budapest 112, P.O. Box 32 (Hungary); Regdon, G. [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Eoetvoes u. 6 (Hungary); Pintye-Hodi, K., E-mail: klara.hodi@pharm.u-szeged.h [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Eoetvoes u. 6 (Hungary)

    2011-07-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the structure of free films of Eudragit{sup L} 30D-55 containing different concentrations (0%, 1% or 5%) of diclofenac sodium by positron annihilation spectroscopy. The data revealed that the size of the free-volume holes and the lifetimes of ortho-positronium atoms decreased with increase of the API concentration. Films containing 5% of the API exhibited a different behavior during storage (17 {sup o}C, 65% relative humidity (RH)) in consequence of the uptake of water from the air. -- Highlights: {yields} The aim of the present study was to investigate the structure of free films of Eudragit{sup L} 30D-55 containing different concentrations (0%, 1% or 5%) of diclofenac sodium by positron annihilation spectroscopy. {yields} The data revealed that the size of the free-volume holes and the lifetimes of ortho-positronium atoms decreased with increase of the API concentration (). {yields} The API distorts the original polymer structure, but as time goes by, the metastable structure relaxes and it is almost totally restored after 3 weeks of storage (17 {sup o}C, 65% RH).

  15. Releasable activity and maximum permissible leakage rate within a transport cask of Tehran Research Reactor fuel samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaeian Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Containment of a transport cask during both normal and accident conditions is important to the health and safety of the public and of the operators. Based on IAEA regulations, releasable activity and maximum permissible volumetric leakage rate within the cask containing fuel samples of Tehran Research Reactor enclosed in an irradiated capsule are calculated. The contributions to the total activity from the four sources of gas, volatile, fines, and corrosion products are treated separately. These calculations are necessary to identify an appropriate leak test that must be performed on the cask and the results can be utilized as the source term for dose evaluation in the safety assessment of the cask.

  16. Assessment of different dyes used in leakage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Ferk, Stephan; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Deckert, Andreas; Legner, Milos; Staehle, Hans Joerg

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this in vitro study was to identify the most suitable dye for endodontic dye leakage studies, which could be a further step towards standardisation. The root canals of 70 extracted, single-rooted human adult teeth were enlarged to apical size 50 using hand instruments. The teeth were divided into seven groups (n = 10 each), and all root canals were completely filled by injection with one of the following dyes: methylene blue 0.5% and 5%, blue ink, black ink, eosin 5%, basic fuchsin 0.5% and drawing ink. Transverse root sections from the coronal, middle and apical part of the roots were examined, and the percentage of the dentine penetrated by dye was evaluated by software-supported light microscopy. In addition, the range of particle size of drawing ink particles was evaluated. There were conspicuous differences in the relative dye penetration into the root dentine and the penetration behaviour in the different root sections (two-way ANOVA, both p < 0.0001). One dye (drawing ink) penetrated less into the root dentine compared with all the others (p <0.0001). The particle size of this agent (0.1-2 microm) corresponds best with the size range of a representative selection of 21 species of pathogenic endodontic bacteria. Compared to the other dyes tested, drawing ink appears to be superior for use in endodontic dye leakage studies. The penetration behaviour into the root dentine of all the other dyes tested might be one factor that limits the applicability of these dyes in dye leakage studies.

  17. Laboratory performance testing of an extruded bitumen containing a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based, low-level aqueous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattus, A.J.; Kaczmarsky, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory results of a comprehensive, regulatory performance test program, utilizing an extruded bitumen and a surrogate, sodium nitrate-based waste, have been compiled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Using a 53 millimeter, Werner and Pfleiderer extruder, operated by personnel of WasteChem Corporation of Paramus, New Jersey, laboratory-scale, molded samples of type three, air blown bitumen were prepared for laboratory performance testing. A surrogate, low-level, mixed liquid waste, formulated to represent an actual on-site waste at ORNL, containing about 30 wt % sodium nitrate, in addition to eight heavy metals, cold cesium and strontium was utilized. Samples tested contained three levels of waste loading: that is, forty, fifty and sixty wt % salt. Performance test results include the ninety day ANS 16.1 leach test, with leach indices reported for all cations and anions, in addition to the EP Toxicity test, at all levels of waste loading. Additionally, test results presented also include the unconfined compressive strength and surface morphology utilizing scanning electron microscopy. Data presented include correlations between waste form loading and test results, in addition to their relationship to regulatory performance requirements

  18. Methane leakage in natural gas operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennervik, A.

    1992-01-01

    The world gas industry is efficient in conservation of natural gas within its systems. As the influence of methane as an infra-red absorbent gas has been more widely recognized, the considerations of methane's greenhouse effect has become vitally important to gas companies around the world. The industry is universally environmentally conscious. natural gas transmission and distribution companies want to maintain their image as suppliers of clean fuel. Further reductions in methane leakage --- particularly in older distribution systems --- can, should and will be pursued. Unfortunately, there has been little exchange of views on methane leakages between commentators on environmental matters and gas companies and organizations. There is absolutely no need for the industry to avoid the issue of greenhouse gases. Without industry involvement, the environmental debate concerning fossil fuels could lead to selective interpretation of scientific views and available evidence. Companies and authorities would be presented with confusing, contradictory evidence on which to base policy approaches and regulations

  19. Follow-On Vapor Containment Tests of the Rapid Response System Glovebox

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arca, Victor

    1997-01-01

    ...) glovebox in April 1996. The tests were conducted by generating a cloud of the simulant methyl salicylate inside the glovebox and measuring the concentration of any simulant that permeated to the operator workspace...

  20. LLNL Containment Program nuclear test effects and geologic data base: glossary and parameter definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, N.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report lists, defines, and updates Parameters in DBASE, an LLNL test effects data bank in which data are stored from experiments performed at NTS and other test sites. Parameters are listed by subject and by number. Part 2 of this report presents the same information for parameters for which some of the data may be classified; it was issued in 1979 and is not being reissued at this time as it is essentially unchanged

  1. Measurement Methods to Determine Air Leakage Between Adjacent Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hult, Erin L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Price, Phillip N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Air leakage between adjacent zones of a building can lead to indoor air quality and energy efficiency concerns, however there is no existing standard for measuring inter-zonal leakage. In this study, synthesized data and field measurements are analyzed in order to explore the uncertainty associated with different methods for collecting and analyzing fan pressurization measurements to calculate interzone leakage.

  2. Time reversal technique for gas leakage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A O; Polovinka, Yu A

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic remote sensing of subsea gas leakage traditionally uses sonars as active acoustic sensors and hydrophones picking up the sound generated by a leak as passive sensors. When gas leaks occur underwater, bubbles are produced and emit sound at frequencies intimately related to their sizes. The experimental implementation of an acoustic time-reversal mirror (TRM) is now well established in underwater acoustics. In the basic TRM experiment, a probe source emits a pulse that is received on an array of sensors, time reversed, and re-emitted. After time reversal, the resulting field focuses back at the probe position. In this study, a method for enhancing operation of the passive receiving system has been proposed by using it in the regime of TRM. Two factors, the local character of the acoustic emission signal caused by the leakage and a resonant nature of the bubble radiation at their birth, make particularly effective scattering with the conjugate wave (CW). Analytical calculations are performed for the scattering of CW wave on a single bubble when CW is formed by bubble birthing wail received on an array, time reversed, and re-emitted. The quality of leakage detection depends on the spatio-temporal distribution of ambient noise.

  3. Headspace concentrations of explosive vapors in containers designed for canine testing and training: theory, experiment, and canine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotspeich, Erica; Kitts, Kelley; Goodpaster, John

    2012-07-10

    It is a common misconception that the amount of explosive is the chief contributor to the quantity of vapor that is available to trained canines. In fact, this quantity (known as odor availability) depends not only on the amount of explosive material, but also the container volume, explosive vapor pressure and temperature. In order to better understand odor availability, headspace experiments were conducted and the results were compared to theory. The vapor-phase concentrations of three liquid explosives (nitromethane, nitroethane and nitropropane) were predicted using the Ideal Gas Law for containers of various volumes that are in use for canine testing. These predictions were verified through experiments that varied the amount of sample, the container size, and the temperature. These results demonstrated that the amount of sample that is needed to saturate different sized containers is small, predictable and agrees well with theory. In general, and as expected, once the headspace of a container is saturated, any subsequent increase in sample volume will not result in the release of more vapors. The ability of canines to recognize and alert to differing amounts of nitromethane has also been studied. In particular, it was found that the response of trained canines is independent of the amount of nitromethane present, provided it is a sufficient quantity to saturate the container in which it is held. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The pharmaceutical vial capping process: Container closure systems, capping equipment, regulatory framework, and seal quality tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Buettiker, Jean-Pierre; Roehl, Holger; Lam, Philippe; Brown, Helen; Luemkemann, Joerg; Adler, Michael; Huwyler, Joerg; Streubel, Alexander; Mohl, Silke

    2016-02-01

    Parenteral drug products are protected by appropriate primary packaging to protect against environmental factors, including potential microbial contamination during shelf life duration. The most commonly used CCS configuration for parenteral drug products is the glass vial, sealed with a rubber stopper and an aluminum crimp cap. In combination with an adequately designed and controlled aseptic fill/finish processes, a well-designed and characterized capping process is indispensable to ensure product quality and integrity and to minimize rejections during the manufacturing process. In this review, the health authority requirements and expectations related to container closure system quality and container closure integrity are summarized. The pharmaceutical vial, the rubber stopper, and the crimp cap are described. Different capping techniques are critically compared: The most common capping equipment with a rotating capping plate produces the lowest amount of particle. The strength and challenges of methods to control the capping process are discussed. The residual seal force method can characterize the capping process independent of the used capping equipment or CCS. We analyze the root causes of several cosmetic defects associated with the vial capping process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Simulation of buoyancy induced gas mixing tests performed in a large scale containment facility using GOTHIC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Z.; Chin, Y.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This paper compares containment thermal-hydraulics simulations performed using GOTHIC against a past test set of large scale buoyancy induced helium-air-steam mixing experiments that had been performed at the AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. A number of typical post-accident containment phenomena, including thermal/gas stratification, natural convection, cool air entrainment, steam condensation on concrete walls and active local air cooler, were covered. The results provide useful insights into hydrogen gas mixing behaviour following a loss-of-coolant accident and demonstrate GOTHIC's capability in simulating these phenomena. (author)

  6. Simulation of buoyancy induced gas mixing tests performed in a large scale containment facility using GOTHIC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.; Chin, Y.S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper compares containment thermal-hydraulics simulations performed using GOTHIC against a past test set of large scale buoyancy induced helium-air-steam mixing experiments that had been performed at the AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. A number of typical post-accident containment phenomena, including thermal/gas stratification, natural convection, cool air entrainment, steam condensation on concrete walls and active local air cooler, were covered. The results provide useful insights into hydrogen gas mixing behaviour following a loss-of-coolant accident and demonstrate GOTHIC's capability in simulating these phenomena. (author)

  7. Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Bryan W.

    2012-08-23

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

  8. Simulations of hydraulic fracturing and leakage in sedimentary basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lothe, Ane Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    sliding, used as input in the failure criteria, have minor impact on timing and amount of leakage. However, high values result in some time-delay, and thereby less leakage from overpressured compartments. Sensitivity tests of the Poisson's ratio and Young's modulus of the caprock, which controls Biot's constant, show an effect on the overpressure. Defining Biot's constant to 1, gives too early pressure accumulation. Lower values of Biot's constant (larger than0.85) give a present day pressure distribution closer to the one observed in wells. How to obtain a pressure difference across faults is tested on the Tune Field data set. Two different fault maps are used, one with only large faults interpreted, and one with both large and small faults included. High-pressure differences are difficult to obtain when the transmissibility across one individual fault is reduced. The transmissibilities of a network of small faults have to be reduced to match the pressure measured in wells. Then, either our transmissibility fault models are wrong, or a relay zone between larger faults is more sealing than expected. In addition, the fluid flow path can be more complex than expected, and can only be understood with a multi-layer model. The secondary oil migration modelling carried out using different pressure history cases; show that overpressures have a major impact on the migration pathways. The resolution in the fault interpretation is important for the simulation results, both for pressure distribution and for hydrocarbon migration. Minor deformation bands are described from experiments and from onshore fieldwork in Brumunddal. These are small faults situated in a sandstone reservoir that will have influence on lateral fluid flow. (Author)

  9. Comparison of test and earthquake response modeling of a nuclear power plant containment building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactor building of a BWR plant was subjected to dynamic testing, a minor earthquake, and a strong earthquake at different times. Analytical models simulating each of these events were devised by previous investigators. A comparison of the characteristics of these models is made in this paper. The different modeling assumptions involved in the different simulation analyses restrict the validity of the models for general use and also narrow the comparison down to only a few modes. The dynamic tests successfully identified the first mode of the soil-structure system.

  10. Comparison of test and earthquake response modeling of a nuclear power plant containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.; Hsieh, B.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactor building of a BWR plant was subjected to dynamic testing, a minor earthquake, and a strong earthquake at different times. Analytical models simulating each of these events were devised by previous investigators. A comparison of the characteristics of these models is made in this paper. The different modeling assumptions involved in the different simulation analyses restrict the validity of the models for general use and also narrow the comparison down to only a few modes. The dynamic tests successfully identified the first mode of the soil-structure system

  11. In-Situ Leak Testing And Replacement Of Glovebox Isolator, Or Containment Unit Gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Julio M.; Macdonald, John M.; Steckle, Jr., Warren P.

    2004-11-02

    A test plug for in-situ testing a glove installed in a glovebox is provided that uses a top plate and a base plate, and a diametrically expandable sealing mechanism fitting between the two plates. The sealing mechanism engages the base plate to diametrically expand when the variable distance between the top plate and the bottom plate is reduced. An inlet valve included on the top plate is used to introducing a pressurized gas to the interior of the glove, and a pressure gauge located on the top plate is used to monitor the interior glove pressure.

  12. Rotating autoclave hydrogenation test with flue dust containing tin from Kayser Smelter A. G. , Berlin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassl

    1942-10-01

    A content breakdown of the dust was given with large traces of Pb and Zn and lesser traces of Cu, Sb, As. Comparison tests were run in hope that these metals would be a usable substitute for tin oxalate, which was rapidly becoming scarce. Since Scholven was looking for a nitrogen-free chlorine compound to replace ammonium chloride, tests were run on NH/sub 4/Cl as well as sulfur monochloride. The dust offered a more favorable decomposition of solid carbon. If ammonium chloride were added to the dust, differences between it and tin oxalate in asphalt reduction, splitting and gasification were not measurable. Sulfur monochloride seemed to work better with the dust than with tin oxalate in asphalt reduction, probably because of the sulfides formed from other metals in the dust. Were the dust used in a sulfide state instead of an oxide, it was stated that 0.2% would give the same results as 0.06% tin oxalate. Temperatures were given in milli-volts (MV or mV). As the test instruments and test materials differed, so apparently did the MV readings in relation to /sup 0/C. 1 table.

  13. Neutron radiographic testing of samples of special concrete containing recycled PET granules as aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Antonio Carlos Alves de; Crispim, Verginia Reis

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at inspecting microcracks in test specimens of special concrete, through neutron radiography tests. The thermal neutron flux used was extracted from the J-9 irradiation channel, placed in the thermal column of Argonauta/IEN/CNEN/RJ reactor, where a neutron radiographic system is installed. The test specimens inspected were molded in a cylindrical shape, with standard concrete and modified concrete where coarse sand was substituted by granules of recycled PET. They were submitted to compression in a SHIMADSU UH F 1000 press, causing microcracks. Then, slices of 50 μm thickness were obtained using an electrical saw. Gadolinium nitrate was used as contrast liquid in order to enhance the visualization of those microcracks. The Neutron Radiography technique proved to be appropriate for this kind of inspection, allowing to clearly visualizing the microcracks. Recycled PET granules met ABNT standards, and may be used in the construction of low income people houses, as structural concrete (25 % PP) or house floors (25% to 50% PEAD). The mechanical properties of compression and elasticity demonstrated for this special concrete, on Civil Engineering conventional tests, and by the neutron radiographic images obtained, showed that its use is viable even for civil construction in areas subject to seismic vents. (author)

  14. Neutron radiographic testing of samples of special concrete containing recycled PET granules as aggregate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Antonio Carlos Alves de; Crispim, Verginia Reis [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Toledo Filho, Romildo D., E-mail: toledo@coc.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Civil; Ferreira, Francisco J.O., E-mail: fferreira@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This study aimed at inspecting microcracks in test specimens of special concrete, through neutron radiography tests. The thermal neutron flux used was extracted from the J-9 irradiation channel, placed in the thermal column of Argonauta/IEN/CNEN/RJ reactor, where a neutron radiographic system is installed. The test specimens inspected were molded in a cylindrical shape, with standard concrete and modified concrete where coarse sand was substituted by granules of recycled PET. They were submitted to compression in a SHIMADSU UH F 1000 press, causing microcracks. Then, slices of 50 {mu}m thickness were obtained using an electrical saw. Gadolinium nitrate was used as contrast liquid in order to enhance the visualization of those microcracks. The Neutron Radiography technique proved to be appropriate for this kind of inspection, allowing to clearly visualizing the microcracks. Recycled PET granules met ABNT standards, and may be used in the construction of low income people houses, as structural concrete (25 % PP) or house floors (25% to 50% PEAD). The mechanical properties of compression and elasticity demonstrated for this special concrete, on Civil Engineering conventional tests, and by the neutron radiographic images obtained, showed that its use is viable even for civil construction in areas subject to seismic vents. (author)

  15. In situ testing of waste forms and container materials: Contribution to the identification of their long term behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseghem, P. Van; Kursten, B.; Valcke, E.; Serra, H.; Fays, J.; Sneyers, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews in situ projects that have been carried out in the underground laboratory in Boom Clay in Mol in Belgium. The projects involved in situ interaction between candidate container materials, nuclear waste glasses or cements and the Boom Clay. The in situ tests on container materials showed a strong corrosion of C-steel, so that a new container (overpack) material is being considered actually in Belgium, namely stainless steel. The interaction between waste glass or cements and Boom Clay results in reaction layers of a few hundred μm thickness. These layers were successfully characterised in detail, and the reaction processes based on these analyses interpreted. The outputs of the in situ tests on the different materials are compared, and possible interferences discussed. The added value of these in situ tests as part of the global objective of evaluating the long term behaviour of the materials in a disposal rock, in conjunction with laboratory tests and modelling is discussed. (authors)

  16. Effects of container material on PCT leach test results for high-level nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, S.B.; Pegg, I.L.

    1994-01-01

    A glass-based waste form used for the immobilization of high-level nuclear wastes should exhibit good resistance to aqueous corrosion since typically this is the primary process by which radionucleides could be released into the environment upon failure of other barriers. In the USA, the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) provides a set of requirements to ensure the consistency of the waste forms produced and specifies the Product Consistency Test (PCT) as a measure of relative chemical durability. While the PCT procedure permits usage of both Teflon and stainless steel vessels for testing of simulated development glasses, Teflon is not permitted for testing of production glasses due to radiative degradation. The results presented in this paper indicate that there are very significant differences between tests conducted in the two types of vessels due to the well-known permeability of Teflon to atmospheric carbon dioxide which results in lowering of the solution pH and a consequent reduction in the leach rate of silicate glasses. A wide range of nuclear waste glass compositions was subjected to the PCT procedure using both Teflon and stainless steel vessels. The magnitude of the effect (up to a factor of four for B, Na, Li concentrations) depends strongly on glass composition, therefore the isolated checks performed previously were inconclusive. The permeability to CO, of two types of Teflon vessels specified in the PCT procedure was directly measured using buffer solutions: ingress of CO, is linear in time, strongly pH-dependent, and was as high as 100 ppm after 7 days. In actual PCT tests in Teflon vessels, the total CO, content was 560 ppm after 87 days and 1930 ppm after one year

  17. [Nursing Experience With a Patient With Gastrostomy Leakage Resulting in Moisture-Associated Skin Damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Mei-Yu; Hsu, Hsiao-Hui; Lyu, Ji-Yan

    2016-10-01

    Leakage is a common complication of gastrostomy. Exposure of the skin surrounding the gastrostomy tube to moisture or chemical irritants may cause moisture-associated skin damage (MASD) and seriously affect the patient's quality of life. This case study describes a nursing experience with gastrostomy leakage that resulted in MASD. An assessment conducted from July 29, 2015 to August 20, 2015 revealed that heavy gastronomy leakage had caused extensive skin erosion, ulceration, hyperplasia, and superficial infection. Simultaneously, the patient was required to conduct complex stoma care, which resulted in physical and psychological exhaustion. Changes in traditional tube and wound care were discussed on multiple occasions with an interdisciplinary healthcare team. Based on the evidence-based literature, we provide gastrostomy and MASD management strategies. Through team collaboration, we prevented gastric contents from contacting the patient's skin directly, improved patient comfort, controlled effluent and skin infections, maintained fluid and electrolyte balances, and acce-lerated the healing of the damaged skin. We recommend that healthcare professionals caring for patients with gastrostomy leakage be provided with early skin protection programs to learn the standard methods for identifying and correcting leakage factors, containing effluent, and adequately stabilizing the gastrostomy tube in order to reduce the impact on the patient's quality of life. In addition, patient education on tube and skin care should be provided to prevent the reoccurrence of complications.

  18. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  19. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region

  20. Drying tests conducted on Three Mile Island fuel canisters containing simulated debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Drying tests were conducted on TMI-2 fuel canisters filled with simulated core debris. During these tests, canisters were dried by heating externally by a heating blanket while simultaneously purging the canisters' interior with hot, dry nitrogen. Canister drying was found to be dominated by moisture retention properties of a concrete filler material (LICON) used for geometry control. This material extends the drying process 10 days or more beyond what would be required were it not there. The LICON resides in a nonpurgeable chamber separate from the core debris, and because of this configuration, dew point measurements on the exhaust stream do not provide a good indication of the dew point in the canisters. If the canisters are not dried, but rather just dewatered, 140-240 lb of water (not including the LICON water of hydration) will remain in each canister, approximately 50-110 lb of which is pore water in the LICON and the remainder unbound water

  1. Leak rates and structural integrity tests for Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant primary containment. Regulatory experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani Alegria, Yuri Raul; Salgado Gonzalez, Julio Ricardo

    1996-01-01

    In the Appendix A General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants of the US Code of Federal Regulations title 10 part 50 (10CFR50) is established the Criterion 1 Quality standards and records which requires that structures, systems and components important to safety should be tested to quality standards according with the importance of the safety function to be performed. This regulation has been adopted by the Mexican Regulatory Body (CNSNS) for their nuclear power plants. (author)

  2. Test results for composite specimens and elements containing joints and cutouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, P. T.; Madan, R. C.; Hawley, A. V.

    1988-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop the technology for joints and cutouts in a composite fuselage that meets all design requirements of a large transport aircraft for the 1990s. An advanced trijet derivative of the DC-10 was selected as the baseline aircraft. Design and analysis of a 30-foot-long composite fuselage barrel provided a realistic basis for the test effort. The primary composite material was Hexcel F584 resin on 12 K IM6 fiber, in tape and broadgoods form. Fiberglass broadgoods were used in E-glass and S-glass fiber form in the cutout region of some panels. Additionally, injection-molded chopped graphite fiber/PEEK was used for longeron-to-frame shear clips. The test effort included four groups of test specimens, beginning with coupon specimens of mono-layer and cross-piled laminates, progressing through increasingly larger and more complex specimens, and ending with two 4- by 5-foot curved fuselage side panels. One of the side panels incorporated a transverse skin splice, while the second included two cabin window cutouts.

  3. Results of an experiment in a Zion-like geometry to investigate the effect of water on the containment basement floor on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey Test Facility: The IET-4 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.D.; Blanchat, T.K.; Pilch, M.; Nichols, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    This document discusses the fourth experiment of the Integral Effects Test (IET-4) series which was conducted to investigate the effects of high pressure melt ejection on direct containment heating. Scale models (1:10) of the Zion reactor pressure vessel (RPV), cavity, instrument tunnel, and subcompartment structures were constructed in the Surtsey Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. ne RPV was modeled with a melt generator that consisted of a steel pressure barrier, a cast MgO crucible, and a thin steel inner liner. The melt generator/crucible had a hemispherical bottom head containing a graphite limitor plate with a 3.5-cm exit hole to simulate the ablated hole in the RPV bottom head that would be tonned by tube ejection in a severe nuclear power plant accident. The reactor cavity model contained 3.48 kg of water with a depth of 0.9 cm that corresponded to condensate levels in the Zion plant. A 43-kg initial charge of iron oxide/aluminum/chromium thermite was used to simulate corium debris on the bottom head of the RPV. Molten thermite was ejected into the scaled reactor cavity by 6.7 MPa steam. IET-4 replicated the third experiment in the IET series (IET-3), except the Surtsey vessel contained slightly more preexisting oxygen (9.6 mol.% vs. 9.0 mol.%), and water was placed on the basement floor inside the crane wall. The cavity pressure measurements showed that a small steam explosion occurred in the cavity at about the same time as the steam explosion in IET-1. The oxygen in the Surtsey vessel in IET-4 resulted in a vigorous hydrogen bum, which caused a significant increase in the peak pressure, 262 kPa compared to 98 kPa in the IET-1 test. EET-3, with similar pre-existing oxygen concentrations, also had a large peak pressure of 246 kPa

  4. [Evaluation of the coronal leakage of fiber posts using different adhesive approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai; Chen, Li-ping

    2011-06-01

    To test and compare the marginal leakage of radicular dentin cemented with three resin cements. Nine extracted maxillary incisors after endodontically treated were divided into 3 groups(n=3).Fiber posts were inserted using three resin cements: One-Step Plus/DuoLink (OD),ParaCore Automix (PA) and RelyXTM Unicem(RU).All teeth were subjected to thermocycling for 5000 cycles. All teeth were stained in 0.1% basic fuchsin for 24h and then longitudinally sectioned into four parts.Coronal leakage was evaluated. SAS 6.0 software package was used for Kruskal-Wallis test. Different resin cements significantly affected the coronal leakage of fiber posts(P<0.001). The system RU, which represents a new simplified self-adhesive protocol, performs the best sealing capacity.

  5. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices

  6. Analysis of L test series of ACE (Advanced Containment Experiments) project with modified corcon UW code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laguna Velasco, H.

    1994-01-01

    A series of experimental tests (so call L, Large scale) have been performance under sponsored of many research institutions around the world and management by Electric Power Research Institute at U.S.A. The goal of these tests is to analyze the phenomena of core-concrete interaction at the same conditions as severe accident in light water nuclear reactor. Results of these tests provides experimental data about thermohydraulic phenomenon and aerosol and fission products release. With these results, improves many codes that already have been developed to simulate core-concrete interaction during severe accident ; in case of CORCON.UW code is a improved version developed in University of Wisconsin at CORCON MOD 2. Scope of this work is shown results obtained from CORCON.UW improved. The improves consist of add data about BaSiO 3 , Ba 2 SiO 4 , BaZrO 3 , SrSiO 4 and SrZrO 3 , append Kutateladze's heat transfer correlation, and finally make more efficient the resolution of energy equations system through use a better algorithm. The results obtained by this improved code to the downward power and H 2 , H 2 O, CO and CO 2 release are agree with experimental results, and also it saved 40% of C.P.U. consumption during execution, due improve of energy equation system. Conclusions are, the increase of thermodynamics data in CORCON.UW produce a well results comparative with experimental results and update heat transfer correlations and algorithm brings a versatile code and reliable results. (Author)

  7. DTPA therapy of lung contaminations: testing a self contained aerosol generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducousso, R.; Pasquier, C.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown how much the effectiveness of DTPA therapy of respiratory contamination decreased when the delay of administration of the product increased. Moreover, the effectiveness of local administration of the chelating agent as aerosol has been widely recognized. Owing to both the therapeutic urgency and the local administration, an individual pocket apparatus allowing emergency DTPA inhalation, on the spot of the accident was tried. A turbo-inhalator sold for the administration of an anti-asthmatic powder was tested, using DTPA powder inhaled by a volunteer previously contaminated by a 140 LaCl 3 aerosol [fr

  8. Laboratory testing of geomembrane for waste containment EPA Method 9090, March 1995. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlock, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-15

    This report describes the work performed by TRI/Environmental, Inc. (TRI) to determine the chemical compatibility of one geomembrane and one seamed geomembrane with four synthetically generated leachates. The objective was to determine the resistance of the geomembrane to changes caused by exposure to the leachates. Changes in physical and mechanical properties were measured after exposure to the leachates at 23 C and 50 C for 30, 60, 90 and 120 days. Exposures were performed in accordance with the exposure regimen specified in US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 9090A. Methods, results and discussion are provided. Test results are also provided in the Tables of Results which accompany this report.

  9. Disintegration Test of Health Food Products Containing Ginkgo Biloba L. or Vitex Agnus-Castus L. in the Japanese Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato-Masumoto, Naoko; Masada, Sayaka; Takahashi, Satoshi; Terasaki, Sachiko; Yokota, Yoichi; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    For many years now, a number of Western herbs have been widely used in health food products in Japan and as pharmaceuticals in Europe. There are few or no mandated criteria concerning the quality of these herbal health food products, thus clarification is warranted. Here, we performed disintegration tests of 26 pharmaceutical and health food products containing the Western herbs ginkgo leaf and chaste tree fruit, in accord with the Japanese Pharmacopoeia. All eight pharmaceutical herbal products found in the European market completely disintegrated within the defined test time, and 11 of the 18 tested herbal products distributed as health foods in Japan disintegrated. Among the incompatible products identified in the Pharmacopoeia test, some products remained intact after incubation in water for 60 min. To ensure the efficacy of Western herbal products sold as health food in Japan, quality control, including disintegration, is therefore recommended, even though these products are not regulated under the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law. PMID:28930200

  10. Laboratory Rodent Diets Contain Toxic Levels of Environmental Contaminants: Implications for Regulatory Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mesnage

    Full Text Available The quality of diets in rodent feeding trials is crucial. We describe the contamination with environmental pollutants of 13 laboratory rodent diets from 5 continents. Measurements were performed using accredited methodologies. All diets were contaminated with pesticides (1-6 out of 262 measured, heavy metals (2-3 out of 4, mostly lead and cadmium, PCDD/Fs (1-13 out of 17 and PCBs (5-15 out of 18. Out of 22 GMOs tested for, Roundup-tolerant GMOs were the most frequently detected, constituting up to 48% of the diet. The main pesticide detected was Roundup, with residues of glyphosate and AMPA in 9 of the 13 diets, up to 370 ppb. The levels correlated with the amount of Roundup-tolerant GMOs. Toxic effects of these pollutants on liver, neurodevelopment, and reproduction are documented. The sum of the hazard quotients of the pollutants in the diets (an estimator of risk with a threshold of 1 varied from 15.8 to 40.5. Thus the chronic consumption of these diets can be considered at risk. Efforts toward safer diets will improve the reliability of toxicity tests in biomedical research and regulatory toxicology.

  11. Laboratory corrosion tests on candidate high-level waste container materials: Results from the Belgian programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druyts, F.; Kursten, B.; Iseghem, P. Van

    2004-01-01

    The Belgian SAFIR-2 concept foresees the geological disposal of conditioned high-level radioactive waste in stainless steel containers and overpacks placed in a concrete gallery backfilled with Boom clay or a bentonite-type backfill. In addition to earlier in situ experiments, we used a laboratory approach to investigate the corrosion properties of selected stainless steels in Boom clay and bentonite environments. In the SAFIR-2 concept, AISI 316L hMo is the main candidate overpack material. As an alternative, we also investigated the higher alloyed stainless steel UHB 904L. Our study focused on localised corrosion and in particular pitting. We used cyclic potentiodynamic polarisation measurements to determine the pit nucleation potential E NP and the protection potential E PP . The evolution of the corrosion potential with time was determined by monitoring the open circuit potential in synthetic clay-water over extended periods. In this paper we present and discuss some results from our laboratory programme, focusing on long-term interactions between the stainless steel overpack and the backfill materials. We describe in particular the influence of chloride and thio-sulphate ions on the pitting corrosion behaviour. The results show that, under geochemical conditions typical for geological disposal, i.e. [Cl-] ∼ 30 mg/L for a Boom clay backfill and [Cl-] ∼ 90 mg/L for a bentonite backfill, neither AISI 316L hMo nor UHB 904L is expected to present pitting problems. An important factor in the long-term prediction of the corrosion behaviour however, is the robustness of the model for the evolution of the geochemistry of the backfill. Indeed, at chloride levels higher than 1000 mg/L, we predict pitting corrosion for AISI 316L hMo. (authors)

  12. Use of coliform bacteria for the detection of on-line leakage in drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, S.; Karim, H.M.A.; Mashiatullah, A.; Sajjad, I.

    1996-01-01

    In this method, rupture or leakage in under ground water pipes is detected simply by taking the water samples from the main supply lines of the houses and incubating them at 40 deg. C for sixteen hours, colonies (developed with yellow colour) are counted with colony counter. Thirteen samples (in triplicate) collected from different houses in the congested localities during repair work of the major supply line and all of them after test showed heavy rate of pollution. The experiment was repeated for the same locality and sampling sites after completion of repair work. This time the rate of pollution decreases very much showing drastically low growth of microorganisms except for two points. For two further investigation of the nearly leakages at these points, 13 samples (in triplicate) were again collected in serial wise number of houses. Two points of the leakage were identified where the growth rate of the microorganisms was abruptly high between two consecutive houses or opposite houses depending upon the supply of water pipe lines showing the leakage of houses. Two points of the leakage were identified where the growth rate of the microorganisms was abruptly high between two consecutive houses or opposite houses depending upon the supply of water pipe lines showing the leakage of he pipes. This method is useful and causes no health hazard to the population and gives best results where the water supply is on intermittent basis. The technique is specially useful in the remote areas of the country where research facilities are not available and the Pacqualab is a field instrument. So it is handy and rapid method for the detection of leakage in underground water supplies in the remote areas of the country. (author)

  13. Analysis of Environmental Applicability of HDPE Geomembrane by Simulated Applicability Testing for Waste Containment Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN-YONG JEON

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Geosynthetic separation boxes made from recycled polymeric materials were designed to increase the waste landfill amount and develop the hydraulic performance in steep slope sides in the waste landfills. To evaluate the advantages of these geosynthetic separation boxes, index tests were conducted in order to compare the geonet composites and geosynthetic separation boxes. The tensile strength retention of the geosynthetic separation box plates exposed to UV light and leachate solutions was better than that of the geonet composites. The drainage performance of the geosynthetic separation boxes was compared with that of the geonet composites at a slope angle corresponding to a real waste landfill site. The drainage performance of the geosynthetic separation box plates was better than that of the geonet composites.

  14. Second Line of Defense Megaports Initiative Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan Colon Container Terminal (CCT) Panama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhouse, Robert N.

    2010-01-01

    Report on the Operational Testing and Evaluation to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the Second Line of Defense (SLD) mission requirements. An SLD system is defined as the detection technology and associated equipment, the system operators from the host country, the standard operating procedures (SOPs), and other elements such as training and maintenance which support long-term system sustainment. To this end, the activities conducted during the OT&E phase must demonstrate that the Megaports System can be operated effectively in real-time by Panama Direccion General de Aduanas (DGA Panama Customs) personnel to the standards of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA).

  15. Status of irradiation testing and PIE of MOX (Pu-containing) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimayuga, F.C.; Zhou, Y.N.; Ryz, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes AECL's mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) program. Post-irradiation examination results of two major irradiation experiments involving several (U, Pu)O 2 fuel bundles are highlighted. One experiment involved bundles irradiated to burnups ranging fro 400 to 1200 MWh/kgHe in the Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD) reactor. The other experiment consisted of several (U, Pu)O 2 bundles irradiated to burnups of up to 500 Mwh/kgHe in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. Results of these experiments demonstrate the excellent performance of CANDU MOX fuel. This paper also outlines the status of current MOX fuel irradiation tests, including the irradiation of various (U, Pu)O 2 bundles. The strategic importance of MOX fuel to CANDU fuel-cycle flexibility is discussed. (author)

  16. Indian Ocean sources of Agulhas leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgadoo, Jonathan V.; Rühs, Siren; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W. B.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the mean pathways, transit timescales, and transformation of waters flowing from the Pacific and the marginal seas through the Indian Ocean (IO) on their way toward the South Atlantic within a high-resolution ocean/sea-ice model. The model fields are analyzed from a Lagrangian perspective where water volumes are tracked as they enter the IO. The IO contributes 12.6 Sv to Agulhas leakage, which within the model is 14.1 ± 2.2 Sv, the rest originates from the South Atlantic. The Indonesian Through-flow constitutes about half of the IO contribution, is surface bound, cools and salinificates as it leaves the basin within 10-30 years. Waters entering the IO south of Australia are at intermediate depths and maintain their temperature-salinity properties as they exit the basin within 15-35 years. Of these waters, the contribution from Tasman leakage is 1.4 Sv. The rest stem from recirculation from the frontal regions of the Southern Ocean. The marginal seas export 1.0 Sv into the Atlantic within 15-40 years, and the waters cool and freshen on-route. However, the model's simulation of waters from the Gulfs of Aden and Oman are too light and hence overly influenced by upper ocean circulations. In the Cape Basin, Agulhas leakage is well mixed. On-route, temperature-salinity transformations occur predominantly in the Arabian Sea and within the greater Agulhas Current region. Overall, the IO exports at least 7.9 Sv from the Pacific to the Atlantic, thereby quantifying the strength of the upper cell of the global conveyor belt.

  17. Lyman Continuum Leakage in the Local Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitherer, Claus; Hernandez, Svea; Lee, Janice; Oey, Sally

    2015-08-01

    Star-forming galaxies are viable candidates for providing the ionizing photon supply accounting for the reionization of the early universe. However, direct determination of the fraction of ionizing photons that can escape the optically thick galaxy ISM is challenging. I will discuss Lyman continuum observations of a sample of massive young star clusters in local galaxies which take advantage of a new capability of HST's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. The derived photon leakages are compared to values found at high redshift and discussed in the context of cosmological models.

  18. EVA Suit Microbial Leakage Investigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, Jay; Baker, Christopher; Clayton, Ronald; Rucker, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to collect microbial samples from various EVA suits to determine how much microbial contamination is typically released during simulated planetary exploration activities. Data will be released to the planetary protection and science communities, and advanced EVA system designers. In the best case scenario, we will discover that very little microbial contamination leaks from our current or prototype suit designs, in the worst case scenario, we will identify leak paths, learn more about what affects leakage--and we'll have a new, flight-certified swab tool for our EVA toolbox.

  19. Application of distributed optical fiber sensing technologies to the monitoring of leakage and abnormal disturbance of oil pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojun; Zhu, Xiaofei; Deng, Chi; Li, Junyi; Liu, Cheng; Yu, Wenpeng; Luo, Hui

    2017-10-01

    To improve the level of management and monitoring of leakage and abnormal disturbance of long distance oil pipeline, the distributed optical fiber temperature and vibration sensing system is employed to test the feasibility for the healthy monitoring of a domestic oil pipeline. The simulating leakage and abnormal disturbance affairs of oil pipeline are performed in the experiment. It is demonstrated that the leakage and abnormal disturbance affairs of oil pipeline can be monitored and located accurately with the distributed optical fiber sensing system, which exhibits good performance in the sensitivity, reliability, operation and maintenance etc., and shows good market application prospect.

  20. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  1. Testing of multistep soil washing for radiocesium-contaminated soil containing plant matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funakawa, Masafumi; Tagawa, Akihiro; Okuda, Nobuyasu

    2012-01-01

    Decontamination work following radiocesium exposure requires a vast reduction in the amount of contaminated soil generated. The current study subjected 4 types of contaminated soil with different properties to multistep soil washing under the same conditions. This study also determined the effectiveness of radiocesium decontamination and the extent to which the amount of contaminated soil was reduced. In addition, the effectiveness of plant matter separation, adsorbent addition, and grinding as part of multistep soil washing was determined using the same contaminated soil. Results of testing indicated that the rate of radiocesium decontamination ranged from 73.6 to 89.2% and the recovery rate ranged from 51.5 to 84.2% for twice-treated soil, regardless of the soil properties or cesium level. Plant matter in soil had a high radiocesium level. However, there was little plant matter in our soil sample. Therefore, plant matter separation had little effect on the improvement in the percentage of radiocesium decontamination of twice-treated soil. Soil surface grinding improved the rate of radiocesium decontamination of twice-treated soil. However, radiocesium in soil tightly bound with minerals in the soil; thus, the addition of an adsorbent also failed to improve the rate of radiocesium decontamination. (author)

  2. Containing Ebola: A Test for Post-Conflict Security Sector Reform in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Haenlein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ebola has provided the greatest test of the Sierra Leonean security sector – and, in turn, of the UK-led reforms of the past ten-to-fifteen years. The performance of the country's security forces at the height of the crisis suggests that there are sound structures in place; however, Ebola has shown that the Government of Sierra Leone's national security architecture still lacks maturity in responding to such a scenario. Drawing on first-hand interviews with advisers on the ground, this article explores the Sierra Leone government’s response to the Ebola crisis and the performance of the security sector so far, within the wider context of UK-led security-sector reform (SSR since the end of the civil war. In doing so, it highlights a number of lessons to have emerged from the crisis, exploring what these reveal about the nature of the reforms implemented since the end of the country's civil war. In turn, it explores what these suggest for future SSR, which continues to be a core component of the UK’s approach to development and overseas capacity-building.

  3. Waste container and method for containing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Akira; Matsushita, Mitsuhiro; Doi, Makoto; Nakatani, Seiichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a waste container, water-proof membranes and rare earth element layers are formed on the inner surface of a steel plate concrete container in which steel plates are embedded. Further, rear earth element detectors are disposed each from the inner side of the steel plate concrete container by way of a pressure pipe to the outer side of the container. As a method for actually containing wastes, when a plurality of vessels in which wastes are fixed are collectively enhoused to the waste container, cussioning materials are attached to the inner surface of the container and wastes fixing containers are stacked successively in a plurality of rows in a bag made of elastic materials. Subsequently, fixing materials are filled and tightly sealed in the waste container. When the waste container thus constituted is buried underground, even if it should be deformed to cause intrusion of rain water to the inside of the container, the rare earth elements in the container dissolved in the rain water can be detected by the detectors, the containers are exchanged before the rain water intruding to the inner side is leached to the surrounding ground, to previously prevent the leakage of radioactive nuclides. (K.M.)

  4. Development of a testing method for asbestos fibers in treated materials of asbestos containing wastes by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Kida, Akiko; Noma, Yukio; Terazono, Atsushi; Sakai, Shin-ichi

    2014-02-01

    Appropriate treatment of asbestos-containing wastes is a significant problem. In Japan, the inertization of asbestos-containing wastes based on new treatment processes approved by the Minister of the Environment is promoted. A highly sensitive method for testing asbestos fibers in inertized materials is required so that these processes can be approved. We developed a method in which fibers from milled treated materials are extracted in water by shaking, and are counted and identified by transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of this method by using asbestos standards and simulated slag samples confirmed that the quantitation limits are a few million fibers per gram and a few μg/g in a sample of 50mg per filter. We used this method to assay asbestos fibers in slag samples produced by high-temperature melting of asbestos-containing wastes. Fiber concentrations were below the quantitation limit in all samples, and total fiber concentrations were determined as 47-170×10(-6) f/g. Because the evaluation of treated materials by TEM is difficult owing to the limited amount of sample observable, this testing method should be used in conjunction with bulk analytical methods for sure evaluation of treated materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk of acute anastomotic leakage after preoperative radiotherapy in rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devid Belalla

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the preoperative radiotherapy and its role in anastomotic leakage. Methods: A total of 327 patients who had an anterior resection (AR in elective surgery for a rectal carcinoma were selected and operated in our clinic of surgery during the period from 2003 to 2015. Among them, 135 patients had a low anterior resection (LAR and the other 192 had an AR. This is a retrospective study. Chi-squared test was used to evaluate statistical differences and the P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 126 patients had radiotherapy before surgery, and 50 of them had a LAR. In the other 201 patients, surgery was the first treatment modality, and 83 of them had a LAR. We had an overall anastomotic leakage of 7.95% or 26% patients. Anastomotic leakage was found in 14 patients with LAR, 9 of which had radiotherapy before surgery. From the 12 patients with AR who had an anastomotic leakage, 6 of them had radiotherapy before surgery. Conclusions: Radiotherapy may affect anastomotic healing and increase the risk of leakage. This risk is higher in low anterior anastomoses where a protective stoma may be considered. A better evaluation and support for patients with preoperative radiotherapy is needed in order to diminish the concomitant risk factors as much as possible.

  6. Biomembrane Permeabilization: Statistics of Individual Leakage Events Harmonize the Interpretation of Vesicle Leakage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braun, S.; Pokorná, Šárka; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Heerklotz, H.; Hoernke, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2018), s. 813-819 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-03160S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : leakage * dye release * pore Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  7. Biomembrane Permeabilization: Statistics of Individual Leakage Events Harmonize the Interpretation of Vesicle Leakage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Braun, S.; Pokorná, Šárka; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Heerklotz, H.; Hoernke, M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2018), s. 813-819 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-03160S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : leakage * dye release * pore Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.942, year: 2016

  8. Monomers for thermosetting and toughening epoxy resins. [glycidyl amine derivatives, propargyl-containing amines, and mutagenic testing of aromatic diamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Eight glycidyl amines were prepared by alkylating the parent amine with epichlorohydrin to form chlorohydrin, followed by cyclization with aqueous NaOH. Three of these compounds contained propargyl groups with postcuring studies. A procedure for quantitatively estimating the epoxy content of these glycidyl amines was employed for purity determination. Two diamond carbonates and several model propargly compounds were prepared. The synthesis of three new diamines, two which contain propargyloxy groups, and another with a sec-butyl group is in progress. These materials are at the dinitro stage ready for the final hydrogenation step. Four aromatic diamines were synthesized for mutagenic testing purposes. One of these compounds rapidly decomposes on exposure to air.

  9. Germline contamination and leakage in whole genome somatic single nucleotide variant detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendorek, Dorota H; Caloian, Cristian; Ellrott, Kyle; Bare, J Christopher; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N; Ewing, Adam D; Houlahan, Kathleen E; Norman, Thea C; Margolin, Adam A; Stuart, Joshua M; Boutros, Paul C

    2018-01-31

    The clinical sequencing of cancer genomes to personalize therapy is becoming routine across the world. However, concerns over patient re-identification from these data lead to questions about how tightly access should be controlled. It is not thought to be possible to re-identify patients from somatic variant data. However, somatic variant detection pipelines can mistakenly identify germline variants as somatic ones, a process called "germline leakage". The rate of germline leakage across different somatic variant detection pipelines is not well-understood, and it is uncertain whether or not somatic variant calls should be considered re-identifiable. To fill this gap, we quantified germline leakage across 259 sets of whole-genome somatic single nucleotide variant (SNVs) predictions made by 21 teams as part of the ICGC-TCGA DREAM Somatic Mutation Calling Challenge. The median somatic SNV prediction set contained 4325 somatic SNVs and leaked one germline polymorphism. The level of germline leakage was inversely correlated with somatic SNV prediction accuracy and positively correlated with the amount of infiltrating normal cells. The specific germline variants leaked differed by tumour and algorithm. To aid in quantitation and correction of leakage, we created a tool, called GermlineFilter, for use in public-facing somatic SNV databases. The potential for patient re-identification from leaked germline variants in somatic SNV predictions has led to divergent open data access policies, based on different assessments of the risks. Indeed, a single, well-publicized re-identification event could reshape public perceptions of the values of genomic data sharing. We find that modern somatic SNV prediction pipelines have low germline-leakage rates, which can be further reduced, especially for cloud-sharing, using pre-filtering software.

  10. Quantitative single-vesicle analysis of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2013-01-01

    was combined with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to quantify leakage from a bulk collection of lipid vesicles in aqueous solution. Quantitative correlation between the two techniques was achieved through a detailed experimental protocol. The potential of combining the two techniques was tested using...

  11. RF capacitance-voltage characterization of MOSFETs with high-leakage dielectric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Jurriaan; Cubaynes, F.N; Cubaynes, F.N.; Havens, R.J.; de Kort, R.; Scholten, A.J.; Tiemeijer, L.F.

    2003-01-01

    We present a MOS Capacitance-Voltage measurement methodology that, contrary to present methods, is highly robust against gate leakage current densities up to 1000 A/cm/sup 2/. The methodology features specially designed RF test structures and RF measurement frequencies. It allows MOS parameter

  12. Benchmarking LWR codes capability to model radionuclide deposition within SFR containments: An analysis of the Na ABCOVE tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, Luis E.; Garcia, Monica; Morandi, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Assessment of LWR codes capability to model aerosol deposition within SFR containments. • Original hypotheses proposed to partially accommodate drawbacks from Na oxidation reactions. • A defined methodology to derive a more accurate characterization of Na-based particles. • Key missing models in LWR codes for SFR applications are identified. - Abstract: Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide transport, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. Postulated BDBAs in SFRs might result in contaminated-coolant discharge at high temperature into the containment. A full scope safety analysis of this reactor type requires computation tools properly validated in all the related fields. Radionuclide deposition, particularly within the containment, is one of those fields. This sets two major challenges: to have reliable codes available and to build up a sound data base. Development of SFR source term codes was abandoned in the 80's and few data are available at present. The ABCOVE experimental programme conducted in the 80's is still a reference in the field. The present paper is aimed at assessing the current capability of LWR codes to model aerosol deposition within a SFR containment under BDBA conditions. Through a systematic application of the ASTEC, ECART and MELCOR codes to relevant ABCOVE tests, insights have been gained into drawbacks and capabilities of these computation tools. Hypotheses and approximations have been adopted so that

  13. A Model for Determining Leakage in Water Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Stathis, Jonathan Alexander

    1998-01-01

    Leaks in pipe networks cause significant problems for utilities and water users in terms of lost revenue and interrupted service. In many cities the leakage is as high as forty percent. A water audit is carried out to assess system-wide leakage. However, to detect leakage at the level of a pipeline, a physical measurement technique is generally employed. For large cities the distribution piping length amounts to a few thousand miles. Therefore, the physical measurements can become tediou...

  14. Analysis of a bending test on a full-scale PWR hot leg elbow containing a surface crack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delliou, P. le [Electricite de France, EDF, 77 - Moret-sur-Loing (France). Dept. MTC; Julisch, P.; Hippelein, K. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt; Bezdikian, G. [Electricite de France, EDF, 92 - Paris la Defense (France). Direction Production Transport

    1998-11-01

    EDF, in co-operation with Framatome, has conducted a large research programme on the mechanical behaviour of thermally aged cast duplex stainless steel elbows, which are part of the main primary circuit of French PWR. One important task of this programme consisted of testing a full-scale PWR hot leg elbow. The elbow contained a semi-elliptical circumferential notch machined on the outer surface of the intrados as well as casting defects located on the flanks. To simulate the end-of-life condition of the component regarding material toughness, it had undergone a 2400 hours ageing heat treatment at 400 C. The test preparation and execution, as well as the material characterization programme, were committed to MPA. The test was conducted under constant internal pressure and in-plane bending (opening mode) at 200 C. For safety reasons, it took place on an open air-site: the Meppen military test ground. At the maximum applied moment (6000 kN.m), the notch did not initiate. This paper presents the experimental results and the fracture mechanics analysis of the test, based on finite element calculations. (orig.)

  15. Detection and quantification of methane leakage from landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljungberg, Sven-Aake; Maartensson, Stig-Goeran (Univ. of Gaevle, Gaevle (Sweden)); Meijer, Jan-Erik; Rosqvist, Haakan (NSR AB, Helsingborg (Sweden))

    2009-03-15

    with different ground humidity showed that pores in the surface layer close when the moisture content is greater, reducing the landfill gas leakage. The large and sometimes rapid changes make it very difficult to get a picture of the distribution of the methane leakage over the landfill surfaces. Methane emissions were measured in different seasons, and also when the landfill surfaces had snow cover. The results showed that methane is emitted easily through porous snow. The same methane concentrations were recorded for GPS-fixed leakage features with and without snow cover. If the objective is to produce a reliable measurement of gas emission from a landfill, the combination of laser/chamber method is probably not sufficiently accurate. However, if the objective is, for example, to determine and prioritise where measures should be taken at different landfill surfaces to reduce emission, the combination of laser and the chamber method is very usable. The measurement method tested was application-oriented, and the aim was that the measurements would provide information on which to base the planning and implementation of short- and long-term measures. Manuals were produced for the laser instrument and the IR camera, showing how the two instruments are to be used for detecting methane emissions from landfills. The project demonstrated how the laser instrument could be used by bouncing the beam off a simple reflector. Measurement using a beam path length of up to 200 m is possible. Examples of such applications are measurements over leachate ponds, beside a landfill and on parts of a landfill. Such measurements can give important information about emission conditions that are difficult to measure in any other way. Geoelectrical measurements have several areas of application for landfills, primarily in studies of groundwater pollution. In recent years, interest has also grown in investigating processes inside landfills. Based on results from previous studies, one of the aims

  16. Pressure control for minimizing leakage in water distribution systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourhan Samir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades water resources availability has been a major issue on the international agenda. In a situation of worsening scarcity of water resources and the rapidly increasing of water demands, the state of water losses management is part of man’s survival on earth. Leakage in water supply networks makes up a significant amount, sometimes more than 70% of the total water losses. The best practices suggest that pressure management is one of the most effective way to reduce the amount of leakage in a water distribution system. The approach presented in this study is aimed at modeling leakage as a function of pressure and pipe length, calibrating leakage coefficient, using fixed pressure reducing valves (PRVs to develop pressure fluctuation and developing WaterCAD scenarios to minimize leakage through the most effective settings of PRVs. This approach was applied on a district metered area (DMA in Alexandria, Egypt. The application of this approach produced some encouraging results, where the leakage through DMA was dropped by 37% for the best scenario. Thus, this approach is recommended as a decision support tool for determining a desirable solution for leakage reduction. Keywords: District measure area, Infrastructure leakage index, Leakage, Pressure management, Water supply networks

  17. Particle and radiation leakage importance: definition, analysis, and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.; Wagschal, J.J.; Yaari, A.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of leakage importance function has been introduced and analyzed for physical systems governed by the Boltzmann transport equation. This leakage importance function represents a measure of the relative importance of source particles located at every point in phase space in contributing to the leakage and provides insight regarding the specific physical process that leads to leakage. The equation satisfied by the leakage importance function has been derived by using adjoint operators. It has been shown that procedures that are customarily used to derive an equation obeyed by an importance function suitable for an integral parameter such as a detector response or an eigenvalue lead to difficulties when directly applied to derive an equation obeyed by the leakage importance function. This is because, although leakage is also an integral parameter (i.e., a functional of the forward flux density), leakage is expressed in terms of a surface integral rather than in terms of volume integrals such as those appearing in expressions of detector responses or eigenvalues. Therefore, a procedure that departs from the customary course has been devised to derive the equation satisfied by the leakage importance function

  18. Transformerless photovoltaic inverters with leakage current and pulsating power elimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yi; Yao, Wenli; Wang, H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a transformerless inverter topology, which is capable of simultaneously solving leakage current and pulsating power issues in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems. Without adding any additional components to the system, the leakage current caused by the PV-to-ground parasi......This paper presents a transformerless inverter topology, which is capable of simultaneously solving leakage current and pulsating power issues in grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems. Without adding any additional components to the system, the leakage current caused by the PV...

  19. Vertebroplasty: Magnetic Resonance Findings Related to Cement Leakage Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Y.H.; Han, D.; Cha, J.H.; Seong, C.K.; Kim, J.; Choi, Y.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul Municipal Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Purpose: To find magnetic resonance (MR) findings predicting cement leakage in patients receiving percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) due to osteoporotic compression fractures. Material and Methods: MR was done in 43 patients (age 52-89 years) before PVP (56 vertebrae), which was done via a bipedicular approach with fluoroscopic monitoring. Shortly after the procedure, a non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan was done at the vertebroplasty sites for evaluation of bone cement leakage. The following MR findings of fractured vertebral bodies were retrospectively reviewed for correlation with leakage risk: severity of bone-marrow edema, presence of a T2-weighted low-signal-intensity line, percentage residual vertebral body height, presence of either a vacuum or cystic change within the vertebral body, and presence of a cortical disruption. Results: After PVP, cement leakage was detected in 35 vertebrae (62.5%). Leakage was most frequently observed in the anterior external vertebral venous plexus (46%). Cement leakage rate increased when there was a cortical disruption (P = 0.037), especially at the endplates, while it decreased when there was a vacuum or a cystic change within the fractured vertebra (P 0.019). Other MR findings were not related to the risk of cement leakage. Conclusion: The risk of cement leakage in PVP increases when MR shows cortical disruption in a fractured vertebral body, especially at the endplates. It decreases when MR shows a vacuum or cystic change within the body. Keywords Cement leakage, MR imaging, spine, vertebroplasty.

  20. Review of leakage-flow-induced vibrations of reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulcahy, T.M.

    1983-05-01

    The primary-coolant flow paths of a reactor system are usually subject to close scrutiny in a design review to identify potential flow-induced vibration sources. However, secondary-flow paths through narrow gaps in component supports, which parallel the primary-flow path, occasionally are the excitation source for significant vibrations even though the secondary-flow rates are orders of magnitude smaller than the primary-flow rate. These so-called leakage flow problems are reviewed here to identify design features and excitation sources that should be avoided. Also, design rules of thumb are formulated that can be employed to guide a design, but quantitative prediction of component response is found to require scale-model testing

  1. Effect of Caffeine Contained in Sports Drink on Hormones Producing Energy Following Sprint Test Performance in Male Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fayiz Abumoh'd

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of caffeine contained in sports drink on hormones producing energy and sprint test performance in male soccer players. Twelve participants (25.97 ± 2.70 y performed the test under thre e conditions (one week apart: caffeine with sports drink (SD-CAF, sports drink (SD, and placebo (PLA. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover protocol, participants performed SD-CAF trial (5 mg/kg of caffeine contained in 300 ml of sports drink 30 minutes prior to sprinting test (7 × 30 m, SD trial (solely 300 ml of sports drink 30 minutes prior to sprinting test, or placebo. Blood analysis indicated significantly higher level of free thyroxine in SD-CAF (21.450 ± 3.048 compared to SD (18.742 ± 1.151 and PLA (16.983 ± 1.783. Similar findings existed regarding insulin (P 0.05. No significant differences were observed between trials in first–fourth repetitions (P > 0.05. Time of fifth-seventh repetitions were significantly lower in SD-CAF compared to SD and PLA (P < 0.05, and were significantly lower in SD than that in PLA (P < 0.05. The time of 7th repetition was (4.331 ± 0.210, 4.610 ± 0.197, 4.81 6 ± 0.171 s for SD-CAF, SD, and PLA, respectively; P < 0.05. In conclusion, caffeine interferes hormones that are responsible for producing energy which in turn have a positive effect on repeated sprint bouts.

  2. Testing Hypotheses on Risk Factors for Scientific Misconduct via Matched-Control Analysis of Papers Containing Problematic Image Duplications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Fang, Ferric C; Casadevall, Arturo; Bik, Elisabeth M

    2018-02-19

    It is commonly hypothesized that scientists are more likely to engage in data falsification and fabrication when they are subject to pressures to publish, when they are not restrained by forms of social control, when they work in countries lacking policies to tackle scientific misconduct, and when they are male. Evidence to test these hypotheses, however, is inconclusive due to the difficulties of obtaining unbiased data. Here we report a pre-registered test of these four hypotheses, conducted on papers that were identified in a previous study as containing problematic image duplications through a systematic screening of the journal PLoS ONE. Image duplications were classified into three categories based on their complexity, with category 1 being most likely to reflect unintentional error and category 3 being most likely to reflect intentional fabrication. We tested multiple parameters connected to the hypotheses above with a matched-control paradigm, by collecting two controls for each paper containing duplications. Category 1 duplications were mostly not associated with any of the parameters tested, as was predicted based on the assumption that these duplications were mostly not due to misconduct. Categories 2 and 3, however, exhibited numerous statistically significant associations. Results of univariable and multivariable analyses support the hypotheses that academic culture, peer control, cash-based publication incentives and national misconduct policies might affect scientific integrity. No clear support was found for the "pressures to publish" hypothesis. Female authors were found to be equally likely to publish duplicated images compared to males. Country-level parameters generally exhibited stronger effects than individual-level parameters, because developing countries were significantly more likely to produce problematic image duplications. This suggests that promoting good research practices in all countries should be a priority for the international

  3. A Framework to Estimate CO2 Leakage associated with Geological Storage in Mature Sedimentary Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celia, M. A.; Bachu, S.; Gasda, S.

    2002-12-01

    Geological storage of carbon dioxide requires careful risk analysis to avoid unintended consequences associated with the subsurface injection. Most negative consequences of subsurface injection are associated with leakage of the injected CO2 out of the geological formation into which it is injected. Such leakage may occur through natural geological features, including fractures and faults, or it may occur through human-created pathways such as existing wells. Possible leakage of CO2 through existing wells appears to be especially important in mature sedimentary basins that have been explored intensively and exploited for hydrocarbon production. In the Alberta Basin of western Canada, more than 300,000 oil and gas wells have been drilled, while in the state of Texas in the United States, more than 1,500,000 wells have been drilled. Many of these wells have been abandoned, and the information available to describe their current state is highly variable and sometimes nonexistent. Because these wells represent possible direct conduits from the injection zone to the land surface, a comprehensive assessment of leakage potential associated with these wells needs to be pursued. Analysis of leakage potential associated with existing wells must combine a data mining component with a multi-level modeling effort to assess leakage potential in a probabilistic framework. Information available for existing wells must be categorized and analyzed, and general leakage characteristics associated with wells of varying properties must be quantified. One example of a realistic target formation is the Viking Formation in Alberta, which is overlain by a thick shale layer and contains hydrocarbon in some locations. The existence of hydrocarbon in the formation indicates that the overlying shale layer is an effective barrier to flow, and therefore this is a good candidate formation for CO2 storage. However, the formation and its cap rock are punctured by approximately 180,000 wells, with

  4. Prototyping and Testing a New Volumetric Curvature Tool for Modeling Reservoir Compartments and Leakage Pathways in the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer: Reducing Uncertainty in CO2 Storage and Permanence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, Jason [Univ. of Kansas and Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Holubnyak, Yevhen [Univ. of Kansas and Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Watney, Willard [Univ. of Kansas and Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2016-12-09

    petrophysical models to separate-vug rock fabrics along solution-enlarged fault and fracture systems. Simulation-based studies demonstrate a potential alternative field development model for developing CO2 storage sites that target carbonate reservoirs overprinted by paleokarst. Simulation results for this complex reservoir indicate that individual fault blocks could function as discrete containers for CO2 storage thereby reducing the risk of plume migration outside the legally defined extent of the permitted storage site. Vertically extensive, anastomosing, solution-enlarged fault/fracture systems — infilled by clay-rich sediments — would operate as non-to-low permeability vertical "curtains" that restrict CO2 movement beyond the confines of the CO2 storage site. Such a location could be developed in a checker-board fashion with CO2 injection operations occurring in one block and surveillance operations occurring in the adjacent block. Such naturally partitioned reservoirs may be ideal candidates for reducing risks associated with CO2 plume breakthrough.

  5. Markovian Processes for Quantitative Information Leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Fabrizio

    Quantification of information leakage is a successful approach for evaluating the security of a system. It models the system to be analyzed as a channel with the secret as the input and an output as observable by the attacker as the output, and applies information theory to quantify the amount...... of information transmitted through such channel, thus effectively quantifying how many bits of the secret can be inferred by the attacker by analyzing the system’s output. Channels are usually encoded as matrices of conditional probabilities, known as channel matrices. Such matrices grow exponentially...... in the size of the secret and observables, are cumbersome to compute and store, encode both the behavior of the system and assumptions about the attacker, and assume an input-output behavior of the system. For these reasons we propose to model the systemattacker scenario with Markovian models. We show...

  6. Acoustic emission generated by fluid leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    The noise generated by the leaking saturated steam and subcooled water form various sizes of hole has been measured as function of leak rate and stagnation pressure. Acoustic emission (proportinal to root mean sguare voltage) is shown to be proportional to the leak rate and stagnation pressure. A transition of acoustic emission power is observed at the stagnation pressure 0.185 MPa associated with the transition to the critical flow state. Substantially higher acoustic emission power generated by the subcooled water leakage is attributed to the flashing source involving the phase transformation and volume expansion. The relative amplitude of noise spectrum becomes more spiky as the leak rate and stagnation pressure increased. (Author)

  7. Understanding Magnetic Flux Leakage signals from gouges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clapham, Lynann; Babbar, Vijay; Dien Chen, Jian [Applied Magnetics Group, Department of Physics, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)], email: lynann@physics.queensu.ca; Alexander, Chris [Stress Engineering Services Inc., Houston, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Mechanical damage in pipelines is an important issue as it can lead to immediate or delayed failures. The magnetic flux leakage (MFL) method can be used to locate and characterize mechanical damage in pipelines. The purpose of this study is to get a better understanding of how MFL signals arise from pipeline gouges. Experimental MFL measurements were carried out on X60 grade pipe sections where a defect set of 10 gouges had been introduced; measurements were conducted on both internal and external pipe wall surface. Results showed that deformation and residual stress due to a gouge are mostly situated at the outer wall surface and that MFL measurements detected it from the inside and a model was developed to account for MFL axial dipole signal. This study brought new information on MFL signals and further work will be undertaken to completely understand how MFL signals arise from pipe gouge.

  8. Development of leakage monitoring system using radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. C.; Lee, D. S. [Seoil College, Seoul (Korea); Cho, Y. S. [Konyang University, Nonsan (Korea); Shin, S. K. [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    This study is to development the potable neutron back-scattering gauge for leakage and detecting liquid interface of an oil and liquid tank, using a radioisotopes. For this purpose, small sized, light weight potable gauge is to be designed as to develope neutron shielding mechanism, low power supply circuit, high voltage circuit, measurement circuit, and operating handle etc. The user will be able to set the duration of the time interval, the scale, the high voltage, the threshold, the channel window, the selection whether the data storage or not, the selection whether the scale, high voltage, threshold and window fix or not at any time. The counted pulse will be displayed with the numerical value and the line bar. The gauge will be able to connect to an IBM compatible PC via a serial port, power will be supplied by internal battery. 9 refs., 28 figs., 10 tabs. (Author)

  9. Oxygen mass-transfer coefficients for different sample containers used in the headspace biochemical oxygen demand test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, B E; Kohler, D

    2001-01-01

    To accurately measure the oxygen demand of a wastewater sample in a headspace biochemical oxygen demand (HBOD) or other respirometric test, the rate of oxygen transfer to the aqueous phase must be greater than the oxygen exertion rate by the sample. Oxygen mass-transfer coefficients (Kawa) measured for 28-, 55-, and 160-mL, partially full (18 to 89%) containers placed on their sides on a shaker table and mixed at 200 r/min averaged 8.0 h-1 (range 5.4 to 9.9 h-1). For this mass-transfer coefficient, HBOD values as great as 1340 mg/L.d are possible at the start of an HBOD test, although the maximum daily HBOD declines to 192 mg/L.d at the end of the test because of oxygen depletion in the sample headspace. Mass-transfer coefficients for shaken samples decreased only at low shaking speeds (Oxygen mass-transfer coefficients for shaken samples were always larger than those (average of 1.8 h-1) measured for samples in a 250-mL bottle mixed with a stir bar on a stir plate. These mass-transfer coefficients indicate that the oxygen demand of typical full-strength municipal wastewaters can be measured in HBOD tests without oxygen transfer limiting the reaction rate.

  10. Elevated Temperature Ballistic Impact Testing of PBO and Kevlar Fabrics for Application in Supersonic Jet Engine Fan Containment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J. Michael; Roberts Gary D.; Revilock, Duane M., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Ballistic impact tests were conducted on fabric made from both Poly(phenylene benzobizoxazole) (PBO) and Kevlar 29 which were selected to be similar in weave pattern, areal density, and fiber denier. The projectiles were 2.54-cm- (1-in.-) long aluminum cylinders with a diameter of 1.27 cm (0.5 in.). The fabric specimens were clamped on four sides in a 30.5-cm- (12-in.-) square frame. Tests on PBO were conducted at room temperature and at 260 C (500 F). A number of PBO specimens were aged in air at 204 and 260 C (400 and 500 F) before impact testing. Kevlar specimens were tested only at room temperature and with no aging. The PBO absorbed significantly more energy than the Kevlar at both room and elevated temperatures. However, after aging at temperatures of 204 C (400 F) and above, the PBO fabric lost almost all of its energy absorbing ability. It was concluded that PBO fabric is not a feasible candidate for fan containment system applications in supersonic jet engines where operating temperatures exceed this level.

  11. Assessment of leakage at the implant-abutment connection using a new gas flow method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauroux, Marie-Alix; Levallois, Bernard; Yachouh, Jacques; Torres, Jacques-Henri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, with a new gas flow technique, leakage at the implant/abutment junction in systems with four different connections. Five Branemark System, five One Morse, five Intra-lock System, and five Ankylos Plus implants and abutments were used. A hole was drilled in the apex of each implant to allow gas to flow through the connection from negative to atmospheric pressure. The gas flow was calculated (slope of pressure decrease, in hPa.s-1). Each connection was tested after both manual and key tightening. Statistical analysis was performed on a generalized linear model with repeated measurements. The significance level was set at α=.05. A global significant difference was observed between the various systems (P=.0001). After manual tightening, gas leakage was (Ln[hPa.s-1], means±standard deviations): One Morse: 0.20 (±1.70); Branemark System: -4.56 (±2.61); Intra-lock: -4.31 (±4.17); Ankylos Plus; -7.59 (±0.76). After key tightening, mean values were: One Morse: -2.51 (±2.72); Branemark System: -7.23 (±1.01); Intra-lock: -7.76 (±0.50); Ankylos Plus; -7.73 (±0.62). This study confirms that gas flow is an appropriate method to assess connection leakage. Ankylos Plus connection leakage was very low when the assembly was tightened manually. Among conical connection systems, low (Ankylos Plus) and high (One Morse) leakage was observed. This gas flow study suggests, therefore, that connection design is not the most important parameter for implant/abutment connection leakage.

  12. Stand-alone containment analysis of Phébus FPT tests with ASTEC and MELCOR codes: the FPT-2 test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gonfiotti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last 40 years, many studies have been carried out to investigate the different phenomena occurring during a Severe Accident (SA in a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP. Such efforts have been supported by the execution of different experimental campaigns, and the integral Phébus FP tests were probably some of the most important experiments in this field. In these tests, the degradation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR fuel bundle was investigated employing different control rod materials and burn-up levels in strongly or weakly oxidizing conditions. From the findings on these and previous tests, numerical codes such as ASTEC and MELCOR have been developed to analyze the evolution of a SA in real NPPs. After the termination of the Phébus FP campaign, these two codes have been furthermore improved to implement the more recent findings coming from different experimental campaigns. Therefore, continuous verification and validation is still necessary to check that the new improvements introduced in such codes allow also a better prediction of these Phébus tests. The aim of the present work is to re-analyze the Phébus FPT-2 test employing the updated ASTEC and MELCOR code versions. The analysis focuses on the stand-alone containment aspects of this test, and three different spatial nodalizations of the containment vessel (CV have been developed. The paper summarizes the main thermal-hydraulic results and presents different sensitivity analyses carried out on the aerosols and fission products (FP behavior. When possible, a comparison among the results obtained during this work and by different authors in previous work is also performed. This paper is part of a series of publications covering the four Phébus FP tests using a PWR fuel bundle: FPT-0, FPT-1, FPT-2, and FPT-3, excluding the FPT-4 one, related to the study of the release of low-volatility FP and transuranic elements from a debris bed and a pool of melted fuel. Keywords: Safety

  13. 29 CFR Appendix I to Part 1917 - Special Cargo Gear and Container Spreader Test Requirements (Mandatory) [see § 1917.50(c)(5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special Cargo Gear and Container Spreader Test Requirements (Mandatory) [see § 1917.50(c)(5)] I Appendix I to Part 1917 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued...) [see § 1917.50(c)(5)] Type gear Test requirement Tested by Proof test A. All Special Cargo Handling...

  14. Experimental investigation of iodine removal and containment depressurization in containment spray system test facility of 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Manish [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Kandar, T.K.; Vhora, S.F.; Mohan, Nalini [Directorate of Technology Development, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Mumbai (India); Iyer, K.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Prabhu, S.V., E-mail: svprabhu@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Depressurization rate in a scaled down vessel filled with air and steam is studied. • Iodine removal rate in a scaled down vessel filled with steam/air is investigated. • Effect of SMD and vessel pressure on depressurization rate is studied. • Depressurization rate decreases with the increase in the droplet size (590 μm – 1 mm) • Decrease in pressure and iodine concentration with time follow exponential trend. - Abstract: As an additional safety measure in the new 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactors, the first of a kind system called containment Spray System is introduced. The system is designed to cater/mitigate the conditions after design basis accidents i.e., loss of coolant accident and main steam line break. As a contribution to the safety analysis of condition following loss-of-coolant accidents, experiments are carried out to establish the performance of the system. The loss of coolant is simulated by injecting saturated steam and iodine vapors into the containment vessel in which air is enclosed at atmospheric and room temperature, and then the steam-air mixture is cooled by sprays of water. The effect of water spray on the containment vessel pressure and the iodine scrubbing in a scaled down facility is investigated for the containment spray system of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors. The experiments are carried out in the scaled down vessel of the diameter of 2.0 m and height of 3.5 m respectively. Experiments are conducted with water at room temperature as the spray medium. Two different initial vessel pressure i.e. 0.7 bar and 1.0 bar are chosen for the studies as they are nearing the loss of coolant accident & main steam line break pressures in Indian pressurized heavy water reactors. These pressures are chosen based on the containment resultant pressures after a design basis accident. The transient temperature and pressure distribution of the steam in the vessel are measured during the depressurization

  15. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-21

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

  16. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F.; Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report

  17. An Ice Block: A Novel Technique of Successful Prevention of Cement Leakage Using an Ice Ball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uri, Ishaq Fahmi, E-mail: uri.isaac@gmail.com [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital (United Kingdom); Garnon, Julien, E-mail: juliengarnon@gmail.com; Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: georgia.tsoumakidou@chru-strasbourg.fr; Gangi, Afshin, E-mail: gangi@unistra.fr [Hôpital Universitaire de Strasbourg, Service d’Imagerie Interventionnelle (France)

    2015-04-15

    We report three cases of painful bone metastases with extraosseous invasion treated with cementoplasty and cryoablation. Due to significant cortical loss in all cases, the ice ball was used simultaneously during cementoplasty to deter potential cement leakage. This was achieved by direct application of the ice ball against the cortical surface, resulting in adequate consolidation and successful containment of the cement within the treated bones. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report to describe such a combined technique.

  18. Potential errors and misuse of statistics in studies on leakage in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, C; Lopez, J M; Pulgar, R; Abalos, C; Valderrama, M J

    2013-04-01

    To assess the quality of the statistical methodology used in studies of leakage in Endodontics, and to compare the results found using appropriate versus inappropriate inferential statistical methods. The search strategy used the descriptors 'root filling' 'microleakage', 'dye penetration', 'dye leakage', 'polymicrobial leakage' and 'fluid filtration' for the time interval 2001-2010 in journals within the categories 'Dentistry, Oral Surgery and Medicine' and 'Materials Science, Biomaterials' of the Journal Citation Report. All retrieved articles were reviewed to find potential pitfalls in statistical methodology that may be encountered during study design, data management or data analysis. The database included 209 papers. In all the studies reviewed, the statistical methods used were appropriate for the category attributed to the outcome variable, but in 41% of the cases, the chi-square test or parametric methods were inappropriately selected subsequently. In 2% of the papers, no statistical test was used. In 99% of cases, a statistically 'significant' or 'not significant' effect was reported as a main finding, whilst only 1% also presented an estimation of the magnitude of the effect. When the appropriate statistical methods were applied in the studies with originally inappropriate data analysis, the conclusions changed in 19% of the cases. Statistical deficiencies in leakage studies may affect their results and interpretation and might be one of the reasons for the poor agreement amongst the reported findings. Therefore, more effort should be made to standardize statistical methodology. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  19. Anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulow, S.

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the literature about anastomotic leakage after anterior resection for rectal cancer a review is presented of the frequency, potential risk factors and consequences of leakage. The risk factors are evaluated according to the level of scientific evidence of the individual background...

  20. Contrast media for radiological examination in gastrointestinal tract leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this investigation has been to find a safe and suitable contrast medium for radiological evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in cases where leakage outside the GIT can be suspected. Leakage outside the gastro-intestinal tract lumen can occur in many ways eg.,

  1. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces vascular leakage via autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ru Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular leakage is an important feature of acute inflammatory shock, which currently has no effective treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that can induce vascular leakage and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of shock. However, the mechanism of MIF-induced vascular leakage is still unclear. In this study, using recombinant MIF (rMIF, we demonstrated that MIF induced disorganization and degradation of junction proteins and increased the permeability of human endothelial cells in vitro. Western blotting analysis showed that rMIF treatment induced LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Inhibition of autophagy with a PI3K inhibitor (3-MA, a ROS scavenger (NAC or autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine rescued rMIF-induced vascular leakage, suggesting that autophagy mediates MIF-induced vascular leakage. The potential involvement of other signaling pathways was also studied using different inhibitors, and the results suggested that MIF-induced vascular leakage may occur through the ERK pathway. In conclusion, we showed that MIF triggered autophagic degradation of endothelial cells, resulting in vascular leakage. Inhibition of MIF-induced autophagy may provide therapeutic targets against vascular leakage in inflammatory shock.

  2. Synthesis, structural characterization and in vitro testing of dysprosium containing silica particles as potential MRI contrast enhancing agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiriac, L.B.; Trandafir, D.L. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Turcu, R.V.F. [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Todea, M. [Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Simon, S., E-mail: simons@phys.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Physics & National Magnetic Resonance Center, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania); Interdisciplinary Research Institute on Bio-Nano-Sciences & Faculty of Physics, Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, RO-400084 (Romania)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Dysprosium containing silica microparticles obtained by freeze and spray drying. • Higher structural units interconnection achieved in freeze vs. spray dried samples. • Dy occurance on the outermost layer of the microparticles evidenced by XPS. • Enhanced MRI contrast observed for freeze dried samples with 5% mol Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}. - Abstract: The work is focused on synthesis and structural characterization of novel dysprosium-doped silica particles which could be considered as MRI contrast agents. Sol-gel derived silica rich particles obtained via freeze-drying and spray-drying processing methods were structurally characterized by XRD, {sup 29}Si MAS-NMR and XPS methods. The occurrence of dysprosium on the outermost layer of dysprosium containing silica particles was investigated by XPS analysis. The MRI contrast agent characteristics have been tested using RARE-T{sub 1} and RARE-T{sub 2} protocols. The contrast of MRI images delivered by the investigated samples was correlated with their local structure. Dysprosium disposal on microparticles with surface structure characterised by decreased connectivity of the silicate network units favours dark T{sub 2}-weighted MRI contrast properties.

  3. Ship cabin leakage alarm based on ARM SCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liyan

    2018-03-01

    If there is a leakage in the cabin of a sailing ship, it is a major accident that threatens the personnel and property of the ship. If we can’t take timely measures, there will be a devastating disaster. In order to judge the leakage of the cabin, it is necessary to set up a leakage alarm system, so as to achieve the purpose of detecting and alarming the leakage of the cabin, and avoid the occurrence of accidents. This paper discusses the design of ship cabin leakage alarm system based on ARM SCM. In order to ensure the stability and precision of the product, the hardware design of the alarm system is carried out, such as circuit design, software design, the programming of SCM, the software programming of upper computer, etc. It is hoped that it can be of reference value to interested readers.

  4. Study on Acoustic Catheter of Boiler Tube Leakage Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yongxing; Feng, Qiang

    Boiler tube leakage is the major reason of affecting the safe operation of the unit now, there are 3 methods of the "four tube" leakage detection: Traditional method, filtering method and acoustic spectrum analysis, acoustic spectrum analysis is the common method, but this method have low sensitivity and the sensor damage easily. Therewith, designed the special acoustic catheter with acoustic resonance cavity type, proved by experiments, the acoustic catheter with acoustic resonance cavity type can enhance leakage sound, can accurately extract leakage signals, has high sensitivity, and can avoid the effect of sensor by fire and hot-gas when the furnace is in positive pressure situation, reduce the installation and maintenance costs of the boiler tube leakage monitor system.

  5. Leakage testing for different adhesive systems and composites to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups of 14 teeth each as follows: The first group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with flowable composite, the second group – etch‑rinse adhesive applied and cavities filled with bulk‑fill resin composite, the third group – one‑stage self‑etch (SE) adhesive applied ...

  6. Leakage Testing for Different Adhesive Systems and Composites to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-16

    Nov 16, 2015 ... dried with compressed air leaving the surface moist. Etch-and-rinse adhesive was utilized to the cavity and left for 20 s. The solvent was detached with air and adhesive was light‑cured for 20 s. Then, the cavities were filled with flowable composite followed by polymerizing for. 20 s. For the second group, the ...

  7. Use of Anal Acoustic Reflectometry in the Evaluation of Men With Passive Fecal Leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornung, Benjamin R; Telford, Karen J; Carlson, Gordon L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Men with passive fecal leakage represent a distinct clinical entity in which the pathophysiology remains unclear. Standard anorectal investigations fail to demonstrate consistent abnormalities in this group. Anal acoustic reflectometry is a new test of anal sphincter function with gre...... is a sensitive test of anal sphincter function and, unlike anal manometry, can discriminate male leakers from continent subjects. An identifiable abnormality has been detected using anal acoustic reflectometry, which may further our understanding of the pathogenesis in this group....

  8. Liquid penetrant and magnetic particle testing at level 2. Manual for the syllabi contained in IAEA-TECDOC-628, training guidelines in non-destructive testing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been active in the promotion of non-destructive testing (NDT) technology in the world for many decades. The prime reason for this has been the need for stringent standards for quality control for safe operation of industrial as well a nuclear installations. It has successfully executed a number of programmes and regional projects of which NDT was an important part. Through these programmes a large number of persons have been trained in the member states and a state of self sufficiency in this area of technology has been achieved in many of them. All along there has been a realization of the need to have well established training guidelines and related books in order, firstly, to guide the IAEA experts who were involved in this training programme and, secondly, to achieve some level of international uniformity and harmonization of training materials and consequent competence of personnel. The syllabi for training courses have been published in the form of two TECDOC publications. The first was IAEA-TECDOC-407 which contained syllabi for the basic five methods, i.e. liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, eddy current testing, radiographic testing and ultrasonic testing, and the second and revised is IAEA-TECDOC-628 which includes additional methods of visual testing and leak testing. IAEA-TECDOC-628, as well as most of the international standards on the subject of training and certification of NDT personnel including ISO 9712, define three levels of competence, namely, Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3. Among these, Level 1 is the lowest and Level 3 the highest. The intermediate Level 2 is considered to be the most appropriate for persons who, beside other duties, are expected to independently undertake practical testing in the relevant method of NDT; develop NDT procedures adapted to various problems; prepare written instructions; make accept/reject decisions in accordance with relevant standards and

  9. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage. NSAIDs and anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Mads

    2012-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and--if possible--eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order to achieve this, the following studies were performed. Study I was a retrospective, case-control study in 75 patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection for colorectal cancer. 33 of these patients received the NSAID diclofenac in the postoperative period; the remaining 42 did not receive any NSAID. There were significantly more ALs among the patients receiving diclofenac (7/33 vs. 1/42, p=0.018). In uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses, diclofenac was the only factor associated with increased AL rate. This study functioned as a hypothesis generating study and laid the ground for the subsequent studies. Study II was an experimental, randomized, case-control study in 32 Wistar rats. The rats had a colonic anastomosis performed and were randomized to diclofenac or placebo treatment. After three days, the rats were sacrificed and the anastomoses were harvested. First, the anastomotic strengths were tested by longitudinal; subsequently, the levels of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the anastomotic tissues were measured. There was no difference among the groups with regard to anastomotic strength, but the animals treated with diclofenac had significantly lower COX-2 levels (median (range) 1.30 (0.42-3.31) ng/mg vs. 2.44 (0.88 - 18.94) ng/mg, pNSAID treatment. Study III was also an experimental, randomized, case-control study. This time round, 60 Wistar

  10. Eddy Current Testing at Level 2: Manual for the Syllabi Contained in IAEA-TECDOC-628.Rev. 2 'Training Guidelines for Non Destructive Testing Techniques'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has been active in the promotion of non-destructive testing (NDT) technology in the world for many decades. The prime reason for this interest has been the need for stringent standards for quality control for safe operation of nuclear as well as other industrial installations. It has successfully executed a number of programmes including technical co-operation (TC) projects (national and regional) and the coordinated research projects (CRP) of which NDT was an important part. Through these programmes a large number of persons in the Member States have been trained, leading to establishment of national certifying bodies (NCB) responsible for training and certification of NDT personnel. Consequently, a state of self-sufficiency in this area of technology has been achieved in many of them. All along there has been a realization of the need to have well established training guidelines and related books in order, firstly, to guide the IAEA experts who were involved in this training programme and, secondly, to achieve some level of international uniformity and harmonization of training materials and consequent competence of NDT personnel. The syllabi for training courses have been published in the form of IAEA-TECDOC publications. The first was IAEA-TECDOC-407 (1987), which contained syllabi for the basic five methods, i.e. liquid penetrant testing, magnetic particle testing, eddy current testing, radiographic testing and ultrasonic testing. To accommodate advancements in NDT technology, later versions of this publication were issued in 1991, 2002 and 2008, the current version being IAEA-TECDOC-628/Rev.2 (2008), which includes additional and more advanced NDT methods. This IAEA-TECDOC, as well as most of the international standards on the subject of training and certification of NDT personnel including ISO 9712 (2005), define three levels of competence. Among these, level 1 is the lowest and level 3 the highest. The intermediate

  11. Commutability of proficiency testing material containing tobramycin: a study within the framework of the Dutch Calibration 2.000 project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robijns, Karen; Boone, Niels W; Jansen, Rob T P; Kuypers, Aldy W H M; Neef, Cees; Touw, Daan J

    2017-02-01

    Results from external quality assessment schemes (EQASs) can provide information about accuracy and comparability of different measurement methods, provided that the material used in these schemes behave identical to patient samples among the different methods, a characteristic also known as commutability. The aim of this study was to assess the commutability of different matrices for the material used in an EQAS for tobramycin. Proficiency testing material (PTM) and patient samples containing tobramycin were prepared, collected, pooled, and distributed to participating laboratories for analysis. Low, medium, and high tobramycin concentrations in liquid human, liquid bovine and lyophilized bovine serum were tested in this study. The patient serum results of every laboratory were plotted against each of the other laboratories, and the distances of the PTM results to the patient serum regression line were calculated. For comparison, these distances were divided by the average within-laboratory standard deviation (SDwl) of the results reported in the official EQAS for tobramycin, resulting in a relative residual. The commutability decision limit was set at 3 SDwl. With 10 laboratories participating in this study, 45 laboratory couples were formed. For human serum, only one relative residual for high concentrations of tobramycin was found outside the commutability decision limit. For liquid and lyophilized bovine sera, the number of relative residuals outside the decision limit was between 15 and 18 for low, medium, and high tobramycin concentrations. The PTM used for tobramycin is preferably prepared with human serum.

  12. FAA Development of Reliable Modeling Methodologies for Fan Blade Out Containment Analysis. Part 2; Ballistic Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the ballistic impact testing that was conducted to provide validation data for the development of numerical models of blade out events in fabric containment systems. The ballistic impact response of two different fiber materials - Kevlar 49 (E.I. DuPont Nemours and Company) and Zylon AS (Toyobo Co., Ltd.) was studied by firing metal projectiles into dry woven fabric specimens using a gas gun. The shape, mass, orientation and velocity of the projectile were varied and recorded. In most cases the tests were designed such that the projectile would perforate the specimen, allowing measurement of the energy absorbed by the fabric. The results for both Zylon and Kevlar presented here represent a useful set of data for the purposes of establishing and validating numerical models for predicting the response of fabrics under conditions simulating those of a jet engine blade release situations. In addition some useful empirical observations were made regarding the effects of projectile orientation and the relative performance of the different materials.

  13. Routine testing on protective and safety systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rysy, W.

    1977-01-01

    1) In-process inspection, tests during commissioning. 2) Tests during reactor operation. 2.1) Reactor protection system, for example: continuous auto-testing by a dynamic system, check of the output signals; 2.2) safety features: selected examples: functional tests on the ECCS, trial operation of the emergency diesels. 3) Tests during refuelling phase. 3.1) Containment: Leakage rate tests, leak testing; 3.2) coolant system: selected examples: inservice inspections of the pressure vessel, eddy current testing of the steam generator, functional tests of safety valves. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Bacterial leakage through temporary fillings in core buildup composite material - an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechenberg, Dan-Krister; Schriber, Martina; Attin, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the ability of the provisional filling material Cavit-W alone or in combination with different restorative materials to prevent bacterial leakage through simulated access cavities in a resin buildup material. LuxaCore resin cylinders were subdivided into 4 experimental groups (n = 30), plus a positive (n = 5) and a negative (n = 30) control group. One bore hole was drilled through each cylinder, except those in the negative control group (G1). The holes were filled with Cavit-W (G2), Cavit-W and Ketac-Molar (glassionomer cement, G3), Cavit-W and LuxaCore bonded with LuxaBond (G4), Cavit-W and LuxaCore (G5), or left empty (G6). Specimens were mounted in a two-chamber leakage setup. The upper chamber was inoculated with E. faecalis. An enterococci-selective broth was used in the lower chamber. Leakage was assessed for 60 days and compared using Fisher's exact test (α Cavit-W alone or combined with a glass-ionomer cement did not prevent bacterial leakage through a resin buildup material for two months. In contrast, covering Cavit-W with a bonded resin material resulted in a bacteria-tight seal for two months.

  15. [Use of fibrin glue in the prevention of leakage in pancreatico-jejunal anastomoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, M; Jeremic, M; Stojanović, P; Stojiljković, M; Gmijović, D; Stanojković, Z; Savić, V; Djordjević, V; Cvetković, Z; Kostov, M; Colović, R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the protective effects of fibrin sealing on the pancreatico-jejunostomy (PJA), the high-risk anastomosis following pancreas head resection. Experimental study was performed on the mongrel dogs, divided in two groups (20 animals each): Experimental group-with end to end "dunking" PJA, protected by temporary occlusion of the pancreatic duct with fibrin sealant/Tissucol/Immuno Ag/, while control group was without any protective procedure. The animals were followed 5 months in order to study: protective effects of such procedure on the PJA quantified with the percent of anastomotic leakage, effects of the exocrine secretion and effects the endocrine function Results: PJA leakage occurred in 13.33% in control group. No leakage was registered in experimental group. Biochemical, histological and electron microscopic study showed slight transitory elevation of amylase levels. Fibrin glue plug was dissolved and pancreatic juice output was reestablished 12th days postoperatively. Long term follow-up showed no damages of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. Pancreatic duct occlusion with fibrin glue appeared to be an useful method in the prevention of pancreatico-jejunostomy leakage, without negative effects on the exocrine and endocrine pancreas.

  16. Detection device for pipeway water leakage in building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Jun.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly detect pipeway leakage at predetermined areas over a wide range in a building. Constitution: If flooding should occur in a power plant building and left as it is, emergency core cooling system, as well as auxiliary equipments and electrical equipments of the system are flooded to make the safety shutdown of the plant impossible. The present invention copes with such a risk. That is, an inlet flow meter and as exit flow meter are disposed to the inlet and the exit of pipeways disposed in a predetermined region in the building and a flow rate difference detector between them is disposed. In this way, pipeway leakage is detected by detecting the flow rate difference between the inlet flow rate and the exit flow rate of the pipeway in the predetermined region. According to the present invention, if a pipeway in a predetermined region is raptured to cause water leakage, the pipeway leakage can rapidly be detected depending on the flow rate difference between the inlet flow rate and the exit flow rate. Further, the water leakage over the entire the predetermined region can be detected rapidly as compared with the conventional case of detecting the leakage at a restricted portion where the leakage detector is disposed. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Leakage pattern of linear accelerator treatment heads from multiple vendors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonski, P.R.; Taylor, M.L.; Franich, R.D.; Harty, P.; Clements, N.; Kron, T.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Patient life expectancy post-radiotherapy is becoming longer. Therefore, secondary cancers caused by radiotherapy treatment have more time to develop. Increasing attention is being given to out-of-field dose resulting from scatter and accelerator head leakage. Dose leakage from equivalent positions on Varian600C, Varian21-X, Siemens Primus and Elekta Synergy-II linacs were measured with TLD 1 00 H dosimeter chips and compared. Treatment parameters such as field size and beam energy were altered. Leakage doses are presented as a percentage of the dose to isocentre (5 Gy). Results illustrate significant variations in leakage dose between linac models where no model emits consistently lower amounts of radiation leakage for all treatment parameters. Results are shown below. Leakage through the collimator assembly in different units is varying as a function of location and unit design by more than a factor of 10. Differences are more pronounced in comparing Varian or Elekta models, which are fitted with an additional collimator separate from the MLC leaves, to the Siemens model, which uses MLC leaves as its only secondary collimator. Further measurements are currently being taken at the patient plane with a directional detector system to determine the spatial distribution of high leakage sources.

  18. Experiments to evaluate behavior of containment piping bellows under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1993-01-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall. In a severe accident they may be subjected to high pressure and temperature, and a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, are being subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen tests have been conducted. The tests showed that withstanding relatively large bellows are capable of deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed

  19. WWER steam generator tube structural and leakage integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splichal, K.; Krhounek, Vl.; Otruba, J.; Ruscak, M.

    1998-01-01

    The integrity of heat exchange tubes may influence the lifetime of WWER steam generators and appears to be an important criterion for the evaluation of their safety and operational reliability. The basic requirements are to assure very low probability of radioactive water leakage, preventing unstable crack growth and sudden tube rupture. These requirements led to development of permissible limits for primary to secondary leak evaluation and heat exchange tubes plugging. The stress corrosion cracking and pitting are the main corrosion damages of WWER heat exchange tubes and are initiated from the outer surface. Both the initiation and crack growth cause thinning of the tube wall and lead to part thickness cracks and through wall cracks, oriented preferentially in the axial direction. The paper presents the leakage and plugging limits for WWER steam generators, which have been determined from leak tests and burst tests. The tubes with axial part-through and through-wall defects have been used. The permissible value of primary to secondary leak rate was evaluated with respect to permissible axial through-wall defect size of WWER 440 and 1000 steam generator tubes. Blocking of the tube cracks by corrosion product particles and other compounds reduces the primary to secondary leak rate. The plugging limits involve the following factors: permissible tube wall thickness which determine further operation of the tubes with defects and assures their integrity under operating conditions and permissible size of a through-wall crack which is sufficiently stable under normal and accident conditions in relation to the critical crack length. For the evaluation of burst test of heat exchange tubes with longitudinal through-wall defects the instability criterion has been used and the dependence of the normalised burst pressure on the normalised length of an axial through-wall defect has been determined. The validity of the criterion of instability for WWER tubes with through

  20. Application of a microcomputer-based data system to ultimate strength tests of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia is evaluating the degree to which existing finite element computer codes can predict the structural behavior of containment buildings beyond the elastic range. The study also is attempting to discover whether any intrinsic functional relationship exists relating leakage to pressure. Test equipment and instrumentation are described

  1. Junction leakage measurements with micro four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Rong; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Wang, Fei

    2012-01-01

    We present a new, preparation-free method for measuring the leakage current density on ultra-shallow junctions. The junction leakage is found by making a series of four-point sheet resistance measurements on blanket wafers with variable electrode spacings. The leakage current density is calculated...... using a fit of the measured four-point resistances to an analytical two-sheet model. The validity of the approximation involved in the two-sheet model is verified by a comparison to finite element model calculations....

  2. Quantum error prevention and leakage elimination for quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegahan, Saeed; Byrd, Mark S.; Reddy Chinni, Karthik

    2015-03-01

    Decoherence-free, or noiseless subsystems, are used to encode spin qubits in quantum dots in order to achieve universal quantum computing using only the exchange interaction. We investigate the use of dynamical decoupling controls for the purposes of eliminating leakage for a logical qubit encoded using three physical qubits. These leakage elimination operators (LEOs) can be used to eliminate all leakage errors using exchange interactions between the physical spin qubits. Depending on the encoding and the decoupling control, different types of errors can be eliminated. We show several different possible controls and the consequential noise reduction for different encodings as well as our general method for determining the effectiveness of these pulses.

  3. FIELD EVALUATION OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING THE AIR LEAKAGE OF DUCT SYSTEMS UNDER NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS IN 51 HOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul W. Francisco; Larry Palmiter; Erin Kruse; Bob Davis

    2003-10-18

    Duct leakage in forced-air distribution systems has been recognized for years as a major source of energy losses in residential buildings. Unfortunately, the distribution of leakage across homes is far from uniform, and measuring duct leakage under normal operating conditions has proven to be difficult. Recently, two new methods for estimating duct leakage at normal operating conditions have been devised. These are called the nulling test and the Delta-Q test. Small exploratory studies have been done to evaluate these tests, but previously no large-scale study on a broad variety of homes has been performed to determine the accuracy of these new methods in the field against an independent benchmark of leakage. This sort of study is important because it is difficult in a laboratory setting to replicate the range of leakage types found in real homes. This report presents the results of a study on 51 homes to evaluate these new methods relative to an independent benchmark and a method that is currently used. An evaluation of the benchmark procedure found that it worked very well for supply-side leakage measurements, but not as well on the return side. The nulling test was found to perform well, as long as wind effects were minimal. Unfortunately, the time and difficulty of setup can be prohibitive, and it is likely that this method will not be practical for general use by contractors except in homes with no return ducts. The Delta-Q test was found to have a bias resulting in overprediction of the leakage, which qualitatively confirms the results of previous laboratory, simulation, and small-scale field studies. On average the bias was only a few percent of the air handler flow, but in about 20% of the homes the bias was large. A primary flaw with the Delta-Q test is the assumption that the pressure between the ducts and the house remain constant during the test, as this assumption does not hold true. Various modifications to the Delta-Q method were evaluated as

  4. Fluid leakage through fractures in an impervious caprock embedded between two geologic aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2012-06-01

    The paper develops an analytical result for the flow through a single fracture under a hydraulic gradient between the two aquifer regions and takes into account permeability characteristics of all components of the system. Non-dimensional results are presented to illustrate the influence of the permeability mis-match between the two geologic formations and the permeability and geometry of the fracture on the flow rate through the fracture. The analytical result is then used to develop additional results for leakage through a swarm of vertically aligned hydraulically non-interacting fractures and a damaged region containing a densely spaced array of vertically aligned fractures and worm hole type features in the caprock. The work presents a convenient result for the estimation of leakage from storage formations in geoenvironmental applications.

  5. Serum lactate as predictor and diagnostic biomarker of plasma leakage in adult dengue patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Bur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF are differentiated by the occurrence in DHF of plasma leakage into the interstitial space as shown by pleural and peritoneal effusion, hemoconcentration, and intravascular hypovolemia. Perfusion dysfunction causes anaerobic metabolism, which leads to increased serum lactate. This study was to determine serum lactate as prognostic predictor and diagnostic biomarker of plasma leakage in adult dengue patients. Methods A cross-sectional retrospective cohort study was conducted on 57 adult dengue patients hospitalized in the internal medicine ward of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital and Persahabatan Hospital in Jakarta. Serum lactate was examined to determine its mean difference between DF and DHF. The data was analyzed by independent t-test and the cut-off points were identified for presence as well as absence of plasma leakage, then the receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve was used to determine sensitivity and specificity. Results Mean serum lactate was significantly higher in DHF than in DF. From the ROC curve, the cut-off point for serum lactate as prognostic predictor on day 3 of fever was ³2.65 mmol/L with AUC of 0.626 (95% CI 0.480-0.772; p=0.108. The cut-off point for diagnostic biomarker of plasma leakage on day 5 of fever was ³2.55 mmol/L with sensitivity 66.6%, specificity 54.2%, and AUC 0.668 (95% CI 0.550-0.826; p=0.016. Conclusion There was a significant difference in serum lactate between DF and DHF. In the critical phase, serum lactate of ³2.55 mmol/L could be used as plasma leakage diagnostic marker of low accuracy.

  6. Toward Understanding Tip Leakage Flows in Small Compressor Cores Including Stator Leakage Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work was to provide additional data to supplement the work reported in NASA/CR-2015-218868 (Berdanier and Key, 2015b). The aim of that project was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearances were studied with nominal tip clearance gaps of 1.5 percent, 3.0 percent, and 4.0 percent based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was previously investigated at four corrected speedlines (100 percent, 90 percent, 80 percent, and 68 percent) for each of the three tip clearance configurations. This study extends the previously published results to include detailed steady and time-resolved pressure data at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100 percent corrected speedline for the intermediate clearance level (3.0 percent). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row are supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data were combined with existing three-component velocity measurements to identify a novel technique for calculating blockage in a multistage compressor. Time-resolved static pressure measurements have been collected over the rotor tips for all rotors with each of the three tip clearance configurations for up to five loading conditions along the 100 percent corrected speedline using fast-response piezoresistive pressure sensors. These time-resolved static pressure measurements reveal new knowledge about the

  7. Process effects on leakage current of Si-PIN neutron detectors with porous microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Baoning; Zhao, Kangkang; Yang, Taotao; Jiang, Yong; Fan, Xiaoqiang; Lu, Min; Han, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Using the technique of Microfabrication, such as deep silicon dry etching, lithography, etc. Si-PIN neutron detectors with porous microstructure have been successfully fabricated. In order to lower the leakage current, the key fabrication processes, including the Al windows opening, deep silicon etching and the porous side wall smoothing, have been optimized. The cross-section morphology and current-voltage characteristics have been measured to evaluate the microfabrication processes. With the optimized conditions presented by the measurements, a neutron detector with a leakage current density of 2.67 μA cm -2 at a bias of -20 V is obtained. A preliminary neutron irradiation test with 252 Cf neutron source has also been carried out. The neutron irradiation test shows that the neutron detection efficiency of the microstructured neutron detectors is almost 3.6 times higher than that of the planar ones. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Competitiveness and carbon leakages in industry under asymmetric climate policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demailly, D.

    2008-02-01

    This research aims at studying how to predict competitiveness loss for an industry submitted to an asymmetric carbon constraint, and carbon leakages, whether high losses and important leakages might be feared, and which policies can be used to mitigate these losses and escapes. The author analyses and comments the content of four articles dealing with: the impact on competitiveness, revenue distribution and economic efficiency of a change in the allocation rules for EU greenhouse gas allowances; the relationship between allocation of CO 2 allowances and competitiveness in the case of the European iron and steel industry; CO 2 abatement, competitiveness and leakage in the European cement industry under EU ETS; and leakage from climate policies and border tax adjustment (lessons from a geographic model of the cement industry). Then, the author combines several approaches to study the cement and steel industries

  9. Leakage-Resilient Cryptography from the Inner-Product Extractor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziembowski, Stefan; Faust, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    , we use a randomized encoding and develop a method to securely refresh these encodings even in the presence of leakage. We then show that our encoding scheme exhibits an efficient additive homomorphism which can be used to protect important cryptographic tasks such as identification, signing......We present a generic method to secure various widely-used cryptosystems against arbitrary side-channel leakage, as long as the leakage adheres three restrictions: first, it is bounded per observation but in total can be arbitrary large. Second, memory parts leak independently, and, third......, the randomness that is used for certain operations comes from a simple (non-uniform) distribution. As a fundamental building block, we construct a scheme to store a cryptographic secret such that it remains information theoretically hidden, even given arbitrary continuous leakage from the storage. To this end...

  10. Prediction of leakage in the fixed mechanical seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asheichik Anatoly A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The questions of influence of the shape of contact surfaces on leakages through rubber seals in fixed connection of subassemblies are considered in the article. It is known from practice of operation of seals of various designs that the shape of contact surfaces and consequently also the shape of diagram of stresses in a contact zone considerably influences on value of leaks Linking leakage magnitude and distribution of contact stresses enables, firstly, more precisely calculate the amount of leakage for existing seals, and, secondly, to optimize the shape of the seals in their design in each case. As the result of experimental studies on the introduction of the rubber gasket ring fixed indenters different profiles found that by optimizing the shape of the indenter magnitude of leakage can be reduced by 10 times.

  11. Testing the biocompatibility of a glutathione-containing intra-ocular irrigation solution by using an isolated perfused bovine retina organ culture model - an alternative to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januschowski, Kai; Zhour, Ahmad; Lee, Albert; Maddani, Ramin; Mueller, Sebastien; Spitzer, Martin S; Schnichels, Sven; Schultheiss, Maximilian; Doycheva, Deshka; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl-Ulrich; Szurman, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The effects of a glutathione-containing intra-ocular irrigation solution, BSS Plus©, on retinal function and on the survival of ganglion cells in whole-mount retinal explants were studied. Evidence is provided that the perfused ex vivo bovine retina can serve as an alternative to in vivo animal testing. Isolated bovine retinas were prepared and perfused with an oxygen-saturated standard irrigation solution, and an electroretinogram was recorded to assess retinal function. After stable b-waves were detected, the isolated retinas were perfused with BSS Plus for 45 minutes. To investigate the effects of BSS Plus on photoreceptor function, 1mM aspartate was added to the irrigation solution in order to obtain a-waves, and the ERG trace was monitored for 75 minutes. For histological analysis, isolated whole retinal mounts were stored for 24 hours at 4°C, in the dark. The percentages of cell death in the retinal ganglion cell layer and in the outer and inner nuclear layers were estimated by using an ethidium homodimer-1 stain and the TUNEL assay. General swelling of the retina was examined with high-resolution optical coherence tomography. During perfusion with BSS Plus, no significant changes in a-wave and b-wave amplitudes were recorded. Retinas stored for 24 hours in BSS Plus showed a statistically significant smaller percentage (52.6%, standard deviation [SD] = 16.1%) of cell death in the retinal ganglion cell layer compared to the control group (69.6%, SD = 3.9, p = 0.0031). BSS Plus did not seem to affect short-term retinal function, and had a beneficial effect on the survival of retinal ganglion cells. This method for analysing the isolated perfused retina represents a valuable alternative for testing substances for their retinal biocompatibility and toxicity. 2012 FRAME.

  12. Risk of Leakage versus Depth of Injection in Geological Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Celia, Michael A.; Nordbotten, Jan Martin; Bachu, Stefan; Dobossy, Mark E.; Court, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    One of the outstanding challenges for large-scale CCS operations is to develop reliable quantitative risk assessments with a focus on leakage of both injected CO2 and displaced brine. A critical leakage pathway is associated with the century-long legacy of oil and gas exploration and production, which has led to many millions of wells being drilled. Many of those wells are in locations that would otherwise be excellent candidates for CCS operations, especially across many parts of North Ameri...

  13. An alternative treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Hoffmann, J.

    1988-01-01

    An alternative non-operative method for treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection is presented. A mediastinal abscess cavity was drained by an ordinary nasogastric tube introduced via the nose through the anastomotic defect and into the cavity.......An alternative non-operative method for treatment for anastomotic leakage after oesophageal resection is presented. A mediastinal abscess cavity was drained by an ordinary nasogastric tube introduced via the nose through the anastomotic defect and into the cavity....

  14. 4D ERT Monitoring of Subsurface Water Pipe Leakage During a Controlled Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inauen, C.; Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Meldrum, P.; Swift, R. T.; Uhlemann, S.; Gunn, D.; Dashwood, B.; Taxil, J.; Curioni, G.

    2016-12-01

    Locating and delineating leakage from subsurface pipelines is an important task for civil engineers. 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) allows changes in subsurface resistivity to be imaged at a high spatial and temporal resolution in a minimally invasive manner. It is therefore a promising tool to supplement conventional point-sensing techniques to monitor subsurface flow processes. To assess the efficacy of ERT for pipe leakage monitoring several controlled leak experiments were carried out at a test site in Blagdon, Bristol, UK. To simulate the leak, a plastic pipe with a hole was buried below a flat, grassed area at a depth of 0.7 m, representing a standard UK mains water pipe installation. The water table at the site lies well below the surface meaning that the experiment took entirely place in the vadose zone, where changes in resistivity are primarily sensitive to water content variations. The ERT array covered an area of 6.5m x 6.5m around the leak location. Data acquisition was carried out with the BGS PRIME (Proactive Infrastructure Monitoring and Evaluation) system, which facilitates remote scheduling and autonomous ERT data collection and transmission. To obtain the resistivity changes of the subsurface a 4D inversion was carried out using a Gauss-Newton approach with spatial and temporal smoothness constraints. We were able to reliably observe the onset, spread and cessation of the leakage. Measurements from in-situ soil sensors at several depths above and below the leak complemented the ERT data and allowed us to assess their reliability and directly relate them to hydrogeological processes. Moreover, through experimental tests with soil samples from the test area, a Waxman-Smits relation was obtained to directly convert the changes in electrical resistivity to gravimetric soil moisture content. With future experiments on the test site more work is planned towards survey optimization, automated processing and tracking of leakage plumes.

  15. Estimation of Leakage Potential of Selected Sites in Interstate and Tri-State Canals Using Geostatistical Analysis of Selected Capacitively Coupled Resistivity Profiles, Western Nebraska, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabel, Joseph; Teeple, Andrew; Kress, Wade H.

    2009-01-01

    With increasing demands for reliable water supplies and availability estimates, groundwater flow models often are developed to enhance understanding of surface-water and groundwater systems. Specific hydraulic variables must be known or calibrated for the groundwater-flow model to accurately simulate current or future conditions. Surface geophysical surveys, along with selected test-hole information, can provide an integrated framework for quantifying hydrogeologic conditions within a defined area. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Platte Natural Resources District, performed a surface geophysical survey using a capacitively coupled resistivity technique to map the lithology within the top 8 meters of the near-surface for 110 kilometers of the Interstate and Tri-State Canals in western Nebraska and eastern Wyoming. Assuming that leakage between the surface-water and groundwater systems is affected primarily by the sediment directly underlying the canal bed, leakage potential was estimated from the simple vertical mean of inverse-model resistivity values for depth levels with geometrically increasing layer thickness with depth which resulted in mean-resistivity values biased towards the surface. This method generally produced reliable results, but an improved analysis method was needed to account for situations where confining units, composed of less permeable material, underlie units with greater permeability. In this report, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the North Platte Natural Resources District, the authors use geostatistical analysis to develop the minimum-unadjusted method to compute a relative leakage potential based on the minimum resistivity value in a vertical column of the resistivity model. The minimum-unadjusted method considers the effects of homogeneous confining units. The minimum-adjusted method also is developed to incorporate the effect of local lithologic heterogeneity on water

  16. International Market Leakage from China’s Forestry Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon leakage can be a problem when seeking to reduce carbon emissions through forest policy. International market leakage is mainly caused by supply and demand imbalances in the timber market. This paper selects China, which is implementing forestry policy changes, as the research object. We begin by offering a brief analysis of China’s forestry policy changes, such as the logging quota and Six Key Forestry Programs to determine whether those policies affect timber supply. Second, through the use of three shock variables, carbon leakage is simulated under different scenarios by the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP model. The results reveal that the magnitude of leakage caused by implementing China’s forestry policies is between 79.7% and 88.8% with carbon leakage mainly displaced to Russia, Southeast Asia, and the EU. Two effective scenarios for reducing market leakage are presented: forest tenure reform and fast growing forest projects to improve domestic timber production, and raising tariffs on timber imports to reduce imports.

  17. Leakage of Microbial Endotoxin through the Implant-Abutment Interface in Oral Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrana, Rhoodie; Mohangi, Govindrau; Malo, Paulo; Nobre, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background . Endotoxin initiates osteoclastic activity resulting in bone loss. Endotoxin leakage through implant abutment connections negatively influences peri-implant bone levels. Objectives . (i) To determine if endotoxin can traverse different implant-abutment connection (IAC) designs; (ii) to quantify the amount of endotoxins traversing the IAC; (iii) to compare the in vitro comportments of different IACs. Materials and Methods . Twenty-seven IACs were inoculated with E. coli endotoxin. Six of the twenty-seven IACs were external connections from one system (Southern Implants) and the remaining twenty-one IACs were made up of seven internal IAC types from four different implant companies (Straumann, Ankylos, and Neodent, Southern Implants). Results . Of the 27 IACs tested, all 6 external IACs leaked measurable amounts of endotoxin. Of the remaining 21 internal IACs, 9 IACs did not show measurable leakage whilst the remaining 12 IACs leaked varying amounts. The mean log endotoxin level was significantly higher for the external compared to internal types ( p = 0.015). Conclusion . Within the parameters of this study, we can conclude that endotoxin leakage is dependent on the design of the IAC. Straumann Synocta, Straumann Cross-fit, and Ankylos displayed the best performances of all IACs tested with undetectable leakage after 7 days. Each of these IACs incorporated a morse-like component in their design. Speculation still exists over the impact of IAC endotoxin leakage on peri-implant tissues in vivo; hence, further investigations are required to further explore this.

  18. Leakage of Microbial Endotoxin through the Implant-Abutment Interface in Oral Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhoodie Garrana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endotoxin initiates osteoclastic activity resulting in bone loss. Endotoxin leakage through implant abutment connections negatively influences peri-implant bone levels. Objectives. (i To determine if endotoxin can traverse different implant-abutment connection (IAC designs; (ii to quantify the amount of endotoxins traversing the IAC; (iii to compare the in vitro comportments of different IACs. Materials and Methods. Twenty-seven IACs were inoculated with E. coli endotoxin. Six of the twenty-seven IACs were external connections from one system (Southern Implants and the remaining twenty-one IACs were made up of seven internal IAC types from four different implant companies (Straumann, Ankylos, and Neodent, Southern Implants. Results. Of the 27 IACs tested, all 6 external IACs leaked measurable amounts of endotoxin. Of the remaining 21 internal IACs, 9 IACs did not show measurable leakage whilst the remaining 12 IACs leaked varying amounts. The mean log endotoxin level was significantly higher for the external compared to internal types (p=0.015. Conclusion. Within the parameters of this study, we can conclude that endotoxin leakage is dependent on the design of the IAC. Straumann Synocta, Straumann Cross-fit, and Ankylos displayed the best performances of all IACs tested with undetectable leakage after 7 days. Each of these IACs incorporated a morse-like component in their design. Speculation still exists over the impact of IAC endotoxin leakage on peri-implant tissues in vivo; hence, further investigations are required to further explore this.

  19. Evaluation of Container Closure System Integrity for Frozen Storage Drug Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Alejandra; Roehl, Holger; Brown, Helen; Nikoloff, Jonas; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Sometimes, drug product for parenteral administration is stored in a frozen state (e.g., -20 °C or -80 °C), particularly during early stages of development of some biotech molecules in order to provide sufficient stability. Shipment of frozen product could potentially be performed in the frozen state, yet possibly at different temperatures, for example, using dry ice (-80 °C). Container closure systems of drug products usually consist of a glass vial, rubber stopper, and an aluminum crimped cap. In the frozen state, the glass transition temperature (Tg) of commonly used rubber stoppers is between -55 and -65 °C. Below their Tg, rubber stoppers are known to lose their elastic properties and become brittle, and thus potentially fail to maintain container closure integrity in the frozen state. Leaks during frozen temperature storage and transportation are likely to be transient, yet, can possibly risk container closure integrity and lead to microbial contamination. After thawing, the rubber stopper is supposed to re-seal the container closure system. Given the transient nature of the possible impact on container closure integrity in the frozen state, typical container closure integrity testing methods (used at room temperature conditions) are unable to evaluate and thus confirm container closure integrity in the frozen state. Here we present the development of a novel method (thermal physical container closure integrity) for direct assessment of container closure integrity by a physical method (physical container closure integrity) at frozen conditions, using a modified He leakage test. In this study, different container closure systems were evaluated with regard to physical container closure integrity in the frozen state to assess the suitability of vial/stopper combinations and were compared to a gas headspace method. In summary, the thermal physical container closure integrity He leakage method was more sensitive in detecting physical container closure

  20. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Spencer D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morton, Dana K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  1. The Dangers of Rooting: Data Leakage Detection in Android Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Casati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are widely spread all over the world, and Android is the most popular operative system in use. According to Kaspersky Lab’s threat statistic (June 2017, many users are tempted to root their mobile devices to get an unrestricted access to the file system, to install different versions of the operating system, to improve performance, and so on. The result is that unintended data leakage flaws may exist. In this paper, we (i analyze the security issues of several applications considered relevant in terms of handling user sensitive information, for example, financial, social, and communication applications, showing that 51.6% of the tested applications suffer at least of an issue and (ii show how an attacker might retrieve a user access token stored inside the device thus exposing users to a possible identity violation. Notice that such a token, and a number of other sensitive information, can be stolen by malicious users through a man-in-the-middle (MITM attack.

  2. Structural and leakage integrity assessment of WWER steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splichal, K.; Otruba, J. [Nuclear Research Inst., Rez (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    The integrity of heat exchange tubes may influence the life-time of WWER steam generators and appears to be an important criterion for the evaluation of their safety and operational reliability. The basic requirement is to assure a very low probability of radioactive water leakage, preventing unstable crack growth and sudden tube rupture. These requirements led to development of permissible limits for primary to secondary leak evolution and heat exchange tubes plugging based on eddy current test inspection. The stress corrosion cracking and pitting are the main corrosion damage of WWER heat exchange tubes and are initiated from the outer surface. They are influenced by water chemistry, temperature and tube wall stress level. They take place under crevice corrosion condition and are indicated especially (1) under the tube support plates, where up to 90-95 % of defects detected by the ECT method occur, and (2) on free spans under tube deposit layers. Both the initiation and crack growth cause thinning of the tube wall and lead to part thickness cracks and through-wall cracks, oriented above all in the axial direction. 10 refs.

  3. Standard Practices for Simulated Service Testing for Corrosion of Metallic Containment Materials for Use With Heat-Transfer Fluids in Solar Heating and Cooling Systems

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1980-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover test procedures simulating field service for evaluating the performance under corrosive conditions of metallic containment materials in solar heating and cooling systems. All test results relate to the performance of the metallic containment material only as a part of a metal/fluid pair. Performance in these test procedures, taken by itself, does not necessarily constitute an adequate basis for acceptance or rejection of a particular metal/fluid pair in solar heating and cooling systems, either in general or in a particular design. 1.2 These practices describe test procedures used to evaluate the resistance to deterioration of metallic containment materials in the several conditions that may occur in operation of solar heating and cooling systems. These conditions include: (1) operating full flow; (2) stagnant empty vented; (3) stagnant, closed to atmosphere, non-draindown; and (4) stagnant, closed to atmosphere, draindown. 1.3 The recommended practices cover the following three te...

  4. Atmospheric leakage and condensate production in NASA's biomass production chamber. Effect of diurnal temperature cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Drese, John H.; Sager, John C.

    1991-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to monitor atmospheric leakage rate and condensate production in NASA's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC). Water was circulated through the 64 plant culture trays inside the chamber during the tests but no plants were present. Environmental conditions were set to a 12-hr photoperiod with either a matching 26 C (light)/20 C (dark) thermoperiod, or a constant 23 C temperature. Leakage, as determined by carbon dioxide decay rates, averaged about 9.8 percent for the 26 C/20 C regime and 7.3 percent for the constant 23 C regime. Increasing the temperature from 20 C to 26 C caused a temporary increase in pressure (up to 0.5 kPa) relative to ambient, while decreasing the temperature caused a temporary decrease in pressure of similar magnitude. Little pressure change was observed during transition between 23 C (light) and 23 C (dark). The lack of large pressure events under isothermal conditions may explain the lower leakage rate observed. When only the plant support inserts were placed in the culture trays, condensate production averaged about 37 liters per day. Placing acrylic germination covers over the tops of culture trays reduced condensate production to about 7 liters per day. During both tests, condensate production from the lower air handling system was 60 to 70 percent greater than from the upper system, suggesting imbalances exist in chilled and hot water flows for the two air handling systems. Results indicate that atmospheric leakage rates are sufficiently low to measure CO2 exchange rates by plants and the accumulation of certain volatile contaminants (e.g., ethylene). Control system changes are recommended in order to balance operational differences (e.g., humidity and temperature) between the two halves of the chamber.

  5. Comparison of Radicular Peroxide Leakage from four Commonly used Bleaching agents following Intracoronal Bleaching in Endodontically treated teeth - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Ks; Hegde, Swaroop; Mathew, Sylvia; Lata, DA; Bhandi, Shilpa H; N, Shruthi

    2013-08-01

    Non vital bleaching is simple, conservative procedure for esthetic correction of discolored endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the amount of peroxide leakage from four different bleaching agents i.e superoxol, sodium perborate, combination of superoxol & sodium perborate and carbamide peroxide during intracoronal bleaching, as the safe and effective bleaching is the need of the hour. 50 extracted maxillary centrals were selected for the study. Following standardized protocol access, cleaning and shaping by step back technique and obturation was done using guttapercha and AH plus sealer. Access was sealed with Cavit G and outer root surface was coated with wax and nail varnish. The teeth were separated into crown and root and the root portion was placed in plastic tube containing distilled water for 7days.After incubation, 3mm of gutta-percha was removed below CEJ and 2mm glass ionomer cement base was placed. Grouped into five categories based on the bleaching agent placed in pulp chamber as -group1 (control)-distilled water, group 2-sodium perborate with distilled water , group 3- 30% hydrogen peroxide ,group 4-mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide and group 5-10% carbamide peroxide gel. Peroxide leakage was measured after 24hrs using ferrothiocyanate method and optical density using spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted using ANOVA and multiple comparisons within the groups was done using BONFERRONI method (Post-Hoc tests). The results showed highest peroxide penetration from 30% hydrogen peroxide followed by mixture of sodium perborate with 30% hydrogen peroxide, mixture of sodium perborate with distilled water and least penetration from 10% carbamide peroxide gel. The results were statistically significant. Radicular peroxide leakage in 10% carbamide peroxide was significantly lower than the other tested bleaching agents making it a very safe alternative for intracoronal

  6. Subatmospheric double containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gans, D. Jr.; Noble, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    A reinforced concrete double wall nuclear containment structure with each wall including an essentially impervious membrane or liner and porous concrete filling the annulus between the two walls is described. The interior of the structure is maintained at subatmospheric pressure, and the annulus between the two walls is maintained at a subatmospheric pressure intermediate between that of the interior and the surrounding atmospheric pressure, during normal operation. In the event of an accident within the containment structure the interior pressure may exceed atmospheric pressure, but leakage from the interior to the annulus between the double walls will not result in the pressure of the annulus exceeding atmospheric pressure so that there is no net outleakage from the containment structure

  7. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-04-19

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements).

  8. Methods for analysis and testing of coal and coke. Part 108. Tests special to coke. Section 108.4 Determination of bulk density (large container)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of the bulk density of coke in a large container such as a wagon or skip. A weighed container of known volume is filled with coke and the increase in mass is determined. 2 refs.

  9. Simple flow cytometric detection of haemozoin containing leukocytes and erythrocytes for research on diagnosis, immunology and drug sensitivity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grobusch Martin P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria pigment (haemozoin, Hz has been the focus of diverse research efforts. However, identification of Hz-containing leukocytes or parasitized erythrocytes is usually based on microscopy, with inherent limitations. Flow cytometric detection of depolarized Side-Scatter is more accurate and its adaptation to common bench top flow cytometers might allow several applications. These can range from the ex-vivo and in-vitro detection and functional analysis of Hz-containing leukocytes to the detection of parasitized Red-Blood-Cells (pRBCs to assess antimalarial activity. Methods A standard benchtop flow cytometer was adapted to detect depolarized Side-Scatter. Synthetic and Plasmodium falciparum Hz were incubated with whole blood and PBMCs to detect Hz-containing leukocytes and CD16 expression on monocytes. C5BL/6 mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA or P. berghei NK65 and Hz-containing leukocytes were analysed using CD11b and Gr1 expression. Parasitized RBC from infected mice were identified using anti-Ter119 and SYBR green I and were analysed for depolarized Side Scatter. A highly depolarizing RBC population was monitored in an in-vitro culture incubated with chloroquine or quinine. Results A flow cytometer can be easily adapted to detect depolarized Side-Scatter and thus, intracellular Hz. The detection and counting of Hz containing leukocytes in fresh human or mouse blood, as well as in leukocytes from in-vitro experiments was rapid and easy. Analysis of CD14/CD16 and CD11b/Gr1 monocyte expression in human or mouse blood, in a mixed populations of Hz-containing and non-containing monocytes, appears to show distinct patterns in both types of cells. Hz-containing pRBC and different maturation stages could be detected in blood from infected mice. The analysis of a highly depolarizing population that contained mature pRBC allowed to assess the effect of chloroquine and quinine after only 2 and 4 hours, respectively

  10. Leakage rate from LOCA-aged inflatable airlock seals Pickering NGS 'B' personnel doors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayle, G.W.; Cordingley, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to demonstrate to the Atomic Energy Control Board that an air-lock inflatable seal will function after a LOCA exposure, an inflatable seal intended for personnel doors at the Pickering NGS 'B' was exposed to the thermal/moisture conditions of the LOCA requirement. While attending to determine the post-LOCA leakage rate it was found that additional leaks developed during each post-LOCA inflation/deflation cycle. The seal had been significantly and irreparably deteriorated by the LOCA exposure. The test has demonstrated that this type of LOCA exposed seal should not be expected to withstand either additional pressure above 207 kPa or additional inflation/deflation cycling. A higher inflation pressure and/or cycling will reduce the likelihood of a post-LOCA seal retaining an inflation pressure sufficient to prevent leakage across the seal

  11. Leakage Currents in Low-Voltage PME and BME Ceramic Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of BME capacitors to high-reliability electronics as a replacement for PME capacitors requires better understanding of changes in performance and reliability of MLCCs to set justified screening and qualification requirements. In this work, absorption and leakage currents in various lots of commercial and military grade X7R MLCCs rated to 100V and less have been measured to reveal difference in behavior of PME and BME capacitors in a wide range of voltages and temperatures. Degradation of leakage currents and failures in virgin capacitors and capacitors with introduced cracks has been studied at different voltages and temperatures during step stress highly accelerated life testing. Mechanisms of charge absorption, conduction and degradation have been discussed and a failure model in capacitors with defects suggested.

  12. Transportability Testing of the Rapid ISO Bracing System (RIBS) in a Side Opening ISO Container of BLU-109 (2,000 Pound) Bombs, TP-94-01, Transportability Testing Procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    ...) in a side opening ISO container with the BLU-109 (2,000) pound bombs in CNU-417 containers and the nose cones and the beam buffers when transportability tested in accordance with TP-94-01, Revision 1, July 2002...

  13. Groundwater modeling to evaluate interaquifer leakage in the Floridan aquifer system near Hunter Army Airfield and Fort Stewart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    Simulations using a modified regional groundwater- flow model were used to determine the amount of leakage from the Upper Floridan aquifer (UFA) through the Lower Floridan confining unit (LFC) into the Lower Floridan aquifer (LFA) resulting from pumping about 1 million gallons per day at newly constructed LFA production wells at Hunter Army Airfield and Fort Stewart in coastal Georgia. Simulated steadystate drawdown at each of the LFA production wells closely matched observed drawdown during a 72-hour aquifer test with the observed water levels reaching steady-state by the end of the test period. However, simulated drawdown was greater than observed drawdown in the UFA because of the short duration of the aquifer test and the time required for groundwater movement through the LFC into the LFA. Steadystate simulations provide an estimate of leakage based on the long-term continuous operation of each production well. Results of model simulations indicate that interaquifer leakage accounts for 48 percent of the flow to the well at Hunter Army Airfield, and 98 percent of the flow to the well at Fort Stewart. Simulated results near the Hunter Army Airfield production well indicated that 65 percent of the leakage from the UFA to the LFA occurs within a 1-mile radius, whereas simulated results near the Fort Stewart production well indicated 80-percent leakage from the UFA to the LFA within the same radius. The greater amount of leakage to the production well near Fort Stewart can be attributed to the higher transmissivity of the UFA and higher vertical hydraulic conductivity in the LFC near the well.

  14. Control of quality in the tests of systems of containment of vehicles. Intercomparison of the results of the tests; Control de calidad en los ensayos de sistemas de contencion de vehiculos. Intercomparacion de los resultados de los ensayos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Ramos, S.

    2009-07-01

    This article tries to offer information on how Central Laboratory of Structures and Materials are made the tests for Marca N of AENOR of the systems of containment of vehicles and its control of external quality. (Author) 15 refs.

  15. Sealing ability of MTA, CPM, and MBPc as root-end filling materials: a bacterial leakage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Leal MEDEIROS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the sealing ability of three root-end filling materials (white MTA, CPM, and MBPc using an Enterococcus faecalis leakage model. Material and Methods Seventy single-root extracted human teeth were instrumented and root-ends were resected to prepare 3 mm depth cavities. Root-end preparations were filled with white MTA, CPM, and MBPc cements. Enterococcus faecalis was coronally introduced and the apical portion was immersed in BHI culture medium with phenol red indicator. The bacterial leakage was monitored every 24 h for 4 weeks. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-Gehan test (p<0.05. Results All cements showed bacterial leakage after 24 hours, except for the negative control group. The MBPc showed significantly less bacterial leakage compared with the MTA group (p<0.05. No significant differences were found between the CPM and the other groups. Conclusions The epoxy resin-based cement MBPc had lower bacterial leakage compared with the calcium silicate-based cements MTA and CPM.

  16. GOTHIC MODEL OF BWR SECONDARY CONTAINMENT DRAWDOWN ANALYSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.N.

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a GOTHIC version 7.1 model of the Secondary Containment Reactor Building Post LOCA drawdown analysis for a BWR. GOTHIC is an EPRI sponsored thermal hydraulic code. This analysis is required by the Utility to demonstrate an ability to restore and maintain the Secondary Containment Reactor Building negative pressure condition. The technical and regulatory issues associated with this modeling are presented. The analysis includes the affect of wind, elevation and thermal impacts on pressure conditions. The model includes a multiple volume representation which includes the spent fuel pool. In addition, heat sources and sinks are modeled as one dimensional heat conductors. The leakage into the building is modeled to include both laminar as well as turbulent behavior as established by actual plant test data. The GOTHIC code provides components to model heat exchangers used to provide fuel pool cooling as well as area cooling via air coolers. The results of the evaluation are used to demonstrate the time that the Reactor Building is at a pressure that exceeds external conditions. This time period is established with the GOTHIC model based on the worst case pressure conditions on the building. For this time period the Utility must assume the primary containment leakage goes directly to the environment. Once the building pressure is restored below outside conditions the release to the environment can be credited as a filtered release

  17. Leather Contains Cobalt and Poses a Risk of Allergic Contact Dermatitis: Cobalt Indicator Solution and X-ray Florescence Spectrometry as Screening Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Dathan; Hamann, Carsten R; Kishi, Patrick; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt was recently identified in a leather couch responsible for dermatitis. Cobalt content/release in leather in the United States is unknown. We evaluated leather for cobalt content/release and investigated screening methods for identifying cobalt in leather. One hundred thirty-one leather swatches were screened for cobalt content/release with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and cobalt indicator solution (CIS). Samples with positive screens and 1 negative control were analyzed using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). CIS showed that 5 of 131 samples contained cobalt, subsequently found to be between 1 and 190 parts per million (ppm) when evaluated with ICPMS. The XRF analysis showed that 6 samples contained >5% cobalt, subsequently found to contain greater than 300 ppm cobalt by ICPMS. 7 of 12 tested swatches contained cobalt in excess of 100 ppm. One sample contained greater than 1000 ppm cobalt. The prevalence of swatches containing cobalt at levels in excess of 190 ppm was at least 5% (n = 7; total, N = 131). Some leather consumer goods contain and release cobalt. Cobalt indicator solution is a poor screening test for cobalt in leather while XRF screening may be effective. Leather is a new source of cobalt exposure. Exposures to metal allergens are changing in ways that impact clinical decision making.

  18. Border adjustment for European emissions trading: Competitiveness and carbon leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuik, Onno, E-mail: onno.kuik@ivm.vu.n [Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hofkes, Marjan [Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Unilateral or sub-global policies to combat climate change are potentially sensitive to free-riding and carbon leakage. One way of dealing with carbon leakage and competitiveness is the imposition of border adjustment measures for competing imports, for example in the form of the obligation to importers of goods to purchase and surrender emissions allowances to the authorities when importing. In this paper, we explore some implications of border adjustment measures in the EU ETS, for sectors that might be subject to carbon leakage. We examine the implications of two variants of these measures on the competitiveness of these sectors and on the global environment with the help of a multi-sector, multi-region computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the global economy. Our calculations suggest that border adjustment might reduce the sectoral rate of leakage of the iron and steel industry rather forcefully, but that the reduction would be less for the mineral products sector, including cement. The reduction of the overall or macro rate of leakage would be modest. So, from an environmental point of view border tax adjustments would not be a very effective policy measure, but might mainly be justified by considerations of sectoral competitiveness.

  19. Border adjustment for European emissions trading. Competitiveness and carbon leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuik, Onno; Hofkes, Marjan [Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1085, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Unilateral or sub-global policies to combat climate change are potentially sensitive to free-riding and carbon leakage. One way of dealing with carbon leakage and competitiveness is the imposition of border adjustment measures for competing imports, for example in the form of the obligation to importers of goods to purchase and surrender emissions allowances to the authorities when importing. In this paper, we explore some implications of border adjustment measures in the EU ETS, for sectors that might be subject to carbon leakage. We examine the implications of two variants of these measures on the competitiveness of these sectors and on the global environment with the help of a multi-sector, multi-region computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the global economy. Our calculations suggest that border adjustment might reduce the sectoral rate of leakage of the iron and steel industry rather forcefully, but that the reduction would be less for the mineral products sector, including cement. The reduction of the overall or macro rate of leakage would be modest. So, from an environmental point of view border tax adjustments would not be a very effective policy measure, but might mainly be justified by considerations of sectoral competitiveness. (author)

  20. Transanal stent in anterior resection does not prevent anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Bulut, O; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS AND METH....... On this basis it was decided to discontinue the study prematurely for ethical reasons. CONCLUSION: Decompression of the anastomosis with a transanal stent does not reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection.......OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: Randomized open trial of 194 patients operated in 11 hospitals during September 2000 to September 2003 with anterior resection for a mobile rectal tumour, 115 men and 79 women, median age 68 years (range 37-90 years). The surgeon decided upon the use of a protective ileostomy, and after...

  1. Report on the water leakage from instrumentation pipe in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    On December 10, 2002, the leakage was found at the pressure instrumentation pipe attached to the exit pipe of No.1 charging pump of the purification system of a primary cooling system at JMTR in the Oarai Research establishment, JAERI. The Investigation Committee for Water Leakage from Instrumentation Pipe in JMTR was established and organized by specialists from inside and outside JAERI on December 16 and its meeting was held in public 3 times by 6th January, 2003. They found out the cause and countermeasures of cracks, and also investigated enhancement of safety management. As the result, it was considered that the leakage started around the 6th of December 2002 and the cause of the cracks was due to fatigue by vibration of the charging pump during operation. The committee discovered following incorrect actions in the safety management. First, operation of JMTR was continued without keeping careful watch in spite of occurrence of leakage detector alarm. Second, every time when the alarm range for the reasons other than the leakage, appropriate investigation and countermeasure were not taken. Third, the manager in charge didn't have a fair understanding of the situation and didn't give an appropriate direction. This is the report on the cause and countermeasures of cracks and enhancement of safety management. (author)

  2. Leakage magnetic field of BLDCM based on Comsol multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Wen, Jiabao; Wang, Wen; Sun, Jinghua

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of geomagnetic field conducted by underwater robot is widely used during cruise, however, it is often influenced by the strong electromagnetic interference of the other large-scale electronic equipment on the robot itself. The leakage magnetic field of high-power brushless DC motor (BLDCM) has been identified as one of the main interference source. To obtain accurate geomagnetic data, it is necessary to analyze the magnetic field characteristics of the leakage field of BLDCM. In this paper, we build a two-dimensional BLDCM model. In addition, we present the rotor's leakage magnetic field when the BLDCM is static, dynamic leakage magnetic field of the stator and rotor when BLDCM is working and the near-field characteristic of BLDCM's leakage magnetic field. Finally, this paper studies the relationship between the frequency of the magnetic field change and the speed of the BLDCM, which can be used to eliminate the AC interference magnetic field. Therefore the measuring accuracy of the geomagnetic field can be improved.

  3. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jung Suk; Lee, Hae Giu; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6–20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6–38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5–14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10–58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites

  4. Leakage current-induced effects in the silicon microstrip and gas electron multiplier readout chain and their compensation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, W.; Kasinski, K.

    2018-04-01

    Leakage current flowing into the charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) is a common issue in many radiation detection systems as it can increase overall system noise, shift a DC baseline or even lead a recording channel to instability. The commonly known leakage current contributor is a detector, however other system components like wires or an input protection circuit may become a serious problem. Compensation of the leakage current resulting from the electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection circuit by properly sizing its components is possible only for a narrow temperature range. Moreover, the leakage current from external sources can be significantly larger. Many applications, especially High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments, require a fast baseline restoration for high input hit rates by applying either a low-value feedback resistor or a high feedback resistance combined with a pulsed reset circuit. Leakage current flowing in the feedback in conjunction with a large feedback resistance supplied with a pulsed reset results in a significant voltage offset between the CSA input and output which can cause problems (e.g. fake hits or instability). This paper shows an issue referred to the leakage current of the ESD protection circuit flowing into the input amplifier. The following analysis and proposed solution is a result of the time and energy readout ASIC project realization for the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) in Darmstadt, Germany. This chip is purposed to work with microstrip and gaseous detectors, with high average input pulses frequencies (250 kHit/s per channel) and the possibility to process input charge of both polarities. We present measurements of the test structure fabricated in UMC 180 nm technology and propose a solution addressing leakage current related issues. This work combines the leakage current compensation capabilities at the CSA level with high, controllable value of the amplifier

  5. 78 FR 54432 - Development of Inward Leakage Standards for Half-Mask Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ...)? 3. Does your company use a panel or portion of a panel to develop respirators for a defined user... implementation of fit testing standards for defined user groups? 4. Does your company use a panel or a portion of... Control and Prevention (CDC) announces a public meeting concerning inward leakage performance requirements...

  6. Tracheal fluid leakage in benchtop trials: comparison of static versus dynamic ventilation model with and without lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Koepfer, Nelly; Madjdpour, Caveh; Frotzler, Angela; Weiss, Markus

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal folds in tracheal tube (TT) cuffs cause leakage of pooled secretions past the tube cuff, and the most common in vitro method to test the efficacy of a new tube is a benchtop model using an artificial rigid trachea. This study compared the potential of a static and dynamic ventilation benchtop model and cuff lubrication in testing the tracheal sealing properties of a given TT cuff. Static trial Six brands of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) cuffed TT (n = 8) with high volume-low pressure cuffs were inflated in an artificial trachea (18 mm ID) without and with lubrication. Dynamic trial The same tube cuffs, without lubrication, were subjected to positive pressure ventilation (PPV) + positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5cmH(2)O or to PPV alone (without PEEP) or to PEEP alone (without PPV). Clear water (5 ml) was placed above the tube cuff, and fluid leakage (ml) was measured up to 60 min. Gel lubrication, PEEP alone and PPV + PEEP completely prevented fluid leakage across the tube cuffs in all six TT brands tested within 60 min when compared to the static unlubricated model (0% leak versus 100% leak; P lubrication, PEEP alone, and PPV + PEEP in the benchtop model had a much stronger protective effect than PPV alone on fluid leakage. Studies testing the fluid sealing efficiency of tube cuffs might be more conclusive in a static benchtop model without lubrication than in a dynamic model.

  7. Dissolution test of herbal medicines containing Paullinia cupana: validation of methods for quantification and assessment of dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Alves de Sousa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available "Guaraná" (Paullinia cupana is used as a physical activity enhancer and stimulator due to its methylxanthines and condensed tannins. The aim of this work was to evaluate the dissolution behavior of five herbal medicines in the form of capsules and tablets containing guaraná. Assay and dissolution methods were validated and results obtained allowed simultaneous marker quantification with precision, accuracy, selectivity and robustness. Findings showed that 100% of the herbal medicinal products analyzed did not provide satisfactory results concerning the presence of four markers, 60% had three markers (caffeine, catechin and epicatechin, while 40% had only caffeine at tested dosage forms. In addition, after 30 minutes, only capsule A showed at least 80% of the dissolved markers. In other capsules, marker dissolution did not exceed 60% whereas 60% of the samples had some characteristic pharmacotechnical problems. These results evidence the need for rigorous quality control to help ensure the therapeutic action of these drugs. To this end, dissolution studies are an essential tool for quality assurance of herbal medicines.Guaraná (Paullinia cupana é utilizado como revigorante e estimulante devido à presença de metilxantinas e taninos condensados. Este trabalho visou avaliar o comportamento de dissolução de cinco fitoterápicos, na forma de cápsulas e comprimidos, contendo guaraná. O método de quantificação e de dissolução foram validados e os resultados obtidos permitiram a quantificação dos marcadores simultaneamente, com precisão, exatidão, seletividade e robustez. Foi verificado que 100% dos fitoterápicos analisados encontravam em desacordo quanto à presença dos quatro marcadores, sendo que 60% apresentaram três marcadores (cafeína, catequina e epicatequina e 40% apresentaram somente a cafeína. Além disso, após o tempo de 30 minutos de ensaio foi possível observar que somente a cápsula A apresentou pelo menos 80% dos

  8. On the Connection between Leakage Tolerance and Adaptive Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Buus; Venturi, Daniele; Zottarel, Angela

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the context of leakage-tolerant interactive protocols as defined by Bitanski, Canetti and Halevi (TCC 2012). Our contributions can be summarized as follows: For the purpose of secure message transmission, any encryption protocol with message space M and secret key space SK tolerating...... at the end of the protocol execution, if and only if the protocol has passive adaptive security against an adaptive corruption of one party at the end of the protocol execution. This shows that as soon as a little leakage is tolerated, one needs full adaptive security. In case more than one party can...... be corrupted, we get that leakage tolerance is equivalent to a weaker form of adaptivity, which we call semi-adaptivity. Roughly, a protocol has semi-adaptive security if there exist a simulator which can simulate the internal state of corrupted parties, however, such a state is not required...

  9. Low dark leakage current in organic planar heterojunction photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Himanshu; Solomeshch, Olga; Liraz, Dan; Tessler, Nir

    2017-11-01

    It is often suggested that the dark leakage current of organic photodiodes is due to extrinsic leakage paths that do not involve the electronic junction. By studying a series of devices, where the acceptor is kept constant (C70) and the donor material is varied, we find a direct correlation between the strength of the sub-gap signature of the charge-transfer states and the leakage current. Attributing the differences in the sub-gap absorption to the donor's sub-gap states suggests that the donor's side of the junction should be made longer, to push the Fermi level at V = 0 towards the acceptor's LUMO, and thus, an optimized value of 800 Pacm-2 at V = -1 V is reported.

  10. Air Leakage Rates in Typical Air Barrier Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hun, Diana E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Estimates for 2010 indicate that infiltration in residential buildings was responsible for 2.85 quads of energy (DOE 2014), which is about 3% of the total energy consumed in the US. One of the mechanisms being implemented to reduce this energy penalty is the use of air barriers as part of the building envelope. These technologies decrease airflow through major leakage sites such as oriented strand board (OSB) joints, and gaps around penetrations (e.g., windows, doors, pipes, electrical outlets) as indicated by Hun et al. (2014). However, most air barrier materials do not properly address leakage spots such as wall-to-roof joints and wall-to-foundation joints because these are difficult to seal, and because air barrier manufacturers usually do not provide adequate instructions for these locations. The present study focuses on characterizing typical air leakage sites in wall assemblies with air barrier materials.

  11. Evaluation of isolation valve leakage in alternate charging piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauch, P.L.; Roarty, D.H.; Brice-Nash, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical and volume control system (CVCS) alternate charging flow path at an operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant was determined to be susceptible to adverse stresses from isolation valve leakage. Isolation valve leakage had resulted in pipe cracks at several nuclear units worldwide, as described in United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Bulletin 88-08 and its supplements. To provide for continuing assurance that cracks would not initiate over the plant life, the operators considered performing fatigue evaluation to demonstrate structural integrity of the system. This evaluation included heat transfer, stress and fatigue analysis, using methods described in Electric Power Research Institute Report ''Thermal Stratification, Cycling, and Striping (TASCS),'' March 1994. The evaluation concluded that the fatigue usage would be less than 1.0 under worst case isolation valve leakage conditions, and therefore a significant investment in permanent temperature monitoring was avoided

  12. Multi-isotope tracing of CO2 leakage and water-rock interaction in a natural CCS analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppmann, Wolfram; Gemeni, Vasiliki; Lions, Julie; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Humez, Pauline; Vasilatos, Charalampos; Millot, Romain; Pauwels, Hélène

    2015-04-01

    Natural analogues of CO2 accumulation and, potentially, leakage, provide a highly valuable opportunity to study (1) geochemical processes within a CO2-reservoir and the overlying aquifers or aquicludes, i.e. gas-water-rock interactions, (2) geology and tightness of reservoirs over geological timescales, (3) potential or real leakage pathways, (3) impact of leakage on shallow groundwater resources quality, and (4) direct and indirect geochemical indicators of gas leakage (Lions et al., 2014, Humez et al., 2014). The Florina Basin in NW Macedonia, Greece, contains a deep CO2-rich aquifer within a graben structure. The graben filling consists of highly heterogeneous Neogene clastic sediments constituted by components from the adjacent massifs including carbonates, schists, gneiss as well as some ultramafic volcanic rocks. Clay layers are observed that isolate hydraulically the deep, partly artesian aquifer. Organic matter, in form of lignite accumulations, is abundant in the Neogene series. The underlying bedrocks are metamorphic carbonates and silicate rocks. The origin of the CO2 accumulation is controversial (deep, partially mantle-derived D'Allessandro et al., 2008 or resulting from thermal decomposition of carbonates, Hatziyannis and Arvanitis, 2011). Groundwaters have been sampled from springs and borewells over 3 years at different depths. First results on major, minor and trace elements give evidence of water-rock interaction, mainly with carbonates but also with ultramafic components but do not indicate that CO2-seepage is the principal driver of those processes (Gemeni et al., submitted). Here we present isotope data on a selection of groundwaters (δ2H , δ18O, δ13CTDIC, 87Sr/86Sr, δ11B, δ7Li). Stable isotopes of water indicate paleo-recharge for some of the groundwaters, limited exchange with gaseous CO2 and, in one case, possibly thermal exchange processes with silicates. Sr isotope ratios vary between marine ratios and radiogenic values indicating

  13. CO2 leakage alters biogeochemical and ecological functions of submarine sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molari, Massimiliano; Guilini, Katja; Lott, Christian; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Meyer, Stefanie; Ramette, Alban; Wegener, Gunter; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Martin, Daniel; Cibic, Tamara; De Vittor, Cinzia; Vanreusel, Ann; Boetius, Antje

    2018-02-01

    Subseabed CO 2 storage is considered a future climate change mitigation technology. We investigated the ecological consequences of CO 2 leakage for a marine benthic ecosystem. For the first time with a multidisciplinary integrated study, we tested hypotheses derived from a meta-analysis of previous experimental and in situ high-CO 2 impact studies. For this, we compared ecological functions of naturally CO 2 -vented seafloor off the Mediterranean island Panarea (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) to those of nonvented sands, with a focus on biogeochemical processes and microbial and faunal community composition. High CO 2 fluxes (up to 4 to 7 mol CO 2 m -2 hour -1 ) dissolved all sedimentary carbonate, and comigration of silicate and iron led to local increases of microphytobenthos productivity (+450%) and standing stocks (+300%). Despite the higher food availability, faunal biomass (-80%) and trophic diversity were substantially lower compared to those at the reference site. Bacterial communities were also structurally and functionally affected, most notably in the composition of heterotrophs and microbial sulfate reduction rates (-90%). The observed ecological effects of CO 2 leakage on submarine sands were reproduced with medium-term transplant experiments. This study assesses indicators of environmental impact by CO 2 leakage and finds that community compositions and important ecological functions are permanently altered under high CO 2 .

  14. Apical leakage of three resin-based endodontic sealers after 810-nm-diode laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Pinto, Tiago; Davidowicz, Harry; de Moura, Abilio Albuquerque Maranhão

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of 810-nm-diode laser irradiation, applied before root canal filling, on apical sealing ability of three different resin-based sealers (AH Plus, EndoRez, and RealSeal). Lasers have been widely used in endodontics. The dentin wall changes caused by laser irradiation could improve the sealing ability of endodontic cements. Sixty single-rooted human teeth were divided into six groups, according to the endodontic sealer used and previous 810-nm-diode laser irradiation. The protocol for laser irradiation was 2.5 W in a continuous wave, in scanning mode, with four irradiations per tooth. After sample preparation, they were analyzed according to apical leakage with silver nitrate impregnation. The RealSeal sealer achieved minimum leakage rates (1.24 mm), with significant differences at the 1% level (Tukey's test, plaser was used, there were also significant differences at the 5% level (plaser irradiation did not promote significant differences in apical leakage.

  15. CO2 leakage alters biogeochemical and ecological functions of submarine sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molari, Massimiliano; Guilini, Katja; Lott, Christian; Weber, Miriam; de Beer, Dirk; Meyer, Stefanie; Ramette, Alban; Wegener, Gunter; Wenzhöfer, Frank; Martin, Daniel; Cibic, Tamara; De Vittor, Cinzia; Vanreusel, Ann; Boetius, Antje

    2018-01-01

    Subseabed CO2 storage is considered a future climate change mitigation technology. We investigated the ecological consequences of CO2 leakage for a marine benthic ecosystem. For the first time with a multidisciplinary integrated study, we tested hypotheses derived from a meta-analysis of previous experimental and in situ high-CO2 impact studies. For this, we compared ecological functions of naturally CO2-vented seafloor off the Mediterranean island Panarea (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) to those of nonvented sands, with a focus on biogeochemical processes and microbial and faunal community composition. High CO2 fluxes (up to 4 to 7 mol CO2 m−2 hour−1) dissolved all sedimentary carbonate, and comigration of silicate and iron led to local increases of microphytobenthos productivity (+450%) and standing stocks (+300%). Despite the higher food availability, faunal biomass (−80%) and trophic diversity were substantially lower compared to those at the reference site. Bacterial communities were also structurally and functionally affected, most notably in the composition of heterotrophs and microbial sulfate reduction rates (−90%). The observed ecological effects of CO2 leakage on submarine sands were reproduced with medium-term transplant experiments. This study assesses indicators of environmental impact by CO2 leakage and finds that community compositions and important ecological functions are permanently altered under high CO2. PMID:29441359

  16. Comparison of Bacterial Leakage between 3 Different Root Canal Obturation Techniques in Oval Shaped Canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eshagh-ali Saberi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sealing ability of 3 obturation techniques in oval-shaped canals by bacterial leakage assessment. Methods: Sixty mandibular incisors with oval canals were selected after providing buccolingual and mesiodistal radiographs. The teeth were sectioned at a 10 mm distance from the apex. After instrumentation, the teeth were divided into 3 groups and the canals in the three groups were obturated with lateral condensation (G1, warm vertical condensation (G2 and thermoplasticized injectable gutta percha (G3. The teeth were exposed to human saliva. Observing the turbidity of the BHI broth for a period of 63 days the number of days required for the complete contamination of root canals was recorded. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistical methods and Kruskal-Wallis test with SPSS statistical software. Results: Warm vertical condensation (G2 needed a significantly greater average time for leakage than the two other methods. No significant differences were found between lateral condensations and thermoplasticized injectable G.P techniques. Conclusion: warm vertical condensation provides a better seal against bacterial leakage than lateral condensation and obtura II method in obturating oval-canals.

  17. Chaos characteristics and least squares support vector machines based online pipeline small leakages detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jinhai; Su, Hanguang; Ma, Yanjuan; Wang, Gang; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Small leakages are severe threats to the long distance pipeline transportation. An online small leakage detection method based on chaos characteristics and Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVMs) is proposed in this paper. For the first time, the relationship between the chaos characteristics of pipeline inner pressures and the small leakages is investigated and applied in the pipeline detection method. Firstly, chaos in the pipeline inner pressure is found. Relevant chaos characteristics are estimated by the nonlinear time series analysis package (TISEAN). Then LS-SVM with a hybrid kernel is built and named as hybrid kernel LS-SVM (HKLS-SVM). It is applied to analyze the chaos characteristics and distinguish the negative pressure waves (NPWs) caused by small leaks. A new leak location method is also expounded. Finally, data of the chaotic Logistic-Map system is used in the simulation. A comparison between HKLS-SVM and other methods, in terms of the identification accuracy and computing efficiency, is made. The simulation result shows that HKLS-SVM gets the best performance and is effective in error analysis of chaotic systems. When real pipeline data is used in the test, the ultimate identification accuracy of HKLS-SVM reaches 97.38% and the position accuracy is 99.28%, indicating that the method proposed in this paper has good performance in detecting and locating small pipeline leaks.

  18. Degradation of Leakage Currents in Solid Tantalum Capacitors Under Steady-State Bias Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Degradation of leakage currents in various types of solid tantalum capacitors under steady-state bias conditions was investigated at temperatures from 105 oC to 170 oC and voltages up to two times the rated voltage. Variations of leakage currents with time under highly accelerated life testing (HALT) and annealing, thermally stimulated depolarization currents, and I-V characteristics were measured to understand the conduction mechanism and the reason for current degradation. During HALT the currents increase gradually up to three orders of magnitude in some cases, and then stabilize with time. This degradation is reversible and annealing can restore the initial levels of leakage currents. The results are attributed to migration of positively charged oxygen vacancies in tantalum pentoxide films that diminish the Schottky barrier at the MnO2/Ta2O5 interface and increase electron injection. A simple model allows for estimation of concentration and mobility of oxygen vacancies based on the level of current degradation.

  19. Satellite assisted aerosol correlation in a sequestered CO2 leakage controlled site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landulfo, Eduardo; da Silva Lopes, Fábio J.; Nakaema, Walter M.; de Medeiros, José A. G.; Moreira, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Currently one of the main challenges in CO2 storage research is to grant the development, testing and validation of accurate and efficient Measuring, Monitoring and Verification (MMV) techniques to be deployed at the final storage site, targeting maximum storage efficiency at the minimal leakage risk levels. For such task a mimetic sequestration site has been deployed in Florianopolis, Brazil, in order to verify the performance of monitoring plataforms to detect and quantify leakages of ground injected CO2, namely a Cavity Ring Down System (CRDS) - Los Gatos Research - an Eddy Covariance System (Campbell Scientific and Irgason) and meteorological tower for wind, humidity, precipitation and temperature monitoring onsite. The measurement strategy for detecting CO2 leakages can be very challenging since environmental and phytogenic influence can be very severe and play a role on determining if the values measured are unambiguous or not. One external factor to be considered is the amount of incoming solar radiation which will be the driving force for the whole experimental setup and following this reasoning the amount of aerosols in the atmospheric column can be a determinant factor influencing the experimental results. Thus the investigation of measured fluxes CO2 and its concentration with the aforementioned experimental instruments and their correlation with the aerosol data should be taken into account by means of satellite borne systems dedicated to measure aerosol vertical distribution and its optical properties, in this study we have selected CALIPSO and MODIS instrumentation to help on deriving the aerosol properties and CO2 measurements.

  20. Cell viability and leakage of electrolytes in Avicennia germinans exposed to heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mendoza, Daniel; Quiroz-Moreno, Adriana; Medrano, Rosa Escobedo Gracia; Grimaldo-Juarez, Onecimo; Zapata-Perez, Omar

    2009-01-01

    The effect of heavy metal stress on the cell viability and leakage of electrolytes of Avicennia germinans leaf discs was investigated by the tissue tolerance test. Foliar discs were incubated with different Cd2+ or CU2+ concentrations for 24 h; thereafter, the cell membrane stability of the tissue was assayed by the cell viability Evans blue and leakage electrolytes methods. The results indicated that electrolyte leakage of the leaf discs increased 24 h after exposure to heavy metal stress, as shown by a reduction of the cell viability by 30% in discs exposed to higher doses of Cd2+ (0.546 M) and Cu2+ (0.7 M), respectively. Additionally, the histological analysis of the leaf discs exposed to heavy metal stress revealed that at higher Cd2+ and/or Cu2+ concentrations an increase in the intercellular spaces and destruction of mesophyll cells was observed 24 h after exposure. In summary, the biochemical and structural changes observed in foliar tissues of A. germinans suggest that higher cadmium and copper concentrations may result in structural changes and altered physiological characters in leaves.

  1. A Graph Theoretic Approach for Hydraulic Fracturing and Wellbore Leakage Risk Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, D.; Rose, K.; Bauer, J. R.; Warner, T.

    2016-12-01

    Recent large scale development of unconventional formations for fossil energy has raised concerns over the potential for fluid leakage between subsurface systems and wellbores. This is particularly true in regions with extensive drilling history, where spatial densities of wellbores are higher, and where significant uncertainties in the location and mechanical integrity of such wellbores exist. The generation of induced fracture networks during hydraulic fracturing may increase subsurface connectivity, and create the potential for unwanted fluid migration between operational and legacy wellbores and subsurface fracture networks. We present a graph theoretic approach for identifying geospatial regions and wellbores at increased risk for subsurface connectivity based on wellbore proximity and local geologic characteristics. The algorithm transforms user inputted geospatial data (geologic and wellbore x,y,z) to graph structure, where wellbores are represented as nodes, and where potential overlapping fracture network zones are represented as edges. The algorithm can be used to complement existing fracture models to better account for the reach of induced fractures, and to identify spatial extents at increased risk for unwanted subsurface connectivity. Additionally, the model can be used to identify regions in need of geophysical detection methods for locating undocumented wells. As a result, the method can be part of a cumulative strategy to reduce uncertainty inherent to combined geologic and engineered systems. The algorithm has been successfully tested against a known leakage scenario in Pennsylvania. In addition to identifying wells associated with the leakage event, the algorithm identified two other higher risk networks in the region. The algorithm output provides valuable information for industry to develop environmentally safe drilling and injection plans; and for regulators to identify specific wellbores at greater risk for leakage, and to develop targeted

  2. A multi-cycle optimization approach for low leakage in-core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Pingdong; Shen Wei

    1999-01-01

    A new approach was developed to optimize pressurized waster reactor (PWR) low-leakage multi-cycle reload core design. The multi-cycle optimization process is carried out by the following three steps: The first step is a linear programming in search for an optimum power sharing distribution and optimum cycle length distribution for the successive several cycles to yield maximum multi-cycle total cycle length. In the second step, the fuel arrangement and burnable poison (BP) assignment are decoupled by using Haling power distribution and the optimum fuel arrangement is determined at the EOL in the absence of all BPs by employing a linear programming method or direct search method with objective function to force the calculated cycle length to be as close as possible to the optimum single cycle length obtained in the first step and with optimum power sharing distribution as additional constraints during optimization. In the third step, the BP assignment is optimized by the Flexible Tolerance Method (FTM) or linear programming method using the number of BP rods as control variable. The technology employed in the second and third steps was the usual decoupling method used in low-leakage core design. The first step was developed specially for multi-cycle optimization design and discussed in detail. Based on the proposed method a computer code MCYCO was encoded and tested for Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant (QNPP) low leakage reload core design. The multi-cycle optimization method developed, together with the program MCYCO, provides an applicable tool for solving the PWR low leakage reload core design problem

  3. Eddy covariance observations of surface leakage during shallow subsurface CO2 releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Fischer, Marc L.; Pan, Lehua; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Dobeck, Laura; Spangler, Lee

    2009-06-01

    We tested the ability of eddy covariance (EC) to detect, locate, and quantify surface CO2 flux leakage signals within a background ecosystem. For 10 days starting on 9 July 2007, and for 7 days starting on 3 August 2007, 0.1 (Release 1) and 0.3 (Release 2) t CO2 d-1, respectively, were released from a horizontal well ˜100 m in length and ˜2.5 m in depth located in an agricultural field in Bozeman, Montana. An EC station measured net CO2 flux (Fc) from 8 June 2006 to 4 September 2006 (mean and standard deviation = -12.4 and 28.1 g m-2 d-1, respectively) and from 28 May 2007 to 4 September 2007 (mean and standard deviation = -12.0 and 28.1 g m-2 d-1, respectively). The Release 2 leakage signal was visible in the Fc time series, whereas the Release 1 signal was difficult to detect within variability of ecosystem fluxes. To improve detection ability, we calculated residual fluxes (Fcr) by subtracting fluxes corresponding to a model for net ecosystem exchange from Fc. Fcr had reduced variability and lacked the negative bias seen in corresponding Fc distributions. Plotting the upper 90th percentile Fcr versus time enhanced the Release 2 leakage signal. However, values measured during Release 1 fell within the variability assumed to be related to unmodeled natural processes. Fcr measurements and corresponding footprint functions were inverted using a least squares approach to infer the spatial distribution of surface CO2 fluxes during Release 2. When combined with flux source area evaluation, inversion results roughly located the CO2 leak, while resolution was insufficient to quantify leakage rate.

  4. Leakage Inductance Calculation for Planar Transformers with a Magnetic Shunt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Zhang; Ouyang, Ziwei; Duffy, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic shunt is generally inserted in a planar transformer to increase the leakage inductance which can be utilized as the series inductor in resonant circuits such as the LLC resonant converter. This paper presents a calculation methodology for the leakage inductance of the transformer...... with a magnetic shunt by means of the stored magnetic energy in the primary and secondary sides of the transformer using the magnetomotive force (MMF) variation method, as well as the stored energy in the shunt based on the reluctance model. The detailed calculation method is described. Both the FEA simulation...

  5. Leakage Inductance Calculation for Planar Transformers with a Magnetic Shunt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jun; Ouyang, Ziwei; Duffy, Maeve C.

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic shunt is generally inserted in a planar transformer to increase the leakage inductance which can be utilized as the series inductor in resonant circuits such as the LLC resonant converter. This paper presents a calculation methodology for the leakage inductance of the transformer...... with a magnetic shunt by means of the stored magnetic energy in the primary and secondary sides of the transformer using the magnetomotive force (MMF) variation method, as well as the stored energy in the shunt based on the reluctance model. The detailed calculation method is described. Both the FEA simulation...

  6. Investigation of Flyback Transformer Flux Leakage Reduction Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvardas Bielskis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental investigation and design optimization of flyback transformer are presented. Aim of the work is to investigate experimentally the impact of the flyback transformer design on the flux leakage and maximal output power. It is difficult to evaluate the effect of the leakage flux mathematically because it depends on various factors: the position of the windings relative to each other; the position of the windings in the transformer; the distance between the winding. A multi-winding flyback transformer was used for experiments. Using the results of the experiments optimal design of the investigated flyback transformer was defined.

  7. Airbag for the closing of pipelines on explosions and leakages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisenreich, N.; Neutz, J.; Seiler, F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a result of international effort aimed at the construction of a device for quick closing of pipelines in the case of explosion propagation and/or chemical leakage. Such a problem exists in industries where flammable substances are transported by pipelines. The basic solution principle...... was the idea to use airbags similar to those utilized in cars. Two pipeline applications were taken into consideration: a low-pressure module able to suppress explosion propagation and a high-pressure module to stop leakages from, e.g. natural gas pipeline capable to be used for duct diameters up to 0.6 m...

  8. APPLICATION OF A GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR A CONTAINMENT SYSTEM LEAK DETECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of physical and hydraulic containment systems for the isolation of contaminated ground water associated with hazardous waste sites has increased during the last decade. Existing methodologies for monitoring and evaluating leakage from hazardous waste containment systems ...

  9. Standard test method for the analysis of refrigerant 114, plus other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds in uranium hexafluoride via fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers determining the concentrations of refrigerant-114, other carbon-containing and fluorine-containing compounds, hydrocarbons, and partially or completely substituted halohydrocarbons that may be impurities in uranium hexafluoride. The two options are outlined for this test method. They are designated as Part A and Part B. 1.1.1 To provide instructions for performing Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis for the possible presence of Refrigerant-114 impurity in a gaseous sample of uranium hexafluoride, collected in a "2S" container or equivalent at room temperature. The all gas procedure applies to the analysis of possible Refrigerant-114 impurity in uranium hexafluoride, and to the gas manifold system used for FTIR applications. The pressure and temperatures must be controlled to maintain a gaseous sample. The concentration units are in mole percent. This is Part A. 1.2 Part B involves a high pressure liquid sample of uranium hexafluoride. This method can be appli...

  10. Recycling of Zn-containing Fe-bearing steelmaking waste by the reducing smelting process in pig iron. I. Laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendera Ján

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the laboratory test treatment of the zinc containing steelwork dusts in a hot liquid pig iron are described. These results show that it is necessary to use an external reductant. The zinc content of the dust emission is ca. 20 %. The charge of the steel-works dusts diminished the Si and Mn content of pig iron.

  11. Methods for analysis and testing of coal and coke. Part 108. Tests special to coke. Section 108.3 Determination of bulk density (small container)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of the bulk density of coke in a cubical container of capacity 0.2 m{sup 3}. It is applicable to coke with a nominal top size not greater than 125 mm.

  12. Ciemat Contribution to The International Standard Problem ISP-34: Contain Analysis of Fal-ISP 1 Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L. E.; Polo, J.

    1994-01-01

    CIEMAT, along with a great number of international laboratories, has participated in the open exercise of the first International Standard Problem addressing fission product transport issues. The FAL-ISP 1, aimed to study particle agglomeration, has been simulated with CONTAIN code. The therma hydraulic results obtained have been satisfactory and aerosol ones have been reasonably accurate. However, some discrepancies appeared between predictions and experimental data; these are essentially related to the injection phase of the experiment, where the major influence of input approximations took place. In addition, the rationalization of discrepancies pointed potential data inconsistencies. Some parametric studies showed the results sensitivity to input assumptions concerning aerosol characterization and default values in CONTAIN; in general, they confirmed the suitability of most of the approximations taken. (Author) 11 refs

  13. CIEMAT contribution to the international standard problem ISP-34: contain analysis of FAL-ISP 1 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herranz, L.E.; Polo, J.

    1994-01-01

    CIEMAT, along with a great number of international laboratories, has participated in the open exercise of the first International Standard Problem addressing fission product transport issues. The FAL-ISP 1, aimed to study particle agglomeration, has been simulated with CONTAIN code. The thermalhydraulic results obtained have been satisfactory and aerosols ones have been reasonably accurate. However, some discrepancies appeared between predictions and experimental data; these are essentially related to the injection phase of the experiment, where the major influence of input approximations took place. In addition, the rationalization of discrepancies pointed potential data inconsistencies. Some parametric studies showed the results sensitivity to input assumptions concerning aerosol characterization and default values in CONTAIN; in general, they confirmed the suitability of most of the approximations taken. (Author)

  14. Technology Solutions Case Study: Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space, Waldorf, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-11-01

    In this project, Building Science Corporation worked with production homebuilder K. Hovnanian to evaluate air transfer between the garage and living space in a single-family detached home constructed by a production homebuilder in compliance with the 2009 International Residential Code and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. The project gathered important information about the performance of whole-building ventilation systems and garage ventilation systems as they relate to minimizing flow of contaminated air from garage to living space. A series of 25 multipoint fan pressurization tests and additional zone pressure diagnostic testing measured the garage and house air leakage, the garage-to-house air leakage, and garage and house pressure relationships to each other and to outdoors using automated fan pressurization and pressure monitoring techniques. While the relative characteristics of this house may not represent the entire population of new construction configurations and air tightness levels (house and garage) throughout the country, the technical approach was conservative and should reasonably extend the usefulness of the results to a large spectrum of house configurations from this set of parametric tests in this one house. Based on the results of this testing, the two-step garage-to-house air leakage test protocol described above is recommended where whole-house exhaust ventilation is employed. For houses employing whole-house supply ventilation (positive pressure) or balanced ventilation (same pressure effect as the baseline condition), adherence to the EPA Indoor airPLUS house-to-garage air sealing requirements should be sufficient to expect little to no garage-to-house air transfer.

  15. [METHODS OF MODELING TEMPERATURE REGIMES IN TESTS OF POLYMER CONTAINING BUILDING MATERIALS AND FURNITURE FOR HOMES AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubova, G P; Chubirko, M I; Obolonskiy, M F; Khrapov, R Yu; Kamenev, V I

    2015-01-01

    This article is devoted to the modeling of temperature conditions in performance of research of polymer containing building materials and furniture. The authors draw attention to the different conditions of modeling used in the existing guidance documents, and provide a unified approach to this problem, namely in the performance of the study to use the temperature regime, which corresponds to the maximum value of the optimum temperature range for residential and industrial premises.

  16. Glove leakage rates as a function of latex content and brand: caveat emptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, C A; Sistrom, M G; Strain, B A; Farr, B M

    2000-08-01

    That water leakage rates and protection against blood-borne pathogens should not vary as a function of latex content among Food and Drug Administration-approved gloves, allowing avoidance of unnecessary latex exposure. Eighteen different glove types were purchased and tested using the American Society for Testing Methods Standard Test for Detecting Holes in medical gloves, which involves mounting the glove on a plastic tube, pouring a liter of tap water into the glove, and visually inspecting the glove initially and after 2 minutes. Half of the gloves were tested straight from the package and half after a standardized manipulation. A university hospital. Eleven sterile glove types (5 high latex content, 4 low latex content, and 2 nonlatex content), and 7 nonsterile examination glove types (2 high latex content, 2 low latex content, and 3 nonlatex content) were tested (total tested, 3720 gloves). Leakage rates were greater for examination than for surgical gloves (relative risk [RR], 1.41, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.96), for manipulated than for unused gloves (RR, 2.89, 5% CI, 1.98-4.22), and for low latex content surgical gloves (RR, 2.58, 95% CI, 1.35-4.92) or nonlatex content surgical gloves (RR, 4.93, 95% CI, 2.35-10.32) than for high latex content surgical gloves. Significant differences were observed among low latex content surgical gloves (Pexposure to blood-borne pathogens, while others may not.

  17. Effect of Magnetic Resonance Imaging on Micro leakage of Amalgam Restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayed, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To authenticate whether exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can cause micro leakage of amalgam restorations or not. Methods: This prospective in-vitro study study was conducted at Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University. Thirty-six non-carious human teeth (18 premolars and 18 molars), (26 upper and 10 lower) were gathered from the Oral Surgery Department. Standard class V cavities with all margins in the enamel were made on the buccal and lingual aspects after surface debridement .Three groups of teeth were randomly assigned, each containing 12 teeth. Three types of amalgams were used, GS-80, Rupy Cap and Trend alloy. Each type of amalgams was randomly applied to one group. Each group was divided randomly into two equal categories, one was designed to be the control group and the other was scanned by a 1.5 Tesla MRI Scanner for approximately 5 minutes. Micro leakage was assessed in each group. Three amalgam specimens were scanned using 1.5 Tesla Optima MR360 Scanner .The three specimens were sticked to the superior aspect of the medium spine phantom (one specimen per scan) to induce magnetization transfer contrast to easily visualize these in vitro dental ware containing amalgam. The three specimens were scanned using the same Susceptibility Weighted Angiography (SWAN) technique in different orthogonal orientations (Axial, Coronal and Sagittal) to assess the amalgam induced artifacts during MRI scanning. The primary outcome measure was the micro leakage caused by different types of amalgams during MRI scanning; the second outcome measure was the artifacts that may be encountered by different types of amalgams during MRI scanning .

  18. Effect of Viscosity on Fuel Leakage Between Lapped Plungers and Sleeves and on the Discharge from a Pump-Injection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, A M; Marsh, E T

    1935-01-01

    Test data and analysis show that the rate of fuel leakage between a lapped plunger and sleeve varies directly with the density of the fuel, the diameter of the plunger, the pressure producing the leakage, and the cube of the mean clearance between the plunger and sleeve. The rate varies inversely as the length of the lapped fit and the viscosity of the fuel. With a mean clearance between the plunger and sleeve of 0.0001 inch the leakage amounts to approximately 0.2 percent of the fuel injected with gasoline and as low as 0.01 percent with diesel fuel oils. With this mean clearance an effective seal is obtained when the length of the lap is three times the diameter of the lap. The deformation of the sleeve and plunger under pressure is sufficient to change the rate of leakage appreciably from that which would be obtained if the clearance was constant under pressure.

  19. Information contained within the large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) dataset exposed using a bespoke data analysis tool-kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.P.; Thomas, H.R.; Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Vardon, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Large Scale Gas Injection Test (Lasgit) is a field scale experiment run by the British Geological Survey (BGS) and is located approximately 420 m underground at SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden. It has been designed to study the impact on safety of gas build up within a KBS-3V concept high level radioactive waste repository. Lasgit has been in almost continuous operation for approximately seven years and is still underway. An analysis of the dataset arising from the Lasgit experiment with particular attention to the smaller scale features and phenomenon recorded has been undertaken in parallel to the macro scale analysis performed by the BGS. Lasgit is a highly instrumented, frequently sampled and long-lived experiment leading to a substantial dataset containing in excess of 14.7 million datum points. The data is anticipated to include a wealth of information, including information regarding overall processes as well as smaller scale or 'second order' features. Due to the size of the dataset coupled with the detailed analysis of the dataset required and the reduction in subjectivity associated with measurement compared to observation, computational analysis is essential. Moreover, due to the length of operation and complexity of experimental activity, the Lasgit dataset is not typically suited to 'out of the box' time series analysis algorithms. In particular, the features that are not suited to standard algorithms include non-uniformities due to (deliberate) changes in sample rate at various points in the experimental history and missing data due to hardware malfunction/failure causing interruption of logging cycles. To address these features a computational tool-kit capable of performing an Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) on long-term, large-scale datasets with non-uniformities has been developed. Particular tool-kit abilities include: the parameterization of signal variation in the dataset

  20. [Experimental study of percutaneous vertebroplasty with a novel bone void filling container system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tai-Ping; Zhang, Kui-bo; Zheng, Zhao-min; Liu, Hui; Yu, Bin-sheng

    2011-04-19

    To investigate vertebral augmentation with a novel reticulate bone filling container system by polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) injection in cadaveric simulated vertebral compressive fracture and explore the effect of reticulate bone filling container on cement distribution controlling within vertebral body and the restoration of biomechanical properties after augmentation. A total of 28 freshly frozen human vertebrae specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups. After the measurements of bone mineral density (BMD) and vertebral height, each vertebra received an axle load by a MTS (material testing system) machine to test the initial strength and stiffness. Subsequently a simultaneous compressive fracture model was created to measure the stiffness and height of fractured vertebrae. Then the augmentation procedure was performed. Afterward the biomechanical properties and the vertebral height were similarly measured as pre-operatively. The expansion of bone filling container and the distribution of cement within vertebral body were morphologically observed by crossing the specimens in sagittal midline and also integrated with the radiographic results. Stiffness was significantly restored comparing with that of fractured level (P container groups while it was irregular in single-layer groups. After crossing, the double-layer version expanded well in vertebral body and could enwrap most of injected cement. There was only a little leakage near the vessel layer. But the single-layer version had a poor expansion and a large amount of cement leakage. This novel reticulate bone void filling container system with different layers may restore both the biomechanical properties and the height of fractured vertebrae. But, with the benefit of reducing cement leakage, a double-layer design can enwrap most of injected PMMA and has a brighter prospect of clinical application.