WorldWideScience

Sample records for consortium fourth year

  1. Ohio Coal Research Consortium fourth year final summary report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    As a part of its efforts to improve the use of high-sulfur Ohio coal within environmental limits, the Ohio Coal Development Office, an entity within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO/ODOD), in late 1988 established a consortium of four Ohio universities. The purpose of the Ohio Coal Research Consortium is to conduct a multi-year fundamental research program focused on (1) the enhancement or development of dry sorption processes for the economical removal of high levels of SO{sub 2} and other pollutants and (2) an increased understanding of methods for reduction in air toxics emissions from combustion gases produced by burning high-sulfur Ohio coal. This report contains summaries of twelve studies in these areas.

  2. Teach Louisiana Consortium: A Fifth Year Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Broussard, Michelle; Stringer, Angelle

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a fifth year program evaluation of a private provider program for teacher certification in Louisiana. The study sought to evaluate the success of the Teach Louisiana Consortium program in terms of teacher placement, teacher retention, administrative satisfaction, teacher attitudes, and teacher pedagogical knowledge. Initial…

  3. Diagnosis and management of dementia with Lewy bodies: Fourth consensus report of the DLB Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeith, Ian G; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Halliday, Glenda; Taylor, John-Paul; Weintraub, Daniel; Aarsland, Dag; Galvin, James; Attems, Johannes; Ballard, Clive G; Bayston, Ashley; Beach, Thomas G; Blanc, Frédéric; Bohnen, Nicolaas; Bonanni, Laura; Bras, Jose; Brundin, Patrik; Burn, David; Chen-Plotkin, Alice; Duda, John E; El-Agnaf, Omar; Feldman, Howard; Ferman, Tanis J; Ffytche, Dominic; Fujishiro, Hiroshige; Galasko, Douglas; Goldman, Jennifer G; Gomperts, Stephen N; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Honig, Lawrence S; Iranzo, Alex; Kantarci, Kejal; Kaufer, Daniel; Kukull, Walter; Lee, Virginia M Y; Leverenz, James B; Lewis, Simon; Lippa, Carol; Lunde, Angela; Masellis, Mario; Masliah, Eliezer; McLean, Pamela; Mollenhauer, Brit; Montine, Thomas J; Moreno, Emilio; Mori, Etsuro; Murray, Melissa; O'Brien, John T; Orimo, Sotoshi; Postuma, Ronald B; Ramaswamy, Shankar; Ross, Owen A; Salmon, David P; Singleton, Andrew; Taylor, Angela; Thomas, Alan; Tiraboschi, Pietro; Toledo, Jon B; Trojanowski, John Q; Tsuang, Debby; Walker, Zuzana; Yamada, Masahito; Kosaka, Kenji

    2017-07-04

    The Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) Consortium has refined its recommendations about the clinical and pathologic diagnosis of DLB, updating the previous report, which has been in widespread use for the last decade. The revised DLB consensus criteria now distinguish clearly between clinical features and diagnostic biomarkers, and give guidance about optimal methods to establish and interpret these. Substantial new information has been incorporated about previously reported aspects of DLB, with increased diagnostic weighting given to REM sleep behavior disorder and (123)iodine-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy. The diagnostic role of other neuroimaging, electrophysiologic, and laboratory investigations is also described. Minor modifications to pathologic methods and criteria are recommended to take account of Alzheimer disease neuropathologic change, to add previously omitted Lewy-related pathology categories, and to include assessments for substantia nigra neuronal loss. Recommendations about clinical management are largely based upon expert opinion since randomized controlled trials in DLB are few. Substantial progress has been made since the previous report in the detection and recognition of DLB as a common and important clinical disorder. During that period it has been incorporated into DSM-5, as major neurocognitive disorder with Lewy bodies. There remains a pressing need to understand the underlying neurobiology and pathophysiology of DLB, to develop and deliver clinical trials with both symptomatic and disease-modifying agents, and to help patients and carers worldwide to inform themselves about the disease, its prognosis, best available treatments, ongoing research, and how to get adequate support. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  4. Regional forecasting with global atmospheric models; Fourth year report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowley, T.J.; North, G.R.; Smith, N.R. [Applied Research Corp., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The scope of the report is to present the results of the fourth year`s work on the atmospheric modeling part of the global climate studies task. The development testing of computer models and initial results are discussed. The appendices contain studies that provide supporting information and guidance to the modeling work and further details on computer model development. Complete documentation of the models, including user information, will be prepared under separate reports and manuals.

  5. Urban Consortium Energy Task Force - Year 21 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-04-01

    The Urban Consortium Energy Task Force (UCETF), comprised of representatives of large cities and counties in the United States, is a subgroup of the Urban Consortium, an organization of the nation's largest cities and counties joined together to identify, develop and deploy innovative approaches and technological solutions to pressing urban issues.

  6. Preparing Fourth-Year Medical Students to Teach During Internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Richard J; Bardach, Naomi S; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Gillum, Leslie A; Haber, Lawrence A; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet S

    2006-01-01

    Interns are expected to teach medical students, yet there is little formal training in medical school to prepare them for this role. To enhance the teaching skills of our graduating students we initiated a 4-hour “teaching to teach” course as part of the end of the fourth-year curriculum. Course evaluations demonstrate that students strongly support this program (overall ratings 2000 to 2005: mean = 4.4 [scale 1 to 5], n = 224). When 2004 course participants were surveyed during the last month of their internship, 84%“agree” or “strongly agree” with the statement: “The teaching to teach course helped prepare me for my role as a teacher during internship” (2005: mean 4.2 [scale 1 to 5], n = 45, response rate 60%). A course preparing fourth-year students to teach during internship is both feasible and reproducible, with a minimal commitment of faculty and resident time. Participants identify it as an important addition to their education and as useful during internship. PMID:16704402

  7. Thirty Years of Innovation in Seismology with the IRIS Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumy, D. F.; Woodward, R.; Aderhold, K.; Ahern, T. K.; Anderson, K. R.; Busby, R.; Detrick, R. S.; Evers, B.; Frassetto, A.; Hafner, K.; Simpson, D. W.; Sweet, J. R.; Taber, J.

    2015-12-01

    The United States academic seismology community, through the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Consortium, has promoted and encouraged a rich environment of innovation and experimentation in areas such as seismic instrumentation, data processing and analysis, teaching and curriculum development, and academic science. As the science continually evolves, IRIS helps drive the market for new research tools that enable science by establishing a variety of standards and goals. This has often involved working directly with manufacturers to better define the technology required, co-funding key development work or early production prototypes, and purchasing initial production runs. IRIS activities have helped establish de-facto international standards and impacted the commercial sector in areas such as seismic instrumentation, open-access data management, and professional development. Key institutional practices, conducted and refined over IRIS' thirty-year history of operations, have focused on open-access data availability, full retention of maximum-bandwidth, continuous data, and direct community access to state-of-the-art seismological instrumentation and software. These practices have helped to cultivate and support a thriving commercial ecosystem, and have been a key element in the professional development of multiple generations of seismologists who now work in both industry and academia. Looking toward the future, IRIS is increasing its engagement with industry to better enable bi-directional exchange of techniques and technology, and enhancing the development of tomorrow's workforce. In this presentation, we will illustrate how IRIS has promoted innovations grown out of the academic community and spurred technological advances in both academia and industry.

  8. Rational pharmacotherapy training for fourth-year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Gelal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In this study we aimed to evaluate the impact of Rational Pharmacotherapy (RPT course program, reinforced by video footages, on the rational pharmacotherapy skills of the students. Materials and Methods: RPT course program has been conducted in Dokuz Eylul University School of Medicine since 2008/9. The course has been organised in accordance with World Health Organisation (WHO Good Prescribing Guide. The aim of the course was to improve the problem solving skills (methodology for selection of the (personel-drug, prescription writing and informing patient about his illness and drugs and communication skills of students. The impact of the course has been measured by pre/post-test design by an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. In academic year 2010/11, to further improve OSCE score of the students we added doctor-patient communication video footages to the RPT course programme. During training, the students were asked to evaluate the doctor-patient communication and prescription on two video footages using a checklist followed by group discussions. Results: Total post-test OSCE score was significantly higher for 2010/11 academic year students (n = 147 than it was for 2009/10 year students (n = 131. The 2010/11 academic year students performed significantly better than the 2009/10 academic year students on four steps of OSCE. These steps were "defining the patient′s problem," "specifying the therapeutic objective," "specifying the non-pharmacological treatment" and "choosing a (drug treatment, taking all relevant patient characteristics into account". Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that the implementation of video footages and group discussions to WHO/Good Prescribing Method improved the fourth-year medical students′ performance in rational pharmacotherapy skills.

  9. Students' perspectives on the fourth year of medical school: a mixed-methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephen J; Lockspeiser, Tai M; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the purpose and value of the fourth year of medical school from the perspective of medical students. In this study, the authors systematically explored the year's purpose and value as determined by students. In April 2011, the authors conducted semistructured focus groups with graduating fourth-year students at the University of Colorado School of Medicine to understand their perspectives on the purpose of the fourth year. Using results of a thematic analysis of the focus group data, the authors developed and administered a 10-item questionnaire to all graduating fourth-year medical students in May 2011. Questionnaire data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis. A total of 17 students participated in two focus groups. Six themes related to the purpose of the fourth year emerged from the focus group data: career development and preparation, pursuing personal interests, career identification, exploration of diverse practice settings, influence of emotion, and flexibility and individualization. The questionnaire was completed by 134 of 148 students (91% response rate). Factor analysis of the questionnaire data identified five factors: strengthening one's residency application, developing skills, pursuing personal interests, exploring diverse practice settings, and identifying a career. Medical students uniformly identified the fourth year of medical school as having purpose and value, but their views on the fourth year's purpose differed. This finding underscores the importance of the individualization of the fourth year. Students' perspectives should inform any decisions made about modifying fourth-year curricula and structure.

  10. Attributions of Academic Performance among Third Year and Fourth Year Biology Major Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick John B. Solar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive study aimed to determine the attributions of academic performance of third year and fourth year biology major students in the College of Education, West Visayas State University, School Year 2013-2014. The academic performance were categorized or measured in terms of test, projects, workbooks, and laboratory experiments, class participation, and attendance. The Attributions in academic performance were evaluated using the closed-form questionnairechecklist,categorized intoin termsof ability, effort, luck, or task difficulty. Mean frequency, mean percentage, Mann-Whitney U-test, two-sampled test set at 0.05 level of significance were used to determine if there were significant difference in the attribution when the students were taken according to their year level. The result of the study revealed that the Third Year biology majors attributed their academic performance to effort which is shown to have the highest percentage attribution in overall rank. There was no significant difference in the attributions of academic performance for third year and fourth year biology major students in terms of test, while the result for projects, workbooks, and laboratory experiment and class participation and attendance categories,was found out to have a significant difference in the attribution for the third and fourth years biology Major students’ academic performances.

  11. Fifteen Years of Collaborative Innovation and Achievement: NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium 15-Year Program Performance and Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Michaela M.; Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Avery, Shelly; Carstenson, Larry; Dugan, James; Farritor, Shane; Joyce, James; Rebrovich, Barb

    2003-01-01

    Condensing five years of significant work into a brief narrative fitting PPR requirements gave the affiliates of the Nebraska Space Grant a valuable chance for reflection. Achievements of Space Grant in Nebraska were judiciously chosen for this document that best illustrate the resultant synergism of this consortium, keeping in mind that these examples are only a representation of greater activity throughout the state. Following are highlights of many of the finer and personal achievements for Nebraska Space Grant. The Consortium welcomes inquiries to elaborate on any of these accomplishments.

  12. Attitude of fourth year Doctor of Pharmacy students towards pharmacy profession and their career preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Saad

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Fourth year students believed that pharmacy education and practice affect the health care system. Their favorite career areas were clinical pharmacy, industrial pharmacy, and hospital pharmacy. Personal interest was the most important factor involved in this selection. Most of them were interested in pharmacy-related research activities.

  13. Problem-Based Learning of Social Sciences and Humanities by Fourth-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, Kathleen K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A required fourth-year course integrating the social sciences and humanities into the required clinical medical curriculum at Dartmouth Medical School is intended to prepare students to deal with the social and humanistic issues involved in medical practice, including law, ethics, economics, and social anthropology. (MSE)

  14. Fourth-Year Medical School Course Load and Success as a Medical Intern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Christopher J; Mukamal, Kenneth J; DeMelo, Nikki; Smith, C Christopher

    2017-02-01

    The fourth year of medical school has come under recent scrutiny for its lack of structure, cost- and time-effectiveness, and quality of education it provides. Some have advocated for increasing clinical burden in the fourth year, while others have suggested it be abolished. To assess the relationship between fourth-year course load and success during internship. We reviewed transcripts of 78 internal medicine interns from 2011-2013 and compared the number of intensive courses (defined as subinternships, intensive care, surgical clerkships, and emergency medicine rotations) with multi-source performance evaluations from the internship. We assessed relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of achieving excellent scores according to the number of intensive courses taken, using generalized estimating equations, adjusting for demographics, US Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 board scores, and other measures of medical school performance. For each additional intensive course taken, the RR of obtaining an excellent score per intensive course was 1.05 (95% CI 1.03-1.07, P interns, increased exposure to intensive course work during the fourth year of medical school was associated with better clinical evaluations during internship.

  15. FORGE Canada Consortium: outcomes of a 2-year national rare-disease gene-discovery project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bernier, Francois P; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E; Jones, Steve J M; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W; Friedman, Jan M; Michaud, Jacques L; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-06-01

    Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE's impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally.

  16. Differences between first and fourth year medical students' interest in pursuing careers in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Monica H; Carter, Mary

    2016-05-24

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess the differences in the attitudes of first and fourth-year medical students regarding careers in academics. We also sought to identify any factors associated with an increased interest in academic medicine. A cross-sectional study was conducted during October 2013 at the University of Louisville. All first and fourth year medical students were invited to complete an online survey utilizing a survey instrument developed through literature review. Demographic data and information about background experiences were collected in addition to participants' perceptions regarding careers in academia using a 5-point Likert scale. Participants were also queried about their current interest in a career in academics and the likelihood they would pursue academic medicine. Of the 330 potential participants, 140 (42.4%) agreed to participate. Overall, fourth-years reported a higher likelihood of pursuing an academic career than first-years. Research experience, publications, distinction track interest or involvement, and belief that a career in academics would reduce salary potential were positively correlated with reported likelihood of pursuing academic medicine. Findings from this pilot study demonstrate differences in interest in academic medicine between junior and senior medical students. Additionally, several factors were associated with a high likelihood of self-reported interest in academic. Based on these findings, efforts to increase medical students' interest in academic medicine careers could be supported by providing more research and teaching opportunities or distinction track options as a structured part of the medical school curriculum.

  17. Results for the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 Tank 50H Salt Solution Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-11

    In this memorandum, the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) sample of Tank 50H salt solution are presented in tabulated form. The Fourth Quarter CY15 Tank 50H samples were obtained on October 29, 2015 and received at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on October 30, 2015. The information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering for the transfer of aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Production Facility, where the waste will be treated and disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility. This memorandum compares results, where applicable, to Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits and targets. Data pertaining to the regulatory limits for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals will be documented at a later time per the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) for the Tank 50H saltstone task. The chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the characterization of the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) sampling of Tank 50H were requested by SRR personnel and details of the testing are presented in the SRNL Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan.

  18. The Launch of the Philadelphia Education Research Consortium: Lessons Learned from the First Year of Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Kate

    2016-01-01

    The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium (PERC) was launched in July 2014 as an innovative place-based consortium of educational research partners from multiple sectors. Its primary objective is to provide research and analyses on some of the city's most pressing education issues. As such, PERC's research agenda is driven by both traditional…

  19. Cassini Maneuver Experience for the Fourth Year of the Solstice Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Mar; Hahn, Yungsun; Stumpf, Paul; Valerino, Powtawche; Wagner, Sean; Wong, Mau

    2014-01-01

    After sixteen years of successful mission operations and invaluable scientific discoveries, the Cassini orbiter continues to tour Saturn on the most complex gravity-assist trajectory ever flown. To ensure that the end-of-mission target of September 2017 is achieved, propellant preservation is highly prioritized over maneuver cycle minimization. Thus, the maneuver decision process, which includes determining whether a maneuver is performed or canceled, designing a targeting strategy and selecting the engine for execution, is being continuously re-evaluated. This paper summarizes the maneuver experience throughout the fourth year of the Solstice Mission highlighting 27 maneuvers targeted to nine Titan flybys.

  20. Preliminary assessment of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex environmental contaminants background study: Fourth year results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report represents the results of the fourth year of the multi-year study, the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex) Environmental Contaminants...

  1. The Relationship between SAT® Scores and Retention to the Fourth Year: 2006 SAT Validity Sample. Statistical Report 2011-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Krista D.; Patterson, Brian F.

    2011-01-01

    The College Board formed a research consortium with four-year colleges and universities to build a national higher education database with the primary goal of validating the SAT® for use in college admission. The first sample included first-time, first-year students entering college in fall 2006, with 110 institutions providing students'…

  2. Story Specifications for Mod 2 Third-Year and Fourth-Year Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Howard J.

    The Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) Mod 2 Reading Program is planned as a four-year program (K-3) for teaching reading skills to primary-grade children. To date, all stories have been written for the first-year and second-year segments of the program. This paper describes the selection of rules and words, the number and type of stories, and…

  3. 22 Years of predictive testing for Huntington's disease: the experience of the UK Huntington's Prediction Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Sheharyar S; Strong, Mark; Rosser, Elisabeth; Taverner, Nicola V; Glew, Ruth; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Clarke, Angus; Craufurd, David; Quarrell, Oliver W

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition. At-risk individuals have accessed predictive testing via direct mutation testing since 1993. The UK Huntington's Prediction Consortium has collected anonymised data on UK predictive tests, annually, from 1993 to 2014: 9407 predictive tests were performed across 23 UK centres. Where gender was recorded, 4077 participants were male (44.3%) and 5122 were female (55.7%). The median age of participants was 37 years. The most common reason for predictive testing was to reduce uncertainty (70.5%). Of the 8441 predictive tests on individuals at 50% prior risk, 4629 (54.8%) were reported as mutation negative and 3790 (44.9%) were mutation positive, with 22 (0.3%) in the database being uninterpretable. Using a prevalence figure of 12.3 × 10(-5), the cumulative uptake of predictive testing in the 50% at-risk UK population from 1994 to 2014 was estimated at 17.4% (95% CI: 16.9-18.0%). We present the largest study conducted on predictive testing in HD. Our findings indicate that the vast majority of individuals at risk of HD (>80%) have not undergone predictive testing. Future therapies in HD will likely target presymptomatic individuals; therefore, identifying the at-risk population whose gene status is unknown is of significant public health value.

  4. Three-Year MD Programs: Perspectives From the Consortium of Accelerated Medical Pathway Programs (CAMPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangiarella, Joan; Fancher, Tonya; Jones, Betsy; Dodson, Lisa; Leong, Shou Ling; Hunsaker, Matthew; Pallay, Robert; Whyte, Robert; Holthouser, Amy; Abramson, Steven B

    2017-04-01

    In the last decade, there has been renewed interest in three-year MD pathway programs. In 2015, with support from the Josiah Macy Jr., Foundation, eight North American medical schools with three-year accelerated medical pathway programs formed the Consortium of Accelerated Medical Pathway Programs (CAMPP). The schools are two campuses of the Medical College of Wisconsin; McMaster University Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine; Mercer University School of Medicine; New York University School of Medicine; Penn State College of Medicine; Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Medicine; University of California, Davis School of Medicine; and University of Louisville School of Medicine. These programs vary in size and medical specialty focus but all include the reduction of student debt from savings in tuition costs. Each school's mission to create a three-year pathway program differs; common themes include the ability to train physicians to practice in underserved areas or to allow students for whom the choice of specialty is known to progress more quickly. Compared with McMaster, these programs are small, but most capitalize on training and assessing competency across the undergraduate medical education-graduate medical education continuum and include conditional acceptance into an affiliated residency program. This article includes an overview of each CAMPP school with attention to admissions, curriculum, financial support, and regulatory challenges associated with the design of an accelerated pathway program. These programs are relatively new, with a small number of graduates; this article outlines opportunities and challenges for schools considering the development of accelerated programs.

  5. Hanford Seismic Annual Report and Fourth Quarter Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AC Rohay; DC Hartshorn; SP Reidel

    1999-12-07

    Hanford Seismic Monitoring provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN) for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. Hanford Seismic Monitoring also locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, Natural Phenomena Hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The HSN and the Eastern Washington Regional Network. (EWRN) consist of 40 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Monitoring staff. A major reconfiguration of the HSN was initiated at the end of this quarter and the results will be reported in the first quarter report for next fiscal year (FY2000). For the HSN, there were 390 triggers during the fourth quarter of fiscal year(FY) 1999 on the primary recording system. With the implementation of dual backup systems during the second quarter of the fiscal year and an overall increase observed in sensitivity, a total of 1632 triggers were examined, identified, and processed during this fiscal year. During the fourth quarter, 24 seismic events were located by the HSN within the reporting region of 46 degrees to 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees to 120 degrees west longitude 9 were earthquakes in the Columbia River Basalt Group, 2 were earthquakes in the pre-basalt sediments, 10 were earthquakes in the crystalline basement; and 2 were quarry blasts. One earthquake appears to be related to a major geologic structure, 14 earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas, and 7 earthquakes were random occurrences.

  6. Course Offerings in the Fourth Year of Medical School: How U.S. Medical Schools Are Preparing Students for Internship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnicki, D Michael; Gallagher, Susan; Willett, Laura; Kane, Gregory; Muntz, Martin; Henry, Daniel; Cannarozzi, Maria; Stewart, Emily; Harrell, Heather; Aiyer, Meenakshy; Salvit, Cori; Chudgar, Saumil; Vu, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The fourth year of medical school remains controversial, despite efforts to reform it. A committee from the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine examined transitions from medical school to internship with the goal of better academic advising for students. In 2013 and 2014, the committee examined published literature and the Web sites of 136 Liaison Committee on Medical Education-accredited schools for information on current course offerings for the fourth year of medical school. The authors summarized temporal trends and outcomes when available.Subinternships were required by 122 (90%) of the 136 schools and allow students to experience the intern's role. Capstone courses are increasingly used to fill curricular gaps. Revisiting basic sciences in fourth-year rotations helps to reinforce concepts from earlier years. Many schools require rotations in specific settings, like emergency departments, intensive care units, or ambulatory clinics. A growing number of schools require participation in research, including during the fourth year. Students traditionally take fourth-year clinical electives to improve skills, both within their chosen specialties and in other disciplines. Some students work with underserved populations or seek experiences that will be henceforth unavailable, whereas others use electives to "audition" at desired residency sites. Fourth-year requirements vary considerably among medical schools, reflecting different missions and varied student needs. Few objective outcomes data exist to guide students' choices. Nevertheless, both medical students and educators value the fourth year of medical school and feel it can fill diverse functions in preparing for residency.

  7. Problems in the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Very typical situations of the Pediatric Surgery Services in the Pediatric Hospital of Cienfuegos may interfere with the appropriate development of the educational process. Consequently, students might not master the principles of medical practice in the most common surgical diseases in children, thus limiting its further application in their professional performances as basic general practitioners. To obtain more accurate information on the causes of this phenomenon is considered to be paramount in order to search for practical solutions to improve the educational process and to fulfil the goals of the teaching stage. The contents on the following information sources are analyzed in this paper: documents for higher education and for medicine career, publications and papers presented in scientific events (directly or indirectly related to the practice of Pediatric Surgery and hospital statistics. This review was aimed at analyzing the situations that negatively affect the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students.

  8. Multiple Intelligence of the Fourth Year English Department Students of STKIP Abdi Pendidikan Payakumbuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Settya Mahaputri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Intelligence (MI is very important to modern education because its main point is that every individual has eight intelligences and they all work together in a unique way. This research belongs to Descriptive research analyzing students’ MI of the fourth year English department of STKIP Abdi Pendidikan Payakumbuh. The data were collected through questionnaires which had been distributed to 20 students. Then it was analyzed by interpreting in each Intelligence. The finding shows that most of the students had good in Interpersonal Intelligence, Musical Intelligence, and Intrapersonal Intelligence. And they are good enough at Naturalist Intelligence, Bodily-kinesthetic Intelligence, and Spatial Intelligence. However, they are low at Linguistic Intelligence and Logical-mathematic Intelligence.

  9. Multiple Intelligence of the Fourth Year English Department Students of STKIP Abdi Pendidikan Payakumbuh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Settya Mahaputri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Intelligence (MI is very important to modern education because its main point is that every individual has eight intelligences and they all work together in a unique way. This research belongs to Descriptive research analyzing students’ MI of the fourth year English department of STKIP Abdi Pendidikan Payakumbuh. The data were collected through questionnaires which had been distributed to 20 students. Then it was analyzed by interpreting in each Intelligence. The finding shows that most of the students had good in Interpersonal Intelligence, Musical Intelligence, and Intrapersonal Intelligence. And they are good enough at Naturalist Intelligence, Bodily-kinesthetic Intelligence, and Spatial Intelligence. However, they are low at Linguistic Intelligence and Logical-mathematic Intelligence.

  10. RSC Classroom Research Consortium Project: 1990-91/Year-Two Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Mary Anne

    In 1989, a consortium of four community colleges in Southern California (i.e., Cerritos College, Mt. San Antonio College, Rancho Santiago College, and Rio Hondo College) received a Title III grant of $2.5 million to support the development of innovative teaching and learning programs. The specific goals of the project are to increase the academic…

  11. Medical student self-assessment narratives: perceived educational needs during fourth-year emergency medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Aaron W; Balodis, Amanda; Kman, Nicholas E; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Khandelwal, Sorabh

    2013-01-01

    The educational needs of medical students in the 4th-year of training are not well defined in the literature. The specific aim of this investigation is to characterize the perceived educational needs of 4th-year medical students during an Emergency Medicine clerkship. This was a thematic analysis of informed self-assessment narratives. The writings were performed by medical students during an Emergency Medicine clerkship from July 2010 through May 2011. Themes and subthemes that emerged were assessed for frequency of occurrence. Qualitative analysis of 203 narratives revealed 13 themes and 55 subthemes. Patient care (50%), history taking (44%), and physical examination (29%) were the themes most commonly noted as strengths. Medical decision making/plan of care (44%), differential diagnosis (37%), presentation skills (32%), and knowledge base (27%) were the themes most commonly noted as weaknesses. All themes were described as strengths by some students and weaknesses by others; however, trends were apparent in the analysis. Fourth-year medical students rotating on an Emergency Medicine clerkship perceive an educational need to improve medical decision making/plan of care. Self-assessment narratives reveal trends in strengths and weaknesses but also highlight the importance of recognizing students as unique learners with individualized needs.

  12. Concurrent and Longitudinal Relationships between Development in Graphic, Language and Symbolic Play Domains from the Fourth to the Fifth Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Julie; Stewart, Andrew; Kidd, Evan

    2013-01-01

    This research investigated the developing inter-relationships between language, graphic symbolism and symbolic play both concurrently and longitudinally from the fourth to the fifth year of childhood. Sixty children ("n"?=?60) aged between 3 and 4?years completed multiple assessments of language and assessments of graphic symbolism,…

  13. Fourth year medical students’ reflective writing on “death of Ivan Ilych: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHSHID ZOHOURI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students should be familiar with the end of life ethical issues and its considerations. For teaching end of life care to medical students, literature is a source of excellent narratives of patients with experiences of terminally ill condition in their journey through suffering and one of the most favourite bioethics literature readings has been the death of Ivan Ilych by Tolstoy. We used this novel to show medical students end of life events and suffering and asked them to write a reflective essay on it. We aimed to find what students think about terminally ill patients and their journey to death. Methods: In an inductive qualitative content analysis model, 350 essays, collected by homogenous sampling, were analyzed. The fourth year medical students were provided with the Death of Ivan Ilych novel to read. They were asked to write a reflection essay based on the reflective stages defined by Sandars. These essays served as the unit of analysis, each being read several times and a coding model was formed according to main topics. The related concepts in each unit were named as themes and each theme was abstracted to a code and the related codes were compared and developed as categories. Results: Qualitative content analysis of 350 essays of fourth year medical students revealed three major categories in students’ reflection on reading Death of Ivan Ilych as an end of life human body. These included: 1 Emotional experience, 2 Empathy and effective communication, 3 Spirituality and dignity. Analysis of essays showed that this reflection activity may help medical students have a deeper idea of the end of life situation and feelings. Conclusion: This project suggests that literature can be used as an example to introduce new ethical concepts to less experienced medical trainees. The students acquired the concept of the story and reflected the major aspects of the suffering of a human being in their essays. Having used and

  14. Fourth year medical students’ reflective writing on “death of Ivan Ilych: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZOHOURI, MAHSHID; AMINI, MITRA; SAGHEB, MOHAMMAD MEHDI

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students should be familiar with the end of life ethical issues and its considerations. For teaching end of life care to medical students, literature is a source of excellent narratives of patients with experiences of terminally ill condition in their journey through suffering and one of the most favourite bioethics literature readings has been the death of Ivan Ilych by Tolstoy. We used this novel to show medical students end of life events and suffering and asked them to write a reflective essay on it. We aimed to find what students think about terminally ill patients and their journey to death. Methods: In an inductive qualitative content analysis model, 350 essays, collected by homogenous sampling, were analyzed. The fourth year medical students were provided with the Death of Ivan Ilych novel to read. They were asked to write a reflection essay based on the reflective stages defined by Sandars. These essays served as the unit of analysis, each being read several times and a coding model was formed according to main topics. The related concepts in each unit were named as themes and each theme was abstracted to a code and the related codes were compared and developed as categories. Results: Qualitative content analysis of 350 essays of fourth year medical students revealed three major categories in students’ reflection on reading Death of Ivan Ilych as an end of life human body. These included: 1) Emotional experience, 2) Empathy and effective communication, 3) Spirituality and dignity. Analysis of essays showed that this reflection activity may help medical students have a deeper idea of the end of life situation and feelings. Conclusion: This project suggests that literature can be used as an example to introduce new ethical concepts to less experienced medical trainees. The students acquired the concept of the story and reflected the major aspects of the suffering of a human being in their essays. Having used and evaluated the effect

  15. Fourth year medical students' reflective writing on "death of Ivan Ilych: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohouri, Mahshid; Amini, Mitra; Sagheb, Mohammad Mehdi

    2017-04-01

    Medical students should be familiar with the end of life ethical issues and its considerations. For teaching end of life care to medical students, literature is a source of excellent narratives of patients with experiences of terminally ill condition in their journey through suffering and one of the most favourite bioethics literature readings has been the death of Ivan Ilych by Tolstoy. We used this novel to show medical students end of life events and suffering and asked them to write a reflective essay on it. We aimed to find what students think about terminally ill patients and their journey to death. In an inductive qualitative content analysis model, 350 essays, collected by homogenous sampling, were analyzed. The fourth year medical students were provided with the Death of Ivan Ilych novel to read. They were asked to write a reflection essay based on the reflective stages defined by Sandars. These essays served as the unit of analysis, each being read several times and a coding model was formed according to main topics. The related concepts in each unit were named as themes and each theme was abstracted to a code and the related codes were compared and developed as categories. Qualitative content analysis of 350 essays of fourth year medical students revealed three major categories in students' reflection on reading Death of Ivan Ilych as an end of life human body. These included: 1) Emotional experience, 2) Empathy and effective communication, 3) Spirituality and dignity. Analysis of essays showed that this reflection activity may help medical students have a deeper idea of the end of life situation and feelings. This project suggests that literature can be used as an example to introduce new ethical concepts to less experienced medical trainees. The students acquired the concept of the story and reflected the major aspects of the suffering of a human being in their essays. Having used and evaluated the effect of literature on facilitating ethical insight

  16. The AGTSR consortium: An update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fant, D.B.; Golan, L.P. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program is a collaborative University-Industry R&D Consortium that is managed and administered by the South Carolina Energy R&D Center. AGTSR is a nationwide consortium dedicated to advancing land-based gas turbine systems for improving future power generation capability. It directly supports the technology-research arm of the ATS program and targets industry-defined research needs in the areas of combustion, heat transfer, materials, aerodynamics, controls, alternative fuels, and advanced cycles. The consortium is organized to enhance U.S. competitiveness through close collaboration with universities, government, and industry at the R&D level. AGTSR is just finishing its third year of operation and is sponsored by the U.S. DOE - Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The program is scheduled to continue past the year 2000. At present, there are 78 performing member universities representing 36 states, and six cost-sharing U.S. gas turbine corporations. Three RFP`s have been announced and the fourth RFP is expected to be released in December, 1995. There are 31 research subcontracts underway at performing member universities. AGTSR has also organized three workshops, two in combustion and one in heat transfer. A materials workshop is in planning and is scheduled for February, 1996. An industrial internship program was initiated this past summer, with one intern positioned at each of the sponsoring companies. The AGTSR consortium nurtures close industry-university-government collaboration to enhance synergism and the transition of research results, accelerate and promote evolutionary-revolutionary R&D, and strives to keep a prominent U.S. industry strong and on top well into the 21st century. This paper will present the objectives and benefits of the AGTSR program, progress achieved to date, and future planned activity in fiscal year 1996.

  17. The relationship between emotion regulation strategies and job search behavior among fourth-year university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Huihui; Zhang, Xue; Fang, Ping

    2017-08-01

    The job search process is a stressful experience. This study investigated the effect of emotion regulation strategies on job search behavior in combination with anxiety and job search self-efficacy among Chinese university fourth-year students (N = 816, mean age = 21.98, 31.5% male, 34.9% majored in science, 18.0% from "211 Project" universities). Results showed that cognitive reappraisal was positively related to job search behavior, while expressive suppression was negatively related to job search behavior. Additionally, anxiety was negatively related to job search behavior, while job search self-efficacy was positively associated with job search behavior. Moreover, both anxiety and job search self-efficacy mediated the relationship between emotion regulation strategies and job search behavior. In general, emotion regulation strategies played an important role in job search behavior. Implications include the notion that emotion regulation interventions may be helpful to increase job search behavior among university students. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Examining the Cultural Competence of Third- and Fourth-Year Nutrition Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Rebekah; Hekmat, Sharareh; Ahmadi, Latifeh

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide preliminary Canadian research assessing nutrition students' cultural competence and to identify areas for future education initiatives in dietetic education that could ultimately improve dietitians' cultural competence. A mixed-methods study was conducted using a 24-item questionnaire that was administered to students enrolled in third- and fourth-year undergraduate nutrition classes (n = 133). In total, 115 questionnaires were analyzed for quantitative data, and 109 were analyzed for qualitative data. The students scored an overall medium-high level of cultural competence. Out of the 5 areas examined (skills, attitudes, awareness, desires, knowledge), students' multicultural knowledge scores were the lowest. It was found that a lower number of barriers to learning about other cultures were significantly associated with a higher overall cultural competence score, and taking a course in cultural foods significantly increased the students' knowledge and overall cultural competence (P ≤ 0.05). The qualitative data found that students felt the cultural competence curriculum had gaps and identified several ideas for improvement. In conclusion, this research data provides novel insights into the cultural competence of Canadian dietetic students and additionally supports future research and curriculum development to enhance cultural competence.

  19. Evaluation of Fourth-Year Veterinary Students' Client Communication Skills: Recommendations for Scaffolded Instruction and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Brenda J; Kedrowicz, April A

    2017-08-10

    Effective client communication is important for success in veterinary practice. The purpose of this project was to describe one approach to communication training and explore fourth-year veterinary students' communication skills through an evaluation of their interactions with clients during a general practice rotation. Two raters coded 20 random videotaped interactions simultaneously to assess students' communication, including their ability to initiate the session, incorporate open-ended questions, listen reflectively, express empathy, incorporate appropriate nonverbal communication, and attend to organization and sequencing. We provide baseline data that will guide future instruction in client communication. Results showed that students' communication skills require development. Half of the students sampled excelled at open-ended inquiry (n=10), and 40% (n=8) excelled at nonverbal communication. Students needed improvement on greeting clients by name and introducing themselves and their role (n=15), reflective listening (n=18), empathy (n=17), and organization and sequencing (n=18). These findings suggest that more-focused instruction and practice is necessary in maintaining an organized structure, reflective listening, and empathy to create a relationship-centered approach to care.

  20. The Value of the Subinternship: A Survey of Fourth Year Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric H. Green, MD MSc

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the subinternship is often regarded as an important part of many fourth year curricula it is rarely studied. Purpose: We aimed to understand the how well the subinternship prepared medical students to perform core clinical skills. Methods: Senior medical students at Boston University School of Medicine rated their perception of the effectiveness of the subinternship and “medical school overall” in preparing them to perform core clinical skills using a written survey. Results: Overall, 69% (101 of students responded. Students believe that the subinternship prepares them to perform most key skills involved in day-to-day medical care. However, students feel less prepared by either their subinternship or overall medical school experience to carry out some complex patient communication skills including delivering “bad news” and discussing end-of-life wishes. Conclusions: The subinternship appears to be effective in preparing students for many of the challenges they will face as an intern and beyond. However, students identified several complex communication skills that could be addressed in part by the subinternship for which they felt unprepared. Student learning would likely be enhanced by creating a longitudinal program to teach these higher-level communication skills during medical school and by integrating practice and feedback of these skills into the subinternship

  1. Radiologic-pathologic Correlation-An Advanced Fourth-year Elective: How We Do It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Matthew; Silverman, Jan; Spruill, Laura; Hill, Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, the radiology elective has been designed to teach medical students the fundamentals of radiologic interpretation. When questioned, many students state that they want to take a radiology elective so they can "interpret images." For the students on radiology, rotation/elective education was often passive, consisting of didactic conferences and observational shadowing of radiologists as they interpreted images. Students had only a superficial appreciation of how radiologists interacted with clinical services, multidisciplinary teams, and pathology. There was very little emphasis on imaging appropriateness or the most efficient and effective imaging for various clinical problems. With the expansion of numerous imaging modalities and the emphasis on patient-centered care, including imaging safety and dose reduction, it is important to change the focus of radiology education from interpretation to the optimal integration of imaging into clinical medicine. Radiology-pathology (rad path) electives were created at Allegheny General Hospital and the Medical University of South Carolina as a new option to provide a high-quality advanced elective for fourth-year medical students. These electives enable students to correlate radiologic images with gross and microscopic pathology specimens, thus increasing their knowledge and understanding of both. The rad path elective combines aspects of surgery, radiology, and pathology and requires students to be active learners. The implementation of this elective is an exciting work in progress that has been evolving over the past 2 and 4 years at Medical University of South Carolina and Allegheny General Hospital, respectively. We will discuss the historical basis for the elective, the advantages and challenges of having such an integrated course, and some different strategies for creating a rad path elective.

  2. Global health education consortium: 20 years of leadership in global health and global health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velji, Anvar

    2011-06-01

    The Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC) is a group of universities and institutions committed to improving the health and human rights of underserved populations worldwide through improved education and training of the global health workforce. In the early 1990s, GHEC brought together many of the global health programs in North America to improve competencies and curricula in global health as well as to involve member institutions in health policy, development issues, and delivery of care in the inner cities, marginalized areas, and abroad.

  3. Medical Student Attitudes Toward Communication Skills Training and Knowledge of Appropriate Provider-Patient Communication: A Comparison of First-Year and Fourth-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kevin B; Bylund, Carma; Ware, Jennifer; Parker, Patricia; Query, Jim L; Baile, Walter

    2006-12-01

    Drawing upon Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives as a theoretical framework, this study examines attitudes toward communication skills training, knowledge of appropriate provider-patient communication, and confidence communicating with patients between first-year and fourth-year medical students at a large medical school in the southern United States. The study findings indicate that fourth-year medical students do not differ from first-year medical students in terms of attitudes towards communication skills training or knowledge of appropriate provider-patient communication, but they have significantly higher confidence scores about communicating with patients. In addition, positive attitudes towards communication skills training are significantly related to perceived importance of communication skills and confidence when communicating with patients. Finally, female medical students have more positive attitudes towards communication skills training than male medical students. The implications of the study findings and directions for future research are also discussed.

  4. First and Fourth-Year Student’s Perceptions about Importance of Nursing Care Behaviors: Socialization toward Caring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Zamanzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The essence of professional nursing is caring and so, nursing education must make caring as a significant part of their curricula. In this regard, little research exists about how nursing students perceive caring. The aim of this study is to investigate the nursing students' perception toward caring and thus, the impact of socialization process on their perception of caring will be determined. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done among all first and fourth-year nursing students (n=230 in Tabriz and Urmia faculties of nursing, 2012. Data were collected using Larson’s Caring Questionnaire that assessed the importance of nursing care behaviors (n=50 in six dimensions: "being accessible", "explains and facilitates", "comforts", "anticipates", "trusting relationship" and "monitors and follows through". Results: The importance of caring behaviors was evaluated by the first and fourth-year nursing students in moderate to high level and also, the both groups considered higher ranks for "monitors and follows through" and "being accessible" and lower ranks for "anticipates" and "trusting relationships". The fourth-year students only ranked "explains and facilitates" higher than the first-year students, but the "comforts" dimension is not differed significantly between groups.Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that nursing education in this study has not likely succeeded in producing intended changes in the nursing students' perceptions. It is recommended to exactly find the perceptual changes or in principle the professional socialization process of nursing students, more research using longitudinal designs be conducted to examine the differences in students' perceptions of caring upon entering and completing the nursing program.

  5. A fourth generation approach to transition in the first year in higher education: First year in higher education community of practice (FYHECoP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorrel Penn-Edwards

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We  propose that higher education institutions move beyond the third generation approach to transition pedagogy (Kift, Nelson, & Clarke, 2010 to a fourth generation approach. We argue that higher education institutions are, as Abraham Lincoln extols, of the people, by the people, for the people and that all major stakeholders:  educationalists; social groups; and civic bodies should be involved in supporting the transition of the higher education first year student. We suggest that university-community partnerships, specifically, those involving the wider social/civic community, have an integral part to play at each point in the progression of the student through undergraduate studies. Our fourth generation approach extends Kift’s (2008 exhortation that the first year experience is “everybody’s business” by being characterised and driven by a social and civic “community of practice” (Wenger, 1998.

  6. Midwest superconductivity consortium. 1993 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, in the fourth year of operations further strengthened its mission to advance the science and understanding of high T{sub c} superconductivity. The goals of the organization and the individual projects continue to reflect the current needs for new knowledge in the field and the unique capabilities of the institutions involved. Group efforts and cooperative laboratory interactions to achieve the greatest possible synergy under the Consortium continue to be emphasized. Industrial affiliations coupled with technology transfer initiatives were expanded. Activities of the participants during the past year achieved an interactive and high level of performance. The number of notable achievements in the field contributed by Consortium investigators increased. The programmatic research continues to focus upon key materials-related problems in two areas. The first area has a focus upon {open_quotes}Synthesis and Processing{close_quotes} while the second is centered around {open_quotes}Limiting Features in Transport Properties of High T{sub c} Materials{close_quotes}.

  7. An Entrustable Professional Activity (EPA)-Based Framework to Prepare Fourth-Year Medical Students for Internal Medicine Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnicki, D Michael; Aiyer, Meenakshy K; Cannarozzi, Maria L; Carbo, Alexander; Chelminski, Paul R; Chheda, Shobhina G; Chudgar, Saumil M; Harrell, Heather E; Hood, L Chad; Horn, Michelle; Johl, Karnjit; Kane, Gregory C; McNeill, Diana B; Muntz, Marty D; Pereira, Anne G; Stewart, Emily; Tarantino, Heather; Vu, T Robert

    2017-06-20

    The purpose of the fourth year of medical school remains controversial. Competing demands during this transitional phase cause confusion for students and educators. In 2014, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) released 13 Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (CEPAERs). A committee comprising members of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine applied these principles to preparing students for internal medicine residencies. The authors propose a curricular framework based on five CEPAERs that were felt to be most relevant to residency preparation, informed by prior stakeholder surveys. The critical areas outlined include entering orders, forming and answering clinical questions, conducting patient care handovers, collaborating interprofessionally, and recognizing patients requiring urgent care and initiating that care. For each CEPAER, the authors offer suggestions about instruction and assessment of competency. The fourth year of medical school can be rewarding for students, while adequately preparing them to begin residency, by addressing important elements defined in the core entrustable activities. Thus prepared, new residents can function safely and competently in supervised postgraduate settings.

  8. Can Individualized Learning Plans in an advanced clinical experience course for fourth year medical students foster Self-Directed Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitkara, Maribeth B; Satnick, Daniel; Lu, Wei-Hsin; Fleit, Howard; Go, Roderick A; Chandran, Latha

    2016-09-01

    Residency programs have utilized Individualized Learning Plans (ILPs) to customize resident education while undergraduate medical education has not done so in a meaningful way. We discuss the use of ILPs within a fourth year medical school course to facilitate self-directed learning (SDL). At Stony Brook University School of Medicine, an ILP component was added to the Advanced Clinical Experience (ACE) course for fourth year students. Each completed an ILP outlining personal learning goals and strategies to achieve them. An adaptation of the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) (Duncan T and McKeachie W, Educ Psych 40(2):117-128, 2005 and Cook DA et al., Med Ed 45:1230-1240, 2011) was used to measure success of ILPs in improving SDL. Qualitative data analysis was conducted on the ILPs and self-reflections. Forty-eight students participated. Two of the four SDL sub-domains identified on the MSLQ showed improvement; self-efficacy (p = .001) and self-regulation (p = .002). 'Medical Knowledge' was the competency most frequently identified as an area of concentration (90 %) and professionalism was selected least frequently (4 %). A higher percentage (83 %) of students who reported complete achievement of their ILP goals also reported feeling better prepared for entering residency. ILPs improve SDL strategies among medical students and may serve as useful tools to help shape future learning goals as they transition to residency training.

  9. Understanding the current anatomical competence landscape: Comparing perceptions of program directors, residents, and fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Erin P; Brokaw, James J; Kochhar, Komal; Nalin, Peter M

    2016-07-08

    A mixed methods survey of fourth-year medical students, resident physicians, and residency program directors at the Indiana University School of Medicine gathered perceptions of anatomical competence-defined as the anatomical education necessary for effective clinical practice. The survey items explored numerous aspects of anatomical competence, including the most effective modes of instruction, perceptions of readiness for clinical practice, and specific suggestions for improving anatomical education during medical school and residency. The response rate was 46% for fourth-year medical students, 47% for residents (as graduates from 137 medical schools), and 71% for program directors. A majority of students and residents reported that their course in Gross Anatomy prepared them well for clinical practice; that cadaveric dissection was important in the early development of their anatomical competence; and that placing a greater emphasis on clinical relevance in medical school would have improved their anatomical competence even further. However, in terms of anatomical preparedness upon entering residency, the program directors rated their residents less prepared than the residents rated themselves. All three groups agreed that there is need for additional opportunities for anatomical educational during medical school and residency. Suggestions for improving anatomical education included the following: providing more opportunities for cadaveric dissection during medical school and residency; more consistent teaching of anatomy for clinical practice; more workshops that review anatomy; and better integration of anatomy with the teaching of other subjects during medical school. Anat Sci Educ 9: 307-318. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  10. Stress and stressors in the clinical environment: a comparative study of fourth-year student nurses and newly qualified general nurses in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Suresh, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    To measure and compare the perceived levels of job-related stress and stressors of newly qualified nurses and fourth-year student nurses in the clinical environment and to explore the participants\\' views on stress and stressors.

  11. Near-peer role modeling: Can fourth-year medical students, recognized for their humanism, enhance reflection among second-year students in a physical diagnosis course?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi McEvoy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Humanism is cultivated through reflection and self-awareness. We aimed to employ fourth-year medical students, recognized for their humanism, to facilitate reflective sessions for second-year medical students with the intention of positively influencing reflective process toward humanistic development. Methods/Analysis: A total of 186 students were randomly assigned to one of three comparison arms: eight groups of eight students (64 students were facilitated by a fourth-year student who was a Gold Humanism Honor Society member (GHHS; eight groups (64 students by a volunteer non-GHHS student; and seven groups (58 students were non-facilitated. Before sessions, second-year students set learning goals concerning interactions with patients; fourth-year students received training materials on facilitation. Groups met twice during their 10 clinical site visits. At the last session, students completed a reflective assignment on their goal progress. Comparative mixed method analyses were conducted among the three comparison arms on reflection (reflective score on in-session assignment and session satisfaction (survey in addition to a thematic analysis of responses on the in-session assignment. Results: We found significant differences among all three comparison arms on students’ reflective scores (p=0.0003 and satisfaction (p=0.0001. T-tests comparing GHHS- and non-GHHS-facilitated groups showed significantly higher mean reflective scores for GHHS-facilitated groups (p=0.033; there were no differences on session satisfaction. Thematic analysis of students’ reflections showed attempts at self-examination, but lacked depth in addressing emotions. There was a common focus on achieving comfort and confidence in clinical skills performance. Discussion/Conclusions: Near peers, recognized for their humanism, demonstrated significant influence in deepening medical students’ reflections surrounding patient interactions or humanistic

  12. Near-peer role modeling: Can fourth-year medical students, recognized for their humanism, enhance reflection among second-year students in a physical diagnosis course?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Mimi; Pollack, Staci; Dyche, Lawrence; Burton, William

    2016-01-01

    Humanism is cultivated through reflection and self-awareness. We aimed to employ fourth-year medical students, recognized for their humanism, to facilitate reflective sessions for second-year medical students with the intention of positively influencing reflective process toward humanistic development. A total of 186 students were randomly assigned to one of three comparison arms: eight groups of eight students (64 students) were facilitated by a fourth-year student who was a Gold Humanism Honor Society member (GHHS); eight groups (64 students) by a volunteer non-GHHS student; and seven groups (58 students) were non-facilitated. Before sessions, second-year students set learning goals concerning interactions with patients; fourth-year students received training materials on facilitation. Groups met twice during their 10 clinical site visits. At the last session, students completed a reflective assignment on their goal progress. Comparative mixed method analyses were conducted among the three comparison arms on reflection (reflective score on in-session assignment) and session satisfaction (survey) in addition to a thematic analysis of responses on the in-session assignment. We found significant differences among all three comparison arms on students' reflective scores (p=0.0003) and satisfaction (p=0.0001). T-tests comparing GHHS- and non-GHHS-facilitated groups showed significantly higher mean reflective scores for GHHS-facilitated groups (p=0.033); there were no differences on session satisfaction. Thematic analysis of students' reflections showed attempts at self-examination, but lacked depth in addressing emotions. There was a common focus on achieving comfort and confidence in clinical skills performance. Near peers, recognized for their humanism, demonstrated significant influence in deepening medical students' reflections surrounding patient interactions or humanistic development. Overall, students preferred facilitated to non-facilitated peer feedback

  13. Assessment Practices of Preparatory Year English Program (PYEP): Investigating Student Advancement through Third and Fourth Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Rana

    2016-01-01

    This small-scale mixed method research focuses on investigating the way Preparatory Year English Program (PYEP) female students in a Saudi tertiary level institution context are assessed and how they are advanced from level three (Pre-intermediate) and level four (Intermediate). A four-point agreement scale survey was conducted with fifteen…

  14. Anatomy Integration Blueprint: A Fourth-Year Musculoskeletal Anatomy Elective Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Kauffman, Gordon L., Jr.; Kothari, Milind J.; Mosher, Timothy J.; Silvis, Matthew L.; Wawrzyniak, John R.; Anderson, Daniel T.; Black, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical school curricular trends focus on both vertical integration of clinical knowledge into the traditionally basic science-dedicated curricula and increasing basic science education in the clinical years. This latter type of integration is more difficult and less reported on than the former. Here, we present an outline of…

  15. Indiana's Fourth Grade Project: Model Applications of Technology. Second Year, 1989-90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advanced Technology, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    Designed to identify teaching-learning strategies that can be facilitated by the use of technology and to specify factors and configurations that have impact on computer use in the classroom, this second-year study of computer use in Indiana schools focused on the effects of computer use on students and on teachers, the curriculum implications of…

  16. Anatomy Integration Blueprint: A Fourth-Year Musculoskeletal Anatomy Elective Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Michelle D.; Kauffman, Gordon L., Jr.; Kothari, Milind J.; Mosher, Timothy J.; Silvis, Matthew L.; Wawrzyniak, John R.; Anderson, Daniel T.; Black, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical school curricular trends focus on both vertical integration of clinical knowledge into the traditionally basic science-dedicated curricula and increasing basic science education in the clinical years. This latter type of integration is more difficult and less reported on than the former. Here, we present an outline of…

  17. Progression characteristics of the European Friedreich's Ataxia Consortium for Translational Studies (EFACTS): a 2 year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reetz, Kathrin; Dogan, Imis; Hilgers, Ralf-Dieter; Giunti, Paola; Mariotti, Caterina; Durr, Alexandra; Boesch, Sylvia; Klopstock, Thomas; de Rivera, Francisco Javier Rodriguez; Schöls, Ludger; Klockgether, Thomas; Bürk, Katrin; Rai, Myriam; Pandolfo, Massimo; Schulz, Jörg B

    2016-12-01

    The European Friedreich's Ataxia Consortium for Translational Studies (EFACTS) is a prospective international registry investigating the natural history of Friedreich's ataxia. We used data from EFACTS to assess disease progression and the predictive value of disease-related factors on progression, and estimated sample sizes for interventional randomised clinical trials. We enrolled patients with genetically confirmed Friedreich's ataxia from 11 European study sites in Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK. Patients were seen at three visits-baseline, 1 year, and 2 years. Our primary endpoint was the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA). Secondary outcomes were the Inventory of Non-Ataxia Signs (INAS), the Spinocerebellar Ataxia Functional Index (SCAFI), phonemic verbal fluency (PVF), and the quality of life measures activities of daily living (ADL) and EQ-5D-3L index. We estimated the yearly progression for each outcome with linear mixed-effect modelling. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02069509, and follow-up assessments and recruitment of new patients are ongoing. Between Sept 15, 2010, and Nov 21, 2013, we enrolled 605 patients with Friedreich's ataxia. 546 patients (90%) contributed data with at least one follow-up visit. The progression rate on SARA was 0·77 points per year (SE 0·06) in the overall cohort. Deterioration in SARA was associated with younger age of onset (-0·02 points per year [0·01] per year of age) and lower SARA baseline scores (-0·07 points per year [0·01] per baseline point). Patients with more than 353 GAA repeats on the shorter allele of the FXN locus had a higher SARA progression rate (0·09 points per year [0·02] per additional 100 repeats) than did patients with fewer than 353 repeats. Annual worsening was 0·10 points per year (0·03) for INAS, -0·04 points per year (0·01) for SCAFI, 0·93 points per year (0·06) for ADL, and -0·02 points per year (0·004) for

  18. DOE KSU EV Site Operator Program. Year 1, fourth quarter report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, J.R.; Steinert, R.A.; Nissen-Pfrang, T.

    1992-08-01

    Kansas State University, with funding from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the DOE Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric of hybrid vehicle technology. This will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four(4) electric cars during the first two years of this five-year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort station wagons. This quarter`s report describes ongoing public relations activities and meetings as well as presenting performance data for the electric vehicles. (GHH)

  19. New Jersey Statewide Minimum Standards: Results from the Program's Fourth Year. Occasional Pepers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Howard B.

    The New Jersey Minimum Basic Skills (MBS) Tests in reading and mathematics were administered for the third consecutive year during the week of March 24, 1980 to approximately 390,000 publicly educated students in grades 3, 6, 9, and 11. The 1979-80 MBS Tests measured the same skills as the 1977-78 and 1978-79 tests. These three tests remained…

  20. Anatomy integration blueprint: A fourth-year musculoskeletal anatomy elective model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Michelle D; Kauffman, Gordon L; Kothari, Milind J; Mosher, Timothy J; Silvis, Matthew L; Wawrzyniak, John R; Anderson, Daniel T; Black, Kevin P

    2014-01-01

    Current undergraduate medical school curricular trends focus on both vertical integration of clinical knowledge into the traditionally basic science-dedicated curricula and increasing basic science education in the clinical years. This latter type of integration is more difficult and less reported on than the former. Here, we present an outline of a course wherein the primary learning and teaching objective is to integrate basic science anatomy knowledge with clinical education. The course was developed through collaboration by a multi-specialist course development team (composed of both basic scientists and physicians) and was founded in current adult learning theories. The course was designed to be widely applicable to multiple future specialties, using current published reports regarding the topics and clinical care areas relying heavily on anatomical knowledge regardless of specialist focus. To this end, the course focuses on the role of anatomy in the diagnosis and treatment of frequently encountered musculoskeletal conditions. Our iterative implementation and action research approach to this course development has yielded a curricular template for anatomy integration into clinical years. Key components for successful implementation of these types of courses, including content topic sequence, the faculty development team, learning approaches, and hidden curricula, were developed. We also report preliminary feedback from course stakeholders and lessons learned through the process. The purpose of this report is to enhance the current literature regarding basic science integration in the clinical years of medical school.

  1. Teaching with comics: a course for fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Though graphic narratives (or comics) now permeate popular culture, address every conceivable topic including illness and dying, and are used in educational settings from grade school through university, they have not typically been integrated into the medical school curriculum. This paper describes a popular and innovative course on comics and medicine for 4th-year medical students. In this course, students learn to critically read book length comics as well as create their own stories using the comics format. The rationale for the course, its general content and format, and methods for teaching are described. Finally, the author offers some reflections on why this medium resonates so powerfully with medical student learners.

  2. The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maunsell John HR

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium (NPRC ends its first year, it is worth looking back to see how the experiment has worked. In order to encourage dissemination of the details outlined in this Editorial, it will also be published in other journals in the Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium.

  3. Comparative Study of Three Different Personal Response Systems with Fourth-Year Undergraduate Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duret, Denis; Senior, Avril

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three different Personal Response Systems that have been used in recent years at the School of Veterinary Science, University of Liverpool: a technology-free system (Communicubes), a handset delivery device (TurningPoint), and a cloud-based technology (Poll Everywhere) that allows students to use a range of personal computing devices to register their answer. All three systems offer a method to promote active learning, and lecturers were encouraged to use them. However, there are cost and logistical implications for each. The authors found that both staff and students did have particular preferences for a specific system. This preference was not the same for both groups. The outcome of the comparison is that further research is needed into cloud-based technology as it offers benefits to the students but is also a distraction.

  4. Northeast Regional Biomass Program. Ninth year, Fourth quarterly report, July--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lusk, P.D.

    1992-12-01

    The Northeast Regional Biomass Program has been in operation for a period of nine years. During this time, state managed programs and technical programs have been conducted covering a wide range of activities primarily aim at the use and applications of wood as a fuel. These activities include: assessments of available biomass resources; surveys to determine what industries, businesses, institutions, and utility companies use wood and wood waste for fuel; and workshops, seminars, and demonstrations to provide technical assistance. In the Northeast, an estimated 6.2 million tons of wood are used in the commercial and industrial sector, where 12.5 million cords are used for residential heating annually. Of this useage, 1504.7 mw of power has been generated from biomass. The use of wood energy products has had substantial employment and income benefits in the region. Although wood and woodwaste have received primary emphasis in the regional program, the use of municipal solid waste has received increased emphasis as an energy source. The energy contribution of biomass will increase as potentia users become more familiar with existing feedstocks, technologies, and applications. The Northeast Regional Biomass Program is designed to support region-specific to overcome near-term barriers to biomass energy use.

  5. A Comparison of Second- and Fourth-Year Medical Students on a Standardized-Patient Examination of Clinical Competence: A Construct Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Amber J.; And Others

    The construct validity of the standardized-patient (SP) examination used at Southern Illinois University (Springfield) School of Medicine was assessed by comparing 66 second-year and 70 fourth-year medical students on 5 SP cases. The results show sizable differences between the groups. The usefulness of passing rates the effect-size measures as a…

  6. The role of spirituality in coping with the demands of the hospital culture amongst fourth-year nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilliers, Frans; Terblanche, Landa

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this research was to describe the role of spirituality in coping with the demands of the hospital culture amongst fourth-year nursing students. Qualitative, descriptive, hermeneutic interpretive research was done. A case study of 14 female Canadian nursing students was asked to write an essay on their experiences of the demands of the hospital culture. Content analysis was used and positive psychology served as the interpretive lens. Trustworthiness and ethicality were ensured. The findings indicated that although the nursing students expressed themselves in religious and spiritual words, they did not significantly illustrate the theoretically associated intra-, interpersonal and sacred behaviours to be referred to as being spiritual in their experience as a care giver in the hospital culture. They also did not illustrate behaviours linked to other positive psychology constructs such as sense of coherence, resilience, engagement or emotional intelligence. Rather, the nursing students experienced identity crises. Recommendations for the inclusion of mentoring in the curriculum of nursing students were formulated.

  7. Self-reported confidence in prescribing skills correlates poorly with assessed competence in fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, David J; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel A; de Vries, Theo P G M; Richir, Milan C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' self-reported confidence and their objectively assessed competence in prescribing. We assessed the competence in several prescribing skills of 403 fourth-year medical students at the VU University Medical Center, the Netherlands, in a formative simulated examination on a 10-point scale (1 = very low; 10 = very high). Afterwards, the students were asked to rate their confidence in performing each of the prescribing skills on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = very unsure; 5 = very confident). Their assessments were then compared with their self-confidence ratings. Students' overall prescribing performance was adequate (7.0 ± 0.8), but they lacked confidence in 2 essential prescribing skills. Overall, there was a weak positive correlation (r = 0.2, P confidence and actual competence. Therefore, this study suggests that self-reported confidence is not an accurate measure of prescribing competence, and that students lack insight into their own strengths and weaknesses in prescribing. Future studies should focus on developing validated and reliable instruments so that students can assess their prescribing skills.

  8. Faculty Evaluations Correlate Poorly with Medical Student Examination Performance in a Fourth-Year Emergency Medicine Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubosh, Nicole M; Fisher, Jonathan; Lewis, Jason; Ullman, Edward A

    2017-06-01

    Clerkship directors routinely evaluate medical students using multiple modalities, including faculty assessment of clinical performance and written examinations. Both forms of evaluation often play a prominent role in final clerkship grade. The degree to which these modalities correlate in an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship is unclear. We sought to correlate faculty clinical evaluations with medical student performance on a written, standardized EM examination of medical knowledge. This is a retrospective study of fourth-year medical students in a 4-week EM elective at one academic medical center. EM faculty performed end of shift evaluations of students via a blinded online system using a 5-point Likert scale for 8 domains: data acquisition, data interpretation, medical knowledge base, professionalism, patient care and communication, initiative/reliability/dependability, procedural skills, and overall evaluation. All students completed the National EM M4 Examination in EM. Means, medians, and standard deviations for end of shift evaluation scores were calculated, and correlations with examination scores were assessed using a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Thirty-nine medical students with 224 discrete faculty evaluations were included. The median number of evaluations completed per student was 6. The mean score (±SD) on the examination was 78.6% ± 6.1%. The examination score correlated poorly with faculty evaluations across all 8 domains (ρ 0.074-0.316). Faculty evaluations of medical students across multiple domains of competency correlate poorly with written examination performance during an EM clerkship. Educators need to consider the limitations of examination score in assessing students' ability to provide quality patient clinical care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fourth quantization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faizal, Mir

    2013-12-18

    In this Letter we will analyze the creation of the multiverse. We will first calculate the wave function for the multiverse using third quantization. Then we will fourth-quantize this theory. We will show that there is no single vacuum state for this theory. Thus, we can end up with a multiverse, even after starting from a vacuum state. This will be used as a possible explanation for the creation of the multiverse. We also analyze the effect of interactions in this fourth-quantized theory.

  10. The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium: 20 years of development and integration of USA national land cover data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, James D.; Homer, Collin G.; Vogelmann, James E.; McKerrow, Alexa; Mueller, Rick; Herold, Nate; Coluston, John

    2014-01-01

    The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium demonstrates the national benefits of USA Federal collaboration. Starting in the mid-1990s as a small group with the straightforward goal of compiling a comprehensive national Landsat dataset that could be used to meet agencies’ needs, MRLC has grown into a group of 10 USA Federal Agencies that coordinate the production of five different products, including the National Land Cover Database (NLCD), the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C-CAP), the Cropland Data Layer (CDL), the Gap Analysis Program (GAP), and the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE). As a set, the products include almost every aspect of land cover from impervious surface to detailed crop and vegetation types to fire fuel classes. Some products can be used for land cover change assessments because they cover multiple time periods. The MRLC Consortium has become a collaborative forum, where members share research, methodological approaches, and data to produce products using established protocols, and we believe it is a model for the production of integrated land cover products at national to continental scales. We provide a brief overview of each of the main products produced by MRLC and examples of how each product has been used. We follow that with a discussion of the impact of the MRLC program and a brief overview of future plans.

  11. Management of fourth degree obstetric perineal tear without colostomy using non - stimulated gracilis - our experience over eleven years

    OpenAIRE

    Jiten Kulkarni; Patil, Anuradha J.; Bhaskar Musande; Abhishek B Bhamare

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although gracilis muscle transposition for faecal incontinence has been well-described method, its literature for use in obstetric perineal tear without colostomy is sparse. In this study, we have tried to analyse its use in fourth-degree obstetric perineal tears. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 patients with recto-vaginal fistula with faecal incontinence secondary to obstetric perineal tear were retrospectively studied between February 2003 and May 2014. The recto-vaginal fis...

  12. DOE Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) Fiscal Year 2001 Fourth Quarter Report of Packaging- and Transportation-related Occurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickerson, L.S.

    2001-11-30

    The Safety Metrics Indicator Program (SMIP) retrieved 44 packaging- or transportation-related occurrences from the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) during the period from July 1 through September 30, 2001. Only those incidents that occur in preparation for transport, during transport, and during unloading of hazardous material are considered as packaging- or transportation-related occurrences. Other incidents with packaging and transportation (P and T) significance but not involving hazardous material (such as vehicle accidents or empty packagings) are not rated to the SMIP criteria, but are archived in the SMIP Subsidiary Database of occurrences, a sub-database of the main SMIP P and T Occurrence Database. Thirty-two of the originally-selected 44 occurrences were appropriate for classification to the SMIP criteria, only 7 of which have offsite applicability. Eight of the original 44 reports are archived in a subsidiary database because they either do not involve the transport of hazardous material or do not involve transport by vehicle, plane, boat, or rail. The others either were deleted because more thorough review revealed that they were not strictly related to P and T or were canceled by the reporting site and removed from the ORPS. These occurrences have not been normalized as in the Annual Report of Occurrences because the necessary information is not yet available. The number and severity of the selected occurrence reports (ORs) are consistent with historical reporting. Contamination events continue to be among the most common type of occurrences; however, ''Shipping Preparation'' events decreased this quarter to only 4 events from the 21 reported last quarter. None of the 32 ORs that were rated had event consequence measures (W{sub EC}) greater than 2; 14 of them were categorized as having a W{sub EC} of 1. This means that all of the fourth-quarter FY 2001 ORs had only slight consequences at worst (i.e., resulting in

  13. Important Skills for Internship and the Fourth-Year Medical School Courses to Acquire Them: A National Survey of Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Anne G; Harrell, Heather E; Weissman, Arlene; Smith, Cynthia D; Dupras, Denise; Kane, Gregory C

    2016-06-01

    To obtain feedback from internal medicine residents, a key stakeholder group, regarding both the skills needed for internship and the fourth-year medical school courses that prepared them for residency. This feedback could inform fourth-year curriculum redesign efforts. All internal medicine residents taking the 2013-2014 Internal Medicine In-Training Examination were asked to rank the importance of learning 10 predefined skills prior to internship and to use a dropdown menu of 11 common fourth-year courses to rank the 3 most helpful in preparing for internship. The predefined skills were chosen based on a review of the literature, a national subinternship curriculum, and expert consensus. Chi-square statistics were used to test for differences in responses between training levels. Of the 24,820 internal medicine residents who completed the exam, 20,484 (83%) completed the survey, had complete identification numbers, and consented to have their responses used for research. The three skills most frequently rated as very important were identifying when to seek additional help and expertise, prioritizing clinical tasks and managing time efficiently, and communicating with other providers around care transitions. The subinternship/acting internship was most often selected as being the most helpful course in preparing for internship. These findings indicate which skills and fourth-year medical school courses internal medicine residents found most helpful in preparing for internship and confirm the findings of prior studies highlighting the perceived value of subinternships. Internal medicine residents and medical educators agree on the skills students should learn prior to internship.

  14. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  15. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium energy field/R and D high performance flat panel display technology (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium energy bun`ya / koseino flat panel display gijutsu no sogo kaihatsu kenkyu (daiichi nendo ) seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    One of the subjects in technology supporting the highly information-oriented society which will develop and diversify toward the 21st century is the construction of high grade man/machine interface. For it, high precision/high luminance/energy saving/thin plane displays are strongly requested. This R and D is to indicate models of systematical development in the region of element technology individually existing in the Shikoku area by forming a regional consortium in the industry/universities/government. Creation of new industries by gathering display related enterprises is a first step in a plan to realize `Display Island Shikoku.` As a concrete target, with the use of high-tech diamond semiconducting technology, a development is conducted of the high performance flat panel display using the negative electron affinity (NEA) electron emitter which drastically solves the problems such as luminance, visibility angle and response speed, the subjects on the commercialized liquid crystal flat panel display. 16 refs., 45 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Management of fourth degree obstetric perineal tear without colostomy using non - stimulated gracilis - our experience over eleven years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiten Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although gracilis muscle transposition for faecal incontinence has been well-described method, its literature for use in obstetric perineal tear without colostomy is sparse. In this study, we have tried to analyse its use in fourth-degree obstetric perineal tears. Patients and Methods: A total of 30 patients with recto-vaginal fistula with faecal incontinence secondary to obstetric perineal tear were retrospectively studied between February 2003 and May 2014. The recto-vaginal fistula was explored, dissected and identification of sphincters was done using muscle stimulator. Fistula closure was done followed by sphincter repair, vaginal tightening procedure and single gracilis transposition. None of the patients had covering colostomy. Faecal incontinence was assessed pre- and post-operatively by digital rectal examination (single examiner, Park's score and Corman's score in all cases and using barium hold and transperineal ultrasonography, manometric studies in a few cases. The outcome was measured at an average follow-up of 8.8 months (7–24 months. Results: As per Park's score 26 patients had Grade I continence, two had Grade II and two patients had Grade III continence. Corman's score improved from fair to excellent in 26 patients. The patients in whom manometry was performed showed a remarkable rise in both resting and squeeze pressures. Two patients developed post-operative infections in upper 1/3 thigh incision site and three patients at gluteal region scar site. Conclusion: Satisfactory continence following gracilis muscle could be achieved.

  17. Impact of a Revised Curriculum Focusing on Clinical Neurology and Musculoskeletal Care on a Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Norbury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A Required Fourth-Year Medical Student Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R Clerkship was found to increase students’ knowledge of PM&R; however the students’ overall rotation evaluations were consistently lower than the other 8 required clerkships at the medical school. Objective. To describe the impact of a revised curriculum based upon Entrustable Professional Activities and focusing on basic pain management, musculoskeletal care, and neurology. Setting. Academic Medical Center. Participants. 73 fourth-year medical students. Methods. The curriculum changes included a shift in the required readings from rehabilitation specific topics toward more general content in the areas of clinical neurology and musculoskeletal care. Hands-on workshops on neurological and musculoskeletal physical examination techniques, small group case-based learning, an anatomy clinical correlation lecture, and a lecture on pain management were integrated into the curriculum. Main Outcome Measurements. Student evaluations of the clerkship. Results. Statistically significant improvements were found in the students’ evaluations of usefulness of lecturers, development of patient interviewing skills, and diagnostic and patient management skills (p≤0.05. Conclusions. This study suggests that students have a greater satisfaction with a required PM&R clerkship when lecturers utilize a variety of pedagogic methods to teach basic pain, neurology and musculoskeletal care skills in the rehabilitation setting rather than rehabilitation specific content.

  18. Beyond Autism: A Baby Siblings Research Consortium Study of High-Risk Children at Three Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Daniel; Young, Gregory S.; Ozonoff, Sally; Dobkins, Karen; Carter, Alice; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Landa, Rebecca J.; Charman, Tony; Stone, Wendy L.; Constantino, John N.; Hutman, Ted; Carver, Leslie J.; Bryson, Susan; Iverson, Jana M.; Strauss, Mark S.; Rogers, Sally J.; Sigman, Marian

    2013-01-01

    Objective: First-degree relatives of persons with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at increased risk for ASD-related characteristics. As little is known about the early expression of these characteristics, this study characterizes the non-ASD outcomes of 3-year-old high-risk (HR) siblings of children with ASD. Method: Two groups of children…

  19. Radiogenomics Consortium (RGC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Radiogenomics Consortium's hypothesis is that a cancer patient's likelihood of developing toxicity to radiation therapy is influenced by common genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  20. Guinea; Fourth Review Under the Three-Year Arrangement Under the Extended Credit Facility, and Financing Assurances Review

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2014-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Economic activity remained weak in early 2014. Activity was impacted by an outbreak of the Ebola virus since late 2013, but lagging structural reforms, energy shortages, and political uncertainty may also be at play. Economic growth is estimated to have been 2.3 percent in 2013, and is projected at 3.5 percent in 2014, supported by higher public investment and assuming a gradual start-up of new mining sector investment. Inflation fell to below 10 percent year-on-year in May ...

  1. The LBNL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses the 11 year of accomplishments of the science consortium of minority graduates from Jackson State University and Ana G. Mendez University at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  2. Hawaii Space Grant Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Luke P.

    2005-01-01

    The Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium is composed of ten institutions of higher learning including the University of Hawai'i at Manoa, the University of Hawai'i at Hilo, the University of Guam, and seven Community Colleges spread over the 4 main Hawaiian islands. Geographic separation is not the only obstacle that we face as a Consortium. Hawai'i has been mired in an economic downturn due to a lack of tourism for almost all of the period (2001 - 2004) covered by this report, although hotel occupancy rates and real estate sales have sky-rocketed in the last year. Our challenges have been many including providing quality educational opportunities in the face of shrinking State and Federal budgets, encouraging science and technology course instruction at the K-12 level in a public school system that is becoming less focused on high technology and more focused on developing basic reading and math skills, and assembling community college programs with instructors who are expected to teach more classes for the same salary. Motivated people can overcome these problems. Fortunately, the Hawai'i Space Grant Consortium (HSGC) consists of a group of highly motivated and talented individuals who have not only overcome these obstacles, but have excelled with the Program. We fill a critical need within the State of Hawai'i to provide our children with opportunities to pursue their dreams of becoming the next generation of NASA astronauts, engineers, and explorers. Our strength lies not only in our diligent and creative HSGC advisory board, but also with Hawai'i's teachers, students, parents, and industry executives who are willing to invest their time, effort, and resources into Hawai'i's future. Our operational philosophy is to FACE the Future, meaning that we will facilitate, administer, catalyze, and educate in order to achieve our objective of creating a highly technically capable workforce both here in Hawai'i and for NASA. In addition to administering to programs and

  3. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  4. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  7. Urban energy management today: Ten year compendium of UCETF programs. Products and expertise of the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force, 1979--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    The reports listed in this Overview summarize projects conducted through the Urban Consortium Energy Task Force by local government staff who have defined and implemented many of the energy strategies described above. Reports from their projects illustrate effective approaches to plan and implement these strategies, as well as software tools, surveys, and technical instruments valuable to other local government officials conducting similar projects.

  8. Corn in consortium with forages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássia Maria de Paula Garcia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic premises for sustainable agricultural development with focus on rural producers are reducing the costs of production and aggregation of values through the use crop-livestock system (CLS throughout the year. The CLS is based on the consortium of grain crops, especially corn with tropical forages, mainly of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The study aimed to evaluate the grain yield of irrigated corn crop intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum and Urochloa. The experiment was conducted at the Fazenda de Ensino, Pesquisa e Extensão – FEPE  of the Faculdade de Engenharia - UNESP, Ilha Solteira in an Oxisol in savannah conditions and in the autumn winter of 2009. The experimental area was irrigated by a center pivot and had a history of no-tillage system for 8 years. The corn hybrid used was simple DKB 390 YG at distances of 0.90 m. The seeds of grasses were sown in 0.34 m spacing in the amount of 5 kg ha-1, they were mixed with fertilizer minutes before sowing  and placed in a compartment fertilizer seeder and fertilizers were mechanically deposited in the soil at a depth of 0.03 m. The experimental design used was a randomized block with four replications and five treatments: Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CTD of the corn; Panicum maximum cv. Mombaça sown during the nitrogen fertilization (CMD of the corn; Urochloa brizantha cv. Xaraés sown during the occasion of nitrogen fertilization (CBD of the corn; Urochloa ruziziensis cv. Comumsown during the nitrogen fertilization (CRD of the corn and single corn (control. The production components of corn: plant population per hectare (PlPo, number of ears per hectare (NE ha-1, number of rows per ear (NRE, number of kernels per row on the cob (NKR, number of grain in the ear (NGE and mass of 100 grains (M100G were not influenced by consortium with forage. Comparing grain yield (GY single corn and maize intercropped with forage of the genus Panicum

  9. CaPOW! Using Problem Sets in a Capstone Course to Improve Fourth-Year Medical Students' Confidence in Self-Directed Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Alison S; Ming, David Y; Knudsen, Nancy W; Engle, Deborah L; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor; Andolsek, Kathryn M; Chudgar, Saumil M

    2017-03-01

    Despite the importance of self-directed learning (SDL) in the field of medicine, individuals are rarely taught how to perform SDL or receive feedback on it. Trainee skill in SDL is limited by difficulties with self-assessment and goal setting. Ninety-two graduating fourth-year medical students from Duke University School of Medicine completed an individualized learning plan (ILP) for a transition-to-residency Capstone course in spring 2015 to help foster their skills in SDL. Students completed the ILP after receiving a personalized report from a designated faculty coach detailing strengths and weaknesses on specific topics (e.g., pulmonary medicine) and clinical skills (e.g., generating a differential diagnosis). These were determined by their performance on 12 Capstone Problem Sets of the Week (CaPOWs) compared with their peers. Students used transitional-year milestones to self-assess their confidence in SDL. SDL was successfully implemented in a Capstone course through the development of required clinically oriented problem sets. Coaches provided guided feedback on students' performance to help them identify knowledge deficits. Students' self-assessment of their confidence in SDL increased following course completion. However, students often chose Capstone didactic sessions according to factors other than their CaPOW performance, including perceived relevance to planned specialty and session timing. Future Capstone curriculum changes may further enhance SDL skills of graduating students. Students will receive increased formative feedback on their CaPOW performance and be incentivized to attend sessions in areas of personal weakness.

  10. Coming of Age in the 1990s: The Eighth-Grade Class of 1988 12 Years Later. Initial Results from the Fourth Follow-Up to the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988. Statistical Analysis Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingels, Steven J.; Curtin, Thomas R.; Kaufman, Phillip; Alt, Martha Naomi; Chen, Xianglei; Owings, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the eighth grade cohort of 1888 in the year 2000. It presents findings from the fourth followup survey of the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88), from the year in which most cohort members turned 26. The period in which this cohort attended school saw major initiatives in educational reform in the United…

  11. Fourth-generation ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty in patients of 55 years or younger: short-term results and complications analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Weiguo; Guo Wanshou; Yue Debo; Shi Zhencai; Zhang Nianfei; Liu Zhaohui; Sun Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence of total hip replacement in the younger and more active patients is ever increasing.The ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) bearing was developed to reduce wear debris-induced osteolysis and loosening and to improve the longevity of hip arthroplasties.Few studies have reported the clinical results and complications of the new zirconia-toughened ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA).Methods A consecutive series of 132 young patients (177 hips) that underwent primary cementless THAs between January 2010 and December 2012 were included in this study.These arthroplasties all had fourth-generation COC bearings performed through a posterolateral approach.The average age was (41.8±8.3) years (ranging from 22 to 55 years),and the mean follow-up period was (24.5±9.4) months (ranging from 12 to 47 months).The results were evaluated both clinically and radiographically.Harris hip score (HHS) was determined before surgery and at the time of each follow-up.Presence of postoperative groin or thigh pain and squeaking were recorded.Other complications such as dislocations,periprosthetic fractures,and ceramic components fractures were diagnosed and treated in emergency.Results The average HHSs improved from preoperative 60.3±10.7 (ranging from 29 to 76) to 91.0±5.1 (ranging from 74 to 100) at the final follow-up (t=-45.064,P <0.05),and 97.7% of cases were scored as excellent and good results.At the last follow-up,incidental inguinal pain was found in three hips (1.7%) and thigh pain in 11 hips (6.2%).Radiographs showed a high rate of new bone formation around the acetabular and stem components.No obvious osteolysis or prosthesis loosening was detected.Complications occurred in six hips (3.4%):posterior dislocation in two hips (1.1%),periprosthetic femoral fracture in one hip (0.6%),asymptomatic squeaking in two hips (1.1%),and ceramic liner fracture in one hip (0.6%).Conclusions The fourth-generation COC THA showed excellent clinical results in

  12. Fourth-generation ceramic-on-ceramic total hip arthroplasty in patients of 55 years or younger: short-term results and complications analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiguo; Guo, Wanshou; Yue, Debo; Shi, Zhencai; Zhang, Nianfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bailiang; Li, Zirong

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of total hip replacement in the younger and more active patients is ever increasing. The ceramic-on-ceramic (COC) bearing was developed to reduce wear debris-induced osteolysis and loosening and to improve the longevity of hip arthroplasties. Few studies have reported the clinical results and complications of the new zirconia-toughened ceramic total hip arthroplasty (THA). A consecutive series of 132 young patients (177 hips) that underwent primary cementless THAs between January 2010 and December 2012 were included in this study. These arthroplasties all had fourth-generation COC bearings performed through a posterolateral approach. The average age was (41.8 ± 8.3) years (ranging from 22 to 55 years), and the mean follow-up period was (24.5 ± 9.4) months (ranging from 12 to 47 months). The results were evaluated both clinically and radiographically. Harris hip score (HHS) was determined before surgery and at the time of each follow-up. Presence of postoperative groin or thigh pain and squeaking were recorded. Other complications such as dislocations, periprosthetic fractures, and ceramic components fractures were diagnosed and treated in emergency. The average HHSs improved from preoperative 60.3 ± 10.7 (ranging from 29 to 76) to 91.0 ± 5.1 (ranging from 74 to 100) at the final follow-up (t = 45.064, P acetabular and stem components. No obvious osteolysis or prosthesis loosening was detected. Complications occurred in six hips (3.4%): posterior dislocation in two hips (1.1%), periprosthetic femoral fracture in one hip (0.6%), asymptomatic squeaking in two hips (1.1%), and ceramic liner fracture in one hip (0.6%). The fourth-generation COC THA showed excellent clinical results in younger active patients with no osteolysis-related prosthesis failure at a short-term follow-up study. Surgeons should still be aware of the potential risks of complications such as dislocation, periprosthetic fracture, squeaking, and ceramic components fracture.

  13. The BADER Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    officials and UD Alumni. Senators Coons and Carper and Representative Carney also attended. Dr. Stanhope travelled to Capitol Hill to visit the...offices of Senators Coons (D-DE) and Carper (D-DE). The briefing meetings resulted in plans for a spring BADER Consortium event on the Hill and a visit...Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital Davis, Samuel, PhD BADER Consortium Affiliate Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (NMCP) de Lateur, Barbara J., MD, MS

  14. Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Program, Site Operator Program. Quarterly progress report for July through September 1994 (Fourth quarter of fiscal year 1994)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiser, D.M.; Brown, H.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Site Operator Program was initially established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to incorporate the electric vehicle activities dictated by the Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Research, Development and Demonstration Act of 1976. In the ensuing years, the Program has evolved in response to new legislation and interests. The Program currently includes twelve sites located in diverse geographic, metrologic, and metropolitan areas across the US. Information is shared reciprocally with a thirteenth site, not under Program contract. The vehicles are operator-owned, except for two Griffon vans. The Mission Statement of the Site Operator Program includes three major activities: advancement of electric vehicle technologies; development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles (EVs) by the public. The current participants in the Site Operator Program are shown. The ultimate thrust of program activities varies among sites, reflecting not only the Operator`s business interests but also geographic and climate-related operating conditions. This fourth quarter report (FY-94) includes a summary of activities from the previous three quarters. The report section sequence has been revised to provide a more easily seen program overview, and specific operator activities are now found in Appendix A.

  15. Multisite geriatrics clerkship for fourth-year medical students: a successful model for teaching the Association of American Medical Colleges' core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Daniel J; Norton, Lisa E; Russell, Matthew L; Chao, Serena H; Hardt, Eric J; Brett, Belle; Kimball, Patricia; Levine, Sharon A

    2009-10-01

    As the population ages, it is important that graduating medical students be properly prepared to treat older adults, regardless of their chosen specialty. To this end, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the John A. Hartford Foundation convened a consensus conference to establish core competencies in geriatrics for all graduating medical students. An ambulatory geriatric clerkship for fourth-year medical students that successfully teaches 24 of the 26 AAMC core competencies using an interdisciplinary, team-based approach is reported here. Graduating students (N=158) reported that the clerkship was successful at teaching the core competencies, as evidenced by positive responses on the AAMC Graduation Questionnaire (GQ). More than three-quarters (80-93%) of students agreed or strongly agreed that they learned the seven geriatrics concepts asked about on the GQ, which cover 14 of the 26 core competencies. This successful model for a geriatrics clerkship can be used in many institutions to teach the core competencies and in any constellation of geriatric ambulatory care sites that are already available to the faculty.

  16. Differences in various biochemical and clinical parameters with respect to family history of Non Communicable Diseases in fourth year MBBS students of Karachi, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Khalid Abdul; Fawwad, Asher; Munir, Muhammad Asadullah; Siddiqui, Iftikhar Ahmed; Siddiqui, Sidra; Basit, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the differences of various biochemical and clinical parameters with respect to Family History (FH) of Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs) in fourth year Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) students. Methods: This observational study was conducted at Baqai Institute of Diabetology & Endocrinology from December 2013 to January 2014. Total 50 medical students from Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS) participated in the study. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13 was used to analyze the data. For cross tabulation and mean comparison z-test and t test were applied. Results: Out of 50 subjects, there were 26 (52%) females. Mean age of the study population was 21.56 ± 0.90 years. Mean serum cholesterol levels with positive FH of NCDs was significantly higher than negative FH of NCDs (p=0.005). Mean value of low density lipoprotein (LDL) of positive family history of NCDs was found higher than those with negative FH (p=0.006) being statistically significant. The insulin levels in subjects with positive FH of NCDs were higher than subjects with negative FH of NCDs (p=0.685). However, serum leptin and plasma renin showed no significant difference with the negative FH of NCDs being higher compared to positive FH of NCDs (p=0.068) and (p=0.884) respectively. However, Waist circumference, Body mass index and central obesity in subjects with positive FH of NCDs shows increasing trend but no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed. Conclusion: In our study of various biochemical and clinical parameters with respect to FH of NCDs, Serum Cholesterol and LDL levels were observed higher and statistically significant. PMID:26430439

  17. Differences in various biochemical and clinical parameters with respect to family history of Non Communicable Diseases in fourth year MBBS students of Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Khalid Abdul; Fawwad, Asher; Munir, Muhammad Asadullah; Siddiqui, Iftikhar Ahmed; Siddiqui, Sidra; Basit, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    To observe the differences of various biochemical and clinical parameters with respect to Family History (FH) of Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs) in fourth year Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) students. This observational study was conducted at Baqai Institute of Diabetology & Endocrinology from December 2013 to January 2014. Total 50 medical students from Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS) participated in the study. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13 was used to analyze the data. For cross tabulation and mean comparison z-test and t test were applied. Out of 50 subjects, there were 26 (52%) females. Mean age of the study population was 21.56 ± 0.90 years. Mean serum cholesterol levels with positive FH of NCDs was significantly higher than negative FH of NCDs (p=0.005). Mean value of low density lipoprotein (LDL) of positive family history of NCDs was found higher than those with negative FH (p=0.006) being statistically significant. The insulin levels in subjects with positive FH of NCDs were higher than subjects with negative FH of NCDs (p=0.685). However, serum leptin and plasma renin showed no significant difference with the negative FH of NCDs being higher compared to positive FH of NCDs (p=0.068) and (p=0.884) respectively. However, Waist circumference, Body mass index and central obesity in subjects with positive FH of NCDs shows increasing trend but no statistically significant difference (p > 0.05) was observed. In our study of various biochemical and clinical parameters with respect to FH of NCDs, Serum Cholesterol and LDL levels were observed higher and statistically significant.

  18. An Error Analysis On The Use Of Gerund To The Fourth Semester Students Of English Department Faculty Of Cultural Studies University Of Sumatera Utara In The Academic Year of 2012/2013

    OpenAIRE

    Mariyadi

    2016-01-01

    Thesis entitled "AN ERROR ANALYSIS ON THE USE OF GERUND TO THE FOURTH SEMESTER STUDENTS OF ENGLISH DEPARTMENT, FACULTY OF CULTURAL STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF SUMATERA UTARA IN THE ACADEMIC YEAR OF 2012/2013" contains about the analysis of errors made by the the fourth semester students. The purpose of this study is to find out the kinds of error, the cause of error and the most dominant error made by students based on the kinds of error. In completing this research, the method that is used is fie...

  19. THE STUDENTS’ ABILITY IN USING ENGLISH INTONATION AT THE FOURTH SEMESTER STUDENTS OF ENGLISH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT LANCANG KUNING UNIVERSITY IN ACADEMIC YEAR 2013-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahdan Syahdan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon found from this research was the students did not know how topronounce appropriate intonation in speaking context because they did not realize thefunction of intonation that different intonation have different meaning. The purpose of theresearch was found out the students' ability In Using English Intonation at the FourthSemester Students of English Education Department Lancang Kuning University inAcademic Year 2013-2014. Type of the research was cross-sectional survey design aiming tobe an evaluation program. The sample of this research consisted of 27 students. Theinstrument used in this research was test. In collecting data, the researcher tested them dealtwith sentences or expression of simple patterns of English intonation namely falling andrising intonation. The data gained was analyzed by using descriptive statistics.Moreover, thefinding of the research showed that total of students’ score was 2110, the mean score was 78,mode of the students’ score was 70, median of students’ score was 75, variance of thestudents’ score was 57.33 and standard deviation of the students’ score was 7.57. The rangescore from lowest score 70 to highest score 95 was 25 points. After analyzing the data, thevariety of data was categorized into homogenous and the range of score was categorized intolow score or could be said that the mean score was representative. Then mean score ofstudents was categorized into good level based on grade course of phonology, score 70-79was categorized into good level or got score B. Inbrief, the students’ ability in using Englishintonation (simple patterns of English intonation was categorized into “Good level”.Therefore, the findings of this research would be useful for the Phonology’s lecturer asevaluated in teaching program.Key Words: Ability, Phonology, English Intonation

  20. Osteoblastic meningioma of the fourth ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D; Tulipan, N; Whetsell, W O

    1989-04-01

    Meningiomas of the fourth ventricle are rare neoplasms. Only meningothelial and fibroblastic subtypes, purportedly arising from the tela choroidea, have been described. In this report we describe clinical, neuroradiological and pathological findings in a 52-year-old man with mild hydrocephalus produced by a large, calcified, osteoblastic meningioma of the fourth ventricle.

  1. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  2. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach, over 8 years, in 11 cities of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Koksal, Iftihar; Akan, Özay Arıkan; Özgültekin, Asu; Kendirli, Tanil; Erben, Nurettin; Yalcin, Ata Nevzat; Ulusoy, Sercan; Sirmatel, Fatma; Ozdemir, Davut; Alp, Emine; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer; Esen, Saban; Ulger, Fatma; Dilek, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Hava; Yýlmaz, Gürdal; Kaya, Selçuk; Ulusoy, Hülya; Tulunay, Melek; Oral, Mehmet; Ünal, Necmettin; Turan, Güldem; Akgün, Nur; İnan, Asuman; Ince, Erdal; Karbuz, Adem; Çiftçi, Ergin; Taşyapar, Nevin; Güneş, Melek; Ozgunes, Ilhan; Usluer, Gaye; Turhan, Ozge; Gunay, Nurgul; Gumus, Eylul; Dursun, Oguz; Arda, Bilgin; Bacakoglu, Feza; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Leyla; Geyik, Mehmet Faruk; Şahin, Ahmet; Erdogan, Selvi; Kılıc, Aysegul Ulu; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach in Turkey and analyse predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance. Design: An observational, prospective, interventional, before-and-after study was conducted from August 2003 to August 2011 in 12 intensive care units (ICU) of 12 hospitals in 11 cities. The study was divided into a baseline and a follow-up period and included random 30-minute observations for hand hygiene compliance in ICU. The hand hygiene approach included administrative support, supplies availability, education and training, reminders in the workplace, process surveillance, and performance feedback. Results: We observed 21,145 opportunities for hand hygiene. Overall hand hygiene compliance increased from 28.8% to 91% (95% CI 87.6–93.0, p 0.0001). Multivariate and univariate analyses showed that several variables were significantly associated with poor hand hygiene compliance: males vs. females (39% vs. 48%; 95% CI 0.79–0.84, p 0.0001), ancillary staff vs. physicians (35% vs. 46%, 95% CI 0.73–0.78, p 0.0001), and adult vs. pediatric ICUs (42% vs. 74%, 95% CI 0.54–0.60, p 0.0001). Conclusions: Adherence to hand hygiene was significantly increased with the INICC Hand Hygiene Approach. Specific programmes should be directed to improve hand hygiene in variables found to be predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance.

  3. The fourth dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Rucker, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    ""This is an invigorating book, a short but spirited slalom for the mind."" - Timothy Ferris, The New York Times Book Review ""Highly readable. One is reminded of the breadth and depth of Hofstadter's Gödel, Escher, Bach."" - Science""Anyone with even a minimal interest in mathematics and fantasy will find The Fourth Dimension informative and mind-dazzling... [Rucker] plunges into spaces above three with a zest and energy that is breathtaking."" - Martin Gardner ""Those who think the fourth dimension is nothing but time should be encouraged to read The Fourth Dimension, along with anyone else

  4. Mineralization of Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate by a Four-Member Aerobic Bacterial Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Luis; Breen, Alec; Thomas, Nikki; Federle, Thomas W.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1991-01-01

    A bacterial consortium capable of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) mineralization under aerobic conditions was isolated from a chemostat inoculated with activated sludge. The consortium, designated KJB, consisted of four members, all of which were gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that grew in pairs and short chains. Three isolates had biochemical properties characteristic of Pseudomonas spp.; the fourth showed characteristics of the Aeromonas spp. Cell suspensions were grown together in minimal medium with [14C]LAS as the only carbon source. After 13 days of incubation, more than 25% of the [14C]LAS was mineralized to 14CO2 by the consortium. Pure bacterial cultures and combinations lacking any one member of the KJB bacterial consortium did not mineralize LAS. Three isolates carried out primary biodegradation of the surfactant, and one did not. This study shows that the four bacteria complemented each other and synergistically mineralized LAS, indicating catabolic cooperation among the four consortium members. PMID:16348496

  5. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F

  6. Institutionalism and schizophrenia 30 years on. Clinical poverty and the social environment in three British mental hospitals in 1960 compared with a fourth in 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curson, D A; Pantelis, C; Ward, J; Barnes, T R

    1992-02-01

    In their comparison of chronic schizophrenic patients in three British mental hospitals in 1960, Wing and Brown found a strong association between the poverty of the social environment and the severity of 'clinical poverty' (blunted affect, poverty of speech, and social withdrawal). Between 1960 and 1968 the social environments of all three hospitals improved and a weak causal relationship between social poverty and clinical poverty was reported in a proportion of patients. Using the same assessment instruments as Wing and Brown, the present study re-examined the relationship between social and clinical poverty in the long-stay schizophrenic population of a fourth British mental hospital in 1990. The association found between social and clinical poverty was much weaker than in 1960. Reluctance on the part of patients to be discharged from the institution was unrelated to length of stay. There was no significant difference in severity of illness between the patients in the present study and those in the earlier study. However, patients in the former group spent more time doing nothing than those in the hospital with the most understimulating environment three decades before, with four-fifths doing nothing for over five hours a day, despite a greatly increased ratio of nurses to patients.

  7. IPD-Work consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Virtanen, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    to advance research on associations between work-related psychosocial risk factors and health; (ii) demonstrate as unfounded Choi et al's assertion that IPD-Work has underestimated associations between job strain and health endpoints; these include the dichotomous measurement of job strain, potential......Established in 2008 and comprising over 60 researchers, the IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis in working populations) consortium is a collaborative research project that uses pre-defined meta-analyses of individual-participant data from multiple cohort studies representing a range......-Work's findings have also generated disagreement as they challenge the importance of job strain as a major target for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention, this is reflected in the critical discussion paper by Choi et al (1). In this invited reply to Choi et al, we aim to (i) describe how IPD-Work seeks...

  8. The Genomic Standards Consortium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Field

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC, an open-membership organization that drives community-based standardization activities, Here we provide a short history of the GSC, provide an overview of its range of current activities, and make a call for the scientific community to join forces to improve the quality and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences.

  9. Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Wynn Volkert; Dr. Arvind Kumar; Dr. Bryan Becker; Dr. Victor Schwinke; Dr. Angel Gonzalez; Dr. DOuglas McGregor

    2010-12-08

    The objective of the Midwest Nuclear Science and Engineering Consortium (MNSEC) is to enhance the scope, quality and integration of educational and research capabilities of nuclear sciences and engineering (NS/E) programs at partner schools in support of the U.S. nuclear industry (including DOE laboratories). With INIE support, MNSEC had a productive seven years and made impressive progress in achieving these goals. Since the past three years have been no-cost-extension periods, limited -- but notable -- progress has been made in FY10. Existing programs continue to be strengthened and broadened at Consortium partner institutions. The enthusiasm generated by the academic, state, federal, and industrial communities for the MNSEC activities is reflected in the significant leveraging that has occurred for our programs.

  10. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  11. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to

  12. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on research and development project for regional consortiums. Regional consortium field (Development of a three-dimensional high-speed bio-micromanipulation system (the second year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium bun'ya. Sanjigen kosoku bio micro manipuration system no kaihatsu (dai 2 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Research and development are made on a bio-micromanipulation system that can substitute human being to perform three-dimensionally selective, large-quantity, repeated, high-speed and high-accuracy processing in micro and nano zones in bio-technologies. Fiscal 1998 has incorporated different component technologies into the common platform structured in last year to structure a high-speed laser manipulator separating device and a three-dimensional micromanipulation device and to perform basic experiments. The structure can sort out arbitrarily only the selected species from a large quantity of microorganisms dispersed in aqueous solution, and separate them at a high speed. Intended objects are trapped by laser beam, and substances other than those intended are removed from the electric field. Then, the trapped objects are moved by laser beam and recovered. This operation can be performed even at DNA level. A positioning and fixing device for cell anatomy was manufactured on a trial basis. In addition, a three-dimensional micromanipulation device was structured, and basic experiments were carried out on force measurement and control. A micro flow path forming technology was established by using a micro processing technology. This paper also describes a commercialization survey. (NEDO)

  13. The International Human Epigenome Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Hirst, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated ac...... achievements of IHEC teams to gather and interpret comprehensive epigenomic datasets to gain insights in the epigenetic control of cell states relevant for human health and disease. PAPERCLIP.......The International Human Epigenome Consortium (IHEC) coordinates the generation of a catalog of high-resolution reference epigenomes of major primary human cell types. The studies now presented (see the Cell Press IHEC web portal at http://www.cell.com/consortium/IHEC) highlight the coordinated...

  14. Atlantic Coast Environmental Indicators Consortium

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — n 2000, the US EPA granted authority to establish up to five Estuarine Indicator Research Programs. These Programs were designed to identify, evaluate, recommend and...

  15. The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Protein Autovac in Patients with Brest Cancer CPharmexa). This trial was initiated in June 2003. The PBCC accrued 5 of the planned 11 patients. This...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-01-1-0374 TITLE: The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium...3. DATES COVERED 1 AUG 2001 - 31 JUL 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Pittsburgh Breast Cancer Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  16. Fourth Light at Paranal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-01

    VLT YEPUN Joins ANTU, KUEYEN and MELIPAL It was a historical moment last night (September 3 - 4, 2000) in the VLT Control Room at the Paranal Observatory , after nearly 15 years of hard work. Finally, four teams of astronomers and engineers were sitting at the terminals - and each team with access to an 8.2-m telescope! From now on, the powerful "Paranal Quartet" will be observing night after night, with a combined mirror surface of more than 210 m 2. And beginning next year, some of them will be linked to form part of the unique VLT Interferometer with unparalleled sensitivity and image sharpness. YEPUN "First Light" Early in the evening, the fourth 8.2-m Unit Telescope, YEPUN , was pointed to the sky for the first time and successfully achieved "First Light". Following a few technical exposures, a series of "first light" photos was made of several astronomical objects with the VLT Test Camera. This instrument was also used for the three previous "First Light" events for ANTU ( May 1998 ), KUEYEN ( March 1999 ) and MELIPAL ( January 2000 ). These images served to evaluate provisionally the performance of the new telescope, mainly in terms of mechanical and optical quality. The ESO staff were very pleased with the results and pronounced YEPUN fit for the subsequent commissioning phase. When the name YEPUN was first given to the fourth VLT Unit Telescope, it was supposed to mean "Sirius" in the Mapuche language. However, doubts have since arisen about this translation and a detailed investigation now indicates that the correct meaning is "Venus" (as the Evening Star). For a detailed explanation, please consult the essay On the Meaning of "YEPUN" , now available at the ESO website. The first images At 21:39 hrs local time (01:39 UT), YEPUN was turned to point in the direction of a dense Milky Way field, near the border between the constellations Sagitta (The Arrow) and Aquila (The Eagle). A guide star was acquired and the active optics system quickly optimized the

  17. Report of the results of the fiscal 1997 regional consortium R and D project. Regional consortium field / Development of technology to treat aquatic environment by using microorganisms fixed on carbon fabrics (abbreviation: carbon/aquatic environment project) (first fiscal year); 1997 nendo chiiki consortium kenkyu kaihatsu jigyo. Chiiki consortium bun`ya / tanso sen`i nansoshiki eno biseibutsu kochaku gensho wo riyoshita mizukankyo seibi gijutsu no kaihatsu (ryakusho: tanso mizu kankyo project) daiichi nendo seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Out of the development of technology to arrange the aquatic environment using phenomena of microorganism fixation on carbon fiber soft textures, the paper stated the fiscal 1997 result. On carbon fibers in a state of swaying in water, microorganisms in water fix in an amazingly large quantity. A catalog was compiled of 58 kinds of carbon fabrics trially woven and knitted. When carbon fiber is used as activated sludge carrier, activity of microorganism lasts more than one year. Only a little amount of surplus sludge is generated. The fixed microorganisms are more active in case of carbon fiber than in case of nylon and polyester fibers. Fiber texture models of carbon fiber fixing activated sludge groups were proposed. By pump operation, the water flow inside/outside microorganism groups is being accelerated. Several new strains of bacillus carboniphilus were isolated/identified from soil and marsh. To grasp relationships of characteristics among three elements such as the state of aquatic environment, fiber, and microorganism group, the experiment was prepared. Preliminary work is conducted to derive a simple equation for facility design, and experimental directions to obtain design conditions were proposed. 6 refs., 166 figs., 47 tabs.

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1994 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high {Tc} superconductivity. During the past year, 27 projects produced over 123 talks and 139 publications. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in August and January); with the second MISCON Workshop held in August; 13 external speakers; 79 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 48 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  19. Implementation of the interdisciplinary curriculum Teaching and Assessing Communicative Competence in the fourth academic year of medical studies (CoMeD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortsiefer, Achim; Rotthoff, Thomas; Schmelzer, Regine; Immecke, J.; Ortmanns, B.; in der Schmitten, J.; Altiner, A.; Karger, André

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Implementation of a longitudinal curriculum for training in advanced communications skills represents an unmet need in most German medical faculties, especially in the 4rth and 5th years of medical studies. The CoMeD project (communication in medical education Düsseldorf) attempted to establish an interdisciplinary program to teach and to assess communicative competence in the 4th academic year. In this paper, we describe the development of the project and report results of its evaluation by medical students. Methods: Teaching objectives and lesson formats were developed in a multistage process. A teaching program for simulated patients (SP) was built up and continuous lecturer trainings were estabilshed. Several clinical disciplines co-operated for the purpose of integrating the communication training into the pre-existing clinical teaching curriculum. The CoMeD project was evaluated using feedback-forms after each course. Results: Until now, six training units for especially challenging communication tasks like “dealing with aggression” or “breaking bad news” were implemented, each unit connected with a preliminary tutorial or e-learning course. An OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) with 4 stations was introduced. The students’ evaluation of the six CoMeD training units showed the top or second-best rating in more than 80% of the answers. Discussion: Introducing an interdisciplinary communication training and a corresponding OSCE into the 4th year medical curriculum is feasible. Embedding communication teaching in a clinical context and involvement of clinicians as lecturers seem to be important factors for ensuring practical relevance and achieving high acceptance by medical students. PMID:22403591

  20. Implementation of the interdisciplinary curriculum Teaching and Assessing Communicative Competence in the fourth academic year of medical studies (CoMeD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortsiefer, Achim; Rotthoff, Thomas; Schmelzer, Regine; Immecke, J; Ortmanns, B; in der Schmitten, J; Altiner, A; Karger, André

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of a longitudinal curriculum for training in advanced communications skills represents an unmet need in most German medical faculties, especially in the 4rth and 5th years of medical studies. The CoMeD project (communication in medical education Düsseldorf) attempted to establish an interdisciplinary program to teach and to assess communicative competence in the 4th academic year. In this paper, we describe the development of the project and report results of its evaluation by medical students. Teaching objectives and lesson formats were developed in a multistage process. A teaching program for simulated patients (SP) was built up and continuous lecturer trainings were estabilshed. Several clinical disciplines co-operated for the purpose of integrating the communication training into the pre-existing clinical teaching curriculum. The CoMeD project was evaluated using feedback-forms after each course. Until now, six training units for especially challenging communication tasks like "dealing with aggression" or "breaking bad news" were implemented, each unit connected with a preliminary tutorial or e-learning course. An OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) with 4 stations was introduced. The students' evaluation of the six CoMeD training units showed the top or second-best rating in more than 80% of the answers. Introducing an interdisciplinary communication training and a corresponding OSCE into the 4th year medical curriculum is feasible. Embedding communication teaching in a clinical context and involvement of clinicians as lecturers seem to be important factors for ensuring practical relevance and achieving high acceptance by medical students.

  1. The Complex Surgical Management of the First Case of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Multiple Intestinal Atresias Surviving after the Fourth Year of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofano, Salvatore; Teruzzi, Elisabetta; Vinardi, Simona; Carbonaro, Giulia; Cerrina, Alessia; Morra, Isabella; Montin, Davide; Mussa, Alessandro; Schleef, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a life-threatening syndrome of recurrent infections and gastrointestinal alterations due to severe compromise of T cells and B cells. Clinically, most patients present symptoms before the age of 3 months and without intervention SCID usually results in severe infections and death by the age of 2 years. Its association with intestinal anomalies as multiple intestinal atresias (MIA) is rare and worsens the prognosis, resulting lethal. We describe the case of a four year-old boy with SCID-MIA. He presented at birth with meconium peritonitis, multiple ileal atresias and underwent several intestinal resections. A targeted Sanger sequencing revealed a homozygous 4-bp deletion (c.313ΔTATC; p.Y105fs) in tetratricopeptide repeat domain 7A (TTC7A). He experienced surgical procedures including resection and stricturoplasty. Despite parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease, the patient is surviving at the time of writing the report. Precocious immune system assessment, scrutiny of TTC7A mutations and prompt surgical procedures are crucial in the management. PMID:25587526

  2. Latest Developments of the Isprs Student Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detchev, I.; Kanjir, U.; Reyes, S. R.; Miyazaki, H.; Aktas, A. F.

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ISPRS) Student Consortium (SC) is a network for young professionals studying or working within the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and other related geo-spatial sciences. The main goal of the network is to provide means for information exchange for its young members and thus help promote and integrate youth into the ISPRS. Over the past four years the Student Consortium has successfully continued to fulfil its mission in both formal and informal ways. The formal means of communication of the SC are its website, newsletter, e-mail announcements and summer schools, while its informal ones are multiple social media outlets and various social activities during student related events. The newsletter is published every three to four months and provides both technical and experiential content relevant for the young people in the ISPRS. The SC has been in charge or at least has helped with organizing one or more summer schools every year. The organization's e-mail list has over 1,100 subscribers, its website hosts over 1,300 members from 100 countries across the entire globe, and its public Facebook group currently has over 4,500 joined visitors, who connect among one another and share information relevant for their professional careers. These numbers show that the Student Consortium has grown into a significant online-united community. The paper will present the organization's on-going and past activities for the last four years, its current priorities and a strategic plan and aspirations for the future four-year period.

  3. Association of second to fourth digit length ratio (2D:4D with some anthropometric measurements: a comparison between Polish and Indian young adults aged 18-25 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chakraborty

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ratio of lengths of second to the fourth digit (2D:4D is a proxy indicator of prenatal sex-hormone exposure. The male has lower 2D:4D than the female. The ratio and its sexual dimorphism vary across ethnicity. The relationships of 2D:4D with anthropometric dimensions are not consistent. Objective: To compare 2D:4D and its sexual dimorphism between the young Indian and Polish populations and to examine the relationship between 2D:4D and anthropometric measures. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 152 Indian (males: 71 females: 81 and 110 Polish (55 each sex young adults aged between 18 and 25 years. Height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, second and fourth digit lengths were measured. Results: Males had significantly lower 2D:4D than the female in both hands in both the ethnic groups. All the anthropometric measurements were higher in Polish males, including the 2D:4D of both hands, than the Indians, except for BMI and WHR. Polish females had higher digit lengths, height, weight and HC than the Indian females. In Polish males, 2D:4D was negatively associated with height and WHR in both hands. No significant correlation was observed between any anthropometric measure (except for height and 2D:4D among the Indians. However, the Indian Female had a nearly significant positive correlation between left 2D:4D and HC. In Indian Male correlation between left hand 2D:4D and Height is significant and similar to that of the Polish men. Conclusion: It was not possible to draw any conclusion regarding the nature of association between 2D:4D and anthropometric parameters. The findings indicate a link between fat patterning and digit ratio.

  4. The ocean sampling day consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo

    2015-01-01

    Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate...... the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our...

  5. The Fourth Basic: Computer Skills. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin County Board of Education, Elizabethtown, KY.

    Traditionally, the fundamental goal of all American education has been to provide students with adequate competencies in reading, writing, and mathematics. A year-long project, conducted at three high schools in Hardin County, Kentucky, provided for the development of a fourth basic: computer skills. Through this project, computer skills were…

  6. The Fourth (A)ATSR Data Reprocessing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryl, Philippe; Cocevar, Pauline; Done, Fay; Aatsr Quality Working Group

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to inform users of the upcoming Fourth Reprocessing of ATSR-1, ATSR-2 and AATSR data. The main objective of the Fourth Reprocessing is to generate (A)ATSR Level 1B data products in a similar format to SLSTR products from Sentinel-3. In this way, users can easily access the 20-year dataset from the ERS and ENVISAT (A)ATSR missions and carry the analysis forward into the Sentinel era. In addition to the product format change, the dataset will build on the improvements implemented in the Third Reprocessing, and will contain further improvements and enhancements, as described below.

  7. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  8. The Statewide Energy Consortium: A California Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, G. Cleve; Giacosie, Robert V.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the formation and organization of a statewide energy consortium consisting of faculty from 19 campuses of the California State University and Colleges system. Also describes three major consortium activities and reasons for its success. (SK)

  9. The ISPRS Student Consortium: From launch to tenth anniversary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjir, U.; Detchev, I.; Reyes, S. R.; Akkartal Aktas, A.; Lo, C. Y.; Miyazaki, H.

    2014-04-01

    The ISPRS Student Consortium is an international organization for students and young professionals in the fields of photogrammetry, remote sensing, and the geospatial information sciences. Since its start ten years ago, the number of members of the Student Consortium has been steadily growing, now reaching close to 1000. Its increased popularity, especially in recent years, is mainly due to the organization's worldwide involvement in student matters. The Student Consortium has helped organize numerous summer schools, youth forums, and student technical sessions at ISPRS sponsored conferences. In addition, the organization publishes a newsletter, and hosts several social media outlets in order to keep its global membership up-to-date on a regular basis. This paper will describe the structure of the organization, and it will give some example of its past student related activities.

  10. Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium (BTEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium is an open scientific forum organized to foster the development of multi-center, international and inter-disciplinary collaborations that will lead to a better understanding of the etiology, outcomes, and prevention of brain tumors.

  11. Supernumerary maxillary and Mandibular Fourth Molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-23

    in earlier primates then in man. Hyperdontia has occasionally been associated with clefts of the lip and palate , I0 cleldocranial dysostosis, 2...year-old black male was seen In the clinic for treatment of pain which was originating from a deep carious lesion in the mandibular left second molar...incompletely formed impacted left fourth molar and right bicuspid were also noted. Case III. A 24-year-old male was seen in the clinic for treatment of

  12. The mammalian gene function resource: The International Knockout Mouse Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bradley (Allan); K. Anastassiadis (Konstantinos); A. Ayadi (Abdelkader); J.F. Battey (James); C. Bell (Cindy); M.-C. Birling (Marie-Christine); J. Bottomley (Joanna); S.D.M. Brown (Steve); F. Bürger (Friederike); C.J. Bult (Carol); W. Bushell (Wendy); F.S. Collins (Francis); C. Desaintes (Christian); B. Doe (Brendan); E. Aris (Economides); J.T. Eppig (Janan); R.H. Finnell (Richard); C. Fletcher (Colin); M. Fray (Martin); D. Frendewey (David); R.H. Friedel (Roland); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Hansen; Y. Hérault (Yann); G. Hicks (Geoffrey); A. Hörlein (Andreas); C. Houghton (Catherine); M. Hrabé De Angelis (Martin); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); V. Iyer (Vivek); P.J. de Jong (Pieter); J.A. Kadin (James); C. Kaloff (Cornelia); K. Kennedy (Karen); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); K.C. Kent Lloyd (K.); S. Marschall (Susan); J. Mason (Jeremy); C. McKerlie (Colin); M.P. McLeod (Michael); H. von Melchner (Harald); M. Moore (Matt); A.O. Mujica (Alejandro); A. Nagy (Andras); M. Nefedov (Mikhail); L.M. Nutter (Lauryl); G. Pavlovic (Guillaume); J.L. Peterson (Jane); I. Pollock; R. Ramirez-Solis (Ramiro); D.E. Rancourt (Derrick); M. Raspa (Marcello); J.E. Remacle (Jacques); M. Ringwald (Martin); B. Rosen (Barry); N. Rosenthal (Nadia); J. Rossant (Janet); P. Ruiz Noppinger (Patricia); S. Ryder; J.Z. Schick (Joel Zupicich); F. Schnütgen (Frank); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Seisenberger (Claudia); M. Selloum (Mohammed); E.M. Simpson (Elizabeth); W.C. Skarnes (William); D. Smedley (Damian); W.L. Stanford (William); A. Francis Stewart (A.); K. Stone (Kevin); K. Swan (Kate); H. Tadepally (Hamsa); J.L. Teboul (Jean Louis); G.P. Tocchini-Valentini (Glauco); D. Valenzuela (David); A.P. West (Anthony); K.-I. Yamamura (Ken-Ichi); Y. Yoshinaga (Yuko); M. Wurst (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 2007, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) made the ambitious promise to generate mutations in virtually every protein-coding gene of the mouse genome in a concerted worldwide action. Now, 5 years later, the IKMC members have developed highthroughput gene trapping and, i

  13. The mammalian gene function resource: The International Knockout Mouse Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bradley (Allan); K. Anastassiadis (Konstantinos); A. Ayadi (Abdelkader); J.F. Battey (James); C. Bell (Cindy); M.-C. Birling (Marie-Christine); J. Bottomley (Joanna); S.D.M. Brown (Steve); F. Bürger (Friederike); C.J. Bult (Carol); W. Bushell (Wendy); F.S. Collins (Francis); C. Desaintes (Christian); B. Doe (Brendan); E. Aris (Economides); J.T. Eppig (Janan); R.H. Finnell (Richard); C. Fletcher (Colin); M. Fray (Martin); D. Frendewey (David); R.H. Friedel (Roland); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Hansen; Y. Hérault (Yann); G. Hicks (Geoffrey); A. Hörlein (Andreas); C. Houghton (Catherine); M. Hrabé De Angelis (Martin); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); V. Iyer (Vivek); P.J. de Jong (Pieter); J.A. Kadin (James); C. Kaloff (Cornelia); K. Kennedy (Karen); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); K.C. Kent Lloyd (K.); S. Marschall (Susan); J. Mason (Jeremy); C. McKerlie (Colin); M.P. McLeod (Michael); H. von Melchner (Harald); M. Moore (Matt); A.O. Mujica (Alejandro); A. Nagy (Andras); M. Nefedov (Mikhail); L.M. Nutter (Lauryl); G. Pavlovic (Guillaume); J.L. Peterson (Jane); I. Pollock; R. Ramirez-Solis (Ramiro); D.E. Rancourt (Derrick); M. Raspa (Marcello); J.E. Remacle (Jacques); M. Ringwald (Martin); B. Rosen (Barry); N. Rosenthal (Nadia); J. Rossant (Janet); P. Ruiz Noppinger (Patricia); S. Ryder; J.Z. Schick (Joel Zupicich); F. Schnütgen (Frank); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Seisenberger (Claudia); M. Selloum (Mohammed); E.M. Simpson (Elizabeth); W.C. Skarnes (William); D. Smedley (Damian); W.L. Stanford (William); A. Francis Stewart (A.); K. Stone (Kevin); K. Swan (Kate); H. Tadepally (Hamsa); J.L. Teboul (Jean Louis); G.P. Tocchini-Valentini (Glauco); D. Valenzuela (David); A.P. West (Anthony); K.-I. Yamamura (Ken-Ichi); Y. Yoshinaga (Yuko); M. Wurst (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn 2007, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) made the ambitious promise to generate mutations in virtually every protein-coding gene of the mouse genome in a concerted worldwide action. Now, 5 years later, the IKMC members have developed highthroughput gene trapping and,

  14. Syringomyelia regression after shunting of a trapped fourth ventricle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukagjin Morina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of progressive syringomyelia following post-infectious trapped fourth ventricle (TFV, which resolved after shunting of the fourth ventricle. A 28-year-old female who had previously undergone treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage and meningitis developed a hydrocephalus with TFV. After 3 years she developed disturbance of walking and coordination. Cranial-CT revealed an enlargement of the shunted fourth ventricle as a result of shunt dysfunction. Furthermore a cervical syringomyelia developed. The patient underwent a revision of a failed fourth ventriculo- peritoneal shunt. Postoperatively, syringomyelia resolved within 6 months and the associated neurological deficits improved significantly. An insufficiency of cerebrospinal fluid draining among patients with TFV can be associated with communicating syringomyelia. An early detection and treatment seems important on resolving syringomyelia and avoiding permanent neurological deficits. Ventriculo-peritoneal shunt in trapped fourth ventricles can resolve a secondary syringomyelia.

  15. Research and development project of regional consortiums in fiscal 1998. Research and development of regional consortium energy (development of measuring technology to aid energy conservation in electronic device manufacturing processes (design and trial production of IMI) (Report on the result in the first year)); 1998 nendo chiiki consortium energy kenkyu kaihatsu. Denshi kikirui seizo process no sho energy shien keisoku seigyo gijutsu no kaihatsu (IMI no sekkei to shisaku) (dai 1 nendo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This paper summarizes the development of intelligent micro instruments (IMI) inaugurated in fiscal 1998 as the wide-area consortium project for the Tama area. Research and development will be carried out on the following items: IMI substrate elements utilizing micro machining technology, applicable to micro sensors and micro probes, semiconductor process sensors, electronic device measuring probes, signal processing and communication circuits for wireless sensing. This paper describes the achievements during fiscal 1998. Technologies were transferred from the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology on silicon micro machining and PZT piezoelectric thin film formation. An IMI research laboratory was installed at the Tokyo Metropolitan University. In developing the IMI substrate elements, different beams applicable to sensors and probes were fabricated on a trial basis, and their mechanical properties were measured. For the semiconductor process sensors, discussions were given on micronization on a chlorine ion analyzer. In developing the electronic device measuring probes, the target was placed on measurement of in-situ characteristics of IC chips on a wafer. A prototype transmitting and receiving circuit board was fabricated for developing the wireless sensing. (NEDO)

  16. John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    The John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium is an inter-institutional research and technology development, beginning with ten projects in FY02 that are aimed at applying GRC expertise in fluid physics and sensor development with local biomedical expertise to mitigate the risks of space flight on the health, safety, and performance of astronauts. It is anticipated that several new technologies will be developed that are applicable to both medical needs in space and on earth.

  17. Fourth Order Theories Without Ghosts

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, P D; Mannheim, Philip D.; Davidson, Aharon

    2000-01-01

    Using the Dirac constraint method we show that the pure fourth-order Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator model is free of observable negative norm states. Even though such ghosts do appear when the fourth order theory is coupled to a second order one, the limit in which the second order action is switched off is found to be a highly singular one in which these states move off shell. Given this result, construction of a fully unitary, renormalizable, gravitational theory based on a purely fourth order action in 4 dimensions now appears feasible.

  18. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  19. Overview of the carbon products consortium (CPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, C.L. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The Carbon Products Consortium (CPC) is an industry, university, government cooperative research team which has evolved over the past seven years to produce and evaluate coal-derived feedstocks for carbon products. The members of the Carbon Products Consortium are UCAR Carbon Company, Koppers Industries, CONOCO, Aluminum Company of America, AMOCO Polymers, and West Virginia University. The Carbon and Insulation Materials Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Fiber Materials Inc., and BASF Corporation are affiliates of the CPC. The initial work on coal-derived nuclear graphites was supported by a grant to WVU, UCAR Carbon, and ORNL from the U.S. DOE New Production Reactor program. More recently, the CPC program has been supported through the Fossil Energy Materials program and through PETC`s Liquefaction program. The coal processing technologies involve hydrogenation, extraction by solvents such as N-methyl pyrolidone and toluene, material blending, and calcination. The breadth of carbon science expertise and manufacturing capability available in the CPC enables it to address virtually all research and development issues of importance to the carbon products industry.

  20. BIODEGRADATION OF MTBE BY A MICROORGANISM CONSORTIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alimohammadi, A. R. Mesdaghinia, M. Mahmoodi, S. Nasseri, A. H. Mahvi and J. Nouri

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE is one of the ether oxygenates which its use has been increased within the last twenty years. This compound is produced from isobutylene and methanol reaction that is used as octane index enhancer and also increases dissolved oxygen in gasoline and decreases carbon monoxide emission in four phased motors because of better combustion of gasoline. High solubility in water (52 g/L, high vapor pressure (0.54 kg/cm3, low absorption to organic carbon of soil and presence of MTBE in the list of potentially-carcinogens of U.S EPA has made its use of great concern. The culture media used in this study was Mineral Salt Medium (MSM. The study lasted for 236 days and in three different concentrations of MTBE of 200, 5 and 0.8 mg/L. A control sample was also used to compare the results. This research studied the isolation methods of microbial consortium in the MTBE polluted soils in Tehran and Abadan petroleum refinery besides MTBE degradation. The results showed the capability of bacteria in consuming MTBE as carbon source. Final microbial isolation was performed with several microbial passages as well as keeping consortium in a certain amount of MTBE as the carbon source.

  1. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium: 1995 Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 127 publications. Three Master`s Degrees and 9 Doctor`s of Philosophy Degrees were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved 2 MISCON group meetings (held in January and July); the third MISCON Summer School held in July; 12 external speakers; 81 collaborations (with universities, industry, Federal laboratories, and foreign research centers); and 54 exchanges of samples and/or measurements. Research achievements this past year focused on understanding the effects of processing phenomena on structure-property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temp superconductors.

  2. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium. Progress report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, A.L. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Mission of the Midwest Superconductivity Consortium, MISCON, is to advance the science and understanding of high Tc superconductivity. Programmatic research focuses upon key materials-related problems; principally, synthesis and processing and properties limiting transport phenomena. During the past year, 26 projects produced over 133 talks and 113 publications. publications. Two Master`s Degrees and one Ph.D. were granted to students working on MISCON projects. Group activities and interactions involved two MISCON group meetings (held in July and January), twenty external speakers, 36 collaborations, 10 exchanges of samples and/or measurements, and one (1) gift of equipment from industry. Research achievements this past year expanded our understanding of processing phenomena on structure property interrelationships and the fundamental nature of transport properties in high-temperature superconductors.

  3. Relationship between serum ferritin levels and sarcopenia in Korean females aged 60 years and older using the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3, 2008-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Ho Kim

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been suggested that elevated serum ferritin is associated with several metabolic disorders. However, there is no reported study assessing any association between serum ferritin and sarcopenia despite the close relationship between sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether serum ferritin was associated with sarcopenia in older Koreans. DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data acquired in the second and third years (2008-9 of the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PARTICIPANTS: In total, 952 men (mean age 69.0 years and 1,380 women (mean age 69.3 years aged 60 years and older completed a body composition study using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. MEASUREMENTS: Serum ferritin levels were measured. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal mass as a percentage of body weight that was less than two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. RESULTS: Serum ferritin levels were lower in women than in men. Women with sarcopenia showed a higher level of serum ferritin than women without sarcopenia (men: without sarcopenia 115.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 134.4 ng/mL vs. women: without sarcopenia 70.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 85.4 ng/mL. The prevalence of sarcopenia increased as the tertile of serum ferritin increased. However, statistical significance was only seen in elderly women (1(st tertile 6.3%, 2(nd tertile 8.0%, 3(rd tertile 12.0%; p = 0.008. Without adjustment, compared with those in the lowest tertile of serum ferritin level, participants in the highest tertile had an odds ratio of 2.02 (95% confidence interval = 1.26-3.23 for sarcopenia in women. After adjusting for known risk factors, the OR for sarcopenia was 1.74 (95% CI = 1.02-2.97 in women. There was no statistically significant association between sarcopenia and serum ferritin tertiles in men. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated serum ferritin levels were

  4. Relationship between serum ferritin levels and sarcopenia in Korean females aged 60 years and older using the fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV-2, 3), 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sang-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that elevated serum ferritin is associated with several metabolic disorders. However, there is no reported study assessing any association between serum ferritin and sarcopenia despite the close relationship between sarcopenia and metabolic disorders. We investigated whether serum ferritin was associated with sarcopenia in older Koreans. We conducted a cross-sectional study based on data acquired in the second and third years (2008-9) of the fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. In total, 952 men (mean age 69.0 years) and 1,380 women (mean age 69.3 years) aged 60 years and older completed a body composition study using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum ferritin levels were measured. Sarcopenia was defined as an appendicular skeletal mass as a percentage of body weight that was less than two standard deviations below the gender-specific mean for young adults. Serum ferritin levels were lower in women than in men. Women with sarcopenia showed a higher level of serum ferritin than women without sarcopenia (men: without sarcopenia 115.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 134.4 ng/mL vs. women: without sarcopenia 70.7 ng/mL and with sarcopenia 85.4 ng/mL). The prevalence of sarcopenia increased as the tertile of serum ferritin increased. However, statistical significance was only seen in elderly women (1(st) tertile 6.3%, 2(nd) tertile 8.0%, 3(rd) tertile 12.0%; p = 0.008). Without adjustment, compared with those in the lowest tertile of serum ferritin level, participants in the highest tertile had an odds ratio of 2.02 (95% confidence interval = 1.26-3.23) for sarcopenia in women. After adjusting for known risk factors, the OR for sarcopenia was 1.74 (95% CI = 1.02-2.97) in women. There was no statistically significant association between sarcopenia and serum ferritin tertiles in men. Elevated serum ferritin levels were associated with an increased prevalence of sarcopenia in women but not in men from a representative sample

  5. An isolated fourth ventricle in neurosarcoidosis: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Terstegge, Klaus; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmann Strasse 9, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Wedekind, Christoph [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmann Strasse 9, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Voges, Juergen [Department of Stereotaxy und Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmann Strasse 9, 50924 Cologne (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    We report on an isolated enlargement of the fourth ventricle in a patient with neurosarcoidosis which developed 3 years after the insertion of a ventriculo-atrial shunt. Repeated MRI images were obtained in a patient with known neurosarcoidosis between 1995 and 2000. Imaging findings were correlated to the medical course of the patient, who developed a hydrocephalus and a trapped fourth ventricle consecutively. The isolation was presumably due to granulomatous inflammation of the ependyma surrounding the fourth ventricular outlets. The isolated fourth ventricle was responsible for a deterioration of neurological status. Neurosarcoidosis is a severe complication in sarcoidosis patients. An isolated enlargement of the fourth ventricle is a rare complication in clinically deteriorated patients with neurosarcoidosis and ventricular drainage, which may require neurosurgical treatment. (orig.)

  6. The Black Rock Forest Consortium: A narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetto-More, Nicole Antoinette

    The Black Rock Forest is a 3,785-acre wilderness area whose richly forested landscape represents the splendor of the Hudson Valley Region of New York State. Although originally intended to become the home of wealthy banker James Stillman, it was his son Ernest whose love of conservation caused him to embrace the then new and revolutionary practice of sustainable forestry and establish Black Rock in 1928. Due to Ernest Stillman's foresight, the property was protected from development and bequeathed to Harvard University following his death for the establishment of an experimental forest. The modern environmental movement in America began when the Black Rock Forest was threatened with development by Consolidated Edison, and the people of the surrounding community banded together, battling tirelessly for over 17 years to stop the degradation of this historic forest. The outcome of this crusade marked a hallmark win for the environment leaving an illustrious and inveterate legacy. The campaign resulted in the watershed legislation the National Environmental Policy Act, the formation of several environmental advocacy groups, the creation of the Council on Environmental Quality of the Executive Office of the President, as well as set a precedent for communities to initiate and win cases against major corporations in order to safeguard natural resources. In the midst of the controversy it became apparent that alternative futures for the Forest needed to be explored. As a result of a committee report and one man's vision, the idea emerged to create a consortium that would purchase and steward the Forest. With a formation that took nearly fifteen years, the Black Rock Forest Consortium was formed, a unique amalgamation of K--12 public and private schools, colleges and universities, and science and cultural centers that successfully collaborate to enhance scientific research, environmental conservation, and education. The Consortium works to bridge the gaps between learners

  7. Consortium for Health and Military Performance (CHAMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center's work addresses a wide scope of trauma exposure from the consequences of combat, operations other than war, terrorism, natural and humanmade disasters,...

  8. A consortium approach to glass furnace modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Golchert, B.; Petrick, M.

    1999-04-20

    Using computational fluid dynamics to model a glass furnace is a difficult task for any one glass company, laboratory, or university to accomplish. The task of building a computational model of the furnace requires knowledge and experience in modeling two dissimilar regimes (the combustion space and the liquid glass bath), along with the skill necessary to couple these two regimes. Also, a detailed set of experimental data is needed in order to evaluate the output of the code to ensure that the code is providing proper results. Since all these diverse skills are not present in any one research institution, a consortium was formed between Argonne National Laboratory, Purdue University, Mississippi State University, and five glass companies in order to marshal these skills into one three-year program. The objective of this program is to develop a fully coupled, validated simulation of a glass melting furnace that may be used by industry to optimize the performance of existing furnaces.

  9. Fourth Doctoral Student Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Ingrid Haug

    2016-01-01

    On 10 May, over 130 PhD students and their supervisors, from both CERN and partner universities, gathered for the 4th Doctoral Student Assembly in the Council Chamber.   The assembly was followed by a poster session, at which eighteen doctoral students presented the outcome of their scientific work. The CERN Doctoral Student Programme currently hosts just over 200 students in applied physics, engineering, computing and science communication/education. The programme has been in place since 1985. It enables students to do their research at CERN for a maximum of three years and to work on a PhD thesis, which they defend at their University. The programme is steered by the TSC committee, which holds two selection committees per year, in June and December. The Doctoral Student Assembly was opened by the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, who stressed the importance of the programme in the scientific environment at CERN, emphasising that there is no more rewarding activity than lear...

  10. Thinking the Fourth Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Kobiella, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    The e4d design series is looking for new aspects of digital technology in the education of Digital Architecture approaches - overcoming the gap between the development of architectural and the necessary digital skills. Digital Design approaches using the full variety of multimedia technology......, the parallelism and crossover of analogue and digital techniques, 3d-modelling, rapid-prototyping and visualization tools and finally the presentation in artistic movies or websites are characteristic for the e4d design method. This method was refined during several design projects within the last two years....... A problem based design method was developed, that enabled students to learn digital and architectural skills simultaneously in an efficient manner....

  11. Thinking the Fourth Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Kobiella, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    , the parallelism and crossover of analogue and digital techniques, 3d-modelling, rapid-prototyping and visualization tools and finally the presentation in artistic movies or websites are characteristic for the e4d design method. This method was refined during several design projects within the last two years......The e4d design series is looking for new aspects of digital technology in the education of Digital Architecture approaches - overcoming the gap between the development of architectural and the necessary digital skills. Digital Design approaches using the full variety of multimedia technology....... A problem based design method was developed, that enabled students to learn digital and architectural skills simultaneously in an efficient manner....

  12. The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy Technology (CARET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, E. M.; Henderson, D. O.; Buffinger, D. R.; Fuller, C. W.; Uribe, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Consortium for Advancing Renewable Energy (CARET) is a research and education program which uses the theme of renewable energy to build a minority scientist pipeline. CARET is also a consortium of four universities and NASA Lewis Research Center working together to promote science education and research to minority students using the theme of renewable energy. The consortium membership includes the HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), Fisk, Wilberforce and Central State Universities as well as Kent State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. The various stages of this pipeline provide participating students experiences with a different emphasis. Some emphasize building enthusiasm for the classroom study of science and technology while others emphasize the nature of research in these disciplines. Still others focus on relating a practical application to science and technology. And, of great importance to the success of the program are the interfaces between the various stages. Successfully managing these transitions is a requirement for producing trained scientists, engineers and technologists. Presentations describing the CARET program have been given at this year's HBCU Research Conference at the Ohio Aerospace Institute and as a seminar in the Solar Circle Seminar series of the Photovoltaic and Space Environments Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. In this report, we will describe the many positive achievements toward the fulfillment of the goals and outcomes of our program. We will begin with a description of the interactions among the consortium members and end with a description of the activities of each of the member institutions .

  13. Tobacco use among fourth year Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) students of the College of Public Health: University of the Philippines Manila, academic year 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevarra, Jonathan P; Cordova, Renerio Q; Mercado, Chris Erwin G; Asaad, Abubakar S

    2014-10-01

    This study determines the prevalence of tobacco use among graduating Public Health students at the College of Public Health, University of the Philippines Manila. It also describes the exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, attitudes, behaviors and smoking cessation training of students. This study used a descriptive cross-sectional study design, adapting a standard questionnaire, pretested and administered to 52 Bachelor of Science in Public Health (BSPH) students at the College of Public Health, University of the Philippines Manila. Data generated from the survey were encoded using Epi Info version 3.5.4 and analyzed using Stata version 12. The prevalence of smoking among 4th year BSPH students was 5.8 % (current smokers). In the past 7 days, respondents have been exposed to secondhand smoke (44 % where they live; 79 % in places other than where they live). Majority were aware of the official policy on smoking ban in school, however, 80 % said that the policy is not enforced. Majority had favorable attitudes in terms of banning tobacco sales to adolescents, banning advertising of tobacco products, banning smoking in restaurants, discos/bars/pubs and enclosed public places. Majority of the respondents also believed that health professionals should get specific training on cessation techniques, that they do serve as role models, and that they have a role in giving advice about smoking cessation. More than three-quarters (76.9 %) of students said that health professionals who smoke are less likely to advise patients to quit. Most of the graduating students learned about the dangers of smoking, importance of obtaining tobacco use history, and providing educational support materials in their public health education but only a few received formal training about smoking cessation approaches. The implementation of the no-smoking policy of the university must be revisited. Smoking cessation approaches should be incorporated in the public health curriculum and the role

  14. NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium: Defining the Path to Elegance in Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Farrington, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Systems Engineering Research Consortium was formed at the end of 2010 to study the approaches to producing elegant systems on a consistent basis. This has been a transformative study looking at the engineering and organizational basis of systems engineering. The consortium has engaged in a variety of research topics to determine the path to elegant systems. In the second year of the consortium, a systems engineering framework emerged which structured the approach to systems engineering and guided our research. This led in the third year to set of systems engineering postulates that the consortium is continuing to refine. The consortium has conducted several research projects that have contributed significantly to the understanding of systems engineering. The consortium has surveyed the application of the NASA 17 systems engineering processes, explored the physics and statistics of systems integration, and considered organizational aspects of systems engineering discipline integration. The systems integration methods have included system energy analysis, Akaike Information Criteria (AIC), State Variable Analysis, Multidisciplinary Coupling Analysis (MCA), Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO), System Cost Modeling, System Robustness, and Value Modeling. Organizational studies have included the variability of processes in change evaluations, margin management within the organization, information theory of board structures, social categorization of unintended consequences, and initial looks at applying cognitive science to systems engineering. Consortium members have also studied the bidirectional influence of policy and law with systems engineering.

  15. Introduction to Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Introduction The Neuroscience Peer Review Consortium is an alliance of neuroscience journals that have agreed to accept manuscript reviews from other members of the Consortium.Its goals are to support efficient and thorough peer review of original research in neuroscience, speed the publication of research reports, and reduce the burden on peer reviewers.

  16. Fandom and the fourth wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I use the Teen Wolf fandom as an example to examine the ways social media has created a more complicated, nuanced relationship with fans. The collapse of the fourth wall between fans and The Powers That Be can have both positive and negative impacts, depending on the willingness of participants to maintain mutual respect and engage in meaningful dialogue.

  17. Fourth-generation storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galayda, J. N.

    1999-11-16

    It seems clear that a linac-driven free-electron laser is the accepted prototype of a fourth-generation facility. This raises two questions: can a storage ring-based light source join the fourth generation? Has the storage ring evolved to its highest level of performance as a synchrotrons light source? The answer to the second question is clearly no. The author thinks the answer to the first question is unimportant. While the concept of generations has been useful in motivating thought and effort towards new light source concepts, the variety of light sources and their performance characteristics can no longer be usefully summed up by assignment of a ''generation'' number.

  18. The fourth generation in supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enqvist, K.; Nanopoulos, D. V.; Zwirner, F.

    1985-12-01

    We consider model-independent constraints on the fourth-generation fermion masses and the magnitude of the D-term contribution to the scalar masses. We find that the ratio of vacuum expectation values is limited to the range 1/5 ~ 150 GeV. A general feature of the four-generation models is thus a heavy spectrum of sparticles. On leave from International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua, Italy.

  19. The Fourth Way in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa Iitti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the general history of the Fourth Way in Finland. The Fourth Way, or simply ‘the Work’, began as a Greco-Armenian man named Georges Ivanovich Gurdjieff (1866?–1949 gathered groups of pupils in St Petersburg and Moscow in 1912. To these groups, Gurdjieff started to teach what he had learned and synthesized between ca 1896 and 1912 during his travels on spiritual search of Egypt, Crete, Sumeria, Assyria, the Holy Land, Mecca, Ethiopia, Sudan, India, Afghanistan, the northern valleys of Siberia, and Tibet. Neither Gurdjieff nor any of his disciples called themselves a church, a sect, or anything alike, but referred to themselves simply as ‘the Work’, or as ‘the Fourth Way’. The name ‘the Fourth Way’ originates in a Gurdjieffian view that there are essentially three traditional ways of spiritual work: those of a monk, a fakir, and a yogi. These ways do not literally refer to the activities of a monk, a fakir, and a yogi, but to similar types of spiritual work emphasizing exercise of emotion, body, or mind. Gurdjieff’s teaching is a blend of various influences that include Suf­ism, orthodox Christianity, Buddhism, Kabbalah, and general elem­ents of various occult teachings of both the East and the West. Gurdjieff’s teaching is a blend of various influences that include Suf­ism, orthodox Christianity, Buddhism, Kabbalah, and general elem­ents of various occult teachings of both the East and the West. It is a unique combination of cosmology, psychology, theory of evolution, and overall theory and practise aiming to help individ­uals in their efforts towards what is called ‘self-remembering’.

  20. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  1. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  2. NASA Space Radiation Transport Code Development Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lawrence W

    2005-01-01

    Recently, NASA established a consortium involving the University of Tennessee (lead institution), the University of Houston, Roanoke College and various government and national laboratories, to accelerate the development of a standard set of radiation transport computer codes for NASA human exploration applications. This effort involves further improvements of the Monte Carlo codes HETC and FLUKA and the deterministic code HZETRN, including developing nuclear reaction databases necessary to extend the Monte Carlo codes to carry out heavy ion transport, and extending HZETRN to three dimensions. The improved codes will be validated by comparing predictions with measured laboratory transport data, provided by an experimental measurements consortium, and measurements in the upper atmosphere on the balloon-borne Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB). In this paper, we present an overview of the consortium members and the current status and future plans of consortium efforts to meet the research goals and objectives of this extensive undertaking.

  3. International Radical Cystectomy Consortium: A way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Johar Raza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC is an emerging operative alternative to open surgery for the management of invasive bladder cancer. Studies from single institutions provide limited data due to the small number of patients. In order to better understand the related outcomes, a world-wide consortium was established in 2006 of patients undergoing RARC, called the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium (IRCC. Thus far, the IRCC has reported its findings on various areas of operative interest and continues to expand its capacity to include other operative modalities and transform it into the International Radical Cystectomy Consortium. This article summarizes the findings of the IRCC and highlights the future direction of the consortium.

  4. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Gene Ontology Consortium: going forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO; http://www.geneontology.org) is a community-based bioinformatics resource that supplies information about gene product function using ontologies to represent biological knowledge. Here we describe improvements and expansions to several branches of the ontology, as well as updates that have allowed us to more efficiently disseminate the GO and capture feedback from the research community. The Gene Ontology Consortium (GOC) has expanded areas of the ontology such as cilia-related terms, cell-cycle terms and multicellular organism processes. We have also implemented new tools for generating ontology terms based on a set of logical rules making use of templates, and we have made efforts to increase our use of logical definitions. The GOC has a new and improved web site summarizing new developments and documentation, serving as a portal to GO data. Users can perform GO enrichment analysis, and search the GO for terms, annotations to gene products, and associated metadata across multiple species using the all-new AmiGO 2 browser. We encourage and welcome the input of the research community in all biological areas in our continued effort to improve the Gene Ontology. PMID:25428369

  6. Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

  7. Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayman Hawari; Nolan Hertel; Mohamed Al-Sheikhly; Laurence Miller; Abdel-Moeze Bayoumi; Ali Haghighat; Kenneth Lewis

    2010-12-29

    2 Project Summary: The Multi-University Southeast INIE Consortium (MUSIC) was established in response to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education (INIE) program. MUSIC was established as a consortium composed of academic members and national laboratory partners. The members of MUSIC are the nuclear engineering programs and research reactors of Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), North Carolina State University (NCSU), University of Maryland (UMD), University of South Carolina (USC), and University of Tennessee (UTK). The University of Florida (UF), and South Carolina State University (SCSU) were added to the MUSIC membership in the second year. In addition, to ensure proper coordination between the academic community and the nation’s premier research and development centers in the fields of nuclear science and engineering, MUSIC created strategic partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) including the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project and the Joint Institute for Neutron Scattering (JINS), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). A partnership was also created with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) with the aim of utilizing their reactor in research if funding becomes available. Consequently, there are three university research reactors (URRs) within MUSIC, which are located at NCSU (1-MW PULSTAR), UMD (0.25-MW TRIGA) and UF (0.10-MW Argonaut), and the AFRRI reactor (1-MW TRIGA MARK F). The overall objectives of MUSIC are: a) Demonstrate that University Research Reactors (URR) can be used as modern and innovative instruments of research in the basic and applied sciences, which include applications in fundamental physics, materials science and engineering, nondestructive examination, elemental analysis, and contributions to research in the health and medical sciences, b) Establish a strong technical collaboration between the nuclear engineering

  8. The fourth dimension simply explained

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Henry P

    2005-01-01

    To remove the contents of an egg without puncturing its shell or to drink the liquor in a bottle without removing the cork is clearly unthinkable - or is it? Understanding the world of Einstein and curved space requires a logical conception of the fourth dimension.This readable, informative volume provides an excellent introduction to that world, with 22 essays that employ a minimum of mathematics. Originally written for a contest sponsored by Scientific American, these essays are so well reasoned and lucidly written that they were judged to merit publication in book form. Their easily unders

  9. Fourth order deformed general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cuttell, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Whenever the condition of anomaly freedom is imposed within the framework of effective approaches to loop quantum cosmology, one seems to conclude that a deformation of general covariance is required. Here, starting from a general deformation we regain an effective gravitational Lagrangian including terms up to fourth order in extrinsic curvature. We subsequently constrain the form of the corrections, and then investigate the conditions for the occurrence of a big bounce and the realisation of an inflationary era, in the presence of a perfect fluid or scalar field.

  10. Fourth Thematic CERN School of Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    Alberto Pace, CSC Director

    2016-01-01

    The Fourth Thematic School of Computing (tCSC2016) takes place this year in Split, Croatia, from 22 to 28 May 2016.   The theme is "Efficient and Parallel Processing of Scientific Data", looking at: The challenge of scientific data processing: commonalities, analogies and the main differences between different sciences. Size of scientific software projects. Parallelism and asynchronism: computation and I/O. The School is open to postgraduate students and research workers with a few years' experience in elementary particle physics, computing, engineering or related fields.  All applicants are welcome, including former and future participants in the main CSC summer school. Registration will close on 15 February and participation is limited to 24 students. To register, please go here. About: The Thematic Schools are part of the annual series of CERN Schools of Computing, to promote advanced learning and knowledge exchange on the subject of scientific compu...

  11. Molecular characterization of a toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficker, M; Krastel, K; Orlicky, S; Edwards, E

    1999-12-01

    A toluene-degrading methanogenic consortium enriched from creosote-contaminated aquifer material was maintained on toluene as the sole carbon and energy source for 10 years. The species in the consortium were characterized by using a molecular approach. Total genomic DNA was isolated, and 16S rRNA genes were amplified by using PCR performed with kingdom-specific primers that were specific for 16S rRNA genes from either members of the kingdom Bacteria or members of the kingdom Archaea. A total of 90 eubacterial clones and 75 archaeal clones were grouped by performing a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Six eubacterial sequences and two archaeal sequences were found in the greatest abundance (in six or more clones) based on the RFLP analysis. The relative abundance of each putative species was estimated by using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and the presence of putative species was determined qualitatively by performing slot blot hybridization with consortium DNA. Both archaeal species and two of the six eubacterial species were detected in the DNA and FISH hybridization experiments. A phylogenetic analysis of these four dominant organisms suggested that the two archaeal species are related to the genera Methanosaeta and Methanospirillum. One of the eubacterial species is related to the genus Desulfotomaculum, while the other is not related to any previously described genus. By elimination, we propose that the last organism probably initiates the attack on toluene.

  12. Fourth International Conference on Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Minai, Ali A; Unifying Themes in Complex Systems IV

    2008-01-01

    In June of 2002, over 500 professors, students and researchers met in Boston, Massachusetts for the Fourth International Conference on Complex Systems. The attendees represented a remarkably diverse collection of fields: biology, ecology, physics, engineering, computer science, economics, psychology and sociology, The goal of the conference was to encourage cross-fertilization between the many disciplines represented and to deepen understanding of the properties common to all complex systems. This volume contains 43 papers selected from the more than 200 presented at the conference. Topics include: cellular automata, neurology, evolution, computer science, network dynamics, and urban planning. About NECSI: For over 10 years, The New England Complex Systems Institute (NECSI) has been instrumental in the development of complex systems science and its applications. NECSI conducts research, education, knowledge dissemination, and community development around the world for the promotion of the study of complex sys...

  13. Fourth ventricle meningiomas: a rare entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichierri, Angelo; Ruggeri, Andrea; Morselli, Carlotta; Delfini, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    Fourth ventricle meningiomas (FVMs) are rare, often misdiagnosed, lesions. To the best of our knowledge, 47 cases have been reported in the literature: we describe our series of three cases treated at our Institution, focusing on some diagnostic tips and intraoperative features of these tumours. Our three patients have a history of headache. Gait disturbances, vomiting and/or diplopia complicated the clinical picture before the referral at our Department. The operations were uneventful, and the patients fully recovered from neurological symptoms. They are free of recurrence at a median follow-up of 19 years. FVMs are rare lesions, which are difficult to differentiate preoperatively from the much more common ependymomas. A preoperative distinction would be extremely advantageous: indeed, although both tumours share similar radiological and clinical patterns, they clearly differ as to surgical difficulty and outcome. In fact, meningiomas are comparatively easier to remove, granting better clinical results.

  14. The Fourth Amendment: Dormitory Room Searches in Public Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph M.; Strope, John L., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Examines 15 cases dealing with dormitory searches covering a 31-year period to determine how the Fourth Amendment applies to dormitory searches. The prevailing consensus is that if a university says and thinks it has the right to conduct a search of a room for health, safety, and maintenance reasons, then, in most circumstances, it has this right.…

  15. Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium - Testing and Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, Benjamin; Skare, Paul; Pratt, Rob; Kim, Tom; Ellis, Abraham

    2017-05-11

    This paper highlights some of the unique testing capabilities and projects being performed at several national laboratories as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium. As part of this effort, the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium Testing Network isbeing developed to accelerate grid modernization by enablingaccess to a comprehensive testing infrastructure and creating a repository of validated models and simulation tools that will be publicly available. This work is key to accelerating thedevelopment, validation, standardization, adoption, and deployment of new grid technologies to help meet U. S. energy goals.

  16. The COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casaburi, Richard; Celli, Bartolome; Crapo, James

    2013-01-01

    , and no interested party has been in a position to undertake such a process. In order to facilitate the development of novel tools to assess new treatments, the Food and Drug Administration, in collaboration with the COPD Foundation, the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute and scientists from the pharmaceutical...... industry and academia conducted a workshop to survey the available information that could contribute to new tools. Based on this, a collaborative project, the COPD Biomarkers Qualification Consortium, was initiated. The Consortium in now actively preparing integrated data sets from existing resources...... that can address the problem of drug development tools for COPD....

  17. 78 FR 40084 - Proposed Requirement-Migrant Education Program Consortium Incentive Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grant (CIG) Program from two years to three years. We take this action... achieving the objectives and outcomes that were established in their approved CIG program application. DATES....gillette@ed.gov . You must include the term ``CIG- Duration'' in the subject line of your electronic...

  18. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  19. Fourth Lepton Family is Natural in Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    T. Frandsen, Mads; Masina, Isabella; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    structure with and without mixing with the Standard Model families. We also analyze the LHC potential to observe the fourth lepton family in tandem with the new composite Higgs dynamics. We finally introduce a model uniting the fourth lepton family and the technifermion sector at higher energies.......Imagine to discover a new fourth family of leptons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) but no signs of an associated fourth family of quarks. What would that imply? An intriguing possibility is that the new fermions needed to compensate for the new leptons gauge anomalies simultaneously address...

  20. Fourth World Theory: The Evolution of . . .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olon F. Dotson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fourth World theory is a methodology for examining and developing greater understanding of the extent of the distress and abandonment commonly found in the cores of American cities resulting from de-industrialization, historic segregation and discrimination patterns, suburban sprawl, erosion of a viable tax base, racism, inability to embrace the concept of desegregation and civil rights legislation, fear, despair, crumbling infrastructure systems, disinvestment in urban school systems, and environmental justice issues. This article uses the analytical lens of Fourth World theory to examine how such structural and cultural forces contributed to the severely distressed conditions now found in the city of Gary, Indiana. Tracking its one-hundred-year history, from its founding as an industrial town through its post-industrial decline occurring during the city’s first African-American mayor’s five terms in office, the methodology clearly demonstrates how the social construction of race has systematically undermined every aspect of Gary’s overall quality of life. To illustrate that this city is not an anomaly but rather reflects a typical pattern of disparity and uneven development arising from racist practices, Gary is compared to other cities of similar size and also to the much larger Detroit. The article triangulates academic literature, news media archives, and an oral history provided by the mayor to show how Gary evolved from being a model industrial city to a cauldron of racial disparity. The paper concludes by arguing that continued absence of reflection on the nation’s historical racialization of place threatens not just impoverished communities of color, but also the sustainability of the entire nation.

  1. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Griffith (Linda); M. Cowan (Morton); L.D. Notarangelo (Luigi Daniele); R. Kohn (Robert); J. Puck (Jennifer); S.-Y. Pai (Sung-Yun); B. Ballard (Barbara); S.C. Bauer (Sarah); J. Bleesing (Jack); M. Boyle (Marcia); R.W. Brower (Ronald); R.H. Buckley (Rebecca); M. van der Burg (Mirjam); L.M. Burroughs (Lauri); F. Candotti (Fabio); A. Cant (Andrew); T. Chatila (Talal); C. Cunningham-Rundles (Charlotte); M.C. Dinauer (Mary); J. Dvorak (Jennie); A. Filipovich (Alexandra); L.A. Fleisher (Lee); H.B. Gaspar (Bobby); T. Gungor (Tayfun); E. Haddad (Elie); E. Hovermale (Emily); F. Huang (Faith); A. Hurley (Alan); M. Hurley (Mary); S.K. Iyengar (Sudha); E.M. Kang (Elizabeth); B.R. Logan (Brent); J.R. Long-Boyle (Janel); H. Malech (Harry); S.A. McGhee (Sean); S. Modell (Sieglinde); S. Modell (Sieglinde); H.D. Ochs (Hans); R.J. O'Reilly (Richard); R. Parkman (Robertson); D. Rawlings (D.); J.M. Routes (John); P. Shearer (P.); T.N. Small (Trudy); H. Smith (H.); K.E. Sullivan (Kathleen); P. Szabolcs (Paul); A.J. Thrasher (Adrian); D. Torgerson; P. Veys (Paul); K. Weinberg (Kenneth); J.C. Zuniga-Pflucker (Juan Carlos)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SC

  2. Microbial Degradation of Aniline by Bacterial Consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN-LONG WANG; ZE-YU MAO; WEI-ZHONG WU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the characteristics of microbial degradation of aniline by a stable bacterial consortium. Methods The bacterial consortium was isolated from activated sludge treating chemical wastewater using aniline as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen by enrichment and isolation technique. The biomass was measured as optical density (OD) at 510 nm using a spectrophotometer. Aniline concentrations were determined by spectrophotometer. The intermediates of aniline degradation were identified by GC/MS method. Results The bacterial consortium could grow at a range of aniline concentrations between 50 and 500 mg/L. The optimal pH and temperature for aniline degradation were determined to be 7.0 and 30, respectively. The presence of NH4NO3 as an additional nitrogen source (100-500 mg/L) had no adverse effect on bacterial growth and aniline degradation. The presence of heavy metal ions, such as Co2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Mn2+ and Cu2+ had an inhibitory effect on aniline degradation. Conclusions The isolated bacterial consortium candegrade aniline up to 500 mg/L effectively and tolerate some heavy metal ions that commonly exist in chemical wastewater. It has a potential to be applied in the practical treatment of aniline-containingwastewater.

  3. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    TBI Translational Research Consortium Executive Committee Steering Committee Model of Injury Working Group Neuroprotection Working Group Regeneration ...Report, Holcomb Page 22 Specific aim #3.1: To study neuroprotection and enhanced neurological recovery with erythropoietin ( Epo ) and Epo ...derivatives after MTBI. - #3.1.1 To study the effects of Epo and Epo derivatives on neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and outcome after experimental MTBI

  4. The Digital Preservation Consortium: Mission and Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Donald J.; Kenney, Anne

    The development of the National Information Infrastructure (NII) and the growing use of the Internet are creating a rapidly-changing environment for collaborative preservation and access. Within this environment, the Digital Preservation Consortium (DPC) seeks to advance the use and utility of digital technology for the preservation of and access…

  5. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  6. Radiation Therapy Versus No Radiation Therapy to the Neo-breast Following Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Immediate Autologous Free Flap Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: Patient-Reported and Surgical Outcomes at 1 Year-A Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC) Substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Andrew L; Diaz-Abele, Julian; Hayakawa, Tom; Buchel, Ed; Dalke, Kimberly; Lambert, Pascal

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) is associated with adverse patient-reported outcomes and surgical complications 1 year after skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer. We compared 24 domains of patient-reported outcome measures 1 year after autologous reconstruction between patients who received adjuvant RT and those who did not. A total of 125 patients who underwent surgery between 2012 and 2015 at our institution were included from the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium study database. Adjusted multivariate models were created incorporating RT technical data, age, cancer stage, estrogen receptor, chemotherapy, breast size, body mass index, and income to determine whether RT was associated with outcomes. At 1 year after surgery, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire breast symptoms were significantly greater in 64 patients who received RT (8-point difference on 100-point ordinal scale, PBREAST-Q (Post-operative Reconstruction Module), Patient-Report Outcomes Measurement Information System Profile 29, McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF) score, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and Patient Health Questionnaire-were not statistically different between groups. Surgical complications were uncommon and did not differ by treatment. RT to the neo-breast compared with no RT following immediate autologous free flap reconstruction for breast cancer is well tolerated at 1 year following surgery despite patients undergoing RT also having a higher cancer stage and more intensive surgical and systemic treatment. Neo-breast symptoms are more common in patients receiving RT by the EORTC Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire but not by the BREAST-Q. Patient-reported results at 1 year after surgery suggest RT following immediate autologous free flap breast reconstruction is well tolerated

  7. Antibody persistence for up to 5 years after a fourth dose of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis serogroups C and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) given at 12-15 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gary S; Blatter, Mark; Marchant, Colin; Aris, Emmanuel; Mesaros, Narcisa; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2013-06-01

    A 4-dose series of recently licensed Haemophilus influenzae type b-meningococcal serogroups C and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (HibMenCY-TT) was immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in infants, with antibodies persisting in most participants for 1 year following dose 4. This study assessed antibody persistence up to 5 years after vaccination. Participants had received HibMenCY-TT or Hib-TT at 2, 4 and 6 months of age. At age 12-15 months, HibMenCY-TT vaccinees received a fourth HibMenCY-TT dose (HibMenCY x 4 group), whereas those who received Hib-TT received a fourth dose of either Hib-TT (Hib) or HibMenCY-TT (HibMenCY x 1). Blood samples were collected 1 month and 1, 3 and 5 years after the last dose for measurement of antipolyribosylribitol phosphate (the Hib capsular polysaccharide) antibodies and serum bactericidal activity (human complement source) against meningococcal serogroups C and Y. Five years after the fourth dose, the percentages of children with antipolyribosylribitol phosphate ≥0.15 μg/mL in HibMenCY x 4, HibMenCY x 1 and Hib groups were 98.8% (95% confidence interval: 93.5%-100%), 97.3% (85.8%-99.9%) and 92.3% (79.1%-98.4%), respectively. The percentages with human complement serum bactericidal activity ≥1:8 for meningococcal serogroup C were 82.9% (72.5%-90.6%), 73.5% (55.6%-87.1%) and 21.1% (9.6%-37.3%), respectively. The percentages with human complement serum bactericidal activity ≥1:8 for serogroup Y were 69.5% (58.4%-79.2%), 54.3% (36.6%-71.2%) and 18.4% (7.7%-34.3%), respectively. HibMenCY-TT given as a 4-dose series or as a single dose at 12-15 months of age induced immune responses for all 3 antigens that lasted for up to 5 years after vaccination in more than half of recipients.

  8. United States housing, fourth quarter 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman

    2017-01-01

    In the beginning of 2013, the U.S. housing construction market indicated increases in all sectors; yet, by the fourth quarter’s end, only housing under construction improved. Moderation and declines are to be expected in the fourth quarter, as winter is setting in. Permits, starts, housing under construction, completions, and new and existing house sales all exceeded...

  9. Geodesy and the UNAVCO Consortium: Three Decades of Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L. R.; Miller, M. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    UNAVCO, a non-profit, university consortium that supports geoscience research using geodesy, began with the ingenious recognition that the nascent Global Positioning System constellation (GPS) could be used to investigate earth processes. The consortium purchased one of the first commercially available GPS receivers, Texas Instrument's TI-4100 NAVSTAR Navigator, in 1984 to measure plate deformation. This early work was highlighted in a technology magazine, GPSWorld, in 1990. Over a 30-year period, UNAVCO and the community have helped advance instrument design for mobility, flexibility, efficiency and interoperability, so research could proceed with higher precision and under ever challenging conditions. Other innovations have been made in data collection, processing, analysis, management and archiving. These innovations in tools, methods and data have had broader impacts as they have found greater utility beyond research for timing, precise positioning, safety, communication, navigation, surveying, engineering and recreation. Innovations in research have expanded the utility of geodetic tools beyond the solid earth science through creative analysis of the data and the methods. For example, GPS sounding of the atmosphere is now used for atmospheric and space sciences. GPS reflectrometry, another critical advance, supports soil science, snow science and ecological research. Some research advances have had broader impacts for society by driving innovations in hazards risk reduction, hazards response, resource management, land use planning, surveying, engineering and other uses. Furthermore, the geodetic data is vital for the design of space missions, testing and advancing communications, and testing and dealing with interference and GPS jamming. We will discuss three decades (and counting) of advances by the National Science Foundation's premiere geodetic facility, consortium and some of the many geoscience principal investigators that have driven innovations in

  10. Mandibular asymmetry and the fourth dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B

    2009-03-01

    This paper represents more than 30 years of discussion and collaboration with Drs Joseph Murray and John Mulliken in an attempt to understand growth patterns over time (ie, fourth dimension) in patients with hemifacial microsomia (HFM). This is essential for the development of rational treatment protocols for children and adults with jaw asymmetry. Traditionally, HFM was thought of as a unilateral deformity, but it was recognized that 20% to 30% of patients had bilateral abnormalities. However, early descriptions of skeletal correction addressed almost exclusively lengthening of the short (affected) side of the face. Based on longitudinal clinical observations of unoperated HFM patients, we hypothesized that abnormal mandibular growth is the earliest skeletal manifestation and that restricted growth of the mandible plays a pivotal role in progressive distortion of both the ipsilateral and contralateral facial skeleton. This hypothesis explains the progressive nature of the asymmetry in patients with HFM and provides the rationale for surgical lengthening of the mandible in children to prevent end-stage deformity. During the past 30 years, we have learned that this phenomenon of progressive distortion of the adjacent and contralateral facial skeleton occurs with other asymmetric mandibular undergrowth (tumor resection, radiation therapy, or posttraumatic defects) and overgrowth (mandibular condylar hyperplasia) conditions. In this paper, I describe the progression of deformity with time in patients with mandibular asymmetry as a result of undergrowth and overgrowth. Understanding these concepts is critical for the development of rational treatment protocols for adults with end-stage asymmetry and for children to minimize secondary deformity.

  11. Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-03-31

    On September 30, 2008, the US Department of Energy (DoE), issued a cooperative agreement award, DE-FC26-08NT01914, to the Metropolitan Energy Center (MEC), for a project known as “Kansas Consortium Plug-in Hybrid Medium Duty Certification” project. The cooperative agreement was awarded pursuant to H15915 in reference to H. R. 2764 Congressionally Directed Projects. The original agreement provided funding for The Consortium to implement the established project objectives as follows: (1) to understand the current state of the development of a test protocol for PHEV configurations; (2) to work with industry stakeholders to recommend a medium duty vehicle test protocol; (3) to utilize the Phase 1 Eaton PHEV F550 Chassis or other appropriate PHEV configurations to conduct emissions testing; (4) and to make an industry PHEV certification test protocol recommendation for medium duty trucks. Subsequent amendments to the initial agreement were made, the most significant being a revised Scope of Project Objectives (SOPO) that did not address actual field data since it was not available as originally expected. This project was mated by DOE with a parallel project award given to the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in California. The SCAQMD project involved designing, building and testing of five medium duty plug-in hybrid electric trucks. SCAQMD had contracted with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to manage the project. EPRI provided the required match to the federal grant funds to both the SCAQMD project and the Kansas Consortium project. The rational for linking the two projects was that the data derived from the SCAQMD project could be used to validate the protocols developed by the Kansas Consortium team. At the same time, the consortium team would be a useful resource to SCAQMD in designating their test procedures for emissions and operating parameters and determining vehicle mileage. The years between award of the cooperative

  12. A History of the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium and Its Model Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kim B.; Cupper, Robert D.; Scot Drysdale, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    With the support of a grant from the Sloan Foundation, nine computer scientists from liberal arts colleges came together in October, 1984 to form the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium (LACS) and to create a model curriculum appropriate for liberal arts colleges. Over the years the membership has grown and changed, but the focus has remained…

  13. A History of the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium and Its Model Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Kim B.; Cupper, Robert D.; Scot Drysdale, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    With the support of a grant from the Sloan Foundation, nine computer scientists from liberal arts colleges came together in October, 1984 to form the Liberal Arts Computer Science Consortium (LACS) and to create a model curriculum appropriate for liberal arts colleges. Over the years the membership has grown and changed, but the focus has remained…

  14. Consortium for Verification Technology Fellowship Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Lorraine E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-01

    As one recipient of the Consortium for Verification Technology (CVT) Fellowship, I spent eight days as a visiting scientist at the University of Michigan, Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences (NERS). During this time, I participated in multiple department and research group meetings and presentations, met with individual faculty and students, toured multiple laboratories, and taught one-half of a one-unit class on Risk Analysis in Nuclear Arms control (six 1.5 hour lectures). The following report describes some of the interactions that I had during my time as well as a brief discussion of the impact of this fellowship on members of the consortium and on me/my laboratory’s technical knowledge and network.

  15. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsztein, Alexandra M; Brooks, Philip J; Dugan, Vivien G; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Guo, Max; Howcroft, T Kevin; Kelley, Christine A; Kuo, Lillian S; Labosky, Patricia A; Lenzi, Rebecca; McKie, George A; Mohla, Suresh; Procaccini, Dena; Reilly, Matthew; Satterlee, John S; Srinivas, Pothur R; Church, Elizabeth Stansell; Sutherland, Margaret; Tagle, Danilo A; Tucker, Jessica M; Venkatachalam, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    The Extracellular RNA (exRNA) Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a) generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b) defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies,

  16. Overview of the Inland California Translational Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkas, Linda H.

    2017-05-01

    The mission of the Inland California Translational Consortium (ICTC), an independent research consortium comprising a unique hub of regional institutions (City of Hope [COH], California Institute of Technology [Caltech], Jet Propulsion Laboratory [JPL], University of California Riverside [UCR], and Claremont Colleges Keck Graduate Institute [KGI], is to institute a new paradigm within the academic culture to accelerate translation of innovative biomedical discoveries into clinical applications that positively affect human health and life. The ICTC actively supports clinical translational research as well as the implementation and advancement of novel education and training models for the translation of basic discoveries into workable products and practices that preserve and improve human health while training and educating at all levels of the workforce using innovative forward-thinking approaches.

  17. The STRONG STAR Multidisciplinary PTSD Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    myocardial infarction and pre- dicting variables. J. Psychosom. Res. 69, 143e150. Harvey, B.H., Brand, L., Jeeva, Z., Stein, D.J., 2006. Cortical...For the STRONG STAR Consortium. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com j our na l h omepa g e: www.e l se v ie r.c om /l oca te/ psyne ue n 0306

  18. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Consortium Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    This is the third progress report of the M.I.T. Home Automation and Healthcare Consortium-Phase Two. It covers majority of the new findings, concepts...research projects of home automation and healthcare, ranging from human modeling, patient monitoring, and diagnosis to new sensors and actuators, physical...aids, human-machine interface and home automation infrastructure. This report contains several patentable concepts, algorithms, and designs.

  19. Removal of triphenylmethane dyes by bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriaa, Jihane; Khaireddine, Monia; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2012-01-01

    A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila)-(CM-4) was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L) and malachite green (50 mg/L) dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  20. Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Linda M; Cowan, Morton J; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Kohn, Donald B; Puck, Jennifer M; Pai, Sung-Yun; Ballard, Barbara; Bauer, Sarah C; Bleesing, Jack J H; Boyle, Marcia; Brower, Amy; Buckley, Rebecca H; van der Burg, Mirjam; Burroughs, Lauri M; Candotti, Fabio; Cant, Andrew J; Chatila, Talal; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Dinauer, Mary C; Dvorak, Christopher C; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Fleisher, Thomas A; Bobby Gaspar, Hubert; Gungor, Tayfun; Haddad, Elie; Hovermale, Emily; Huang, Faith; Hurley, Alan; Hurley, Mary; Iyengar, Sumathi; Kang, Elizabeth M; Logan, Brent R; Long-Boyle, Janel R; Malech, Harry L; McGhee, Sean A; Modell, Fred; Modell, Vicki; Ochs, Hans D; O'Reilly, Richard J; Parkman, Robertson; Rawlings, David J; Routes, John M; Shearer, William T; Small, Trudy N; Smith, Heather; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Szabolcs, Paul; Thrasher, Adrian; Torgerson, Troy R; Veys, Paul; Weinberg, Kenneth; Zuniga-Pflucker, Juan Carlos

    2014-02-01

    The Primary Immune Deficiency Treatment Consortium (PIDTC) is a network of 33 centers in North America that study the treatment of rare and severe primary immunodeficiency diseases. Current protocols address the natural history of patients treated for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease through retrospective, prospective, and cross-sectional studies. The PIDTC additionally seeks to encourage training of junior investigators, establish partnerships with European and other International colleagues, work with patient advocacy groups to promote community awareness, and conduct pilot demonstration projects. Future goals include the conduct of prospective treatment studies to determine optimal therapies for primary immunodeficiency diseases. To date, the PIDTC has funded 2 pilot projects: newborn screening for SCID in Navajo Native Americans and B-cell reconstitution in patients with SCID after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Ten junior investigators have received grant awards. The PIDTC Annual Scientific Workshop has brought together consortium members, outside speakers, patient advocacy groups, and young investigators and trainees to report progress of the protocols and discuss common interests and goals, including new scientific developments and future directions of clinical research. Here we report the progress of the PIDTC to date, highlights of the first 2 PIDTC workshops, and consideration of future consortium objectives.

  1. Removal of Triphenylmethane Dyes by Bacterial Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihane Cheriaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new consortium of four bacterial isolates (Agrobacterium radiobacter; Bacillus spp.; Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Aeromonas hydrophila-(CM-4 was used to degrade and to decolorize triphenylmethane dyes. All bacteria were isolated from activated sludge extracted from a wastewater treatment station of a dyeing industry plant. Individual bacterial isolates exhibited a remarkable color-removal capability against crystal violet (50 mg/L and malachite green (50 mg/L dyes within 24 h. Interestingly, the microbial consortium CM-4 shows a high decolorizing percentage for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively, 91% and 99% within 2 h. The rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD removal increases after 24 h, reaching 61.5% and 84.2% for crystal violet and malachite green, respectively. UV-Visible absorption spectra, FTIR analysis and the inspection of bacterial cells growth indicated that color removal by the CM-4 was due to biodegradation. Evaluation of mutagenicity by using Salmonella typhimurium test strains, TA98 and TA100 studies revealed that the degradation of crystal violet and malachite green by CM-4 did not lead to mutagenic products. Altogether, these results demonstrated the usefulness of the bacterial consortium in the treatment of the textile dyes.

  2. The Fourth World Conference on Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The Fourth World Conference on Women held in Beijing during September 4-15, 1995, was a major success. The platform for action adopted by consensus at the conference is comprised of the mission statement, a global framework, critical areas of concern, strategic objectives and actions, and institutional and financial arrangements. The conference was an extension of other large international conferences organized under UN initiative over the past 15 years. The Beijing platform of action aims to remove all obstacles to women's active participation in all spheres of public and private life through a full and equal share in economic, social, cultural, and political decision-making. The following concerns were defined by the conference: eradicating poverty, increasing school enrollment and eliminating gender inequalities in access to education, improving access to health care and eliminating gender inequalities in access to services, eliminating violence against women, mitigating the consequences of armed conflicts against women, securing equal access of men and women to economic resources and employment, providing equal participation of men and women in power structures and decision making, enhancing national mechanisms to promote the advancement of women, protecting the rights of girls and women, eradicating stereotypes about women, participating in the management of natural resources and environmental protection, and improving the status of girls.

  3. The Fourth Wave in Deterrence Research

    OpenAIRE

    Knopf, Jeffrey W.

    2010-01-01

    The article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13523261003640819 A new line of work on deterrence began emerging after the end of the Cold War and gained momentum after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Building on a previous characterization by Robert Jervis that identified three waves of deterrence research,1 this work is here designated the fourth wave. The fourth wave reflects a change from a focus on relatively symmetrical situations of mu...

  4. Within and beyond the 'fourth generation' of revolutionary theory

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, George

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in the study of revolutions. Yet the burgeoning interest in revolutionary events has not been matched by a comparable interest in the\\ud development of revolutionary theory. For the most part, empirical studies of revolutions remain contained within the parameters established by the ‘fourth generation’ of\\ud revolutionary theory. This body of work sees revolutions as conjunctural amalgams of systemic crisis, structural opening, and collective action, wh...

  5. Computer Aided Battery Engineering Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-07

    A multi-national lab collaborative team was assembled that includes experts from academia and industry to enhance recently developed Computer-Aided Battery Engineering for Electric Drive Vehicles (CAEBAT)-II battery crush modeling tools and to develop microstructure models for electrode design - both computationally efficient. Task 1. The new Multi-Scale Multi-Domain model framework (GH-MSMD) provides 100x to 1,000x computation speed-up in battery electrochemical/thermal simulation while retaining modularity of particles and electrode-, cell-, and pack-level domains. The increased speed enables direct use of the full model in parameter identification. Task 2. Mechanical-electrochemical-thermal (MECT) models for mechanical abuse simulation were simultaneously coupled, enabling simultaneous modeling of electrochemical reactions during the short circuit, when necessary. The interactions between mechanical failure and battery cell performance were studied, and the flexibility of the model for various batteries structures and loading conditions was improved. Model validation is ongoing to compare with test data from Sandia National Laboratories. The ABDT tool was established in ANSYS. Task 3. Microstructural modeling was conducted to enhance next-generation electrode designs. This 3- year project will validate models for a variety of electrodes, complementing Advanced Battery Research programs. Prototype tools have been developed for electrochemical simulation and geometric reconstruction.

  6. Higher serum ferritin level and lower femur neck strength in women at the stage of bone loss (≥ 45 years of age): The Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Seong Hee; Lee, Seokhyeon; Kim, Hyeonmok; Lee, Seung Hun; Kim, Beom-Jun; Koh, Jung-Min

    2016-11-01

    Despite the clear effect of iron on bone metabolism, most clinical studies related to bone health have only focused on bone mineral density (BMD). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between serum ferritin and composite indices of femur neck strength via a population-based, cross-sectional study using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Our study series included 693 women at the stage of bone loss (≥ 45 years of age), defined based on the observed patterns of age-related BMD changes in the KNHANES. Geometric bone structure properties, including hip axis length (HAL) and femur neck width (FNW), were measured using hip dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans and were combined with BMD, body weight, and height to create composite indices of femur neck strength relative to load in three different failure modes: compression (CSI), bending (BSI), and impact strength indices (ISI). After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), lifestyle factors, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcium and phosphorus intake, diabetes, and menopause status, multiple regression analyses revealed that serum ferritin was inversely associated with the BMD values at the lumbar spine and femur neck, and the femur neck cortical thickness. Importantly, in all adjustment models, higher serum ferritin was consistently associated with the lower values for all three femur neck composite indices, such as CSI, BSI, and ISI. These data provide the first clinical evidence that increased total body iron stores reflected by higher serum ferritin may be associated with the decrease of bone strength relative to load.

  7. Nelfinavir: fourth protease inhibitor approved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted accelerated approval to nelfinavir in both adult and pediatric formulations. Agouron, the manufacturer, used innovative computerized drug design techniques to discover, design, and refine the nelfinavir molecule. Nelfinavir is marketed under the trade name Viracept, and costs $5,000 per year. Early clinical trials find it to be as powerful as the other protease inhibitors, but with a different resistance profile. The drug has relatively few drug indications; however, several compounds have been contraindicated.

  8. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  9. CAS Joins Asian Consortium of Science Academies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ CAS formally became a member of the Association of Academies of Sciences in Asia (AASA) at the fourth general assembly of AASA from Sept. 23 to 25 in Tehran, Iran. A CAS delegation headed by Vice-President Yang Bailing attended the conference.

  10. International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Cancer Proteogenome Consortium (ICPC), is a voluntary scientific organization that provides a forum for collaboration among some of the world's leading cancer and proteogenomic research centers.

  11. Car-2-Car Communication Consortium - Manifesto

    OpenAIRE

    Baldessari, Roberto; Bödekker, Bert; Deegener, Matthias; Festag, Andreas; Franz, Walter; Kellum, C. Christopher; Kosch, Timo; Kovacs, Andras; Lenardi, Massimiliano; Menig, Cornelius; Peichl, Timo; Röckl, Matthias; Seeberger, Dieter; Straßberger, Markus; Stratil, Hannes

    2007-01-01

    This document summarizes and describes the main building blocks of the Car2X Communication System as it is pursued by the Car2Car Communication Consortium (C2C-CC). “Car2X” means interactions among cars, between cars and infrastructures, and viceversa. It provides interested readers with an introduction to Car2X communications. It is intended to be a living document which will be complemented according to the progress of the work of the C2C-CC. One main objective of this document is to give i...

  12. University Research Consortium annual review meeting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

  13. The Naturalness of the Fourth SM Family

    CERN Document Server

    Sultansoy, S

    2009-01-01

    The necessity of the fourth family follows from the SM basics. According to flavor democracy the Dirac masses of the fourth SM family fermions are almost equal with preferable value 450 GeV, which corresponds to common (for all fundamental fermions) Yukawa coupling equal to SU(2) gauge coupling gW. In principle, one expect u4 a little bit lighter than d4, while nu4 could be essentially lighter than l4 due to Majorana mass terms for right-handed components of neutrinos. Obviously, the fourth family quarks will be copiously produced at the LHC. However, the first indication of the fourth SM family may be provided by early Higgs boson observation due to almost an order enhancement of the gluon fusion to Higgs cross-section. For the same reason the Tevatron still has a chance to observe the Higgs boson before the LHC. Concerning the fourth family leptons, in general, best place will be NLC/CLIC. However, for some mass regions and MNS matrix elements double discovery of both the nu4 and H could be possible at the ...

  14. CREAT A CONSORTIUM AND DEVELOP PREMIUM CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John M. Andresen

    2003-08-01

    The Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory and matching funds from industry and academic institutions continued to excel in developing innovative technologies to use coal and coal-derived feedstocks to produce premium carbon product. During Budget Period 5, eleven projects were supported and sub-contracted were awarded to seven organizations. The CPCPC held two meetings and one tutorial at various locations during the year. Budget Period 5 was a time of growth for CPCPC in terms of number of proposals and funding requested from members, projects funded and participation during meetings. Although the membership was stable during the first part of Budget Period 5 an increase in new members was registered during the last months of the performance period.

  15. Using fourth-year medical students' reflections to propose strategies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-13

    Dec 13, 2011 ... the pictures represented an experience or emotion that related to their visit to ... the Faculty of Health Sciences of the University of Pretoria to use the .... students didn't touch the patient, but were still involved in the discussion ...

  16. Disaster Medicine Training Through Simulations for Fourth-Year Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Marc G.; Cowan, Michael L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a six-day multiple-simulation exercise in the military disaster medical services training program of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences is described. It is the second part of a clerkship that includes a classroom/laboratory phase using a disaster problem-solving board game. (MSE)

  17. The Fourth R: A School-Based Adolescent Dating Violence Prevention Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Wolfe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a school-based primary prevention program (The Fourth R to prevent adolescent dating violence, and related risk behaviors. The cornerstone of The Fourth R is a 21-lesson skillbased curriculum delivered by teachers who receive specialized training, that promotes healthy relationships, and targets violence, high-risk sexual behavior, and substance use among adolescents. The Fourth R was evaluated in a cluster randomized trial in 20 schools. Results indicated that teaching youth healthy relationships and skills as part of their curriculum reduced physical dating violence, and increased condom use 2.5 years later.

  18. Fermentative hydrogen production by microbial consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maintinguer, Sandra I.; Fernandes, Bruna S.; Duarte, Iolanda C.S.; Saavedra, Nora Katia; Adorno, M. Angela T.; Varesche, M. Bernadete [Department of Hydraulics and Sanitation, School of Engineering of Sao Carlos, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Sao-carlense, 400, 13566-590 Sao Carlos-SP (Brazil)

    2008-08-15

    Heat pre-treatment of the inoculum associated to the pH control was applied to select hydrogen-producing bacteria and endospores-forming bacteria. The source of inoculum to the heat pre-treatment was from a UASB reactor used in the slaughterhouse waste treatment. The molecular biology analyses indicated that the microbial consortium presented microorganisms affiliated with Enterobacter cloacae (97% and 98%), Clostridium sp. (98%) and Clostridium acetobutyricum (96%), recognized as H{sub 2} and volatile acids' producers. The following assays were carried out in batch reactors in order to verify the efficiencies of sucrose conversion to H{sub 2} by the microbial consortium: (1) 630.0 mg sucrose/L, (2) 1184.0 mg sucrose/L, (3) 1816.0 mg sucrose/L and (4) 4128.0 mg sucrose/L. The subsequent yields were obtained as follows: 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 20% (1.6 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), 15% (1.2 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose) and 4% (0.3 mol H{sub 2}/mol sucrose), respectively. The intermediary products were acetic acid, butyric acid, methanol and ethanol in all of the anaerobic reactors. (author)

  19. The NIH Extracellular RNA Communication Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Ainsztein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Extracellular RNA (exRNA Communication Consortium, funded as an initiative of the NIH Common Fund, represents a consortium of investigators assembled to address the critical issues in the exRNA research arena. The overarching goal is to generate a multi-component community resource for sharing fundamental scientific discoveries, protocols, and innovative tools and technologies. The key initiatives include (a generating a reference catalogue of exRNAs present in body fluids of normal healthy individuals that would facilitate disease diagnosis and therapies, (b defining the fundamental principles of exRNA biogenesis, distribution, uptake, and function, as well as development of molecular tools, technologies, and imaging modalities to enable these studies, (c identifying exRNA biomarkers of disease, (d demonstrating clinical utility of exRNAs as therapeutic agents and developing scalable technologies required for these studies, and (e developing a community resource, the exRNA Atlas, to provide the scientific community access to exRNA data, standardized exRNA protocols, and other useful tools and technologies generated by funded investigators.

  20. LBL/JSU/AGMUS science consortium annual report, FY 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In 1983, a formal Memorandum of Understanding joined the Ana G. Mendez University System (AGMUS), Jackson State University (JSU), and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in a consortium designed to advance the science and technology programs of JSU and AGMUS. This is the first such collaboration between a Hispanic university system, a historically Black university, and a national laboratory. The goals of this alliance are basic and direct: to develop and effect a long-term, comprehensive program that will enable the campuses of AGMUS and JSU to provide a broad, high-quality offering in the natural and computer sciences, to increase the number of minority students entering these fields, and to contribute to scientific knowledge and the federal government`s science mission through research. This report documents the progress toward these goals and includes individual success stories. The LBL/JSU/AGMUS Science Consortium has developed plans for utilizing its program successes to help other institutions to adopt or adapt those elements of the model that have produced the greatest results. Within the five-year plan formulated in 1990 are eight major components, each with defining elements and goals. These elements have become the components of the Science Consortium`s current plan for expansion and propagation.

  1. Fourth Generation Leptons and Muon $g-2$

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Wei-Shu; Ma, Chien-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We consider the contributions to $g_\\mu-2$ from fourth generation heavy neutral and charged leptons, $N$ and $E$, at the one-loop level. Diagrammatically, there are two types of contributions: boson-boson-$N$, and $E$-$E$-boson in the loop diagram. In general, the effect from $N$ is suppressed by off-diagonal lepton mixing matrix elements. For $E$, we consider flavor changing neutral couplings arising from various New Physics models, which are stringently constrained by $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$. We assess how the existence of a fourth generation would affect these New Physics models.

  2. JACOBI PSEUDOSPECTRAL METHOD FOR FOURTH ORDER PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-su Wan; Ben-yu Guo; Zhong-qing Wang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate Jacobi pseudospectral method for fourth order problems.We establish some basic results on the Jacobi-Gauss-type interpolations in non-uniformly weighted Sobolev spaces, which serve as important tools in analysis of numerical quadratures, and numerical methods of differential and integral equations. Then we propose Jacobi pseudospectral schemes for several singular problems and multiple-dimensional problems of fourth order. Numerical results demonstrate the spectral accuracy of these schemes,and coincide well with theoretical analysis.

  3. STROKOG (stroke and cognition consortium): An international consortium to examine the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocognitive disorders in relation to cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdev, Perminder S; Lo, Jessica W; Crawford, John D; Mellon, Lisa; Hickey, Anne; Williams, David; Bordet, Régis; Mendyk, Anne-Marie; Gelé, Patrick; Deplanque, Dominique; Bae, Hee-Joon; Lim, Jae-Sung; Brodtmann, Amy; Werden, Emilio; Cumming, Toby; Köhler, Sebastian; Verhey, Frans R J; Dong, Yan-Hong; Tan, Hui Hui; Chen, Christopher; Xin, Xu; Kalaria, Raj N; Allan, Louise M; Akinyemi, Rufus O; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, Aleksandra; Dichgans, Martin; Wollenweber, Frank A; Zietemann, Vera; Hoffmann, Michael; Desmond, David W; Linden, Thomas; Blomstrand, Christian; Fagerberg, Björn; Skoog, Ingmar; Godefroy, Olivier; Barbay, Mélanie; Roussel, Martine; Lee, Byung-Chul; Yu, Kyung-Ho; Wardlaw, Joanna; Makin, Stephen J; Doubal, Fergus N; Chappell, Francesca M; Srikanth, Velandai K; Thrift, Amanda G; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Chander, Russell J; Lin, Xuling; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Moulin, Solene; Rossi, Costanza; Sabayan, Behnam; Stott, David J; Jukema, J Wouter; Melkas, Susanna; Jokinen, Hanna; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Mok, Vincent C T; Wong, Adrian; Lam, Bonnie Y K; Leys, Didier; Hénon, Hilde; Bombois, Stéphanie; Lipnicki, Darren M; Kochan, Nicole A

    2017-01-01

    The Stroke and Cognition consortium (STROKOG) aims to facilitate a better understanding of the determinants of vascular contributions to cognitive disorders and help improve the diagnosis and treatment of vascular cognitive disorders (VCD). Longitudinal studies with ≥75 participants who had suffered or were at risk of stroke or TIA and which evaluated cognitive function were invited to join STROKOG. The consortium will facilitate projects investigating rates and patterns of cognitive decline, risk factors for VCD, and biomarkers of vascular dementia. Currently, STROKOG includes 25 (21 published) studies, with 12,092 participants from five continents. The duration of follow-up ranges from 3 months to 21 years. Although data harmonization will be a key challenge, STROKOG is in a unique position to reuse and combine international cohort data and fully explore patient level characteristics and outcomes. STROKOG could potentially transform our understanding of VCD and have a worldwide impact on promoting better vascular cognitive outcomes.

  4. ICONE: An International Consortium of Neuro Endovascular Centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J; White, P; Kallmes, D F; Spears, J; Marotta, T; Roy, D; Guilbert, F; Weill, A; Nguyen, T; Molyneux, A J; Cloft, H; Cekirge, S; Saatci, I; Bracard, S; Meder, J F; Moret, J; Cognard, C; Qureshi, A I; Turk, A S; Berenstein, A

    2008-06-30

    The proliferation of new endovascular devices and therapeutic strategies calls for a prudentand rational evaluation of their clinical benefit. This evaluation must be done in an effective manner and in collaboration with industry. Such research initiative requires organisation a land methodological support to survive and thrive in a competitive environment. We propose the formation of an international consortium, an academic alliance committed to the pursuit of effective neurovascular therapies. Such a consortium would be dedicated to the designand execution of basic science, device developmentand clinical trials. The Consortium is owned and operated by its members. Members are international leaders in neurointerventional research and clinical practice. The Consortium brings competency, knowledge, and expertise to industry as well as to its membership across aspectrum of research initiatives such as: expedited review of clinical trials, protocol development, surveys and systematic reviews; laboratory expertise and support for research design and grant applications to public agencies. Once objectives and protocols are approved, the Consortium provides a stable network of centers capable of timely realization of clinical trials or pre clinical investigations in an optimal environment. The Consortium is a non-profit organization. The potential revenue generated from clientsponsored financial agreements will be redirected to the academic and research objectives of the organization. The Consortium wishes to work inconcert with industry, to support emerging trends in neurovascular therapeutic development. The Consortium is a realistic endeavour optimally structured to promote excellence through scientific appraisal of our treatments, and to accelerate technical progress while maximizing patients' safety and welfare.

  5. Growth behind the Mirror: The Family Therapy Consortium's Group Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendorf, Donald J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Charts the development of the Family Therapy Consortium, a group that provides supervision and continuing education in family therapy and explores the peer supervision process at work in the consortium. The focus is on individual and group development, which are seen as complementary aspects of the same growth process. (Author/NRB)

  6. International Arid Lands Consortium: A synopsis of accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Jeffrey O. Dawson; James T. Fisher; Itshack Moshe; Timothy E. Fulbright; W. Carter Johnson; Paul Verburg; Muhammad Shatanawi; Jim P. M. Chamie

    2003-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training activities related to the development, management, and reclamation of arid and semiarid lands in the Southwestern United States, the Middle East, and elsewhere in the world. The Consortium supports the ecological sustainability and environmentally sound...

  7. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma originating between the fourth and fifth metatarsal--case report and literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bolger, J C

    2010-09-01

    We report a case of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma arising between the fourth and fifth metatarsal. A 13-year-old boy presented to outpatients with a history of pain and swelling in the lateral aspect of his left forefoot. Plain radiographs and MRI showed a soft tissue mass displacing the fourth metatarsal. Percutaneous biopsy revealed an alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Staging scans showed advanced metastatic disease. The patient was treated with chemotherapy. This highly malignant lesion remains challenging to diagnose, and difficult to treat successfully.

  8. Fourth Semiannual Report to the Congress by the United States Atomic Energy Commission, July 1948

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilienthal, David E.; Bacher, Robert F.; Pike, Sumner T.; Strauss, Lewis L.; Waymack, William W.

    1948-07-01

    The document includes the letter of submittal and the Fourth semiannual report. These reports are called for pursuant to Section 17 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946. This fourth report incorporates some changes to the report. In order to make these reports of maximum value to Members of Congress, the Commission has prepared this mid-year report as a specialized document giving a comprehensive account of several major phases of the atomic energy program.

  9. Technical Progress Report for the Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-02-27

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of October 1, 2005 through December 31, 2005. Activities during this time period were: (1) Nomination and election of Executive Council members for 2006-07 term, (2) Release the 2006 GSTC request-for-proposals (RFP), (3) Recruit and invoice membership for FY2006, (4) Improve communication efforts, and (5) Continue planning the GSTC spring meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006.

  10. Singapore: The Fourth Way in Action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Andy

    2012-01-01

    This article has two main objectives. It first outlines the first three waves of change termed by Hargreaves and Shirley (The Fourth Way: The inspiring future for educational change. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, "2009") as the First, Second and Third Way that defined global educational policy and practice since the 1960s. It then…

  11. Teaching Fourth Generation Evaluation through Monologue Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Eric; Sparks, Cheryl

    1992-01-01

    This article illustrates the use of monologue interpretation, in which an interpreter illuminates issues in a speaker's monologue to translate theoretical pedagogical material into usable classroom applications. The example shows how the tenets of Guba and Lincoln's (1989) Responsive Constructivist Fourth Generation Model were presented via…

  12. Fourth Generation War: Paradigm for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    frustrated by the advantages that the weak acquire through 4GW, are also within the genre of the Fourth Generation. Terrorism is the strategy and tactic of...for SF. In order to examine these factors a brief overview of SF is necessary. 1. What Makes the SOF As per the techno-- thriller author Tom

  13. Vocabulary Strategies for a Fourth Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Gina

    2012-01-01

    For this project I worked with twelve of my fourth grade students from a local school in the southwestern part of Stokes County, North Carolina on increasing their vocabulary skills through the development and implementation of seven vocabulary strategies. During the Literature Review I came across the following seven strategies: Prediction;…

  14. An experiment with the fourth Futamura projection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glück, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We have experimentally validated the theoretical insight, that a compiler generator is an Ershov generating extension of a program specializer, by showing that an existing offline partial evaluator can perform the fourth Futamura projection. Specifically, an online and an offline partial evaluator...

  15. "Researching" with Third- and Fourth-Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, Barbara

    1970-01-01

    In order to instill in children the skills which will be basic to their school experience, words implying a process (such as "hemp,""parasite," and "vanilla") may be "researched" by third and fourth graders through the use of a dictionary, an encyclopedia, a supplementary book on the subject, and an interview with an adult. The child makes a…

  16. The Fourth Domain of Educational Objectives: Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Wes

    1985-01-01

    Tests the claim to comprehensiveness of Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives by analyzing educational objectives of some freshmen orientation programs and those connected with human developmental tasks. It is concluded that the taxonomy should be enlarged with a fourth domain: actual induction into tasks for which students are being…

  17. The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC) consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubernet, M. L.; Antony, B. K.; Ba, Y. A.; Babikov, Yu L.; Bartschat, K.; Boudon, V.; Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Daniel, F.; Delahaye, F.; Del Zanna, G.; de Urquijo, J.; Dimitrijević, M. S.; Domaracka, A.; Doronin, M.; Drouin, B. J.; Endres, C. P.; Fazliev, A. Z.; Gagarin, S. V.; Gordon, I. E.; Gratier, P.; Heiter, U.; Hill, C.; Jevremović, D.; Joblin, C.; Kasprzak, A.; Krishnakumar, E.; Leto, G.; Loboda, P. A.; Louge, T.; Maclot, S.; Marinković, B. P.; Markwick, A.; Marquart, T.; Mason, H. E.; Mason, N. J.; Mendoza, C.; Mihajlov, A. A.; Millar, T. J.; Moreau, N.; Mulas, G.; Pakhomov, Yu; Palmeri, P.; Pancheshnyi, S.; Perevalov, V. I.; Piskunov, N.; Postler, J.; Quinet, P.; Quintas-Sánchez, E.; Ralchenko, Yu; Rhee, Y.-J.; Rixon, G.; Rothman, L. S.; Roueff, E.; Ryabchikova, T.; Sahal-Bréchot, S.; Scheier, P.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmitt, B.; Stempels, E.; Tashkun, S.; Tennyson, J.; Tyuterev, Vl G.; Vujčić, V.; Wakelam, V.; Walton, N. A.; Zatsarinny, O.; Zeippen, C. J.; Zwölf, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC) Consortium is a worldwide consortium which federates atomic and molecular databases through an e-science infrastructure and an organisation to support this activity. About 90% of the inter-connected databases handle data that are used for the interpretation of astronomical spectra and for modelling in many fields of astrophysics. Recently the VAMDC Consortium has connected databases from the radiation damage and the plasma communities, as well as promoting the publication of data from Indian institutes. This paper describes how the VAMDC Consortium is organised for the optimal distribution of atomic and molecular data for scientific research. It is noted that the VAMDC Consortium strongly advocates that authors of research papers using data cite the original experimental and theoretical papers as well as the relevant databases. .

  18. On the Nature, Author, and Rhyming of Text Preached on the Emperor’s Birthday in the Zhongxing Hall in the Fourth Year of the Changxing Era%《长兴四年中兴殿应圣节讲经文》性质、作者与用韵研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程兴丽; 许松

    2015-01-01

    敦煌文献保留下来的《长兴四年中兴殿应圣节讲经文》并非是讲经的稿本,它的性质是骈雅化的案头文学而非通俗的说唱文本。至于作者,当是在云辩所用《仁王护国般若波罗蜜多经》的讲经文原稿基础上,秦王李从荣与心腹文人一起进行了集体润色加工。它的用韵艺术成就体现在:唱词基本合于近体诗格律,散文里的骈句合于平仄对应关系,也符合黏结的规律。%The Text Preached on the Emperor’s Birthday in the Zhongxing Hall in the Fourth Year of the Changxing Era kept among Dunhuang documents is not a draft for a sermon but rather an example of serious rhythmic prose. The rhyme patterns match those of metrical modern -style librettos with additional tonal patterns in parallel verse. Its author is likely Li Congrong, the Prince of Qin, and scholars in his service, who together polished a draft written by Yun Bian for preaching the Karunikaraja Sutra.

  19. Consortium sandbox: building and sharing resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Mark D

    2014-06-25

    Some common challenges of biomedical product translation-scientific, regulatory, adoption, and reimbursement-can best be addressed by the broad sharing of resources or tools. But, such aids remain undeveloped because the undertaking requires expertise from multiple research sectors as well as validation across organizations. Biomedical resource development can benefit from directed consortia-a partnership framework that provides neutral and temporary collaborative environments for several, oftentimes competing, organizations and leverages the aggregated intellect and resources of stakeholders so as to create versatile solutions. By analyzing 369 biomedical research consortia, we tracked consortia growth around the world and gained insight into how this partnership model advances biomedical research. Our analyses suggest that research-by-consortium provides benefit to biomedical science, but the model needs further optimization before it can be fully integrated into the biomedical research pipeline.

  20. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  1. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) Quarterly Report - Fourth Quarter FY-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 2009 (July - September 2009). Tasks reports include: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Objective Lightning Probability Tool. Phase III, (3) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting. Phase II, (4) Update and Maintain Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS), (5) Verify MesoNAM Performance (6) develop a Graphical User Interface to update selected parameters for the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLlT)

  2. The First Woman Doctor in the New Fourth Army

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    WHILE a university student in Kuomintang-controlled Shanghai, she met a Communist who changed her life. This man set her on the way to become the first woman doctor in the Communist New Fourth Army. Zhang Yangfen now enjoys her old age in peace and satisfaction with her fruitful life. Sitting under the grape arbor in her courtyard, Zhang recalls her past. Every Common Person Has Her Obligation To the Country My childhood was spent in the years when China was in a desperate situation and people were living in dire poverty.

  3. [Activity of NTDs Drug-discovery Research Consortium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namatame, Ichiji

    2016-01-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are an extremely important issue facing global health care. To improve "access to health" where people are unable to access adequate medical care due to poverty and weak healthcare systems, we have established two consortiums: the NTD drug discovery research consortium, and the pediatric praziquantel consortium. The NTD drug discovery research consortium, which involves six institutions from industry, government, and academia, as well as an international non-profit organization, is committed to developing anti-protozoan active compounds for three NTDs (Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, and African sleeping sickness). Each participating institute will contribute their efforts to accomplish the following: selection of drug targets based on information technology, and drug discovery by three different approaches (in silico drug discovery, "fragment evolution" which is a unique drug designing method of Astellas Pharma, and phenotypic screening with Astellas' compound library). The consortium has established a brand new database (Integrated Neglected Tropical Disease Database; iNTRODB), and has selected target proteins for the in silico and fragment evolution drug discovery approaches. Thus far, we have identified a number of promising compounds that inhibit the target protein, and we are currently trying to improve the anti-protozoan activity of these compounds. The pediatric praziquantel consortium was founded in July 2012 to develop and register a new praziquantel pediatric formulation for the treatment of schistosomiasis. Astellas Pharma has been a core member in this consortium since its establishment, and has provided expertise and technology in the area of pediatric formulation development and clinical development.

  4. 2014年第四季度及全年陶氏化学业绩优异未来发展信心十足%Dow Chemical's Performance Was Excellent in the Fourth Quarter of 2014 and throughout the Whole Year, the Company Has Full Faith to Future Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓斌

    2015-01-01

    2014年第四季度,美国陶氏化学公司根据终端市场客户特点调整业务结构,彻底取消基础型业务板块,突出产品制造一体化和客户解决方案。依托北美低成本原料优势、产品一体化制造优势和领先科技带来的价值增长优势,产品销量、开工率水平、每股收益、经营现金流、净利润、销售利润率和资本回报率均实现同比稳步增长,经营业绩表现优异。未来公司将进一步加大中东和北美地区投资力度,持续进行资产组合优化,实现对股东的更高回报。%In the fourth quarter of 2014, U.S. Dow Chemical readjusted its business structure in the light of market end-user characteristics and thoroughly cancelled basic business sectors, giving prominence to product manufacturing integration and user resolutions. Relying on North American low cost raw material superiority, product integrated manufacturing superiority and value growth superiority brought by leading science and technology, product sales, operating rate level, earnings per share, operational cash flows, net profit, sales profit ratio and return on capital all realized steady growth on year-on-year basis, the company's performance was excellent. In future, the company will further amplify the investment strength in the Middle East and North America, continuously carry out portfolio optimization and realize higher return to shareholders.

  5. The Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions Environmental Technology Consortium annual report 1994--1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The HBCU/MI ET Consortium was established in January 1990, through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) among its member institutions. This group of research oriented Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Minority Institutions (HBCU/MIs) agreed to work together to initiate or revise education programs, develop research partnerships with public and private sector organizations, and promote technology development to address the nation`s critical environmental contamination problems. The Consortium`s Research, Education and Technology Transfer (RETT) Plan became the working agenda. The Consortium is a resource for collaboration among the member institutions and with federal an state agencies, national and federal laboratories, industries, (including small businesses), majority universities, and two and four-year technical colleges. As a group of 17 institutions geographically located in the southern US, the Consortium is well positioned to reach a diverse group of women and minority populations of African Americans, Hispanics and American Indians. This Report provides a status update on activities and achievements in environmental curriculum development, outreach at the K--12 level, undergraduate and graduate education, research and development, and technology transfer.

  6. Using fourth-generation evaluation in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, M M

    1991-03-01

    Evaluation is disciplined inquiry undertaken to determine the value, including merit and worth, of some entity: a curriculum program, a clinical intervention, an academic course, a care plan. An evaluation is conducted to improve or refine the thing being evaluated (evaluand) or to assess its impact and effectiveness. Evaluation in nursing has been designed using various positivistic and post-positivistic models in the first three "generations" in the evolution of evaluation practice. This article describes a new model of nursing evaluation more consistent with a nursing paradigm than with a traditional, scientific, medical paradigm. Responsive nursing evaluation informs and empowers all those involved in its outcomes (the stakeholders) when framed within the research stance called naturalistic or constructivist inquiry. The fourth-generation-evaluation approach of Guba and Lincoln (1989) is consistent with a nursing paradigm and a constructivist approach. Fourth-generation evaluation is presented with specific application to nursing evaluation.

  7. The Fourth Law of Behavior Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabris, Christopher F; Lee, James J; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J; Laibson, David I

    2015-07-01

    Behavior genetics is the study of the relationship between genetic variation and psychological traits. Turkheimer (2000) proposed "Three Laws of Behavior Genetics" based on empirical regularities observed in studies of twins and other kinships. On the basis of molecular studies that have measured DNA variation directly, we propose a Fourth Law of Behavior Genetics: "A typical human behavioral trait is associated with very many genetic variants, each of which accounts for a very small percentage of the behavioral variability." This law explains several consistent patterns in the results of gene discovery studies, including the failure of candidate gene studies to robustly replicate, the need for genome-wide association studies (and why such studies have a much stronger replication record), and the crucial importance of extremely large samples in these endeavors. We review the evidence in favor of the Fourth Law and discuss its implications for the design and interpretation of gene-behavior research.

  8. The "fourth dimension" of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Bert W

    2009-05-01

    The three dimensions of space provide our relationship to position on the earth, but the fourth dimension of time has an equally profound influence on our lives. Everything from light and sound to weather and biology operate on the principle of measurable temporal periodicity. Consequently, a wide variety of time clocks affect all aspects of our existence. The annual (and biannual) cycles of activity, metabolism, and mating, the monthly physiological clocks of women and men, and the 24-h diurnal rhythms of humans are prime examples. Should it be surprising to us that the fourth dimension also impinges upon gene expression and that the genome itself is regulated by the fastest running of all biological clocks? Recent evidence substantiates the existence of such a ubiquitin-dependent transcriptional clock that is based upon the activation and destruction of transcriptional coactivators.

  9. Imitatio Christi in the fourth gospel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.G. van der Merwe

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Imitatio Christi is a concept which, although not referred to explicitly in the Fourth Gospel, is clearly spelled out in relation to the agency motif occurring in the Gospel. The disciples of Jesus have been appointed as his agents to continue his mission after his departure to his Father. In giving this message through to his readers, the Fourth Evangelist refers to Jesus' calling of his disciples, [Foreign font omitted]; pictures Jesus as [Foreign font omitted]; uses [Foreign font omitted] (the particle of comparison to compare the lives of the disciples with that of Jesus; points out the tasks the disciples had to perform after Jesus' ascension and, finally, indicates how Jesus dwells in his disciples through the Paraclete.

  10. Fourth international conference on Networks & Communications

    CERN Document Server

    Meghanathan, Natarajan; Nagamalai, Dhinaharan; Computer Networks & Communications (NetCom)

    2013-01-01

    Computer Networks & Communications (NetCom) is the proceedings from the Fourth International Conference on Networks & Communications. This book covers theory, methodology and applications of computer networks, network protocols and wireless networks, data communication technologies, and network security. The proceedings will feature peer-reviewed papers that illustrate research results, projects, surveys and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the diverse areas of computer networks & communications.

  11. On a fourth order superlinear elliptic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of a nonzero solution for the fourth order elliptic equation $$Delta^2u= mu u +a(xg(u$$ with boundary conditions $u=Delta u=0$. Here, $mu$ is a real parameter, $g$ is superlinear both at zero and infinity and $a(x$ changes sign in $Omega$. The proof uses a variational argument based on the argument by Bahri-Lions cite{BL}.

  12. Fourth World Theory: The Evolution of . . .

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Fourth World theory is a methodology for examining and developing greater understanding of the extent of the distress and abandonment commonly found in the cores of American cities resulting from de-industrialization, historic segregation and discrimination patterns, suburban sprawl, erosion of a viable tax base, racism, inability to embrace the concept of desegregation and civil rights legislation, fear, despair, crumbling infrastructure systems, disinvestment in urban school systems, and en...

  13. The fourth China Bioanalysis Forum Annual Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Daniel; Zhong, Dafang; Dong, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    The fourth China Bioanalysis Forum annual conference, co-organized with the Nanjing International Drug Metabolism Conference, was successfully held in Nanjing, China, between 24-26 June 2016. The theme of the conference was 'how to conduct regulated bioanalysis under China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) regulations'. In addition, several hot topics including bioanalytical challenges, solutions for biomarkers, antidrug antibody (antibody-drug conjugates) and biologics were discussed. This Conference Report summarizes the major discussion topics from the conference.

  14. Anorexia: an early sign of fourth ventricle astrocytoma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Baroncini, Marc; Delestret, Isabelle; Florent, Vincent; Vinchon, Matthieu

    2014-12-01

    Paediatric low-grade astrocytomas of the fourth ventricle are rare tumours, generally revealed by hydrocephalus. However, some patients present with a history of severe anorexia. It might be a harbinger, which if recognized, could lead to earlier diagnosis. We decided to examine our database in order to evaluate the incidence and signification of anorexia in this context. Retrospective monocentric study of cases of low-grade astrocytomas of the fourth ventricle operated between 1991 and 2012 in our paediatric neurosurgery department. We particularly observed the clinical presentation and long-term clinical, oncological and radiological evolution. Non-parametrical tests were used (Mann-Whitney, Fisher). We reviewed 34 cases, 31 pilocytic astrocytomas and 3 diffuse astrocytomas, 16 boys and 18 girls, (M/F ratio 0.89). Mean age at diagnosis was 8 years old. Seven presented with notable anorexia, the average BMI in this group was ≤2 standard deviation (SD); with clinical signs evolving for 11.5 months. Twenty-seven children had no anorexia; average BMI in this group was +1 SD, with clinical evolution for 6 months on an average of p anorexia, body mass index improved markedly in the postoperative follow-up, which lasted, on average, for 6 years. Anorexia with stunted body weight curve is a non-exceptional presentation in children with low-grade astrocytomas of the fourth ventricle. Unexplained or atypical anorexia with negative etiologic assessment should prompt cerebral imaging. Clinical improvement after surgical resection, could suggest a possible interaction between tumour tissue and appetite-suppressing peptide secretion.

  15. Art meets mathematics in the fourth dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Lipscomb, Stephen Leon

    2014-01-01

    To see objects that live in the fourth dimension we humans would need to add a fourth dimension to our three-dimensional vision. An example of such an object that lives in the fourth dimension is a hyper-sphere or “3-sphere”. The quest to imagine the elusive 3-sphere has deep historical roots: medieval poet Dante Alighieri, in his circa 1300 AD Divine Comedy, used a 3-sphere to convey his allegorical vision of the Christian afterlife. In 1917, Albert Einstein visualized the universe, at each instant in time, as a 3-sphere. He described his representation as “…the place where the reader’s imagination boggles. Nobody can imagine this thing.” Over time, however, our understanding of the concept of dimension evolved. By 2003, a researcher had successfully rendered into human vision the structure of a 4-web (think of an every increasingly-dense spider’s web). In this text Stephen Lipscomb takes his innovative dimension theory research a step further, using the 4-web to reveal a new partial image of a...

  16. Telling time in the Fourth Gospel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome H. Neyrey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available When we begin the task of telling time in the Fourth Gospel, we bring something not found in any previous study, namely, a model of time articulated by cross- ultural anthropologists (Bordieu, in Pitt-Rivers 1963:55-72, Ayoade, in Wright 1984:71-89. As much as we admire Davies’ study, she has no notes to her chapter on time nor any citations in her bibliography to indicate that she has any conversation partners, much less cultural experts, a deficit to be filled in this study. Learning to tell time entails three theoretical considerations: a definition of time, key classifications of it, and special attention to what the ancients meant by past, present and future. With these lenses we are prepared to do as thorough a study as we can on telling time in the Fourth Gospel. As we consider each classification, we will suggest a brief meaning of it from the experts on time, then present a body of Greco-Roman materials illustrative of the classification, and finally use it to gather and interpret data in John. Proving the native existence of these classifications for telling time in antiquity is essential for readers to have a background against which to compare their usage with that of the Fourth Gospel.

  17. Fourth order difference methods for hyperbolic IBVP's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Olsson, Pelle

    1994-01-01

    Fourth order difference approximations of initial-boundary value problems for hyperbolic partial differential equations are considered. We use the method of lines approach with both explicit and compact implicit difference operators in space. The explicit operator satisfies an energy estimate leading to strict stability. For the implicit operator we develop boundary conditions and give a complete proof of strong stability using the Laplace transform technique. We also present numerical experiments for the linear advection equation and Burgers' equation with discontinuities in the solution or in its derivative. The first equation is used for modeling contact discontinuities in fluid dynamics, the second one for modeling shocks and rarefaction waves. The time discretization is done with a third order Runge-Kutta TVD method. For solutions with discontinuities in the solution itself we add a filter based on second order viscosity. In case of the non-linear Burger's equation we use a flux splitting technique that results in an energy estimate for certain different approximations, in which case also an entropy condition is fulfilled. In particular we shall demonstrate that the unsplit conservative form produces a non-physical shock instead of the physically correct rarefaction wave. In the numerical experiments we compare our fourth order methods with a standard second order one and with a third order TVD-method. The results show that the fourth order methods are the only ones that give good results for all the considered test problems.

  18. SEEA SOUTHEAST CONSORTIUM FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Timothy [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Ball, Kia [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance; Fournier, Ashley [Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance

    2014-01-21

    In 2010 the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) received a $20 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) under the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Building Neighborhood Program (BBNP). This grant, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, also included sub-grantees in 13 communities across the Southeast, known as the Southeast Consortium. The objective of this project was to establish a framework for energy efficiency retrofit programs to create models for replication across the Southeast and beyond. To achieve this goal, SEEA and its project partners focused on establishing infrastructure to develop and sustain the energy efficiency market in specific localities across the southeast. Activities included implementing minimum training standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency through strategic marketing and outreach and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency through a variety of financing mechanisms. The anticipated outcome of these activities would be best practice models for program design, marketing, financing, data collection and evaluation as well as increased market demand for energy efficiency retrofits and products. The Southeast Consortium’s programmatic impacts along with the impacts of the other BBNP grantees would further the progress towards the overall goal of energy efficiency market transformation. As the primary grantee SEEA served as the overall program administrator and provided common resources to the 13 Southeast Consortium sub-grantees including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection, reporting and compliance. Sub-grantee programs were located in cities across eight states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Each sub

  19. Establishing an International Soil Modelling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Harry; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    -change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society . To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. We therefore propose to establish an international soil modelling consortium with the aims of 1) bringing together leading experts in modelling soil processes within all major soil disciplines, 2) addressing major scientific gaps in describing key processes and their long term impacts with respect to the different functions and ecosystem services provided by soil, 3) intercomparing soil model performance based on standardized and harmonized data sets, 4) identifying interactions with other relevant platforms related to common data formats, protocols and ontologies, 5) developing new approaches to inverse modelling, calibration, and validation of soil models, 6) integrating soil modelling expertise and state of the art knowledge on soil processes in climate, land surface, ecological, crop and contaminant models, and 7) linking process models with new observation, measurement and data evaluation technologies for mapping and characterizing soil properties across scales. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key global issues and stimulate the development of translational research activities. This presentation will provide a compelling case for this much-needed effort, with a focus on tangible benefits to the scientific and food security communities.

  20. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Joel [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The United States has more oil and gas wells than any other country. As of December 31, 2004, there were more than half a million producing oil wells in the United States. That is more than three times the combined total for the next three leaders: China, Canada, and Russia. The Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) is a partnership that includes domestic oil and gas producers, service and supply companies, trade associations, academia, the Department of Energy’s Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil (SCNGO) at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). The Consortium was established in 2000. This report serves as a final technical report for the SWC activities conducted over the May 1, 2004 to December 1, 2011 timeframe. During this timeframe, the SWC worked with 173 members in 29 states and three international countries, to focus on the development of new technologies to benefit the U.S. stripper well industry. SWC worked with NETL to develop a nationwide request-for-proposal (RFP) process to solicit proposals from the U.S. stripper well industry to develop and/or deploy new technologies that would assist small producers in improving the production performance of their stripper well operations. SWC conducted eight rounds of funding. A total of 132 proposals were received. The proposals were compiled and distributed to an industry-driven SWC executive council and program sponsors for review. Applicants were required to make a formal technical presentation to the SWC membership, executive council, and program sponsors. After reviewing the proposals and listening to the presentations, the executive council made their funding recommendations to program sponsors. A total of 64 projects were selected for funding, of which 59 were fully completed. Penn State then worked with grant awardees to issue a subcontract for their approved work. SWC organized and hosted a total of 14 meetings

  1. Adding International Themes to a Community College Curriculum: A Review of the Southwest Consortium for International Studies and Foreign Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Steve

    1989-01-01

    Describes a program designed by Pima Community College (Arizona) and funded by the U. S. Department of Education. Discusses the establishment of a consortium of two-and four-year colleges committed to developing international studies curricula. Examines the use of workshops and mini-grants. Provides examples of courses and modules which were…

  2. Cotton School Tells Us More--The Fourth COTTON USA Cotton School Convened in Qingdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    By Wang Ting

    2012-01-01

    Since the year of 2006, Cotton Council International has already convened the Cotton School for three times in China. This year, in 2012, CCI held the Cotton School in the city of Qingdao for the fourth time, generously shared with international buyers, especially the Chinese domestic purchases, the knowledge of qualified U.S. cotton.

  3. European Sourcebook of Crime and Criminal Justice Statistics - 2010 : Fourth edition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aebi, M.F.; Aubusson de Cavarlay, B.; Barclay, G.; Gruszczyńska, B.; Harrendorf, S.; Heiskanen, M.; Vasilika, H.; Jaquier, V.; Jehle, J.-M.; Killias, M.; Shostko, O.; Smit, P.; Þórisdóttir, R.

    2010-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of a data collection initiative that started in 1993 under the umbrella of the Council of Europe. The present document covers the years of 2003-2006 for all areas. In-depth analysis are presented for the year 2006. The basic structure of five chapters - offences and offen

  4. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    concluded that the consortium of these bacteria can be used for the decontamination of ... affects the oil fluid properties such as gravity, viscosity and other physical parameters of crude ... by attack on the aliphatic or light aromatic fraction of oil.

  5. Regional Development and the European Consortium of Innovative Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Saskia Loer; Kokkeler, Ben; van der Sijde, P. C.

    2002-01-01

    The European Consortium of Innovative Universities is a network that shares information not just among universities but with affiliated incubators, research parks, and other regional entities. The learning network contributes to regional development.(JOW)

  6. Kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin; Xu Hongke; An Mingquan; Yan Guiwen

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics and characteristics of phenanthrene degradation by a microbial consortium W4 isolated from Henan Oilfield were investigated. The degradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 6 days of incubation was higher than 95% under the condition of 37 ℃ and 120 r/min by this microbial consortium. The degradation of phenanthrene could be fitted to a first-order kinetic model with the half-life of 1.25 days. The optimum conditions for degradation of phenanthrene by consortium W4 were as follows: temperature about 37 ℃, pH from 6.0 to 7.0 and salinity about 8.0 g/L.It was concluded that microbial consortium W4 might degrade phenanthrene via both salicylic acid and o-phthalic acid pathways by analyzing products with GC-MS.

  7. AGRICOH: A Consortium of Agricultural Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelia H. Zahm

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available AGRICOH is a recently formed consortium of agricultural cohort studies involving 22 cohorts from nine countries in five continents: South Africa (1, Canada (3, Costa Rica (2, USA (6, Republic of Korea (1, New Zealand (2, Denmark (1, France (3 and Norway (3. The aim of AGRICOH, initiated by the US National Cancer Institute (NCI and coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC, is to promote and sustain collaboration and pooling of data to investigate the association between a wide range of agricultural exposures and a wide range of health outcomes, with a particular focus on associations that cannot easily be addressed in individual studies because of rare exposures (e.g., use of infrequently applied chemicals or relatively rare outcomes (e.g., certain types of cancer, neurologic and auto-immune diseases. To facilitate future projects the need for data harmonization of selected variables is required and is underway. Altogether, AGRICOH provides excellent opportunities for studying cancer, respiratory, neurologic, and auto-immune diseases as well as reproductive and allergic disorders, injuries and overall mortality in association with a wide array of exposures, prominent among these the application of pesticides.

  8. [Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-10-01

    Japan Spastic Paraplegia Research Consortium (JASPAC), a nationwide clinical and genetic survey of patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), was started in 2006 as a project of the Research Committee for Ataxic Diseases of the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare, Japan. To date (April 4, 2014), 448 indexed patients with HSP have been registered from 46 prefectures in Japan. We are now performing molecular testing of the HSP patients using Sanger sequencing (SPG4, SPG11, SPG31, and ARSACS), comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 15, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, 39, 42, ABCD1, alsin, and ARSACS), and resequencing microarray (SPG1, 2, 3A, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, 21, 31, 33, and ABCD1). In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). In 88 patients with autosomal recessive HSP, although SPG11 was the most common form, accounting for 6%, most showed significant genetic heterogeneity. The results of molecular testing will be applicable to patients in terms of improved positive diagnosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling. JASPAC will contribute to elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP, and will facilitate the development of better treatments for HSP.

  9. Astroparticle Physics European Consortium Town Meeting Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Astroparticle Physics European Consortium (APPEC) invites you to a town meeting at the Grand Amphithéatre de Sorbonne in Paris on the 6th and 7th April 2016 to discuss an update of the 2011 APPEC Astroparticle Physics roadmap, to be published in September 2016. In 2014 APPEC decided to launch an update of the 2011 Roadmap, transforming it to a “resource aware” roadmap. The intention was to gauge the financial impact of the beginnings of operation of the large global scale observatories put forward in the previous roadmap and to examine the possibilities of international coordination of future global initiatives. The APPEC Scientific Advisory Committee examined the field and prepared a set of recommendations. Based on these recommendations, the APPEC General Assembly drafted a set of “considerations” to be published by end of February 2016 and be debated in an open dialogue with the community, through the web page but primarily at the town meeting of 6-7 April. Based on this debate the final re...

  10. 7 CFR 51.2296 - Three-fourths half kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Three-fourths half kernel. 51.2296 Section 51.2296 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards...-fourths half kernel. Three-fourths half kernel means a portion of a half of a kernel which has more...

  11. Biodeterioration studies of thermoplastics in nature using indigenous bacterial consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Shahbaz Anwar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastics, poly vinyl chloride and low-density polyethylene were treated in the presence of indigenously developed bacterial consortium in laboratory and natural conditions. The consortium was developed using four bacteria, selected on the basis of utilization of PVC as primary carbon source, namely P. otitidis, B. aerius, B. cereus and A. pedis isolated from the plastic waste disposal sites in Northern India. The comparative in-vitro treatment studies as revealed by the spectral and thermal data, illustrated the relatively better biodegradation potential of developed consortium for PVC than the LDPE. Further, the progressive treatments of both the thermoplastics were conducted for three months under natural conditions. For this purpose, bioformulation of consortium was prepared and characterized for the viability up to 70 days of storage at 25±1ºC. The consortium treated polymer samples were monitored through SEM and FT-IR spectroscopy. Analytical data revealed the biodeterioration potential of the developed consortium for PVC and LDPE, which could help in disposing the plastic waste.

  12. Enrichment strategy to select functional consortium from mixed cultures: Consortium from rumen liquor for simultaneous cellulose degradation and hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi [State Key Lab of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Gao, Lingfang; Xu, Jifei; Liu, Chong; Lee, Duu-Jong [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Strain isolation using conventional roll tube/plating technique is time consuming and is able to culture in vitro only a small fraction of existing microbes in a natural microflora. This paper proposed a simple and rapid method to select the as-simple-as-possible biological consortium by serially diluting the original mixed culture. The diluted which remains, while the one diluted in serial loses the target function, is defined as the functional consortium of the original mixed culture. Since the microbial structure and the reaction pathway incorporated with the functional consortium is much simpler than its original mother liquor, detailed analysis on the strain interaction is possible without the risk of losing key functional strains as often caused from conventional isolation method. The rumen liquor that can degrade cellulose and produce hydrogen is used as a demonstration example. A ''rumen cellulose-degrading bacterial consortium'' (RCBC) was identified using the proposed enrichment strategy. (author)

  13. Fourth Generation Leptons and Muon $g-2$

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Wei-Shu; Ma, Chien-Yi

    2008-01-01

    We consider the contributions to $g_\\mu-2$ from fourth generation neutral and charged leptons, $N$ and $E$, at the one-loop level. Diagramatically, there are two types of contributions: boson-boson-$N$, and $E$-$E$-boson in the loop diagram. In general, the effect from $N$ is suppressed by off-diagonal PMNS matrix element $V_{N\\mu}$, from the Standard Model to the Two-Higgs Doublet Models. With contribution from $E$, we consider flavor changing neutral couplings.

  14. Geometry, relativity and the fourth dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Rucker, Rudolf

    1977-01-01

    This is a highly readable, popular exposition of the fourth dimension and the structure of the universe. A remarkable pictorial discussion of the curved space-time we call home, it achieves even greater impact through the use of 141 excellent illustrations. This is the first sustained visual account of many important topics in relativity theory that up till now have only been treated separately.Finding a perfect analogy in the situation of the geometrical characters in Flatland, Professor Rucker continues the adventures of the two-dimensional world visited by a three-dimensional being to expl

  15. Fourth international seminar on horizontal steam generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuomisto, H. [ed.] [IVO Group, Vantaa (Finland); Purhonen, H. [ed.] [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kouhia, V. [ed.] [Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The general objective of the International Seminars of Horizontal Steam Generator Modelling has been the improvement in understanding of realistic thermal hydraulic behaviour of the generators when performing safety analyses for VVER reactors. The main topics presented in the fourth seminar were: thermal hydraulic experiments and analyses, primary collector integrity, feedwater distributor replacement, management of primary-to-secondary leakage accidents and new developments in the VVER safety technology. The number of participants, representing designers and manufacturers of the horizontal steam generators, plant operators, engineering companies, research organizations, universities and regulatory authorities, was 70 from 10 countries.

  16. The fourth-generation Water Vapor Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, R. Michael; Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Neal, Helen L.; McDermid, I. Stuart

    2012-02-01

    For 20 years the Naval Research Laboratory has been making continuous water vapor profile measurements at 22.235 GHz with the Water Vapor Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer (WVMS) instruments, with the program expanding from one to three instruments in the first 6 years. Since the initial deployments there have been gradual improvements in the instrument design which have improved data quality and reduced maintenance requirements. Recent technological developments have made it possible to entirely redesign the instrument and improve not only the quality of the measurements but also the capability of the instrument. We present the fourth-generation instrument now operating at Table Mountain, California, which incorporates the most recent advances in microwave radiometry. This instrument represents the most significant extension of our measurement capability to date, enabling us to measure middle atmospheric water vapor from ˜26-80 km.

  17. SUNrises on the International Plant Nucleus Consortium: SEB Salzburg 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graumann, Katja; Bass, Hank W; Parry, Geraint

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear periphery is a dynamic, structured environment, whose precise functions are essential for global processes-from nuclear, to cellular, to organismal. Its main components-the nuclear envelope (NE) with inner and outer nuclear membranes (INM and ONM), nuclear pore complexes (NPC), associated cytoskeletal and nucleoskeletal components as well as chromatin are conserved across eukaryotes (Fig. 1). In metazoans in particular, the structure and functions of nuclear periphery components are intensely researched partly because of their involvement in various human diseases. While far less is known about these in plants, the last few years have seen a significant increase in research activity in this area. Plant biologists are not only catching up with the animal field, but recent findings are pushing our advances in this field globally. In recognition of this developing field, the Annual Society of Experimental Biology Meeting in Salzburg kindly hosted a session co-organized by Katja Graumann and David E. Evans (Oxford Brookes University) highlighting new insights into plant nuclear envelope proteins and their interactions. This session brought together leading researchers with expertise in topics such as epigenetics, meiosis, nuclear pore structure and functions, nucleoskeleton and nuclear envelope composition. An open and friendly exchange of ideas was fundamental to the success of the meeting, which resulted in founding the International Plant Nucleus Consortium. This review highlights new developments in plant nuclear envelope research presented at the conference and their importance for the wider understanding of metazoan, yeast and plant nuclear envelope functions and properties.

  18. Consortium Building and Licensing by University Libraries in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Klugkist

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available There are 13 university libraries in the Netherlands. Together with the Royal Library in The Hague and the Royal Dutch Academy of Sciences in Amsterdam they form an association, the Association UKB. The UKB is a voluntary association with no formal legal basis. It is a platform for discussing and developing joint policy in the area of scientific information provision and services in the Netherlands. Her main interests include designing a national information infrastructure, organising loans between libraries, developing digital information services, granting consortium-related licenses, agreeing on pricing policies with respect to publishers, co-ordinating collection development and shared cataloguing and indexing. The UKB co-operates closely with PICA, a Dutch corporation for library automation and information, which was founded by a number of Dutch libraries and is now merged with OCLC. Especially in the field of licensing, the UKB has taken a number of important actions over the last few years: For example, it was on the UKB’s initiative that various licensing deals with information providers were concluded. This paper deals with the results achieved so far and reviews some of the experienced successes and problems.

  19. Antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saule Saduakhasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Available evidence suggests that probiotics have different biological functions that depend on several mechanisms, such as antioxidant and DNA-protective activities. The probiotic consortium includes bacterial cultures such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, and other bacterial cultures isolated from traditional Kazakh dairy products (ayran, kumys, shubat, and healthy clinical material. The aim of this study was to investigate the total antioxidant activity of the consortium of probiotic bacteria and to determine the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and DNA-protective action. Material and methods: In vitro comet assay was used to determine the antigenotoxicity of the probiotic consortium. Total antioxidant activity was determined using a method of analysis with Trolox as the equivalent. The analysis method of superoxide dismutase activity assesses the inhibition rate of the nitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan by superoxide dismutase. Determination of glutathione reductase activity is based on the measurement of the NADPH oxidation speed. Results: A significantly high level of the total antioxidant activity of the probiotic consortium intact cells (15.3 mM/ml was observed whereas the activity index of  lysate  was 11.1 mM/ml. The superoxide dismutase activity of probiotic consortium lysate was evaluated, with values that peaked at 0.24 U/mg protein. The superoxide dismutase activity of the consortium was lower in comparison to L.fernentum E-3 and L.fernentum E-18 cultures with values of 0.85 U/mg and 0.76 U/mg protein, respectively. SOD activity of probiotic consortium whole cells was not observed, which is typical for lactic acid bacteria. Glutathione reductase plays an important role in the optimal protection from oxidative stress. Glutathione reductase activity of the studied probiotic consortium was low; moreover, the activity of the lysate was two times

  20. Fourth International Conference on Squeezed States and Uncertainty Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D. (Editor); Peng, Kunchi (Editor); Kim, Y. S. (Editor); Manko, V. I. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The fourth International Conference on Squeezed States and Uncertainty Relations was held at Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China, on June 5 - 9, 1995. This conference was jointly organized by Shanxi University, the University of Maryland (U.S.A.), and the Lebedev Physical Institute (Russia). The first meeting of this series was called the Workshop on Squeezed States and Uncertainty Relations, and was held in 1991 at College Park, Maryland. The second and third meetings in this series were hosted in 1992 by the Lebedev Institute in Moscow, and in 1993 by the University of Maryland Baltimore County, respectively. The scientific purpose of this series was initially to discuss squeezed states of light, but in recent years, the scope is becoming broad enough to include studies of uncertainty relations and squeeze transformations in all branches of physics, including, of course, quantum optics and foundations of quantum mechanics. Quantum optics will continue playing the pivotal role in the future, but the future meetings will include all branches of physics where squeeze transformations are basic transformation. This transition took place at the fourth meeting of this series held at Shanxi University in 1995. The fifth meeting in this series will be held in Budapest (Hungary) in 1997, and the principal organizer will be Jozsef Janszky of the Laboratory of Crystal Physics, P.O. Box 132, H-1052. Budapest, Hungary.

  1. The ProteomeXchange consortium in 2017: supporting the cultural change in proteomics public data deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W; Csordas, Attila; Sun, Zhi; Jarnuczak, Andrew; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Ternent, Tobias; Campbell, David S; Bernal-Llinares, Manuel; Okuda, Shujiro; Kawano, Shin; Moritz, Robert L; Carver, Jeremy J; Wang, Mingxun; Ishihama, Yasushi; Bandeira, Nuno; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-04

    The ProteomeXchange (PX) Consortium of proteomics resources (http://www.proteomexchange.org) was formally started in 2011 to standardize data submission and dissemination of mass spectrometry proteomics data worldwide. We give an overview of the current consortium activities and describe the advances of the past few years. Augmenting the PX founding members (PRIDE and PeptideAtlas, including the PASSEL resource), two new members have joined the consortium: MassIVE and jPOST. ProteomeCentral remains as the common data access portal, providing the ability to search for data sets in all participating PX resources, now with enhanced data visualization components.We describe the updated submission guidelines, now expanded to include four members instead of two. As demonstrated by data submission statistics, PX is supporting a change in culture of the proteomics field: public data sharing is now an accepted standard, supported by requirements for journal submissions resulting in public data release becoming the norm. More than 4500 data sets have been submitted to the various PX resources since 2012. Human is the most represented species with approximately half of the data sets, followed by some of the main model organisms and a growing list of more than 900 diverse species. Data reprocessing activities are becoming more prominent, with both MassIVE and PeptideAtlas releasing the results of reprocessed data sets. Finally, we outline the upcoming advances for ProteomeXchange.

  2. The ProteomeXchange consortium in 2017: supporting the cultural change in proteomics public data deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Csordas, Attila; Sun, Zhi; Jarnuczak, Andrew; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Ternent, Tobias; Campbell, David S.; Bernal-Llinares, Manuel; Okuda, Shujiro; Kawano, Shin; Moritz, Robert L.; Carver, Jeremy J.; Wang, Mingxun; Ishihama, Yasushi; Bandeira, Nuno; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The ProteomeXchange (PX) Consortium of proteomics resources (http://www.proteomexchange.org) was formally started in 2011 to standardize data submission and dissemination of mass spectrometry proteomics data worldwide. We give an overview of the current consortium activities and describe the advances of the past few years. Augmenting the PX founding members (PRIDE and PeptideAtlas, including the PASSEL resource), two new members have joined the consortium: MassIVE and jPOST. ProteomeCentral remains as the common data access portal, providing the ability to search for data sets in all participating PX resources, now with enhanced data visualization components. We describe the updated submission guidelines, now expanded to include four members instead of two. As demonstrated by data submission statistics, PX is supporting a change in culture of the proteomics field: public data sharing is now an accepted standard, supported by requirements for journal submissions resulting in public data release becoming the norm. More than 4500 data sets have been submitted to the various PX resources since 2012. Human is the most represented species with approximately half of the data sets, followed by some of the main model organisms and a growing list of more than 900 diverse species. Data reprocessing activities are becoming more prominent, with both MassIVE and PeptideAtlas releasing the results of reprocessed data sets. Finally, we outline the upcoming advances for ProteomeXchange. PMID:27924013

  3. The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kartik; Mills, Elisabeth A. C.; Hooper, Eric; National Astronomy Consortium

    2015-01-01

    The National Astronomy Consortium (NAC; see https://sites.google.com/site/nraonac/) is a growing national partnership between majority and minority universities and institutions with the goal of increasing the numbers of under-represented minorities and students who might otherwise be overlooked by the traditional academic pipeline into STEM, or related, careers. The NAC model is based on the successful 'Posse Foundation' model for undergraduate success and incorporates all its major components: pre-training of cohorts to prepare them for the research experience, joint weekly cohort activities throughout the research summer, peer- and multiple mentoring, weekly discussion of various aspects of professional and career development, continued engagement of students in science after return to home institution and lifelong mentoring. The mentors also form a cohort, exchanging information and learning from each other. With its partner institutions, the NAC aims to build a complete pipeline from undergraduate through career for the next generation of scientists and engineers. Our annual goal is to create two to three cohorts of four to five students at each site (currently NRAO-Charlottesville, NRAO-Socorro and U. Wisconsin - Madison). Recruitment occurs in the fall semester with seminars and colloquia in partnership with faculty at the minority serving institutions and the GRAD-MAP program at the University of Maryland. In this talk we describe in detail all the components of the NAC and report on our progress. We are keen to interact and partner with new universities and institutions and encourage them to contact the NAC at nac4stem@googlegroups.com.

  4. Problems in the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students Problemas en el proceso docente educativo durante la estancia de cirugía pediátrica del cuarto año de la carrera de Medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Cabrera Machado

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Very typical situations of the Pediatric Surgery Services in the Pediatric Hospital of Cienfuegos may interfere with the appropriate development of the educational process. Consequently, students might not master the principles of medical practice in the most common surgical diseases in children, thus limiting its further application in their professional performances as basic general practitioners. To obtain more accurate information on the causes of this phenomenon is considered to be paramount in order to search for practical solutions to improve the educational process and to fulfil the goals of the teaching stage. The contents on the following information sources are analyzed in this paper: documents for higher education and for medicine career, publications and papers presented in scientific events (directly or indirectly related to the practice of Pediatric Surgery and hospital statistics. This review was aimed at analyzing the situations that negatively affect the educational process during the pediatric surgery area teaching of fourth year medicine students.En el Hospital Pediátrico de Cienfuegos existen varias situaciones, propias del Servicio de Cirugía Pediátrica, que interfieren en el buen desarrollo del proceso docente educativo y pudieran, en consecuencia, malograr que los estudiantes dominen los principios de la actuación médica ante las enfermedades quirúrgicas más frecuentes en la edad pediátrica y no puedan aplicarlos en su actividad profesional como médicos generales básicos. Disponer de información más exacta de sus causas se consideró cardinal en el proceso de búsqueda de soluciones prácticas para perfeccionar el proceso y cumplir los objetivos en la formación del estudiante de medicina durante la estancia. En este trabajo se realiza un análisis del contenido de las siguientes fuentes de información: documentos de la carrera de Medicina y de la educación superior; publicaciones y trabajos presentados en

  5. Fourth-generation Mars vehicle concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Brent

    1994-09-01

    Conceptual designs for fourth-generation crew-carrying Mars transfer and excursion vehicles, fully integrated to state-of-the-art standards, are presented. The resulting vehicle concepts are sized for six crew members, and can support all opposition and conjunction opportunities in or after 2014. The modular, reusable transfer ship is launched to Earth orbit on six 185-ton-class boosters and assembled there robotically. Its dual nuclear-thermal rocket engines use liquid hydrogen propollant. The payload consists of a microgravity habitation system and an expendable lift-to-drag = 1.6 lander capable of aeromaneuvering to sites within +/- 20 deg of the equator. This lander can deliver either an expendable, storable-bipropellant crew-carrying ascent vehicle, or 40 tons of cargo, and it is capable of limited surface mobility to support base buildup. Multiple cargo landers sent ahead on robotic transfer vehicles deliver the supplies and equipment required for long-duration surface missions.

  6. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2014 Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Campleman, Sharan L; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry was queried for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2014. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender, ethnicity), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. In 2014, 9172 cases were entered in the Registry across 47 active member sites. Females accounted for 51.1 % of cases. The majority (65.1 %) of cases were adults between the ages of 19 and 65. Caucasians made up the largest identified ethnic group (48.9 %). Most Registry cases originated from the inpatient setting (93.5 %), with a large majority of these consultations coming from the emergency department or inpatient admission services. Intentional and unintentional pharmaceutical exposures continued to be the most frequent reasons for consultation, accounting for 61.7 % of cases. Among cases of intentional pharmaceutical exposure, 62.4 % were associated with a self-harm attempt. Non-pharmaceutical exposures accounted for 14.1 % of Registry cases. Similar to the past years, non-opioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Clinical signs or symptoms were noted in 81.9 % of cases. There were 89 recorded fatalities (0.97 %). Medical treatment (e.g., antidotes, antivenom, chelators, supportive care) was rendered in 62.3 % of cases. Patient demographics and exposure characteristics in 2014 Registry cases remain similar to prior years. The majority of consultations arose in the acute care setting (emergency department or inpatient) and involved exposures to pharmaceutical products. Among exposures, non-opioid analgesics, sedative/hypnotics, and opioids were the most frequently

  7. Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Software Engineering Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    On December 1 and 2, the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL), a consortium composed of NASA/Goddard, the University of Maryland, and CSC, held the 24th Software Engineering Workshop (SEW), the last of the millennium. Approximately 240 people attended the 2-day workshop. Day 1 was composed of four sessions: International Influence of the Software Engineering Laboratory; Object Oriented Testing and Reading; Software Process Improvement; and Space Software. For the first session, three internationally known software process experts discussed the influence of the SEL with respect to software engineering research. In the Space Software session, prominent representatives from three different NASA sites- GSFC's Marti Szczur, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Rick Doyle, and the Ames Research Center IV&V Facility's Lou Blazy- discussed the future of space software in their respective centers. At the end of the first day, the SEW sponsored a reception at the GSFC Visitors' Center. Day 2 also provided four sessions: Using the Experience Factory; A panel discussion entitled "Software Past, Present, and Future: Views from Government, Industry, and Academia"; Inspections; and COTS. The day started with an excellent talk by CSC's Frank McGarry on "Attaining Level 5 in CMM Process Maturity." Session 2, the panel discussion on software, featured NASA Chief Information Officer Lee Holcomb (Government), our own Jerry Page (Industry), and Mike Evangelist of the National Science Foundation (Academia). Each presented his perspective on the most important developments in software in the past 10 years, in the present, and in the future.

  8. Efficacy of the Arts in a Transdisciplinary Learning Experience for Culturally Diverse Fourth Graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porte, Angela Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this participant observation was to understand the efficacy of a modified International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program for fourth-graders at a public school with a large percentage of language and socioeconomically disadvantaged students. Data collection over a five-month period concentrated on teaching interactions including…

  9. Longitudinal Invariance of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition in a Referral Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richerson, Lindsay P.; Watkins, Marley W.; Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Measurement invariance of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) was investigated with a group of 352 students eligible for psychoeducational evaluations tested, on average, 2.8 years apart. Configural, metric, and scalar invariance were found. However, the error variance of the Coding subtest was not constant…

  10. 高等教育借助在线发展已成不可逆转的趋势--美国在线教育11年系列报告的综合分析及启示%Irreversible Online Development of Higher Education:Systematic Analysis of 11-Year Sloan Consortium Report Series on Online Education in the US

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永海; 韩锡斌; 杨娟; 程建钢

    2014-01-01

    Surveys conducted by the Sloan Consortium revealed that online education in the United States has maintained a stable development in the past eleven consecutive years.As shown in the report series,online enrollments have increased at rates far in excess of the overall rates of higher education;the majority of academic leaders rated learning outcomes in online education as the same as or superior to those in face-to-face instruction;most higher education institutions reported online education was critical to their long-term strategy;more than half of the institutions have offered online degrees.At the same time,different institutions (in size,level,and class)held different views towards online in-struction.The main obstacles to the development of online education are still there:lack of faculty ac-ceptance,need for more discipline on the part of online students,lower retention rates,and lack of rec-ognition of online education by employers.Although hot spots like MOOCs may be viewed as a catalyst for further integration of technology with education,they could neither change the development trend, nor overcome the obstacles to online education.The analysis results of this study indicate that the na-ture and trajectory of online education should be understood from the holistic perspective of education transition in the digital knowledge-economy era.Those hot spots would be positioned eventually in the systems of online courses and online education after making short-time “disturbance”.Higher education institutions need to develop objectives and trajectories for online educations based on their own require-ments and characteristics.In addition,online education in China needs to be investigated with long-term tracking studies.%斯隆联盟连续十一年发布美国在线教育调查报告显示,高校在线教育保持稳定发展的态势,表现为:在线课程注册学生数持续增长,在线教育质量逐渐被院校主管认

  11. Advances in industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium for biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Li; Zhou, Jin-Jie; Quan, Chun-Shan; Xiu, Zhi-Long

    2017-01-01

    One of the important targets of industrial biotechnology is using cheap biomass resources. The traditional strategy is microbial fermentations with single strain. However, cheap biomass normally contains so complex compositions and impurities that it is very difficult for single microorganism to utilize availably. In order to completely utilize the substrates and produce multiple products in one process, industrial microbiome based on microbial consortium draws more and more attention. In this review, we first briefly described some examples of existing industrial bioprocesses involving microbial consortia. Comparison of 1,3-propanediol production by mixed and pure cultures were then introduced, and interaction relationships between cells in microbial consortium were summarized. Finally, the outlook on how to design and apply microbial consortium in the future was also proposed.

  12. Evaluation of production of lettuce and radish in consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Santos Valete Damasceno

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability of radish-lettuce consortium, as well as the best arrangement for the development of the vegetables. The experiment was carried out in randomized block design, in the University of Mato Grosso – UNEMAT, Campus Alta Floresta. It were evaluated the cropping system of lettuce, radish, and the consortium between cultures in two arrangements (three rows of lettuce with two rows of radish and three rows of radish with two rows of lettuce, with 6 replications. Evaluated characteristics were total fresh weight, commercial fresh weight, leaf fresh weight and number of leaves by plants. Means were compared by Scott-Knott test, at 5% of probability. The arrangement with three lettuce crop rows and two radish proved feasible, with promising for use in the consortium system.

  13. A statewide consortium of surgical care: a longitudinal investigation of vascular operative procedures at 16 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Peter K; Kubus, Jim; Englesbe, Michael J; Harbaugh, Calista; Campbell, Darrell A

    2010-10-01

    Regional surgical quality improvement consortiums are becoming more common. Herein we have reported the effectiveness of a statewide consortium focusing on open vascular operative procedures. The statewide Michigan Surgical Quality Consortium was established in 2005 with 16 hospitals that report cases of vascular open operative intervention, in a sampling manner consistent with the private sector National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Data are abstracted by onsite trained nurses using defined and validated pre-, peri-, and postoperative variables with 30-day follow-up. Outpatient and emergent cases were excluded. We compared outcomes over the course of the consortium (era I, April 2005-March 2007; era II, April 2007-March 2008) via univariate and multivariate techniques. Era I (n = 2,453) and era II (n = 3,409) cases were similar in age (mean, 68 years), gender (61% male), relative value units (mean, 21), and distribution of Current Procedural Terminology codes. Duration of stay and operative time decreased by 15% and 11%, respectively, when comparing era I with era II (P cardiac or renal, complications. When evaluating both eras, modifiable variables (able to be altered by the surgeon) for morbidity included increased length of operation (odds ratio [OR], 1.004; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.003-1.005; P < .0001), hypertension (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.03-2.1; P = .03), and blood transfusion (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 2.04-3.88; P < .0001). However, anemic patients (11%; hematocrit <30) who were transfused were less likely to suffer morbidity (OR, 56; 95% CI, 0.47-0.67; P < .0001) than those transfused who were not anemic. The absolute 2% reduction in complications led to a $172 cost savings for the payers per patient in era II compared with era I. A statewide quality-of-care consortium with timely feedback of data was associated with decreased morbidity over a relatively short follow-up period in vascular patients. Focusing on best processes in real-world practice

  14. Treatment of Complications after Distraction Osteogenesis for Brachymetatarsia of the Fourth Metatarsal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Mariko; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Kishi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Congenital brachymetatarsia most commonly involves the fourth ray and may be combined with metacarpal shortening. Numerous reports have demonstrated the usefulness of gradual lengthening of the metatarsals. However, very few studies have investigated methods of recovering the lost regenerative bone. The patient was a 16-year-old girl with bilateral brachymetatarsia of the fourth metatarsal. After a long consolidation period after gradual lengthening of the fourth metatarsal by 20 mm, the patient had an hourglass-shaped regenerated bone. Therefore, we grafted a bioabsorbable hydroxyapatite and collagen composite. Six months after the surgery, well-regenerated bone could be recognized on radiographic evaluation and was resistant to refracture. Callus distraction is a method that aims to avoid donor site morbidity. The strength of artificial bone is often a problem. Bioabsorbable hydroxyapatite and collagen composite compensates for the lack of regenerated bone and distraction gap and prevents refracture, thus preventing complications after metatarsal distraction. PMID:27536496

  15. Fourth Ventricular Schwannoma: Identical Clinicopathologic Features as Schwann Cell-Derived Schwannoma with Unique Etiopathologic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany R. Hodges

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To our knowledge, this is the sixth reported case in the literature of fourth ventricular schwannoma. The etiology and natural history of intraventricular schwannomas is not well understood. A thorough review of potential etiopathogenic mechanisms is provided in this case report. Case Description. A 69-year-old man presented with an incidentally found fourth ventricular tumor during an evaluation for generalized weakness, gait instability, and memory disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a heterogeneously enhancing lesion in the fourth ventricle. A suboccipital craniotomy was performed to resect the lesion. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of schwannoma (WHO grade I. Conclusions. Schwannomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intraventricular tumors. Although the embryologic origins may be different from nerve sheath-derived schwannomas, the histologic, clinical, and natural history appear identical and thus should be managed similarly.

  16. Searching for the fourth family quarks through anomalous decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Turkoz, S.

    2010-09-01

    The flavor democracy hypothesis predicts the existence of the fourth standard model family. Because of the high masses of the fourth family quarks, their anomalous decays could be dominant if certain criteria are met. This will drastically change the search strategy at hadron colliders. We show that the fourth standard model family down quarks with masses up to 400-450 GeV can be observed (or excluded) via anomalous decays by Tevatron.

  17. The Fourth Gospel as a textual field of meaning

    OpenAIRE

    Micallef, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The Fourth Gospel is a textual field of meaning and it reinforces pressure on readers to differentiate appearance from intended meaning. No single interpretation can claim to have said the last word on the meaning of the Fourth Gospel’s use of language, which may be considered as the most striking characteristic of this Gospel. The whole network of the Johannine literary devices and vocabulary is an expression of the Fourth Gospel’s theological message and brings dissimilari...

  18. Midwest Superconductivity Consortium - Final Progress Report October 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bement, Arden L.

    2001-10-23

    The basic mission of the Consortium was to advance the science and understanding of high-T{sub c} superconductivity and to promote the development of new materials and improved processing technology. Focused group efforts were the key element of the research program. One program area is the understanding of the layered structures involved in candidate materials and the factors that control their formation, stability and relationship superconductor properties. The other program area had a focus upon factors that limit or control the transport properties such as weak links, flux lattice behavior, and interfaces. Interactions among Consortium d with industrial armiates were an integral part of the program.

  19. Augmentation of a Microbial Consortium for Enhanced Polylactide (PLA) Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Nimisha R; Sekhar, Vini C; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan

    2016-03-01

    Bioplastics are eco-friendly and derived from renewable biomass sources. Innovation in recycling methods will tackle some of the critical issues facing the acceptance of bioplastics. Polylactic acid (PLA) is the commonly used and well-studied bioplastic that is presumed to be biodegradable. Considering their demand and use in near future, exploration for microbes capable of bioplastic degradation has high potential. Four PLA degrading strains were isolated and identified as Penicillium chrysogenum, Cladosporium sphaerospermum, Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. A consortium of above strains degraded 44 % (w/w) PLA in 30 days time in laboratory conditions. Subsequently, the microbial consortium employed effectively for PLA composting.

  20. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium: past and future perspectives on mouse phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the function of all mammalian genes remains a major challenge for the biomedical science community in the 21st century. The goal of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) over the next 10 years is to undertake broad-based phenotyping of 20,000 mouse genes, providing an unprecedented insight into mammalian gene function. This short article explores the drivers for large-scale mouse phenotyping and provides an overview of the aims and processes involved in IMPC mouse production and phenotyping. PMID:22940749

  1. Recommendations for individual participant data meta-analyses on work stressors and health outcomes: comments on IPD-Work Consortium papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bong Kyoo; Schnall, Peter; Landsbergis, Paul; Dobson, Marnie; Ko, Sangbaek; Gómez-Ortiz, Viviola; Juárez-Garcia, Arturo; Baker, Dean

    2015-05-01

    The IPD-Work (individual-participant data meta-analysis of working populations) Consortium has published several papers on job strain (the combination of low job control and high job demands) based on Karasek's demand-control model (1) and health-related outcomes including cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, obesity, diabetes as well as health-related behaviors, utilizing meta-analyses of a pooled database of study participants from 17 European cohorts. An IPD approach has some advantages over typical meta-analyses, eg, having access to all the data for each individual allows for additional analyses, compared to typical meta-analyses. However, such an approach, like other meta-analyses, is not free from errors and biases (2-6) when it is not conducted appropriately. In our review of the IPD-Work Consortium's (hereafter called the Consortium) publications of the last two years, we have identified and pointed out several conceptual and methodological errors, as well as unsubstantiated conclusions and inappropriate recommendations for worksite public health policies (6-15). However, the Consortium has not yet appropriately addressed many of the issues we have raised. Also several major errors and biases underlying the Consortium IPD meta-analysis publications have not been presented in a comprehensive way, nor have they been discussed widely among work stress researchers. We are concerned that the same errors and biases could be repeated in future IPD Consortium meta-analysis publications as well as by other researchers who are interested in meta-analyses on work stressors and health outcomes. It is possible that the inappropriate interpretations in the Consortium publications, which remained uncorrected to date, may have a negative impact on the international efforts of the work stress research community to improve the health of working populations. Recently, Dr. Töres Theorell, a principal investigator of the Consortium, responded in this journal (16) to some of

  2. Computational Astrophysics Consortium 3 - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woosley, Stan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2014-08-29

    Final project report for UCSC's participation in the Computational Astrophysics Consortium - Supernovae, Gamma-Ray Bursts and Nucleosynthesis. As an appendix, the report of the entire Consortium is also appended.

  3. Neural crest: The fourth germ layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Shyamala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The neural crest cells (NCCs, a transient group of cells that emerges from the dorsal aspect of the neural tube during early vertebrate development has been a fascinating group of cells because of its multipotency, long range migration through embryo and its capacity to generate a prodigious number of differentiated cell types. For these reasons, although derived from the ectoderm, the neural crest (NC has been called the fourth germ layer. The non neural ectoderm, the neural plate and the underlying mesoderm are needed for the induction and formation of NC cells. Once formed, NC cells start migrating as a wave of cells, moving away from the neuroepithelium and quickly splitting into distinct streams. These migrating NCCs home in to different regions and give rise to plethora of tissues. Umpteen number of signaling molecules are essential for formation, epithelial mesenchymal transition, delamination, migration and localization of NCC. Authors believe that a clear understanding of steps and signals involved in NC formation, migration, etc., may help in understanding the pathogenesis behind cancer metastasis and many other diseases. Hence, we have taken this review to discuss the various aspects of the NC cells.

  4. The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium: An Innovative Approach to Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algren, Chris L.; Hockenberger, Susan

    The Bellarmine Outreach Consortium, which provides access to baccalaureate and masters education in nursing for registered nurses in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Tennessee, is described. The components of a marketing process for colleges are also considered, with attention to product, place, price, and promotion. The nursing department of…

  5. It Takes a Consortium to Support Open Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Judy

    2009-01-01

    If the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER) has its way, expensive textbooks may go the way of typewriters and carbon paper. Ideally, Internet access for all students would allow educators to replace commercially printed textbooks with interactive digital textbooks and personal learning environments. However, until…

  6. Preface of the Proceedings of the Doctoral Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinciarelli, A.; Pelachaud, C.; Cowie, R.; Nijholt, A.

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects the contributions presented at the ACII 2009 Doctoral Consortium, the event aimed at gathering PhD students with the goal of sharing ideas about the theories behind affective computing; its development; and its application. Published papers have been selected out a large number

  7. The Worker Rights Consortium Makes Strides toward Legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Werf, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the rapid growth of the Workers Rights Consortium, a student-originated group with 44 member institutions which opposes sweatshop labor conditions especially in the apparel industry. Notes disagreements about the number of administrators on the board of directors and about the role of industry representives. Compares this group with the…

  8. Computerized comprehensive data analysis of Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC)

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jun; Pu, Jiantao; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Leader, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) is the largest public CT image database of lung nodules. In this study, the authors present a comprehensive and the most updated analysis of this dynamically growing database under the help of a computerized tool, aiming to assist researchers to optimally use this database for lung cancer related investigations.

  9. Consortium analysis of 7 candidate SNPs for ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramus, S.J.; Vierkant, R.A.; Johnatty, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H...

  10. NASA Consortium awards funding to Virginia Tech's geospatial program

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    NASA has selected a partnership between the Virginia Space Grant Consortium (VSGC) and Virginia Tech to receive a $100,000 grant for geospatial education and work force development. The grant, awarded through the NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship program, allows the partners to continue the already successful Virginia Geospatial Extension Program that was established in July 2003.

  11. On the Consortium for Business Object Promotion (CBOP)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the goals and visions of a consortium inJapan, named Cons ortium for Business Object Promotion (CBOP), discussing its background, activiti es, and basic technical approaches to share and exchanging various types of Busi ness Objects. Especially, Object Pattern Technologies used in CBOP should be di scussed.

  12. Genomic standards consortium workshop: metagenomics, metadata and metaanalysis (M3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, Peter; Hirschman, Lynette; Field, Dawn; Wooley, John

    2010-01-01

    The M3 workshop has, as its primary focus, the rapidly growing area of metagenomics, including the metadata standards and the meta-analysis approaches needed to organize, process and interpret metagenomics data. The PSB Workshop builds on the first M3 meeting, a Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting at ISMB 2009, organized by the Genomics Standards Consortium.

  13. Academic Library Consortium in Jordan: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mustafa H.; Suleiman, Raid Jameel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Due to the current financial and managerial difficulties that are encountered by libraries in public universities in Jordan and the geographical diffusion of these academic institutions, the idea of establishing a consortium was proposed by the Council of Higher Education to combine these libraries. This article reviews the reality of…

  14. Open Geospatial Consortium standards supporting Lake Maggiore Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Massimiliano; Antonovic, Milan; Molinari, Monia; Pozzoni, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    The Locarno area (Canton Ticino, Switzerland) is an area exposed to lake Maggiore flooding risk. In order to reduce the effects of such a kind of events, the Canton Ticino [1] and the Locarno and Vallemaggia Civil Protection [2] provide mandates to the Institute of Earth sciences of Southern Switzerland University of Applied Sciences (IST-SUPSI) [3] to supply a system for supporting the management, alerting and intervention in the area. The system, that was originally created about 15 year ago, includes: 1. the management of the regional hydro-meteorological monitoring network, 2. the Lake Maggiore basins hydrological modelling, 3. the management of geoinformation that includes exposed and contextual elements and, 4. the provision of a Web platform for access and interact with the information. In the last years, the IST-SUPSI has undertaken a process of renewal of the entire system following the concept of interoperability as identified in recently conducted European projects like SANY [4] or TRIDEC [5]. This mainstream leads us to adopt different open standards and to develop ad-hoc software. At the present time, the renewal process is almost finished: the Web interface is the only component currently under upgrade. As a result today the IST-SUPSI offers: - a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) for the monitoring data and has developed his own SOS implementation (istSOS [6]) capable to satisfy all the requirements identified in over 20 year of hydro-meteorological data management; - Web Processing Services (WPS) for the elaboration of raw monitoring data (from the SOS) and meteorological forecasts to feed the hydrological model with costumized and real-time inputs; - Web Mapping Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) for the visualization of exposed elements and base maps; - a RESTFul Web Services for the provision of all the civil protection information management and elaboration of specific requests; - a security system for authentication and authorization

  15. Field-Based Concerns about Fourth-Generation Evaluation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Morris K.

    Some aspects of fourth generation evaluation procedures that have been advocated by E. G. Guba and Y. S. Lincoln were examined empirically, with emphasis on areas where there have been discrepancies between theory and field-based experience. In fourth generation evaluation, the product of an evaluation is not a set of conclusions, recommendations,…

  16. Human Resources Administration: A School-Based Perspective. Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced and updated, this Fourth Edition of Richard E. Smith's highly successful text examines the growing role of the principal in planning, hiring, staff development, supervision, and other human resource functions. The Fourth Edition includes new sections on ethics, induction, and the role of the mentor teacher. This edition also introduces…

  17. Human Resources Administration: A School-Based Perspective. Fourth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced and updated, this Fourth Edition of Richard E. Smith's highly successful text examines the growing role of the principal in planning, hiring, staff development, supervision, and other human resource functions. The Fourth Edition includes new sections on ethics, induction, and the role of the mentor teacher. This edition also introduces…

  18. 77 FR 43237 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Work Plan Review Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Work Plan Review Workshop.... SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 16 and 17, 2012. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is planning to develop the reference...

  19. 78 FR 47674 - Genome in a Bottle Consortium-Progress and Planning Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Genome in a Bottle Consortium--Progress and Planning... workshop. SUMMARY: NIST announces the Genome in a Bottle Consortium meeting to be held on Thursday and Friday, August 15 and 16, 2013. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium is developing the reference...

  20. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  1. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    chair of the Biology Committee, and he organized a symposium of investigators and clinicians who were part of a MPNST (malignant peripheral nerve sheath...tumor) Consortium and the MPNST Committee of the NF1 Consortium that convened as a satellite meeting of the full NF1 Consortium meeting in Atlanta

  2. 76 FR 38666 - Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... Nutrition (CFSAN) and the Marine Environmental Sciences Consortium/Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL). The goal... Marine Environmental Science Consortium-Dauphin Island Sea Lab (DISL) will greatly contribute to FDA's... Objectives FDA Gulf Coast Seafood Laboratory (GCSL) and the Marine Environmental Science Consortium of the...

  3. 77 FR 38770 - Notice of Consortium on “nSoft Consortium”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Notice of Consortium on ``nSoft Consortium'' AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: On June 3, 2011, the... feasibility of establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on Neutron Metrology for Soft Materials...

  4. Proceedings: Fourth Workshop on Mining Scientific Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, C

    2001-07-24

    Commercial applications of data mining in areas such as e-commerce, market-basket analysis, text-mining, and web-mining have taken on a central focus in the JCDD community. However, there is a significant amount of innovative data mining work taking place in the context of scientific and engineering applications that is not well represented in the mainstream KDD conferences. For example, scientific data mining techniques are being developed and applied to diverse fields such as remote sensing, physics, chemistry, biology, astronomy, structural mechanics, computational fluid dynamics etc. In these areas, data mining frequently complements and enhances existing analysis methods based on statistics, exploratory data analysis, and domain-specific approaches. On the surface, it may appear that data from one scientific field, say genomics, is very different from another field, such as physics. However, despite their diversity, there is much that is common across the mining of scientific and engineering data. For example, techniques used to identify objects in images are very similar, regardless of whether the images came from a remote sensing application, a physics experiment, an astronomy observation, or a medical study. Further, with data mining being applied to new types of data, such as mesh data from scientific simulations, there is the opportunity to apply and extend data mining to new scientific domains. This one-day workshop brings together data miners analyzing science data and scientists from diverse fields to share their experiences, learn how techniques developed in one field can be applied in another, and better understand some of the newer techniques being developed in the KDD community. This is the fourth workshop on the topic of Mining Scientific Data sets; for information on earlier workshops, see http://www.ahpcrc.org/conferences/. This workshop continues the tradition of addressing challenging problems in a field where the diversity of applications is

  5. The endoscopic trans-fourth ventricle aqueductoplasty and stent placement for the treatment of trapped fourth ventricle: Long-term results in a series of 18 consecutive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Gallo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different surgical approaches have been described in the past to treat a trapped fourth ventricle (TFV but, unfortunately, these techniques showed a high rate of dysfunction and complications. During the last 10 years the development of neuroendoscopy has dramatically changed the outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a retrospective evaluation of the safety, effectiveness, and long-term outcome of endoscopic aqueductoplasty and stent placement, performed in 18 consecutive patients with symptomatic TFV through a trans-fourth ventricle approach between 1994 and 2010. Thirteen patients underwent endoscopic aqueductoplasty and stent placement and 5 patients underwent aqueductoplasty alone using a tailored suboccipital approach through the foramen of Magendie in prone or sitting position. Results: The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 15.2 years. All patients but 3 had a supratentorial ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Fifteen patients presented with slit supratentorial ventricles. At a mean followup of 90.8 months all patients experienced a stable clinical improvement. Only two complications were observed: A transient diplopia due to dysconjugate eye movements in one patient and a transient trochlear palsy in another one. Conclusions: Our experience and the literature review suggest that endoscopic trans-fourth ventricle aqueductoplasty and stent placement is a minimally invasive, safe, and effective technique for the treatment of TFV and should be strongly recommended, especially in patients with supratentorial slit ventricles.

  6. Meeting report: Fourth Forum on Respiratory Tract Infections, Sitges, Spain, 8 11 February 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Glenn S; Ball, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Over 420 delegates participated in this, the fourth of a biennial series of scientific meetings, drawing from 30 or more nations and encompassing the specialties of infectious diseases, clinical microbiology, pulmonary and general medicine and Industry inter alia. The 2007 Forum was chaired by Professors Antoni Torres Marti, Giuliana Gialdroni Grassi and Dr Peter Ball and received academic endorsement from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (BSAC), Italian Society for Chemotherapy, Spanish Pulmonology Society, Paul Ehrlich Society and the Société de Pneumologie de Langue Français. The Scientific Programme was scientifically and financially supported by the BSAC and a consortium of pharmaceutical companies. Discussion focused on key contemporary issues in respiratory tract infection (RTI), including the impact of antibiotic resistance on clinical outcomes and the continuing need for antibiotic conservation via evolving guidelines, the challenges of avian influenza, nosocomial RTIs and the emergence of new pathogens, e.g. community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, novel antimicrobial agents, disease definitions (e.g. healthcare-associated pneumonia) and therapeutic assessment criteria, such as patient-reported outcome measures, in improving RTI management. The entire meeting was granted CME recognition (18 sessions) by the European Accreditation Council for continuing medical education.

  7. CERN announces the fourth annual Beamline for Schools competition

    CERN Multimedia

    BL4S team

    2016-01-01

    CERN is pleased to announce the fourth annual Beamline for Schools (BL4S) competition. Once again, in 2017, a fully equipped beamline will be made available at CERN for students. As in previous years, two teams will be invited to the Laboratory to execute the experiments they proposed in their applications. The 2017 competition is being made possible thanks to support from the Alcoa Foundation for the second consecutive year.   The competition is open to teams of high-school students aged 16 or older who, if they win, are invited (with two supervisors) to CERN to carry out their experiment. Teams must have at least five students but there is no upper limit to a team’s size (although just nine students per winning team will be invited to CERN). Teams may be composed of pupils from a single school, or from a number of schools working together. As science-loving mega-celebrity Will.I.Am told us: “If you’re interested in science, technology, engineering or ...

  8. Combined search for the quarks of a sequential fourth generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Marcken, G.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.

    2012-12-01

    Results are presented from a search for a fourth generation of quarks produced singly or in pairs in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5fb-1 recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011. A novel strategy has been developed for a combined search for quarks of the up and down type in decay channels with at least one isolated muon or electron. Limits on the mass of the fourth-generation quarks and the relevant Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements are derived in the context of a simple extension of the standard model with a sequential fourth generation of fermions. The existence of mass-degenerate fourth-generation quarks with masses below 685 GeV is excluded at 95% confidence level for minimal off-diagonal mixing between the third- and the fourth-generation quarks. With a mass difference of 25 GeV between the quark masses, the obtained limit on the masses of the fourth-generation quarks shifts by about ±20GeV. These results significantly reduce the allowed parameter space for a fourth generation of fermions.

  9. The superior transvelar approach to the fourth ventricle and brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Bollam, Papireddy; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Objective The superior transvelar approach is used to access pathologies located in the fourth ventricle and brainstem. The surgical path is below the venous structures, through the superior medullary velum. Following splitting the tentorial edge, near the tentorial apex, the superior medullary velum is split in the cerebello-mesencephalic fissure. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial, transtentorial or parietal interhemispheric routes, the superior medullary velum is approached. Splitting this velum provides a detailed view of the fourth ventricle and its floor. Materials and Methods A total of 10 formalin-fixed specimens were dissected in a stepwise manner to simulate the superior transvelar approach to the fourth ventricle. The exposure gained the distance from the craniotomy site and the ease of access was assessed for each of the routes. We also present an illustrative case, operated by the senior author (AN). Results The superior transvelar approach provides access to the entire length of the fourth ventricle floor, from the aqueduct to the obex, when using the parietal interhemispheric route. In addition, this approach provides access to the entire width of the floor of the fourth ventricle; however, this requires retracting the superior cerebellar peduncle. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial route gives a limited exposure of the superior part of the fourth ventricle. The occipital interhemispheric route is a compromise between these two. Conclusion The superior transvelar approach to the fourth ventricle provides a route for approaching the fourth ventricle from above. This approach does not require opening the posterior fossa in the traditional way, and provides a reasonable alternative for accessing the superior fourth ventricle.

  10. Yangzhou’s Famous Twenty-fourth Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    “LOOMING green moun-tains and runningstreams;grass does notwither and fall,though the autumnhas come to an end in the south.The bright moon arises overTwenty-fourth Bridge.Where doyou teach pure-jade Yangzhouwomen to play music on bambooflutes?”This poem by Du Mu(803-c.852),a famous poet of thelate Tang Dynasty,is well remem-bered today It made Yangzhou’sTwenty-fourth Bridge Known to la-ter generations.Of many ancientpoems about Twenty-fourth Bridge

  11. Fourth-order partial differential equations for effective image denoising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongjai Kim

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns mathematical image denoising methods incorporating fourth-order partial differential equations (PDEs. We introduce and analyze piecewise planarity conditions (PPCs with which unconstrained fourth-order variational models in continuum converge to a piecewise planar image. It has been observed that fourth-order variational models holding PPCs can restore better images than models without PPCs and second-order models. Numerical schemes are presented in detail and various examples in image denoising are provided to verify the claim.

  12. Using Quasi-Experimental Methods to Select Comparisons Schools for an Evaluation of the Northeast Tennessee College and Career Ready Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokher, Christine; Cavalluzzo, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the quasi-experimental methods used to select comparison schools for an evaluation of a federal investing in innovation (i3) validation grant. The Northeast Tennessee College and Career Ready Consortium (NETCO) consists of 29 high schools participating in a five-year program to expand students' access to rigorous…

  13. Towards Effective International Work-Integrated Learning Practica in Development Studies: Reflections on the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian Studies' Development Studies Professional Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, overseas work-integrated learning practica have become an increasingly important part of development studies curricula in "Northern" universities. This paper examines the factors that shape pedagogical effectiveness in the provision of such programmes, focusing on the case of the Australian Consortium for "In-Country" Indonesian…

  14. Innovations in Nuclear Infrastructure and Education From the SW Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, Warren

    2011-03-22

    This report describes the final expenditures for the INIE project during FY 08/09. (There were no expenditures during FY09/10 or during FY10/11.) To see the list of accomplishments done using the INIE funds, please see the reports included here. The last of the FY 07/08 funds were brought forward and used to complete two distance education modules teaching reactor experiments. These modules and parts from the modules are still being used and are being disseminated off-campus as a part of our distance education effort. The second largest expenditure was sending students to the ANS to present student papers on work that they had done the previous year underwritten by INIE funds. The remaining expenditures were IDC charges and minor travel expenses to give students a tour of a medical facility. Once again we wish to express of sincere appreciation of the INIE program and hope that the return on investment is appreciated by the DOE. Although INIE has come to a close, looking back at all the Consortium has accomplished is astounding. And, as was hoped, these funds have proved to be a springboard for continuing work, particularly at Texas A&M. With the resurgence of nuclear power, the utilities have realized that the nuclear workforce in the near future will be too small for the task of bringing dozens of new plants on line and have turned their attention to the URRs to help feed the workforce pipeline. The distance education modules developed at the A&M are soon to be broadcast throughout the country to help train a new generation of nuclear workers. Our students at the Nuclear Science Center at being snapped up by the nuclear power plants after graduating. Our research projects at A&M have all ended with new data, new ways of looking at old problems, and produced a covey of good students. I want to say 'Thanks' with utmost sincerity because without the INIE funds our efforts would yield a small fraction of the accomplishments you see in this report.

  15. JV Task 120 - Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Loreal Heebink; David Hassett; Bruce Dockter; Kurt Eylands; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher

    2009-03-28

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium{reg_sign} (CARRC{reg_sign}, pronounced 'cars') is the core coal combustion product (CCP) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCPs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCP utilization and ensuring its successful application. The U.S. Department of Energy is a partner in CARRC through the EERC Jointly Sponsored Research Program, which provides matching funds for industrial member contributions and facilitates an increased level of effort in CARRC. CARRC tasks were designed to provide information on CCP performance, including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC technical research tasks are developed based on member input and prioritization. CARRC special projects are developed with members and nonmembers to provide similar information and to support activities, including the assembly and interpretation of data, support for standards development and technology transfer, and facilitating product development and testing. CARRC activities from 2007 to 2009 included a range of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCPs. The tasks were included in four categories: (1) Environmental Evaluations of CCPs; (2) Evaluation of Impacts on CCPs from Emission Controls; (3) Construction and Product-Related Activities; and (4) Technology Transfer and Maintenance Tasks. All tasks are designed to work toward achieving the CARRC overall goal and supporting objectives. The various tasks are coordinated in order to provide broad and useful technical data for CARRC members

  16. Test Review: Wechsler, D. (2005). "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Spanish." San Antonio, TX: Harcourt Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Jeffery P.; Iribarren, Jacqueline A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors review the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition Spanish (WISC-IV Spanish), a Spanish translation and adaptation of the WISC-IV. The test was developed to measure the intellectual ability of Spanish-speaking children in the United States ages 6 years, 0 months, through 16 years, 11 months. These…

  17. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium, Post Traumatic Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    10 Aug 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Mission Connect MTBI Translational Research Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Post traumatic hypopituitarism 5b...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism ...June 21, 2010; however, none have reached the six month milestone for blood testing 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY

  18. FLYSUB-Consortium Tracking and RICH Performance Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soha, Aria [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Azumoun, Bob [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blatnik, Marie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pak, Robert [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Purschke, Martin [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Di Ruzza, Benedetto [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Woody, Craig [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bhopatkar, Vallary [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Hohlmann, Marcus [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Twigger, Jessie [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Zhang, Aiwu [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Dehmelt, Klaus [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Feege, Nils [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Hemmick, Thomas [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Bai, Xinzhang [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gnanvo, Kondo [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Liyanage, Nilanga [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Majka, Richard [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Smirnov, Nikolai [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2013-09-23

    This is a technical scope of work (TSW) between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experiments of FLYSUB-Consortium who have committed to participate in beam tests to be carried out during the 2013-2014 Fermilab Test Beam Facility program. The ultimate goal of this test-beam effort is to test and verify the performance of the individual components according to their expectation.

  19. p-Cresol mineralization by a nitrifying consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Luna, C. D.; Gomez, J.; Houbron, E.; Cuervo Lopez, F. M.; Texier, A. C.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrification and denitrification processes are considered economically feasible technologies for nitrogen removal from wastewater. Knowledge of the toxic or inhibitory effects of cresols on the nitrifying respiratory process is still insufficient. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinetic behavior and oxidizing ability of a nitrifying consortium exposed to p-cresol in batch cultures. Biotransformation of p-cresol was investigated by identifying the different intermediates formed. (Author)

  20. Meeting Report from the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Workshop 9

    OpenAIRE

    Davidsen, Tanja; Madupu, Ramana; Sterk, Peter; Field, Dawn; Garrity, George; Gilbert, Jack; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Hirschman, Lynette; Kolker, Eugene; Kottmann, Renzo; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Morrison, Norman; Schriml, Lynn; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 9th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC), held at the J. Craig Venter Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. It was the first GSC workshop to have open registration and attracted over 90 participants. This workshop featured sessions that provided overviews of the full range of ongoing GSC projects. It included sessions on Standards in Genomic Sciences, the open access journal of the GSC, building standards for genome annotation, the M5 platf...

  1. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry—The 2012 Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current...

  2. EIA publication manual: Fourth edition. [Energy information manuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neef, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Publications Manual. It was written to help the staff of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) who are involved in the production process to create and format uniform publications that not only provide information, but readily identify the agency. The manual reflects the substantial changes that have taken place to streamline methods of producing EIA publications over the past few years. Whereas the first edition, in 1979, was written for writers and typists which struggled with producing reports on manual typewriters, this report now reflects the increased use of automation in preparing most EIA publications. EIA has a fully automated photocomposition publishing system. Many of the style features discussed in this manual are automatically produced using EPIC/ICEF2. The need for format sheets and illustrations produced by graphic artists has been significantly reduced. However, the basic style has changed very little. EIA style continues to be based on the Government Printing Office Style Manual with some deviations tailored specifically for EIA.

  3. The radial velocity experiment (RAVE) : Fourth data release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Roeser, S.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Carrillo, I.; Anguiano, B.; Burton, D.; Campbell, R.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Russell, K. S.; Stupar, M.; Watson, F. G.; Bienayme, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Conrad, C.; Famaey, B.; Faure, C.; Just, A.; Kos, J.; Matijevic, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Minchev, I.; Scholz, R.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; de Boer, E. Wylie; Zerjal, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atm

  4. Development of neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy after fourth ventricle tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Doroshenko

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of the development of neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy that had the characteristics of Takotsubo cardiomyopathyin a young female patient in the early periods after fourth ventricle tumor surgery.

  5. Development of neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy after fourth ventricle tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Doroshenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a clinical case of the development of neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy that had the characteristics of Takotsubo cardiomyopathyin a young female patient in the early periods after fourth ventricle tumor surgery.

  6. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE): Fourth Data Release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kordopatis, G.; Gilmore, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Boeche, C.; Seabroke, G. M.; Siebert, A.; Zwitter, T.; Binney, J.; de Laverny, P.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Williams, M. E. K.; Piffl, T.; Enke, H.; Roeser, S.; Bijaoui, A.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Freeman, K.; Munari, U.; Carrillo, I.; Anguiano, B.; Burton, D.; Campbell, R.; Cass, C. J. P.; Fiegert, K.; Hartley, M.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Ritter, A.; Russell, K. S.; Stupar, M.; Watson, F. G.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Gerhard, O.; Gibson, B. K.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Navarro, J. F.; Conrad, C.; Famaey, B.; Faure, C.; Just, A.; Kos, J.; Matijevič, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Minchev, I.; Scholz, R.; Sharma, S.; Siviero, A.; de Boer, E. Wylie; Žerjal, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, overall metallicity), radial velocities, individual abundances, and distances determined for 425,561 stars, which constitute the fourth public data release of the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE). The stellar atm

  7. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - Fourth Quarter 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2009-12-31

    The Fourth Quarter 2009 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  8. Proceedings of the Fourth Glacier Bay Science Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Gende, Scott M.

    2007-01-01

    Foreword Glacier Bay was established as a National Monument in 1925, in part to protect its unique character and natural beauty, but also to create a natural laboratory to examine evolution of the glacial landscape. Today, Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve is still a place of profound natural beauty and dynamic landscapes. It also remains a focal point for scientific research and includes continuing observations begun decades ago of glacial processes and terrestrial ecosystems. In recent years, research has focused on glacial-marine interactions and ecosystem processes that occur below the surface of the bay. In October 2004, Glacier Bay National Park convened the fourth in a series of science symposiums to provide an opportunity for researchers, managers, interpreters, educators, students and the general public to share knowledge about Glacier Bay. The Fourth Glacier Bay Science Symposium was held in Juneau, Alaska, rather than at the Park, reflecting a desire to maximize attendance and communication among a growing and diverse number of stakeholders interested in science in the park. More than 400 people attended the symposium. Participants provided 46 oral presentations and 41 posters covering a wide array of disciplines including geology, glaciology, oceanography, wildlife and fisheries biology, terrestrial and marine ecology, socio-cultural research and management issues. A panel discussion focused on the importance of connectivity in Glacier Bay research, and keynote speakers (Gary Davis and Terry Chapin) spoke of long-term monitoring and ecological processes. These proceedings include 56 papers from the symposium. A summary of the Glacier Bay Science Plan-itself a subject of a meeting during the symposium and the result of ongoing discussions between scientists and resource managers-also is provided. We hope these proceedings illustrate the diversity of completed and ongoing scientific studies, conducted within the Park. To this end, we invited all

  9. Characterization of microalgae-bacteria consortium cultured in landfill leachate for carbon fixation and lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Sheng; Qiu, Duanyang; Schideman, Lance; Chai, Xiaoli; Zhao, Youcai

    2014-03-01

    The characteristics of cultivating high-density microalgae-bacteria consortium with landfill leachate was tested in this study. Landfill leachate was collected from Laogang landfill operated for over 10 years in Shanghai, China. The maximum biomass concentration of 1.58g L(-1) and chlorophyll a level of 22mg L(-1) were obtained in 10% leachate spike ratio. Meanwhile, up to 90% of the total nitrogen in landfill leachate was removed in culture with 10% leachate spike ratio with a total nitrogen concentration of 221.6mg L(-1). The fluorescence peak of humic-like organic matters red shifted to longer wavelengths by the end of culture, indicating that microalgae-bacteria consortium was effective for treating landfill leachate contaminants. Furthermore, with the leachate spike ratio of 10%, the maximum lipid productivity and carbon fixation were 24.1 and 65.8mg L(-1)d(-1), respectively. Results of this research provide valuable information for optimizing microalgae culture in landfill leachate.

  10. The Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1990--1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-02-25

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) . This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management by the Consortium universities resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. The term waste management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration. (2) Research programs at the leading edge, providing training to faculty and students and feeding into the education programs. (3) Education and research at the campuses, as well as from three field sites. (4) Ties with other multi-disciplinary university facilities. (5) Ties with two National Laboratories located in New Mexico. (6) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a proposed satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (7) An outreach program to interest others in environmental management, especially precollege students, minority students and practitioners in the field. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the first year.

  11. Microbial consortium influence upon steel corrosion rate, using polarisation resistance and electrochemical noise techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Gayosso, M.J.; Zavala Olivares, G.; Ruiz Ordaz, N.; Juarez Ramirez, C.; Garcia Esquivel, R.; Padilla Viveros, A

    2004-10-01

    The microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a process, which affects the oil industry, particularly the hydrocarbons extraction, transport and storage. MIC evaluation has been normally based upon microbiological tests, and just a few references mention alternating methods, such as the electrochemical techniques, which can be used as criteria for their evaluation. In this work, two different electrochemical laboratory techniques, polarisation resistance and electrochemical noise were used, in order to determine the corrosion behaviour of a microbial consortium, obtained from a gas transporting pipeline, located in the southeast of Mexico. The bacteria population growth was found to be different for sessile and plancktonic microorganisms. Moreover, long incubation times were required to reach the maximum concentration of sessile bacteria. The electrochemical techniques used in this study exhibited a similar tendency on the corrosion rate behaviour with time, and values above 0.3 mm year{sup -1} were observed at the end of the experiments. The experiments were complemented with surface analysis. Scanning electron microscope observation of APIXL52 steel coupons, exposed to the consortium action, revealed bacteria presence, as well as a damaged steel surface. A type of localized corrosion was observed on the metal surface, and it was associated to the bacteria effect.

  12. Combined search for the quarks of a sequential fourth generation

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    Results are presented from a search for a fourth generation of quarks produced singly or in pairs in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011. A novel strategy has been developed for a combined search for quarks of the up- and down-type in decay channels with at least one isolated muon or electron. Limits on the mass of the fourth-generation quarks and the relevant CKM matrix elements are derived in the context of a simple extension of the standard model with a sequential fourth generation of fermions. The existence of mass-degenerate fourth-generation quarks with masses below 685 GeV is excluded at 95% confidence level for minimal off-diagonal mixing between the third- and the fourth-generation quarks. With a mass difference of 25 GeV between the quark masses, the obtained limit on the masses of the fourth-generation quarks shifts by about +/- 20 GeV. This result significantly reduces the allowed parameter space for a fourt...

  13. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  14. Earth Hazards Consortium: a Unique Approach to Student-Centered Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, C. P.; Granados, H. D.; Durant, A.; Wolf, R. E.; Girard, G.; Javier, I. H.; Cisneros, M.; Rose, W.; Sánchez, S. S.; Stix, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Earth Hazards (EHaz) consortium consists of six research-based universities in the United States (Michigan Technological University, University at Buffalo), Canada (McGill University, Simon Fraser University) and México (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Colima) funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and the Secretaría de Educación Pública of México, as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The objective of the consortium is to expose students to a wide variety of scientific and cultural perspectives in the mitigation of geological natural hazards in North America. This four year program is multi-faceted, including student exchanges, graduate level, web-based courses in volcanology, and intensive group field trips. In 2005 to 2006, a total of 27 students were mobilized among the three countries. In this first year, the videoconferencing course focused on caldera supervolcanoes with weekly discussion leaders from various fields of volcanology. At the end of the course the students participated in a field trip to Long Valley and Yellowstone calderas. Also during the first year of the program, México hosted an International Course on Volcanic Hazards Map Construction. The course was attended by graduate students from Mexico and the United States, included lectures from noted guest speakers, and involved a field trip to Popocatepetl volcano. A student survey demonstrated that during the videoconferencing the students benefited by the weekly interaction with well- known volcanologists at the top of their field. Students who participated in the field trip benefited from an outstanding opportunity to link the theoretical concepts covered during the course with the field aspects of supervolcano systems, as well as the opportunity to network amongst their peers. Feedback from students who went abroad indicates that the program provided support for internship opportunities

  15. Democracy and Governance in Nigeria's Fourth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    seem to have given way for illusion and bewilderment 10 years after the experimentation (with ... Governance is defined by the World Bank as “the manner in which power is exercised in the .... The ultimate prize is the capture and retention of ...

  16. Halfway to a fourth presidential term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Aleksandrovich Ilyin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available May 2015 is marked by the end of the first half of Vladimir Putin’ six-year presidency. Today we can say with confidence that since 1991 there has been no such high support of the top state official for the entire period of the modern history of the Russian Federation

  17. Double primary cancers in 2 young sibs, leukemia in another, and dextrocardia in a fourth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F P; McIntosh, S; Peng-Whang, J

    1977-06-01

    Two brothers developed multiple primary neoplasms in childhood; one had glioblastoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at age 11 years, and the other brain tumor and acute leukemia at six years. A third brother died with myelogenous leukemia at thre years, and a fourth with cyanotic congenital heart disease at 11 weeks. Each child also had at least one hamartomatous lesion of the skin. The clinical features suggested von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis or other inherited cancer syndrome, but laboratory studies identified no markers of susceptibility to familial neoplasia.

  18. Teaching About Critical Earth Issues in the 2U Semester Online Consortium (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the spring of 2014 Washington University will present one of the first courses, entitled 'Critical Earth Issues,' in a new experiment in online education to be carried out by a consortium of Universities working with the production company 2U. The consortium, consisting of Washington University in St. Louis, Boston College, Brandeis University, Emory University, Northwestern University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Notre Dame, will all offer courses that can be taken by each other's students. In addition, three affiliate institutions so far (Baylor University, Southern Methodist University, and Temple University) have agree to allow their students to take online courses from this consortium, and transfer credit will be granted from the consortium institution teaching a particular course to students from other institutions as well. A total of eleven courses from the seven consortium schools are being taught in the fall of 2013. 'Critical Earth Issues,' to be taught the next spring, will be the first geoscience course taught. The structure of the course will be very different from traditional MOOCs. Half of the course (80 minutes per week) will be asynchronous and produced in advance by the company 2U. This is designed to take the place of the lecture component of a class, but it can take a variety of forms. While there are traditional lecture segments and filmed demos, these are also broken up by assignments for the students in order to make the 'lecture' segment more interactive. Sometimes the students will have to answer short or long questions before they can go on to the next part of the asynchronous material. Students can only get to the assignment at the end if they work their way through all the produced and interactive segments. This material will often also prompt them to upload an 'assignment,' such as uploading photos of different rocks that are used for the buildings at their host institution (to be shared

  19. Earth Hazards Consortium: a Novel Approach to Student Education in Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, C. P.; Delgado Granados, H.; Escobar Wolf, R.; Durant, A.; Girard, G.; Calder, E.; Dominguez, T.; Roberge, J.; Rose, W.; Stix, J.; Varley, N.; Williams-Jones, G.; Hernandez Javier, I.; Salinas Sanchez, S.

    2007-05-01

    The Earth Hazards (Ehaz) consortium consists of six research-based universities in the United States (Michigan Technological University, University of New York at Buffalo), Canada (McGill University, Simon Fraser University) and Mexico (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Colima) funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada, and the Secretaría de Educación Pública of Mexico, as part of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The objective of the consortium is to expose students to a wide variety of scientific and cultural perspectives in the mitigation of geological natural hazards in North America. This four-year program is multi-faceted, including student exchanges, graduate level, web-based courses in volcanology, and intensive group field trips. In 2005 to 2006, a total of 27 students were mobilized among the three countries. In this first year, the videoconferencing course focused on caldera "Supervolcanoes" with weekly discussion leaders from various fields of volcanology. At the end of the course the students participated in a field trip to Long Valley and Yellowstone calderas. Also during the first year of the program, Mexico hosted an International Course on Volcanic Hazards Map Construction. The course was attended by graduate students from Mexico and the United States, included lectures from noted guest speakers, and involved a field trip to Popocatépetl volcano. The multi-university course focus for 2007 is Volcanic Edifice Failure with a field trip planned in August 2007 to the Cascades and Western Canada. A student survey from 2006 demonstrated that (1) during the videoconferencing the students benefited by the weekly interaction with well-known volcanologists at the top of their field, (2) the field trip provided an outstanding opportunity for participants to link the theoretical concepts covered during the course with the field aspects of supervolcano systems, as well as the

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INDUSTRY-DRIVEN CONSORTIUM FOCUSED ON IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE OF DOMESTIC STRIPPER WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel L. Morrison

    2002-09-30

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The consortium creates a partnership with the U.S. petroleum and natural gas industries and trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report serves as the second topical report. The SWC has grown and diversified its membership during its first 24 months of existence. The Consortium is now focused on building strategic alliances with additional industrial, state, and federal entities to expand further the SWC membership base and transfer technologies as they are developed. In addition, the Consortium has successfully worked to attract state support to co-fund SWC projects. Penn State has entered a co-funding arrangement with the New York State Energy Development Authority (NYSERDA) which has provided $200,000 over the last two years to co-fund stripper well production-orientated projects that have relevance to New York state producers. During this reporting period, the Executive Council approved co-funding for 14 projects that have a total project value of $2,116,897. Since its inception, the SWC has approved cofunding for 27 projects that have a total project value of $3,632,109.84. The SWC has provided $2,242,701 in co-funding for these projects and programmatically maintains a cost share of 39%.

  1. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  2. Cultivation of algae consortium in a dairy farm wastewater for biodiesel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dairy farm wastewaters are potential resources for production of microalgae biofuels. A study was conducted to evaluate the capability of production of biodiesel from consortium of native microalgae culture in dairy farm treated wastewater. Native algal strains were isolated from dairy farm wastewaters collection tank (untreated wastewater as well as from holding tank (treated wastewater. The consortium members were selected on the basis of fluorescence response after treating with Nile red reagent. Preliminary studies of two commercial and consortium of ten native strains of algae showed good growth in wastewaters. A consortium of native strains was found capable to remove more than 98% nutrients from treated wastewater. The biomass production and lipid content of consortium cultivated in treated wastewater were 153.54 t ha−1 year−1 and 16.89%, respectively. 72.70% of algal lipid obtained from consortium could be converted into biodiesel.

  3. Microbial dehalogenation of trichlorophenol by a bacterial consortium: characterization and mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Chlorinated phenolic compounds are a class of toxic and refractory organic pollutants. The pollution caused by chlorophenols poses serious ecological and environmental problems. A stable bacterial consortium capable of reductively dechlorinating trichlorophenol was isolated using chlorophenol as the sole source of carbon and energy. The physiological characteristics of the mixed cultures were studied and the results show that the consortium could use pyruvate as the carbon and energy source. The fermentation of pyruvate, sulfate reduction and dechlorination process proceeded strictly in succession within this consortium. The effect of specific inhibitors on the dechlorinating activity of the consortium was investigated, and the results indicate that sulfate and molybdate (1 mmol/L) have a strong inhibitive influence on the dechlorination activity. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was applied to analyzing the composition of the consortium and the results reveal that one major subpopulation within the consortium was phylogenetically affiliated to gamma and delta subclass of Proteobacteria.

  4. A giant solid cystic inferior fourth ventricle subependymoma – Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovani A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Subependymomas are a rare subtype of ependymomas, slow growing WHO grade I tumors that develop either intracranial from the subependymal glial precursor cells layer of the ventricles or intramedullary. These tumors originate in the undifferentiated Subependymal layer of cells that can become either ependymocytes or astrocytes. Most of the subependymomas are located inside the fourth ventricle (50-60%. We reviewed the case of a 40 years old woman with a giant solid cystic fourth ventricle ependymoma. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor through a subociipital transvermian approach. We discussed the characteristics of these benign tumors and reviewed the literature on this subject and concluded that total resection is the treatment of choice for symptomatic Subependymomas localized in posterior fossa.

  5. Aspiration of coagulated hematoma in the third and fourth ventricles via paracele anterior horn puncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Tao; Sheng-Hong Ding

    2016-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is a neurological urgency with a high mortality and unfavorable prognosis.Fast removal of intraventricular blood should be considered as a priority.The current treatments of IVH mainly focus on external ventricular drain and endoscopic aspiration,but neither way can remove the blood in the fourth ventricle easily and relieve the compression of brainstem.Here we report a unique procedure to solve this problem.A 41-year-old male patient who had suffered sudden attack of headache and disturbance of consciousness for 2 h was diagnosed as having high density lesion in thewhole ventricular system by computed tomographic (CT) imaging.An emergent bilateral ventriculopuncture and intraventricular hematoma removal under non-line-of-sight was performed immediately;the catheter was extended to the fourth ventricle to maximally remove the hematoma.Postoperative CT scan demonstrated total removal of IVH and no sign of extra brain damage.

  6. Dark Coulomb binding of heavy neutrinos of fourth family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotsky, K. M.; Esipova, E. A.; Khlopov, M. Yu.; Laletin, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    Direct dark matter searches put severe constraints on the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). These constraints cause serious troubles for the model of stable neutrino of fourth generation with mass around 50GeV. Though the calculations of primordial abundance of these particles make them in the charge symmetric case a sparse subdominant component of the modern dark matter, their presence in the universe would exceed the current upper limits by several orders of the magnitude. However, if quarks and leptons of fourth generation possess their own Coulomb-like y-interaction, recombination of pairs of heavy neutrinos and antineutrinos and their annihilation in the “neutrinium” atoms can play important role in their cosmological evolution, reducing their modern abundance far below the experimental upper limits. The model of stable fourth generation assumes that the dominant part of dark matter is explained by excessive Ū antiquarks, forming (ŪŪŪ)-- charged clusters, bound with primordial helium in nuclear-interacting O-helium (OHe) dark atoms. The y charge conservation implies generation of the same excess of fourth generation neutrinos, potentially dangerous WIMP component of this scenario. We show that due to y-interaction recombination of fourth neutrinos with OHe hides these WIMPs from direct WIMP searches, leaving the negligible fraction of free neutrinos, what makes their existence compatible with the experimental constraints.

  7. The fourth nuclear power plant in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2017-01-15

    Since 2006 the nuclear sector in Argentina has aimed at recovering and strengthening its capabilities and facilities. Part of the challenge posed by this revival has been to also accompany the development of activities with a higher level of responsibility for safety and the environment. Among the strategic decisions taken in recent years, one main highlight is the construction of the nuclear power plant CAREM25 entirely with Argentine technology and design under the responsibility of the National Atomic Energy Commission. On February 4, 2015, the Ministry of Federal Planning and the National Energy Administration (NEA) signed the agreement for cooperation and construction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) with ACP-1000 technology, developed in the Peoples Republic of China.

  8. Decolorization and biodegradation of reactive dyes and dye wastewater by a developed bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saratale, R G; Saratale, G D; Chang, J S; Govindwar, S P

    2010-11-01

    A bacterial consortium (consortium GR) consisting of Proteus vulgaris NCIM-2027 and Micrococcus glutamicus NCIM-2168 could rapidly decolorize and degrade commonly-used sulfonated reactive dye Green HE4BD and many other reactive dyes. Consortium GR shows markedly higher decolorization activity than that of the individual strains. The preferable physicochemical parameters were identified to achieve higher dye degradation and decolorization efficiency. The supplementation of cheap co-substrates (e.g., extracts of agricultural wastes) could enhance the decolorization performance of consortium GR. Extent of mineralization was determined with TOC and COD measurements, showing nearly complete mineralization of Green HE4BD by consortium GR (up to 90% TOC and COD reduction) within 24 h. Oxidoreductive enzymes seemed to be involved in fast decolorization/degradation process with the evidence of enzymes induction in the bacterial consortium. Phytotoxicity and microbial toxicity studies confirm that the biodegraded products of Green HE4BD by consortium GR are non-toxic. Consortium GR also shows significant biodegradation and decolorization activities for mixture of reactive dyes as well as the effluent from actual dye manufacturing industry. This confers the possibility of applying consortium GR for the treatment of industrial wastewaters containing dye pollutants.

  9. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, S S; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H; Hilner, J E; Julier, C; Morahan, G; Nerup, J; Nierras, C; Pociot, F; Todd, J A

    2009-12-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual's risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community. To facilitate the access to these resources, the T1DGC has developed a Consortium Agreement (http://www.t1dgc.org) that specifies the rights and responsibilities of investigators who participate in Consortium activities. The T1DGC has assembled a resource of affected sib-pair families, parent-child trios, and case-control collections with banks of DNA, serum, plasma, and EBV-transformed cell lines. In addition, both candidate gene and genome-wide (linkage and association) studies have been performed and displayed in T1DBase (http://www.t1dbase.org) for all researchers to use in their own investigations. In this supplement, a subset of the T1DGC collection has been used to investigate earlier published candidate genes for T1D, to confirm the results from a genome-wide association scan for T1D, and to determine associations with candidate genes for other autoimmune diseases or with type II diabetes that may be involved with beta-cell function.

  10. Overview of the Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, SS; Akolkar, B; Concannon, P; Erlich, H.; Hilner, JE; Julier, C.; Morahan, G; J. Nerup; Nierras, C.; Pociot, F; Todd, JA.

    2009-01-01

    The Type I Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC) is an international, multicenter research program with two primary goals. The first goal is to identify genomic regions and candidate genes whose variants modify an individual’s risk of type I diabetes (T1D) and help explain the clustering of the disease in families. The second goal is to make research data available to the research community and to establish resources that can be used by, and that are fully accessible to, the research community...

  11. WDM module research within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Mahmoud; Koteles, Emil S.; Delage, Andre; Chatenoud, F.; Templeton, Ian M.; Champion, Garth; He, Jian Jun; Wang, Weijian; Dion, Michael M.; Barber, Richard A.

    1995-02-01

    We report on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of monolithic wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) modules produced within the Canadian Solid State Optoelectronics Consortium. The transmitter module includes multiple, discrete wavelength, distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diodes monolithically integrated with waveguide combiners fabricated using an InGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The wavelength demultiplexer unit is based on a Rowland circle grating spectrometer monolithically integrated with a metal- semiconductor-metal (MSM) detector array fabricated on an InGaAs/AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure. The epitaxial layer wafers for both transmitter and receiver modules were grown in single molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) runs.

  12. Bariatric Surgery and Liver Cancer in a Consortium of Academic Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyu; Yang, Hannah P; Ward, Kristy K; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; McGlynn, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is implicated as an important factor in the rising incidence of liver cancer in the USA. Bariatric surgery is increasingly used for treating morbid obesity and comorbidities. Using administrative data from UHC, a consortium of academic medical centers in the USA, we compared the prevalence of liver cancer among admissions with and without a history of bariatric surgery within a 3-year period. Admissions with a history of bariatric surgery had a 61 % lower prevalence of liver cancer compared to those without a history of bariatric surgery (prevalence ratio 0.39, 95 % confidence interval 0.35-0.44), and these inverse associations persisted within strata of sex, race, and ethnicity. This hospital administrative record-based analysis suggests that bariatric surgery could play a role in liver cancer prevention.

  13. Innovation in Academic Progression: Progress of the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landen, Jenny; Evans-Prior, Diane; Dakin, Becky; Liesveld, Judy

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) challenged nursing education programs to increase the proportion of nurses with a baccalaureate degree in nursing to 80 percent by 2020. All 18 state-funded prelicensure nursing programs in New Mexico joined forces to create the New Mexico Nursing Education Consortium (NMNEC). NMNEC is a model of collaboration with a statewide common curriculum that provides seamless transferability for students between schools while offering the BSN on community college campuses. Over three years, university partnerships with community colleges increased prelicensure BSN seats by 77 percent. This article describes the NMNEC model, challenges and opportunities associated with implementation, current program outcomes, and factors that have contributed to NMNEC's success. Also discussed are future steps for sustainability and growth as NMNEC continues in its commitment to meeting the IOM challenge.

  14. Two New Fourth-Order Three-Stage Symplectic Integrators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Rong; WU Xin

    2011-01-01

    Two new fourth-order three-stage symplectic integrators are specifically designed for a family of Hamiltonian systems,such as the harmonic oscillator,mathematical pendulum and lattice ψ4 model.When the nonintegrable lattice ψ4 system is taken as a test model,numerical comparisons show that the new methods have a great advantage over the second-order Verlet symplectic integrators in the accuracy of energy,become explicitly better than the usual non-gradient fourth-order seven-stage symplectic integrator of Forest and Ruth,and are almost equivalent to a fourth-order seven-stage force gradient symplectic integrator of Chin.As the most important advantage,the new integrators are convenient for solving the variational equations of many Hamiltonian systems so as to save a great deal of the computational cost when scanning a lot of orbits for chaos.

  15. Scaling, similarity, and the fourth paradigm for hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Clark, Martyn; Samaniego, Luis; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; van Emmerik, Tim; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Achieng, Kevin; Franz, Trenton E.; Woods, Ross

    2017-07-01

    In this synthesis paper addressing hydrologic scaling and similarity, we posit that roadblocks in the search for universal laws of hydrology are hindered by our focus on computational simulation (the third paradigm) and assert that it is time for hydrology to embrace a fourth paradigm of data-intensive science. Advances in information-based hydrologic science, coupled with an explosion of hydrologic data and advances in parameter estimation and modeling, have laid the foundation for a data-driven framework for scrutinizing hydrological scaling and similarity hypotheses. We summarize important scaling and similarity concepts (hypotheses) that require testing; describe a mutual information framework for testing these hypotheses; describe boundary condition, state, flux, and parameter data requirements across scales to support testing these hypotheses; and discuss some challenges to overcome while pursuing the fourth hydrological paradigm. We call upon the hydrologic sciences community to develop a focused effort towards adopting the fourth paradigm and apply this to outstanding challenges in scaling and similarity.

  16. Brachymetatarsia of the fourth metatarsal, lengthening scarf osteotomy with bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Desai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl presented with left fourth metatarsal shortening causing significant psychological distress. She underwent lengthening scarf osteotomy held with an Omnitech® screw (Biotech International, France with the addition of two 1 cm cancellous cubes (RTI Biologics, United States. A lengthening z-plasty of the extensor tendons and skin were also performed. At 6 weeks the patient was fully weight bearing and at one-year follow up, the patient was satisfied and discharged. A modified technique of lengthening scarf osteotomy is described for congenital brachymatatarsia. This technique allows one stage lengthening through a single incision with graft incorporation by 6 weeks.

  17. Test Review: Abidin, R. R. (2012) "Parenting Stress Index, Fourth Edition" ("PSI-4"). Lutz, Florida: Psychological Assessment Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alyce O.

    2015-01-01

    The "Parenting Stress Index, Fourth Edition" (PSI-4) is a 120-item measure used to explore parental stress levels considering a parent's relationship with one of his or her children between the ages of 1 month and 12 years. The main purpose of the test is to define these stress levels and from where they originate in order to identify…

  18. Use of Medical Students in a Flipped Classroom Programme in Nutrition Education for Fourth-Grade School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Christian S.; Cantore, Kathryn M.; Denlinger, LeAnn N.; Schleich, Michele A.; Stevens, Nicole M.; Swavely, Steven C.; Odom, Anne A.; Novick, Marsha B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a flipped classroom progamme, designed and implemented by medical students, in communicating nutrition education to fourth-grade school students aged 9-10 years and to characterise teachers' assessments of the progamme, which was designed to minimise the burden placed on…

  19. A feline case of isolated fourth ventricle with syringomyelia suspected to be related with feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Masato; Okada, Midori; Sato, Tsuneo; Kanayama, Kiichi; Sakai, Takeo

    2007-07-01

    A one-year-old female cat was unable to stand. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed, and an enlargement of the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles and syringomyelia were detected. The cat was diagnosed with an isolated fourth ventricle (IFV) with syringomyelia. The serum isoantibody test for the feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) virus was 1:3,200. After the cat died, a pathological examination revealed nonsuppurative encephalomyelitis. We suspected that the IFV, detected in the cat, was associated with FIP encephalomyelitis. To our knowledge, there has been no report on IFV in veterinary medicine.

  20. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  1. Towards Reviving Electroweak Baryogenesis with a Fourth Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Shu Hou

    2013-01-01

    universe. However, it does not work within the standard model due to two reasons: (1 the strength of CP violation from the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism with three generations is too small; (2 the electroweak phase transition is not first order for the experimentally allowed Higgs boson mass. We discuss possibilities to solve these problems by introducing a fourth generation of fermions and how electroweak baryogenesis might be revived. We also discuss briefly the recent observation of a Higgs-like boson with mass around 125 GeV, which puts the fourth generation in a difficult situation, and the possible way out.

  2. Bergman kernel function on Hua construction of the fourth type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the Hua construction and presents the holomorphic automorphism group of the Hua construction of the fourth type. Utilizing the Bergman kernel function, under the condition of holomorphic automorphism and the standard complete orthonormal system of the semi-Reinhardt domain, the infinite series form of the Bergman kernel function is derived. By applying the properties of polynomial and Γ functions, various identification relations of the aforementioned form are developed and the explicit formula of the Bergman kernel function for the Hua construction of the fourth type is obtained, which suggest that many of the previously-reported results are only the special cases of our findings.

  3. Depressive Symptoms among Fourth Form Students in St. Kitts and Nevis High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian A. Lowe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been limited research on depressive symptoms among high school students in St. Kitts and Nevis. This project examines levels of depressive symptoms among fourth form (grade 10 students attending all high schools in St. Kitts and Nevis. Students enrolled in the fourth form during the 2006/2007 academic year in all high schools were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II. A near census of the students was conducted (n = 744 students; 50.4% females, 47.6% males, and 2% no gender reported; age 13–19 years, mean = 15.5 ± 0.8 years. Six in every ten students (62.1% reported some symptoms of depression, with 14.8% reporting moderate to severe and 9.7% reporting severe symptoms of depression. Females reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (t(727 = 7.11, p < 0.01 with 70% of females reporting some level of depressive symptoms compared with 52% of their male counterparts (X2(1 = 24.6, p < 0.05. Additionally, 34% of females were in the moderate to severe or severe range of depressive symptoms, while 15% of males were in the same range. Students who were older than expected for their grade (i.e., 17 years or older reported significantly higher BDI-II scores (F(2,740 = 2.88, p < 0.05 than students who were younger or at the expected age (i.e., 14–16 years. Students whose mothers had a high school or postsecondary education reported significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms than students whose mothers had less than a high school education (F(3, 637, = 4.23, p < 0.05. Symptoms of depression among fourth form students in St. Kitts and Nevis are a prevalent problem that is influenced by students’ age, gender, and social class as indicated by maternal education.

  4. Comparison of two commonly used clinical cognitive screening tests to diagnose mild cognitive impairment in heart failure with the golden standard European Consortium Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Mah, Darren; Dyck, Jason R B; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Ezekowitz, Justin

    2017-02-01

    This study on mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in heart failure (HF) compares the utility of Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) to the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) for diagnosing MCI in a HF population when compared to the golden standard European Consortium Criteria (ECC). Participants were recruited from the Alberta HEART study at the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute in Edmonton and St. Mary's hospital in Camrose. This study enrolled 53 community adults aged>50years: 33 HF and 20 controls. Participants were assessed using both the MMSE and MoCA for MCI. MCI was diagnosed using the golden standard, European Consortium Criteria. Sensitivity and specificity analysis, positive and negative predictive values, likelihood ratios and kappa statistic were calculated. The mean age was 72.8years (SD 8.4), 60.4% were females and 34% had underlying ischemic heart disease. Overall, two thirds of patients (22/33, 66%) with HF had MCI. In comparison to European Consortium Criteria, the sensitivity and specificity of MoCA were 82% and 91% in identifying individuals with MCI, and MMSE were 9% and 91%, respectively. The positive and negative predictive values for MoCA were 95% and 71%, and for MMSE were 67% and 33%, respectively. Kappa statistics showed good agreement between MoCA and consortium criteria (kappa=0.68) and a low agreement between MMSE and consortium criteria (kappa=0.07). Cognitive dysfunction is common in patients with HF. Overall, the MoCA seems to be a better screening tool than MMSE for MCI in HF patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Low temperature reduction of hexavalent chromium by a microbial enrichment consortium and a novel strain of Arthrobacter aurescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Vicki S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromium is a transition metal most commonly found in the environment in its trivalent [Cr(III] and hexavalent [Cr(VI] forms. The EPA maximum total chromium contaminant level for drinking water is 0.1 mg/l (0.1 ppm. Many water sources, especially underground sources, are at low temperatures (less than or equal to 15 Centigrade year round. It is important to evaluate the possibility of microbial remediation of Cr(VI contamination using microorganisms adapted to these low temperatures (psychrophiles. Results Core samples obtained from a Cr(VI contaminated aquifer at the Hanford facility in Washington were enriched in Vogel Bonner medium at 10 Centigrade with 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 1000 mg/l Cr(VI. The extent of Cr(VI reduction was evaluated using the diphenyl carbazide assay. Resistance to Cr(VI up to and including 1000 mg/l Cr(VI was observed in the consortium experiments. Reduction was slow or not observed at and above 100 mg/l Cr(VI using the enrichment consortium. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI in the 30 and 60 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the consortium was 8 and 17 days, respectively at 10 Centigrade. Lyophilized consortium cells did not demonstrate adsorption of Cr(VI over a 24 hour period. Successful isolation of a Cr(VI reducing organism (designated P4 from the consortium was confirmed by 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing. Average time to complete reduction of Cr(VI at 10 Centigrade in the 25 and 50 mg/l Cr(VI cultures of the isolate P4 was 3 and 5 days, respectively. The 16S rDNA sequence from isolate P4 identified this organism as a strain of Arthrobacter aurescens, a species that has not previously been shown to be capable of low temperature Cr(VI reduction. Conclusion A. aurescens, indigenous to the subsurface, has the potential to be a predominant metal reducer in enhanced, in situ subsurface bioremediation efforts involving Cr(VI and possibly other heavy metals and radionuclides.

  6. The Latin American Consortium of Studies in Obesity (LASO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, L. E.; Casas, J. P.; Herrera, V. M.; Miranda, J. J.; Perel, P.; Pichardo, R.; González, A.; Sanchez, J. R.; Ferreccio, C.; Aguilera, X.; Silva, E.; Oróstegui, M.; Gómez, L. F.; Chirinos, J. A.; Medina-Lezama, J.; Pérez, C. M.; Suárez, E.; Ortiz, A. P.; Rosero, L.; Schapochnik, N.; Ortiz, Z.; Ferrante, D.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Current, high-quality data are needed to evaluate the health impact of the epidemic of obesity in Latin America. The Latin American Consortium of Studies of Obesity (LASO) has been established, with the objectives of (i) Accurately estimating the prevalence of obesity and its distribution by sociodemographic characteristics; (ii) Identifying ethnic, socioeconomic and behavioural determinants of obesity; (iii) Estimating the association between various anthropometric indicators or obesity and major cardiovascular risk factors and (iv) Quantifying the validity of standard definitions of the various indexes of obesity in Latin American population. To achieve these objectives, LASO makes use of individual data from existing studies. To date, the LASO consortium includes data from 11 studies from eight countries (Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Peru, Puerto Rico and Venezuela), including a total of 32 462 subjects. This article describes the overall organization of LASO, the individual studies involved and the overall strategy for data analysis. LASO will foster the development of collaborative obesity research among Latin American investigators. More important, results from LASO will be instrumental to inform health policies aiming to curtail the epidemic of obesity in the region. PMID:19438980

  7. Inner-City Energy and Environmental Education Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-11

    The numbers of individuals with adequate education and training to participate effectively in the highly technical aspects of environmental site cleanup are insufficient to meet the increasing demands of industry and government. Young people are particularly sensitive to these issues and want to become better equipped to solve the problems which will confront them during their lives. Educational institutions, on the other hand, have been slow in offering courses and curricula which will allow students to fulfill these interests. This has been in part due to the lack of federal funding to support new academic programs. This Consortium has been organized to initiate focused educational effort to reach inner-city youth with interesting and useful energy and environmental programs which can lead to well-paying and satisfying careers. Successful Consortium programs can be replicated in other parts of the nation. This report describes a pilot program in Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Baltimore with the goal to attract and retain inner-city youth to pursue careers in energy-related scientific and technical areas, environmental restoration, and waste management.

  8. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  9. A programmable Escherichia coli consortium via tunable symbiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Kerner

    Full Text Available Synthetic microbial consortia that can mimic natural systems have the potential to become a powerful biotechnology for various applications. One highly desirable feature of these consortia is that they can be precisely regulated. In this work we designed a programmable, symbiotic circuit that enables continuous tuning of the growth rate and composition of a synthetic consortium. We implemented our general design through the cross-feeding of tryptophan and tyrosine by two E. coli auxotrophs. By regulating the expression of genes related to the export or production of these amino acids, we were able to tune the metabolite exchanges and achieve a wide range of growth rates and strain ratios. In addition, by inverting the relationship of growth/ratio vs. inducer concentrations, we were able to "program" the co-culture for pre-specified attributes with the proper addition of inducing chemicals. This programmable proof-of-concept circuit or its variants can be applied to more complex systems where precise tuning of the consortium would facilitate the optimization of specific objectives, such as increasing the overall efficiency of microbial production of biofuels or pharmaceuticals.

  10. The Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Teasdale, Thomas A; Hajjar, Ihab; Shaughnessy, Marianne; Mintzer, Michael J

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes the activities of the Consortium of E-Learning in Geriatrics Instruction (CELGI), a group dedicated to creating, using, and evaluating e-learning to enhance geriatrics education. E-learning provides a relatively new approach to addressing geriatrics educators' concerns, such as the shortage of professionals trained to care for older people, overcrowded medical curricula, the move to transfer teaching venues to community settings, and the switch to competency-based education models. However, this innovative education technology is facing a number of challenges as its use and influence grow, including proof of effectiveness and efficiency. CELGI was created in response to these challenges, with the goal of facilitating the development and portability of e-learning materials for geriatrics educators. Members represent medical and nursing schools, the Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare system, long-term care facilities, and other institutions that rely on continuing streams of quality health education. CELGI concentrates on providing a coordinated approach to formulating and adapting specifications, standards, and guidelines; developing education and training in e-learning competencies; developing e-learning products; evaluating the effect of e-learning materials; and disseminating these materials. The vision of consortium members is that e-learning for geriatric education will become the benchmark for valid and successful e-learning throughout medical education.

  11. Heavy bino dark matter and collider signals in the MSSM with vectorlike fourth-generation particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohammad; Feng, Jonathan L.; Iwamoto, Sho; Lillard, Benjamin

    2016-11-01

    MSSM4G models, in which the minimal supersymmetric standard model is extended to include vectorlike copies of standard model particles, are promising possibilities for weak-scale supersymmetry. In particular, two models, called QUE and QDEE, realize the major virtues of supersymmetry (naturalness consistent with the 125 GeV Higgs boson, gauge coupling unification, and thermal relic neutralino dark matter) without the need for fine-tuned relations between particle masses. We determine the implications of these models for dark matter and collider searches. The QUE and QDEE models revive the possibility of heavy bino dark matter with mass in the range 300-700 GeV, which is not usually considered. Dark matter direct detection cross sections are typically below current limits, but are naturally expected above the neutrino floor and may be seen at next-generation experiments. Indirect detection prospects are bright at the Cherenkov Telescope Array, provided the fourth-generation leptons have mass above 350 GeV or decay to taus. In a completely complementary way, discovery prospects at the LHC are dim if the fourth-generation leptons are heavy or decay to taus, but are bright for fourth-generation leptons with masses below 350 GeV that decay either to electrons or to muons. We conclude that the combined set of direct detection, CTA, and LHC experiments will discover or exclude these MSSM4G models in the coming few years, assuming the Milky Way has an Einasto dark matter profile.

  12. 25 CFR 1000.16 - What criteria must a Tribe/Consortium satisfy to be eligible for admission to the “applicant pool”?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .../Consortium satisfy to be eligible for admission to the “applicant pool”? To be admitted into the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must either be an Indian Tribe or a Consortium of Indian Tribes and...

  13. Fourth order phase-field model for local max-ent approximants applied to crack propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri, Fatemeh; Millán, Daniel; Arroyo Balaguer, Marino; Silani, Mohammad; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-01

    We apply a fourth order phase-field model for fracture based on local maximum entropy (LME) approximants. The higher order continuity of the meshfree LME approximants allows to directly solve the fourth order phase-field equations without splitting the fourth order differential equation into two second order differential equations. We will first show that the crack surface can be captured more accurately in the fourth order model. Furthermore, less nodes are needed for the fourth order model ...

  14. Fourth Zagreb index of Circumcoronene series of Benzenoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza FARAHANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A topological index of a graph is a numeric quantity related to a structure of a molecule which is invariant under graph automorphism. Recently, Ghorbani and Hosseinzadeh introduced Fourth Zagreb index of graphs. In this paper we determine a closed formula of this new topological index of the famous Benzenoid family named Circumcoronene series of Benzenoid Hk.

  15. Dietary Behaviors among Fourth Graders: A Social Cognitive Theory Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Sara J.; Sargent, Roger G.; Rheaume, Carol E.; Saunders, Ruth P.

    1999-01-01

    Examined the impact of behavioral, personal, and environmental factors on fourth graders' dietary practices, using a social cognitive theory framework. Survey results highlighted social cognitive variables that significantly influenced dietary behaviors: gender, race, socioeconomic status, fruit and vegetable availability at home, nutrition…

  16. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-14

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  17. Fourth Way in Action: Teacher Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Oon Seng

    2012-01-01

    Policy makers are often looking for solutions to develop their educational systems in today's highly competitive knowledge-based economy. Hargreaves and Shirley's Fourth Way provides a useful approach in analysing policy trends, successes and pitfalls, based on an observation of practices and research evidences in the west, particularly, the USA…

  18. Transactions of the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Hoover, M.D. (eds.)

    1987-01-01

    This paper contains the presented papers at the fourth symposium on space nuclear power systems. Topics of these papers include: space nuclear missions and applications, reactors and shielding, nuclear electric and nuclear propulsion, refractory alloys and high-temperature materials, instrumentation and control, energy conversion and storage, space nuclear fuels, thermal management, nuclear safety, simulation and modeling, and multimegawatt system concepts. (LSP)

  19. Implementation Frailties of Guba and Lincoln's "Fourth Generation" Evaluation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Tom

    1995-01-01

    The evaluation of a science education project for teachers in Durban (South Africa) illustrates some problems inherent in the application of the fourth-generation evaluation approach of Guba and Lincoln. One of the strongest concerns is that full participation by stakeholders may be an unrealistic assumption. (SLD)

  20. Constraints on Majorana dark matter from a fourth lepton family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hapola, T.; Jarvinen, M.; Kouvaris, C.

    2014-01-01

    We study the possibility of dark matter in the form of heavy neutrinos from a fourth lepton family with helicity suppressed couplings such that dark matter is produced thermally via annihilations in the early Universe. We present all possible constraints for this scenario coming from LHC...... account for the dark matter abundance....

  1. Did that Dog Sniff Violate the Fourth Amendment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawke, Catherine; Middleton, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    Is sniffing at the front door of a private home by a trained narcotics detection dog a Fourth Amendment search requiring probable cause? Is a "drug dog" somehow like a manmade technology, such as a thermal imaging device? These were a couple of the questions recently presented to the U.S. Supreme Court during arguments in "Florida v. Jardines."…

  2. Dental Hygiene Program Clinic Manual, Fall 1997. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Mary; Cama, Christine; Pastoriza-Maldonado, Alida

    This is the fourth edition of the Clinic Manual for the Dental Hygiene Program at Eugenio Maria de Hostos Community College in the Bronx (New York). It contains general information, grading procedures, performance guides, and clinical forms related to the program. Section 1 provides an introduction to clinic philosophy, policies, goals and…

  3. A curve flow evolved by a fourth order parabolic equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We study a fourth order curve flow, which is the gradient flow of a functional describing the shapes of human red blood cells. We prove that for any smooth closed initial curve in R2, the flow has a smooth solution for all time and the solution subconverges to a critical point of the functional.

  4. A curve flow evolved by a fourth order parabolic equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YanNan; JIAN HuaiYu

    2009-01-01

    We study a fourth order curve flow,which is the gradient flow of a functional describing the shapes of human red blood cells.We prove that for any smooth closed initial curve in R2,the flow has a smooth solution for all time and the solution subconverges to a critical point of the functional.

  5. TRICARE Fourth Generation Study Group - Exploring the Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    JAN 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE TRICARE Fourth Generation Study Group - Exploring the...1ncludes all AD, AOFMIGRIGRFM, and unclef 65 RETIRETFMIOTH, exclucbng 65+ Albers Equal Area Prqect10n, 2011 2011 MHS Conference Five Models  TRICARE

  6. The Weak Field Limit of Fourth Order Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    We discuss Newtonian and the post-Newtonian limits of Fourth Order Gravity Theories pointing out, in details, their resemblances and differences with respect to General Relativity. Particular emphasis is placed on the exact solutions and methods used to obtain them.

  7. An Examination of Fourth Graders' Aesthetic Engagement with Literary Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Linda T.

    2013-01-01

    Reader response, simulation, and assimilation theories offer insights to our emotional connections with characters. Findings from a study conducted with avid fourth-grade readers show that when the children feel they are next to the character, they acentrally imagine the narrative and experience sympathy. The children also participate and…

  8. Fourth-order discrete anisotropic boundary-value problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Leszczynski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we consider the fourth-order discrete anisotropic boundary value problem with both advance and retardation. We apply the direct method of the calculus of variations and the mountain pass technique to prove the existence of at least one and at least two solutions. Non-existence of non-trivial solutions is also undertaken.

  9. Virginia Tech team places fourth at Solar Decathlon 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2005-01-01

    A house designed and built by a team of students from Virginia Tech's College of Architecture and Urban Studies and College of Engineering placed fourth overall on Friday, Oct. 14, at Solar Decathlon 2005, an international competition sponsored by the Department of Energy held on the Mall in Washington, D.C.

  10. Fourth Way in Action? The Evolution of Singapore's Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, Saravanan

    2012-01-01

    Hargreaves and Shirley's "The Fourth Way" offers a valuable framework for considering the challenges and dilemmas that confront education change practitioners. In this article, I consider how well their framework fits the evolution and more recent changes in Singapore education. History, context culture and aspirations are seen as…

  11. The Weak Field Limit of Fourth Order Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Capozziello, Salvatore; Stabile, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    We discuss Newtonian and the post-Newtonian limits of Fourth Order Gravity Theories pointing out, in details, their resemblances and differences with respect to General Relativity. Particular emphasis is placed on the exact solutions and methods used to obtain them.

  12. Fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T. G.; Kanber, H.; Olli, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    The observation of a fourth-order acoustic torque in intense sound fields is reported. The torque was determined by measuring the acoustically induced angular deflection of a polished cylinder suspended by a torsion fiber. This torque was measured in a sound field of amplitude greater than that in which first-order acoustic torque has been observed.

  13. Fourth annual conference on materials for coal conversion and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    The fourth annual conference on materials for coal conversion and utilization was held October 9 to 11, 1979, at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland. It was sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards, the Electric Power Research Institute, the US Department of Energy, and the Gas Research Institute. The papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  14. Solution to the ghost problem in fourth order derivative theories

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, P D

    2006-01-01

    We present a solution to the ghost problem in fourth order derivative theories. In particular we study the Pais-Uhlenbeck fourth order oscillator model, a model which serves as a prototype for theories which are based on second plus fourth order derivative actions. Via a Dirac constraint method quantization we construct the appropriate quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian and Hilbert space for the system. We find that while the second-quantized Fock space of the general Pais-Uhlenbeck model does indeed contain the negative norm energy eigenstates which are characteristic of higher derivative theories, in the limit in which we switch off the second order action, such ghost states are found to move off shell, with the spectrum of asymptotic in and out S-matrix states of the pure fourth order theory which results being found to be completely devoid of states with either negative energy or negative norm. We provide additional insight into the structure of the Pais-Uhlenbeck theory by quantizing it via path integration ...

  15. North Carolina Tales Fly with Fourth Grade Tellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Gretchen Daub

    2008-01-01

    In fourth grade, North Carolina students are required to write their own personal narratives. The teachers felt that telling a story would be a great stepping stone toward writing one. Rather than focusing on grammar and the mechanics of writing, students could focus on story development and creativity. In this article, the author describes how…

  16. Null controllability for a fourth order parabolic equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hang

    2009-01-01

    In the paper,the null interior controllability for a fourth order parabolic equation is obtained.The method Is based on Lebeau-Rabbiano inequality which is a quantitative unique continuation property for the sum of eigenfunctions of the Laplacian.

  17. The Copyright Book: A Practical Guide. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, William S.

    In response to important changes in copyright law as the United States accommodates itself to the Berne Convention and develops means to take account of new technologies, this guide puts these changes in a form and context that will make sense to persons who are concerned about their rights under the law. New material in the fourth edition of this…

  18. Multiway Filtering Based on Fourth-Order Cumulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Bourennane

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new multiway filtering based on fourth-order cumulants for the denoising of noisy data tensor with correlated Gaussian noise. The classical multiway filtering is based on the TUCKALS3 algorithm that computes a lower-rank tensor approximation. The presented method relies on the statistics of the analyzed multicomponent signal. We first recall how the well-known lower rank-(K1,…,KN tensor approximation processed by TUCKALS3 alternating least square algorithm exploits second-order statistics. Then, we propose to introduce the fourth-order statistics in the TUCKALS3-based method. Indeed, the use of fourth-order cumulants enables to remove the Gaussian components of an additive noise. In the presented method the estimation of the n-mode projector on the n-mode signal subspace are built from the eigenvectors associated with the largest eigenvalues of a fourth-order cumulant slice matrix instead of a covariance matrix. Each projector is applied by means of the n-mode product operator on the n-mode of the data tensor. The qualitative results of the improved multiway TUCKALS3-based filterings are shown for the case of noise reduction in a color image and multicomponent seismic data.

  19. Fourth-order discrete anisotropic boundary-value problems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this article we consider the fourth-order discrete anisotropic boundary value problem with both advance and retardation. We apply the direct method of the calculus of variations and the mountain pass technique to prove the existence of at least one and at least two solutions. Non-existence of non-trivial solutions is also undertaken.

  20. Discrimination Evidence for Examining Fourth Grade Students' Learning Disability Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Abdulhameed S.; Al-Harthy, Ibrahim S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the ability of discriminate variables (perceptual-motor, hyperactivity disorder, neurological and psychological skills) to distinguish between normal (n = 68) and students with learning disabilities (n = 72) in fourth grade. Three instruments were developed: perceptual-motor scale, hyperactivity disorder scale, skills test…

  1. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO FOURTH-ORDER NEUMANN BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study a class of fourth-order Neumann boundary value problem (NBVP for short). By virtue of fixed point index and the spectral theory of linear operators, the existence of positive solutions is obtained under the assumption that the nonlinearity satisfies sublinear or superlinear conditions, which are relevant to the first eigenvalue of the corresponding linear operator.

  2. Development and preliminary validation of the spondyloarthritis research consortium of Canada magnetic resonance imaging sacroiliac joint structural score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Wichuk, Stephanie; Chiowchanwisawakit, Praveena

    2015-01-01

    on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) SIJ Structural Score (SSS). METHODS: The SSS method for assessment of structural lesions is based on T1-weighted spin echo MRI, validated lesion definitions, slice selection according to well-defined anatomical...... in scores, and was highest for fat metaplasia when both ICC and SDC values were compared. CONCLUSION: The new SPARCC MRI SSS method can detect structural changes in the SIJ with acceptable reliability over a 1-2-year timeframe, and should be further validated in patients with SpA....

  3. Ophthalmic epidemiology in Europe : the "European Eye Epidemiology" (E3) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delcourt, Cecile; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Buitendijk, Gabrielle H. S.; Foster, Paul J.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Piermarocchi, Stefano; Peto, Tunde; Jansonius, Nomdo; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hogg, Ruth E.; Bretillon, Lionel; Topouzis, Fotis; Deak, Gabor; Grauslund, Jakob; Broe, Rebecca; Souied, Eric H.; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Sahel, Jose; Daien, Vincent; Lehtimaki, Terho; Hense, Hans-Werner; Prokofyeva, Elena; Oexle, Konrad; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fauser, Sascha; Bertelsen, Geir; Hoyng, Carel; Bergen, Arthur; Silva, Rufino; Wolf, Sebastian; Lotery, Andrew; Chakravarthy, Usha; Fletcher, Astrid; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    The European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium is a recently formed consortium of 29 groups from 12 European countries. It already comprises 21 population-based studies and 20 other studies (case-control, cases only, randomized trials), providing ophthalmological data on approximately 170,000

  4. Final Report: Appalachian Consortium. Evaluation of a Dissemination and Diffusion Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbery Systems Analysis, Ltd., Flushing, NY.

    The Appalachian Consortium was evaluated as an organization for the dissemination of educational information regarding programs for the early identification of preschool handicapped children. Chapter I provides a historical overview and discusses the Consortium's independence from the Appalachian Educational Laboratory. The chapter also indicates…

  5. Isolation and Characteristics of a Microbial Consortium for Effectively Degrading Phenanthrene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Xu Hongke; Guo Shaohui

    2007-01-01

    A microbial consortium (named W4) capable of aerobic biodegradation of solid phenanthrene as the sole source of carbon and energy was isolated by selective enrichment from petroleum-contaminated soil in the Henan oilfield,China. The strains of the consortium were identified as Sphingomonas cloacae, Rhizobium sp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Achromobacter xylosoxidans respectively by means of genetic methods. The major metabolites of phenanthrene were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The biodegradation percentage of solid phenanthrene at 200 mg/L in liquid medium after 7 days of growth was greater than 99%. The degradation of phenanthrene was compared between individual predominant strains and the microbial consortium in different treatment processes. The microbial consortium showed a significant improvement of phenanthrene degradation rates in either static or shaking culture. The degradation percentage of phenanthrene by the consortium W4 decreased to some degree when C 16 coexisted, however it was hardly affected by C30. Furthermore, the ability of consortium W4 to remediate oil sludge from the Dagang oil refinery was studied by composting; and it was found that the consortium W4 could obviously remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and paraffinic hydrocarbons. All the results indicated that the microbial consortium W4 had a promising application in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments and could be potentially used in microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR).

  6. 77 FR 12041 - Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... Applications for New Awards; Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program AGENCY: Office...: Migrant Education Program (MEP) Consortium Incentive Grants Program; Notice inviting applications for new... appropriate entities to improve the delivery of services to migrant children whose education is...

  7. The Activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), RO-077125 Magurele (Romania); Cabellos, O. [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kodeli, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Koning, A. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8–10, 1040 Wien (Austria); Rochman, D. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Westerduinweg 3, 1755 LE Petten (Netherlands); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Neutron Physic and Reactor Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Sauvan, P. [Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C. Juan del Rosal, 12, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sublet, J.-C. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Trkov, A. [Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI), Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dupont, E. [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris (France); Leichtle, D.; Izquierdo, J. [Fusion for Energy, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-15

    This paper presents an overview of the activities of the European Consortium on Nuclear Data Development and Analysis for Fusion. The Consortium combines available European expertise to provide services for the generation, maintenance, and validation of nuclear data evaluations and data files relevant for ITER, IFMIF and DEMO, as well as codes and software tools required for related nuclear calculations.

  8. 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NIH Pain Consortium will convene the 11th Annual NIH Pain Consortium Symposium on Advances in Pain Research, featuring keynote speakers and expert panel sessions on Innovative Models and Methods. The first keynote address will be delivered by David J. Clark, MD, PhD, Stanford University entitled “Challenges of Translational Pain Research: What Makes a Good Model?” |

  9. Ophthalmic epidemiology in Europe : the "European Eye Epidemiology" (E3) consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delcourt, Cecile; Korobelnik, Jean-Francois; Buitendijk, Gabrielle H. S.; Foster, Paul J.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Piermarocchi, Stefano; Peto, Tunde; Jansonius, Nomdo; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hogg, Ruth E.; Bretillon, Lionel; Topouzis, Fotis; Deak, Gabor; Grauslund, Jakob; Broe, Rebecca; Souied, Eric H.; Creuzot-Garcher, Catherine; Sahel, Jose; Daien, Vincent; Lehtimaki, Terho; Hense, Hans-Werner; Prokofyeva, Elena; Oexle, Konrad; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Cumberland, Phillippa M.; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Fauser, Sascha; Bertelsen, Geir; Hoyng, Carel; Bergen, Arthur; Silva, Rufino; Wolf, Sebastian; Lotery, Andrew; Chakravarthy, Usha; Fletcher, Astrid; Klaver, Caroline C. W.

    2016-01-01

    The European Eye Epidemiology (E3) consortium is a recently formed consortium of 29 groups from 12 European countries. It already comprises 21 population-based studies and 20 other studies (case-control, cases only, randomized trials), providing ophthalmological data on approximately 170,000 Europea

  10. Capec Consortium: Effective Academic-Industrial Interactions Strengthened By Surveys and Analyses of Gaps in Properties Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connell, John P.; Gani, Rafiqul

    The CAPEC Consortium has operated for many years. Starting with UNIFAC correlations for activity coefficients, the research has branched out to many other properties like critical properties, heats of formation, boiling points, heats of vaporization, and many others. One key to CAPEC's success has...... been the establishment of an industrial advisory committee at an early stage. This committee meets annually to provide guidance about which properties are of top priority for the coming year(s). This process will be reviewed along with the resulting compilation of properties of interest and its...... evolution with time. One key to CAPEC's success has been the establishment of an industrial advisory committee at an early stage. This committee meets annually to provide guidance about which properties are of top priority for the coming year(s). This process will be reviewed along with the resulting...

  11. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, WERC'' includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  12. Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) annual progress report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-07

    In February, 1990, the Secretary of Energy, James Watkins approved a grant for a waste (management) education and research consortium program by New Mexico State University (NMSU) to the US Department of Energy (DOE). This program known by the acronym, ``WERC`` includes NMSU, the University of New Mexico (UNM), the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMIMT), Navajo Community College, the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Sandia National Laboratories. The program is designed to provide an integrated approach to the national need via the following: (1) Education in waste management to reach thousands of students by the three Consortium universities and the affiliate college resulting in graduate, undergraduate, and associate degrees with concentration in environmental management. (The term waste or environmental management is used in a broad sense throughout this paper and includes all aspects of environmental management and environmental restoration.) (2) Professional development via teleconference for industry and government. (3) Technology development programs at the leading edge, providing training to students and information to faculty feeding into the education programs. (4) Education and technology development at the campuses, as well as from four field sites. (5) Ties with other multidisciplinary university facilities. (6) Ties with two National Laboratories (Los Alamos & Sandia) located in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities and others. (7) Technology transfer and education via an existing fiber optic network, a satellite link, and an existing state-wide extension program. (8) Outreach program of special interest to pre-college students, communities and business and government leaders throughout the United States. This report summarizes the accomplishments and status at the end of the second year.

  13. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kachinskaya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization

  14. 77 FR 25406 - Consortium on “Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)”: Membership Fee Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Consortium on ``Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME... NIST/Industry Consortium on Concrete Rheology: Enabling Metrology (CREME)''. The notice stated that...

  15. Assessment of microalgae and nitrifiers activity in a consortium in a continuous operation and the effect of oxygen depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vargas

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The consortium it can be obtained in a single continuous operation, and has a high capacity for nitrogen removal with low oxygen content. The consortium could prove to be a more economical method compared to traditional.

  16. Experience of the Paris Research Consortium Climate-Environment-Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joussaume, Sylvie; Pacteau, Chantal; Vanderlinden, Jean Paul

    2016-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that the complexity of climate change issues translates itself into a need for interdisciplinary approaches to science. This allows to first achieve a more comprehensive vision of climate change and, second, to better inform the decision-making processes. However, it seems that willingness alone is rarely enough to implement interdisciplinarity. The purpose of this presentation is to mobilize reflexivity to revisit and analyze the experience of the Paris Consortium for Climate-Environment-Society. The French Consortium Climate-Environment-Society aims to develop, fund and coordinate interdisciplinary research into climate change and its impacts on society and environment. Launched in 2007, the consortium relies on the research expertise of 17 laboratories and federation in the Paris area working mainly in the fields of climatology, hydrology, ecology, health sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. As examples, economists and climatologists have studied greenhouse gas emission scenarios compatible with climate stabilization goals. Historical records have provided both knowledge about past climate change and vulnerability of societies. Some regions, as the Mediterranean and the Sahel, are particularly vulnerable and already have to cope with water availability, agricultural production and even health issues. A project showed that millet production in West Africa is expected to decline due to warming in a higher proportion than observed in recent decades. Climate change also raises many questions concerning health: combined effects of warming and air quality, impacts on the production of pollens and allergies, impacts on infectious diseases. All these issues lead to a need for approaches integrating different disciplines. Furthermore, climate change impacts many ecosystems which, in turn, affect its evolution. Our experience shows that interdisciplinarity supposes, in order to take shape, the conjunction between programming

  17. Seismological analysis of the fourth North Korean nuclear test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Gernot; Gestermann, Nicolai; Ceranna, Lars

    2016-04-01

    The Democratic People's Republic of Korea has conducted its fourth underground nuclear explosions on 06.01.2016 at 01:30 (UTC). The explosion was clearly detected and located by the seismic network of the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Additional seismic stations of international earthquake monitoring networks at regional distances, which are not part of the IMS, are used to precisely estimate the epicenter of the event in the North Hamgyong province (41.38°N / 129.05°E). It is located in the area of the North Korean Punggye-ri nuclear test site, where the verified nuclear tests from 2006, 2009, and 2013 were conducted as well. The analysis of the recorded seismic signals provides the evidence, that the event was originated by an explosive source. The amplitudes as well as the spectral characteristics of the signals were examined. Furthermore, the similarity of the signals with those from the three former nuclear tests suggests very similar source type. The seismograms at the 8,200 km distant IMS station GERES in Germany, for example, show the same P phase signal for all four explosions, differing in the amplitude only. The comparison of the measured amplitudes results in the increasing magnitude with the chronology of the explosions from 2006 (mb 4.2), 2009 (mb 4.8) until 2013 (mb 5.1), whereas the explosion in 2016 had approximately the same magnitude as that one three years before. Derived from the magnitude, a yield of 14 kt TNT equivalents was estimated for both explosions in 2013 and 2016; in 2006 and 2009 yields were 0.7 kt and 5.4 kt, respectively. However, a large inherent uncertainty for these values has to be taken into account. The estimation of the absolute yield of the explosions depends very much on the local geological situation and the degree of decoupling of the explosive from the surrounding rock. Due to the missing corresponding information, reliable magnitude-yield estimation for the

  18. Collaboration in a Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed by Virtual Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Joseph; Ramnarine-Rieks, Angela; McKnight, Lee

    This paper describes the formation of the Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed (WGiT) coordinated by a virtual consortium involving academic and non-academic entities. Syracuse University and Virginia Tech are primary university partners with several other academic, government, and corporate partners. Objectives include: 1) coordinating knowledge sharing, 2) defining key parameters for wireless grids network applications, 3) dynamically connecting wired and wireless devices, content and users, 4) linking to VT-CORNET, Virginia Tech Cognitive Radio Network Testbed, 5) forming ad hoc networks or grids of mobile and fixed devices without a dedicated server, 6) deepening understanding of wireless grid application, device, network, user and market behavior through academic, trade and popular publications including online media, 7) identifying policy that may enable evaluated innovations to enter US and international markets and 8) implementation and evaluation of the international virtual collaborative process.

  19. Exploring the genetic basis of stroke. Spanish stroke genetics consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giralt-Steinhauer, E; Jiménez-Conde, J; Soriano Tárraga, C; Mola, M; Rodríguez-Campello, A; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Ois, A; Fernández-Cádenas, I; Carrera, C; Montaner, J; Díaz Navarro, R M; Vives-Bauzá, C; Roquer, J

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an overview of stroke genetics studies ranging from the candidate gene approach to more recent studies by the genome wide association. It highlights the complexity of stroke owing to its different aetiopathogenic mechanisms, the difficulties in studying its genetic component, and the solutions provided to date. The study emphasises the importance of cooperation between the different centres, whether this takes places occasionally or through the creation of lasting consortiums. This strategy is currently essential to the completion of high-quality scientific studies that allow researchers to gain a better knowledge of the genetic component of stroke as it relates to aetiology, treatment, and prevention. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shiang, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Retief, A.E. [Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Vergnaud, G. [Centre d`Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit (France)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Metabolism of nitrate esters by a consortium of two bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, J L; Haïdour, A; Duque, E; Piñar, G; Calvo, V; Oliva, J M

    1996-03-01

    The products of condensation of organic alcohols and nitric acid are nitrate esters with the general structure C-O-NO2. These products are widely employed as vasodilators and explosives, and are true xenobiotic compounds, as they do not occur in nature. We have isolated and characterized a consortium of two microorganisms, Arthrobacter ilicis and Agrobacterium radiobacter, that mineralized recalcitrant ethylene glycol dinitrate. The Arthrobacter strain was the actual degrading microorganism, although the second microbe facilitated mineralization. The biodegradation of ethylene glycol dinitrate by A. ilicis involved the progressive elimination of the nitro groups from the organic molecule to generate ethylene glycol, which was then mineralized. Waters polluted with ethylene glycol dinitrate have been shown amenable to biological treatment in a pilot plant with wastewaters generated during the synthesis of the chemical in a factory.

  2. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  3. Advances in Metal Supported Cells in the METSOFC EU Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, B. J.; Christiansen, N.; Schauperl, R.;

    2013-01-01

    ). Further success was attained with even larger cell areas of 12 × 12 cm2 squares, which facilitated integration into small stacks at Topsoe Fuel Cell having powers approaching 1/2 kW. Development of MSC stacks showed that the MSCs could achieve similar or better performance, compared to most standard...... industrial anode supported ceramic cells. The best stacked MSCs had power densities approaching 275 mW cm–2 (at 680 °C and 0.8 V). Furthermore, extended testing at AVL determined extra stack performance and reliability characteristics, including behavior toward sulfur and simulated diesel reformate......, and tolerance to thermal cycles and load cycles. These and other key outcomes of the METSOFC consortium are covered, along with associated work supported by the Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation....

  4. Methotrexate administration directly into the fourth ventricle in children with malignant fourth ventricular brain tumors: a pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, David I; Rytting, Michael; Zaky, Wafik; Kerr, Marcia; Ketonen, Leena; Kundu, Uma; Moore, Bartlett D; Yang, Grace; Hou, Ping; Sitton, Clark; Cooper, Laurence J; Gopalakrishnan, Vidya; Lee, Dean A; Thall, Peter F; Khatua, Soumen

    2015-10-01

    We hypothesize that chemotherapy can be safely administered directly into the fourth ventricle to treat recurrent malignant brain tumors in children. For the first time in humans, methotrexate was infused into the fourth ventricle in children with recurrent, malignant brain tumors. A catheter was surgically placed into the fourth ventricle and attached to a ventricular access device. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow was confirmed by CINE MRI postoperatively. Each cycle consisted of 4 consecutive daily methotrexate infusions (2 milligrams). Disease response was monitored with serial MRI scans and CSF cytologic analysis. Trough CSF methotrexate levels were sampled. Five patients (3 with medulloblastoma and 2 with ependymoma) received 18, 18, 12, 9, and 3 cycles, respectively. There were no serious adverse events or new neurological deficits attributed to methotrexate. Two additional enrolled patients were withdrawn prior to planned infusions due to rapid disease progression. Median serum methotrexate level 4 h after infusion was 0.04 µmol/L. Range was 0.02-0.13 µmol/L. Median trough CSF methotrexate level 24 h after infusion was 3.18 µmol/L (range 0.53-212.36 µmol/L). All three patients with medulloblastoma had partial response or stable disease until one patient had progressive disease after cycle 18. Both patients with ependymoma had progressive disease after 9 and 3 cycles, respectively. Low-dose methotrexate can be infused into the fourth ventricle without causing neurological toxicity. Some patients with recurrent medulloblastoma experience a beneficial anti-tumor effect both within the fourth ventricle and at distant sites.

  5. 76 FR 20633 - Announcement of Meeting to Explore Feasibility of Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Establishing a NIST/Industry Consortium on Neutron Measurements for Soft Materials Manufacturing AGENCY... National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) invites interested parties to attend a pre-consortium... industry interest in creating a NIST/industry consortium focused on advanced neutron-based probes for...

  6. On the Need to Establish an International Soil Modeling Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Vanderborght, J.; Schnepf, A.

    2014-12-01

    Soil is one of the most critical life-supporting compartments of the Biosphere. Soil provides numerous ecosystem services such as a habitat for biodiversity, water and nutrients, as well as producing food, feed, fiber and energy. To feed the rapidly growing world population in 2050, agricultural food production must be doubled using the same land resources footprint. At the same time, soil resources are threatened due to improper management and climate change. Despite the many important functions of soil, many fundamental knowledge gaps remain, regarding the role of soil biota and biodiversity on ecosystem services, the structure and dynamics of soil communities, the interplay between hydrologic and biotic processes, the quantification of soil biogeochemical processes and soil structural processes, the resilience and recovery of soils from stress, as well as the prediction of soil development and the evolution of soils in the landscape, to name a few. Soil models have long played an important role in quantifying and predicting soil processes and related ecosystem services. However, a new generation of soil models based on a whole systems approach comprising all physical, mechanical, chemical and biological processes is now required to address these critical knowledge gaps and thus contribute to the preservation of ecosystem services, improve our understanding of climate-change-feedback processes, bridge basic soil science research and management, and facilitate the communication between science and society. To meet these challenges an international community effort is required, similar to initiatives in systems biology, hydrology, and climate and crop research. Our consortium will bring together modelers and experimental soil scientists at the forefront of new technologies and approaches to characterize soils. By addressing these aims, the consortium will contribute to improve the role of soil modeling as a knowledge dissemination instrument in addressing key

  7. Human case of gastric infection by a fourth larval stage of Pseudoterranova decipiens (Nematoda, Anisakidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Mercado

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Only three cases of human infection by anisakid nematodes have been reported in Chile since 1976. In the present case, an anisakid worm, identified as a fourth-stage Pseudoterranova decipiens larva, was removed with a gastroendoscopic biopsy clipper from the stomach of a 45 year-old man from southern Chile. The patient, who presented acute epigastric pain and a continuous sensation of having an empty stomach, reported having eaten smoked fish. The worm was fixed in 70% ethanol and cleaned in lactophenol for morphological study. The morphometric characteristics of the worm are described and drawn. Anisakid larvae in fish flesh can be killed by freezing or cooking.

  8. Results For The Fourth Quarter 2014 Tank 50 WAC Slurry Sample: Chemical And Radionuclide Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-30

    This report details the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results for the characterization of the Calendar Year (CY) 2014 Fourth Quarter sampling of Tank 50 for the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) in effect at that time. Information from this characterization will be used by DWPF & Saltstone Facility Engineering (DSFE) to support the transfer of low-level aqueous waste from Tank 50 to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Facility in Z-Area, where the waste will be immobilized. This information is also used to update the Tank 50 Waste Characterization System.

  9. STRUCTURE OF CONSORTIUM DESTRUCTIVE COMPONENTS IN THE INDUSTRIAL AREA OF KRIVYI RIG BASIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachinskaya V.V.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Тhe structural organization and a biological variety of ground mesofauna on consortium level of the organization of ecosystems are considered. The analysis of indicators of the structural organization and a biodiversity of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of territories of industrial mining – metallurgical complex of Krivyi Rig Basin is carried out. It is established that taxonomical structure of ground mesofauna is characterized by insignificant number and quantity of taxonomical groups. Prevalence in morfo-ecological structure of hortobiontes and herpetobiontes testifies about faunae considerable attachment to consortium determinants and influences of a steppe climate on its structure. Prevalence of phytophages and polyphages in trophic structure is caused by combination of determinants specificity of consortium and zone source of fauna formations. The structural organization of ground mesofauna in consortium Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites is characterized simplified taxonomical structure with a low biodiversity at all levels. It was suggested that structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block consortium of Ulmus and Populus in the conditions of industrial sites are simplified and determined by biogeochemical patterns of pedogenic and leaf litter layer of consortium and type of anthropogenic impact. Management and sustainable use of consortium under technogenic pressure should be based on the effects of extreme and critical components in the evolution of consortium. These critical points are the type of leading man-made factors and pedogenic and leaf litter biogeochemical conditions of consortium determinants, which results in inhibition of development and simplification of the structural and functional organization of destructive components of the block. The elaboration of measures to restore and maintain that structural and functional organization

  10. Sharing perspectives and experiences of doctoral fellows in the first cohort of Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa: 2011–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Adedokun, Babatunde; Nyasulu, Peter; Maseko, Fresier; Adedini, Sunday; Akinyemi, Joshua; Afolabi, Sulaimon; De Wet, Nicole; Sulaimon, Adedokun; Sambai, Caroline; Utembe, Wells; Opiyo, Rose; Awotidebe, Taofeek; Chirwa, Esnat; Nabakwe, Esther; Niragire, François

    2014-01-01

    Background: Resolution of public health problems in Africa remains a challenge because of insufficient skilled human resource capacity. The Consortium for Advanced Research Training in Africa (CARTA) was established to enhance capacity in multi-disciplinary health research that will make a positive impact on population health in Africa.Objective: The first cohort of the CARTA program describes their perspectives and experiences during the 4 years of fellowship and puts forward suggestions for...

  11. 24 CFR 91.402 - Consolidated program year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Consolidated program year. 91.402... Consolidated Plan § 91.402 Consolidated program year. (a) Same program year for consortia members. All units of general local government that are members of a consortium must be on the same program year for CDBG, HOME...

  12. PREFACE: Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing Selected papers from the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemenman, Ilya; Faeder, James R.; Hlavacek, William S.; Jiang, Yi; Wall, Michael E.; Zilman, Anton

    2011-10-01

    Summary This special issue consists of 11 original papers that elaborate on work presented at the Fourth Annual q-bio Conference on Cellular Information Processing, which was held on the campus of St John's College in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, 11-14 August 2010. Now in its fourth year, the q-bio conference has changed considerably over time. It is now well established and a major event in systems biology. The 2010 conference saw attendees from all continents (except Antarctica!) sharing novel results and participating in lively discussions at both the oral and poster sessions. The conference was oversubscribed and grew to 27 contributed talks, 16 poster spotlights and 137 contributed posters. We deliberately decreased the number of invited speakers to 21 to leave more space for contributed presentations, and the attendee feedback confirmed that the choice was a success. Although the q-bio conference has grown and matured, it has remained true to the original goal of being an intimate and dynamic event that brings together modeling, theory and quantitative experimentation for the study of cell regulation and information processing. Funded in part by a grant from NIGMS and by DOE funds through the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development program, the conference has continued to exhibit youth and vigor by attracting (and partially supporting) over 100 undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral researchers. The associated q-bio summer school, which precedes the conference each year, further emphasizes the development of junior scientists and makes q-bio a singular event in its impact on the future of quantitative biology. In addition to an increased international presence, the conference has notably diversified its demographic representation within the USA, including increased participation from the southeastern corner of the country. One big change in the conference this year is our new publication partner, Physical Biology. Although we are very

  13. Estimation of the fourth-order dispersion coefficient β4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Huang; Jianquan Yao

    2012-01-01

    The fourth-order dispersion coefficient of fibers are estimated by the iterations around the third-order dispersion and the high-order nonlinear items in the nonlinear Schordinger equation solved by Green's function approach.Our theoretical evaluation demonstrates that the fourth-order dispersion coefficient slightly varies with distance.The fibers also record β4 values of about 0.002,0.003,and 0.00032 ps4/km for SMF,NZDSF and DCF,respectively.In the zero-dispersion regime,the high-order nonlinear effect (higher than self-steepening) has a strong impact on the transmitted short pulse.This red-shifts accelerates the symmetrical split of the pulse,although this effect is degraded rapidly with the increase of β2.Thus,the contributions to β4 of SMF,NZDSF,and DCF can be neglected.

  14. Spinal accessory nerve schwannomas masquerading as a fourth ventricular lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are benign lesions that arise from the nerve sheath of cranial nerves. The most common schwannomas arise from the 8 th cranial nerve (the vestibulo-cochlear nerve followed by trigeminal and facial nerves and then from glossopharyngeal, vagus, and spinal accessory nerves. Schwannomas involving the oculomotor, trochlear, abducens and hypoglossal nerves are very rare. We report a very unusual spinal accessory nerve schwannoma which occupied the fourth ventricle and extended inferiorly to the upper cervical canal. The radiological features have been detailed. The diagnostic dilemma was due to its midline posterior location mimicking a fourth ventricular lesion like medulloblastoma and ependymoma. Total excision is the ideal treatment for these tumors. A brief review of literature with tabulations of the variants has been listed.

  15. The fourth edition of the ASP took place in Kigali

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2016-01-01

    The fourth biennial African School of Fundamental Physics and Applications (ASP) took place on 1-19 August in Africa’s cleanest city, Kigali in Rwanda.   The students of the fourth African School of Fundamental Physics and Applications pose for the traditional conference group picture. Many lecturers flew in from CERN to give lectures and mentor students. (Photo: Gilbert Tekoute) Seventy-five students from around the African continent, chosen from 439 applicants, were hosted in the University of Rwanda’s College of Sciences and Technology for about 3 weeks. The school received financial support from CERN and 19 other institutions in total, including the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Brookhaven National Laboratory, the South African National Research Foundation and Department of Technology, the Rwandan Ministry of Education, INFN, and other major particle physics laboratories, as well as governmental institutions in Africa, Europe and the United States....

  16. FOURTH REVIEW OF TESTS PUBLISHED IN SPAIN: FORM AND CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Elosua

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the quality of tests and disseminating the results has been implemented in the international arena with the aim of improving testing and professional practice. Assessing tests provides users with an independent review, which follows clearly defined procedures and criteria. In Spain, the Spanish Association of Psychology (COP leads the “test evaluation” project, which has recently completed its fourth edition. Basically, there are two primary assessment models; the Buros model and the European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations (EFPA model, which has been adopted by the COP. The two models share the same objectives and content; excluding the evaluation format and the management system, they are similar in essence. In this paper, we present the results of the fourth edition of the Spanish test evaluation program following the general guidelines for assessing the quality of tests, and we explain the critical points affecting each phase of the process

  17. Primary intra-fourth ventricular meningioma: Report two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishanth Sadashiva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningioma's occurring intraventricular region are rare and these occurring in the fourth ventricle is even rare. Because of the rarity, it is not usually considered as a differential diagnosis in any age group. Clinical features and Imaging is not characteristic, and most of them are thought to be some different tumor. Here, we discuss two cases harboring a primary fourth ventricular meningioma Grade II, which was surgically excised successfully. Total excision was achieved in both cases and as the tumor was firm to soft and vermian splitting was not required. Understanding the clinical features and a careful preoperative radiological examination is required to differentiate this tumor from more commonly occurring lesions at this location.

  18. The Superior Transvelar Approach to the Fourth Ventricle and Brainstem

    OpenAIRE

    Ezer, Haim; Banerjee, Anirban Deep; Bollam, Papireddy; Guthikonda, Bharat; Nanda, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Objective The superior transvelar approach is used to access pathologies located in the fourth ventricle and brainstem. The surgical path is below the venous structures, through the superior medullary velum. Following splitting the tentorial edge, near the tentorial apex, the superior medullary velum is split in the cerebello-mesencephalic fissure. Using the supracerebellar infratentorial, transtentorial or parietal interhemispheric routes, the superior medullary velum is approached. Splittin...

  19. US Energy Industry Financial Developments, 1993 fourth quarter, April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-14

    This report traces key financial trends in the US energy industry for the fourth quarter of 1993. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated electric utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as energy industry corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest; return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations. Based on information provided in 1993 fourth quarter financial disclosures, the net income for 82 petroleum companies -- including 18 majors -- was unchanged between the fourth quarter of 1992 and the fourth quarter of 1993. An 18-percent decline in crude oil prices resulted in a deterioration of the performance of upstream (oil and gas production) petroleum companies during the final quarter of 1993. However, prices for refined products fell much less than the price of crude oil, resulting in higher refined product margins and downstream (refining, marketing and transport) petroleum earnings. An increase in refined product demand also contributed to the rise in downstream income.

  20. Fourth Generation Warfare and Its Impact on the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    In 1989, the authors of an article entitled, "The Changing Face of War: Into the Fourth Generation ," offered a glimpse of the future rooted in the...decline of the West in a world rife with cultural conflicts and the powerful influences of a form of cultural Marxism known as political correctness...were combining in America to create conditions for a new generation of warfare. Their vision included a form of warfare that bypassed the military

  1. Pseudo-randomness of the fourth class of GSS sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yupu; XIAO Guozhen

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses pseudo-randomness of a periodic sequence, named the fourth class of GSS sequence. We get the ollowing results: ① Its least period always reaches the maximum (that is, 2n-1). ② Its least period and linear complexity keep robust under single-symbol-substitution. ③ It has good Iow-degree-auto-correlation feature. ④It has good short-length-run-distribution.

  2. Distance Learning in Einstein’s Fourth Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This article blends the concepts of space-time from theoretical physics and Einstein’s Relativity Theory to discuss the spatio-temporal nature of distance education. By comparing and contrasting speed-of-light space travel with the speed of computer processing, the leap is made to consider the fourth dimension and its phenomena for the Web traveler. Learning events are compared with events in time to depict the theory presented.

  3. Fourth Beijing Human Rights Forum Held in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUR STAFF REPORTER

    2012-01-01

    The Fourth Beijing Forum on Human Rights was held in Beijing from September 21-23,2011.Jointly sponsored by the China Society for Human Rights Studies and the China Human Rights Development Foundation,the forum was centered on the theme of "Cultural Tradition,Concept of Values and Human Rights." Attending were nearly 100senior human rights officials,specialists and scholars from 26 countries and regions as well as the United Nations and other international organizations.

  4. Fourth Meeting of China-Spain Forum Held in Madrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Chairman Hu Qili and Executive Chairman Chen Haosu of the Chinese Committee of the China-Spain Forum(CSF) led a Chinese delegation to attend the Fourth Meeting of the CSF in Madrid from November 27 to 28,2007.The meeting with the theme of "Harmony,Development and Gaining Win-Win Results" was jointly sponsored by the CPAFFC,the CSF Chinese Committee,the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Spain China Council Foundation.

  5. Fourth China-South Asia International Cultural Forum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    <正>The Fourth China-South Asia International Cultural Forum on "revitalizing people-to-people cultural exchanges for peace and prosperity",co-sponsored by the CPAFFC and Shenzhen University,was held in Shenzhen from November 14 to 17,2012. More than 60 experts and scholars from over 40 Chinese research institutes and their colleagues from India,the United States and Singapore engaged in in-depth discussions on economic cooperation and cultural development,the present condi-

  6. Nodal Solutions for a Nonlinear Fourth-Order Eigenvalue Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ru Yun MA; Bevan THOMPSON

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with determining the values of λ, for which there exist nodal solutions of the fourth-order boundary value problem y =λa(x)f(y),00 for all u ≠0. We give conditions on the ratio f (s)/s,at infinity and zero, that guarantee the existence of nodal solutions.The proof of our main results is based upon bifurcation techniques.

  7. New Efficient Fourth Order Method for Solving Nonlinear Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farooq Ahmad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In a paper [Appl. Math. Comput., 188 (2 (2007 1587--1591], authors have suggested and analyzed a method for solving nonlinear equations. In the present work, we modified this method by using the finite difference scheme, which has a quintic convergence. We have compared this modified Halley method with some other iterative of fifth-orders convergence methods, which shows that this new method having convergence of fourth order, is efficient.

  8. Distance Learning in Einstein’s Fourth Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Throne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This article blends the concepts of space-time from theoretical physics and Einstein’s Relativity Theory to discuss the spatio-temporal nature of distance education. By comparing and contrasting speed-of-light space travel with the speed of computer processing, the leap is made to consider the fourth dimension and its phenomena for the Web traveler. Learning events are compared with events in time to depict the theory presented.

  9. Masses of a Fourth Generation with Two Higgs Doublets

    CERN Document Server

    Bellantoni, Leo; Heckman, Jonathan J; Ramirez-Homs, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    We use sampling techniques to find robust constraints on the masses of a possible fourth sequential fermion generation from electroweak oblique variables. We find that in the case of a light (115 GeV) Higgs from a single electroweak symmetry breaking doublet, inverted mass hierarchies are possible for both quarks and leptons, but a mass splitting more than M(W) in the quark sector is unlikely. We also find constraints in the case of a heavy (600 GeV) Higgs in a single doublet model. As recent data from the Large Hadron Collider hints at the existence of a resonance at 124.5 GeV and a single Higgs doublet at that mass is inconsistent with a fourth fermion generation, we examine a type II two Higgs doublet model. In this model, there are ranges of parameter space where the Higgs sector can potentially counteract the effects of the fourth generation. Even so, we find that such scenarios produce qualitatively similar fermion mass distribtions.

  10. Quarterly environmental data summary for fourth quarter 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1997 is prepared in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data presented constitute the QEDS. The data were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group and, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses), merged into the data base during the fourth quarter of 1997. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data. Air data are not stored in the data base and KPA data are not merged into the regular data base. Significant data, defined as data values that have exceeded defined ``above normal`` level 2 values, are discussed in this letter for Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) generated data only. Above normal level 2 values are based, in ES and H procedures, on historical high values, DOE Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs), NPDES limits and other guidelines. The procedures also establish actions to be taken in response to such data. Data received and verified during the fourth quarter were within a permissible range of variability except for those which are detailed.

  11. Fourth-Order Difference Methods for Hyperbolic IBVPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Bertil; Olsson, Pelle

    1995-03-01

    In this paper we consider fourth-order difference approximations of initial-boundary value problems for hyperbolic partial differential equations. We use the method of lines approach with both explicit and compact implicit difference operators in space. The explicit operator satisfies an energy estimate leading to strict stability. For the implicit operator we develop boundary conditions and give a complete proof of strong stability using the Laplace transform technique. We also present numerical experiments for the linear advection equation and Burgers' equation with discontinuities in the solution or in its derivative. The first equation is used for modeling contact discontinuities in fluid dynamics; the second one is used for modeling shocks and rarefaction waves. The time discretization is done with a third-order Runge-Kutta TVD method. For solutions with discontinuities in the solution itself we add a filter based on second-order viscosity. In case of the non-linear Burgers' equation we use a flux splitting technique that results in an energy estimate for certain difference approximations, in which case also an entropy condition is fulfilled. In particular we shall demonstrate that the unsplit conservative form produces a non-physical shock instead of the physically correct rarefaction wave. In the numerical experiments we compare our fourth-order methods with a standard second-order one and with a third-order TVD method. The results show that the fourth-order methods are the only ones that give good results for all the considered test problems.

  12. Fourth-order gravity gradient torque of spacecraft orbiting asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Shijie

    2014-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of spacecraft around asteroids is a key element in design of such missions. An asteroid's irregular shape, non-spherical mass distribution and its rotational sate make the dynamics of spacecraft quite complex. This paper focuses on the gravity gradient torque of spacecraft around non-spherical asteroids. The gravity field of the asteroid is approximated as a 2nd degree and order-gravity field with harmonic coefficients C20 and C22. By introducing the spacecraft's higher-order inertia integrals, a full fourth-order gravity gradient torque model of the spacecraft is established through the gravitational potential derivatives. Our full fourth-order model is more precise than previous fourth-order model due to the consideration of higher-order inertia integrals of the spacecraft. Some interesting conclusions about the gravity gradient torque model are reached. Then a numerical simulation is carried out to verify our model. In the numerical simulation, a special spacecraft consisted of 36 po...

  13. Gauge-coupling unification and the minimal SUSY model a fourth generation below the top?

    CERN Document Server

    Gunion, J F; Pois, H; Douglas W McKay

    1994-01-01

    \\centerline{\\bf Abstract} We explore the possibility of a fourth generation in the gauge-coupling-unified, minimal supersymmetric (MSSM) framework. We find that a sequential fourth generation (with a heavy neutrino \

  14. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicators of early immune stimulation: a Childhood Leukemia International Consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudant, Jérémie; Lightfoot, Tracy; Urayama, Kevin Y; Petridou, Eleni; Dockerty, John D; Magnani, Corrado; Milne, Elizabeth; Spector, Logan G; Ashton, Lesley J; Dessypris, Nikolaos; Kang, Alice Y; Miller, Margaret; Rondelli, Roberto; Simpson, Jill; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Orsi, Laurent; Roman, Eve; Metayer, Catherine; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2015-04-15

    The associations between childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and several proxies of early stimulation of the immune system, that is, day-care center attendance, birth order, maternally reported common infections in infancy, and breastfeeding, were investigated by using data from 11 case-control studies participating in the Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (enrollment period: 1980-2010). The sample included 7,399 ALL cases and 11,181 controls aged 2-14 years. The data were collected by questionnaires administered to the parents. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, study, maternal education, and maternal age. Day-care center attendance in the first year of life was associated with a reduced risk of ALL (odds ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval: 0.71, 0.84), with a marked inverse trend with earlier age at start (P < 0.0001). An inverse association was also observed with breastfeeding duration of 6 months or more (odds ratio = 0.86, 95% confidence interval: 0.79, 0.94). No significant relationship with a history of common infections in infancy was observed even though the odds ratio was less than 1 for more than 3 infections. The findings of this large pooled analysis reinforce the hypothesis that day-care center attendance in infancy and prolonged breastfeeding are associated with a decreased risk of ALL.

  15. Sociodemographic Predictors of Breast Reconstruction Procedure Choice: Analysis of the Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany N. S. Ballard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To promote patient-centered care, it is important to understand the impact of sociodemographic factors on procedure choice for women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction. In this context, we analyzed the effects of these variables on the reconstructive method chosen. Methods. Women undergoing postmastectomy breast reconstruction were recruited for the prospective Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium Study. Procedure types were divided into tissue expander-implant/direct-to-implant and abdominally based flap reconstructions. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated from logistic regression. Results. The analysis included 2,203 women with current or previous breast cancer and 202 women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. Compared with women <40 years old with current or previous breast cancer, those 40 to 59 were significantly more likely to undergo an abdominally based flap. Women working or attending school full-time were more likely to receive an autologous procedure than those working part-time or volunteering. Women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy who were ≥50 years were more likely to undergo an abdominal flap compared to those <40. Conclusions. Our results indicate that sociodemographic factors affect the reconstructive procedure received. As we move forward into a new era of patient-centered care, providing tailored treatment options to reconstruction patients will likely lead to higher satisfaction and better outcomes for those we serve.

  16. Test Review: C. Mardell & D. S. Goldenberg. "Speed Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning-Fourth Edition" ("Speed DIAL-4")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doskey, Elena M.; Lagunas, Brenda; SooHoo, Michelle; Lomax, Amanda; Bullick, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Speed DIAL-4 was developed from the Developmental Indicators for the Assessment of Learning, Fourth Edition (DIAL-4), a screening designed to identify children between the ages of 2 years, 6 months through 5 years, 11 months "who are in need of intervention or diagnostic assessment in the following areas: motor, concepts, language,…

  17. Implementierung eines interdisziplinären Unterrichtscurriculums "Kommunikative Kompetenz lehren und prüfen" im vierten Studienjahr Humanmedizin (CoMeD [Implementation of the interdisciplinary curriculum Teaching and Assessing Communicative Competence in the fourth academic year of medical studies (CoMeD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mortsiefer, Achim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Implementation of a longitudinal curriculum for training in advanced communications skills represents an unmet need in most German medical faculties, especially in the 4 and 5 years of medical studies. The CoMeD project (communication in medical education Düsseldorf attempted to establish an interdisciplinary program to teach and to assess communicative competence in the 4th academic year. In this paper, we describe the development of the project and report results of its evaluation by medical students.Methods: Teaching objectives and lesson formats were developed in a multistage process. A teaching program for simulated patients (SP was built up and continuous lecturer trainings were estabilshed. Several clinical disciplines co-operated for the purpose of integrating the communication training into the pre-existing clinical teaching curriculum. The CoMeD project was evaluated using feedback-forms after each course.Results: Until now, six training units for especially challenging communication tasks like “dealing with aggression” or “breaking bad news” were implemented, each unit connected with a preliminary tutorial or e-learning course. An OSCE (objective structured clinical examination with 4 stations was introduced. The students’ evaluation of the six CoMeD training units showed the top or second-best rating in more than 80% of the answers. Discussion: Introducing an interdisciplinary communication training and a corresponding OSCE into the 4 year medical curriculum is feasible. Embedding communication teaching in a clinical context and involvement of clinicians as lecturers seem to be important factors for ensuring practical relevance and achieving high acceptance by medical students.[german] Einleitung: Bei der Implementierung eines kommunikativen Längsschnittcurriculums besteht besonders für die höheren Semester noch ein großer Entwicklungsbedarf. Im Rahmen des Projekts CoMeD (Communication in

  18. Report on the CEPA activities [Consorcio Educativo para la Proteccion Ambiental/Educational Consortium for Environmental Preservation] [Final report of activities from 1998 to 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Miriam

    2003-02-01

    This report compiles the instances of scientific, educational, and institutional cooperation on environmental issues and other activities in which CEPA was engaged during the past five years, and includes several annual reports and meeting summaries. CEPA is a collaborative international consortium that brings together higher education institutions with governmental agencies, research laboratories, and private sector entities. CEPA's mission is to strengthen the technical, professional, and educational environmental infrastructure in the United States and Latin America. The CEPA program includes curriculum development, student exchange, faculty development, and creation of educational materials, joint research, and other cooperative activities. CEPA's goals are accomplished by actively working with Hispanic-serving institutions of higher education in the United States, in collaboration with institutions of higher education in Latin America and other Consortium members to deliver competitive environmental programs.

  19. Trends in international research presented through the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (1965-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Bradley J; Powell, Felicity M; Lee, Miyoung

    2009-09-01

    The extent of international research on the Research Consortium's program between 1965 and 2008 was documented. A total of 9,132 abstracts were reviewed, and 657 (7.19%) had an international component. Inclusion of international research ranged from a low of 1.97% in 1983 to a high of 14.24% in 2007. There was a decrease in the amount of international research presented between 1965 and 1983, after which there was an increase through 2008. Most growth was from increased contributions coming from researchers in Southeast Asia. In terms of general research topics, eight areas increased over the 44-year history reviewed, and five areas decreased. Seven recommendations are advanced for expanding the place and role of international research within the Research Consortium.

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  1. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  2. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  3. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or ~28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In addition to

  4. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University successfully managed the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which was a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technologies on premium carbon products from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC was an initiative led by Penn State, its cocharter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provided the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity continued under cooperative agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003 and ended December 31, 2010. The objective of the second agreement was to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, which included Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC was its industry-led council that selected proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas had strong industrial support. CPCPC had 58 member companies and universities engaged over the 7-year period of this contract. Members were from 17 states and five countries outside of the U.S. During this period, the CPCPC Executive Council selected 46 projects for funding. DOE/CPCPC provided $3.9 million in funding or an average of $564,000 per year. The total project costs were $5.45 million with $1.5 million, or {approx}28% of the total, provided by the members as cost share. Total average project size was $118,000 with $85,900 provided by DOE/CPCPC. In

  5. 2006 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of Western Lewis County for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data set covers...

  6. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Snohomish County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 167 square miles and covers a...

  7. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  8. 2004 Puget Sound Lidar Consortium (PSLC) Topographic Bare-Earth Lidar: Pierce County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The project area covers approximately 814 square miles of western...

  9. The International Consortium for the Investigation of Renal Malignancies (I-ConFIRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Consortium for the Investigation of Renal Malignancies (I-ConFIRM) was formed to promote international, multidisciplinary collaborations to advance our understanding of the etiology and outcomes of kidney cancer.

  10. 2009 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Lewis County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Lewis County survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium. This data...

  11. 2011 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Quinault River Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on the Quinault River Basin survey area for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium and...

  12. 2000 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Kitsap Peninsula, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 1,146 square miles and covers part...

  13. 2003 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Yakima County, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TerraPoint surveyed and created this data for the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium under contract. The area surveyed is approximately 77 square miles and covers a...

  14. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  15. 2015 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) LiDAR: WA DNR Lands (P1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 2014, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Inc. (QSI) company, was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)...

  16. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Tulalip Partnership

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC)to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  17. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Nooksack

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July 2012, WSI (Watershed Sciences, Inc.) was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data on a...

  18. 2013 Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) Topographic LiDAR: Saddle Mountain

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In October 2013, WSI, a Quantum Spatial Company (QSI), was contracted by the Puget Sound LiDAR Consortium (PSLC) to collect Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data...

  19. Federal Laboratory Consortium Recognizes Unituxin Collaborators with Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) presented an Excellence in Technology Transfer award to the group that collaborated to bring Unituxin (dinutuximab, also known as ch14.18), an immunotherapy for neuroblastoma, to licensure.

  20. Communal microaerophilic-aerobic biodegradation of Amaranth by novel NAR-2 bacterial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Giek Far; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul; Chua, Lee Suan; Ab llah, Norzarini; Nasiri, Rozita; Ikubar, Mohamed Roslan Mohamad

    2012-02-01

    A novel bacterial consortium, NAR-2 which consists of Citrobacter freundii A1, Enterococcus casseliflavus C1 and Enterobacter cloacae L17 was investigated for biodegradation of Amaranth azo dye under sequential microaerophilic-aerobic condition. The NAR-2 bacterial consortium with E. casseliflavus C1 as the dominant strain enhanced the decolorization process resulting in reduction of Amaranth in 30 min. Further aerobic biodegradation, which was dominated by C. freundii A1 and E. cloacae L17, allowed biotransformation of azo reduction intermediates and mineralization via metabolic pathways including benzoyl-CoA, protocatechuate, salicylate, gentisate, catechol and cinnamic acid. The presence of autoxidation products which could be metabolized to 2-oxopentenoate was elucidated. The biodegradation mechanism of Amaranth by NAR-2 bacterial consortium was predicted to follow the steps of azo reduction, deamination, desulfonation and aromatic ring cleavage. This is for the first time the comprehensive microaerophilic-aerobic biotransformation pathways of Amaranth dye intermediates by bacterial consortium are being proposed.