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Sample records for conserved wobble uridine

  1. Roles of Trm9- and ALKBH8-like proteins in the formation of modified wobble uridines in Arabidopsis tRNA

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    Leihne, Vibeke; Kirpekar, Finn; Vågbø, Cathrine B

    2011-01-01

    Uridine at the wobble position of tRNA is usually modified, and modification is required for accurate and efficient protein translation. In eukaryotes, wobble uridines are modified into 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm(5)U), 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm(5)U) or derivatives thereof. Here, we d...

  2. Archaeal Tuc1/Ncs6 homolog required for wobble uridine tRNA thiolation is associated with ubiquitin-proteasome, translation, and RNA processing system homologs.

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    Nikita E Chavarria

    Full Text Available While cytoplasmic tRNA 2-thiolation protein 1 (Tuc1/Ncs6 and ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (Urm1 are important in the 2-thiolation of 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U at wobble uridines of tRNAs in eukaryotes, the biocatalytic roles and properties of Ncs6/Tuc1 and its homologs are poorly understood. Here we present the first report of an Ncs6 homolog of archaea (NcsA of Haloferax volcanii that is essential for maintaining cellular pools of thiolated tRNA(LysUUU and for growth at high temperature. When purified from Hfx. volcanii, NcsA was found to be modified at Lys204 by isopeptide linkage to polymeric chains of the ubiquitin-fold protein SAMP2. The ubiquitin-activating E1 enzyme homolog of archaea (UbaA was required for this covalent modification. Non-covalent protein partners that specifically associated with NcsA were also identified including UbaA, SAMP2, proteasome activating nucleotidase (PAN-A/1, translation elongation factor aEF-1α and a β-CASP ribonuclease homolog of the archaeal cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 1 family (aCPSF1. Together, our study reveals that NcsA is essential for growth at high temperature, required for formation of thiolated tRNA(LysUUU and intimately linked to homologs of ubiquitin-proteasome, translation and RNA processing systems.

  3. Familial dysautonomia (FD) patients have reduced levels of the modified wobble nucleoside mcm(5)s(2)U in tRNA.

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    Karlsborn, Tony; Tükenmez, Hasan; Chen, Changchun; Byström, Anders S

    2014-11-21

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a recessive neurodegenerative genetic disease. FD is caused by a mutation in the IKBKAP gene resulting in a splicing defect and reduced levels of full length IKAP protein. IKAP homologues can be found in all eukaryotes and are part of a conserved six subunit protein complex, Elongator complex. Inactivation of any Elongator subunit gene in multicellular organisms cause a wide range of phenotypes, suggesting that Elongator has a pivotal role in several cellular processes. In yeast, there is convincing evidence that the main role of Elongator complex is in formation of modified wobble uridine nucleosides in tRNA and that their absence will influence translational efficiency. To date, no study has explored the possibility that FD patients display defects in formation of modified wobble uridine nucleosides as a consequence of reduced IKAP levels. In this study, we show that brain tissue and fibroblast cell lines from FD patients have reduced levels of the wobble uridine nucleoside 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U). Our findings indicate that FD could be caused by inefficient translation due to lower levels of wobble uridine nucleosides. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How to Be Wobbly

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    Goldsworthy, Anne

    2007-01-01

    "Primary Science Review's" original "Wobbly Bits" series of articles was born back in 1997, after a conversation about this problem at a meeting of the ASE Primary Committee. The conversation turned to primary science teachers' scientific learning journeys. Each one of them could recount a story where they had completely misunderstood an aspect of…

  5. tRNA's wobble decoding of the genome: 40 years of modification.

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    Agris, Paul F; Vendeix, Franck A P; Graham, William D

    2007-02-09

    The genetic code is degenerate, in that 20 amino acids are encoded by 61 triplet codes. In 1966, Francis Crick hypothesized that the cell's limited number of tRNAs decoded the genome by recognizing more than one codon. The ambiguity of that recognition resided in the third base-pair, giving rise to the Wobble Hypothesis. Post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA's wobble position 34, especially modifications of uridine 34, enable wobble to occur. The Modified Wobble Hypothesis proposed in 1991 that specific modifications of a tRNA wobble nucleoside shape the anticodon architecture in such a manner that interactions were restricted to the complementary base plus a single wobble pairing for amino acids with twofold degenerate codons. However, chemically different modifications at position 34 would expand the ability of a tRNA to read three or even four of the fourfold degenerate codons. One foundation of Crick's Wobble Hypothesis was that a near-constant geometry of canonical base-pairing be maintained in forming all three base-pairs between the tRNA anticodon and mRNA codon on the ribosome. In accepting an aminoacyl-tRNA, the ribosome requires maintenance of a specific geometry for the anticodon-codon base-pairing. However, it is the post-transcriptional modifications at tRNA wobble position 34 and purine 37, 3'-adjacent to the anticodon, that pre-structure the anticodon domain to ensure the correct codon binding. The modifications create both the architecture and the stability needed for decoding through restraints on anticodon stereochemistry and conformational space, and through selective hydrogen bonding. A physicochemical understanding of modified nucleoside contributions to the tRNA anticodon domain architecture and its decoding of the genome has advanced RNA world evolutionary theory, the principles of RNA chemistry, and the application of this knowledge to the introduction of new amino acids to proteins.

  6. The contributions of wobbling and superwobbling to the reading of the genetic code.

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    Sibah Alkatib

    Full Text Available Reduced bacterial genomes and most genomes of cell organelles (chloroplasts and mitochondria do not encode the full set of 32 tRNA species required to read all triplets of the genetic code according to the conventional wobble rules. Superwobbling, in which a single tRNA species that contains a uridine in the wobble position of the anticodon reads an entire four-fold degenerate codon box, has been suggested as a possible mechanism for how tRNA sets can be reduced. However, the general feasibility of superwobbling and its efficiency in the various codon boxes have remained unknown. Here we report a complete experimental assessment of the decoding rules in a typical prokaryotic genetic system, the plastid genome. By constructing a large set of transplastomic knock-out mutants for pairs of isoaccepting tRNA species, we show that superwobbling occurs in all codon boxes where it is theoretically possible. Phenotypic characterization of the transplastomic mutant plants revealed that the efficiency of superwobbling varies in a codon box-dependent manner, but--contrary to previous suggestions--it is independent of the number of hydrogen bonds engaged in codon-anticodon interaction. Finally, our data provide experimental evidence of the minimum tRNA set comprising 25 tRNA species, a number lower than previously suggested. Our results demonstrate that all triplets with pyrimidines in third codon position are dually decoded: by a tRNA species utilizing standard base pairing or wobbling and by a second tRNA species employing superwobbling. This has important implications for the interpretation of the genetic code and will aid the construction of synthetic genomes with a minimum-size translational apparatus.

  7. Uridine prevents fenofibrate-induced fatty liver.

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    Thuc T Le

    Full Text Available Uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, can modulate liver lipid metabolism although its specific acting targets have not been identified. Using mice with fenofibrate-induced fatty liver as a model system, the effects of uridine on liver lipid metabolism are examined. At a daily dosage of 400 mg/kg, fenofibrate treatment causes reduction of liver NAD(+/NADH ratio, induces hyper-acetylation of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme (ECHD and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1, and induces excessive accumulation of long chain fatty acids (LCFA and very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA. Uridine co-administration at a daily dosage of 400 mg/kg raises NAD(+/NADH ratio, inhibits fenofibrate-induced hyper-acetylation of ECHD, ACOX1, and reduces accumulation of LCFA and VLCFA. Our data indicates a therapeutic potential for uridine co-administration to prevent fenofibrate-induced fatty liver.

  8. Variations of the amplitude of the Chandler wobble.

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    Kolaczek, B.; Kosek, W.

    Amplitude variations of the Chandler wobble of polar motion in 1846 - 1988 were analyzed on the basis of the IERS97 C01 pole coordinate data. The Chandler wobble was filtered by the Fourier Transform Band Pass Filter. Periodic oscillations with periods of about 75, 40, 30 and 20 years were detected in amplitude variations of the Chandler wobble. The deep minimum of the Chandler wobble amplitude, similar to the minimum on turn of the decades 1920 and 1930 was predicted for the beginning of the next century.

  9. Indispensable residue for uridine binding in the uridine-cytidine kinase family

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    Fumiaki Tomoike

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Uridine-cytidine kinase (UCK, including human UCK2, are a family of enzymes that generally phosphorylate both uridine and cytidine. However, UCK of Thermus thermophilus HB8 (ttCK phosphorylates only cytidine. This cytidine-restricted activity is thought to depend on Tyr93, although the precise mechanism remains unresolved. Exhaustive mutagenesis of Tyr93 in ttCK revealed that the uridine phosphorylation activity was restored only by replacement of Tyr93 with His or Gln. Replacement of His117 in human UCK2, corresponding to residue Tyr93 in ttCK, by Tyr resulted in a loss of uridine phosphorylation activity. These findings indicated that uridine phosphorylation activity commonly depends on a single residue in the UCK family.

  10. Spiral wobbling beam illumination uniformity in HIF fuel target implosion

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    Kawata S.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A few % wobbling-beam illumination nonuniformity is realized in heavy ion inertial confinement fusion (HIF throughout the heavy ion beam (HIB driver pulse by a newly introduced spiraling beam axis motion in the first two rotations. The wobbling HIB illumination was proposed to realize a uniform implosion in HIF. However, the initial imprint of the wobbling HIBs was a serious problem and introduces a large unacceptable energy deposition nonuniformity. In the wobbling HIBs illumination, the illumination nonuniformity oscillates in time and space. The oscillating-HIB energy deposition may produce a time-dependent implosion acceleration, which reduces the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T growth [Laser Part. Beams 11, 757 (1993, Nuclear Inst. Methods in Phys. Res. A 606, 152 (2009, Phys. Plasmas 19, 024503 (2012] and the implosion nonuniformity. The wobbling HIBs can be generated in HIB accelerators and the oscillating frequency may be several 100 MHz ∼ 1 GHz [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 254801 (2010]. Three-dimensional HIBs illumination computations present that the few % wobbling HIBs illumination nonuniformity oscillates with the same wobbling HIBs frequency.

  11. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

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    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Mironov, A. S. [State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Betzel, C. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2′-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation.

  12. Evaluation of beam wobbling methods for heavy-ion radiotherapy.

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    Yonai, Shunsuke; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Takei, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu; Isobe, Yoshiharu; Tashiro, Mutsumi; Koikegami, Hajime; Tomita, Hideki

    2008-03-01

    The National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) has extensively studied carbon-ion radiotherapy at the Heavy-Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) with some positive outcomes, and has established its efficacy. Therefore, efforts to distribute the therapy to the general public should be made, for which it is essential to enable direct application of clinical and technological experiences obtained at NIRS. For widespread use, it is very important to reduce the cost through facility downsizing with minimal acceleration energy to deliver the HIMAC-equivalent clinical beams. For the beam delivery system, the requirement of miniaturization is translated to reduction in length while maintaining the clinically available field size and penetration range for range-modulated uniform broad beams of regular fields that are either circular or square for simplicity. In this paper, we evaluate the various wobbling methods including original improvements, especially for application to the compact facilities through the experimental and computational studies. The single-ring wobbling method used at HIMAC is the best one including a lot of experience at HIMAC but the residual range is a fatal problem in the case of a compact facility. On the other hand, uniform wobbling methods such as the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods are effective and suitable for a compact facility. Furthermore, these methods can be applied for treatment with passive range modulation including respiratory gated irradiation. In theory, the choice between the spiral and zigzag wobbling methods depends on the shape of the required irradiation field. However, we found that it is better to use the zigzag wobbling method with transformation of the wobbling pattern even when a circular uniform irradiation field is required, because it is difficult to maintain the stability of the wobbler magnet due to the rapid change of the wobbler current in the spiral wobbling method. The regulated wobbling method

  13. Using an Augmented Wobble Board as a Game Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    and evaluation of three prototypes intended to provide individuals in need of ankle rehabilitation with the necessary motivation. The prototypes leverage video games potential as a source of intrinsic motivation by allowing individuals to control a game by means of a wobble board—an instrument used for ankle...... vibrotactile feedback during wobble board games since the feedback may distract the user, but also has the potential to make the experience more involving......., and a user study suggested that participants generally found the act of playing intrinsically motivating. In a second study we compared a the wobble board interface with to commercially available input devices (the Wii balance board, and keyboard and mouse). The results provided insights about...

  14. The cost of wobble translation in fungal mitochondrial genomes: integration of two traditional hypotheses

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    Xia Xuhua

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fungal and animal mitochondrial genomes typically have one tRNA for each synonymous codon family. The codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis predicts that the wobble nucleotide of a tRNA anticodon should evolve towards maximizing Watson-Crick base pairing with the most frequently used codon within each synonymous codon family, whereas the wobble versatility hypothesis argues that the nucleotide at the wobble site should be occupied by a nucleotide most versatile in wobble pairing, i.e., the tRNA wobble nucleotide should be G for NNY codon families, and U for NNR and NNN codon families (where Y stands for C or U, R for A or G and N for any nucleotide. Results We here integrate these two traditional hypotheses on tRNA anticodons into a unified model based on an analysis of the wobble costs associated with different wobble base pairs. This novel approach allows the relative cost of wobble pairing to be qualitatively evaluated. A comprehensive study of 36 fungal genomes suggests very different costs between two kinds of U:G wobble pairs, i.e., (1 between a G at the wobble site of a tRNA anticodon and a U at the third codon position (designated MU3:G and (2 between a U at the wobble site of a tRNA anticodon and a G at the third codon position (designated MG3:U. Conclusion In general, MU3:G is much smaller than MG3:U, suggesting no selection against U-ending codons in NNY codon families with a wobble G in the tRNA anticodon but strong selection against G-ending codons in NNR codon families with a wobble U at the tRNA anticodon. This finding resolves several puzzling observations in fungal genomics and corroborates previous studies showing that U3:G wobble is energetically more favorable than G3:U wobble.

  15. Base-pairing versatility determines wobble sites in tRNA anticodons of vertebrate mitogenomes.

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    Miguel M Fonseca

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vertebrate mitochondrial genomes typically have one transfer RNA (tRNA for each synonymous codon family. This limited anticodon repertoire implies that each tRNA anticodon needs to wobble (establish a non-Watson-Crick base pairing between two nucleotides in RNA molecules to recognize one or more synonymous codons. Different hypotheses have been proposed to explain the factors that determine the nucleotide composition of wobble sites in vertebrate mitochondrial tRNA anticodons. Until now, the two major postulates--the "codon-anticodon adaptation hypothesis" and the "wobble versatility hypothesis"--have not been formally tested in vertebrate mitochondria because both make the same predictions regarding the composition of anticodon wobble sites. The same is true for the more recent "wobble cost hypothesis". PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have analyzed the occurrence of synonymous codons and tRNA anticodon wobble sites in 1553 complete vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, focusing on three fish species with mtDNA codon usage bias reversal (L-strand is GT-rich. These mitogenomes constitute an excellent opportunity to study the evolution of the wobble nucleotide composition of tRNA anticodons because due to the reversal the predictions for the anticodon wobble sites differ between the existing hypotheses. We observed that none of the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in these unusual mitochondrial genomes coevolved to match the new overall codon usage bias, suggesting that nucleotides at the wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitochondrial genomes are determined by wobble versatility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that, at wobble sites of tRNA anticodons in vertebrate mitogenomes, selection favors the most versatile nucleotide in terms of wobble base-pairing stability and that wobble site composition is not influenced by codon usage. These results are in agreement with the "wobble versatility hypothesis".

  16. Wobble friction coefficient in post-stressed concrete

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    Diego Ernesto Dueñas Puentes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at establishing a wobble friction coefficient (K from records regarding some post-stressed bridges built in Colombia. Such records were arranged and analysed together with stress diagrams resulting from the corres-ponding plans, calculations and reports. Suitable records were produced from this review to make the analysis. Once the records had been selected, the probable wobble friction coefficient (K was then calculated for each case and this coefficient was related to the length of the cable and the total area of the strands composing the cable. These records and their results were subsequently grouped according to the type of bridge to produce a wobble friction coefficient (K for each specific structure. The study indicated that the wobble friction coefficient was lower than that indicated by the Colombian Seismic Bridge Design Code, Instituto Nacional De Vías, 1995]. The influence of tensioning equipment, materials and labour suggested a format for recording tensioning to reduce inaccuracy when readings are being taken. A reduction in the costs of tensioning would arise from taking the forgoing into account.

  17. Structural and Biochemical Studies on the Reaction Mechanism of Uridine-Cytidine Kinase.

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    Tomoike, Fumiaki; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2015-12-01

    Uridine-cytidine kinase catalyzes phosphorylation of the pyrimidine nucleosides uridine and cytidine and plays an important role in nucleotide metabolism. However, the detailed molecular mechanism of these reactions remains to be elucidated. Here, we determined the structure of the ternary complex of Uridine-cytidine kinase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 with both cytidine and β,γ-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue. Substrate binding is accompanied by substantial domain movement that allows the substrate-binding cleft to close. The terminal phosphodiester bond of the ATP analogue is in an ideal location for an inline attack of the 5'-hydroxyl group of cytidine. Asp40 is located near the 5'-hydroxyl group of cytidine. Mutation of this conserved residue to Asn or Ala resulted in a complete loss of enzyme activity, which is consistent with the notion that Asp40 acts as a general base that activates the 5'-hydroxyl group of cytidine. The pH profile of the activity showed an apparent pK a value of 7.4. Based on this structure, a likely mechanism of the catalytic step is discussed.

  18. A preliminary nonlinear analysis of the earth's chandler wobble

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    V. Frede

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chandler wobble (CW is a resonant response of the Earth rotational pole wandering around its figure axis whose excitation mechanism is still uncertain. It appears as polar motion oscillations with an average period of about 433 days and a slowly varying amplitude in the range (0–300 milliarcsec (mas. We here perform a nonlinear analysis of the CW via a time-delay coordinate embedding of its measured X and Y components and show that the CW can be interpreted as a low dimensional unstable deterministic process.

  19. Using an Augmented Wobble Board as a Game Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    and evaluation of three prototypes intended to provide individuals in need of ankle rehabilitation with the necessary motivation. The prototypes leverage video games potential as a source of intrinsic motivation by allowing individuals to control a game by means of a wobble board—an instrument used for ankle...... with actuators and thereby provide vibrotactile feedback to the user while playing. The results of the performed evaluation indicated that the additional feedback need not improve performance in relation to the particular game being played. Moreover, the results suggest that one should be mindful when to add...

  20. An electrostatic lower stator axial-gap polysilicon wobble motor part II: Fabrication and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legtenberg, R.; Legtenberg, Rob; Berenschot, Johan W.; van Baar, J.J.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    This paper presents the fabrication and first performance characteristics of electrostatically driven axial-gap polysilicon wobble motors. The fabrication is based on a four mask process using polysilicon surface-micromachining techniques. Three twelve-stator-pole wobble motor designs have been

  1. Stabilization of Escherichia coli uridine phosphorylase by evolution and immobilization

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    Visser, Daniel F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli was evolved by iterative saturation mutagenesis. The best mutant showed a temperature optimum of 60C and a half-life of 17.3 h at 60C. The mutant enzyme, as well as a purine nucleoside phosphorylase from...

  2. Wireless gyroscope platform enabled by a portable media device for quantifying wobble board therapy.

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    LeMoyne, Robert; Mastroianni, Timothy

    2017-07-01

    The wobble board enables a therapy strategy for rehabilitation of the ankle foot complex. Quantification of therapy, such as through the use of a wobble board, can facilitate a therapist's acuity for advancing and optimizing the overall therapy strategy. The portable media device, such as an iPod, can be equipped with a software application to function as a wireless gyroscope platform. Integration of the wobble board with the portable media device functioning as a wireless gyroscope enables the potential for patient to therapist interaction through connectivity to the Internet. A patient can conduct wobble board therapy for the ankle foot complex from the convenient vantage point of a homebound setting with therapy data transmitted wirelessly as email attachments. The gyroscope signal of the wobble board therapy can be consolidated into a feature set for machine learning classification. Using a multilayer perceptron neural network considerable classification accuracy has been achieved for differentiating between a hemiplegic affected ankle and unaffected ankle while using a wobble board. The combination of machine learning, wireless systems, such as a portable media device functioning as a wireless gyroscope, and a conventional therapy device, such as a wobble board, are envisioned to advance the capability to optimally impact the rehabilitation experience.

  3. Pharmacogenomics of human uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases and clinical implications.

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    Guillemette, C; Lévesque, É; Rouleau, M

    2014-09-01

    Glucuronidation by uridine diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) is a major phase II biotransformation pathway and, complementary to phase I metabolism and membrane transport, one of the most important cellular defense mechanisms responsible for the inactivation of therapeutic drugs, other xenobiotics, and endogenous molecules. Interindividual variability in UGT pathways is significant and may have profound pharmacological and toxicological implications. Several genetic and genomic processes underlie this variability and are discussed in relation to drug metabolism and diseases such as cancer.

  4. Analysis of the wobbling effect in a lens-shaped body rotation

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    Kim, Minho

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the wobbling motion in a lens-shaped body rotation, focusing on the frequencies and the amplitude of nutation by filming the rotational motion and wobbling of the body. The friction coefficient of the surface is altered to examine its influence for two lenses with different curvature radii. MATLAB programs are developed to retrieve the Euler angles, which are graphed according to time. It is shown that the lens with a smaller curvature radius exhibits the wobbling effect in all cases, whereas the lens with a larger curvature radius shows such behaviour in limited circumstances. The study confirms that the friction coefficient has a negative linear correlation with the vertical axis declination amplitude with the R-squared value 0.878, showing that friction gives damping and causes smaller axis declination amplitudes. Negative linear correlation also exists with relation to the number of wobbles before the motion stops, where the R-squared value is 0.938, providing further evidence that friction and wobbling cause higher energy dissipation rates. The frequency of the wobbling motion only has a correlation with the curvature radius of the lens, showing no explicit correlation with the friction coefficient, with its R-squared value being 0.077. No losses of contact were observable in this motion. The overall process does not utilize particularly expensive apparatus and will be applicable for senior undergraduate students to experiment on and analyze the motion of a special situation regarding a rigid body that is both spinning and nutating.

  5. Wobbling and Precessing Jets from Warped Disks in Binary Systems

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    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian

    2015-12-01

    We present results of the first ever three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the accretion-ejection structure. We investigate the 3D evolution of jets launched symmetrically from single stars but also jets from warped disks in binary systems. We have applied various model setups and tested them by simulating a stable and bipolar symmetric 3D structure from a single star-disk-jet system. Our reference simulation maintains a good axial symmetry and also a bipolar symmetry for more than 500 rotations of the inner disk, confirming the quality of our model setup. We have then implemented a 3D gravitational potential (Roche potential) due by a companion star and run a variety of simulations with different binary separations and mass ratios. These simulations show typical 3D deviations from axial symmetry, such as jet bending outside the Roche lobe or spiral arms forming in the accretion disk. In order to find indications of precession effects, we have also run an exemplary parameter setup, essentially governed by a small binary separation of only ≃200 inner disk radii. This simulation shows a strong indication that we observe the onset of a jet precession caused by the wobbling of the jet-launching disk. We estimate the opening angle of the precession cone defined by the lateral motion of the jet axis to be about 4° after about 5000 dynamical time steps.

  6. Chandler wobble excitation by catastrophic flooding of the Black Sea

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    E. Boschi

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that during the late Quaternary glaciation the Black Sea formed an isolated inland lake (Ross et al., 1970. New geological data and the recognition of sudden population movements away from the Black Sea coasts suggest that the basin was rapidly flooded through the Bosphorus sill 7150 years bp, causing a sea level rise of ~ 135 m in a few years (Ryan et al., 1997. As shown here, such a catastrophic redistribution of mass has significantly altered the amplitude of the Chandler wobble, the free motion of the pole of rotation around the main inertia axis of the Earth (Lambeck, 1980. We also estimate that during the flooding the pole of rotation was diverted from its secular path and shifted by ~ 30 m, at a rate of several meters per year. These rotational variations are found to be orders of magnitude larger than those produced by other short-term geophysical processes, such as earthquakes seismic moment release (O'Connell and Dziewonski, 1979; Chao et al.,1996, anthropogenic water impoundment (Chao, 1995, and tectonic mass movements (Alfonsi and Spada, 1998. The Black Sea flooding may thus be responsible for the most drastic change in the rotational parameters of the Earth in the recent history of our planet.

  7. Mass asymmetry and tricyclic wobble motion assessment using automated launch video analysis

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    Ryan Decker

    2016-04-01

    Examination of the pitch and yaw histories clearly indicates that in addition to epicyclic motion's nutation and precession oscillations, an even faster wobble amplitude is present during each spin revolution, even though some of the amplitudes of the oscillation are smaller than 0.02 degree. The results are compared to a sequence of shots where little appreciable mass asymmetries were present, and only nutation and precession frequencies are predominantly apparent in the motion history results. Magnitudes of the wobble motion are estimated and compared to product of inertia measurements of the asymmetric projectiles.

  8. Regulation of uridine kinase quaternary structure. Dissociation by the inhibitor CTP.

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    Payne, R C; Traut, T W

    1982-11-10

    Uridine kinase from mouse Ehrlich ascites cells can exist in a variety of different aggregation states, from monomer up to aggregates that may contain 32 or more subunits. With very crude enzyme preparations, uridine kinase activity is always associated with several different coexisting molecular weight species. Changes in the aggregation state are produced in the presence of normal effectors (orthophosphate, ATP and CTP) at physiological concentrations. With uridine kinase that has been purified 9,000-fold, enzyme activity is associated with only a single molecular weight species, but is still responsive to the same physiological effectors. In the presence of orthophosphate, uridine kinase has a molecular weight of 380,000 (appropriate for a dodecamer). In the presence of CTP, the enzyme dissociates with concomitant loss of activity. The dissociated enzyme can be reassociated to the native size. These results imply that alteration of the enzyme's quaternary structure by normal effectors constitutes a mechanism for regulating uridine kinase activity in vivo.

  9. Characteristics of the uridine uptake system in normal and polyoma transformed hamster embryo cells

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    Lemkin, J.A.

    1973-01-01

    The lability of the uridine uptake system in the normal and polyoma transformed hamster embryo fibroblast was studied. The major areas investigated were: the kinetic parameters of uridine transport, a comparison of changes in cellular ATP content by factors which modulate uridine uptake, and a comparison of the qualitative and quantitative effects of the same modulating agent on uridine transport, cell growth, and cellular ATP content. Uridine uptake into cells in vitro was examined using tritiated uridine as a tracer to measure the amount of uridine incorporated into the acid soluble and acid-insoluble fractions of the cells studied. The ATP content of the cells was determined by the firefly bioluminescence method. It was found that the K/sub t/ for uridine uptake into the normal hamster embryo cell and two polyoma transformed hamster embryo cell lines was identical. However, the V/sub max/ for uridine transport was higher in both polyoma transformed cell lines. Furthermore, the K/sub t/ in both the normal and transformed cell cultured in serum-less or serum-containing media was identical, although the V/sub max/ was higher in the serum-stimulated cell in both the normal and transformed cell. Stimulation of the normal cell with adenosine produced a different K/sub t/ for uridine transport. Preliminary investigations have demonstrated that treatment of the polyoma transformed with adenosine also induces a different K/sub t/ (not shown). The K/sub i/ for phloretin inhibition in serum-less and serum-stimulated normal and polyoma transformed cells was found to be identical in each case.

  10. Book Review: Precession, Nutation, and Wobble of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Christiaan; Dehant, V.; Mathews, P. M.

    2016-10-01

    This great book describes and explains observational and computational aspects of three apparently tiny changes in the Earth's motion and orientation, viz., precession, nutation, and wobble. The three introductory chapters of this book present fundamental definitions, elementary geodetic theory, and celestial/terrestrial reference systems - including transformations between reference frames. The next chapter on observational techniques describes the principle of accurate measurements of the orientation of the Earth's axis, as obtained from measurements of extra-galactic radio sources using Very Long Baseline Interferometry and GPS observations. Chapter 5 handles precession and nutation of the rigid Earth (i.e., a celestial body that cannot, by definition, deform) and the subsequent chapter takes deformation into consideration, viz., the effect of a centrifugal force caused by a constant-rate rotation that causes the Earth's shape and structure to become ellipsoidal. Deformations caused by external solar-system bodies are discussed in terms of deformability parameters. The next three chapters handle additional complex deviations: non-rigid Earth and more general Earth models, anelastic Earth parameters, and the effects of the fluid layers (i.e., ocean and atmosphere) on Earth rotation. Chapter 10 complements Chapter 7 with refinements that take into account diverse small effects such as the effect of a thermal conductive layer at the top of the core, Core Mantle and Inner Boundary coupling effects on nutation, electromagnetic coupling, and so-called topographic coupling. Chapter 11 covers comparison of observation and theory, and tells us that the present-date precision of the nutation theory is at the level of milliarcseconds in the time domain, and of a tenth of a microsecond in the frequency domain (with some exceptions). This chapter is followed by a 25-page chapter of definitions of equator, equinox, celestial intermediate pole and origin, stellar angle

  11. Modeling for control of a kinematic wobble-yoke Stirling engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia-Canseco, Eloisa; Alvarez-Aguirre, Alejandro; Scherpen, Jacquelien M. A.

    In this paper we derive the dynamical model of a four-cylinder double-acting wobble-yoke Stirling engine. In addition to the classical thermodynamics methods that dominate the literature of Stirling mechanisms, we present a control systems viewpoint to analyze the dynamic properties of the engine.

  12. Strategies for equilibrium maintenance during single leg standing on a wobble board

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Priscila de Brito; Oliveira, Anderson Souza; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and compare movement strategies used to maintain balance while single leg standing on either a firm surface (FS) or on a wobble board (WB). In 17 healthy men, retroreflective markers were positioned on the xiphoid process and nondominant lateral malleolus to ...

  13. An electrostatic lower stator axial-gap polysilicon wobble motor part I: Design and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legtenberg, R.; Legtenberg, Rob; Berenschot, Johan W.; van Baar, J.J.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    This paper presents design issues and a theoretical model of electrostatically driven axial-gap polysilicon wobble motors. The motor design benefits from large axial rotor-to-stator overlap and large gear ratios, and motor designs with rotor radii of 50 and 100 μm are capable of generating torques

  14. A detection of wobbling brightest cluster galaxies within massive galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David; Courbin, F.; Kneib, J. P.; McCarthy, Ian G.

    2017-12-01

    A striking signal of dark matter beyond the standard model is the existence of cores in the centre of galaxy clusters. Recent simulations predict that a brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) inside a cored galaxy cluster will exhibit residual wobbling due to previous major mergers, long after the relaxation of the overall cluster. This phenomenon is absent with standard cold dark matter where a cuspy density profile keeps a BCG tightly bound at the centre. We test this hypothesis using cosmological simulations and deep observations of 10 galaxy clusters acting as strong gravitational lenses. Modelling the BCG wobble as a simple harmonic oscillator, we measure the wobble amplitude, Aw, in the BAHAMAS suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, finding an upper limit for the cold dark matter paradigm of Aw indicates a non-zero Aw, with larger surveys, e.g. Euclid, we will be able to not only confirm the effect but also to use it to determine whether or not the wobbling finds its origin in new fundamental physics or astrophysical process.

  15. Enhanced uridine bioavailability following administration of a triacetyluridine-rich nutritional supplement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E Weinberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uridine is a therapy for hereditary orotic aciduria and is being investigated in other disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, including toxicities resulting from treatment with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV. Historically, the use of uridine as a therapeutic agent has been limited by poor bioavailability. A food supplement containing nucleosides, NucleomaxX®, has been reported to raise plasma uridine to supraphysiologic levels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Single- and multi-dose PK studies following NucleomaxX® were compared to single-dose PK studies of equimolar doses of pure uridine in healthy human volunteers. Product analysis documented that more than 90% of the nucleoside component of NucleomaxX® is in the form of triacetyluridine (TAU. Single and repeated dosing with NucleomaxX® resulted in peak plasma uridine concentrations 1-2 hours later of 150.9 ± 39.3 µM and 161.4 ± 31.5 µM, respectively, levels known to ameliorate mitochondrial toxicity in vitro. C(max and AUC were four-fold higher after a single dose of NucleomaxX® than after uridine. No adverse effects of either treatment were observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: NucleomaxX®, containing predominantly TAU, has significantly greater bioavailability than pure uridine in human subjects and may be useful in the management of mitochondrial toxicity.

  16. Early induction of Na(+)-dependent uridine uptake in the regenerating rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Montasell, B; Martinez-Mas, J V; Enrich, C; Casado, F J; Felipe, A; Pastor-Anglada, M

    1993-01-18

    Na(+)-dependent uridine transport into liver plasma membrane vesicles from partially hepatectomized and sham-operated rats was studied. Preparations purified 6 h after 70% hepatectomy exhibited an increased Vmax of uridine uptake (3.7 vs. 1.4 pmol/mg prot/3 s) without any change in Km (6 microM). Incubation of the vesicles in the presence of monensin decreased uridine uptake although the differences between both experimental groups remained identical. It is concluded that uridine transport is induced early after partial hepatectomy by a mechanism which does not involve changes in the transmembrane Na+ gradient. This is the first evidence in favor of modulation of nucleoside transport into liver cells.

  17. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Bilos, Albert; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-11-02

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent inducers of toxicity. They can be formed by glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), but a systematic characterization of subtype specificity and kinetics of lactonization is lacking. Here, we demonstrate for six clinically relevant statins that only UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 contribute significantly to their lactonization. UGT1A3 appeared to have the highest lactonization capacity with marked differences in statin conversion rates: pitavastatin ≫ atorvastatin > cerivastatin > lovastatin > rosuvastatin (simvastatin not converted). Using in silico modeling we could identify a probable statin interaction region in the UGT binding pocket. Polymorphisms in these regions of UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 may be a contributing factor in statin-induced myopathies, which could be used in personalization of statin therapy with improved safety.

  18. The Effects of Wobble Board Training on the Eyes Open and Closed Static Balance Ability of Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Tae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of wobble board training on static balance, with and without vision, of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). [Subjects] Ten adolescents with DS were recruited for this study. [Methods] Participants performed quiet standing with their eyes open and closed, pre- and post-wobble board training. During quiet standing, the center of pressure (COP) data was recorded using a force plate. To assess the static balance ability of the p...

  19. Active-passive biodynamics of the human trunk when seated on a wobble chair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahvarpour, A; Shirazi-Adl, A; Larivière, C

    2016-04-11

    Unstable sitting on a wobble chair with different balance difficulty levels can be used as an effective tool in exercises as well as evaluation and therapeutic stages of rehabilitation. No data on muscle activity levels and spinal loads are however available to assess its safety compared to other regular daily activities. The goal of this study was to estimate muscle forces and spinal loads in a seated unstable wobble chair task. In vivo 3D kinematics of the trunk and seat collected in an earlier study were used here to drive computational trunk musculoskeletal models of 6 normal and 6 low-back pain subject groups sitting on a wobble chair for a duration of 10s. Results revealed no significant differences between kinematics, muscle forces, spinal loads and force plate reaction forces when comparing these two groups. The estimated muscle forces and spinal loads were moderate though larger than those in a stationary sitting posture. Local spinal forces at the L5-S1 disc varied with time and reached their peaks (1473 N and 1720 N in compression, 691 N and 687 N in posterior-anterior shear and 153 N and 208 N in right-left shear, respectively for healthy and CLBP groups) being much greater relative to those in the stationary sitting posture (means of 12 subjects: 768 N, 284 N and 0 N, respectively). The wobble chair with characteristics considered in this study is found hence safe enough as a therapeutic exercise for both healthy and low-back pain subjects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Novel Form of RNA Double Helix Based on G·U and C·A+ Wobble Base Pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ankur; Heinemann, Udo

    2017-11-09

    Wobble base pairs are critical in various physiological functions and have been linked to local structural perturbations in double helical structures of nucleic acids. We report a 1.38-Å resolution crystal structure of an antiparallel octadecamer RNA double helix in overall A conformation, which includes a unique, central stretch of six consecutive wobble base pairs (W helix) with two G·U and four rare C·A+ wobble pairs. Four adenines within the W helix are N1-protonated and wobble-base-paired with the opposing cytosine through two regular hydrogen bonds. Combined with the two G·U pairs, the C·A+ base pairs facilitate formation of a half turn of W-helical RNA flanked by six regular Watson-Crick base pairs in standard A conformation on either side. RNA melting experiments monitored by differential scanning calorimetry, UV and circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrate that the RNA octadecamer undergoes a pH-induced structural transition which is consistent with the presence of a duplex with C·A+ base pairs at acidic pH. Our crystal structure provides a first glimpse of an RNA double helix based entirely on wobble base pairs with possible applications in RNA or DNA nanotechnology and pH biosensors. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Synthesis of Extended Uridine Phosphonates Derived from an Allosteric P2Y2 Receptor Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Song

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report the synthesis of C5/C6-fused uridine phosphonates that are structurally related to earlier reported allosteric P2Y2 receptor ligands. A silyl-Hilbert-Johnson reaction of six quinazoline-2,4-(1H,3H-dione-like base moieties with a suitable ribofuranosephosphonate afforded the desired analogues after full deprotection. In contrast to the parent 5-(4-fluorophenyuridine phosphonate, the present extended-base uridine phosphonates essentially failed to modulate the P2Y2 receptor.

  2. Variable Chandler and Annual Wobbles in Earth's Polar Motion During 1900-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocheng; Liu, Lintao; Su, Xiaoqing; Liang, Xinghui; Yan, Haoming; Tu, Yi; Li, Zhonghua; Li, Wenping

    2016-11-01

    The Chandler wobble (CW) and annual wobble (AW) are the two main components of polar motion, which are difficult to separate because of their very close periods. In the light of Fourier dictionary and basis pursuit method, a Fourier basis pursuit (FBP) spectrum is developed, which can reduce spectral smearing and leakage caused by the finite length of the time series. Further, a band-pass filtering method based on FBP spectrum (FBPBPF), which can effectively suppress the edge effect, is proposed in this paper. The simulation test results show that the FBPBPF method can effectively suppress the edge effect caused by spectral smearing and leakage and that its reconstruction accuracy at the boundary is approximately three times higher than the Fourier transform band-pass filtering method, which is based on Hamming windowed FFT spectrum, in extracting quasi-harmonic signals. The FBPBPF method is then applied to Earth's polar motion data during 1900-2015. Through analyzing the amplitude and period variations of CW and AW, and calculating the eccentricity variation of the AW, we found that: (1) the amplitude of the CW is currently at a historic minimum level, and it is even possible to diminish further until a complete stop; and (2) the eccentricity of the AW has a gradually decreased fluctuation during the last 116 years.

  3. Inhibition of 3H-Uridine Uptake in Mouse Macrophages Infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozato, Keiko; Oiwa, Koji

    1972-01-01

    In mouse macrophages cultivated in vitro and infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium, 3H-uridine uptake was comparable to that in uninfected controls when cells were labeled immediately after infection but was markedly inhibited 2 to 3 hr later. Images PMID:4564401

  4. Effect of 8-hydroxyquinoline on the uptake of uridine and incorporation into RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, D; Hemleben, V

    1977-01-01

    8-hydroxyquinoline has been previously used as an inhibitor in studies on porphyrin metabolism, where it is thought to act by chelating iron. It is shown that this compound also rapidly inhibits uridine uptake of seedlings or cotyledons of the crucifer Matthiola incana R.Br. RNA synthesis is also affected but the inhibition is not as severe as reported for fission yeast.

  5. The effects of wobble board training on the eyes open and closed static balance ability of adolescents with down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Jin

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of wobble board training on static balance, with and without vision, of adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). [Subjects] Ten adolescents with DS were recruited for this study. [Methods] Participants performed quiet standing with their eyes open and closed, pre- and post-wobble board training. During quiet standing, the center of pressure (COP) data was recorded using a force plate. To assess the static balance ability of the participants, the 95% confidence ellipse area of COP was calculated. The paired t-test was used to compare the 95% confidence ellipse area of COP between the eyes open and closed conditions, and between pre- and post-training. [Results] Although there was no significant difference in the 95% confidence ellipse area of COP between with and without vision, the 95% confidence ellipse area of COP decreased significantly after wobble board training. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that wobble board training is an effective at improving the static balance ability of adolescents with DS.

  6. Crystal structure of a 14 bp RNA duplex with non-symmetrical tandem GxU wobble base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trikha, J; Filman, D J; Hogle, J M

    1999-01-01

    Adjacent GxU wobble base pairs are frequently found in rRNA. Atomic structures of small RNA motifs help to provide a better understanding of the effects of various tandem mismatches on duplex structure and stability, thereby providing better rules for RNA structure prediction and validation. The crystal structure of an RNA duplex containing the sequence r(GGUAUUGC-GGUACC)2 has been solved at 2.1 A resolution using experimental phases. Novel refinement strategies were needed for building the correct solvent model. At present, this is the only short RNA duplex structure containing 5'-U-U-3'/3'-G-G-5' non-symmetric tandem GxU wobble base pairs. In the 14mer duplex, the six central base pairs are all displaced away from the helix axis, yielding significant changes in local backbone conformation, helix parameters and charge distribution that may provide specific recognition sites for biologically relevant ligand binding. The greatest deviations from A-form helix occur where the guanine of a wobble base pair stacks over a purine from the opposite strand. In this vicinity, the intra-strand phosphate distances increase significantly, and the major groove width increases up to 3 A. Structural comparisons with other short duplexes containing symmetrical tandem GxU or GxT wobble base pairs show that nearest-neighbor sequence dependencies govern helical twist and the occurrence of cross-strand purine stacks. PMID:10076005

  7. Effect of wobble board training on movement strategies to maintain equilibrium on unstable surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Priscila de Brito; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Oliveira, Anderson Souza

    2018-01-01

    Standing on unstable surfaces requires more complex motor control mechanisms to sustain balance when compared to firm surfaces. Surface instability enhances the demand to maintain equilibrium and is often used to challenge balance, but little is known about how balance training affects movement...... strategies to control posture while standing on unstable surfaces. This study aimed at assessing the effects of isolated wobble board (WB) training on movement strategies to maintain balance during single-leg standing on a WB. Twenty healthy men were randomly assigned to either a control or a training group....... The training group took part in four weeks of WB training and both groups were tested pre and post the intervention. Electromyography from the supporting lower limb muscles, full-body kinematics and ground reaction forces were recorded during firm surface (FS) and WB single-leg standing. WB training did...

  8. Suppression of E. coli tumbling and wobbling in dilute polymeric fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patteson, Alison; Gopinath, Arvind; Arratia, Paulo

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria commonly utilize a run-and-tumble swimming behavior to navigate through complex environments, such as mucus in the lungs or digestive system. This swimming behavior has been extensively studied in water-like fluids; yet, studies on the role of particles/polymers on the run-and-tumble technique are limited. Here, we experimentally investigate the role of polymer concentration on the swimming dynamics of E. coli. We find that small amounts of polymer drastically change the run-and-tumble behavior of E. coli cells, significantly enhancing the translational diffusion. The average cell velocity increases with polymer concentration (and viscosity) and the mean run times are enhanced. By varying polymer molecular weight, we show that enhanced translation is a result of two mechanisms: (1) suppression of cell wobbling due to elasticity and (2) enhancement of run times due to viscosity. Our results show that the transport of chemotactic cells can be independently modified by viscosity and elasticity.

  9. The Chandler wobble as a trigger of the El Niño excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serykh, Ilya; Sonechkin, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    Using data of the Met Office Hadley Centre, time series of the near surface temperature and sea-surface pressure for the period 1875-2012 are processed to compute the Oceanic Niño Index (ONI) and the Equatorial Southern Oscillation Index (ESOI). Detailed spectra of the ONI and ESOI show peaks that exist throughout the year, but the most powerful in the boreal winter months. Peak periods are consist of 29, 43 and 58 months, which is roughly equivalent to 2, 3 and 4 periods of the well-known 14-month Chandler wobble of the Earth's pole motion. A plausible physical mechanism of the Chandler wobble influence on the El Niño excitation is presented. A computation of the global fields of the spectral energy at each of the periods afore-indicated admits to identify some distinctive features of the spatial structure of the most powerful disturbances during El Niño. Detailed spectra of the El Niño Modoki Index (EMI) computed for each month separately show differences between main oscillations of El Niño Modoki and classic El Niño. Besides, computations are made of cross-correlations and lead/lag interrelations between El Niño and some other processes in the global climate system for all afore-indicated periods. Some regions are identified for which the cross-correlations are essential, but the processes being considered either lead or lag El Niño. This finding admits to suppose that there exists an external force common for both, El Niño and other macroscale climatic processes.

  10. Interaction of uridine diphosphate glucose analogs with calf liver uridine diphosphate glucose dehydrogenase. Influence of substituents at C-5 of pyrimidine nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibaev, V N; Eliseeva, G I; Kochetkov, N K

    1975-09-22

    The interaction of alpha-D-glucopyranosyl pyrophosphates of 5-X-uridines (X = CH3, NH2, CH3O, I, Br, Cl, OH) with uridine diphosphate glucose (UDPGlc) dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.22) from calf liver has been studied. All the derivatives investigated were able to serve as substrates for the enzyme. The apparent Michaelis constants for UDPGlc-analogs were dependent both on electronic and steric factors. Increase of substituent negative inductive effect lead to decrease of pKa for ionization of the NH-group in the uracil nucleus and, consequently, to a diminishing of the proportion of the active analog species under the conditions of assay. After correction for the ionization effect, the Km values were found to depend on the van der Waals radius of the substituent. The value of 1.95 A seems to be critical, as the analogs with bulkier substituents at C-5 showed a decreased affinity to the enzyme. The maximal velocity values of the analogs were also dependent on nature of the substituent. Good linear correlation between log V and substituent hydrophobic phi-constant was observed for a number of the analogs, although V values for the nucleotides with X = H, OH or NH2 were higher than would be expected on the basis of the correlation. The significance of the results for understanding of the topography of UDPGlc dehydrogenase active site is discussed.

  11. Cleavage of a RNA analog containing uridine by a bifunctional dinuclear Zn(II) catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Clifford S; Mathews, Ryan A; del Mundo, Imee Marie A; Morrow, Janet R

    2009-01-01

    The macrocyclic ligand, 1,4-bis((1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecan-7-yl)methyl)benzene (L1) is prepared. L1 binds two Zn(II) ions at neutral pH to form Zn(2)(L1) as studied by using pH-potentiometric titrations. Zn(2)(L1) binds two uridines at pH 7.0, I=0.100M (NaCl) and the mononuclear analog Zn(L2) (L2=1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane) binds a single uridine; dissociation constants for both complexes are in the millimolar range. Both complexes promote the cleavage of a simple RNA analog lacking a nucleobase (HpPNP=2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenylphosphate), and a uridine containing RNA analog UpPNP (uridine-3'-4-nitrophenylphosphate). Plots of the first-order rate constant for cleavage of HpPNP as a function of Zn(L2) concentration from 0.5mM to 20.0mM are linear, consistent with weak complexation to substrate K(d)>20mM. In contrast, first-order rate constants for cleavage of UpPNP by Zn(L2) or Zn(2)(L1) over similar concentration ranges exhibit a downward curvature, consistent with the formation of a complex between catalyst and UpPNP. Comparison of second-order rate constants (k(2)=k(cat)/K(d)) shows that the dinuclear complex Zn(2)(L1) is a better catalyst than Zn(L2) for both HpPNP and UpPNP cleavage.

  12. Heterogeneity of uridine incorporation along the rabbit nephron. I. Autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandewalle, A.; Farman, N.; Cluzeaud, F.; Bonvalet, J.P.

    1984-04-01

    An autoradiographic study of uridine labeling in tubular segments microdissected from the rabbit kidney is presented. Kidney pyramids were incubated for 60 min with low (66 nM) and high (66..mu..M) (/sup 3/H)-uridine concentration. At the two concentrations studied the labeling was almost exclusively nuclear in all segments studied. At the low concentration, labeling predominated in the macula densa (MD = 63.88 +/- 6.15 silver grains/100 ..mu..m/sup 2/, n = 11), cortical ascending limb (CAL = 19.65 +/- 1.65, n = 15), and initial distal tubule (DCT/sub a/ = 24.31 +/- 2.70, n = 6). It was minimal in the proximal tubule (PCT/sub 2/ = 9.14 +/- 1.61, n = 16) and in the cortical (CCT = 5.23 +/- 0.75, n = 18) and medullary (MCT = 5.52 +/- 1.10, n = 12) collecting ducts. At a high concentration, the profile of labeling was roughly similar except for a relative increase in labeling much more pronounced in collecting ducts (CCT = +373, MCT = +323%) than in the other structures (MD = -14, CAL = +66, DCT/sub a/ = +49, PCT = +9%). Pulse-chase experiments do not show evidence for differences in turnover or degradation rates of RNA between segments, at least in the PCT and the connecting part of the CCT. Analysis of the results at low and high concentration suggests that the observed heterogeneity in uridine labeling depends on both variable endogenous nucleoside pools and different rates of uridine incorporation into RNA from one segment to another.

  13. Intracellular changes in rat hepatocytes after intratracheal administration of highly dispersed silicon dioxide and uridine effects on these changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebkova, N P; Baranov, V I

    2006-05-01

    Rat hepatocytes were examined under electron microscope at early terms after intratracheal administration of highly dispersed silicon dioxide powder against the background of uridine treatment. Penetration of powder particles into hepatocyte cytoplasm, nuclei, mitochondria, and peroxisomes and development of bacteria in these cells were observed. Uridine reduced the destructive effect of powder on the organelles, increased glycogen content in hepatocytes, and inhibited the formation of capsulated bacterial forms in these cells.

  14. Dietary uridine enhances the improvement in learning and memory produced by administering DHA to gerbils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, Sarah; Martinez, Joseph; Chow, Camille; Wurtman, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects on cognitive behaviors of giving normal adult gerbils three compounds, normally in the circulation, which interact to increase brain phosphatides, synaptic proteins, dendritic spines, and neurotransmitter release. Animals received supplemental uridine (as its monophosphate, UMP; 0.5%) and choline (0.1%) via the diet, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 300 mg/kg/day) by gavage, for 4 wk, and then throughout the subsequent period of behavioral training and testing. As shown previously, giving all three compounds caused highly significant (P<0.001) increases in total brain phospholipids and in each major phosphatide; giving DHA or UMP (plus choline) produced smaller increases in some of the phosphatides. DHA plus choline improved performance on the four-arm radial maze, T-maze, and Y-maze tests; coadministering UMP further enhanced these increases. (Uridine probably acts by generating both CTP, which can be limiting in phosphatide synthesis, and UTP, which activates P2Y receptors coupled to neurite outgrowth and protein synthesis. All three compounds also act by enhancing the substrate-saturation of phosphatide-synthesizing enzymes.) These findings demonstrate that a treatment that increases synaptic membrane content can enhance cognitive functions in normal animals.—Holguin, S., Martinez, J., Chow, C., Wurtman, R. Dietary uridine enhances the improvement in learning and memory produced by administering DHA to gerbils. PMID:18606862

  15. Uridine metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients: effect of infection, of antiretroviral therapy and of HIV-1/ART-associated lipodystrophy syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Domingo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uridine has been advocated for the treatment of HIV-1/HAART-associated lipodystrophy (HALS, although its metabolism in HIV-1-infected patients is poorly understood. METHODS: Plasma uridine concentrations were measured in 35 controls and 221 HIV-1-infected patients and fat uridine in 15 controls and 19 patients. The diagnosis of HALS was performed following the criteria of the Lipodystrophy Severity Grading Scale. Uridine was measured by a binary gradient-elution HPLC method. Analysis of genes encoding uridine metabolizing enzymes in fat was performed with TaqMan RT-PCR. RESULTS: Median plasma uridine concentrations for HIV-1-infected patients were 3.80 µmol/l (interquartile range: 1.60, and for controls 4.60 µmol/l (IQR: 1.8 (P = 0.0009. In fat, they were of 6.0 (3.67, and 2.8 (4.65 nmol/mg of protein, respectively (P = 0.0118. Patients with a mixed HALS form had a median plasma uridine level of 4.0 (IC95%: 3.40-4.80 whereas in those with isolated lipoatrophy it was 3.25 (2.55-4.15 µmol/l/l (P = 0.0066. The expression of uridine cytidine kinase and uridine phosphorylase genes was significantly decreased in all groups of patients with respect to controls. A higher expression of the mRNAs for concentrative nucleoside transporters was found in HIV-1-infected patients with respect to healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-1 infection is associated with a decrease in plasma uridine and a shift of uridine to the adipose tissue compartment. Antiretroviral therapy was not associated with plasma uridine concentrations, but pure lipoatrophic HALS was associated with significantly lower plasma uridine concentrations.

  16. A sphericon-shaped magnetic millirobot rolling on a surface actuated by an external wobbling magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmun Jeon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel sphericon-shaped magnetic millirobot (SSMM that can roll on a variety of surfaces. The SSMM comprises four identical half cones with a cylindrical magnet inserted into the geometric center. It can roll forward or backward on a surface with repeated rolling cone motions (wobbling motions. Since a rolling SSMM develops its entire surface by means of line contact, a relatively large maximum static friction force can make the SSMM move on a surface steadily and effectively. In this work, a new type of external wobbling magnetic field (EWMF was also derived to manipulate the SSMM’s rolling motions precisely. Then, the controlled rolling motions of prototype SSMMs under various surface conditions were demonstrated to examine the rolling ability of the proposed SSMM.

  17. Frequency Adaptive Control Technique for Periodic Runout and Wobble Cancellation in Optical Disk Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Pien Yang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Periodic disturbance occurs in various applications on the control of the rotational mechanical systems. For optical disk drives, the spirally shaped tracks are usually not perfectly circular and the assembly of the disk and spindle motor is unavoidably eccentric. The resulting periodic disturbance is, therefore, synchronous with the disk rotation, and becomes particularly noticeable for the track following and focusing servo system. This paper applies a novel adaptive controller, namely Frequency Adaptive Control Technique (FACT, for rejecting the periodic runout and wobble effects in the optical disk drive with dual actuators. The control objective is to attenuate adaptively the specific frequency contents of periodic disturbances without amplifying its rest harmonics. FACT is implemented in a plug-in manner and provides a suitable framework for periodic disturbance rejection in the cases where the fundamental frequencies of the disturbance are alterable. It is shown that the convergence property of parameters in the proposed adaptive algorithm is exponentially stable. It is applicable to both the spindle modes of constant linear velocity (CLV and constant angular velocity (CAV for various operation speeds. The experiments showed that the proposed FACT has successful improvement on the tracking and focusing performance of the CD-ROM, and is extended to various compact disk drives.

  18. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Pavia); (Lund); (Southern Research)

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  19. The crystal structure of Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase reveals a distinct subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Timothy H; Christoffersen, S; Allan, Paula W; Parker, William B; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I; Terreni, M; Ealick, Steven E

    2011-08-02

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 Å resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an α/β monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is ∼7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  20. Metabolomics profiles delineate uridine deficiency contributes to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis induced by celastrol in human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Yang, Jing; Chen, Minjian; Li, Lei; Huan, Fei; Li, Aiping; Liu, Yanqing; Xia, Yankai; Duan, Jin-Ao; Ma, Shiping

    2016-07-19

    Celastrol, extracted from "Thunder of God Vine", is a promising anti-cancer natural product. However, its effect on acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and underlying molecular mechanism are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore its effect on APL and underlying mechanism based on metabolomics. Firstly, multiple assays indicated that celastrol could induce apoptosis of APL cells via p53-activated mitochondrial pathway. Secondly, unbiased metabolomics revealed that uridine was the most notable changed metabolite. Further study verified that uridine could reverse the apoptosis induced by celastrol. The decreased uridine was caused by suppressing the expression of gene encoding Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, whose inhibitor could also induce apoptosis of APL cells. At last, mouse model confirmed that celastrol inhibited tumor growth through enhanced apoptosis. Celastrol could also decrease uridine and DHODH protein level in tumor tissues. Our in vivo study also indicated that celastrol had no systemic toxicity at pharmacological dose (2 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days). Altogether, our metabolomics study firstly reveals that uridine deficiency contributes to mitochondrial apoptosis induced by celastrol in APL cells. Celastrol shows great potential for the treatment of APL.

  1. Parallel Solution-Phase Synthesis and General Biological Activity of a Uridine Antibiotic Analog Library

    OpenAIRE

    Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Reynolds, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    A small library of ninety four uridine antibiotic analogs was synthesized, under the Pilot Scale Library (PSL) Program of the NIH Roadmap initiative, from amine 2 and carboxylic acids 33 and 77 in solution-phase fashion. Diverse aldehyde, sulfonyl chloride, and carboxylic acid reactant sets were condensed to 2, leading after acid-mediated hydrolysis, to the targeted compounds 3?32 in good yields and high purity. Similarly, treatment of 33 with diverse amines and sulfonamides gave 34?75. The c...

  2. Photocycloaddition of the T1 excited state of thioinosine to uridine and adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenska, Grazyna; Filipiak, Piotr; Burdziński, Gotard; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Hug, Gordon L; Gdaniec, Zofia

    2009-10-01

    Novel photoadducts were obtained by irradiation of thioinosine (6-thiopurine riboside, TI) in deaerated aqueous solution without and in the presence of uridine and adenosine. Excitation (lambda > 300 nm) of TI to its excited S2 state yields a single bimolecular photoproduct. It is a purine-pyrimidine diriboside in which the purine ring is attached to the amide nitrogen of 6-amino-4-thioxo-5-formamidopyrimidine. When TI was irradiated in the presence of an excess of adenosine, two photoproducts were isolated: diribosides of N-(4,6-diaminopirymidin-5-yl)-N-formyl-6-aminopurine and N-(4-amino-6-formylamino-pyrimidin-5-yl)-6-aminopurine, both containing a purine and a formylaminopyrimidine (Fapy) fragment. The photoreaction of TI with uridine gave two regioisomeric photoproducts identified as diribosides containing either 5- or 6-(purin-6-yl)uracil as aglycones. A multistep mechanism leading to the stable photoproducts is proposed. In the first step of the mechanism, the C=S group of the excited TI undergoes a [2 + 2] cycloaddition regioselectively to the N(7)=C(8) bond of the purine ring or adds in a non-regioselective manner to the C(5)=C(6) bond of uracil. The unstable photoproducts thus formed undergo a series of dark reactions at room temperature. The photocycloaddition reactions originate from the excited T1 state of TI. This conclusion is supported by a combination of evidence from reaction quenching studies using both steady-state quantum yield determinations and kinetics results from nanosecond laser flash photolysis. The T1 state of TI is quenched by other TI molecules in their S0 state (self-quenching) and also by uridine and adenosine, all with large rate constants (0.8-5) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The quantum yields of the reactions are in general very low (phi(R) < or = 8 x 10(-3)). The sources of the inefficiency in the photocycloaddition of TI to uridine and adenosine are discussed. The photoproducts containing the Fapy residue undergo deformylation and

  3. Thermodynamics of binding of divalent magnesium and manganese to uridine phosphates: implications for diabetes-related hypomagnesaemia and carbohydrate biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohl Nicola L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the necessity of divalent magnesium and manganese for full activity of sugar nucleotidyltransferases and glycosyltransferases is well known, the role of these metal cations in binding the substrates (uridine 5'-triphosphate, glucose-1-phosphate, N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate, and uridine 5'-diphosphate glucose, products (uridine 5'-diphosphate glucose, uridine 5'-diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine, pyrophosphate, and uridine 5'-diphosphate, and/or enzyme is not clearly understood. Results Using isothermal titration calorimetry we have studied the binding relationship between the divalent metals, magnesium and manganese, and uridine 5'-phosphates to determine the role these metals play in carbohydrate biosynthesis. It was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC data that Mg+2 and Mn+2 are most tightly bound to PPi, Kb = 41,000 ± 2000 M-1 and 28,000 ± 50,000 M-1 respectively, and UTP, Kb = 14,300 ± 700 M-1 and 13,000 ± 2,000 M-1 respectively. Conclusion Our results indicate that the formal charge state of the phosphate containing substrates determine the binding strength. Divalent metal cations magnesium and manganese showed similar trends in binding to the sugar substrates. Enthalpy of binding values were all determined to be endothermic except for the PPi case. In addition, entropy of binding values were all found to be positive. From this data, we discuss the role of magnesium and manganese in both sugar nucleotidyltransferase and glycosyltransferase reactions, the differences in metal-bound substrates expected under normal physiological metal concentrations and those of hypomagnesaemia, and the implications for drug design.

  4. Parallel solution-phase synthesis and general biological activity of a uridine antibiotic analog library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukha-chafiq, Omar; Reynolds, Robert C

    2014-05-12

    A small library of ninety four uridine antibiotic analogs was synthesized, under the Pilot Scale Library (PSL) Program of the NIH Roadmap initiative, from amine 2 and carboxylic acids 33 and 77 in solution-phase fashion. Diverse aldehyde, sulfonyl chloride, and carboxylic acid reactant sets were condensed to 2, leading after acid-mediated hydrolysis, to the targeted compounds 3-32 in good yields and high purity. Similarly, treatment of 33 with diverse amines and sulfonamides gave 34-75. The coupling of the amino terminus of d-phenylalanine methyl ester to the free 5'-carboxylic acid moiety of 33 followed by sodium hydroxide treatment led to carboxylic acid analog 77. Hydrolysis of this material gave analog 78. The intermediate 77 served as the precursor for the preparation of novel dipeptidyl uridine analogs 79-99 through peptide coupling reactions to diverse amine reactants. None of the described compounds show significant anticancer or antimalarial acivity. A number of samples exhibited a variety of promising inhibitory, agonist, antagonist, or activator properties with enzymes and receptors in primary screens supplied and reported through the NIH MLPCN program.

  5. Strategies for equilibrium maintenance during single leg standing on a wobble board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Priscila de Brito; Oliveira, Anderson Souza; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Laessoe, Uffe; Kersting, Uwe Gustav

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and compare movement strategies used to maintain balance while single leg standing on either a firm surface (FS) or on a wobble board (WB). In 17 healthy men, retroreflective markers were positioned on the xiphoid process and nondominant lateral malleolus to calculate trunk and contralateral-leg excursion (EXC) and velocity (VEL), and center of pressure (CoP) EXC and VEL during FS on a force platform. From the WB test, standing time (WBTIME) was determined and the board's angular EXC and VEL were calculated from four markers on the WB as surrogate measures for CoP dynamics. Electromyographic average rectified values (ARV) from eight leg and thigh muscles of the supporting limb were calculated for both tasks. WB ARV amplitudes were normalized with respect to the value of FS ARV and presented significantly higher peroneus longus and biceps femoris activity (p<0.05). WB standing time was correlated to trunk sagittal plane velocity (r=-0.73 at p=0.016) and excursion (r=-0.67 at p=0.03). CoP and WB angular movement measures were weakly and not significantly correlated between tasks. This lack of correlation indicates that WB balance maintenance requires movement beyond the ankle strategy as described for the FS task. WB standing likely demands different biomechanical and neuromuscular control strategies, which has immediate implications for the significance of WB tests in contrast to FS balance tests. Differences in control strategies will also have implications for the understanding of mechanisms for rehabilitation training using such devices. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Thermally induced double proton transfer in GG and wobble GT base pairs: A possible origin of the mutagenic guanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padermshoke, Adchara; Katsumoto, Yukiteru; Masaki, Ryuta; Aida, Misako

    2008-05-01

    Double proton transfer (DPT) reactions in three guanine-guanine (GG) dimers, a guanine-thymine wobble (wGT) base pair, and a model compound 4(3H)-pyrimidinone (k-PP) dimer have been investigated using ab initio MO calculations and liquid-phase infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The calculations suggest that the DPT processes in these dimers are energetically accessible. Temperature-dependent IR measurements of the model compound reveal that slight thermal energy can induce the DPT reaction, and hence the enol tautomer can result. The present study demonstrates a potential pathway for the generation of the mutagenic amino-enol form of guanine.

  7. Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate affects contractility of mouse aorta and decreases blood pressure in conscious rats and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Hristovska, A; Wolff, H

    2010-01-01

    Aim:  In the anaesthetized rat, uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up(4) A) is a circulating, endothelium-derived vasoconstrictor presumably operating as such in un-anaesthetized animals. The present study investigated the in vivo effects of Up(4) A in conscious mice and rats, and its direct...

  8. Synthesis, characterization and properties of uridine 5′-(α-d-apio-d-furanosyl pyrophosphate)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindel, Paul K.; Watson, Ronald R.

    1973-01-01

    1. A method was developed for synthesizing UDP-apiose [uridine 5′-(α-d-apio-d-furanosyl pyrophosphate)] from UDP-glucuronic acid [uridine 5′-(α-d-glucopyranosyluronic acid pyrophosphate)] in 62% yield with the enzyme UDP-glucuronic acid cyclase. 2. UDP-apiose had the same mobility as uridine 5′-(α-d-xylopyranosyl pyrophosphate) when chromatographed on paper and when subjected to paper electrophoresis at pH5.8. When [3H]UDP-[U-14C]glucuronic acid was used as the substrate for UDP-glucuronic acid cyclase, the 3H/14C ratio in the reaction product was that expected if d-apiose remained attached to the uridine. In separate experiments doubly labelled reaction product was: (a) hydrolysed at pH2 and 100°C for 15min; (b) degraded at pH8.0 and 100°C for 3min; (c) used as a substrate in the enzymic synthesis of [14C]apiin. In each type of experiment the reaction products were isolated and identified and were found to be those expected if [3H]UDP-[U-14C]apiose was the starting compound. 3. Chemical characterization established that the product containing d-[U-14C]apiose and phosphate formed on alkaline degradation of UDP-[U-14C]apiose was α-d-[U-14C]apio-d-furanosyl 1:2-cyclic phosphate. 4. Chemical characterization also established that the product containing d-[U-14C]apiose and phosphate formed on acid hydrolysis of α-d-[U-14C]apio-d-furanosyl 1:2-cyclic phosphate was d-[U-14C]apiose 2-phosphate. 5. The half-life periods for the degradation of UDP-[U-14C]apiose to α-d-[U-14C]apio-d-furanosyl 1:2-cyclic phosphate and UMP at pH8.0 and 80°C, at pH8.0 and 25°C and at pH8.0 and 4°C were 31.6s, 97.2min and 16.5h respectively. The half-life period for the hydrolysis of UDP-[U-14C]-apiose to d-[U-14C]apiose and UDP at pH3.0 and 40°C was 4.67min. After 20 days at pH6.2–6.6 and 4°C, 17% of the starting UDP-[U-14C]apiose was degraded to α-d-[U-14C]apio-d-furanosyl 1:2-cyclic phosphate and UMP and 23% was hydrolysed to d-[U-14C]apiose and UDP. After 120 days at p

  9. Comparison of the novel vasodilator uridine triphosphate and adenosine for the measurement of fractional flow reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, Jacob; Jensen, Jan; Galatius, Søren

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Examination of the fractional flow reserve (FFR) responses of intravenous (IV) adenosine with increasing doses of intracoronary (IC) adenosine versus IC uridine triphosphate (UTP) in patients with coronary artery disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured FFR in 25 patients during continuous IV...... and IC infusion (using a microcatheter in the coronary ostium). Standard IV adenosine infusion (140 μg/kg/min) was compared to 8 equimolar incremental doses of IC UTP and IC adenosine (20, 40, 60, 80, 160, 240, 320 and 640 μg/min) in a randomized order. Across all doses, ΔFFR[IC UTP - IC adenosine......] was -0.038 ± 0.008, Padenosine (FFR[IV adenosine] = 0.72 ± 0.05; P=.02) and IC adenosine (FFR[IC adenosine] = 0.68 ± 0.05; P=.03). Furthermore, UTP had significantly fewer side effects compared...

  10. Structure of uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Thomas E; Gardberg, Anna S; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Zhang, Yang; Staker, Bart L; Myler, Peter J; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-05-01

    Uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP) catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of UDP-GlcNAc, which is involved in cell-wall biogenesis in plants and fungi and in protein glycosylation. Small-molecule inhibitors have been developed against UAP from Trypanosoma brucei that target an allosteric pocket to provide selectivity over the human enzyme. A 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure was determined of UAP from Entamoeba histolytica, an anaerobic parasitic protozoan that causes amoebic dysentery. Although E. histolytica UAP exhibits the same three-domain global architecture as other UAPs, it appears to lack three α-helices at the N-terminus and contains two amino acids in the allosteric pocket that make it appear more like the enzyme from the human host than that from the other parasite T. brucei. Thus, allosteric inhibitors of T. brucei UAP are unlikely to target Entamoeba UAPs.

  11. YibK is the 2'-O-methyltransferase TrmL that modifies the wobble nucleotide in Escherichia coli tRNA(Leu) isoacceptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Villarroya, Magda; Douthwaite, Stephen Roger

    2010-01-01

    K methylation reduces the efficiency of codon-wobble base interaction, as demonstrated in an amber suppressor supP system. Inactivation of yibK had no detectable effect on steady-state growth rate, although a distinct disadvantage was noted in multiple-round, mixed-population growth experiments, suggesting...

  12. Ultrastructural and cytochemical changes in the respiratory compartment of the lungs in rats after combined treatment with fine silicon dioxide powder and uridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebkova, N P; Baranov, V I

    2004-06-01

    Electron microscopy and cytochemical study of alveolar tissue of rat lungs were performed at the early stage after intratracheal treatment with fine silicon dioxide powder. The preparation was administered to animals receiving or not receiving intravenous injection of uridine. Dust particles permeated the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nuclei of cells in the air-blood barrier of the alveoli. Uridine decreased the severity of dust-induced damage to cells and increased intracellular glycogen content.

  13. Rapid determination of rat plasma uridine levels by HPLC-ESI-MS utilizing the Captiva plates for sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marta G; Palandra, Joe; Shobe, Eric M

    2003-06-01

    A rapid, accurate and precise HPLC-ESI-MS method for the determination of rat plasma uridine concentrations was developed and is described here. Sample preparation involves methanol precipitation of plasma proteins in a 96-well Captiva protein precipitation filter plate. A clear extract is drawn through the filter plate with vacuum, followed by evaporation of the extract and subsequent reconstitution prior to chromatography on a reversed-phase column with an aqueous mobile phase [0.1% (v/v) glacial acetic acid]. Detection was accomplished by positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A calibration curve ranging in concentration from 0.78 to 25 microM was constructed by best-fit, 1/x weighting linear regression analysis of the calibration standard concentrations vs peak height ratios of analyte with internal standard. The correlation coefficient was >0.995. The overall assay accuracy as shown by the back-calculated concentrations of the calibration curve ranged from 96.6 to 103% with RSD ranging from 4.5 to 20%. While this assay method was developed for the determination of uridine in rat plasma, it could be readily adapted for determination of uridine in plasma from other species, such as human. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS) and X-chromosome deletion in fetal mummification in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Mohamed Elshabrawy; Nakao, Toshihiko; Nishibori, Masahide

    2006-01-01

    Ten mummified fetuses were tested for the deficiency of uridine monophosphate synthase (DUMPS), which is known to contribute to the embryonic and fetal mortality in cattle. Genomic DNAs of the mummified fetuses were extracted from tissue samples collected from the mummies and were amplified by GenomiPhi DNA amplification kit. UMPS gene of the mummies was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with DUMPS primers. Out of ten mummies examined, two fetuses were heterozygous (carriers) for DUMPS as indicated by the presences of three bands of 89, 53 and 36 bp. Estimated stage of gestation when the death occurred in the two mummies was 3.5 and 2.5 months, respectively. The other fetuses exhibited only two bands of 53 and 36 bp on the polyacrylamide gel indicated that they were normal. On the other hand, all the mummies were sexed using AMX/Y primers. Specific regions of Y and X chromosomes were amplified by PCR using AMX/Y. The expected 280 bp fragment in the female sample and the 280 and 217 bp in the male sample were observed. Nine mummies had a normal X and Y chromosome bands; however, the other mummified fetus exhibited only Y chromosome band, while the constitutive X chromosome fragment was missing. The estimated stage of gestation when the death occurred in this mummified fetus was 100 days. This might be the first report of DUMPS and X-chromosome deletion at the amelogenin gene in bovine-mummified fetuses in Japan.

  15. The uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases: quantitative structure-activity relationships for hydroxyl polychlorinated biphenyl substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Degao [Dalian University of Technology, Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian (China)

    2005-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs), which relate the glucuronidation of hydroxyl polychlorinated biphenyls (OH-PCBs) - catalyzed by the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) - to their physicochemical properties and molecular structural parameters, can be used to predict the rate constants and interpret the mechanism of glucuronidation. In this study, QSARs have been developed that use 23 semi-empirical calculated quantum chemical descriptors to predict the logarithms of the constants 1/K{sub m} and V{sub max}, related to enzyme kinetics. A partial least squares regression method was used to select the optimal set of descriptors to minimize the multicollinearity between the descriptors, as well as to maximize the cross-validated coefficient (Q{sup 2} {sub cum}) values. The key descriptors affecting log(1/K{sub m}) were E{sub lumo}- E{sub homo} (the energy gap between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital) and q{sub C}{sup -} (the largest negative net atomic charge on a carbon atom), while the key descriptors affecting log V{sub max} were the polarizability {alpha}, the Connolly solvent-excluded volume (CSEV), and logP (the logarithm of the partition coefficient for octanol/water). From the results obtained it can be concluded that hydrophobic and electronic aspects of OH-PCBs are important in the glucuronidation of OH-PCBs. (orig.)

  16. Uridine 5'-triphosphate promotes in vitro Schwannoma cell migration through matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloa Lamarca

    Full Text Available In response to peripheral nerve injury, Schwann cells adopt a migratory phenotype and modify the extracellular matrix to make it permissive for cell migration and axonal re-growth. Uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP and other nucleotides are released during nerve injury and activate purinergic receptors expressed on the Schwann cell surface, but little is known about the involvement of purine signalling in wound healing. We studied the effect of UTP on Schwannoma cell migration and wound closure and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. We found that UTP treatment induced Schwannoma cell migration through activation of P2Y2 receptors and through the increase of extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 activation and expression. Knockdown P2Y2 receptor or MMP-2 expression greatly reduced wound closure and MMP-2 activation induced by UTP. MMP-2 activation evoked by injury or UTP was also mediated by phosphorylation of all 3 major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: JNK, ERK1/2, and p38. Inhibition of these MAPK pathways decreased both MMP-2 activation and cell migration. Interestingly, MAPK phosphorylation evoked by UTP exhibited a biphasic pattern, with an early transient phosphorylation 5 min after treatment, and a late and sustained phosphorylation that appeared at 6 h and lasted up to 24 h. Inhibition of MMP-2 activity selectively blocked the late, but not the transient, phase of MAPK activation. These results suggest that MMP-2 activation and late MAPK phosphorylation are part of a positive feedback mechanism to maintain the migratory phenotype for wound healing. In conclusion, our findings show that treatment with UTP stimulates in vitro Schwannoma cell migration and wound repair through a MMP-2-dependent mechanism via P2Y2 receptors and MAPK pathway activation.

  17. Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and a common mutation of the bilirubin uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase gene in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaba, K; Kimura, T; Sasaki, A; Tanabe, S; Wakabayashi, T; Hiroi, M; Yasumura, S; Maki, K; Aikawa, S; Hayasaka, K

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, which is prevalent among Asian peoples, has been considered as a physiological phenomenon, and its metabolic basis has not been clearly explained. Gilbert syndrome is a common inherited disease of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia due to decreased bilirubin uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (B-UGT), and its role in neonatal jaundice has recently been considered. We have previously reported that the Gly71Arg mutation of the B-UGT gene associated with Gilbert syndrome is prevalent in Japanese, Korean, and Chinese populations and was more frequently detected in neonates with severe hyperbilirubinemia than in control subjects. We have studied 159 Japanese full-term neonates, evaluating the relationship between the B-UGT genotype and the severity of jaundice, as assessed with a transcutaneous bilirubinometer. The gene frequency of the Gly71Arg mutation in these neonates was 0.19, and neonates carrying the Gly71Arg mutation had significantly increased bilirubin levels on days 2-4, manifested in a gene dose-dependent manner. The frequency of the Gly71Arg mutation was 0.47 in the neonates who required phototherapy (i.e., those with more severe hyperbilirubinemia), significantly higher than 0.16 in the neonates who did not require the therapy. The gene frequency of the TA repeat promoter polymorphism, the (TA)7 mutation, was 0.07, and neonates carrying this mutation did not have an increase in bilirubin. These results suggested that the Gly71Arg mutation contributes to the high incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in Japanese.

  18. Feature extraction of micro-motion frequency and the maximum wobble angle in a small range of missile warhead based on micro-Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Jiang, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    Micro-Doppler effect is induced by the micro-motion dynamics of the radar target itself or any structure on the target. In this paper, a simplified cone-shaped model for ballistic missile warhead with micro-nutation is established, followed by the theoretical formula of micro-nutation is derived. It is confirmed that the theoretical results are identical to simulation results by using short-time Fourier transform. Then we propose a new method for nutation period extraction via signature maximum energy fitting based on empirical mode decomposition and short-time Fourier transform. The maximum wobble angle is also extracted by distance approximate approach in a small range of wobble angle, which is combined with the maximum likelihood estimation. By the simulation studies, it is shown that these two feature extraction methods are both valid even with low signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Stiffness of a wobbling mass models analysed by a smooth orthogonal decomposition of the skin movement relative to the underlying bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Raphaël; Jacquelin, Eric

    2017-09-06

    The so-called soft tissue artefacts and wobbling masses have both been widely studied in biomechanics, however most of the time separately, from either a kinematics or a dynamics point of view. As such, the estimation of the stiffness of the springs connecting the wobbling masses to the rigid-body model of the lower limb, based on the in vivo displacements of the skin relative to the underling bone, has not been performed yet. For this estimation, the displacements of the skin markers in the bone-embedded coordinate systems are viewed as a proxy for the wobbling mass movement. The present study applied a structural vibration analysis method called smooth orthogonal decomposition to estimate this stiffness from retrospective simultaneous measurements of skin and intra-cortical pin markers during running, walking, cutting and hopping. For the translations about the three axes of the bone-embedded coordinate systems, the estimated stiffness coefficients (i.e. between 2.3kN/m and 55.5kN/m) as well as the corresponding forces representing the connection between bone and skin (i.e. up to 400N) and corresponding frequencies (i.e. in the band 10-30Hz) were in agreement with the literature. Consistently with the STA descriptions, the estimated stiffness coefficients were found subject- and task-specific. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-01-01

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2′-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2′-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 Å resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an α/β monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild type SpUP showed that substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is about sevenfold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies on active site mutant SpUP showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4. PMID:21707079

  1. Uridine 5'-diphosphate-xylose: anthocyanidin 3-O-glucose-xylosyltransferase from petals of Matthiola incana R.Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusch, M

    1986-12-01

    Petals of genetically defined lines of Matthiola incana R.Br. contain a glycosyltransferase which catalyzes the transfer of the xylosyl moiety of uridine 5'-diphosphate-xylose to the glucose of cyanidin 3-glucoside. The enzyme also uses 3-glucosides of pelargonidin and delphinidin, cyanidin 3-(p-coumaroyl)-glucoside and 3-(caffeoyl)-glucoside as substrates. The xylosyltransferase exhibits a pH optimum of 6.5. The enzyme activity depends on the stage of bud and flower development. Accumulation of cyanidin 3-glucoside during flower development is correlated with xylosyltransferase activity.

  2. Altered purinergic signaling in uridine adenosine tetraphosphate-induced coronary relaxation in swine with metabolic derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhichao; Sorop, Oana; de Beer, Vincent J; Heinonen, Ilkka; Cheng, Caroline; Jan Danser, A H; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2017-05-24

    We previously demonstrated that uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A) induces potent and partially endothelium-dependent relaxation in the healthy porcine coronary microvasculature. We subsequently showed that Up4A-induced porcine coronary relaxation was impaired via downregulation of P1 receptors after myocardial infarction. In view of the deleterious effect of metabolic derangement on vascular function, we hypothesized that the coronary vasodilator response to Up4A is impaired in metabolic derangement, and that the involvement of purinergic receptor subtypes and endothelium-derived vasoactive factors (EDVFs) is altered. Coronary small arteries, dissected from the apex of healthy swine and swine 6 months after induction of diabetes with streptozotocin and fed a high-fat diet, were mounted on wire myographs. Up4A (10(-9)-10(-5) M)-induced coronary relaxation was maintained in swine with metabolic derangement compared to normal swine, despite impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation to bradykinin and despite blunted P2X7 receptor and NO-mediated vasodilator influences of Up4A. Moreover, a thromboxane-mediated vasoconstrictor influence was unmasked. In contrast, an increased Up4A-mediated vasodilator influence via P2Y1 receptors was observed, while, in response to Up4A, cytochrome P450 2C9 switched from producing vasoconstrictor to vasodilator metabolites in swine with metabolic derangement. Coronary vascular expression of A2A and P2X7 receptors as well as eNOS, as assessed with real-time PCR, was reduced in swine with metabolic derangement. In conclusion, although the overall coronary vasodilator response to Up4A was maintained in swine with metabolic derangement, the involvement of purinergic receptor subtypes and EDVF was markedly altered, revealing compensatory mechanisms among signaling pathways in Up4A-mediated coronary vasomotor influence in the early phase of metabolic derangement. Future studies are warranted to investigate the effects of severe

  3. Gut-brain and brain-gut axis in Parkinson's disease models: Effects of a uridine and fish oil diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pardo, Paula; Dodiya, Hemraj B; Broersen, Laus M; Douna, Hidde; van Wijk, Nick; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Garssen, Johan; Keshavarzian, Ali; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2017-03-09

    Recent investigations have focused on the potential role of gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The 'dual-hit' hypothesis of PD speculates that a putative pathogen enters the brain via two routes: the olfactory system and the GI system. Here, we investigated (1) whether local exposures of the neurotoxin rotenone in the gut or the brain of mice could induce PD-like neurological and GI phenotypes as well as a characteristic neuropathology in accordance with this 'dual-hit hypothesis' and (2) the effects of a diet containing uridine and fish oil providing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), in both models. Mice were given rotenone either orally or by an injection in the striatum. Dietary interventions were started 1 week before rotenone exposures. We found that (1) both oral and intrastriatal administration of rotenone induced similar PD-like motor deficits, dopaminergic cell loss, delayed intestinal transit, inflammation, and alpha-synuclein accumulation in the colon; (2) the uridine and DHA containing diet prevented rotenone-induced motor and GI dysfunctions in both models. The models suggest possible bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain for the genesis of PD-like phenotype and pathology. The dietary intervention may provide benefits in the prevention of motor and non-motor symptoms in PD.

  4. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  5. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  6. In Silico Discovery of Potential Uridine-Cytidine Kinase 2 Inhibitors from the Rhizome of Alpinia mutica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Malami

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Uridine-cytidine kinase 2 is implicated in uncontrolled proliferation of abnormal cells and it is a hallmark of cancer, therefore, there is need for effective inhibitors of this key enzyme. In this study, we employed the used of in silico studies to find effective UCK2 inhibitors of natural origin using bioinformatics tools. An in vitro kinase assay was established by measuring the amount of ADP production in the presence of ATP and 5-fluorouridine as a substrate. Molecular docking studies revealed an interesting ligand interaction with the UCK2 protein for both flavokawain B and alpinetin. Both compounds were found to reduce ADP production, possibly by inhibiting UCK2 activity in vitro. In conclusion, we have identified flavokawain B and alpinetin as potential natural UCK2 inhibitors as determined by their interactions with UCK2 protein using in silico molecular docking studies. This can provide information to identify lead candidates for further drug design and development.

  7. Effects of a wobble board-based therapeutic exergaming system for balance training on dynamic postural stability and intrinsic motivation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Diarmaid; Trakarnratanakul, Nanthana; Smyth, Barry; Caulfield, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial. To compare the effects of wobble board exercises with and without feedback provided through integrating the wobble board movement into a computer game system, by comparing changes in postural stability and motivation. Therapeutic exergaming systems may offer a solution to poor adherence to postural control exercise regimes by improving motivation levels during exercise performance. Twenty-two healthy adults, randomly assigned to an exergaming group (n = 11) and a control group (n = 11), completed 12 exercise sessions. Dynamic postural stability was quantified at baseline and follow-up using the star excursion balance test and the dynamic postural stability index during a jump-landing task. Intrinsic motivation was measured at baseline using the Self-Motivation Inventory and at follow-up using the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. Star excursion balance test scores showed a statistically significant (PIntrinsic Motivation Inventory showed significantly higher scores (PIntrinsic Motivation Inventory categories evaluated. The findings suggest that exercising with the therapeutic exergaming system showed similar improvements in dynamic postural stability and showed a greater level of interest and enjoyment when compared to a group doing similar balance training without the game system. Therapy, level 2b.

  8. Wobbly Corner: Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Lisa; Maklad, Rania; Dunne, Mick; Grace, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    During a final seminar with BA year 4 science specialist trainee teachers, the authors posed a question about the difficulties associated with understanding magnetism. The ensuing discussion focused on a number of concerns commonly identified by students, which may also be of interest to classroom teachers teaching magnetism. Issues raised…

  9. 2'-O-[(4-CF3-triazol-1-yl)methyl] Uridine - A Sensitive (19)F NMR Sensor for the Detection of RNA Secondary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granqvist, Lotta; Virta, Pasi

    2015-08-21

    A sensitive uridine-derived sensor (viz., 2'-O-[(4-CF3-triazol-1-yl)methyl]uridine, 1) for (19)F NMR spectroscopic monitoring of RNA secondary structures is described. The applicability of 1 is demonstrated by monitoring the thermal denaturation of the following double and triple helical RNA models: (1) a miR 215 hairpin, (2) a poly U-A*U triple helix RNA (bearing two C-G*C(H+) interrupts), and (3) a polyadenylated nuclear-nuclear retention element complex. In these RNA models, the (19)F NMR shift of the 2'-O-(CF3-triazolylmethyl) group shows high sensitivity to secondary structural arrangements. Moreover, 1 favors the desired N-conformation, and its effect on both RNA duplex and triplex stabilities is marginal.

  10. Maternal dietary uridine causes, and deoxyuridine prevents, neural tube closure defects in a mouse model of folate-responsive neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiniova, Lucia; Field, Martha S; Finkelstein, Julia L; Perry, Cheryll A; Stover, Patrick J

    2015-04-01

    Folic acid prevents neural tube closure defects (NTDs), but the causal metabolic pathways have not been established. Serine hydroxymethyltransferase 1 (SHMT1) is an essential scaffold protein in folate-dependent de novo thymidylate synthesis in the nucleus. SHMT1-deficient mice provide a model to investigate folic acid-responsive NTDs wherein disruption of de novo thymidylate synthesis impairs neural tube closure. We examined the effects of maternal supplementation with the pyrimidine nucleosides uridine, thymidine, or deoxyuridine with and without folate deficiency on NTD incidence in the Shmt1 mouse model. Shmt1(+/+) and Shmt1(-/-) female mice fed folate-replete or folate-deficient diets and supplemented with uridine, thymidine, or deoxyuridine were bred, and litters (n = 10-23 per group) were examined for the presence of NTDs. Biomarkers of impaired folate status and metabolism were measured, including plasma nucleosides, hepatic uracil content, maternal plasma folate concentrations, and incorporation of nucleoside precursors into DNA. Shmt1(+/-) and Shmt1(-/-) embryos from dams fed the folate-deficient diet were susceptible to NTDs. No NTDs were observed in litters from dams fed the folate-deficient diet supplemented with deoxyuridine. Surprisingly, uridine supplementation increased NTD incidence, independent of embryo genotype and dietary folic acid. These dietary nucleosides did not affect maternal hepatic uracil accumulation in DNA but did affect plasma folate concentrations. Maternal deoxyuridine supplementation prevented NTDs in dams fed the folate-deficient diet, whereas maternal uridine supplementation increased NTD incidence, independent of folate and embryo genotype. These findings provide new insights into the metabolic impairments and mechanisms of folate-responsive NTDs resulting from decreased Shmt1 expression. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Synthesis and properties of triplex-forming oligonucleotides containing 2'-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-5-(3-aminoprop-1-ynyl)-uridine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Chenguang; Xiao, Qiang; Brennan, Lavinia

    2010-01-01

    2'-O-(2-Methoxyethyl)-5-(3-aminoprop-1-ynyl)-uridine phosphoramidite (MEPU) has been synthesized from d-ribose and 5-iodouracil and incorporated into triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) by automated solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. The TFOs gave very high triplex stability with their ta...... with their target duplexes as measured by ultraviolet/fluorescence melting and DNase I footprinting. The incorporation of MEPU into TFOs renders them resistant to degradation by serum nucleases....

  12. A new and efficient approach for construction of uridine/uracil auxotrophic mutants in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khuyen Thi; Ho, Quynh Ngoc; Do, Loc Thi Binh Xuan; Mai, Linh Thi Dam; Pham, Duc-Ngoc; Tran, Huyen Thi Thanh; Le, Diep Hong; Nguyen, Huy Quang; Tran, Van-Tuan

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a filamentous fungus widely used in food industry and as a microbial cell factory for recombinant protein production. Due to the inherent resistance of A. oryzae to common antifungal compounds, genetic transformation of this mold usually requires auxotrophic mutants. In this study, we show that Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) method is very efficient for deletion of the pyrG gene in different Aspergillus oryzae wild-type strains to generate uridine/uracil auxotrophic mutants. Our data indicated that all the obtained uridine/uracil auxotrophic transformants, which are 5- fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA) resistant, exist as the pyrG deletion mutants. Using these auxotrophic mutants and the pyrG selectable marker for genetic transformation via A. tumefaciens, we could get about 1060 transformants per 106 fungal spores. In addition, these A. oryzae mutants were also used successfully for expression of the DsRed fluorescent reporter gene under control of the A. oryzae amyB promoter by the ATMT method, which resulted in obvious red transformants on agar plates. Our work provides a new and effective approach for constructing the uridine/uracil auxotrophic mutants in the importantly industrial fungus A. oryzae. This strategy appears to be applicable to other filamentous fungi to develop similar genetic transformation systems based on auxotrophic/nutritional markers for food-grade recombinant applications.

  13. AM-2201 Inhibits Multiple Cytochrome P450 and Uridine 5′-Diphospho-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hyun Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AM-2201 is a synthetic cannabinoid that acts as a potent agonist at cannabinoid receptors and its abuse has increased. However, there are no reports of the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on human cytochrome P450 (CYP or uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT enzymes. We evaluated the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on the activities of eight major human CYPs (1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and six major human UGTs (1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B7 enzymes in pooled human liver microsomes using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry to investigate drug interaction potentials of AM-2201. AM-2201 potently inhibited CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4′-hydroxylation, CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylation, UGT1A3-catalyzed chenodeoxycholic acid 24-acyl-glucuronidation, and UGT2B7-catalyzed naloxone 3-glucuronidation with IC50 values of 3.9, 4.0, 4.3, and 10.0 μM, respectively, and showed mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation with a Ki value of 2.1 μM. It negligibly inhibited CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, and UGT1A9 activities at 50 μM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results indicate that AM-2201 needs to be examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to its potent inhibition of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and UGT2B7 enzyme activities.

  14. Suppressing ABA uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferase (SlUGT75C1) alters fruit ripening and the stress response in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yufei; Ji, Kai; Liang, Bin; Du, Yangwei; Jiang, Li; Wang, Juan; Kai, Wenbin; Zhang, Yushu; Zhai, Xiawan; Chen, Pei; Wang, Hongqing; Leng, Ping

    2017-08-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) glucose conjugation mediated by uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferases (UGTs) is an important pathway in regulating ABA homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated three tomato SlUGTs that are highly expressed in fruit during ripening, and these SlUGTs were localized to the cytoplasm and cell nucleus. Among these three UGTs, SlUGT75C1 catalyzes the glucosylation of both ABA and IAA in vitro; SlUGT76E1 can only catalyze the conjugation of ABA; and SlUGT73C4 cannot glycosylate either ABA or IAA. Therefore, SlUGT75C1 was selected for further investigation. SlUGT75C1 RNA interference significantly up-regulated the expression level of SlCYP707A2, which encodes an ABA 8'-hydroxylase but did not affect the expression of SlNCED1, which encodes a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. Suppression of SlUGT75C1 significantly accelerated fruit ripening by enhancing ABA levels and promoting the early release of ethylene. SlUGT75C1-RNAi altered the expression of fruit ripening genes (genes involved in ethylene release and cell wall catabolism). SlUGT75C1-RNAi seeds showed delayed germination and root growth compared with wild-type as well as increased sensitivity to exogenous ABA. SlUGT75C1-RNAi plants were also more resistant to drought stress. These results demonstrated that SlUGT75C1 plays a crucial role in ABA-mediated fruit ripening, seed germination, and drought responses in tomato. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. based conservation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mcd.v10i2.1. Increasing women's par- ticipation in community- based conservation: key to success? Ensuring that both men and women benefit equitably from conservation and development programs is likely to increase the long-term success of both conservation and development goals. However ...

  16. Human tRNALys3UUU is Pre-Structured by Natural Modifications for Cognate and Wobble Codon Binding through Keto-EnolTautomerism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendeix, Franck A. P.; Murphy, Frank V.; Cantara, William A.; Leszczyńska, Grażyna; Gustilo, Estella M.; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    Human tRNALys3UUU (htRNALys3UUU) decodes the lysine codons AAA and AAG during translation, and also plays a crucial role as the primer for HIV-1 reverse transcription. The post-transcriptional modifications 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U34), 2-methylthio-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ms2t6A37)and pseudouridine (ψ39) in the tRNA'santicodon loop are critical for ribosomal binding and HIV-1 reverse transcription. To understand the importance of modified nucleoside contributions, the structure and function of this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop domain were determined with these modifications at positions 34, 37 and 39, respectively (hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U37;ms2t6A37;ψ39). Ribosome binding assays in vitrorevealed that the hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A37;ψ39bound AAA and AAG codons, whereas binding of the unmodified ASLLys3UUU was barely detectable. The UV hyperchromicity, the circular dichroism and the structural analyses indicated that ψ39 enhanced the thermodynamic stability of the ASL through base stacking while ms2t6A37 restrained the anticodon to adopt an open loop conformation that is required for ribosomal binding. The NMR-restrained molecular dynamics derived solution structure revealed that the modifications provided an open, ordered loop for codon binding. The crystal structures of the hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A37;ψ39 bound to the 30S ribosomal subunit with each codon in the A site showed that the modified nucleotides mcm5s2U34 and ms2t6A37 participate in the stability of the anticodon/codon interaction. Importantly, the mcm5s2U34•G3 wobble base pair is in the Watson-Crick geometry, requiring unusual hydrogen bonding to G in which mcm5s2U34 must shift from the keto to enol form. The results unambiguously demonstrate that modifications pre-structurethe anticodonas a key prerequisite for efficient and accurate recognition of cognate and wobble codons. PMID:22227389

  17. Human tRNA(Lys3)(UUU) is pre-structured by natural modifications for cognate and wobble codon binding through keto-enol tautomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendeix, Franck A P; Murphy, Frank V; Cantara, William A; Leszczyńska, Grażyna; Gustilo, Estella M; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F

    2012-03-02

    Human tRNA(Lys3)(UUU) (htRNA(Lys3)(UUU)) decodes the lysine codons AAA and AAG during translation and also plays a crucial role as the primer for HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) reverse transcription. The posttranscriptional modifications 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U(34)), 2-methylthio-N(6)-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ms(2)t(6)A(37)), and pseudouridine (Ψ(39)) in the tRNA's anticodon domain are critical for ribosomal binding and HIV-1 reverse transcription. To understand the importance of modified nucleoside contributions, we determined the structure and function of this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop (ASL) domain with these modifications at positions 34, 37, and 39, respectively (hASL(Lys3)(UUU)-mcm(5)s(2)U(34);ms(2)t(6)A(37);Ψ(39)). Ribosome binding assays in vitro revealed that the hASL(Lys3)(UUU)-mcm(5)s(2)U(34);ms(2)t(6)A(37);Ψ(39) bound AAA and AAG codons, whereas binding of the unmodified ASL(Lys3)(UUU) was barely detectable. The UV hyperchromicity, the circular dichroism, and the structural analyses indicated that Ψ(39) enhanced the thermodynamic stability of the ASL through base stacking while ms(2)t(6)A(37) restrained the anticodon to adopt an open loop conformation that is required for ribosomal binding. The NMR-restrained molecular-dynamics-derived solution structure revealed that the modifications provided an open, ordered loop for codon binding. The crystal structures of the hASL(Lys3)(UUU)-mcm(5)s(2)U(34);ms(2)t(6)A(37);Ψ(39) bound to the 30S ribosomal subunit with each codon in the A site showed that the modified nucleotides mcm(5)s(2)U(34) and ms(2)t(6)A(37) participate in the stability of the anticodon-codon interaction. Importantly, the mcm(5)s(2)U(34)·G(3) wobble base pair is in the Watson-Crick geometry, requiring unusual hydrogen bonding to G in which mcm(5)s(2)U(34) must shift from the keto to the enol form. The results unambiguously demonstrate that modifications pre-structure the anticodon as a key

  18. Interaction of 3‧,4‧,6‧-trimyristoyl-uridine derivative as potential anticancer drug with phospholipids of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, Luiz Fernando Grosso; Jaroque, Guilherme Nuñez; Escobar, Jhon Fernando Berrío; Giordani, Cristiano; Martinez, Alejandro Martinez; Fernández, Diana Margarita Márquez; Castelli, Francesco; Sarpietro, Maria Grazia; Caseli, Luciano

    2017-12-01

    Investigating the mechanism of action of drugs whose pharmaceutical activity is associated with cell membranes is fundamental to comprehending the biochemical and biophysical processes that occur on membrane surfaces. In this work, we investigated the interaction of an ester-type derivative of uridine, 3‧,4‧,6‧-trimyristoyl uridine, with models for cell membranes formed by lipid monolayers at the air-water interface. For that, selected lipids have been chosen in order to mimic tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. For mixed monolayers with 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) or 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine (DPPS), the surface pressure-area isotherms exhibited a noticeable shift to lower areas in relation to the areas predicted for ideal mixtures, indicating a condensation of the monolayer structure. Changes in the viscoelastic properties of the interfacial film could be inferred by analyzing the compressibility modulus of the monolayer. Structural and morphological changes were also evidenced by using vibrational spectroscopy and Brewster angle microscopy, respectively, with distinctive effects on DPPC and DPPS. As conclusion we can state that the lipid composition of the monolayer modulates the interaction with this lipophilic drug, which may have important implications in understanding how this drug acts on specific sites of the cellular membrane.

  19. Transient conductivity OF 1,3-dimethyluracil, uridine and 3-methyluridine in aqueous solution following 20-ns laser excitation at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görner, Helmut; Currell, Leslie J.

    1996-09-01

    Uridine, 3-methyluridine and 1,3-dimethyluracil in aqueous solution were studied by timeresolved conductimetry after excitation at 248 nm by 20-ns laser pulses. The conductivity signal increases to the maximum value at the pulse end (Δκ m) and decreases then with time, depending on the saturating gas (Ar, N 2O, O 2 or McCI) and pH. The Δκ m signal is suggested to originate from hydrated electrons (e aq-) and protons, the latter resulting from radical cations after rapid reaction with water. Biphotonic photoionization occurs in the whole pH range 3-11 with a quantum yield of 0.016 or smaller for laser intensities of ⩽ 8 MW/cm 2. The reaction of eaq with uncharged bases in Ar-saturated solution at pH 5-8 generates radical anions which are subsequently protonated. The neutralization reaction kinetics of the uracil derivatives depend essentially on the transient proton concentration and lead to the disappearance of most of the conductivity (>90%) within a few microseconds or less in neutral or acidic solution, respectively. For 3-methyluridine and uridine after neutralization, the presence of a long-lived species with acidic properties was observed (in small yield) upon biphotonic (but not monophotonic) excitation. The time-resolved conductivity pattern in the alkaline pH range is different for each of the three pyrimidines, depending essentially on the generation or consumption of OH - in the radical termination reactions.

  20. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  1. Reshaping conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Mikkel; Danielsen, Finn; Ngaga, Yonika

    2013-01-01

    members strengthen the monitoring practices to their advantage, and to some extent move them beyond the reach of government agencies and conservation and development practitioners. This has led to outcomes that are of greater social and strategic value to communities than the original 'planned' benefits......, although the monitoring scheme has also to some extent become dominated by local 'conservation elites' who negotiate the terrain between the state and other community members. Our findings suggest that we need to move beyond simplistic assumptions of community strategies and incentives in participatory...... conservation and allow for more adaptive and politically explicit governance spaces in protected area management....

  2. Hearing Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    the federal standard. Footnote** See Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.95 "Occupational Noise Exposure." (Back to text) | USDOL | CONTACT INFORMATION | DISCLAIMER | 15 of 15 OSHA 3074 - Hearing Conservation

  3. Wildlife Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Spash, Clive L.; Aldred, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we consider how conservation has arisen as a key aspect of the reaction to human-initiated degradation and disappearance of ecosystems, wild lands. and wildlife. Concern over species extinction is given an historical perspective which shows the way in which pressure on wild and natural aspects of global ecology have changed in recent centuries. The role of conservation in the struggle to protect the environment is then analysed using underlying ethical arguments behind the econo...

  4. Austere conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bluwstein, Jevgeniy; Moyo, Francis; Kicheleri, Rose Peter

    2016-01-01

    . Our findings suggest that WMAs foster very limited ownership, participation and collective action at the community level, because WMA governance follows an austere logic of centralized control over key resources. Thus, we suggest that it is difficult to argue that WMAs are community-owned conservation...... initiatives until a genuinely devolved and more flexible conservation model is implemented to give space for popular participation in rule-making....

  5. Properties of 5- and/or 2-modified 2'-O-cyanoethyl uridine residue: 2'-O-cyanoethyl-5-propynyl-2-thiouridine as an efficient duplex stabilizing component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Yoshiaki; Miyasaka, Ryuta; Hirai, Kunihiro; Kanamori, Takashi; Tsunoda, Hirosuke; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Seio, Kohji; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2014-02-21

    We systematically synthesized eight types of 5- and/or 2-modified uridine derivatives and evaluated their effect on duplex stability. The incorporation of 2'-O-cyanoethyl-2-thio-5-propynyluridine (p(5)s(2)UOCE) into RNA was significantly effective for stabilization of RNA/RNA (+8.5 °C) and DNA/RNA (+10.4 °C) duplexes. These striking effects were maintained in oligonucleotides with different sequences or multiple incorporations. In addition, p(5)s(2)UOCE increased selectivity toward the correct AU Watson-Crick base pair over the most stable mismatched base pair in both RNA/RNA and DNA/RNA duplexes. Hence, p(5)s(2)UOCE could be useful for various applications of modified oligonucleotides that need high duplex stability and base pairing selectivity.

  6. Supplementation of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), vitamin D3 and uridine in combination with six weeks of cognitive and motor training in prepubescent children: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Solvejg Lis; Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Voigt, Camilla B.

    2017-01-01

    program with dietary supplementation consisting of 500 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 10 μg vitamin D3 and 1000 mg uridine (DDU-supplement) in 16 prepubescent children (age 8–11 years). Methods We designed a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study lasting 6 weeks in which DDU-supplement...... tests were performed. Results Fourteen of the 16 children completed the intervention and ingested the supplement as required. 6 weeks DDU-supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the blood concentration of vitamin D2+3 and DHA (p = 0.023 and p ...Background Learning and memory have been shown to be influenced by combination of dietary supplements and exercise in animal models, but there is little available evidence from human subjects. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effect of combining a motor- and cognitive exercise...

  7. The Biosynthesis of Capuramycin-type Antibiotics: IDENTIFICATION OF THE A-102395 BIOSYNTHETIC GENE CLUSTER, MECHANISM OF SELF-RESISTANCE, AND FORMATION OF URIDINE-5'-CARBOXAMIDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenlong; Goswami, Anwesha; Yang, Zhaoyong; Liu, Xiaodong; Green, Keith D; Barnard-Britson, Sandra; Baba, Satoshi; Funabashi, Masanori; Nonaka, Koichi; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Spork, Anatol P; Ducho, Christian; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie; Thorson, Jon S; Van Lanen, Steven G

    2015-05-29

    A-500359s, A-503083s, and A-102395 are capuramycin-type nucleoside antibiotics that were discovered using a screen to identify inhibitors of bacterial translocase I, an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan cell wall biosynthesis. Like the parent capuramycin, A-500359s and A-503083s consist of three structural components: a uridine-5'-carboxamide (CarU), a rare unsaturated hexuronic acid, and an aminocaprolactam, the last of which is substituted by an unusual arylamine-containing polyamide in A-102395. The biosynthetic gene clusters for A-500359s and A-503083s have been reported, and two genes encoding a putative non-heme Fe(II)-dependent α-ketoglutarate:UMP dioxygenase and an l-Thr:uridine-5'-aldehyde transaldolase were uncovered, suggesting that C-C bond formation during assembly of the high carbon (C6) sugar backbone of CarU proceeds from the precursors UMP and l-Thr to form 5'-C-glycyluridine (C7) as a biosynthetic intermediate. Here, isotopic enrichment studies with the producer of A-503083s were used to indeed establish l-Thr as the direct source of the carboxamide of CarU. With this knowledge, the A-102395 gene cluster was subsequently cloned and characterized. A genetic system in the A-102395-producing strain was developed, permitting the inactivation of several genes, including those encoding the dioxygenase (cpr19) and transaldolase (cpr25), which abolished the production of A-102395, thus confirming their role in biosynthesis. Heterologous production of recombinant Cpr19 and CapK, the transaldolase homolog involved in A-503083 biosynthesis, confirmed their expected function. Finally, a phosphotransferase (Cpr17) conferring self-resistance was functionally characterized. The results provide the opportunity to use comparative genomics along with in vivo and in vitro approaches to probe the biosynthetic mechanism of these intriguing structures. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. In silico analysis of the three-dimensional structures of the homodimer of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia Pseudotuberculosis in the ligand-free state and in a complex with 5-fluorouracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkov, A. A.; Sotnichenko, S. E.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2013-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis is an acute infectious disease characterized by a lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. A positive therapeutic effect can be achieved by selectively suppressing the activity of uridine phosphorylase from the causative agent of the disease Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The synergistic effect of a combination of the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil and antimicrobial drugs, which block the synthesis of pyrimidine bases, on the cells of pathogenic protozoa and bacteria is described in the literature. The three-dimensional structures of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) both in the ligand-free state and in complexes with pharmacological agents are unknown, which hinders the search for and design of selective inhibitors of YptUPh. The three-dimensional structure of the ligand-free homodimer of YptUPh was determined by homology-based molecular modeling. The three-dimensional structure of the subunit of the YptUPh molecule belongs to α/β proteins, and its topology is a three-layer α/β/α sandwich. The subunit monomer of the YptUPh molecule consists of 38% helices and 24% β strands. A model of the homodimer structure of YptUPh in a complex with 5-FU was obtained by the molecular docking. The position of 5-FU in the active site of the molecule is very consistent with the known data on the X-ray diffraction structures of other bacterial uridine phosphorylases (the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Salmonella typhimurium ( StUPh) with 5-FU, ID PDB: 4E1V and the complex of uridine phosphorylase from Escherichia coli ( EcUPh) with 5-FU and ribose 1-phosphate, ID PDB: 1RXC).

  9. Conservation endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen; Romero, L. Michael

    2017-01-01

    Endocrinologists can make significant contributions to conservation biology by helping to understand the mechanisms by which organisms cope with changing environments. Field endocrine techniques have advanced rapidly in recent years and can provide substantial information on the growth, stress, and reproductive status of individual animals, thereby providing insight into current and future responses of populations to changes in the environment. Environmental stressors and reproductive status can be detected nonlethally by measuring a number of endocrine-related endpoints, including steroids in plasma, living and nonliving tissue, urine, and feces. Information on the environmental or endocrine requirements of individual species for normal growth, development, and reproduction will provide critical information for species and ecosystem conservation. For many taxa, basic information on endocrinology is lacking, and advances in conservation endocrinology will require approaches that are both “basic” and “applied” and include integration of laboratory and field approaches.

  10. Colorful Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Some people only think about conservation on Earth Day. Being in the "art business" however, this author is always conscious of the many products she thinks get wasted when they could be reused, recycled, and restored--especially in a school building and art room. In this article, she describes an art lesson that allows students to paint…

  11. Creative conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentham, Roelof J.

    1968-01-01

    The increasing exploitation of our natural resources, the unlimited occupation of ever more new areas, and the intensification of land-use, make it necessary for us to expand the concept of conservation. But we also need to reconsider that concept itself. For the changing conditions in the

  12. [Conservation Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Each of the six instructional units deals with one aspect of conservation: forests, water, rangeland, minerals (petroleum), and soil. The area of the elementary school curriculum with which each correlates is indicated. Lists of general and specific objectives are followed by suggested teaching procedures, including ideas for introducing the…

  13. Idiosyncratic recognition of UUG/UUA codons by modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine, τm5U present at 'wobble' position in anticodon loop of tRNALeu: A molecular modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita S Kamble

    Full Text Available Lack of naturally occurring modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm5U at the 'wobble' 34th position in tRNALeu causes mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS. The τm5U34 specifically recognizes UUG and UUA codons. Structural consequences of τm5U34 to read cognate codons have not been studied so far in detail at the atomic level. Hence, 50ns multiple molecular dynamics (MD simulations of various anticodon stem loop (ASL models of tRNALeu in presence and absence of τm5U34 along with UUG and UUA codons were performed to explore the dynamic behaviour of τm5U34 during codon recognition process. The MD simulation results revealed that τm5U34 recognizes G/A ending codons by 'wobble' as well as a novel 'single' hydrogen bonding interactions. RMSD and RMSF values indicate the comparative stability of the ASL models containing τm5U34 modification over the other models, lacking τm5U34. Another MD simulation study of 55S mammalian mitochondrial rRNA with tRNALeu showed crucial interactions between the A-site residues, A918, A919, G256 and codon-anticodon bases. Thus, these results could improve our understanding about the decoding efficiency of human mt tRNALeu with τm5U34 to recognize UUG and UUA codons.

  14. Variable Frequency of Plastid RNA Editing among Ferns and Repeated Loss of Uridine-to-Cytidine Editing from Vascular Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution. PMID:25568947

  15. Variable frequency of plastid RNA editing among ferns and repeated loss of uridine-to-cytidine editing from vascular plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhu Guo

    Full Text Available The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution.

  16. Variable frequency of plastid RNA editing among ferns and repeated loss of uridine-to-cytidine editing from vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution.

  17. Exporting conservation

    OpenAIRE

    LTRA-12

    2012-01-01

    Metadata only record Soil degradation represents a major threat to food security, particularly in mountainous regions of Southeast Asia, where rainfall can wash away inches of topsoil. This article presents conservation agriculture as a potential solution, focusing on the work that North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University conducts in Southeast Asia in conjunction with regional partners as part of the Sustainable Agriculture and Natural Resource Management (SANREM) collabo...

  18. Uridine composition of the poly-U/UC tract of HCV RNA defines non-self recognition by RIG-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretja Schnell

    Full Text Available Viral infection of mammalian cells triggers the innate immune response through non-self recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs in viral nucleic acid. Accurate PAMP discrimination is essential to avoid self recognition that can generate autoimmunity, and therefore should be facilitated by the presence of multiple motifs in a PAMP that mark it as non-self. Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA is recognized as non-self by RIG-I through the presence of a 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp on the viral RNA in association with a 3' poly-U/UC tract. Here we define the HCV PAMP and the criteria for RIG-I non-self discrimination of HCV by examining the RNA structure-function attributes that impart PAMP function to the poly-U/UC tract. We found that the 34 nucleotide poly-uridine "core" of this sequence tract was essential for RIG-I activation, and that interspersed ribocytosine nucleotides between poly-U sequences in the RNA were required to achieve optimal RIG-I signal induction. 5'-ppp poly-U/UC RNA variants that stimulated strong RIG-I activation efficiently bound purified RIG-I protein in vitro, and RNA interaction with both the repressor domain and helicase domain of RIG-I was required to activate signaling. When appended to 5'-ppp RNA that lacks PAMP activity, the poly-U/UC U-core sequence conferred non-self recognition of the RNA and innate immune signaling by RIG-I. Importantly, HCV poly-U/UC RNA variants that strongly activated RIG-I signaling triggered potent anti-HCV responses in vitro and hepatic innate immune responses in vivo using a mouse model of PAMP signaling. These studies define a multi-motif PAMP signature of non-self recognition by RIG-I that incorporates a 5'-ppp with poly-uridine sequence composition and length. This HCV PAMP motif drives potent RIG-I signaling to induce the innate immune response to infection. Our studies define a basis of non-self discrimination by RIG-I and offer insights into the antiviral therapeutic

  19. Inhibitory Effects of Aschantin on Cytochrome P450 and Uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Sang Kwon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aschantin is a bioactive neolignan found in Magnolia flos with antiplasmodial, Ca2+-antagonistic, platelet activating factor-antagonistic, and chemopreventive activities. We investigated its inhibitory effects on the activities of eight major human cytochrome P450 (CYP and uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT enzymes of human liver microsomes to determine if mechanistic aschantin–enzyme interactions were evident. Aschantin potently inhibited CYP2C8-mediated amodiaquine N-de-ethylation, CYP2C9-mediated diclofenac 4′-hydroxylation, CYP2C19-mediated [S]-mephenytoin 4′-hydroxylation, and CYP3A4-mediated midazolam 1′-hydroxylation, with Ki values of 10.2, 3.7, 5.8, and 12.6 µM, respectively. Aschantin at 100 µM negligibly inhibited CYP1A2-mediated phenacetin O-de-ethylation, CYP2A6-mediated coumarin 7-hydroxylation, CYP2B6-mediated bupropion hydroxylation, and CYP2D6-mediated bufuralol 1′-hydroxylation. At 200 µM, it weakly inhibited UGT1A1-catalyzed SN-38 glucuronidation, UGT1A6-catalyzed N-acetylserotonin glucuronidation, and UGT1A9-catalyzed mycophenolic acid glucuronidation, with IC50 values of 131.7, 144.1, and 71.0 µM, respectively, but did not show inhibition against UGT1A3, UGT1A4, or UGT2B7 up to 200 µM. These in vitro results indicate that aschantin should be examined in terms of potential interactions with pharmacokinetic drugs in vivo. It exhibited potent mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A4.

  20. The effect of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A6 genetic polymorphism on valproic acid pharmacokinetics in Indian patients with epilepsy: a pharmacogenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Murali; Tripathi, Manjari; Behari, Madhuri; Raghavan, S; Jain, D C; Ramanujam, Barghavi; Arumugam, Karthik; Rajakannan, Thiyagu; Mallayasamy, Surulivel Rajan; Subbiah, Vivekanandhan

    2013-10-01

    Sodium valproate is a widely prescribed broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug. It shows high inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics and has a narrow therapeutic range. We evaluated the effects of polymorphic uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)1A6 (541A>G, 552A>C) metabolizing enzyme on the pharmacokinetics of sodium valproate in the patients with epilepsy who showed toxicity to therapy. Genotype analysis of the patients was made with polymerase chain-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with sequencing. Plasma drug concentrations were measured with reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and concentration-time data were analyzed by using a non-compartmental approach. The results of this study suggested a significant genotypic as well as allelic association with valproic acid toxicity for UGT1A6 (541A>G) or UGT1A6 (552A>C) polymorphic enzymes. The elimination half-life (t ½ = 40.2 h) of valproic acid was longer and the clearance rate (CL = 917 ml/h) was lower in the poor metabolizers group of UGT1A6 (552A>C) polymorphism who showed toxicity than in the intermediate metabolizers group (t ½ = 35.5 h, CL = 1,022 ml/h) or the extensive metabolizers group (t ½ = 25.4 h, CL = 1,404 ml/h). Our findings suggest that the UGT1A6 (552A>C) genetic polymorphism plays a significant role in the steady state concentration of valproic acid, and it thereby has an impact on the toxicity of the valproic acid used in the patients with epilepsy.

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Selaginellins from Selaginella tamariscina (Beauv. Spring against Cytochrome P450 and Uridine 5′-Diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase Isoforms on Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Kyung Heo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Selaginella tamariscina (Beauv. has been used for traditional herbal medicine for treatment of cancer, hepatitis, and diabetes in the Orient. Numerous bioactive compounds including alkaloids, flavonoids, lignans, and selaginellins have been identified in this medicinal plant. Among them, selaginellins having a quinone methide unit and an alkylphenol moiety have been known to possess anticancer, antidiabetic, and neuroprotective activity. Although there have been studies on the biological activities of selaginellins, their modulatory potential of cytochrome P450 (P450 and uridine 5′-diphosphoglucuronosyltransferase (UGT activities have not been previously evaluated. In this study, we investigated the drug interaction potential of two selaginellins on ten P450 isoforms (CYP1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2 and 3A and six UGT isoforms (UGT1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9 and 2B7 using human liver microsomes and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Selaginellin and selaginellin M had high inhibitory potential for CYP2C8-mediated amodiaquine O-demethylation with IC50 values of 0.5 and 0.9 μM, respectively. Selaginellin and selaginellin M also showed medium inhibitory potential against CYP2C9, CYP2J2, UGT1A1, and UGT1A3 (1 μM < IC50 < 5 μM. These two selaginellins had low inhibitory potential against CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2E1, and UGT1A6 (IC50 > 25 μM. This information might be helpful to predict possible drug interaction potential of between selaginellins and co-administered drugs.

  2. Ion-pairing liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based quantification of uridine diphosphate-linked intermediates in the Staphylococcus aureus cell wall biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Harika; Bobba, Sudheer; Putty, Sandeep; Barbara, Joanna E; Gutheil, William G

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial cell wall biosynthesis is the target of several antibiotics and is of interest as a target for new inhibitor development. The cytoplasmic steps of this pathway involve a series of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-linked peptidoglycan intermediates. Quantification of these intermediates is essential for studies of current agents targeting this pathway and for the development of new agents targeting this pathway. In this study, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for quantification of these intermediates in Staphylococcus aureus. To address the problem of poor retention of UDP-linked intermediates on reverse phase media, an ion-pairing (IP) approach using N,N-dimethylhexylamine was developed. MS/MS detection in negative mode was optimized for UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-MurNAc, UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala, UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala-D-Glu, UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala-D-Glu-L-Lys, and UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala. The lower limits of quantification (LLOQs) for these analytes were 1.8, 1.0, 0.8, 2.2, 0.6, and 0.5 pmol, respectively, which correspond to LLOQs of 6, 3, 3, 7, 2, and 2 nmol/g bacteria, respectively. This method was demonstrated for quantification of in vivo levels of these intermediates from S. aureus (0.3mg dry weight analyzed) treated with fosfomycin, D-boroAla, D-cycloserine, and vancomycin. Metabolite accumulation is consistent with the known targets of these antibiotics and indicates potential regulatory loops within this pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Uridine diphosphate glucuronide transferase 1A1FNx0128 gene polymorphism and the toxicity of irinotecan in recurrent and refractory small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim was to investigate the association between uridine diphosphate glucuronide transferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 gene promoter region polymorphism and irinotecan-related adverse effects and efficacy on recurrent and refractory small cell lung cancer (SCLC. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 patients with recurrent and refractory SCLC were enrolled in this study from June 2012 to August 2013 and received at least two cycles of single-agent irinotecan chemotherapy. The efficacy and adverse effects of irinotecan were evaluated. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and direct sequencing method was employed to test UGT1A1FNx0128 polymorphism, thus analyzing the correlation between UGT1A1FNx0128 polymorphism and irinotecan-related side-effects and efficacy. Results: A total of 25 cases (80.6% were UGT1A1FNx0128 wild-type (TA 6 /(TA 6 ; 6 cases (19.4% were heterozygous mutant (TA 6 /(TA 7 , no homozygous mutant genotype (TA 7 /(TA 7 was found. The incidences of grade 3/4 neutropenia, diarrhea and thrombocytopenia were 35.5%, 25.8% and 22.6% in all the patients, respectively. The incidence of 3/4 adverse effects in patients with genotype (TA 6 /(TA 6 and heterozygous (TA 6 /(TA 7 had no statistical difference (P > 0.05 for all. The overall response rate (ORR was 32.3%. Median progression free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were 4 months and 7.5 months in all patients, respectively. There was no statistical difference in ORR, PFS and OS between genotype (TA 6 /(TA 6 patients and heterozygous (TA 6 /(TA 7 patients. Conclusion: Irinotecan showed efficacy in patients with recurrent and refractory SCLC; UGT1A1 FNx01 28 polymorphism failed to predict the incidence of serious adverse effects and efficacy of irinotecan.

  4. Identification of Uridine 5'-Diphosphate-Glucuronosyltransferases Responsible for the Glucuronidation of Mirabegron, a Potent and Selective β3-Adrenoceptor Agonist, in Human Liver Microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Kentaro; Tenmizu, Daisuke; Takusagawa, Shin

    2017-11-21

    Mirabegron is cleared by multiple mechanisms, including drug-metabolizing enzymes. One of the most important clearance pathways is direct glucuronidation. In humans, M11 (O-glucuronide), M13 (carbamoyl-glucuronide), and M14 (N-glucuronide) have been identified, of which M11 is one of the major metabolites in human plasma. The objective of this study was to identify the uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoform responsible for the direct glucuronidation of mirabegron using human liver microsomes (HLMs) and recombinant human UGTs (rhUGTs). Reaction mixtures contained 1-1000 μM mirabegron, 8 mM MgCl2, alamethicin (25 μg/mL), 50 mM Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.5), human liver microsome (HLM) or rhUGT (1.0 mg protein/mL), and 2 mM UDP-glucuronic acid in a total volume of 200 μL for 120 min at 37 °C. HLMs from 16 individuals were used for the correlation study, and mefenamic acid and propofol were used for the inhibition study. Regarding M11 formation, rhUGT2B7 showed high activity among the rhUGTs tested (11.3 pmol/min/mg protein). This result was supported by the correlation between M11 formation activity and UGT2B7 marker enzyme activity (3-glucuronidation of morphine, r 2 = 0.330, p = 0.020) in individual HLMs; inhibition by mefenamic acid in pooled HLMs (IC50 = 22.8 μM); and relatively similar K m values between pooled HLMs and rhUGT2B7 (1260 vs. 486 μM). Regarding M13 and M14 formation, rhUGT1A3 and rhUGT1A8 showed high activity among the rhUGTs tested, respectively. UGT2B7 is the main catalyst of M11 formation in HLMs. Regarding M13 and M14 formation, UGT1A3 and UGT1A8 are strong candidates for glucuronidation, respectively.

  5. Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate is a novel vasodilator in the coronary microcirculation which acts through purinergic P1 but not P2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhichao; Merkus, Daphne; Cheng, Caroline; Duckers, Henricus J; Jan Danser, A H; Duncker, Dirk J

    2013-01-01

    Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A) has been identified as an endothelium-derived contracting factor, which acts through purinergic P2X and P2Y receptors. Since the coronary vascular actions of Up4A are unknown, we investigated the vasoactive profile of Up4A in coronary microvessels, and studied the involvement of purinergic receptor subtypes. Studies were performed in isolated porcine coronary small arteries (diameter∼250 μm), with and without endothelial denudation, mounted on a Mulvany wire myograph. Purinergic receptor expression was assessed by real-time PCR. Up4A (10(-9)-10(-5) M) failed to induce contraction at basal tone, but produced concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in precontracted microvessels. Up4A was slightly less potent than adenosine, ATP, and ADP in producing vasorelaxation, but significantly more potent than UTP and UDP. mRNA expression of P2X(4), P2Y(1), P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6) and A(2A), but not P2X(1), receptors was observed. Up4A-induced vasodilation was unaffected by non-selective P2 receptor antagonist PPADS, P2X(1) antagonist MRS2159, P2Y(1) antagonist MRS2179 and P2Y(6) antagonist MRS2578, but was markedly attenuated by non-selective P1 receptor antagonist 8PT and A(2A) antagonist SCH58261. Up4A-induced vasodilation was not affected by ectonucleotidase inhibitor ARL67156, suggesting that A(2A) stimulation was not the result of Up4A breakdown to adenosine. Up4A-induced vasodilation was blunted in denuded vessels; additional A(2A) receptor blockade further attenuated Up4A-induced vasodilation, suggesting that A(2A) receptor-mediated vasodilation is only partly endothelium-dependent. In conclusion, Up4A exerts a vasodilator rather than a vasoconstrictor influence in coronary microvessels, which is mediated via A(2A) receptors and is partly endothelium-dependent. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of the isotope-dilution principle to the analysis of factors affecting the incorporation of (3H) uridine and (3H) cytidine into cultured lymphocytes. Evaluation of pools in serum and culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsdyke, D R

    1971-12-01

    1. Rat lymph-node cells were incubated in serum and medium 199 with [5-(3)H]uridine or [5-(3)H]cytidine and acid-precipitable radioactivity was measured. Results were interpreted in terms of an isotope-dilution model. 2. Both serum and medium 199 contained pools that inhibited radioactive labelling in a competitive manner. The serum activity was diffusible and inhibited labelling with [(3)H]cytidine more than with [(3)H]uridine; in these respects the activity resembled cytidine (14mum). 3. The pools in serum and plasma were the same size; however, the rate of labelling was greater in plasma, owing to a diffusible factor. 4. Paradoxically, relatively simple media (Earle's salts and Eagle's minimum essential) appeared to have a larger pool than the more complex pyrimidine-containing medium 199; this suggests a contribution to the pool by cells in the simple media. 5. In the absence of pools the average cell was capable of incorporating 2000 radioactive nucleoside molecules/s.

  7. 7 CFR 12.23 - Conservation plans and conservation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation plans and conservation systems. 12.23... CONSERVATION Highly Erodible Land Conservation § 12.23 Conservation plans and conservation systems. (a) Use of field office technical guide. A conservation plan or conservation system developed for the purposes of...

  8. Building robust conservation plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visconti, Piero; Joppa, Lucas

    2015-04-01

    Systematic conservation planning optimizes trade-offs between biodiversity conservation and human activities by accounting for socioeconomic costs while aiming to achieve prescribed conservation objectives. However, the most cost-efficient conservation plan can be very dissimilar to any other plan achieving the set of conservation objectives. This is problematic under conditions of implementation uncertainty (e.g., if all or part of the plan becomes unattainable). We determined through simulations of parallel implementation of conservation plans and habitat loss the conditions under which optimal plans have limited chances of implementation and where implementation attempts would fail to meet objectives. We then devised a new, flexible method for identifying conservation priorities and scheduling conservation actions. This method entails generating a number of alternative plans, calculating the similarity in site composition among all plans, and selecting the plan with the highest density of neighboring plans in similarity space. We compared our method with the classic method that maximizes cost efficiency with synthetic and real data sets. When implementation was uncertain--a common reality--our method provided higher likelihood of achieving conservation targets. We found that χ, a measure of the shortfall in objectives achieved by a conservation plan if the plan could not be implemented entirely, was the main factor determining the relative performance of a flexibility enhanced approach to conservation prioritization. Our findings should help planning authorities prioritize conservation efforts in the face of uncertainty about future condition and availability of sites. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. A double-blind, randomized, comparative study of the use of a combination of uridine triphosphate trisodium, cytidine monophosphate disodium, and hydroxocobalamin, versus isolated treatment with hydroxocobalamin, in patients presenting with compressive neuralgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg H

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Henrique Goldberg,1 Marco Antonio Mibielli,2 Carlos Pereira Nunes,2 Stephanie Wrobel Goldberg,3 Luiz Buchman,4 Spyros GE Mezitis,5 Helio Rzetelna,6 Lisa Oliveira,2 Mauro Geller,2 Fernanda Wajnsztajn7 1UERJ Medical School, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2UNIFESO Medical School, Teresópolis, Brazil; 3Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 4Instituto de Pós-Graduação Médica Carlos Chagas (ICC, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 5New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 6Santa Casa da Misericórdia do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 7New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, Neurology, New York, NY, USA Context: This paper reports on the results of treatment of compressive neuralgia using a combination of nucleotides (uridine triphosphate trisodium [UTP] and cytidine monophosphate disodium [CMP] and vitamin B12.Objectives: To assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of nucleotides (UTP and CMP and vitamin B12 in patients presenting with neuralgia arising from neural compression associated with degenerative orthopedic alterations and trauma, and to compare these effects with isolated administration of vitamin B12. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, consisting of a 30-day oral treatment period: Group A (n=200 receiving nucleotides + vitamin B12, and Group B (n=200 receiving vitamin B12 alone. The primary study endpoint was the percentage of subjects presenting pain visual analog scale (VAS scores ≤20 at end of study treatment period. Secondary study endpoints included the percentage of subjects presenting improvement ≥5 points on the patient functionality questionnaire (PFQ; percentage of subjects presenting pain reduction (reduction in VAS scores at study end in relation to pretreatment; and number of subjects presenting adverse events. Results: The results of this study showed a more expressive improvement in efficacy evaluations among

  10. Conservation genetics in transition to conservation genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouborg, N. Joop; Pertoldi, Cino; Loeschcke, Volker

    2010-01-01

    in conservation biology. This has allowed assessment of the impact of genetic drift on genetic variation, of the level of inbreeding within populations, and of the amount of gene flow between or within populations. Recent developments in genomic techniques, including next generation sequencing, whole genome scans...... and gene-expression pattern analysis, have made it possible to step up from a limited number of neutral markers to genome-wide estimates of functional genetic variation. Here, we focus on how the transition of conservation genetics to conservation genomics leads to insights into the dynamics of selectively...

  11. Human tRNALys3UUU Is Pre-Structured by Natural Modifications for Cognate and Wobble Codon Binding through Keto-Enol Tautomerism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendeix, Franck A.P.; Murphy, IV, Frank V.; Cantara, William A.; Leszczy,; #324; ska, Gra; #380; yna,; Gustilo, Estella M.; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F. [Cornell; (NCSU); (Poland); (Integrated DNA); (SUNYA)

    2013-09-27

    modified nucleotides mcm5s2U34 and ms2t6A37 participate in the stability of the anticodon–codon interaction. Importantly, the mcm5s2U34·G3 wobble base pair is in the Watson–Crick geometry, requiring unusual hydrogen bonding to G in which mcm5s2U34 must shift from the keto to the enol form. The results unambiguously demonstrate that modifications pre-structure the anticodon as a key prerequisite for efficient and accurate recognition of cognate and wobble codons.

  12. 5-(Perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), an arabino-based rigid amphipathic fusion inhibitor, targets virion envelope lipids to inhibit fusion of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus, and other enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Che C; Ustinov, Alexey V; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Korshun, Vladimir A; Schang, Luis M

    2013-04-01

    Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes. Fusion requires the formation of an intermediate stalk structure, in which only the outer leaflets are fused. The stalk structure, in turn, requires the lipid bilayer of the envelope to bend into negative curvature. This process is inhibited by enrichment in the outer leaflet of lipids with larger polar headgroups, which favor positive curvature. Accordingly, phospholipids with such shape inhibit viral fusion. We previously identified a compound, 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-2'-deoxy-uridine (dUY11), with overall shape and amphipathicity similar to those of these phospholipids. dUY11 inhibited the formation of the negative curvature necessary for stalk formation and the fusion of a model enveloped virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). We proposed that dUY11 acted by biophysical mechanisms as a result of its shape and amphipathicity. To test this model, we have now characterized the mechanisms against influenza virus and HCV of 5-(perylen-3-yl)ethynyl-arabino-uridine (aUY11), which has shape and amphipathicity similar to those of dUY11 but contains an arabino-nucleoside. aUY11 interacted with envelope lipids to inhibit the infectivity of influenza virus, hepatitis C virus (HCV), herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2), and other enveloped viruses. It specifically inhibited the fusion of influenza virus, HCV, VSV, and even protein-free liposomes to cells. Furthermore, aUY11 inhibited the formation of negative curvature in model lipid bilayers. In summary, the arabino-derived aUY11 and the deoxy-derived dUY11 act by the same antiviral mechanisms against several enveloped but otherwise unrelated viruses. Therefore, chemically unrelated compounds of appropriate shape and amphipathicity target virion envelope lipids to inhibit formation of the negative curvature required for fusion, inhibiting infectivity by biophysical, not biochemical, mechanisms.

  13. A double-blind, randomized, comparative study of the use of a combination of uridine triphosphate trisodium, cytidine monophosphate disodium, and hydroxocobalamin, versus isolated treatment with hydroxocobalamin, in patients presenting with compressive neuralgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Henrique; Mibielli, Marco Antonio; Nunes, Carlos Pereira; Goldberg, Stephanie Wrobel; Buchman, Luiz; Mezitis, Spyros Ge; Rzetelna, Helio; Oliveira, Lisa; Geller, Mauro; Wajnsztajn, Fernanda

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of treatment of compressive neuralgia using a combination of nucleotides (uridine triphosphate trisodium [UTP] and cytidine monophosphate disodium [CMP]) and vitamin B12. To assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of nucleotides (UTP and CMP) and vitamin B12 in patients presenting with neuralgia arising from neural compression associated with degenerative orthopedic alterations and trauma, and to compare these effects with isolated administration of vitamin B12. A randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, consisting of a 30-day oral treatment period: Group A (n=200) receiving nucleotides + vitamin B12, and Group B (n=200) receiving vitamin B12 alone. The primary study endpoint was the percentage of subjects presenting pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores ≤20 at end of study treatment period. Secondary study endpoints included the percentage of subjects presenting improvement ≥5 points on the patient functionality questionnaire (PFQ); percentage of subjects presenting pain reduction (reduction in VAS scores at study end in relation to pretreatment); and number of subjects presenting adverse events. The results of this study showed a more expressive improvement in efficacy evaluations among subjects treated with the combination of nucleotides + vitamin B12, with a statistically significant superiority of the combination in pain reduction (evidenced by VAS scores). There were adverse events in both treatment groups, but these were transitory and no severe adverse event was recorded during the study period. Safety parameters were maintained throughout the study in both treatment groups. The combination of uridine, cytidine, and vitamin B12 was safe and effective in the treatment of neuralgias arising from neural compression associated with degenerative orthopedic alterations and trauma.

  14. Conservation: Toward firmer ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The following aspects of energy conservation were discussed: conservation history and goals, conservation modes, conservation accounting-criteria, and a method to overcome obstacles. The conservation modes tested fall into one of the following categories: reduced energy consumption, increased efficiency of energy utilization, or substitution of one or more forms of energy for another which is in shorter supply or in some sense thought to be of more value. The conservation accounting criteria include net energy reduction, economic, and technical criteria. A method to overcome obstacles includes (approaches such as: direct personal impact (life style, income, security, aspiration), an element of crisis, large scale involvement of environmental, safety, and health issues, connections to big government, big business, big politics, involvement of known and speculative science and technology, appeal to moral and ethical standards, the transient nature of opportunities to correct the system.

  15. Wildlife conservation on farmland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Macdonald, David W; Feber, R. (Ruth)

    2015-01-01

    ...: Integrates more than 30 years of research by the Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at Oxford to reveal how agricultural systems and wildlife interact, presenting examples from scales varying...

  16. Paradigms for parasite conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Eric R; Carlson, Colin J; Bueno, Veronica M; Burgio, Kevin R; Cizauskas, Carrie A; Clements, Christopher F; Seidel, Dana P; Harris, Nyeema C

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic species, which depend directly on host species for their survival, represent a major regulatory force in ecosystems and a significant component of Earth's biodiversity. Yet the negative impacts of parasites observed at the host level have motivated a conservation paradigm of eradication, moving us farther from attainment of taxonomically unbiased conservation goals. Despite a growing body of literature highlighting the importance of parasite-inclusive conservation, most parasite species remain understudied, underfunded, and underappreciated. We argue the protection of parasitic biodiversity requires a paradigm shift in the perception and valuation of their role as consumer species, similar to that of apex predators in the mid-20th century. Beyond recognizing parasites as vital trophic regulators, existing tools available to conservation practitioners should explicitly account for the unique threats facing dependent species. We built upon concepts from epidemiology and economics (e.g., host-density threshold and cost-benefit analysis) to devise novel metrics of margin of error and minimum investment for parasite conservation. We define margin of error as the risk of accidental host extinction from misestimating equilibrium population sizes and predicted oscillations, while minimum investment represents the cost associated with conserving the additional hosts required to maintain viable parasite populations. This framework will aid in the identification of readily conserved parasites that present minimal health risks. To establish parasite conservation, we propose an extension of population viability analysis for host-parasite assemblages to assess extinction risk. In the direst cases, ex situ breeding programs for parasites should be evaluated to maximize success without undermining host protection. Though parasitic species pose a considerable conservation challenge, adaptations to conservation tools will help protect parasite biodiversity in the face of

  17. Introducing Conservation of Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Marjorie; Brunt, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    The teaching of the principle of conservation of linear momentum is considered (ages 15 + ). From the principle, the momenta of two masses in an isolated system are considered. Sketch graphs of the momenta make Newton's laws appear obvious. Examples using different collision conditions are considered. Conservation of momentum is considered…

  18. Resource Conservation Glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    This glossary is a composite of terms selected from 13 technologies, and is the expanded revision of the original 1952 edition of "The Soil and Water Conservation Glossary." The terms were selected from these areas: agronomy, biology, conservation, ecology, economics, engineering, forestry, geology, hydrology, range, recreation, soils, and…

  19. Creative Soil Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Take plant lessons outdoors with this engaging and inquiry-based activity in which third-grade students learn how to apply soil conservation methods to growing plants. They also collect data and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of their method of soil conservation. An added benefit to this activity is that the third-grade students played…

  20. Biodiversity Conservation in Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Dale Squires

    2014-01-01

    Asian's remarkable economic growth brought many benefits but also fuelled threats to its ecosystems and biodiversity. Economic growth brings biodiversity threats but also conservation opportunities. Continued biodiversity loss is inevitable, but the types, areas and rates of biodiversity loss are not. Prioritising biodiversity conservation, tempered by what is tractable, remains a high priority. Policy and market distortions and failures significantly underprice biodiversity, undermine ecosys...

  1. Fixism and conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Alexandre; Fontaine, Colin; Veron, Simon; Monnet, Anne-Christine; Legrand, Marine; Clavel, Joanne; Chantepie, Stéphane; Couvet, Denis; Ducarme, Frédéric; Fontaine, Benoît; Jiguet, Frédéric; le Viol, Isabelle; Rolland, Jonathan; Sarrazin, François; Teplitsky, Céline; Mouchet, Maud

    2017-08-01

    The field of biodiversity conservation has recently been criticized as relying on a fixist view of the living world in which existing species constitute at the same time targets of conservation efforts and static states of reference, which is in apparent disagreement with evolutionary dynamics. We reviewed the prominent role of species as conservation units and the common benchmark approach to conservation that aims to use past biodiversity as a reference to conserve current biodiversity. We found that the species approach is justified by the discrepancy between the time scales of macroevolution and human influence and that biodiversity benchmarks are based on reference processes rather than fixed reference states. Overall, we argue that the ethical and theoretical frameworks underlying conservation research are based on macroevolutionary processes, such as extinction dynamics. Current species, phylogenetic, community, and functional conservation approaches constitute short-term responses to short-term human effects on these reference processes, and these approaches are consistent with evolutionary principles. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Context and Number Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Irwin W.

    1979-01-01

    A replication study was conducted to determine whether conservation-of-number performance would be improved by questioning the subject only after the transformation is performed, rather than before and after the transformation, as is done in the standard conservation test. Subjects were preschoolers, aged 0-4 to 5-7. (Author/MP)

  3. Conservation in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-05-30

    A nationwide examination was made of grassroots energy conservation programs related to transportation. Information compiled from civic groups, trade associations, and corporations is included on driver awareness/mass transit; travel; and ride sharing. It is concluded that a willingness by the public to cooperate in transportation energy conservation exists and should be exploited. (LCL)

  4. Madagascar Conservation & Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madagascar Conservation & Development welcomes the results of original research, field surveys, advances in field and laboratory techniques, book reviews, and informal status reports from research, conservation, development and management programs and in-field projects in Madagascar. In addition, notes on changes ...

  5. Water Conservation Resource List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NJEA Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Alarmed by the growing water shortage, the New Jersey State Office of Dissemination has prepared this annotated list of free or inexpensive instructional materials for teaching about water conservation, K-l2. A tipsheet for home water conservation is appended. (Editor/SJL)

  6. Cloning, over-expression and purification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa murC encoding uridine diphosphate N-acetylmuramate: L-alanine ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zoeiby, A; Sanschagrin, F; Lamoureux, J; Darveau, A; Levesque, R C

    2000-02-15

    We cloned and sequenced the murC gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa encoding a protein of 53 kDa. Multiple alignments with 20 MurC peptide sequences from different bacteria confirmed the presence of highly conserved regions having sequence identities ranging from 22-97% including conserved motifs for ATP-binding and the active site of the enzyme. Genetic complementation was done in Escherichia coli (murCts) suppressing the lethal phenotype. The murC gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET30a and overexpressed in E. coli BL21(lambdaDE3). Three PCR cloning strategies were used to obtain the three recombinant plasmids for expression of the native MurC, MurC His-tagged at N-terminal and at C-terminal, respectively. MurC His-tagged at C-terminal was chosen for large scale production and protein purification in the soluble form. The purification was done in a single chromatographic step on an affinity nickel column and obtained in mg quantities at 95% homogeneity. MurC protein was used to produce monoclonal antibodies for epitope mapping and for assay development in high throughput screenings. Detailed studies of MurC and other genes of the bacterial cell cycle will provide the reagents and strain constructs for high throughput screening and for design of novel antibacterials.

  7. Making conservation research more relevant for conservation practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurance, W.F.; Koster, H.; Grooten, M.; Anderson, A.B.; Zuidema, P.A.; Zwick, S.; Zagt, R.J.; Lynam, A.J.; Linkie, M.; Anten, N.P.R.

    2012-01-01

    Conservation scientists and practitioners share many of the same goals. Yet in a majority of cases, we argue, research conducted by academic conservation scientists actually makes surprisingly few direct contributions to environmental conservation. We illustrate how researchers can increase the

  8. Wobbly walker evolves into soccer star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Linde, R.; Wisse, M.; Hobbelen, D.; De Boer, T.; Verdult, E.

    2012-01-01

    Seventeen years ago, a graduate student of the Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime and Materials Engineering built the first Delft walking robot. Not a walking computer with heavy motors, but an energy-efficient autonomous robot. That quest into human walking has developed into the Delft Biorobotics

  9. Tourism and Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budeanu, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    Tourism is promoted by policy makers and international organizations as a tool for advancing conservation agendas, while contributing to poverty alleviation and human development, under the banner of ecotourism or sustainable tourism. However, the indiscriminating use of complex and ambiguous...

  10. Hearing Conservation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hearing Conservation Team focuses on ways to identify the early stages of noise-induced damage to the human ear.Our current research involves the evaluation of...

  11. Energy Conservation Behaviour Toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Börner, Dirk; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., Börner, D., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2013, 31 January). Energy Conservation Behaviour Toolkit. Presentation given at the symposium "Groene ICT en Duurzame ontwikkeling: Meters maken in het Hoger Onderwijs", Driebergen, The Netherlands.

  12. Metro Conservation Corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — The Metro Conservation Corridors (MeCC) grow out of the natural resource analysis work done by the DNR in the late '90's, documented in the Metro Greenprint...

  13. Mesocycles in conserving plastics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shashoua, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Analysis suggests that progress in conservation of plastics objects and artworks can be described by a series of overlapping mesocycles. Focus has been placed for periods of 5-10 years each on determining the degradation pathways in the 1990s, developing strategies to inhibit those pathways from...... plastics has been the origin of the data describing lifetimes. By contrast, mesocycles in developing suitable storage and display microclimates for plastics have mirrored preventive conservation practices for natural polymeric materials. The rate of the third mesocycle, interventive conservation, has been...... driven by the need to balance the requirements for reversibility in conservation practices with the artist’s intent and significance. Developments within each of the three mesocycles from the 1990s to date are discussed in this article. Environmental science and toxicology of waste plastics offer a novel...

  14. 76 FR 22785 - Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0578-AA58 Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, United States... concerning the Natural Resources Conservation Service's (NRCS) coordination responsibilities. DATES..., Director, Ecological Sciences Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation...

  15. Orchid conservation: further links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Michael F

    2016-07-01

    Due in great part to their often complex interactions with mycorrhizal fungi, pollinators and host trees, Orchidaceae present particular challenges for conservation. Furthermore, orchids, as potentially the largest family of angiosperms with >26000 species, species complexes and frequent hybrid formation, are complex to catalogue. Following a highlight in 2015, a further seven papers focusing on orchids, their interactions with beneficial organisms, pollinators and mycorrhiza, and other factors relating to their conservation, including threats from human utilization and changing land use, are presented here. The production of an online flora of all known plants and an assessment of the conservation status of all known plant species as far as possible, to guide conservation action are the first two targets of the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation Without knowing how many species there are and how they should be circumscribed, neither of these targets is achievable. Orchids are a fascinating subject for fundamental research with rapid species evolution, specific organ structure and development, but they also suffer from high levels of threat. Effective orchid conservation must take account of the beneficial interactions with fungi and pollinators and the potentially detrimental effects of over-collection and changes in land use. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Conservation Kickstart- Catalyzing Conservation Initiatives Worldwide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation (ASC) is a nonprofit organization that collects environmental data to catalyze conservation initiatives worldwide. Adventure athletes have the skills and motivation to reach the most remote corners of the world. ASC utilizes those skills to provide the scientific community with data while providing the outdoor community with purpose beyond the personal high of reaching a summit or rowing across an ocean. We carefully select projects, choosing partnerships that will maximize the impact of ASC volunteers. Each project must have a clear path to a tangible conservation outcome and demonstrate a clear need for our brand of volunteers. We partner with government agencies, universities, and independant reseachers to kickstart data collection efforts around the world. Last year, through a partnership with the Olympic National Forest, 20 volunteers from the Seattle area set up and monitored camera traps in an effort to survey for costal Pacific marten. Our work led to the species' listing as "critically imperiled" with NatureServe. A partnership with the inaugural Great Pacific Race, engaging trans-Pacific rowing teams, searched for microplastics in the Pacific Ocean as part of our ongoing microplastics campaign. In a multi-year partnership with the American Prairie Reserve (APR), ASC volunteer crews live and work on the Reserve collecting wildlife data year round. The data we obtain directly informs the Reserve's wildlife management decisions. On this project, our crews have safely and effectively navigated temperature extremes from -30 degrees to 100+ degrees while traveling in a remote location. We are currently scouting projects in the Okavango Delta of Botswana and the rainforest of Suriname where we will be able to cover large amounts of area in a short periord of time. ASC is at the crossroads of the adventure and coservation science communities. Our approach of answering specific questions by using highly skilled and

  17. Effects of aqueous extract of Ruta graveolens and its ingredients on cytochrome P450, uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate (NAD(PH-quinone oxidoreductase in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yune-Fang Ueng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruta graveolens (the common rue has been used for various therapeutic purposes, including relief of rheumatism and treatment of circulatory disorder. To elucidate the effects of rue on main drug-metabolizing enzymes, effects of an aqueous extract of the aerial part of rue and its ingredients on cytochrome P450 (P450/CYP, uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate (NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase were studied in C57BL/6JNarl mice. Oral administration of rue extract to males increased hepatic Cyp1a and Cyp2b activities in a dose-dependent manner. Under a 7-day treatment regimen, rue extract (0.5 g/kg induced hepatic Cyp1a and Cyp2b activities and protein levels in males and females. This treatment increased hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity only in males. However, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase activity remained unchanged. Based on the contents of rutin and furanocoumarins of mouse dose of rue extract, rutin increased hepatic Cyp1a activity and the mixture of furanocoumarins (Fmix increased Cyp2b activities in males. The mixture of rutin and Fmix increased Cyp1a and Cyp2b activities. These results revealed that rutin and Fmix contributed at least in part to the P450 induction by rue.

  18. Physiology in conservation translocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  19. Creative Conservation Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jason

    2015-04-01

    I am a fellow with the International League of Conservation photographers (iLCP) and have been focused on photographing conservation dynamics at the intersection of social and environmental issues for a decade. Subjects have included traditional concerns such as deforestation, water conservation, endangered species, and fisheries. However, I rarely make photographs of the traditional nature, wildlife, landscapes, or environmental atrocities that most people think of when they think about environmentalism. Instead, I photograph people and how they live on the planet, as I believe passionately that without also considering social and cultural concerns, we will not be able to effectively and sustainably do conservation work or achieve positive environmental change. My presentation will share recent photography projects on forest conservation in Indonesian Borneo and fisheries management in Central America where I used a 'stakeholder profile-based' process to broadly survey the complexity of the issues while also making personal connections for these projects' diverse audiences. Through these case studies I will explore the opportunities and challenges of combining the authenticity, accuracy, and scientific validity of journalistic and documentary work with the emotional impact of the conventions of art and storytelling.

  20. Two Centuries of Soil Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Narrates U.S. soil conservation history since the late eighteenth century. Discusses early practices such as contour plowing. Profiles individuals who promoted soil conservation and were largely responsible for the creation of the Soil Conservation Service. Explains the causes of erosion and how soil conservation districts help farmers prevent…

  1. Information, conservation and retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eng, T. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Norberg, E. [National Swedish Archives, Stockholm (Sweden); Torbacke, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of History; Jensen, M. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    The seminar took place on the Swedish ship for transportation of radioactive wastes, M/S Sigyn, which at summer time is used for exhibitions. The seminar treated items related to general information needs in society and questions related to radioactive waste, i.e. how knowledge about a waste repository should be passed on to future generations. Three contributions are contained in the report from the seminar and are indexed separately: `Active preservation - otherwise no achieves`; `The conservation and dissemination of information - A democratic issue`; and, `Conservation and retrieval of information - Elements of a strategy to inform future societies about nuclear waste repositories`.

  2. Energy conservation in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blass, Elliott

    2015-08-01

    Energy acquisition through suckling has been widely studied in rat and human infants. Processes mediating energy conservation, however, have not received the attention that they deserve. This essay, in honor of Professor Jerry Hogan, discusses parallel behaviors used by rat and human mothers to minimize energy loss in their offspring. Parallel mechanisms underlying energy preservation have been identified in rats and humans, suggesting phylogenetic conservation and possibly continuity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: In Honor of Jerry Hogan. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Future directions for conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulartz, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The use of target baselines or reference states for conservation and restoration has become increasingly problematic and impractical, due to rapid environmental change, the paradigm shift in ecology from a static to a dynamic view of nature, and growing awareness of the role of cultural

  4. Conservation of Beclardia macrostachya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admpather

    little research was done on the biology of these orchids in Mauritius (Roberts, 2001). Therefore, the biology of Beclardia macrostachya was studied and consequently, appropriate strategies would be devised for its conservation. There is only one known species under the genus Beclardia which is Beclardia macrostachya ...

  5. Biological science in conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Johns

    2000-01-01

    Large-scale wildlands reserve systems offer one of the best hopes for slowing, if not reversing, the loss of biodiversity and wilderness. Establishing such reserves requires both sound biology and effective advocacy. Attempts by The Wildlands Project and its cooperators to meld science and advocacy in the service of conservation is working, but is not without some...

  6. Conservation and gene banking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant conservation has several objectives the main ones include safeguarding our food supply, preserving crop wild relatives for breeding and selection of new cultivars, providing material for industrial and pharmaceutical uses and preserving the beauty and diversity of our flora for generations to ...

  7. Urban bird conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snep, Robbert P.H.; Kooijmans, Jip Louwe; Kwak, Robert G.M.; Foppen, Ruud P.B.; Parsons, Holly; Awasthy, Monica; Sierdsema, Henk L.K.; Marzluff, John M.; Fernandez-Juricic, Esteban; Laet, de Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Following the call from the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity “Cities & Biodiversity Outlook” project to better preserve urban biodiversity, this paper presents stakeholder-specific statements for bird conservation in city environments. Based upon the current urban bird

  8. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses methods for promoting energy conservation in foundries. Use of electric power, natural gas, and coke are evaluated. Waste heat recovery systems are considered. Energy consumption in the specific processes of electric melting, natural gas melting, heat treatments, ladle melting, and coke fuel melting is described. An example energy analysis is included. (GHH)

  9. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses methods for promoting energy conservation in foundries. Use of electric power, natural gas, and coke are evaluated. Waste heat recovery systems are considered. Energy consumption in the specific processes of electric melting, natural gas melting, heat treatments, ladle melting, and coke fuel melting is described. An example energy analysis is included. (GHH)

  10. Energy Conservation Simplified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    The standard formulation of energy conservation involves the subsidiary ideas of kinetic energy ("KE"), work ("W"), thermal energy, internal energy, and a half-dozen different kinds of potential energy ("PE"): elastic, chemical, nuclear, gravitational, and so forth. These quantities came to be recognized during the centuries over which the…

  11. "Conservative" views of abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, P E

    1997-01-01

    The introduction to this essay, which presents and defends the "conservative" position on abortion, explains that this position holds that 1) abortion is wrong because it destroys the fetus; 2) the fetus has full personhood from conception (or very near conception); 3) abortion is only justified under special circumstances, such as when the pregnancy poses a threat to the woman's life; and 4) these conclusions should be reflected in law and public policy. Part 2 sets forth the moral foundations for this position. The third part considers the status of the fetus and reviews the various arguments that have been forwarded to resolve the question, such as the species principle, the potentiality principle, the sentience principle, and the conventionalist principle. Part 4 applies the conservative position to problems posed by hard cases, determines that abortion is a form of homicide from two weeks after fertilization (at the latest), reviews circumstances in which various legal definitions of homicide are applicable, argues for the denial of abortion funding by the state, and notes that violent militancy is not the appropriate response to a belief that abortion should be illegal. Section 5 refutes objections to the conservative position based on the fact that some opponents of abortion also oppose contraception, based on feminist ideals, and based on calls for religious freedom in a pluralistic society. In conclusion, the labels applied to the abortion debate are examined, and it is suggested that "communitarian" is the best term for the conservative position.

  12. Madagascar Conservation & Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    www.journalmcd.com

    MADAGASCAR CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT. VOLUME 7 | ISSUE 1 — JUNE 2012. PAGE 5 .... and measurements of deforestation in Africa and Madagascar, but the deforestation itself continues: in some places – espe ... the islands around Africa, in the 1982 FAO compila- tion. For the purpose of the present article, ...

  13. Beyond conservation agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giller, K.E.; Andersson, J.A.; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and

  14. Restoration of uridine 5′-triphosphate-suppressed delayed rectifying K+ currents by an NO activator KMUP-1 involves RhoA/Rho kinase signaling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen-Kong Dai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that KMUP-1 (7-[2-[4-(2-chlorobenzenepiperazinyl]ethyl]-1,3-dimethylxanthine blunts monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by altering Ca2+ sensitivity, K+-channel function, endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, and RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK expression. This study further investigated whether KMUP-1 impedes uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP-inhibited delayed rectifying K+ (KDR current in rat pulmonary arteries involved the RhoA/ROCK signaling. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs were enzymatically dissociated from rat pulmonary arteries. KMUP-1 (30μM attenuated UTP (30μM-mediated membrane depolarization and abolished UTP-enhanced cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to monitor KDR currents. A voltage-dependent KDR current was isolated and shown to consist of a 4-aminopyridine (5mM-sensitive component and an insensitive component. The 4-aminopyridine sensitive KDR current was suppressed by UTP (30μM. The ROCK inhibitor Y27632 (30μM abolished the ability of UTP to inhibit the KDR current. Like Y27632, KMUP-1 (30μM similarly abolished UTP-inhibited KDR currents. Superfused protein kinase A and protein kinase G inhibitors (KT5720, 300nM and KT5823, 300nM did not affect UTP-inhibited KDR currents, but the currents were restored by adding KMUP-1 (30μM to the superfusate. KMUP-1 reversal of KDR current inhibition by UTP predominantly involves the ROCK inhibition. The results indicate that the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway plays a key role in eliciting PASMCs depolarization caused by UTP, which would result in pulmonary artery constriction. KMUP-1 blocks UTP-mediated PASMCs depolarization, suggesting that it would prevent abnormal pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  15. Conservation businesses and conservation planning in a biological diversity hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Minin, Enrico; Macmillan, Douglas Craig; Goodman, Peter Styan; Escott, Boyd; Slotow, Rob; Moilanen, Atte

    2013-08-01

    The allocation of land to biological diversity conservation competes with other land uses and the needs of society for development, food, and extraction of natural resources. Trade-offs between biological diversity conservation and alternative land uses are unavoidable, given the realities of limited conservation resources and the competing demands of society. We developed a conservation-planning assessment for the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal, which forms the central component of the Maputaland-Pondoland-Albany biological diversity hotspot. Our objective was to enhance biological diversity protection while promoting sustainable development and providing spatial guidance in the resolution of potential policy conflicts over priority areas for conservation at risk of transformation. The conservation-planning assessment combined spatial-distribution models for 646 conservation features, spatial economic-return models for 28 alternative land uses, and spatial maps for 4 threats. Nature-based tourism businesses were competitive with other land uses and could provide revenues of >US$60 million/year to local stakeholders and simultaneously help meeting conservation goals for almost half the conservation features in the planning region. Accounting for opportunity costs substantially decreased conflicts between biological diversity, agricultural use, commercial forestry, and mining. Accounting for economic benefits arising from conservation and reducing potential policy conflicts with alternative plans for development can provide opportunities for successful strategies that combine conservation and sustainable development and facilitate conservation action. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  16. Bison Conservation Initiative : Bison Conservation Genetics Workshop : Reports and Recommendations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One of the first outcomes of the Department of the Interior (DOI) Bison Conservation Initiative was the Bison Conservation Genetics Workshop held in Nebraska in...

  17. Conservation of Mangifera sylvatica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhter, Sayma

    and mostly focused on wood quality and phylogenetic relationships. Therefore, this study investigated the conservation potential of wild mango considering its contribution for food, nutrition and livelihoods. To do so, an assessment was made of the current and future distribution of the species, which......Many wild and underutilised plants contribute to food and nutrition. However, overexploitation due to ever increasing demand for wood products has frequently led to declines in populations of these species. Enhanced knowledge of the status of such species is necessary for livelihood security...... and conservation of these valuable species. The present study considers an underutilised and threatened species of Bangladesh, namely wild mango (Mangifera sylvatica Roxb.). Although this wild mango is one of the genetically closest species to the common mango (Mangifera indica L.) research is very limited...

  18. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Sharma

    2017-01-01

    The importance of natural resources in sustaining productivity and environmental protection is now relatively more realized than the past. Over the past few decades or so, more and more attention is being paid all over the world to conserve the Natural Resources. Natural resources are important material basis for a stable economy and social development too With Industrialization and Urbanization, mankind’s great demand for natural resources and their large scale exploitation and consumption h...

  19. Conservation of earthen constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Mattone, Manuela; Bignamini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Earthen constructions, built in many European, American, Asian and African countries, represent an interesting and important architectural heritage, whose conservation is necessary in order to make possible the transmission of a technological culture which keeps values of the uniqueness of the landscape as well as of their history. A study of the conditions of preservation of many unplastered earthen buildings revealed the need to set-up and test out treatments for the protection of the walls...

  20. Madagascar Conservation & Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    www.journalmcd.com

    MADAGASCAR CONSERVATION & DEVELOPMENT. VOLUME 7 | ISSUE 1 — JUNE 2012. PAGE 9. SPOTLIGHTS http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mcd.v7i1.3. RÉSUMÉ. Depuis le .... Selon la Loi de finance 2011, les salaires et avantages de ces 'parlementaires' s'élevaient à 4 400 000 Ariary mensuels (1 $US équivaut à 2 000 ...

  1. Animal behaviour and wildlife conservation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Festa-Bianchet, M; Appollonio, M

    2003-01-01

    .... The contributions discuss the conservation of free-living but exploited animals. Efforts to conserve wildlife populations and preserve biological diversity are often hampered by an inadequate understanding of animal behaviour...

  2. Conservation genetics of Iberian raptors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña

    2011-01-01

    [EN] In this paper I provide an overview of conservation genetics and describe the management actions in the wild that can benefit from conservation genetic studies. I describe the genetic factors of risk for the survival of wild species, the consequences of loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and outbreeding depression, and the use of genetic tools to delimitate units of conservation. Then I introduce the most common applications of conservation genetics in the management of wild populatio...

  3. Conservation Education: A Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil Conservation Society of America, Ankeny, IA.

    The Soil Conservation Society of America's (SCSA) aim is to advance the science and art of good land and water use. Conservation education has a significant role in achieving the wise use of these resources. In this report, perspectives are offered on: (1) the requirements for effective conservation education programs; (2) rationale for…

  4. Integrating conservation costs into sea level rise adaptive conservation prioritization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Zhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biodiversity conservation requires strategic investment as resources for conservation are often limited. As sea level rises, it is important and necessary to consider both sea level rise and costs in conservation decision making. In this study, we consider costs of conservation in an integrated modeling process that incorporates a geomorphological model (SLAMM, species habitat models, and conservation prioritization (Zonation to identify conservation priorities in the face of landscape dynamics due to sea level rise in the Matanzas River basin of northeast Florida. Compared to conservation priorities that do not consider land costs in the analysis process, conservation priorities that consider costs in the planning process change significantly. The comparison demonstrates that some areas with high conservation values might be identified as lower priorities when integrating economic costs in the planning process and some areas with low conservation values might be identified as high priorities when considering costs in the planning process. This research could help coastal resources managers make informed decisions about where and how to allocate conservation resources more wisely to facilitate biodiversity adaptation to sea level rise.

  5. Energy conservation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtright, H.A. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The conservation of energy through the efficiency improvement of existing end-uses and the development of new technologies to replace less efficient systems is an important component of the overall effort to reduce greenhouse gases which may contribute to global climate change. Even though uncertainties exist on the degree and causes of global warming, efficiency improvements in end-use applications remain in the best interest of utilities, their customers and society because efficiency improvements not only reduce environmental exposures but also contribute to industrial productivity, business cost reductions and consumer savings in energy costs.

  6. Conservation genetics of amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebee, T J C

    2005-12-01

    Amphibians are good models for investigating the genetics of wild animal populations because they are: (1) widely distributed in most ecosystems; (2) easy to sample in breeding assemblages; (3) often philopatric to breeding sites, generating high levels of population genetic structure; (4) amenable to controlled crossings in the laboratory; and (5) of major conservation concern. Neutral genetic markers, mostly microsatellites, have been used successfully in studies of amphibian effective population sizes and structures, and in assessing the consequences of hybridisation. Phylogeography has provided important insights into population histories and the fates of introductions. Quantitative genetic methods have demonstrated adaptive variation in life history traits of importance to fitness and therefore to population viability.

  7. Hearing Conservation Live #2430

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    Occupational hearing loss is one of the most common work-related illnesses in the United States (US). From 22 to 30 million US workers are exposed to hazardous noise levels at work, and 25% of these workers will develop permanent hearing loss. Hearing loss from noise is slow and painless, and you can have a disability before you notice it. This course presents the hazards associated with workplace noise, the purpose and elements of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hearing Conservation Program (HCP), and controls that are available to reduce your exposure to hazardous levels of noise.

  8. Stabilities of lead(II) complexes formed in aqueous solution with methyl thiophosphate (MeOPS(2-)), uridine 5'- O-thiomonophosphate (UMPS(2-)) or adenosine 5'- O-thiomonophosphate (AMPS(2-)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Carla P; Krajewska, Danuta; Okruszek, Andrzej; Stec, Wojciech J; Sigel, Helmut

    2002-04-01

    The acidity constants of twofold protonated methyl thiophosphate (MeOPS(2-)) and of monoprotonated uridine 5'- O-thiomonophosphate (UMPS(2-)) have been determined in aqueous solution (25 degrees C; I= 0.1 M, NaNO(3)) by potentiometric pH titration. The stability constants of their 1:1 complexes formed with Pb(2+), i.e. Pb(MeOPS) and Pb(UMPS), have also been measured. The results show that replacement of a phosphate oxygen by a sulfur atom increases the acidity by about 1.4 p K units. On the basis of recently established log versus plots ( = simple phosphate or phosphonate ligands where R is a non-coordinating residue), it is shown that the stability of the Pb(thiophosphate) complexes is by log Delta= 2.43+/-0.09 larger than expected for a Pb(2+)-phosphate interaction. The identity of the stability increase (log Delta) observed for Pb(MeOPS) and Pb(UMPS) shows that the nucleobase residue in the Pb(UMPS) complex has no influence on complex formation. To be able to carry out the mentioned comparisons, we have also determined the stability constant of the complex formed between Pb(2+) and methyl phosphate; the corresponding data for Pb(UMP) were already known from our earlier studies. The present results allow an evaluation of other Pb(2+) complexes formed with thiophosphate derivatives and they are applied now to the Pb(2+) complexes of adenosine 5'- O-thiomonophosphate (AMPS(2-)). The stability constants of the Pb(H;AMPS)(+) and Pb(AMPS) complexes were measured and it is shown that, within the error limits, the stability of the Pb(AMPS) complex is determined by the basicity of the thiophosphate group of AMPS(2-); in other words, no hint for macrochelate formation involving N7 was observed. More important, with the aid of micro-stability-constant considerations it is concluded that the structure of the dominating isomer of the Pb(H;AMPS)(+) species is the one where the proton is located at the N1 site of the adenine residue and Pb(2+) is coordinated to the

  9. Binding of hnRNP H and U2AF65 to Respective G-codes and a Poly-Uridine Tract Collaborate in the N50-5'ss Selection of the REST N Exon in H69 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortuño-Pineda, Carlos; Galindo-Rosales, José Manuel; Calderón-Salinas, José Victor; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; De Nova-Ocampo, Mónica; Valdés, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The splicing of the N exon in the pre-mRNA coding for the RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST) results in a truncated protein that modifies the expression pattern of some of its target genes. A weak 3'ss, three alternative 5'ss (N4-, N50-, and N62-5'ss) and a variety of putative target sites for splicing regulatory proteins are found around the N exon; two GGGG codes (G2-G3) and a poly-Uridine tract (N-PU) are found in front of the N50-5'ss. In this work we analyzed some of the regulatory factors and elements involved in the preferred selection of the N50-5'ss (N50 activation) in the small cell lung cancer cell line H69. Wild type and mutant N exon/β-globin minigenes recapitulated N50 exon splicing in H69 cells, and showed that the N-PU and the G2-G3 elements are required for N50 exon splicing. Biochemical and knockdown experiments identified these elements as U2AF65 and hnRNP H targets, respectively, and that they are also required for N50 exon activation. Compared to normal MRC5 cells, and in keeping with N50 exon activation, U2AF65, hnRNP H and other splicing factors were highly expressed in H69 cells. CLIP experiments revealed that hnRNP H RNA-binding occurs first and is a prerequisite for U2AF65 RNA binding, and EMSA and CLIP experiments suggest that U2AF65-RNA recognition displaces hnRNP H and helps to recruit other splicing factors (at least U1 70K) to the N50-5'ss. Our results evidenced novel hnRNP H and U2AF65 functions: respectively, U2AF65-recruiting to a 5'ss in humans and the hnRNP H-displacing function from two juxtaposed GGGG codes. PMID:22792276

  10. Binding of hnRNP H and U2AF65 to respective G-codes and a poly-uridine tract collaborate in the N50-5'ss selection of the REST N exon in H69 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ortuño-Pineda

    Full Text Available The splicing of the N exon in the pre-mRNA coding for the RE1-silencing transcription factor (REST results in a truncated protein that modifies the expression pattern of some of its target genes. A weak 3'ss, three alternative 5'ss (N4-, N50-, and N62-5'ss and a variety of putative target sites for splicing regulatory proteins are found around the N exon; two GGGG codes (G2-G3 and a poly-Uridine tract (N-PU are found in front of the N50-5'ss. In this work we analyzed some of the regulatory factors and elements involved in the preferred selection of the N50-5'ss (N50 activation in the small cell lung cancer cell line H69. Wild type and mutant N exon/β-globin minigenes recapitulated N50 exon splicing in H69 cells, and showed that the N-PU and the G2-G3 elements are required for N50 exon splicing. Biochemical and knockdown experiments identified these elements as U2AF65 and hnRNP H targets, respectively, and that they are also required for N50 exon activation. Compared to normal MRC5 cells, and in keeping with N50 exon activation, U2AF65, hnRNP H and other splicing factors were highly expressed in H69 cells. CLIP experiments revealed that hnRNP H RNA-binding occurs first and is a prerequisite for U2AF65 RNA binding, and EMSA and CLIP experiments suggest that U2AF65-RNA recognition displaces hnRNP H and helps to recruit other splicing factors (at least U1 70K to the N50-5'ss. Our results evidenced novel hnRNP H and U2AF65 functions: respectively, U2AF65-recruiting to a 5'ss in humans and the hnRNP H-displacing function from two juxtaposed GGGG codes.

  11. Lyme disease and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, H.

    1994-01-01

    Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness that is wide-spread in North America, especially in the northeastern and northcentral United States. This disease could negatively influence efforts to conserve natural populations in two ways: (1) the disease could directly affect wild animal health; and (2) tick control efforts could adversely affect natural populations and communities. Lyme disease affects several domestic animals, but symptoms have been reported in only a few wild species. Direct effects of Lyme disease on wild animal populations have not been reported, but the disease should be considered as a possible cause in cases of unexplained population declines in endemic areas. Methods available to manage ticks and Lyme disease include human self-protection techniques, manipulation of habitats and hosts species populations, biological control, and pesticide applications. The diversity of available techniques allows selection of approaches to minimize environmental effects by (1) emphasizing personal protection techniques, (2) carefully targeting management efforts to maximize efficiency, and (3) integrating environmentally benign techniques to improve management while avoiding broad-scale environmentally destructive approaches. The environmental effects of Lyme disease depend, to a large extent, on the methods chosen to minimize human exposure to infected ticks. Conservation biologists can help design tick management programs that effectively lower the incidence of human Lyme disease while simultaneously minimizing negative effects on natural populations.

  12. Beyond Conservation Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken E Giller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance, soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals and biotechnology. Over the past ten years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub- tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture.

  13. Beyond conservation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giller, Ken E.; Andersson, Jens A.; Corbeels, Marc; Kirkegaard, John; Mortensen, David; Erenstein, Olaf; Vanlauwe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Global support for Conservation Agriculture (CA) as a pathway to Sustainable Intensification is strong. CA revolves around three principles: no-till (or minimal soil disturbance), soil cover, and crop rotation. The benefits arising from the ease of crop management, energy/cost/time savings, and soil and water conservation led to widespread adoption of CA, particularly on large farms in the Americas and Australia, where farmers harness the tools of modern science: highly-sophisticated machines, potent agrochemicals, and biotechnology. Over the past 10 years CA has been promoted among smallholder farmers in the (sub-) tropics, often with disappointing results. Growing evidence challenges the claims that CA increases crop yields and builds-up soil carbon although increased stability of crop yields in dry climates is evident. Our analyses suggest pragmatic adoption on larger mechanized farms, and limited uptake of CA by smallholder farmers in developing countries. We propose a rigorous, context-sensitive approach based on Systems Agronomy to analyze and explore sustainable intensification options, including the potential of CA. There is an urgent need to move beyond dogma and prescriptive approaches to provide soil and crop management options for farmers to enable the Sustainable Intensification of agriculture. PMID:26579139

  14. Sensitivity analysis of conservation targets in systematic conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Noam; Mazor, Tessa; Brokovich, Eran; Jablon, Pierre-Elie; Kark, Salit

    2015-10-01

    Systematic conservation planning has rapidly advanced in the past decade and has been increasingly incorporated in multiple studies and conservation projects. One of its requirements is a quantitative definition of conservation targets. While the Convention on Biological Diversity aims to expand the world's protected area network to 17% of the land surface, in many cases such uniform policy-driven targets may not be appropriate for achieving persistence of various species. Targets are often set arbitrarily, often because information required for the persistence of each species is unavailable or unknown in the focal region. Conservation planners therefore need to establish complementary novel approaches to address the gaps in setting targets. Here, we develop and present a novel method that aims to help guide the selection of conservation targets, providing support for decision makers, planners, and managers. This is achieved by examining the overall flexibility of the conservation network resulting from conservation prioritization, and aiming for greater flexibility. To test this approach we applied the decision support tool Marxan to determine marine conservation priority areas in the eastern Mediterranean Sea as a case study. We assessed the flexibility of the conservation network by comparing 80 different scenarios in which conservation targets were gradually increased and assessed by a range of calculated metrics (e.g., the percentage of the total area selected, the overall connectivity). We discovered that when conservation targets were set too low (i.e., below 10% of the distribution range of each species), very few areas were identified as irreplaceable and the conservation network was not well defined. Interestingly, when conservation targets were set too high (over 50% of the species' range), too many conservation priority areas were selected as irreplaceable, an outcome which is realistically infeasible to implement. As a general guideline, we found that

  15. Priorities for global felid conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Amy J; Hinks, Amy E; Macdonald, Ewan A; Burnham, Dawn; Macdonald, David W

    2015-06-01

    Conservation resources are limited, necessitating prioritization of species and locations for action. Most prioritization approaches are based solely on biologically relevant characteristics of taxa or areas and ignore geopolitical realities. Doing so risks a poor return on conservation investment due to nonbiological factors, such as economic or political instability. We considered felids, a taxon which attracts intense conservation attention, to demonstrate a new approach that incorporates both intrinsic species traits and geopolitical characteristics of countries. We developed conservation priority scores for wild felids based on their International Union for Conservation of Nature status, body mass, habitat, range within protected area, evolutionary distinctiveness, and conservation umbrella potential. We used published data on governance, economics and welfare, human population pressures, and conservation policy to assign conservation-likelihood scores to 142 felid-hosting countries. We identified 71 countries as high priorities (above median) for felid conservation. These countries collectively encompassed all 36 felid species and supported an average of 96% of each species' range. Of these countries, 60.6% had below-average conservation-likelihood scores, which indicated these countries are relatively risky conservation investments. Governance was the most common factor limiting conservation likelihood. It was the major contributor to below-median likelihood scores for 62.5% of the 32 felid species occurring in lower-likelihood countries. Governance was followed by economics for which scores were below median for 25% of these species. An average of 58% of species' ranges occurred in 43 higher-priority lower-likelihood countries. Human population pressure was second to governance as a limiting factor when accounting for percentage of species' ranges in each country. As conservation likelihood decreases, it will be increasingly important to identify relevant

  16. 75 FR 20111 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water... Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating... conservation standards for residential water heaters (other than tabletop and electric instantaneous models...

  17. Democracy in Conservation – Wall Painting Conservation and Church Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brajer, Isabelle Eve

    2007-01-01

    Wall painting conservation in Denmark has been functioning within a democratically organised church infrastructure for more than 100 years, which permits an overview of community involvement in conservation over a longer period. The case stories presented here show widely varying attitudes held...

  18. Architecture of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 Complex: A Conserved Assembly in Eukaryotic mRNA Turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humayun Sharif

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The decay of mRNAs is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. The cytoplasmic Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex is a conserved component of the 5′-to-3′ mRNA decay pathway, linking deadenylation to decapping. Lsm1-7 is similar to the nuclear Sm complexes that bind oligo-uridine tracts in snRNAs. The 2.3 Å resolution structure of S. cerevisiae Lsm1-7 shows the presence of a heptameric ring with Lsm1-2-3-6-5-7-4 topology. A distinct structural feature of the cytoplasmic Lsm ring is the C-terminal extension of Lsm1, which plugs the exit site of the central channel and approaches the RNA binding pockets. The 3.7 Å resolution structure of Lsm1-7 bound to the C-terminal domain of Pat1 reveals that Pat1 recognition is not mediated by the distinguishing cytoplasmic subunit, Lsm1, but by Lsm2 and Lsm3. These results show how the auxiliary domains and the canonical Sm folds of the Lsm1-7 complex are organized in order to mediate and modulate macromolecular interactions.

  19. Protozoan ALKBH8 Oxygenases Display both DNA Repair and tRNA Modification Activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zdżalik, Daria; Vågbø, Cathrine B; Kirpekar, Finn

    2014-01-01

    , interestingly, two protozoan ALKBH8s also catalyzed wobble uridine modification of tRNA, thus displaying a dual in vitro activity. Also, we found the modification status of tRNAGly(UCC) to be unaltered in an ALKBH8 deficient mutant of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, indicating that bacterial ALKBH8s have a function...

  20. Educating Astronauts About Conservation Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the training of astronauts in the interdisciplinary work of conservation biology. The primary responsibility of the conservation biologist at NASA is directing and supporting the photography of the Earth and maintaining the complete database of the photographs. In order to perform this work, the astronauts who take the pictures must be educated in ecological issues.

  1. Motivations for conserving urban biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Donald C; Kark, Salit

    2010-04-01

    In a time of increasing urbanization, the fundamental value of conserving urban biodiversity remains controversial. How much of a fixed budget should be spent on conservation in urban versus nonurban landscapes? The answer should depend on the goals that drive our conservation actions, yet proponents of urban conservation often fail to specify the motivation for protecting urban biodiversity. This is an important shortcoming on several fronts, including a missed opportunity to make a stronger appeal to those who believe conservation biology should focus exclusively on more natural, wilder landscapes. We argue that urban areas do offer an important venue for conservation biology, but that we must become better at choosing and articulating our goals. We explored seven possible motivations for urban biodiversity conservation: preserving local biodiversity, creating stepping stones to nonurban habitat, understanding and facilitating responses to environmental change, conducting environmental education, providing ecosystem services, fulfilling ethical responsibilities, and improving human well-being. To attain all these goals, challenges must be faced that are common to the urban environment, such as localized pollution, disruption of ecosystem structure, and limited availability of land. There are, however, also challenges specific only to particular goals, meaning that different goals will require different approaches and actions. This highlights the importance of specifying the motivations behind urban biodiversity conservation. If the goals are unknown, progress cannot be assessed.

  2. Operationalizing biodiversity for conservation planning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The relative concept of biodiversity built into the definition of complementarity has the level of precision needed to undertake conservation planning. ... Biodiversity and Biocultural Conservation Laboratory, Program in the History and Philosophy of Science and the Department of Philosophy, University of Texas at Austin, ...

  3. Tax aspects of conservation easements

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Siegel

    2006-01-01

    A woodland owner may wish to guarantee that his or her forest land always remains as forest. Persons in this situation sometimes consider placing a conservation easement on the property to achieve that goal. A qualified conservation easement is defined as a transfer of a qualified real property interest means a restriction, granted in perpetuity, on the use that may be...

  4. Conservation business: sustaining Africa's future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P. Sonnekus

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas in Africa are threatened by a lack of funds to conduct their work effectively and by extremely poor communities that surround their resource-rich areas. We believe that conservation staff suffer from mental blocks. They assume that business and profitability reflect unethical processes that destroy natural resources. We developed a workshop process that allows conservationists to integrate entrepreneurial thinking with conservation principles and ethics. We measured perceptions both before and after such a workshop to assess the impact of the process. The process assisted conservationists at the Southern African Wildlife College to develop the integrated mental frameworks that are required to develop conservation into a sustainable business. The group internalised the new mental framework, whereby conservation and business, when integrated in an ethical manner, are viewed as virtually synonymous. The group also identified many innovative ways in which they could derive sustainable income from their natural resources while simultaneously achieving their conservation objectives.

  5. Optimal conservation of migratory species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara G Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migratory animals comprise a significant portion of biodiversity worldwide with annual investment for their conservation exceeding several billion dollars. Designing effective conservation plans presents enormous challenges. Migratory species are influenced by multiple events across land and sea-regions that are often separated by thousands of kilometres and span international borders. To date, conservation strategies for migratory species fail to take into account how migratory animals are spatially connected between different periods of the annual cycle (i.e. migratory connectivity bringing into question the utility and efficiency of current conservation efforts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the first framework for determining an optimal conservation strategy for a migratory species. Employing a decision theoretic approach using dynamic optimization, we address the problem of how to allocate resources for habitat conservation for a Neotropical-Nearctic migratory bird, the American redstart Setophaga ruticilla, whose winter habitat is under threat. Our first conservation strategy used the acquisition of winter habitat based on land cost, relative bird density, and the rate of habitat loss to maximize the abundance of birds on the wintering grounds. Our second strategy maximized bird abundance across the entire range of the species by adding the constraint of maintaining a minimum percentage of birds within each breeding region in North America using information on migratory connectivity as estimated from stable-hydrogen isotopes in feathers. We show that failure to take into account migratory connectivity may doom some regional populations to extinction, whereas including information on migratory connectivity results in the protection of the species across its entire range. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that conservation strategies for migratory animals depend critically upon two factors: knowledge of

  6. Conservation through the economics lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    Although conservation is an inherently transdisciplinary issue, there is much to be gained from examining the problem through an economics lens. Three benefits of such an approach are laid out in this paper. First, many of the drivers of environmental degradation are economic in origin, and the better we understand them, the better we can conserve ecosystems by reducing degradation. Second, economics offers us a when-to-stop rule, which is equivalent to a when-to-conserve rule. All economic production is based on the transformation of raw materials provided by nature. As the economic system grows in physical size, it necessarily displaces and degrades ecosystems. The marginal benefits of economic growth are diminishing, and the marginal costs of ecological degradation are increasing. Conceptually, we should stop economic growth and focus on conservation when the two are equal. Third, economics can help us understand how to efficiently and justly allocate resources toward conservation, and this paper lays out some basic principles for doing so. Unfortunately, the field of economics is dominated by neoclassical economics, which builds an analytical framework based on questionable assumptions and takes an excessively disciplinary and formalistic approach. Conservation is a complex problem, and analysis from individual disciplinary lenses can make important contributions to conservation only when the resulting insights are synthesized into a coherent vision of the whole. Fortunately, there are a number of emerging transdisciplines, such as ecological economics and environmental management, that are dedicated to this task.

  7. Targeted gene flow for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ella; Phillips, Ben L

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic threats often impose strong selection on affected populations, causing rapid evolutionary responses. Unfortunately, these adaptive responses are rarely harnessed for conservation. We suggest that conservation managers pay close attention to adaptive processes and geographic variation, with an eye to using them for conservation goals. Translocating pre-adapted individuals into recipient populations is currently considered a potentially important management tool in the face of climate change. Targeted gene flow, which involves moving individuals with favorable traits to areas where these traits would have a conservation benefit, could have a much broader application in conservation. Across a species' range there may be long-standing geographic variation in traits or variation may have rapidly developed in response to a threatening process. Targeted gene flow could be used to promote natural resistance to threats to increase species resilience. We suggest that targeted gene flow is a currently underappreciated strategy in conservation that has applications ranging from the management of invasive species and their impacts to controlling the impact and virulence of pathogens. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Making conservation work for everyone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, J. [Veridian Corp., Ajax, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This presentation discussed the economic value of conservation, the optimal deployment of energy conservation. A sample load profile was presented to demonstrate how much electricity the average residential customer uses on a summer day. The average customer does not have the tools to understand the financial consequences of conservation for different types of equipment at different times of the day. Smart metering technology could help in this regard. Accurate unsubsidized prices are also considered to be the best incentive to conserve because customers will reduce electricity use when the prices are high. It was also suggested that standards for new appliances should be increased effectively to their economic value. The enablers to energy conservation include solid consumer education programs, real time metering in places where it is cost effective, real time pricing in places where it is practical, and power rates that reflect real costs. Barriers to energy conservation include the residual economic advantage that may be insufficient to justify investment; support from local distribution companies and transmission companies if the lost revenue adjustment mechanism (LRAM) is not sufficient to recover lost revenue and if LDCs are not sufficiently involved in the design of the electricity conservation program. 7 figs.

  9. Mistaken identity: activating conservative political identities induces "conservative" financial decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Michael W; Carranza, Erica; Fox, Craig R

    2008-11-01

    Four studies investigated whether activating a social identity can lead group members to choose options that are labeled in words associated with that identity. When political identities were made salient, Republicans (but not Democrats) became more likely to choose the gamble or investment option labeled "conservative." This shift did not occur in a condition in which the same options were unlabeled. Thus, the mechanism underlying the effect appears to be not activated identity-related values prioritizing low risk, but rather activated identity-related language (the group label "conservative"). Indeed, when political identities were salient, Republicans favored options labeled "conservative" regardless of whether the options were low or high risk. Finally, requiring participants to explain the label "conservative" before making their choice did not diminish the effect, which suggests that it does not merely reflect inattention to content or construct accessibility. We discuss the implications of these results for the literatures on identity, priming, choice, politics, and marketing.

  10. Conservation Lands and Preserves, Private - Volusia County Conservation Corridor

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — The Volusia Conservation Corridor (VCC) is a mosaic of contiguous parcels of land, approximately 55,000 acres in size, which sits essentially in the middle of the...

  11. Evaluation of Conservation Costs and Benefits of Developing Conservation Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Olanipekun N. O.

    2014-01-01

    Due to environmental degradation, depletion and overexploitation of natural resources caused by human activities resulted in development of strategies for conservation of species, habitats and resource. Hence, this paper thus examines the advantages of financial investment and critical elements associated with creating strategies for the conservation of various species. Interdependent to one another are fish, wildlife species, natural habitats as well as natural resources. It rightly observed...

  12. The conservation of orbital symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Woodward, R B

    2013-01-01

    The Conservation of Orbital Symmetry examines the principle of conservation of orbital symmetry and its use. The central content of the principle was that reactions occur readily when there is congruence between orbital symmetry characteristics of reactants and products, and only with difficulty when that congruence does not obtain-or to put it more succinctly, orbital symmetry is conserved in concerted reaction. This principle is expected to endure, whatever the language in which it may be couched, or whatever greater precision may be developed in its application and extension. The book ope

  13. Challenges of conservation: working objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Professor Elizabeth Pye

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the concepts and practice of museum conservation, and the role of conservation in preserving both material and significance of objects. It explores the conservation of science and industry collections and the fact that the significance of many of these objects lies in their operation. It considers alternatives to operating original objects but emphasises the value of experiencing the real thing, and argues that visitors should be given greater physical access to museum objects, including being enabled to handle and work functioning objects. It finishes by calling for research into the effects of operation on the objects themselves, and into what constitutes a satisfying experience of working objects.

  14. Climate, Carbon, Conservation and Communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaugn, Kit; Brickell, Emily [WWF-UK (United Kingdom); Roe, Dilys; Reid, Hannah; Elliot, Jo

    2007-07-01

    The growing market for carbon offers great opportunities for linking greenhouse gas mitigation with conservation of forests and biodiversity, and the generation of local livelihoods. For these combined objectives to be achieved, strong governance is needed along with institutions that ensure poor people win, rather than lose out, from the new challenges posed by climate change. This briefing paper explores the opportunities from and limitations to carbon-based funds for conservation and development. It highlights mechanisms that may help secure benefits for climate, conservation and communities.

  15. Local Responses to Participatory Conservation in Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Damodar; Nepal, Sanjay K.

    2010-02-01

    Biodiversity conservation has undergone a profound change in philosophy, policies and management approaches over the last forty years. The traditional top-down approach to nature protection has been widely criticized for failing to include critical social elements in management practices, and is being gradually replaced by a slew of participatory strategies under the rubric of bottom-up conservation. The new approach recognizes local communities as key partners in wildlife management and seeks their participation in social development and biodiversity conservation. However, every social context is different in its structure and functions, and in the way social groups respond to calls for participation. In order to gain a better understanding of the approach and the barriers encountered in its implementation, a questionnaire survey of 188 households was employed in the communities of the Upper Mustang extension of Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. The study provides a comparative analysis of community participation and its barriers between Non-Tourist (NT) and Tourist (TV) villages. The results revealed important differences between the two groups in terms of their participation in community programs, barriers to participation, and perception of benefits from participation. Owing to their distinct spatial, demographic and attitudinal differences, the two village groups have their own sets of needs, values and motivation factors which cannot be generalized and treated as such. The research clearly identifies the need for the conservation agency to be creative in devising strategies and initiatives appropriate to specific social groups so as to optimize their input in participatory conservation.

  16. Local responses to participatory conservation in Annapurna conservation area, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Damodar; Nepal, Sanjay K

    2010-02-01

    Biodiversity conservation has undergone a profound change in philosophy, policies and management approaches over the last forty years. The traditional top-down approach to nature protection has been widely criticized for failing to include critical social elements in management practices, and is being gradually replaced by a slew of participatory strategies under the rubric of bottom-up conservation. The new approach recognizes local communities as key partners in wildlife management and seeks their participation in social development and biodiversity conservation. However, every social context is different in its structure and functions, and in the way social groups respond to calls for participation. In order to gain a better understanding of the approach and the barriers encountered in its implementation, a questionnaire survey of 188 households was employed in the communities of the Upper Mustang extension of Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA) in Nepal. The study provides a comparative analysis of community participation and its barriers between Non-Tourist (NT) and Tourist (TV) villages. The results revealed important differences between the two groups in terms of their participation in community programs, barriers to participation, and perception of benefits from participation. Owing to their distinct spatial, demographic and attitudinal differences, the two village groups have their own sets of needs, values and motivation factors which cannot be generalized and treated as such. The research clearly identifies the need for the conservation agency to be creative in devising strategies and initiatives appropriate to specific social groups so as to optimize their input in participatory conservation.

  17. The Conservation of Panel paintings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Until the early 17th century almost all portable paintings were created on wood supports, including masterpieces by famous painters, ranging from Giotto to Dürer to Rembrandt. The structural conservation of these paintings requires specific knowledge and skills as the supports are susceptible...... to damage caused by unstable environmental conditions. Unfortunately, past structural interventions often caused significant damage due to insufficient knowledge of the behaviour of the wood panels, glue and paint layers. Over the last fifty years, the field has developed treatment strategies based...... on interdisciplinary collaboration and on the knowledge of specialist conservators. Most current conservation protocols rely on empirical knowledge of conservators and are not necessarily based on a scientific understanding of the nature and behaviour of wood and paint layers. In order to move the field forward...

  18. Operationalizing biodiversity for conservation planning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    diversity conservation has emerged as a central focus of environmental concern. ..... and temperature (and, sometimes, soil types). For many areas of the world, ..... fauna of Australia (eds) W R Baker and P J M Greensdale. (Adelaide: Peacock ...

  19. Conservation tillage in organic farming

    OpenAIRE

    PEIGNE, J.; Vedie, H.; DEMEUSY, J.; Gerber, M.; VIAN, J-F.; GAUTRONNEAU, Y.; CANNAVACCUIOLO, M.; Aveline, A.; GITEAU, L.L.; Berry, D.

    2009-01-01

    Organic farmers are interested in adopting conservation tillage to preserve soil quality and fertility and to prevent soil erosion. Within the framework of a French national study, we compared conventional (ploughing) and conservation tillage systems in organic farming for arable and vegetable cropping systems. Field experiments and on-farm surveys were conducted in several regions of France in order to assess the effects of different tillage systems on soil fertility (physical, chemical, bio...

  20. Linearization of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belendez, A; Alvarez, M L [Departamento de Fisica, IngenierIa de Sistemas y TeorIa de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Fernandez, E; Pascual, I [Departamento de Optica, FarmacologIa y AnatomIa, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: a.belendez@ua.es

    2009-03-11

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for the complete range of oscillation amplitudes. Some conservative nonlinear oscillators are analysed to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of the technique.

  1. Orchid conservation: making the links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Michael F; Pailler, Thierry; Dixon, Kingsley W

    2015-09-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest families of flowering plants, present particular challenges for conservation, due in great part to their often complex interactions with mycorrhizal fungi, pollinators and host trees. In this Highlight, we present seven papers focusing on orchids and their interactions and other factors relating to their conservation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. 75 FR 34924 - Conservation Stewardship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Commodity Credit Corporation 7 CFR Part 1470 RIN 0578-AA43 Conservation Stewardship Program AGENCY: Commodity Credit Corporation, Natural Resources Conservation Service, United States Department of..., Rulemaking Manager, Natural Resources Conservation Service. BILLING CODE 3410-16-P ...

  3. Successful conservative treatment of chylothorax following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful conservative treatment of chylothorax following oesophagectomy – a clinical algorithm. ... Design. During a 2-year period, 3 patients developed chylothorax after oesophagectomy. This was treated conservatively, following our departmental protocol. Results. Conservative management (total parenteral nutrition, ...

  4. Conservation genetics of Iberian raptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez–Cruz, B.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I provide an overview of conservation genetics and describe the management actions in the wild that can benefit from conservation genetic studies. I describe the genetic factors of risk for the survival of wild species, the consequences of loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and outbreeding depression, and the use of genetic tools to delimitate units of conservation. Then I introduce the most common applications of conservation genetics in the management of wild populations. In a second part of the paper I review the conservation genetic studies carried on the Iberian raptors. I introduce several studies on the Spanish imperial eagle, the bearded vulture, the black vulture and the red kite that were carried out using autosomal microsatellite markers and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequencing. I describe studies on the lesser kestrel and Egyptian vulture that additionally applied major histocompatibility complex (MHC markers, with the purpose of incorporating the study of non–neutral variation. For every species I explain how these studies can be and/or are applied in the strategy of conservation in the wild.

  5. Constructing Conservation Impact: Understanding Monitoring and Evaluation in Conservation NGOs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Benson Wahlén

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing number of scholars critically examine large conservation organisations to explore organisational intentions, practices, and outcomes. In parallel, other scholars have problematised audit cultures, suggesting that these seemingly good practices of evaluation and measurement are not neutral and instead have consequences for governance and power. This article combines literature on conservation NGOs, organisational theory, and audit culture to study the inner workings of conservation and to understand the construction of effectiveness and impact. I draw on semi-structured interviews to examine how a large, international conservation organisation, which I term the World Conservation Organisation (WCO; a pseudonym, coordinates monitoring and evaluation (M&E processes among its international, national, and local offices. I find individual staff within WCO make varying assumptions about the M&E policies and place different values on M&E, which results in different institutional logics towards M&E and a broader organisational failure to measure progress and reflect upon outcomes. The findings also show difficulties in translating broad organisational goals into specific project activities, underscoring tensions in implementation and limitations in M&E practice. I also find that organisational and managerial pressure to report success is greater than donor pressure, a finding that expands understandings of NGO-donor dynamics.

  6. Domain architecture conservation in orthologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Pekkari, Isabella; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2011-08-05

    As orthologous proteins are expected to retain function more often than other homologs, they are often used for functional annotation transfer between species. However, ortholog identification methods do not take into account changes in domain architecture, which are likely to modify a protein's function. By domain architecture we refer to the sequential arrangement of domains along a protein sequence.To assess the level of domain architecture conservation among orthologs, we carried out a large-scale study of such events between human and 40 other species spanning the entire evolutionary range. We designed a score to measure domain architecture similarity and used it to analyze differences in domain architecture conservation between orthologs and paralogs relative to the conservation of primary sequence. We also statistically characterized the extents of different types of domain swapping events across pairs of orthologs and paralogs. The analysis shows that orthologs exhibit greater domain architecture conservation than paralogous homologs, even when differences in average sequence divergence are compensated for, for homologs that have diverged beyond a certain threshold. We interpret this as an indication of a stronger selective pressure on orthologs than paralogs to retain the domain architecture required for the proteins to perform a specific function. In general, orthologs as well as the closest paralogous homologs have very similar domain architectures, even at large evolutionary separation.The most common domain architecture changes observed in both ortholog and paralog pairs involved insertion/deletion of new domains, while domain shuffling and segment duplication/deletion were very infrequent. On the whole, our results support the hypothesis that function conservation between orthologs demands higher domain architecture conservation than other types of homologs, relative to primary sequence conservation. This supports the notion that orthologs are

  7. Water Conservation and Water Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Water storage can be a viable part of the solution to water conservation. This means that we should include reservoirs. Regardless, one should evaluate all aspects of water conservation principles. Recent drought in California indicates that there is an urgent need to re-visit the techniques used to maintain the water supply-chain mechanism in the entire state. We all recognize the fact that fish and wildlife depend on the streams, rivers and wetlands for survival. It is a well-known fact that there is an immediate need to provide solid protection to all these resources. Laws and regulations should help meet the needs of natural systems. Farmers may be forced to drilling wells deeper than ever. But, they will be eventually depleting groundwater reserves. Needless to say that birds, fish and wildlife cannot access these groundwater table. California is talking a lot about conservation. Unfortunately, the conservation efforts have not established a strong visible hold. The Environmental Protection Agency has a plan called E2PLAN (Narayanan, 2012). It is EPA's plan for achieving energy and environmental performance, leadership, accountability, and carbon neutrality. In June 2011, the EPA published a comprehensive, multi-year planning document called Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan. The author has previously reported these in detail at the 2012 AGU fall meeting. References: Ziegler, Jay (15 JUNE 2014). The Conversation: Water conservation efforts aren't taking hold, but there are encouraging signs. THE SACRAMENTO BEE. California. Narayanan, Mysore. (2012). The Importance of Water Conservation in the 21st Century. 72nd AGU International Conference. Eos Transactions: American Geophysical Union, Vol. 92, No. 56, Fall Meeting Supplement, 2012. H31I - 1255.http://www.sacbee.com/2014/06/15/6479862/jay-ziegler-water-conservation.html#storylink=cpy

  8. Domain architecture conservation in orthologs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background As orthologous proteins are expected to retain function more often than other homologs, they are often used for functional annotation transfer between species. However, ortholog identification methods do not take into account changes in domain architecture, which are likely to modify a protein's function. By domain architecture we refer to the sequential arrangement of domains along a protein sequence. To assess the level of domain architecture conservation among orthologs, we carried out a large-scale study of such events between human and 40 other species spanning the entire evolutionary range. We designed a score to measure domain architecture similarity and used it to analyze differences in domain architecture conservation between orthologs and paralogs relative to the conservation of primary sequence. We also statistically characterized the extents of different types of domain swapping events across pairs of orthologs and paralogs. Results The analysis shows that orthologs exhibit greater domain architecture conservation than paralogous homologs, even when differences in average sequence divergence are compensated for, for homologs that have diverged beyond a certain threshold. We interpret this as an indication of a stronger selective pressure on orthologs than paralogs to retain the domain architecture required for the proteins to perform a specific function. In general, orthologs as well as the closest paralogous homologs have very similar domain architectures, even at large evolutionary separation. The most common domain architecture changes observed in both ortholog and paralog pairs involved insertion/deletion of new domains, while domain shuffling and segment duplication/deletion were very infrequent. Conclusions On the whole, our results support the hypothesis that function conservation between orthologs demands higher domain architecture conservation than other types of homologs, relative to primary sequence conservation. This supports the

  9. Forest conservation delivers highly variable coral reef conservation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Carissa J; Jupiter, Stacy D; Selig, Elizabeth R; Watts, Matthew E; Halpern, Benjamin S; Kamal, Muhammad; Roelfsema, Chris; Possingham, Hugh P

    2012-06-01

    Coral reefs are threatened by human activities on both the land (e.g., deforestation) and the sea (e.g., overfishing). Most conservation planning for coral reefs focuses on removing threats in the sea, neglecting management actions on the land. A more integrated approach to coral reef conservation, inclusive of land-sea connections, requires an understanding of how and where terrestrial conservation actions influence reefs. We address this by developing a land-sea planning approach to inform fine-scale spatial management decisions and test it in Fiji. Our aim is to determine where the protection of forest can deliver the greatest return on investment for coral reef ecosystems. To assess the benefits of conservation to coral reefs, we estimate their relative condition as influenced by watershed-based pollution and fishing. We calculate the cost-effectiveness of protecting forest and find that investments deliver rapidly diminishing returns for improvements to relative reef condition. For example, protecting 2% of forest in one area is almost 500 times more beneficial than protecting 2% in another area, making prioritization essential. For the scenarios evaluated, relative coral reef condition could be improved by 8-58% if all remnant forest in Fiji were protected rather than deforested. Finally, we determine the priority of each coral reef for implementing a marine protected area when all remnant forest is protected for conservation. The general results will support decisions made by the Fiji Protected Area Committee as they establish a national protected area network that aims to protect 20% of the land and 30% of the inshore waters by 2020. Although challenges remain, we can inform conservation decisions around the globe by tackling the complex issues relevant to integrated land-sea planning.

  10. Decentralizing conservation and diversifying livelihoods within Kanchenjunga Conservation Area, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Pete; Thapa, Brijesh; Jacob, Aerin

    2015-12-01

    To alleviate poverty and enhance conservation in resource dependent communities, managers must identify existing livelihood strategies and the associated factors that impede household access to livelihood assets. Researchers increasingly advocate reallocating management power from exclusionary central institutions to a decentralized system of management based on local and inclusive participation. However, it is yet to be shown if decentralizing conservation leads to diversified livelihoods within a protected area. The purpose of this study was to identify and assess factors affecting household livelihood diversification within Nepal's Kanchenjunga Conservation Area Project, the first protected area in Asia to decentralize conservation. We randomly surveyed 25% of Kanchenjunga households to assess household socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and access to livelihood assets. We used a cluster analysis with the ten most common income generating activities (both on- and off-farm) to group the strategies households use to diversify livelihoods, and a multinomial logistic regression to identify predictors of livelihood diversification. We found four distinct groups of household livelihood strategies with a range of diversification that directly corresponded to household income. The predictors of livelihood diversification were more related to pre-existing socioeconomic and demographic factors (e.g., more landholdings and livestock, fewer dependents, receiving remittances) than activities sponsored by decentralizing conservation (e.g., microcredit, training, education, interaction with project staff). Taken together, our findings indicate that without direct policies to target marginalized groups, decentralized conservation in Kanchenjunga will continue to exclude marginalized groups, limiting a household's ability to diversify their livelihood and perpetuating their dependence on natural resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Animal conservation, carbon and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader-Williams, N

    2002-08-15

    International conventions to reduce carbon dioxide levels focus on ecosystems and do not specifically recognize the need to conserve species. However, species are the building blocks of ecosystems, they are more widely understood among the public, and they provide means of capturing market values from ecosystems. Achieving successful conservation globally will require ensuring that the systems under which species and ecosystems are conserved are more inclusive than statutory protected areas. Equal emphasis needs to be placed on including effective regimes that also encompass private and communal ownership through incentive-based approaches. Nevertheless, if globalized industries such as nature-based tourism or consumptive use are to provide meaningful incentives locally, a key requirement is to reduce leakage of revenue that is earned as a result of conserving species, such that local development concerns are addressed. However, current biodiversity conventions that address these needs are largely aspirational, while globalized industries such as tourism mainly promote their green credentials only through voluntary codes of conduct. Greatly improved linkages are needed between international conservation concerns and ensuring effective solutions to sustainability, which inevitably rest at national and sub-national levels, through systems of rights, tenure, benefits and incentives.

  12. Dynamic conservation for migratory species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Mark D.; Sullivan, Brian L.; Hallstein, Eric; Matsumoto, Sandra; Kelling, Steve; Merrifield, Matthew; Fink, Daniel; Johnston, Alison; Hochachka, Wesley M.; Bruns, Nicholas E.; Reiter, Matthew E.; Veloz, Sam; Hickey, Catherine; Elliott, Nathan; Martin, Leslie; Fitzpatrick, John W.; Spraycar, Paul; Golet, Gregory H.; McColl, Christopher; Morrison, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    In an era of unprecedented and rapid global change, dynamic conservation strategies that tailor the delivery of habitat to when and where it is most needed can be critical for the persistence of species, especially those with diverse and dispersed habitat requirements. We demonstrate the effectiveness of such a strategy for migratory waterbirds. We analyzed citizen science and satellite data to develop predictive models of bird populations and the availability of wetlands, which we used to determine temporal and spatial gaps in habitat during a vital stage of the annual migration. We then filled those gaps using a reverse auction marketplace to incent qualifying landowners to create temporary wetlands on their properties. This approach is a cost-effective way of adaptively meeting habitat needs for migratory species, optimizes conservation outcomes relative to investment, and can be applied broadly to other conservation challenges. PMID:28845449

  13. Water conservation behavior in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnicar, Sara; Hurlimann, Anna; Grün, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Ensuring a nation's long term water supply requires the use of both supply-sided approaches such as water augmentation through water recycling, and demand-sided approaches such as water conservation. Conservation behavior can only be increased if the key drivers of such behavior are understood. The aim of this study is to reveal the main drivers from a comprehensive pool of hypothesized factors. An empirical study was conducted with 3094 Australians. Data was analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis and decision trees to determine which factors best predict self-reported water conservation behavior. Two key factors emerge: high level of pro-environmental behavior; and pro-actively seeking out information about water. A number of less influential factors are also revealed. Public communication strategy implications are derived. PMID:22522412

  14. 7 CFR 631.9 - Conservation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation plan. 631.9 Section 631.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM General Provisions § 631.9 Conservation...

  15. 77 FR 15933 - Conservation Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Agency (FSA) implemented the new Conservation Loan (CL) Program authorized by the Food, Conservation, and... the conservation plan demonstrate NRCS Field Office Technical Guide quality criteria for at least... Farm Service Agency 7 CFR Parts 761, 762, 764, 765, and 766 RIN 0560-AI04 Conservation Loan Program...

  16. Developing conservation agriculture in the Philippines

    OpenAIRE

    Mercado, Agustin R., Jr.; Reyes, Manuel R.; Ella, Victor B.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation describes the implementation of Conservation Agriculture production practices in Claveria, Misamis, Philippines, as well as its impacts on soil conservation and marketable produce yields. This research was conducted by the SANREM CRSP Long Term Research Activity 12, Conservation agriculture for food security in Cambodia and the Philippines. LTRA-12 (Conservation agriculture for food security in Cambodia and the Philippines)

  17. 43 CFR 427.1 - Water conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Water conservation. 427.1 Section 427.1... INTERIOR WATER CONSERVATION RULES AND REGULATIONS § 427.1 Water conservation. (a) In general. The Secretary shall encourage the full consideration and incorporation of prudent and responsible water conservation...

  18. Conservative Management of Hip Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Tisha A M

    2017-07-01

    Hip dysplasia (HD) is a common orthopedic condition seen in small animal patients that leads to osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joint. The disease can be managed conservatively or surgically. The goals of surgical treatment in the immature patient are to either prevent the clinical signs of HD or to prevent or slow the progression of osteoarthritis. In mature patients surgery is used as a salvage procedure to treat debilitating osteoarthritis. Conservative management can be used in dogs with mild or intermittent clinical signs and includes nutritional management and weight control, exercise modification, physical rehabilitation, pain management and disease-modifying agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Animal models and conserved processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greek Ray

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of conserved processes presents unique opportunities for using nonhuman animal models in biomedical research. However, the concept must be examined in the context that humans and nonhuman animals are evolved, complex, adaptive systems. Given that nonhuman animals are examples of living systems that are differently complex from humans, what does the existence of a conserved gene or process imply for inter-species extrapolation? Methods We surveyed the literature including philosophy of science, biological complexity, conserved processes, evolutionary biology, comparative medicine, anti-neoplastic agents, inhalational anesthetics, and drug development journals in order to determine the value of nonhuman animal models when studying conserved processes. Results Evolution through natural selection has employed components and processes both to produce the same outcomes among species but also to generate different functions and traits. Many genes and processes are conserved, but new combinations of these processes or different regulation of the genes involved in these processes have resulted in unique organisms. Further, there is a hierarchy of organization in complex living systems. At some levels, the components are simple systems that can be analyzed by mathematics or the physical sciences, while at other levels the system cannot be fully analyzed by reducing it to a physical system. The study of complex living systems must alternate between focusing on the parts and examining the intact whole organism while taking into account the connections between the two. Systems biology aims for this holism. We examined the actions of inhalational anesthetic agents and anti-neoplastic agents in order to address what the characteristics of complex living systems imply for inter-species extrapolation of traits and responses related to conserved processes. Conclusion We conclude that even the presence of conserved processes is

  20. Impact of conservation tillage on nematode populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, N A

    1986-04-01

    Literature reporting the development of conservation tillage and the research that has been conducted on nematode control in crops grown in conservation tillage systems is reviewed. Effects of different types of conservation tillage on population densities of various nematode species in monocropping and multicropping systems, effects of tillage on nematode distribution in the soil profile, effects of conservation tillage on nematode control, and the role of nematology in conservation tillage research are discussed.

  1. Mainstreaming the social sciences in conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nathan J; Roth, Robin; Klain, Sarah C; Chan, Kai M A; Clark, Douglas A; Cullman, Georgina; Epstein, Graham; Nelson, Michael Paul; Stedman, Richard; Teel, Tara L; Thomas, Rebecca E W; Wyborn, Carina; Curran, Deborah; Greenberg, Alison; Sandlos, John; Veríssimo, Diogo

    2017-02-01

    Despite broad recognition of the value of social sciences and increasingly vocal calls for better engagement with the human element of conservation, the conservation social sciences remain misunderstood and underutilized in practice. The conservation social sciences can provide unique and important contributions to society's understanding of the relationships between humans and nature and to improving conservation practice and outcomes. There are 4 barriers-ideological, institutional, knowledge, and capacity-to meaningful integration of the social sciences into conservation. We provide practical guidance on overcoming these barriers to mainstream the social sciences in conservation science, practice, and policy. Broadly, we recommend fostering knowledge on the scope and contributions of the social sciences to conservation, including social scientists from the inception of interdisciplinary research projects, incorporating social science research and insights during all stages of conservation planning and implementation, building social science capacity at all scales in conservation organizations and agencies, and promoting engagement with the social sciences in and through global conservation policy-influencing organizations. Conservation social scientists, too, need to be willing to engage with natural science knowledge and to communicate insights and recommendations clearly. We urge the conservation community to move beyond superficial engagement with the conservation social sciences. A more inclusive and integrative conservation science-one that includes the natural and social sciences-will enable more ecologically effective and socially just conservation. Better collaboration among social scientists, natural scientists, practitioners, and policy makers will facilitate a renewed and more robust conservation. Mainstreaming the conservation social sciences will facilitate the uptake of the full range of insights and contributions from these fields into

  2. Conservative approach to rectosigmoid endometriosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egekvist, Anne G; Marinovskij, Edvard; Forman, Axel

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the risk of surgery after initial conservative treatment of rectosigmoid endometriosis in relation to demographic data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted on the tertiary endometriosis referral unit, Aarhus University Hospital. Medical r...

  3. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology...

  4. Prime time for turtle conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Ross Kiester; Deanna H. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Our turtle heritage is diminishing at a rate outpacing that of other main animal groups. The 2011-Year of the Turtle partnership and campaign is an opportunity to raise awareness for turtles, celebrate our turtle heritage, herald conservation and research successes, and identify gaps in our understanding that can be the focus of future work. We outline seven...

  5. The conservator-restorer perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Licari, James

    2013-01-01

    Cultural Heritage may be tangible or intangible. Industrial Heritage also includes many intangible dimensions embodied in the skills, memories and social life of workers and their communities. Conservator restorers must strive to the best of their ability to study and document cultural assets while clearly identifying their values to better preserve them.

  6. Training in Conservation of Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbeck, Carla; Schwartz, Marian

    1970-01-01

    Reinforcement training was shown to facilitate acquisition of conservation of weight, while active participation was no more effective than passive observation. This report is based on a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of requirements for the M.S. degree by the first author under the supervision of the second author. (MH)

  7. Conservation of threatened natural habitats

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hall, AV

    1984-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this book is to give a holistic setting to the conservation of plants and animals. Instead of concentrating on species alone, the aim is to spread the concern to the physical and biological features; including humanity that make up...

  8. Regularity of conservative inductive limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kucera

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequentially complete inductive limit of Fréchet spaces is regular, see [3]. With a minor modification, this property can be extended to inductive limits of arbitrary locally convex spaces under an additional assumption of conservativeness.

  9. Cubication of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L.; Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Immaculada

    2009-01-01

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear…

  10. Linearization of Conservative Nonlinear Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belendez, A.; Alvarez, M. L.; Fernandez, E.; Pascual, I.

    2009-01-01

    A linearization method of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force which allows us to obtain a frequency-amplitude relation which is valid not only for small but also for large amplitudes and, sometimes, for…

  11. Theological paradigms and conservative Afrikaners

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    logical paradigm for conservative Afrikaner believers must be critical, legitimising and free of .... thoughts with a belief in the divine source of knowledge. Both aimed at arriving at knowledge which is .... the right-wing Afrikaners with the vision that they are the chosen Israel. These peo ple emphasise the concept of election in ...

  12. Food production and nature conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, Iain J.; Squire, Geoff R.; Prins, Herbert H.T.

    2016-01-01

    Feeding the world's growing human population is increasingly challenging, especially as more people adopt a western diet and lifestyle. Doing so without causing damage to nature poses an even greater challenge. This book argues that in order to create a sustainable food supply whilst conserving

  13. Understanding Conservation: A Playful Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefaloukos, Mary-Anne; Bobis, Janette

    2011-01-01

    This article describes some aspects of Piaget's Theory of Cognitive Development. It highlights the importance of giving young children specific access to explore conservation in measurement, which will give students invaluable experiences in measurement that in years to come will be regarded as their prior knowledge of the concept. This is…

  14. Madagascar Conservation & Development: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Readers are also encouraged to alert Madagascar Conservation & Developmentto pertinent letter-writing campaigns and other activities, which may need the support of the Madagascar ... They send in a detailed review on the contribution together with the reviewer recommendation form (the latter is for the editors only).

  15. Renewable energy and wildlife conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mona

    2016-09-09

    The renewable energy sector is rapidly expanding and diversifying the power supply of the country. Yet, as our Nation works to advance renewable energy and to conserve wildlife, some conflicts arise. To address these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting innovative research and developing workable solutions to reduce impacts of renewable energy production on wildlife.

  16. Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks. Part I : Genuine Nonlinearity and Discontinuous Solutions. Phoolan Prasad is with the. Department of. Mathematics, Indian. Institute of Science and has been working in the area of nonlinear waves and hyperbolic partial differential equations. He is deeply interested in.

  17. Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks. 2. Stability Consideration and Examples. Phoolan Prasad is with the. Department of. Mathematics, Indian. Institute of Science and has been working in the area of nonlinear waves and hyperbolic partial differential equations. He is deeply interested in mathematics education at.

  18. Conservation and Renewable Energy Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughan, K.H.

    1991-05-01

    This bibliography lists reports and selected papers published under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Conservation and Renewable Energy Program from 1986 through February 1991. Information on documents published prior to 1986 can be obtained from ORNL. Most of the documents in the bibliography are available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  19. Conservative Ideology and Ambivalent Sexism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Andrew N.; Mull, Melinda S.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the relationship between different facets of conservative ideology and ambivalent sexism, 246 residents of two towns in southern Michigan completed a social dominance orientation scale (SDO), a right-wing authoritarianism scale (RWA), a Protestant work ethic scale (PWE), and the Glick and Fiske (1996) Ambivalent Sexism Inventory via a…

  20. Arizona Conserve Water Educators Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This award-winning, 350-page, full-color book provides a thorough study of Arizona water resources from a water conservation perspective. Its background section contains maps, graphs, diagrams and photos that facilitate the teaching of 15 interactive, multi-disciplinary lessons to K-12 students. In addition, 10 Arizona case studies are highlighted…

  1. Energy conservation in rented buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klingberg, T.; Broechner, J.; Forsman, J.; Gaunt, L.; Holgersson, M.

    1984-08-01

    The bulletin is an anthology of nine essays by different authors addressing the issue of energy conservation in buildings, where there exists a landlord/tenant relationship. After an overview of the rental market and the stock of rental buildings different types of rental contracts and energy charges are described.

  2. Perception as a Possible Source of Conservation: Evidence for Length Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Irwin W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Perceptual counterparts of a series of conservation of length tests were presented to subjects who were categorized as conservers or nonconservers conservation of length pre-tests, and to conservers and nonconservers given conservation length training. Perceptual performance of the untrained nonconservers was significantly worse than that of the…

  3. Googling trends in conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Raphaël; Massicotte, Philippe; Pépino, Marc

    2014-02-01

    Web-crawling approaches, that is, automated programs data mining the internet to obtain information about a particular process, have recently been proposed for monitoring early signs of ecosystem degradation or for establishing crop calendars. However, lack of a clear conceptual and methodological framework has prevented the development of such approaches within the field of conservation biology. Our objective was to illustrate how Google Trends, a freely accessible web-crawling engine, can be used to track changes in timing of biological processes, spatial distribution of invasive species, and level of public awareness about key conservation issues. Google Trends returns the number of internet searches that were made for a keyword in a given region of the world over a defined period. Using data retrieved online for 13 countries, we exemplify how Google Trends can be used to study the timing of biological processes, such as the seasonal recurrence of pollen release or mosquito outbreaks across a latitudinal gradient. We mapped the spatial extent of results from Google Trends for 5 invasive species in the United States and found geographic patterns in invasions that are consistent with their coarse-grained distribution at state levels. From 2004 through 2012, Google Trends showed that the level of public interest and awareness about conservation issues related to ecosystem services, biodiversity, and climate change increased, decreased, and followed both trends, respectively. Finally, to further the development of research approaches at the interface of conservation biology, collective knowledge, and environmental management, we developed an algorithm that allows the rapid retrieval of Google Trends data. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. Conservation Treatment and the Custodian/Conservator Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Appelbaum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available La collaboration entre les conservateurs-restaurateurs et les conservateurs et de musées joue un rôle important dans la planification de la conservation-restauration, en ce qu’elle permet de déterminer ensemble le but final du traitement. Les conservateurs de musées devraient ainsi comprendre le processus de prise de décisions en matière d’intervention de restauration,  pour y participer d'une façon significative et s’assurer que les décisions de traitement sont compatibles avec l'utilisation actuelle, la signification et les valeurs d'une oeuvre d'art. Cette collaboration est cependant rare, et rendue de surcroît difficile par l’usage fréquent que les conservateurs-restaurateurs font du vocabulaire technique.Collaboration between conservators and custodians is an important part of conservation treatment planning, particularly while deciding on the treatment goal. Custodians need to understand more about the treatment decision-making process in order to participate in a meaningful way and to assure that treatment decisions are consistent with the current use, meaning, and values of a work of art.  Meaningful collaboration is, however, rare, made difficult by a lack of understanding among the parties, and exacerbated by conservators’ habitual use of technical language.  It is possible – and desirable - for conservators to discuss the treatment decision-making process using non-technical terminology so that real collaboration can take place.  

  5. Conservation Genetics, Precision Conservation, and De-extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desalle, Rob; Amato, George

    2017-07-01

    It has been estimated that three species on the planet now go extinct every hour and that this rate is orders of magnitude higher than the planet has seen in previous catastrophic extinction events. We clearly are in the midst of a sixth extinction, and this one is different from the previous five. Why? This sixth extinction is caused by the activity of a single species-us. If there is any hope of ameliorating this extinction, it will entirely be up to us, as the current stewards of this planet, to change the course. There are many challenges, though, to marshaling this effort. Two primary ones immediately come to mind. The first is that we simply haven't found the right biological tools to address this crisis. The second is that many humans on this planet don't even admit we have a problem. These are two very different problems. The first is primarily technological. Only recently has some of the more advanced biologically focused technology been available to conservation biology and extinction science. Humans are enthralled by cutting-edge technology for the most part, and for the public, one of the more exciting possibilities in the realm of conservation biology is that some of the more charismatic species that have gone extinct might be resurrected through next-generation technologies. While our discussion will articulate some weaknesses with the de-extinction approach to conservation biology, we suggest that the "sexiness" of the technologies used in de-extinction may simultaneously provide a definition of the techniques viable in conservation biology and afford a teachable moment. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  6. Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooteboom, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    CITES: In February 1987 Singapore finally ratified the Washington Treaty on the international trade in threatened species, exceptions have been made for the trade in crocodile products. A serious breach has now been closed that was of some impediment to the trade between Singapore and many of its

  7. Leadership: a new frontier in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Jim C; Chan, Kai M; Finkelstein, Myra E; Stephens, Scott; Nelson, Cara R; Grant, Jacqualine B; Dombeck, Michael P

    2009-08-01

    Leadership is a critical tool for expanding the influence of conservation science, but recent advances in leadership concepts and practice remain underutilized by conservation scientists. Furthermore, an explicit conceptual foundation and definition of leadership in conservation science are not available in the literature. Here we drew on our diverse leadership experiences, our reading of leadership literature, and discussions with selected conservation science leaders to define conservation-science leadership, summarize an exploratory set of leadership principles that are applicable to conservation science, and recommend actions to expand leadership capacity among conservation scientists and practitioners. We define 2 types of conservation-science leadership: shaping conservation science through path-breaking research, and advancing the integration of conservation science into policy, management, and society at large. We focused on the second, integrative type of leadership because we believe it presents the greatest opportunity for improving conservation effectiveness. We identified 8 leadership principles derived mainly from the "adaptive leadership" literature: recognize the social dimension of the problem; cycle frequently through action and reflection; get and maintain attention; combine strengths of multiple leaders; extend your reach through networks of relationships; strategically time your effort; nurture productive conflict; and cultivate diversity. Conservation scientists and practitioners should strive to develop themselves as leaders, and the Society for Conservation Biology, conservation organizations, and academia should support this effort through professional development, mentoring, teaching, and research.

  8. 75 FR 23823 - Sixth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-04

    ... POWER AND CONSERVATION PLANNING COUNCIL Sixth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Plan AGENCY: Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council (Northwest Power and Conservation Council; the Council). ACTION: Notice of adoption of the Sixth Northwest Electric Power and Conservation...

  9. Built heritage monitoring conservation management

    CERN Document Server

    Boriani, Maurizio; Guidi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive, up-to-date overview on the most pressing issues in the conservation and management of archaeological, architectural, and urban landscapes. Multidisciplinary research is presented on a wide range of built heritage sites, from archaeological ruins and historic centers through to twentieth century and industrial architectural heritage. The role of ICT and new technologies, including those used for digital archiving, surveying, modeling, and monitoring, is extensively discussed, in recognition of their importance for professionals working in the field. Detailed attention is also paid to materials and treatments employed in preventive conservation and management. With contributions from leading experts, including university researchers, professionals, and policy makers, the book will be invaluable for all who seek to understand, and solve, the challenges faced in the protection and enhancement of the built heritage.

  10. Conservation constraints on random matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Ma Wen Jong; Hsieh, J

    2003-01-01

    We study the random matrices constrained by the summation rules that are present in the Hessian of the potential energy surface in the instantaneous normal mode calculations, as a result of momentum conservation. In this paper, we analyse the properties related to such conservation constraints in two classes of real symmetric matrices: one with purely row-wise summation rules and the other with the constraints on the blocks of each matrix, which underscores partially the spatial dimension. We show explicitly that the constraints are removable by separating the degrees of freedom of the zero-eigenvalue modes. The non-spectral degrees of freedom under the constraints can be realized in terms of the ordinary constraint-free orthogonal symmetry but with the rank deducted by the block dimension. We propose that the ensemble of real symmetric matrices with full randomness, constrained by the summation rules, is equivalent to the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) with lowered rank. Independent of the joint probabil...

  11. Cubication of conservative nonlinear oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belendez, Augusto; Alvarez, Mariela L [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain); Fernandez, Elena; Pascual, Inmaculada [Departamento de Optica, FarmacologIa y Anatomia, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)], E-mail: a.belendez@ua.es

    2009-09-15

    A cubication procedure of the nonlinear differential equation for conservative nonlinear oscillators is analysed and discussed. This scheme is based on the Chebyshev series expansion of the restoring force, and this allows us to approximate the original nonlinear differential equation by a Duffing equation in which the coefficients for the linear and cubic terms depend on the initial amplitude, A, while in a Taylor expansion of the restoring force these coefficients are independent of A. The replacement of the original nonlinear equation by an approximate Duffing equation allows us to obtain an approximate frequency-amplitude relation as a function of the complete elliptic integral of the first kind. Some conservative nonlinear oscillators are analysed to illustrate the usefulness and effectiveness of this scheme.

  12. Community Forestry and Forest Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Anders; Casse, Thorkil

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a meta-study of local forest management experiences in developing countries drawn from a review of 56 case-studies presented in 52 papers. Many case-studies report positive links between community forestry and forest conservation. In international organizations and NGOs...... there is a generally accepted agreement that collective management (community forestry) will yield success in forest conservation. However, the claim is seldom rigorously examined. We suggest to have a review of the literature and to propose a first step to a test of the claim in order to reach a first generalization...... are very heterogeneous in their approaches, and it is also suggested that the state still has a role to play, even when the transfer of management rights to the forest resources is genuine. Community forestry does not work in a vacuum, and we suggest that a minimum requirement is probably the presence...

  13. Psychological dimensions of Energy Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Tonello, Graciela; Jakovcevic, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    One of the most serious current environmental problems is the depletion of non renewable natural resources. The vast majority of our daily actions involve the consumption of energy and they increase the problem. Environmental psychology studies the psychological motivations that determine pro-ecological behaviour. In this context the aim of this review was to determine which psychological models and variables are better descriptors of residential energy conservation, comparing the predictive ...

  14. Island biodiversity conservation needs palaeoecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogué, Sandra; de Nascimento, Lea; Froyd, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    to human activities. Consequently, even the most degraded islands are a focus for restoration, eradication, and monitoring programmes to protect the remaining endemic and/or relict populations. Here, we build a framework that incorporates an assessment of the degree of change from multiple baseline...... and the introduction of non-native species. We provide exemplification of how such approaches can provide valuable information for biodiversity conservation managers of island ecosystems....

  15. Wildlife cancer: a conservation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAloose, Denise; Newton, Alisa L

    2009-07-01

    Until recently, cancer in wildlife was not considered to be a conservation concern. However, with the identification of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease, sea turtle fibropapillomatosis and sea lion genital carcinoma, it has become apparent that neoplasia can be highly prevalent and have considerable effects on some species. It is also clear that anthropogenic activities contribute to the development of neoplasia in wildlife species, such as beluga whales and bottom-dwelling fish, making them sensitive sentinels of disturbed environments.

  16. Conservative treatment modalities in retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Bhavna; Jain, Amit; Azad, Rajvardhan

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on various conservative treatment modalities available for the treatment of retinoblastoma and their effectiveness, when used alone or in combination. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched through 2012 for published peer reviewed data on conservative treatment modalities for retinoblastoma. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumors, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermotherapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results. It is important to recognize that today, several treatment options are available that can obviate the need for enucleation, and cure the cancer with preservation of functional vision. A thorough knowledge and understanding of these conservative treatment modalities is essential for appropriate management. PMID:24104705

  17. Conservative treatment modalities in retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Chawla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy of childhood. A potentially curable cancer, its treatment has improved significantly over the last few decades. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on various conservative treatment modalities available for the treatment of retinoblastoma and their effectiveness, when used alone or in combination. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library were searched through 2012 for published peer reviewed data on conservative treatment modalities for retinoblastoma. Various studies show that while enucleation remains the standard of care for advanced intraocular tumors, conservative modalities that can result in globe salvage and preservation of useful vision are being increasingly employed. Such modalities include systemic chemotherapy, focal consolidation with transpupillary thermotherapy, laser photocoagulation and cryotherapy, plaque brachytherapy, and delivery of local chemotherapy using subconjunctival, sub-tenon, or intra-arterial routes. When used alone or in combination, these treatment modalities can help in avoidance of external beam radiotherapy or enucleation, thus reducing the potential for long-term side effects, while salvaging useful vision. Radioactive plaque brachytherapy has an established role in selected patients with intraocular retinoblastoma. Local injections of chemotherapeutic agents via the sub-tenon or sub-conjunctival route have been used with varying degrees of success, usually as an adjunct to systemic chemotherapy. Intra-arterial ophthalmic artery delivery of melphalan has shown promising results. It is important to recognize that today, several treatment options are available that can obviate the need for enucleation, and cure the cancer with preservation of functional vision. A thorough knowledge and understanding of these conservative treatment modalities is essential for appropriate management.

  18. China's brick history and conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, C. X.; Cantisani, E.; Fratini, F.

    2017-01-01

    of raw material were studied with regard to the mineralogical, petrographic, chemical, physical, mechanical characteristics, and the maximum firing temperature. It also makes measurements of the presented soluble salts in the altered brick samples. Preliminary conclusions are drawn with regard to three...... critical issues: the provenance of the bricks, the hitherto undocumented changes in the manufacturing technology, and the condition of the brick material in terms of conservation....

  19. Consequences of Not Conserving Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.; Crawford, L.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of fresh water is not only local, but also global. In certain parts of the world, much needed rain is becoming less frequent, possibly due to the effects of global warming. The resources of clean fresh water on earth are very limited and are reducing every year due to pollution like industrial waste, oil spills, untreated sewage, inefficient irrigation systems, waste and leakage, etc. This is destroying the ecosystem of the entire planet. Of course, in some parts of world there is rain almost throughout the year. Regardless, major problems are still prevalent because of a variety of reasons such as drainage, storage, evaporation, cleanliness, etc. It is all too well known that evapotranspiration contributes to a significant water loss from drainage basins. Most of the citizens of this world are still careless about water usage and are unappreciative of the need for water conservation. This is a very unpleasant fact and needs to change. Cost expenditures for the development of infrastructure to supply water to households and industries are becoming prohibitively expensive. Many parts in this world have extremely dry terrain and rainfall is not as frequent as it should be. As a result, the underground water tables are not replenished properly, thereby turning regions to arid land and deserts. Unless effective irrigation methods are used, potential evapotranspiration may be actually greater than precipitation provided by nature. The soil therefore dries out creating an arid landmass. The earth and its inhabitants can sustain only if creative methods of clean water conservation ideas are effectively implemented. (Co-author: Dr. Mysore Narayanan) References: http://www.epa.gov/oaintrnt/water/http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome?navid=conservationhttp://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wr/ws/wtrcnsv.htmlhttp://www.sandiego.gov/water/conservation/http://www.swcs.org/http://www.awwa.org/resources-tools/water-knowledge/water-conservation.aspxhttp://www.benefits-of-recycling.com/waterconservationmethods/

  20. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively. © 2015 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Climate change, wine, and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Lee; Roehrdanz, Patrick R; Ikegami, Makihiko; Shepard, Anderson V; Shaw, M Rebecca; Tabor, Gary; Zhi, Lu; Marquet, Pablo A; Hijmans, Robert J

    2013-04-23

    Climate change is expected to impact ecosystems directly, such as through shifting climatic controls on species ranges, and indirectly, for example through changes in human land use that may result in habitat loss. Shifting patterns of agricultural production in response to climate change have received little attention as a potential impact pathway for ecosystems. Wine grape production provides a good test case for measuring indirect impacts mediated by changes in agriculture, because viticulture is sensitive to climate and is concentrated in Mediterranean climate regions that are global biodiversity hotspots. Here we demonstrate that, on a global scale, the impacts of climate change on viticultural suitability are substantial, leading to possible conservation conflicts in land use and freshwater ecosystems. Area suitable for viticulture decreases 25% to 73% in major wine producing regions by 2050 in the higher RCP 8.5 concentration pathway and 19% to 62% in the lower RCP 4.5. Climate change may cause establishment of vineyards at higher elevations that will increase impacts on upland ecosystems and may lead to conversion of natural vegetation as production shifts to higher latitudes in areas such as western North America. Attempts to maintain wine grape productivity and quality in the face of warming may be associated with increased water use for irrigation and to cool grapes through misting or sprinkling, creating potential for freshwater conservation impacts. Agricultural adaptation and conservation efforts are needed that anticipate these multiple possible indirect effects.

  2. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Omar I; Delmas, Magali A

    2015-02-10

    In the electricity sector, energy conservation through technological and behavioral change is estimated to have a savings potential of 123 million metric tons of carbon per year, which represents 20% of US household direct emissions in the United States. In this article, we investigate the effectiveness of nonprice information strategies to motivate conservation behavior. We introduce environment and health-based messaging as a behavioral strategy to reduce energy use in the home and promote energy conservation. In a randomized controlled trial with real-time appliance-level energy metering, we find that environment and health-based information strategies, which communicate the environmental and public health externalities of electricity production, such as pounds of pollutants, childhood asthma, and cancer, outperform monetary savings information to drive behavioral change in the home. Environment and health-based information treatments motivated 8% energy savings versus control and were particularly effective on families with children, who achieved up to 19% energy savings. Our results are based on a panel of 3.4 million hourly appliance-level kilowatt-hour observations for 118 residences over 8 mo. We discuss the relative impacts of both cost-savings information and environmental health messaging strategies with residential consumers.

  3. Deep sea fisheries - implications in conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Botha

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available I stand before you as what I would reluctantly like to call a crisis conservationist. In marine fisheries conservation we are exposed to the full blast of human greed. Dr Hey has referred to the unfortunate human attitudes to nature conservation. I fully share his concern. Fisheries conservation finds itself in the unenviable position of having largely to apply conservation principles to species which are more often than not in advanced stages of commercial exploitation. In this situation ethics, aesthetics and science cuts little or no ice with decision-makers. The only language which they understand is economics. Unfortunately fisheries conservation has also been hampered by the well-meant but thoroughly unscientific efforts of certain lay so-called "conservation societies". Through their admirable but purely humanistic approach to conservation, they have antagonized economically-orientated decision-makers and thereby unfortunately harmed the cause of conservation.  

  4. State Conservation Lands; StaCons11

    Data.gov (United States)

    University of Rhode Island Geospatial Extension Program — Approximate edges of Conservation Lands protected by the State of Rhode Island through Fee Title Ownership, Conservation Easement, or Deed Restriction. Includes:...

  5. Conservative Treatment of Acute Colonic Diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, S. T.; Rottier, S. J.; van Geloven, A. A. W.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review Since the treatment of acute diverticulitis has become more conservative over the last years, knowledge of conservative treatment strategies is increasingly important. Recent Findings Several treatment strategies that previously have been imposed as routine treatment are now

  6. Landscape Conservative Cooperatives for New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Landscape conservation cooperatives (LCCs) are conservation-science partnerships between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and other...

  7. Global large carnivore conservation and international law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trouwborst, A.

    2015-01-01

    International cooperation, including through international legal instruments, appears important for the conservation of large carnivores worldwide. This is due to, inter alia, the worrying conservation status and population trends of many large carnivore species; the importance of large carnivores

  8. Geomorphological characterization of conservation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Cecchin, Marco; Prosdocimi, Massimo; Masin, Roberta

    2017-04-01

    Soil water erosion is one of the major threats to soil resources throughout the world. Conventional agriculture has worsened the situation. Therefore, agriculture is facing multiple challenges: it has to produce more food to feed a growing population, and, on the other hand, safeguard natural resources adopting more sustainable production practices. In this perspective, more conservation-minded soil management practices should be taken to achieve an environmental sustainability of crop production. Indeed, conservation agriculture is considered to produce relevant environmental positive outcomes (e.g. reducing runoff and soil erosion, improving soil organic matter content and soil structure, and promoting biological activity). However, as mechanical weed control is limited or absent, in conservation agriculture, dependence on herbicides increases especially in the first years of transition from the conventional system. Consequently, also the risk of herbicide losses via runoff or adsorbed to eroded soil particles could be increased. To better analyse the complexity of soil water erosion and runoff processes in landscapes characterised by conservation agriculture, first, it is necessary to demonstrate if such different practices can significantly affect the surface morphology. Indeed, surface processes such erosion and runoff strongly depend on the shape of the surface. The questions are: are the lands treated with conservation and conventional agriculture different from each other regarding surface morphology? If so, can these differences provide a better understanding of hydrogeomorphic processes as the basis for a better and sustainable land management? To give an answer to these questions, we considered six study areas (three cultivated with no-tillage techniques, three with tillage techniques) in an experimental farm. High-resolution topography, derived from low-cost and fast photogrammetric techniques Structure-from-Motion (SfM), served as the basis to

  9. Integrated conservation planning for coral reefs: Designing conservation zones for multiple conservation objectives in spatial prioritisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael A. Magris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision-makers focus on representing biodiversity pattern, maintaining connectivity, and strengthening resilience to global warming when designing marine protected area (MPA systems, especially in coral reef ecosystems. The achievement of these broad conservation objectives will likely require large areas, and stretch limited funds for MPA implementation. We undertook a spatial prioritisation of Brazilian coral reefs that considered two types of conservation zones (i.e. no-take and multiple use areas and integrated multiple conservation objectives into MPA planning, while assessing the potential impact of different sets of objectives on implementation costs. We devised objectives for biodiversity, connectivity, and resilience to global warming, determined the extent to which existing MPAs achieved them, and designed complementary zoning to achieve all objectives combined in expanded MPA systems. In doing so, we explored interactions between different sets of objectives, determined whether refinements to the existing spatial arrangement of MPAs were necessary, and tested the utility of existing MPAs by comparing their cost effectiveness with an MPA system designed from scratch. We found that MPAs in Brazil protect some aspects of coral reef biodiversity pattern (e.g. threatened fauna and ecosystem types more effectively than connectivity or resilience to global warming. Expanding the existing MPA system was as cost-effective as designing one from scratch only when multiple objectives were considered and management costs were accounted for. Our approach provides a comprehensive assessment of the benefits of integrating multiple objectives in the initial stages of conservation planning, and yields insights for planners of MPAs tackling multiple objectives in other regions.

  10. Conservation Laws in Biochemical Reaction Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdi, Adam; Ferragut, Antoni; Valls, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    We study the existence of linear and nonlinear conservation laws in biochemical reaction networks with mass-action kinetics. It is straightforward to compute the linear conservation laws as they are related to the left null-space of the stoichiometry matrix. The nonlinear conservation laws...

  11. Conservative treatment of sciatica : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroomen, PCAJ; de Krom, MCTFM; Slofstra, PD; Knottnerus, JA

    2000-01-01

    Most patients with sciatica (often caused by disc herniations) are managed conservatively at first. The natural course seems to be favorable. The additional value of many conservative therapies remains controversial. Because a systematic review of the conservative treatment of sciatica is lacking,

  12. Inhibition, Conflict Detection, and Number Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Amélie; Simon, Grégory; Houdé, Olivier; De Neys, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of number conservation is a critical step in children's numerical and mathematical development. Classic developmental studies have established that children's number conservation is often biased by misleading intuitions. However, the precise nature of these conservation errors is not clear. A key question is whether conservation…

  13. 7 CFR 633.9 - Conservation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation plan. 633.9 Section 633.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING WATER BANK PROGRAM § 633.9 Conservation plan. (a) The program participant...

  14. Valuation of Nature in Conservation and Restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulartz, F.W.J.; Swart, S.; Windt, v.d. H.

    2001-01-01

    Valuation of nature is an important aspect of nature conservation and restoration. Understanding valuation in a broad sense may contribute to conservation strategies since it may lead to better support from society. In this article we propose a model of valuation with respect to conservation and

  15. Valuation of nature in conservation and restoration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA; van der Windt, HJ; Keulartz, J

    Valuation of nature is an important aspect of nature conservation and restoration. Understanding valuation in a broad sense may contribute to conservation strategies since it may lead to better support from society. In this article we propose a model of valuation with respect to conservation and

  16. Conservation and Development Options existing on Uluguru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conservation and Development Options existing on Uluguru Mountains, Tanzania. ... Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation ... Abstract. Effective management of projects on Uluguru Mountains requires that both development and conservation options are weighed and that opportunities and challenges are ...

  17. 36 CFR 910.36 - Energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Energy conservation. 910.36... DEVELOPMENT AREA Standards Uniformly Applicable to the Development Area § 910.36 Energy conservation. All new..., and the District of Columbia Energy Conservation Code Act of 1979 and its implementing regulations set...

  18. 24 CFR 242.82 - Energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Energy conservation. 242.82 Section... INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS Miscellaneous Requirements § 242.82 Energy conservation. Construction, mechanical equipment, and energy and metering selections shall provide cost-effective energy conservation in accordance...

  19. 75 FR 31609 - Conservation Stewardship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: Section 2301 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act) amended the Food Security Act of 1985 to establish the Conservation Stewardship...: Soil and Water Conservation Society. This review is available at http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/technical/NRI...

  20. 75 FR 18472 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ... for proposals. SUMMARY: Section 2707 of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Act) establishes the Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative (CCPI) by amending section 1243 of the Food... eligible entities, such as conservation planning, technical consultation, and assistance with design and...

  1. 75 FR 54005 - Conservation Loan Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ..., 762, 764, 765, and 766 RIN 0560-AI04 Conservation Loan Program AGENCY: Farm Service Agency, USDA. ACTION: Interim final rule. SUMMARY: The Farm Service Agency (FSA) is implementing the new Conservation Loan (CL) Program authorized by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (the 2008 Farm Bill...

  2. 75 FR 44067 - Conservation Reserve Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... amending the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) regulations to implement provisions of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (the 2008 Farm Bill). The 2008 Farm Bill generally extends the existing... Commodity Credit Corporation 7 CFR Part 1410 RIN 0560-AH80 Conservation Reserve Program AGENCY: Commodity...

  3. Water Conservation Education with a Rainfall Simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Hans; Kessen, Shelly

    1997-01-01

    Describes a program in which a rainfall simulator was used to promote water conservation by showing water infiltration, water runoff, and soil erosion. The demonstrations provided a good background for the discussion of issues such as water conservation, crop rotation, and conservation tillage practices. The program raised awareness of…

  4. Robust network design for multispecies conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronan Le Bras; Bistra Dilkina; Yexiang Xue; Carla P. Gomes; Kevin S. McKelvey; Michael K. Schwartz; Claire A. Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    Our work is motivated by an important network design application in computational sustainability concerning wildlife conservation. In the face of human development and climate change, it is important that conservation plans for protecting landscape connectivity exhibit certain level of robustness. While previous work has focused on conservation strategies that result...

  5. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  6. Crystal structure and RNA-binding properties of an Hfq homolog from the deep-branching Aquificae: conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanek, Kimberly A.; Patterson-West, Jennifer; Randolph, Peter S.; Mura, Cameron

    2017-03-31

    The host factor Hfq, as the bacterial branch of the Sm family, is an RNA-binding protein involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA expression and turnover. Hfq facilitates pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) and their corresponding mRNA targets by binding both RNAs and bringing them into close proximity. Hfq homologs self-assemble into homo-hexameric rings with at least two distinct surfaces that bind RNA. Recently, another binding site, dubbed the `lateral rim', has been implicated in sRNA·mRNA annealing; the RNA-binding properties of this site appear to be rather subtle, and its degree of evolutionary conservation is unknown. An Hfq homolog has been identified in the phylogenetically deep-branching thermophileAquifex aeolicus(Aae), but little is known about the structure and function of Hfq from basal bacterial lineages such as the Aquificae. Therefore,AaeHfq was cloned, overexpressed, purified, crystallized and biochemically characterized. Structures ofAaeHfq were determined in space groupsP1 andP6, both to 1.5 Å resolution, and nanomolar-scale binding affinities for uridine- and adenosine-rich RNAs were discovered. Co-crystallization with U6RNA reveals that the outer rim of theAaeHfq hexamer features a well defined binding pocket that is selective for uracil. ThisAaeHfq structure, combined with biochemical and biophysical characterization of the homolog, reveals deep evolutionary conservation of the lateral RNA-binding mode, and lays a foundation for further studies of Hfq-associated RNA biology in ancient bacterial phyla.

  7. Global conservation status of sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James J; McGrath, Emily; Biggerstaff, Andrew; Bates, Tracey; Cárdenas, César A; Bennett, Holly

    2015-02-01

    Sponges are important for maintaining ecosystem function and integrity of marine and freshwater benthic communities worldwide. Despite this, there has been no assessment of their current global conservation status. We assessed their status, accounting for the distribution of research effort; patterns of temporal variation in sponge populations and assemblages; the number of sponges on threatened species lists; and the impact of environmental pressures. Sponge research effort has been variable; marine sponges in the northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean and freshwater sponges in Europe and North America have received the most attention. Although sponge abundance has increased in some locations since 1990, these were typically on coral reefs, in response to declines in other benthic organisms, and restricted to a few species. Few data were available on temporal trends in freshwater sponge abundance. Despite over 8500 described sponge species, only 20 are on threatened species lists, and all are marine species from the northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Of the 202 studies identified, the effects of temperature, suspended sediment, substratum loss, and microbial pathogens have been studied the most intensively for marine sponges, although responses appear to be variable. There were 20 studies examining environmental impacts on freshwater sponges, and most of these were on temperature and heavy metal contamination. We found that most sponges do not appear to be threatened globally. However, little information is available for most species and more data are needed on the impacts of anthropogenic-related pressures. This is a critical information gap in understanding sponge conservation status. © 2015 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Water Conservation and Economic Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2016-12-01

    Water has played a vital role in the progress of human civilization throughout history. Both agriculture based economics as well as industry based economics totally rely upon water for survival and prosperity. Water could be a limiting factor in dictating day-to-day human activities and as such one should learn to live within the limits of available natural resources. Most of the water on this earth is either salty or undrinkable. Only one percent of world's water is available for all the needs of human civilization. This includes human personal household needs, community activities, agriculture, industry, plant and animal life sustenance. The supply of usable fresh water is finite and the per capita consumption of fresh water needs to be reduced in particularly in some selected regions of this world. The United States consumes about 450 billion gallons of water every day. The U.S. daily average of water pumped by public water supply systems is 185 gallons per person. The biggest water gobbler in a household is the lawn. Typically, at least 50% of water consumed by households is used outdoors. Even inside a house, bathroom facilities claim nearly 75% of the water used. Here is a short list of economic Incentives that may help water conservation. (1) Providing rebates, refunds or other economic incentives to those consumers that are willing to change to modern technological methods. Examples include, but not limited to energy efficient washing machines, low-flush toilets and improved shower head designs. (2) Communities should provide economic incentives to limit the type and size of landscaping. (3) Need, necessity and nature of outdoor water use could be restricted whenever possible. (4) Sprinkler ban may be deemed appropriate in extreme cases. (5) Set up hotlines that can help penalize those that ignore water conservation guidelines. (6) Incorporating water conservation monitors. References: http://www.nrdc.org/water/http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/wr/ws/wtrcnsv.htmlhttp://www.sscwd.org/tips.html

  9. Conservation physiology of animal migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J.; Chapman, Jacqueline M.; Souliere, Christopher M.; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  10. Cultivating creativity in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Clare E; Pinsky, Malin L; Ryan, Maureen E; Souther, Sara; Terrell, Kimberly A

    2014-04-01

    Conservation practitioners and scientists are often faced with seemingly intractable problems in which traditional approaches fail. While other sectors (e.g., business) frequently emphasize creative thinking to overcome complex challenges, creativity is rarely identified as an essential skill for conservationists. Yet more creative approaches are urgently needed in the effort to sustain Earth's biodiversity. We identified 4 strategies to develop skills in creative thinking and discuss underlying research and examples supporting each strategy. First, by breaking down barriers between disciplines and surrounding oneself with unfamiliar people, concepts, and perspectives, one can expand base knowledge and experiences and increase the potential for new combinations of ideas. Second, by meeting people where they are (both literally and figuratively), one exposes oneself to new environments and perspectives, which again broadens experiences and increases ability to communicate effectively with stakeholders. Third, by embracing risk responsibly, one is more likely to develop new, nontraditional solutions and be open to high-impact outcomes. Finally, by following a cycle of learning, struggle, and reflection, one can trigger neurophysiological changes that allow the brain to become more creative. Creativity is a learned trait, rather than an innate skill. It can be actively developed at both the individual and institutional levels, and learning to navigate the relevant social and practical barriers is key to the process. To maximize the success of conservation in the face of escalating challenges, one must take advantage of what has been learned from other disciplines and foster creativity as both a professional skill and an essential component of career training and individual development. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Conserved secondary structures in Aspergillus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Manson McGuire

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the number and variety of functional RNAs (ncRNAs as well as cis-acting RNA elements within mRNAs is much higher than previously thought; thus, the ability to computationally predict and analyze RNAs has taken on new importance. We have computationally studied the secondary structures in an alignment of six Aspergillus genomes. Little is known about the RNAs present in this set of fungi, and this diverse set of genomes has an optimal level of sequence conservation for observing the correlated evolution of base-pairs seen in RNAs.We report the results of a whole-genome search for evolutionarily conserved secondary structures, as well as the results of clustering these predicted secondary structures by structural similarity. We find a total of 7450 predicted secondary structures, including a new predicted approximately 60 bp long hairpin motif found primarily inside introns. We find no evidence for microRNAs. Different types of genomic regions are over-represented in different classes of predicted secondary structures. Exons contain the longest motifs (primarily long, branched hairpins, 5' UTRs primarily contain groupings of short hairpins located near the start codon, and 3' UTRs contain very little secondary structure compared to other regions. There is a large concentration of short hairpins just inside the boundaries of exons. The density of predicted intronic RNAs increases with the length of introns, and the density of predicted secondary structures within mRNA coding regions increases with the number of introns in a gene.There are many conserved, high-confidence RNAs of unknown function in these Aspergillus genomes, as well as interesting spatial distributions of predicted secondary structures. This study increases our knowledge of secondary structure in these aspergillus organisms.

  12. Conserving tigers in working landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchani, Pranav; Noon, Barry R; Bailey, Larissa L; Warrier, Rekha A

    2016-06-01

    Tiger (Panthera tigris) conservation efforts in Asia are focused on protected areas embedded in human-dominated landscapes. A system of protected areas is an effective conservation strategy for many endangered species if the network is large enough to support stable metapopulations. The long-term conservation of tigers requires that the species be able to meet some of its life-history needs beyond the boundaries of small protected areas and within the working landscape, including multiple-use forests with logging and high human use. However, understanding of factors that promote or limit the occurrence of tigers in working landscapes is incomplete. We assessed the relative influence of protection status, prey occurrence, extent of grasslands, intensity of human use, and patch connectivity on tiger occurrence in the 5400 km(2) Central Terai Landscape of India, adjacent to Nepal. Two observer teams independently surveyed 1009 km of forest trails and water courses distributed across 60 166-km(2) cells. In each cell, the teams recorded detection of tiger signs along evenly spaced trail segments. We used occupancy models that permitted multiscale analysis of spatially correlated data to estimate cell-scale occupancy and segment-scale habitat use by tigers as a function of management and environmental covariates. Prey availability and habitat quality, rather than protected-area designation, influenced tiger occupancy. Tiger occupancy was low in some protected areas in India that were connected to extensive areas of tiger habitat in Nepal, which brings into question the efficacy of current protection and management strategies in both India and Nepal. At a finer spatial scale, tiger habitat use was high in trail segments associated with abundant prey and large grasslands, but it declined as human and livestock use increased. We speculate that riparian grasslands may provide tigers with critical refugia from human activity in the daytime and thereby promote tiger occurrence

  13. Conservative treatment of idiopathic clubfoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K

    1992-01-01

    Operation in the early stage of clubfoot is still a controversial issue. Twenty-five patients treated conservatively were studied at the age of 4-16 years. In 95%, the outcome was either excellent or good according to Laaveg and Ponseti's rating system. Operation appears not to be indicated when the residual varus, adductus, or intoeing is passively correctable at least to the neutral position. Residual equinus without fixed varus was correctable by serial casting in childhood. Muscle imbalances, which make maintenance of the corrected position difficult in infancy, tend to improve with growth.

  14. Conservation agriculture in urban deserts

    OpenAIRE

    D.I.A. Edralin; Hok, L.; LeNgoc, K.; Williams, M.; Gayle, G.; Raczkowski, C.W.; Reyes, Manuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Limited access to nutritious and affordable food is experienced by 23 million people in the US as they live in 'food desserts' making them food and health insecure. Resources such as land, water, labor and capital are used not in the context of sustainability making the problem more severe. Urban conservation agriculture will be an ‘oasis’ or a sustainable solution to this problem on food desserts and unsustainable resource use. A part of a human disturbed landscape, a turf grass lawn, was co...

  15. The Last B-2s: A Wobbly Iron Triangle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stacy, Jerry

    1996-01-01

    .... The Republican victory in the 1994 congressional elections that gave them control of the House of Representatives, and the "iron triangle" of mutual interests formed by the Air Force, Northrop...

  16. 75 FR 41102 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Furnace Fans: Reopening of Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AC22 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards... establish energy conservation standards for the use of electricity for purposes of circulating air through... (DOE) initiated a rulemaking to consider establishing new energy conservation standards or energy use...

  17. 76 FR 57897 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain External Power Supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... RIN 1904-AB57 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain External Power... exclude external power supplies used in specific applications from certain energy conservation standards prescribed under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Congress enacted this exclusion, which...

  18. 77 FR 10997 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AC04 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution... regarding energy conservation standards for distribution transformers. It was recently discovered that... the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA or the Act), Public Law 94-163 (42 U.S.C. 6291...

  19. 75 FR 27227 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Part 431 RIN 1904-AB47 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential... preliminary analyses performed by DOE for these products; and potential energy conservation standard levels... on the energy conservation standards notice of public meeting (NOPM) and availability of the...

  20. 76 FR 43941 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Part 430 RIN 1904-AC56 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating... proposed rulemaking and announcement of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA), as amended, prescribes energy conservation standards for various consumer products and...

  1. 75 FR 9921 - San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service San Diego County Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan, San Diego and Riverside Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... the Draft Water Authority Natural Communities Conservation Program/Habitat Conservation Plan (NCCP/HCP...

  2. Conservation when landowners have bargaining power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennox, Gareth D.; Gaston, Kevin J.; Acs, Szvetlana

    2013-01-01

    Spatially heterogeneous costs of securing conservation agreements should be accounted for when prioritizing properties for conservation investment. Most researchers incorporating conservation costs into analyses have relied on estimates of landowners' opportunity costs of accepting a conservation...... agreement. Implicitly assumed in such studies is therefore that those who ``produce'' biodiversity (landowners) receive none of the surplus available from trade. Instead, landowners could use their bargaining power to gain profits from conservation investments. We employ game theory to determine the surplus...... landowners could obtain in negotiations over conservation agreements, and the consequent effects on conservation outcomes, when enrolment decisions are governed by continuous variables (e.g. the proportion of a property to enrol). In addition, we consider how landowner uncertainty regarding the opportunity...

  3. Seeing (and Doing) Conservation Through Cultural Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Richard B.; Russell, Diane; West, Paige; Brosius, J. Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we first discuss various vantage points gained through the authors’ experience of approaching conservation through a “cultural lens.” We then draw out more general concerns that many anthropologists hold with respect to conservation, summarizing and commenting on the work of the Conservation and Community Working Group within the Anthropology and Environment Section of the American Anthropological Association. Here we focus on both critiques and contributions the discipline of anthropology makes with regard to conservation, and show how anthropologists are moving beyond conservation critiques to engage actively with conservation practice and policy. We conclude with reflections on the possibilities for enhancing transdisciplinary dialogue and practice through reflexive questioning, the adoption of disciplinary humility, and the realization that “cross-border” collaboration among conservation scholars and practitioners can strengthen the political will necessary to stem the growing commoditization and ensuing degradation of the earth’s ecosystems.

  4. Bison conservation initiative: Bison conservation genetics workshop: report and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, Peter J.; Dratch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    One of the first outcomes of the Department of the Interior (DOI) Bison Conservation Initiative was the Bison Conservation Genetics Workshop held in Nebraska in September 2008. The workshop brought together scientists from government agencies and non-governmental organizations with professional population geneticists to develop guidance for the genetic management of the federal bison herds. The scientists agreed on the basic tenets of genetic management for the DOI herds and discussed different approaches to meeting those goals. First, the 12 DOI herds are an irreplaceable resource for the long-term conservation of North American plains bison. Most of the herds show low levels of cattle introgression dating from the time when they were saved from extirpation; those herds should not be mixed without careful consideration as to their origin. Herds that show no evidence of cattle ancestry by the current molecular methods are the highest priority for protection from genetic mixing with any other bison herds. Second, despite the fact that most of the herds now managed by the U.S. government were founded with very few bison and have been maintained for many generations at relatively low population sizes, they do not show obvious effects of inbreeding. They have retained significant amounts of genetic variation by the standard measures, heterozygosity and allelic diversity. This may be explained in part by the fact that most of these herds are not remnants of a single population. Third, to preserve genetic variation in federal bison herds over decades and centuries, herds should be managed at a population or metapopulation level of 1,000 animals or more, with a sex ratio that enables competition between breeding bulls. The parks and refuges that currently have bison herds, with the exception of Yellowstone National Park, do not have enough land to support a population of this size. In the short term, it will be important to develop satellite herds to attain population

  5. A Cultural Conscience for Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Caroline; Burnham, Dawn; Macdonald, David W

    2017-07-20

    On 2 July 2015, the killing of a lion nicknamed "Cecil" prompted the largest global reaction in the history of wildlife conservation. In response to this, it is propitious to consider the ways in which this moment can be developed into a financial movement to transform the conservation of species such as the lion that hold cultural significance and sentiment but whose numbers in the wild are dwindling dangerously. This provocative piece explores how a species royalty could be used effectively by drawing revenue from the heavy symbolic use of charismatic animals in affluent economies. This would, in turn, reduce strain on limited government funds in threatened animals' native homelands. Three potential areas of lucrative animal symbolism-fashion, sports mascots, and national animals-provide examples of the kind of revenue that could be created from a species royalty. These examples also demonstrate how this royalty could prove to be a desirable means by which both corporations and consumers could positively develop their desired selves while simultaneously contributing to a relevant and urgent cause. These examples intend to ignite a multi-disciplinary conversation on the global cultural economy's use of endangered species symbols. An overhaul in perspective and practice is needed because time is running out for much of the wildlife and their ecosystems that embellish products and embody anthropocentric business identities.

  6. Training program for energy conservation in new-building construction. Volume I. Energy conservation technology: management and energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    A Model Code for Energy Conservation in New Building Construction was developed by those national organizations primarily concerned with the development and promulgation of model codes. The technical provisions are based on ASHRAE Standard 90-75 and are intended for use by state and local officials. This training manual is both an introduction to the need for energy conservation in buildings and a definition of the need for and the role of the enforcement official for energy conservation.

  7. Breast conserving surgery versus mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peer; Carstensen, Stina Lyck; Ejlertsen, Bent

    2018-01-01

    included patients registered after primary surgery for early invasive breast cancer in the database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, in the period 1995–2012. The cohort was divided into three groups: (i) patients who primarily had a mastectomy, (ii) patients treated by BCS, and (iii) patients...... significant interactions were not observed for age, period of treatment, and nodal status, but patients with Charlson’s Comorbidity Index (CCI) score 2+ had no increased mortality after mastectomy, as opposed to patients with CCI 0–1. Loco-regional radiation therapy (RT) in node positive patients did......Background: Observational studies have pointed at a better survival after breast conserving surgery (BCS) compared with mastectomy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether this remains true when more extensive tumor characteristics and treatment data were included. Methods: The cohort...

  8. Transportation energy conservation data book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebl, A. S.; Bjornstad, D. J.; Burch, D. F.; Howard, E. B.; Hull, J. F.; Madewell, D. G.; Malthouse, N. S.; Ogle, M. C.

    1976-10-01

    Statistics which characterize the major transportation modes are assembled and displayed, and data on other factors which influence the transportation sector in the nation are presented. Statistical data on energy use in the transportation sector are presented in the form of tables, graphs, and charts. The following topics are covered in six chapters: Characteristics of Transportation Modes; Energy Characteristics, including energy consumption by source and by sector and energy intensiveness; Conservation Alternatives; Government Impacts, including expenditures, regulations and research, development, and demonstration spending; Energy Supply, including domestic petroleum production, prices, and projections; and Transportation Demand, including population characteristics and economic determinants. A bibliography of data sources is provided at the end of each chapter. A more general bibliography glossary, and subject index are included at the end of the book.

  9. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  10. Psychological dimensions of Energy Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonello, Graciela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most serious current environmental problems is the depletion of non renewable natural resources. The vast majority of our daily actions involve the consumption of energy and they increase the problem. Environmental psychology studies the psychological motivations that determine pro-ecological behaviour. In this context the aim of this review was to determine which psychological models and variables are better descriptors of residential energy conservation, comparing the predictive power of different models related to behaviour, residential consumption as well as to the acceptability of energy policies. Results suggest that energy saving is mainly linked to altruistic motivations, followed by egoistic reasons and in a minor way to environmental concerns. People would act according to these dimensions when contextual conditions are perceived as appropriate.

  11. Crane reproductive physiology and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    Some unique features of crane reproduction, management, and conservation are described. Because cranes are sexually monomorphic, sexing is difficult and must be accomplished using behavior, laparoscopy, cloacal examination, genetic techniques, or fecal steroid analysis. Although husbandry techniques for cranes are similar to those used with other nondomestic birds, a number of basic characteristics, such as extreme aggressiveness, imprinting by the crane chick on man, a delayed molt in the immature crane, delayed sexual maturity, and infertility, pose special problems for the propagator. Artificial insemination is a practical solution to crane infertility. Vigorous captive management and propagation efforts must become increasingly important if several endangered crane species are to survive the continuing decline in wild populations. The ultimate goal is the restoration of suitable habitat and sustainable native populations.

  12. Optimized production and energy conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, T.R.; Sinner, B.; Volden, O.V.

    1986-05-01

    The possibilities of energy conservation in a cement factory are great. At least two important energy waste sources can be identified: flue gas heat and electrical energy of fan drives. A study of the Cementa AB factory at Slite, Sweden (production 2.1 million ton/y) shows that even though considerable efforts already have been made in energy saving, the potential is still great. Thus it is estimated that about 40 MW of gas heat can be turned into 3.5 MW of electrical energy. By applying high-efficiency motor drives about 2 MW can be recovered from fan drives. These two sources correspond to a total annual saving of /2.5 million. An investment to recover this energy will be paid back in less than a year.

  13. De-extinction and Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaebnick, Gregory E; Jennings, Bruce

    2017-07-01

    We are living in what is widely considered the sixth major extinction. Most ecologists believe that biodiversity is disappearing at an alarming rate, with up to 150 species going extinct per day according to scientists working with the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. Part of the reason the loss signified by biological extinction feels painful is that it seems irremediable. These creatures are gone, and there's nothing to be done about it. In recent years, however, the possibility has been broached that, just possibly, something can be done, in at least some cases. Human ingenuity, a contributing factor in the extinction crisis, might achieve their "de-extinction"-in at least some cases, and with sometimes significant qualifications about whether the original species had been "recreated" and whether it could resume its original place in the environment. De-extinction is an entry point into a larger set of questions about how biotechnological tools can support, coexist with, or undermine the goals of conservation and about the very meaning of conservation. Are we beings in control of the world or beings who prosper by accommodating ourselves to webs of symbiotic interdependencies? Are we creators or creatures, or both-and if both, then how can we achieve the balance between them that might be called humility? The interplay of perfecting and accommodating is not unique to human beings-perhaps it characterizes all forms of life on Earth-but with humans, these modes of being are distinctive, and our technology greatly expands their scale and effects. It is such questions that the ten essays in this special report explore. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  14. Incorporating ecological functions in conservation decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Emilia; Linke, Simon; Hermoso, Virgilio; Geist, Juergen

    2017-10-01

    Systematic conservation planning has become a standard approach globally, but prioritization of conservation efforts hardly considers species traits in decision making. This can be important for species persistence and thus adequacy of the conservation plan. Here, we developed and validated a novel approach of incorporating trophic information into a systematic conservation planning framework. We demonstrate the benefits of this approach using fish data from Europe's second largest river, the Danube. Our results show that adding trophic information leads to a different spatial configuration of priority areas at no additional cost. This can enhance identification of priority refugia for species in the lower position of the trophic web while simultaneously identifying areas that represent a more diverse species pool. Our methodological approach to incorporating species traits into systematic conservation planning is generally applicable, irrespective of realm, geographical area, and species composition and can potentially lead to more adequate conservation plans.

  15. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack of quantit...... results suggest that a strategy of leaving residues in the field can alleviate negative effects of reduced tillage on soil structural quality.......Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack...... of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...

  16. Preferred conservation policies of shark researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, David S; Hammerschlag, Neil

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing concern about the conservation status of sharks. However, the presence of numerous different (and potentially mutually exclusive) policies complicates management implementation and public understanding of the process. We distributed an online survey to members of the largest professional shark and ray research societies to assess member knowledge of and attitudes toward different conservation policies. Questions covered society member opinions on conservation and management policies, personal histories of involvement in advocacy and management, and perceptions of the approach of conservation nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to shark conservation. One hundred and two surveys were completed (overall response rate 21%). Respondents considered themselves knowledgeable about and actively involved in conservation and management policy; a majority believed scientists have a responsibility to advocate for conservation (75%), and majorities have sent formal public comments to policymakers (54%) and included policy suggestions in their papers (53%). They believe sustainable shark fisheries are possible, are currently happening today (in a few places), and should be the goal instead of banning fisheries. Respondents were generally less supportive of newer limit-based (i.e., policies that ban exploitation entirely without a species-specific focus) conservation policy tools, such as shark sanctuaries and bans on the sale of shark fins, than of target-based fisheries management tools (i.e., policies that allow for sustainable harvest of species whose populations can withstand it), such as fishing quotas. Respondents were generally supportive of environmental NGO efforts to conserve sharks but raised concerns about some NGOs that they perceived as using incorrect information and focusing on the wrong problems. Our results show there is an ongoing debate in shark conservation and management circles relative to environmental policy on target-based natural

  17. Volume conservation during finite plastic deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, He-Ling; Jiang, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Li-Yuan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    An elastoplastic theory is not volume conserved if it improperly sets an arbitrary plastic strain rate tensor to be deviatoric. This paper discusses how to rigorously realize volume conservation in finite strain regime, especially when the unloading stress free configuration is not adopted or unique in the elastoplastic theories. An accurate condition of volume conservation is clarified and used in this paper that the density of a volume element after the applied loads are completely removed ...

  18. The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Duthie, Elizabeth; Verissimo, Diogo; Keane, Aidan; Knight, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Celebrities are frequently used in conservation marketing as a tool to raise awareness, generate funding and effect behaviour change. The importance of evaluating effectiveness is widely recognised in both marketing and conservation but, to date, little research into the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement as a tool for conservation marketing has been published.Using a combination of interviews and an online choice survey instrument, we investigated the extent to which a sample of UK-based...

  19. The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Duthie, Elizabeth; Ver?ssimo, Diogo; Keane, Aidan; Knight, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Celebrities are frequently used in conservation marketing as a tool to raise awareness, generate funding and effect behaviour change. The importance of evaluating effectiveness is widely recognised in both marketing and conservation but, to date, little research into the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement as a tool for conservation marketing has been published. Using a combination of interviews and an online choice survey instrument, we investigated the extent to which a sample of UK-base...

  20. Multispecies genetic objectives in spatial conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Erica S; Beger, Maria; Henriques, Romina; Selkoe, Kimberly A; von der Heyden, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Growing threats to biodiversity and global alteration of habitats and species distributions make it increasingly necessary to consider evolutionary patterns in conservation decision making. Yet, there is no clear-cut guidance on how genetic features can be incorporated into conservation-planning processes, despite multiple molecular markers and several genetic metrics for each marker type to choose from. Genetic patterns differ between species, but the potential tradeoffs among genetic objectives for multiple species in conservation planning are currently understudied. We compared spatial conservation prioritizations derived from 2 metrics of genetic diversity (nucleotide and haplotype diversity) and 2 metrics of genetic isolation (private haplotypes and local genetic differentiation) in mitochondrial DNA of 5 marine species. We compared outcomes of conservation plans based only on habitat representation with plans based on genetic data and habitat representation. Fewer priority areas were selected for conservation plans based solely on habitat representation than on plans that included habitat and genetic data. All 4 genetic metrics selected approximately similar conservation-priority areas, which is likely a result of prioritizing genetic patterns across a genetically diverse array of species. Largely, our results suggest that multispecies genetic conservation objectives are vital to creating protected-area networks that appropriately preserve community-level evolutionary patterns. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  1. Some guiding concepts for conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmayer, David; Hunter, Malcolm

    2010-12-01

    The search for generalities in ecology has often been thwarted by contingency and ecological complexity that limit the development of predictive rules. We present a set of concepts that we believe succinctly expresses some of the fundamental ideas in conservation biology. (1) Successful conservation management requires explicit goals and objectives. (2) The overall goal of biodiversity management will usually be to maintain or restore biodiversity, not to maximize species richness. (3) A holistic approach is needed to solve conservation problems. (4) Diverse approaches to management can provide diverse environmental conditions and mitigate risk. (5) Using nature's template is important for guiding conservation management, but it is not a panacea. (6) Focusing on causes not symptoms enhances efficacy and efficiency of conservation actions. (7) Every species and ecosystem is unique, to some degree. (8) Threshold responses are important but not ubiquitous. (9) Multiple stressors often exert critical effects on species and ecosystems. (10) Human values are variable and dynamic and significantly shape conservation efforts. We believe most conservation biologists will broadly agree these concepts are important. That said, an important part of the maturation of conservation biology as a discipline is constructive debate about additional or alternative concepts to those we have proposed here. Therefore, we have established a web-based, online process for further discussion of the concepts outlined in this paper and developing additional ones. © 2010 Society for Conservation Biology.

  2. Agricultural intensification escalates future conservation costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Jacob; Carrasco, Luis Roman; Webb, Edward L.; Koh, Lian Pin; Pascual, Unai

    2013-01-01

    The supposition that agricultural intensification results in land sparing for conservation has become central to policy formulations across the tropics. However, underlying assumptions remain uncertain and have been little explored in the context of conservation incentive schemes such as policies for Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation, conservation, sustainable management, and enhancement of carbon stocks (REDD+). Incipient REDD+ forest carbon policies in a number of countries propose agricultural intensification measures to replace extensive “slash-and-burn” farming systems. These may result in conservation in some contexts, but will also increase future agricultural land rents as productivity increases, creating new incentives for agricultural expansion and deforestation. While robust governance can help to ensure land sparing, we propose that conservation incentives will also have to increase over time, tracking future agricultural land rents, which might lead to runaway conservation costs. We present a conceptual framework that depicts these relationships, supported by an illustrative model of the intensification of key crops in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a leading REDD+ country. A von Thünen land rent model is combined with geographic information systems mapping to demonstrate how agricultural intensification could influence future conservation costs. Once postintensification agricultural land rents are considered, the cost of reducing forest sector emissions could significantly exceed current and projected carbon credit prices. Our analysis highlights the importance of considering escalating conservation costs from agricultural intensification when designing conservation initiatives. PMID:23589860

  3. Technology for nature conservation: an industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joppa, Lucas N

    2015-11-01

    Information age technology has the potential to change the game for conservation by continuously monitoring the pulse of the natural world. Whether or not it will depends on the ability of the conservation sector to build a community of practice, come together to define key technology challenges and work with a wide variety of partners to create, implement, and sustain solutions. I describe why these steps are necessary, outline the latest developments in the field and offer actionable ways forward for conservation agencies, universities, funding bodies, professional societies, and technology corporations to come together to realize the revolution that computational technologies can bring for biodiversity conservation.

  4. Geography of conservation spending, biodiversity, and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, T R; Rankin, P S

    2016-10-01

    We used linear and multivariate models to examine the associations between geography, biodiversity, per capita economic output, national spending on conservation, governance, and cultural traits in 55 countries. Cultural traits and social metrics of modernization correlated positively with national spending on conservation. The global distribution of this spending culture was poorly aligned with the distribution of biodiversity. Specifically, biodiversity was greater in the tropics where cultures tended to spend relatively less on conservation and tended to have higher collectivism, formalized and hierarchical leadership, and weaker governance. Consequently, nations lacking social traits frequently associated with modernization, environmentalism, and conservation spending have the largest component of Earth's biodiversity. This has significant implications for setting policies and priorities for resource management given that biological diversity is rapidly disappearing and cultural traits change slowly. Therefore, we suggest natural resource management adapt to and use characteristics of existing social organization rather than wait for or promote social values associated with conservation spending. Supporting biocultural traditions, engaging leaders to increase conservation commitments, cross-national efforts that complement attributes of cultures, and avoiding interference with nature may work best to conserve nature in collective and hierarchical societies. Spending in modernized nations may be a symbolic response to a symptom of economic development and environmental degradation, and here conservation actions need to ensure that biodiversity is not being lost. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  5. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) system contains information reported to the state environmental programs on activities and cleanup...

  6. The value of flexibility in conservation financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Gareth D; Fargione, Joseph; Spector, Sacha; Williams, Gwyn; Armsworth, Paul R

    2017-06-01

    Land-acquisition strategies employed by conservation organizations vary in their flexibility. Conservation-planning theory largely fails to reflect this by presenting models that are either extremely inflexible-parcel acquisitions are irreversible and budgets are fixed-or extremely flexible-previously acquired parcels can readily be sold. This latter approach, the selling of protected areas, is infeasible or problematic in many situations. We considered the value to conservation organizations of increasing the flexibility of their land-acquisition strategies through their approach to financing deals. Specifically, we modeled 2 acquisition-financing methods commonly used by conservation organizations: borrowing and budget carry-over. Using simulated data, we compared results from these models with those from an inflexible fixed-budget model and an extremely flexible selling model in which previous acquisitions could be sold to fund new acquisitions. We then examined 3 case studies of how conservation organizations use borrowing and budget carry-over in practice. Model comparisons showed that borrowing and budget carry-over always returned considerably higher rewards than the fixed-budget model. How they performed relative to the selling model depended on the relative conservation value of past acquisitions. Both the models and case studies showed that incorporating flexibility through borrowing or budget carry-over gives conservation organizations the ability to purchase parcels of higher conservation value than when budgets are fixed without the problems associated with the selling of protected areas. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  7. On nonepistemic values in conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgaertner, Bert; Holthuijzen, Wieteke

    2017-02-01

    Conservation biology is a uniquely interdisciplinary science with strong roots in ecology, but it also embraces a value-laden and mission-oriented framework. This combination of science and values causes conservation biology to be at the center of critique regarding the discipline's scientific credibility-especially the division between the realms of theory and practice. We identify this dichotomy between seemingly objective (fact-based) and subjective (value-laden) practices as the measure-value dichotomy, whereby measure refers to methods and analyses used in conservation biology (i.e., measuring biodiversity) and value refers to nonepistemic values. We reviewed and evaluated several landmark articles central to the foundation of conservation biology and concepts of biodiversity with respect to their attempts to separate measures and values. We argue that the measure-value dichotomy is false and that conservation biology can make progress in ways unavailable to other disciplines because its practitioners are tasked with engaging in both the realm of theory and the realm of practice. The entanglement of measures and values is by no means a weakness of conservation biology. Because central concepts such as biodiversity contain both factual and evaluative aspects, conservation biologists can make theoretical progress by examining, reviewing, and forming the values that are an integral part of those concepts. We suggest that values should be included and analyzed with respect to the methods, results, and conclusions of scientific work in conservation biology. © 2016 Society for Conservation Biology.

  8. Watershed Conservation in the Long Run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Brooks

    2014-01-01

    We studied unanticipated long-run outcomes of conservation activities that occurred in forested watersheds on O`ahu, Hawaii, in the early twentieth century. The initial general impetus for the conservation activities was to improve irrigation surface water flow for the sugar industry. Industry...... in determining conservation policy. We incorporated remote-sensing data, expert opinion on current watershed quality, and a spatial economic and hydrological model of O`ahu’s freshwater use with reports of conservation activities from 1910–1960 to assess these benefits. We find a 2.3% annual increase...

  9. Reflections Around the Conservation of Sacred Thangkas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Cotte

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tibetan thangkas (Buddhist scroll paintings are created as religious ritual objects. The fact that they are mainly considered as artworks in the Western world impacts on the decisions made for their display and conservation. This article explores the current approach to thangkas in Australian public collections and compares it with the views of contemporary Tibetan Buddhism practitioners. It underlines a few misconceptions at the source of conservation decision-making, and discusses practical outcomes of integrating the sacred dimension into professional practice against the backdrop of conservation’s Codes of Ethics. Conserving living religious heritage requires that professional ethical standards are adaptable to the needs of users. Existing frameworks for the conservation of sacred objects of pre-colonised, indigenous cultures provide useful models for the conservation of thangkas. This article argues that engaging with contemporary cultural groups to conserve religious significance is part of the mission of conservators. This is viewed as an expansion of conservation practice into the social realm, in a search for purposeful conservation that establishes the social relevance of our profession.

  10. Achieving open access to conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Richard A; Lee, Jasmine R; Watson, James E M

    2014-12-01

    Conservation science is a crisis discipline in which the results of scientific enquiry must be made available quickly to those implementing management. We assessed the extent to which scientific research published since the year 2000 in 20 conservation science journals is publicly available. Of the 19,207 papers published, 1,667 (8.68%) are freely downloadable from an official repository. Moreover, only 938 papers (4.88%) meet the standard definition of open access in which material can be freely reused providing attribution to the authors is given. This compares poorly with a comparable set of 20 evolutionary biology journals, where 31.93% of papers are freely downloadable and 7.49% are open access. Seventeen of the 20 conservation journals offer an open access option, but fewer than 5% of the papers are available through open access. The cost of accessing the full body of conservation science runs into tens of thousands of dollars per year for institutional subscribers, and many conservation practitioners cannot access pay-per-view science through their workplace. However, important initiatives such as Research4Life are making science available to organizations in developing countries. We urge authors of conservation science to pay for open access on a per-article basis or to choose publication in open access journals, taking care to ensure the license allows reuse for any purpose providing attribution is given. Currently, it would cost $51 million to make all conservation science published since 2000 freely available by paying the open access fees currently levied to authors. Publishers of conservation journals might consider more cost effective models for open access and conservation-oriented organizations running journals could consider a broader range of options for open access to nonmembers such as sponsorship of open access via membership fees. © 2014 The Authors. Conservation Biology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc., on behalf of the Society for

  11. Conservation tourism and landscape governance in Kenya: the interdependency of three conservation NGOs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pellis, A.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Duim, van der V.R.

    2015-01-01

    Tourism plays an increasingly important role in the way non-governmental organisations govern landscapes, especially in decentralised conservation contexts in developing countries. In this paper, we examine the role of three key conservation organisations (the African Wildlife Foundation, the

  12. Conservation of Energy - Is This a Violation of Energy Conservation? [video

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School Physics

    2014-01-01

    NPS Physics Physics Demonstrations In this video Dr. D talks about conservation of energy using an apparatus known as the brachistochrone. This particular brachistochrone returns peculiar results when demonstrated. It appears energy is not conserved, but why?

  13. 76 FR 70865 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Refrigerators...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... / Wednesday, November 16, 2011 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 RIN 1904-AB79 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Refrigerators...

  14. Modeling the impact of future development and public conservation orientation on landscape connectivity for conservation planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lechner, Alex Mark; Brown, Greg; Raymond, Christopher Mark

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent papers on the spatial assessment of conservation opportunity have focused on how social values for conservation may change modeled conservation outcomes. Accounting for social factors is important for regional wildlife corridor initiatives as they often emphasize the collaborative...... aspects of conservation planning. Objectives We present an approach for characterizing the potential effects of public conservation orientation and projected future development land use scenarios on landscape connectivity. Methods Using public participation GIS techniques (mail-based surveys linked...... to a mapping component), we classified spatially explicit conservation values and preferences into a conservation orientation index consisting of positive, negative, or neutral scores. Connectivity was then modeled using a least-cost path and graph-network approach for a range of conservation orientation...

  15. CONSERVATION STARTERS IN ENGLISH TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sisbiyanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The global issue of environment which needs specific attention has made all countries think about possible solution or creative responses. Indonesia, which is in the process of boosting its economy and people‘s prosperity, is inevitably prone to industrial exposure that leads the country to environmental-deterioration. Consequently, environment should be prioritized in the national-development design. This issue has actually been positively responded by the Indonesian authority of national education program with one of the spirits of curriculum 2013, that is to integrate characters, including ‗caring for the environment‘, in the teaching of discrete subjects including English. However, the theme concerning environmental awareness, though explicitly mentioned in the curriculum, seems to still be ignored by some English teachers due to their being badly preoccupied with the stage of understanding/interpreting the newly-implemented curriculum itself. To fill the gap, this paper tries to offer alternative techniques called ‗conservation starters‘ to be used in English teaching & learning. The techniques are modified from some already familiar activities such as ‗find someone who‘, ‗hunting‘, and ‗word description‘ games. It is expected that the techniques can help English teachers improve students‘ motivation in getting engaged to the English teaching & learning programs, introduce students to environmental issues, and, finally, improve students‘ achievement.

  16. Quantitative genetics in conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankham, R

    1999-12-01

    Most of the major genetic concerns in conservation biology, including inbreeding depression, loss of evolutionary potential, genetic adaptation to captivity and outbreeding depression, involve quantitative genetics. Small population size leads to inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity and so increases extinction risk. Captive populations of endangered species are managed to maximize the retention of genetic diversity by minimizing kinship, with subsidiary efforts to minimize inbreeding. There is growing evidence that genetic adaptation to captivity is a major issue in the genetic management of captive populations of endangered species as it reduces reproductive fitness when captive populations are reintroduced into the wild. This problem is not currently addressed, but it can be alleviated by deliberately fragmenting captive populations, with occasional exchange of immigrants to avoid excessive inbreeding. The extent and importance of outbreeding depression is a matter of controversy. Currently, an extremely cautious approach is taken to mixing populations. However, this cannot continue if fragmented populations are to be adequately managed to minimize extinctions. Most genetic management recommendations for endangered species arise directly, or indirectly, from quantitative genetic considerations.

  17. Oncoplastic Approaches to Breast Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis R. Holmes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer many aspects of her physical, emotional, and sexual wholeness are threatened. The quickly expanding field of oncoplastic breast surgery aims to enhance the physician commitment to restore the patient's image and self-assurance. By combining a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment with oncoplastic surgery, successful results in the eyes of the patient and physician are significantly more likely to occur. As a way to aid oncoplastic teams in determining which approach is most suitable for their patient's tumor size, tumor location, body habitus, and desired cosmetic outcome we present a review of several oncoplastic surgical approaches. For resections located anywhere in the breast, the radial ellipse segmentectomy incision and circumareolar approach for segmental resection are discussed. For resections in the upper or central breast, crescent mastopexy, the batwing incision, the hemibatwing incision, donut mastopexy, B-flap resection, and the central quadrantectomy are reviewed. For lesions of the lower breast, the triangle incision, inframammary incision, and reduction mastopexy are discussed. Surgeons who are interested in adding oncoplastic breast conserving therapies to their skill sets are encouraged to implement these surgical techniques where applicable and to seek out breast fellowships or enhanced training when appropriate.

  18. Evolving conservation paradigms for the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel E. Lugo

    2014-01-01

    The Anthropocene will have fundamental effects on the species composition, function, and structure of the ecosystems of the world. Land management agencies such as the USDA Forest Service will need to adapt their policies and conservation activities to avoid engaging in continuous conflict with natural processes and unfamiliar biotic assemblages. Conservation paradigms...

  19. Italy and the history of preventive conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lambert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Italy is a point of reference for the conservation community worldwide, but it has yet to make a definitive leap towards preventive conservation. This paper examines some of the reasons to explain this, in the hope that this may be useful for other countries. After a brief look at the history of preventive conservation from Antiquity to the Second World War, two seldom-discussed Italian initiatives are presented: The Franceschini Commission (1964 and the Pilot plan for the programmed conservation of cultural heritage in Umbria (1976.L’Italie est une reference mondiale dans le domaine de la conservation-restauration, cependant, elle n’a toujours pas adopté la conservation préventive de façon définitive. Cet essai tente d’examiner quelques raisons pouvant expliquer ce fait, dans l’espoir que ces informations pourront être utiles pour d’autres pays. Après un survol de l’histoire de la conservation préventive de l’Antiquité à la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, deux initiatives peu connues sont présentées, à savoir: la Commission Franceschini (1964 et le Plan pilote pour la conservation programmée des biens culturels en Ombrie (1976.

  20. Scaling-up energy conservation initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doren, van D.; Giezen, M.; Driessen, P.P.J.; Runhaar, H.A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Energy conservation in residential and commercial buildings is considered a key challenge and opportunity for low-carbon urban development. In cities worldwide, energy conservation initiatives have been realized that demonstrate the social, financial, and environmental benefits that energy

  1. Autoethnography as a New Approach in Conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes autoethnography as a new approach for conservators. It allows for a process-based assessment that foregrounds the conservator’s personal input during conservation treatments and installation procedures. It addresses the cognitive processes that steer towards the desired result in

  2. Quality Assessment on Environmental Conservation Interventions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Economic Review, Volume III, Issue I, January 2015. 90 Page. Quality Assessment on Environmental Conservation Interventions in three Selected. Councils of Dodoma Region, Tanzania. Gaspar Peter Mwananchipeta Mwembezi1. Abstract. The study highlights some of conservation challenges, quality ...

  3. Review: Freshwater conservation planning in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the 1970s, at approximately 10-year intervals, 4 national-scale freshwater conservation plans have been developed for South Africa. These 4 plans reflect different but broadly advancing approaches to conservation planning. We provide an overview of 3 historical plans and a more detailed discussion of the most ...

  4. Workplace Energy Conservation at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Summer; Marquart-Pyatt, Sandra T.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: This research contributes to the literature on workplace energy conservation by examining the predictors of individual employee behaviors and policy support in a university. The purpose of this research is to better understand what factors influence energy conservation behaviors in this setting to inform programs and interventions.…

  5. Novel urban ecosystems, biodiversity, and conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowarik, Ingo, E-mail: kowarik@tu-berlin.de [Department of Ecology, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Rothenburgstr. 12, D 12165 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    With increasing urbanization the importance of cities for biodiversity conservation grows. This paper reviews the ways in which biodiversity is affected by urbanization and discusses the consequences of different conservation approaches. Cities can be richer in plant species, including in native species, than rural areas. Alien species can lead to both homogenization and differentiation among urban regions. Urban habitats can harbor self-sustaining populations of rare and endangered native species, but cannot replace the complete functionality of (semi-)natural remnants. While many conservation approaches tend to focus on such relict habitats and native species in urban settings, this paper argues for a paradigm shift towards considering the whole range of urban ecosystems. Although conservation attitudes may be challenged by the novelty of some urban ecosystems, which are often linked to high numbers of nonnative species, it is promising to consider their associated ecosystem services, social benefits, and possible contribution to biodiversity conservation. - Highlights: > This paper reviews biotic responses to urbanization and urban conservation approaches. > Cities may be rich in both native and nonnative species. > Urban habitats cannot replace the functionality of natural remnants. > However, even novel urban habitats may harbour rare and endangered species. > Conservation approaches should consider the perspective of novel urban ecosystems. - This paper reviews the ways in which biodiversity is affected by urbanization and argues for expanding urban conservation approaches.

  6. Forest gene conservation programs in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodie. Krakowski

    2017-01-01

    Provincial tree improvement programs in Alberta began in 1976. Early gene conservation focused on ex situ measures such as seed and clone banking, and research trials of commercial species with tree improvement programs. The gene conservation program now encompasses representative and unique populations of all native tree species in situ. The ex situ program aims to...

  7. Traditional media use in Forest Conservation Support ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the potential of forest conservation support communication along traditional media in use for agricultural information dissemination in and around two reserved sites: Old Oyo National Park, Oyo and Oluwa forest reserve in Ondo State. Results show that the reliability of Forest Conservation Support ...

  8. Wilderness biology and conservation: future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed F. Noss

    2000-01-01

    The new conservation movement—uniting scientists and activists—seeks to relook at the role of protected land. The result is a redefining of terms, the encompassing of the concept of ecosystems, incorporating both scientific and nonscientific approaches to conservation, and reconsidering management. This philosophical essay speculates on the future of wilderness and...

  9. A glossary for avian conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf R. Koford; John B. Dunning; Christine A. Ribic; Deborah M. Finch

    1994-01-01

    This glossary provides standard definitions for many of the terms used in avian conservation biology. We compiled these definitions to assist communication among researchers, managers, and others involved in the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Program, also known as Partners in Flight. We used existing glossaries and recent literature to prepare this glossary....

  10. Promoting Effective Monitoring and Conservation through Online ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A lot of information on birds exist as grey literature and museum specimens and never re-utilized after results' publication for conservation actions. The system communicates major findings of submitted records to relevant authorities concerned with conservation and advocacy thus contributing to a much wider sharing and ...

  11. Plant conservation progress in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayri Havens; Andrea Kramer; Ed. Guerrant

    2017-01-01

    Effective national plant conservation has several basic needs, including: 1) accessible, up-to-date information on species distribution and rarity; 2) research and management capacity to mitigate the impact of threats that make plants rare; 3) effective networks for conserving species in situ and ex situ; 4) education and training to make sure the right people are...

  12. Successful conservative treatment of chylothorax following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results. Conservative management (total parenteral nutrition, bowel rest, pleural drainage and octreotide, followed by a low-fat diet) was successful in all 3 cases within a reasonable period of time (14 - 18 days). Conclusion. We recommend conservative measures as the first-line treatment for postoperative chylothorax.

  13. Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doug Duncan; Robert W. Clarkson

    2013-01-01

    The Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program was established to conserve native fishes and manage against nonnative fishes in response to several Endangered Species Act biological opinions between the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Central Arizona Project (CAP) water transfers to the Gila River basin. Populations of some Gila...

  14. 34 CFR 75.616 - Energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Energy conservation. 75.616 Section 75.616 Education... Grantee? Construction § 75.616 Energy conservation. (a) To the extent feasible, a grantee shall design and construct facilities to maximize the efficient use of energy. (b) The following standards of the American...

  15. 24 CFR 200.78 - Energy conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Energy conservation. 200.78 Section... Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Property Requirements § 200.78 Energy conservation. Construction, mechanical equipment, and energy and metering selections shall provide cost effective energy...

  16. Interference and the Law of Energy Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosd, Robert; Minkin, Leonid; Shapovalov, Alexander S.

    2014-01-01

    Introductory physics textbooks consider interference to be a process of redistribution of energy from the wave sources in the surrounding space resulting in constructive and destructive interferences. As one can expect, the total energy flux is conserved. However, one case of apparent non-conservation energy attracts great attention. Imagine that…

  17. Successful conservative treatment of chylothorax following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is still controversial. Surgical re-interventions are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Design. During a 2-year period, 3 patients developed chylothorax after oesophagectomy. This was treated conservatively, following our departmental protocol. Results. Conservative management (total parenteral nutrition ...

  18. Communities` attitudes towards conservation in Gashakagumti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the attitudes of communities around GashakaGumti National Park towards conservation. It also investigated factors that influence these conservation attitudes. Data were obtained through structured questionnaire which covered demographic characteristics, perceived benefits and challenges derived ...

  19. Conservation Education Outreach Program Accomplishment Report, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindlund, Rod, Comp.; Boshart, Tihisia, Comp.

    In 1992, Elaine McKinney and six college interns set into motion an experiment in human relations at the Forest Service's Northeast Area and Station Headquarters in Radnor, PA. The program provides basic conservation education to urban youth who may never have been exposed to the concepts of conservation, recycling, or forest management. This…

  20. Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation accommodates the current diverse and multidisciplinary approaches towards ecosystem conservation at national and global levels. The journal is published biannually and accepts research and review papers covering technological, physical, biological, social and ...

  1. Resource conservation and recovery: current reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    A 32 page bibliography of references of resource recovery, recycling, waste processing, and materials recovery is presented. The references are divided into categories of general information, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, resource conservation in packaging and in recycling containers, industrial wastes, energy recovery, and the technology and markets for recovered materials. Any item listed can be ordered from the US EPA. (LCL)

  2. SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT THROUGH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    attempted, to identify the traditional and indigenous of soil conservation practices, to assess the socio-cultural, economic system constraints ... agricultural production in general and the current food insecurity in particular, witnesses ..... Adoption of Improved Soil Conservation. Technology in a Middle Mountain Watershed of.

  3. strategies paysannes de conservation de quelques ressources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    conservation are the use of «Huidza» and «Ava» granaries for maize, cask or bole and baril for cowpea. Some homemade products are added to seeds in order improve conservation ; these are kitchen salt, woodash, sawdust, fine sand, Azadirachta indica juice, for maize and dry pericarp of Citrus sp. and/or. Capsicum sp.

  4. Energy conservation potential of surface modification technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, H.K.; Horne, D.M.; Silberglitt, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    This report assesses the energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries. The energy conservation impact of surface modification technologies on the metalworking industries is assessed by estimating their friction and wear tribological sinks and the subsequent reduction in these sinks when surface modified tools are used. Ion implantation, coatings, and laser and electron beam surface modifications are considered.

  5. Conservative discretization of the Landau collision integral

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2016-01-01

    We describe a density, momentum, and energy conserving discretization of the nonlinear Landau collision integral. Our algorithm is suitable for both the finite-element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and does not require structured meshes. The conservation laws for the discretization are proven algebraically and demonstrated numerically for an axially symmetric nonlinear relaxation problem.

  6. Effects of conservation practices on fisheries management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley Lake watershed was subjected to a series of conservation management practices with the goal of reducing sediment and nutrients entering the lake via agricultural runoff. Concurrent with the application of conservation practices, the lake was renovated and restocked to produce a sports fishe...

  7. Promoting Conservation Tourism: The Case of the African Wildlife Foundation's Tourism Conservation Enterprises in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van J.J.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Duim, van der V.R.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines the organizational form of tourism conservation enterprises, which has been developed and promoted by the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF) since the late 1990s. By deploying commercial tourism as a mechanism to attain conservation and livelihood goals, tourism conservation

  8. 76 FR 45606 - Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan and Possible Land Use Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Fish and Wildlife Service Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, Habitat... Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, for the proposed Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP... proposed Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP). The EIS will be a joint Environmental Impact...

  9. Prioritizing trees for global conservation action: BGCI’s tree conservation agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Shaw; M. Rivers; E. Beech

    2017-01-01

    Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) is a global voice for plant conservation via its worldwide network of botanic gardens and partners. Tree conservation has been a strong focus of BGCI’s program for many years. In collaboration with Fauna & Flora International, BGCI runs the Global Trees Campaign (GTC, www.globaltrees.org), the only international...

  10. Maximizing species conservation in continental Ecuador: a case of systematic conservation planning for biodiverse regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessmann, Janeth; Muñoz, Jesús; Bonaccorso, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Ecuador has the largest number of species by area worldwide, but also a low representation of species within its protected areas. Here, we applied systematic conservation planning to identify potential areas for conservation in continental Ecuador, with the aim of increasing the representation of terrestrial species diversity in the protected area network. We selected 809 terrestrial species (amphibians, birds, mammals, and plants), for which distributions were estimated via species distribution models (SDMs), using Maxent. For each species we established conservation goals based on conservation priorities, and estimated new potential protected areas using Marxan conservation planning software. For each selected area, we determined their conservation priority and feasibility of establishment, two important aspects in the decision-making processes. We found that according to our conservation goals, the current protected area network contains large conservation gaps. Potential areas for conservation almost double the surface area of currently protected areas. Most of the newly proposed areas are located in the Coast, a region with large conservation gaps and irreversible changes in land use. The most feasible areas for conservation were found in the Amazon and Andes regions, which encompass more undisturbed habitats, and already harbor most of the current reserves. Our study allows defining a viable strategy for preserving Ecuador's biodiversity, by combining SDMs, GIS-based decision-support software, and priority and feasibility assessments of the selected areas. This approach is useful for complementing protected area networks in countries with great biodiversity, insufficient biological information, and limited resources for conservation. PMID:25360277

  11. 78 FR 55781 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 78 , No... 1904-AB86 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Walk-In Coolers and Freezers... commercial and industrial equipment, including walk-in coolers and walk-in freezers. EPCA also requires the U...

  12. 77 FR 74167 - Information Collection Request: Highly Erodible Land Conservation and Wetland Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... information is collected in support of the conservation compliance provisions of Title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985 (the 1985 Farm Bill), as amended by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008... Security Act of 1985 (16 U.S.C. 3801-3862), as amended by the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008...

  13. 76 FR 20089 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76 , No. 69... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts AGENCY: Office of Energy... standards for various consumer products and commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp...

  14. Conservation biogeography - foundations, concepts and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Timothy; Whittaker, R.J.; Whittaker, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Conservation biogeography involves the application of biogeographical principles, theories, and analyses to problems regarding biodiversity conservation. The field was formally defined in 2005, and considerable research has been conducted in the ensuing 5 years. This editorial sets the context...... for 16 contributions in a special issue of Diversity and Distributions on developments and challenges in conservation biogeography. Papers are grouped into the following main themes: species distribution modelling; data requirements; approaches for assigning conservation priorities; approaches...... for integrating information from numerous disparate sources; special challenges involving invasive species; and the crucial issue of determining how elements of biodiversity are likely to respond to rapid climate change. One paper provides a synthesis of requirements for a robust conservation biogeography...

  15. Is It Time for Synthetic Biodiversity Conservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Segelbacher, Gernot; Seddon, Philip J; Alphey, Luke; Bennett, Elizabeth L; Carlson, Robert H; Friedman, Robert M; Kanavy, Dona; Phelan, Ryan; Redford, Kent H; Rosales, Marina; Slobodian, Lydia; Wheeler, Keith

    2017-02-01

    Evidence indicates that, despite some critical successes, current conservation approaches are not slowing the overall rate of biodiversity loss. The field of synthetic biology, which is capable of altering natural genomes with extremely precise editing, might offer the potential to resolve some intractable conservation problems (e.g., invasive species or pathogens). However, it is our opinion that there has been insufficient engagement by the conservation community with practitioners of synthetic biology. We contend that rapid, large-scale engagement of these two communities is urgently needed to avoid unintended and deleterious ecological consequences. To this point we describe case studies where synthetic biology is currently being applied to conservation, and we highlight the benefits to conservation biologists from engaging with this emerging technology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Quantum conserved currents in affine Toda theories

    CERN Document Server

    Delius, G W; Zanon, D

    1992-01-01

    We study the renormalization and conservation at the quantum level of higher-spin currents in affine Toda theories with particular emphasis on the nonsimply-laced cases. For specific examples, namely the spin-3 current for the $a_3^{(2)}$ and $c_2^{(1)}$ theories, we prove conservation to all-loop order, thus establishing the existence of factorized S-matrices. For these theories, as well as the simply-laced $a_2^{(1)}$ theory, we compute one-loop corrections to the corresponding higher-spin charges and study charge conservation for the three-particle vertex function. For the $a_3^{(2)}$ theory we show that although the current is conserved, anomalous threshold singularities spoil the conservation of the corresponding charge for the on-shell vertex function, implying a breakdown of some of the bootstrap procedures commonly used in determining the exact S-matrix.

  17. Lasers in the Conservation of Artworks

    CERN Document Server

    Nimmrichter, Johann; Schreiner, Manfred; LACONA VI Proceedings

    2007-01-01

    Within the last decades, the use of lasers in artworks conservation became an important tool for many conservators, scientists, architects and other experts, who are involved in the care of monuments and artefacts or laser technology. For the first time in 1995 Professor Costas Fotakis brought together restorers and scientists to discuss the potential of lasers in art conservation. Since then the field of "Lasers in the Conservation of Artworks" has gained enormously in importance. Nowadays restorers and laser scientists work close together in order to develop new fields of applications during the last years. Furthermore a large number of national and international research projects have been carried out by conservator-restorers, architects and scientists. In the last 10 years a number of historical and artistic high quality monuments (e.g. St. Stephens Cathedral in Vienna) have been cleaned or measured by laser and brought the laser in the spectra of tools which are useful in the sensible field of artworks. ...

  18. Novel urban ecosystems, biodiversity, and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowarik, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    With increasing urbanization the importance of cities for biodiversity conservation grows. This paper reviews the ways in which biodiversity is affected by urbanization and discusses the consequences of different conservation approaches. Cities can be richer in plant species, including in native species, than rural areas. Alien species can lead to both homogenization and differentiation among urban regions. Urban habitats can harbor self-sustaining populations of rare and endangered native species, but cannot replace the complete functionality of (semi-)natural remnants. While many conservation approaches tend to focus on such relict habitats and native species in urban settings, this paper argues for a paradigm shift towards considering the whole range of urban ecosystems. Although conservation attitudes may be challenged by the novelty of some urban ecosystems, which are often linked to high numbers of nonnative species, it is promising to consider their associated ecosystem services, social benefits, and possible contribution to biodiversity conservation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Climate change threatens European conservation areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Miguel B; Alagador, Diogo; Cabeza, Mar; Nogués-Bravo, David; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Europe has the world's most extensive network of conservation areas. Conservation areas are selected without taking into account the effects of climate change. How effectively would such areas conserve biodiversity under climate change? We assess the effectiveness of protected areas and the Natura 2000 network in conserving a large proportion of European plant and terrestrial vertebrate species under climate change. We found that by 2080, 58 ± 2.6% of the species would lose suitable climate in protected areas, whereas losses affected 63 ± 2.1% of the species of European concern occurring in Natura 2000 areas. Protected areas are expected to retain climatic suitability for species better than unprotected areas (Pareas retain climate suitability for species no better and sometimes less effectively than unprotected areas. The risk is high that ongoing efforts to conserve Europe's biodiversity are jeopardized by climate change. New policies are required to avert this risk. PMID:21447141

  20. Evolutionary conservation of protein vibrational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguid, Sandra; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Echave, Julian

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the evolutionary divergence of vibrational protein dynamics. To this end, we used the Gaussian Network Model to perform a systematic analysis of normal mode conservation on a large dataset of proteins classified into homologous sets of family pairs and superfamily pairs. We found that the lowest most collective normal modes are the most conserved ones. More precisely, there is, on average, a linear correlation between normal mode conservation and mode collectivity. These results imply that the previously observed conservation of backbone flexibility (B-factor) profiles is due to the conservation of the most collective modes, which contribute the most to such profiles. We discuss the possible roles of normal mode robustness and natural selection in the determination of the observed behavior. Finally, we draw some practical implications for dynamics-based protein alignment and classification and discuss possible caveats of the present approach.

  1. No. 186-Conservative Management of Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Magali; Ross, Sue

    2018-02-01

    To outline the evidence for conservative management options for treating urinary incontinence. Conservative management options for treating urinary incontinence include behavioural changes, lifestyle modification, pelvic floor retraining, and use of mechanical devices. To provide understanding of current available evidence concerning efficacy of conservative alternatives for managing urinary incontinence; to empower women to choose continence therapies that have benefit and that have minimal or no harm. The Cochrane Library and Medline (1966 to 2005) were searched to find articles related to conservative management of incontinence. Review articles were appraised. The quality of evidence is rated, and recommendations are made using the criteria described by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Evidence for the efficacy of conservative management options for urinary incontinence is strong. These options can be advocated as primary interventions with minimal or no harm to women. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Conservation Triage Falls Short Because Conservation Is Not Like Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Vucetich

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Conservation triage, as a concept, seems to have been born from analogizing circumstances that characterize conservation with triage, as the concept applies to emergency medicine. Careful consideration—facilitated through the aid of formal argumentation—demonstrates the critical limitations of the analogy. Those limitations reveal how the concept of conservation triage falls short. For example, medical triage presupposes that resources available for an emergency are limited and fixed. By contrast, the resources available for conservation are not fixed. Moreover, the ethics of prioritization in medical triage is characterized by there being universal agreement on the moral value of the patients. However, in conservation there is not universal agreement on the value of various objects of conservation concern. The looming importance of those features of conservation—disputed values and unfixed resources—make conservation triage a largely un-useful concept.

  3. A fungal perspective on conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann-Clausen, Jacob; Barron, Elizabeth S; Boddy, Lynne; Dahlberg, Anders; Griffith, Gareth W; Nordén, Jenni; Ovaskainen, Otso; Perini, Claudia; Senn-Irlet, Beatrice; Halme, Panu

    2015-02-01

    Hitherto fungi have rarely been considered in conservation biology, but this is changing as the field moves from addressing single species issues to an integrative ecosystem-based approach. The current emphasis on biodiversity as a provider of ecosystem services throws the spotlight on the vast diversity of fungi, their crucial roles in terrestrial ecosystems, and the benefits of considering fungi in concert with animals and plants. We reviewed the role of fungi in ecosystems and composed an overview of the current state of conservation of fungi. There are 5 areas in which fungi can be readily integrated into conservation: as providers of habitats and processes important for other organisms; as indicators of desired or undesired trends in ecosystem functioning; as indicators of habitats of conservation value; as providers of powerful links between human societies and the natural world because of their value as food, medicine, and biotechnological tools; and as sources of novel tools and approaches for conservation of megadiverse organism groups. We hope conservation professionals will value the potential of fungi, engage mycologists in their work, and appreciate the crucial role of fungi in nature. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. Conservation Documentation and the Implications of Digitisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Moore

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Conservation documentation can be defined as the textual and visual records collected during the care and treatment of an object. It can include records of the object's condition, any treatment done to the object, any observations or conclusions made by the conservator as well as details on the object's past and present environment. The form of documentation is not universally agreed upon nor has it always been considered an important aspect of the conservation profession. Good documentation tells the complete story of an object thus far and should provide as much information as possible for the future researcher, curator, or conservator. The conservation profession will benefit from digitising its documentation using software such as databases and hardware like digital cameras and scanners. Digital technology will make conservation documentation more easily accessible, cost/time efficient, and will increase consistency and accuracy of the recorded data, and reduce physical storage space requirements. The major drawback to digitising conservation records is maintaining access to the information for the future; the notorious pace of technological change has serious implications for retrieving data from any machine- readable medium.

  5. Conservation planning as a transdisciplinary process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyers, Belinda; Roux, Dirk J; Cowling, Richard M; Ginsburg, Aimee E; Nel, Jeanne L; O' Farrell, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    Despite substantial growth in the field of conservation planning, the speed and success with which conservation plans are converted into conservation action remains limited. This gap between science and action extends beyond conservation planning into many other applied sciences and has been linked to complexity of current societal problems, compartmentalization of knowledge and management sectors, and limited collaboration between scientists and decision makers. Transdisciplinary approaches have been proposed as a possible way to address these challenges and to bridge the gap between science and action. These approaches move beyond the bridging of disciplines to an approach in which science becomes a social process resolving problems through the participation and mutual learning of stakeholders. We explored the principles of transdisciplinarity, in light of our experiences as conservation-planning researchers working in South Africa, to better understand what is required to make conservation planning transdisciplinary and therefore more effective. Using the transdisciplinary hierarchy of knowledge (empirical, pragmatic, normative, and purposive), we found that conservation planning has succeeded in integrating many empirical disciplines into the pragmatic stakeholder-engaged process of strategy development and implementation. Nevertheless, challenges remain in engagement of the social sciences and in understanding the social context of implementation. Farther up this knowledge hierarchy, at the normative and purposive levels, we found that a lack of integrated land-use planning and policies (normative) and the dominant effect of national values (purposive) that prioritize growth and development limit the effectiveness and relevance of conservation plans. The transdisciplinary hierarchy of knowledge highlighted that we need to move beyond bridging the empirical and pragmatic disciplines into the complex normative world of laws, policies, and planning and become

  6. A multidisciplinary conceptualization of conservation opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Katie; Adams, Vanessa M; Januchowski-Hartley, Stephanie R; Polyakov, Maksym; Mills, Morena; Biggs, Duan; Knight, Andrew T; Game, Edward T; Raymond, Christopher M

    2014-12-01

    An opportunity represents an advantageous combination of circumstances that allows goals to be achieved. We reviewed the nature of opportunity and how it manifests in different subsystems (e.g., biophysical, social, political, economic) as conceptualized in other bodies of literature, including behavior, adoption, entrepreneur, public policy, and resilience literature. We then developed a multidisciplinary conceptualization of conservation opportunity. We identified 3 types of conservation opportunity: potential, actors remove barriers to problem solving by identifying the capabilities within the system that can be manipulated to create support for conservation action; traction, actors identify windows of opportunity that arise from exogenous shocks, events, or changes that remove barriers to solving problems; and existing, everything is in place for conservation action (i.e., no barriers exist) and an actor takes advantage of the existing circumstances to solve problems. Different leverage points characterize each type of opportunity. Thus, unique stages of opportunity identification or creation and exploitation exist: characterizing the system and defining problems; identifying potential solutions; assessing the feasibility of solutions; identifying or creating opportunities; and taking advantage of opportunities. These stages can be undertaken independently or as part of a situational analysis and typically comprise the first stage, but they can also be conducted iteratively throughout a conservation planning process. Four types of entrepreneur can be identified (business, policy, social, and conservation), each possessing attributes that enable them to identify or create opportunities and take advantage of them. We examined how different types of conservation opportunity manifest in a social-ecological system (the Great Barrier Reef) and how they can be taken advantage of. Our multidisciplinary conceptualization of conservation opportunity strengthens and

  7. Choosing conservative therapy in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, José Luis; Burguera Vion, Víctor; Gomis Couto, Antonio; Rivera Gorrín, Maite; Fernández-Lucas, Milagros; Rodríguez Mendiola, Nuria; Quereda, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Incidence of use for various renal replacement therapies is well-known, but no data are available on conservative treatment use. To assess the proportion of patients with chronic kidney failure receiving a conservative treatment. From July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014, 232 patients with stage 5 CKD were seen in the Nephrology Department. After having received information on existing therapeutic options and having known the opinion of their treating physicians, 81 patients (35%) selected hemodialysis, 56 (24%) preferred peritoneal dialysis, 5 (2%) selected a preemptive transplant from a living donor, and in 90 (39%) a conservative treatment option was selected. In a univariate analysis using logistic regression, variables associated to a preference for conservative treatment were age, Charlson index excluding age, degree of walking difficulties, and functional dependence level, with the first three factors achieving statistical significance in a multivariate analysis. Presence of a severe disease resulting in a poor prognosis was the main reason for selecting a conservative treatment (49%), with the second one being patient refusal to receive a renal replacement therapy (26%). Mortality rate was 8.2/100 patient-months in conservative therapy group versus 0.6/100 patient-months in patients receiving renal replacement therapy (P<.001). In patients receiving conservative therapy, baseline glomerular filtration rate at the time of study enrollment was the sole variable showing a significant impact on survival. About 39% of patients with stage 5 CKD seen over a 1-year period in the Nephrology Department received conservative therapy. Age, co-morbidity, and functional disability were the factors associated to selecting a conservative therapy option. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Global conservation priorities for marine turtles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P Wallace

    Full Text Available Where conservation resources are limited and conservation targets are diverse, robust yet flexible priority-setting frameworks are vital. Priority-setting is especially important for geographically widespread species with distinct populations subject to multiple threats that operate on different spatial and temporal scales. Marine turtles are widely distributed and exhibit intra-specific variations in population sizes and trends, as well as reproduction and morphology. However, current global extinction risk assessment frameworks do not assess conservation status of spatially and biologically distinct marine turtle Regional Management Units (RMUs, and thus do not capture variations in population trends, impacts of threats, or necessary conservation actions across individual populations. To address this issue, we developed a new assessment framework that allowed us to evaluate, compare and organize marine turtle RMUs according to status and threats criteria. Because conservation priorities can vary widely (i.e. from avoiding imminent extinction to maintaining long-term monitoring efforts we developed a "conservation priorities portfolio" system using categories of paired risk and threats scores for all RMUs (n = 58. We performed these assessments and rankings globally, by species, by ocean basin, and by recognized geopolitical bodies to identify patterns in risk, threats, and data gaps at different scales. This process resulted in characterization of risk and threats to all marine turtle RMUs, including identification of the world's 11 most endangered marine turtle RMUs based on highest risk and threats scores. This system also highlighted important gaps in available information that is crucial for accurate conservation assessments. Overall, this priority-setting framework can provide guidance for research and conservation priorities at multiple relevant scales, and should serve as a model for conservation status assessments and priority

  9. Beyond biology: toward a more public ecology for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    David P. Robertson; R. Bruce Hull

    2001-01-01

    The ultimate purpose of conservation science is to inform and affect conservation policy. Therefore, conservation biologists and all the people who produce, review, and apply conservation research should evaluate the success of their knowledge according to its ability to influence conservation decisions. In addition to possessing conventional "scientific"...

  10. The Politics of Implementation in Resource Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This chapter discusses implementation as a policy instrument in terms of fishery resource conservation. Implementation is primarily a means of pursuing established political goals. However, it is also a potential means of deliberate subversion or change of political goals. The chapter...... describes the development of multiple goals in fisheries management and addresses mechanisms through which conservation goals are subverted or changed at the implementation stage. Through comparison between The EU/Denmark and Norway, the chapter identifies factors that promote and prevent subversion...... of conservation goals during implementation....

  11. Evolving concepts and opportunities in soil conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Dumanski

    2015-03-01

    The paper discusses some of the new driving forces, new international programs, and new potential partners in soil conservation. Increasingly, international efforts to mitigate land degradation are shifting from studies of the biophysical processes to improving the global, national and local enabling policy environment, as well as mainstreaming of soil conservation into national and regional policies and programs. Also, increased emphasis is placed on economic instruments and international markets, such as carbon trading, and incorporation of non-market values in ecosystem investment, such as payment for ecosystem services, certification schemes, etc. The paper discusses some of the opportunities for soil conservation that accrue from these new driving forces.

  12. Conservation, management, and restoration of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanich, Suchana; Soong, Keryea; Zvuloni, Assaf; Rinkevich, Baruch; Alino, Porfirio

    2015-04-01

    The 8th International Conference on Coelenterate Biology (ICCB 8) was held in Eilat, Israel from December 1st to 5th 2013. The conference included 15 sessions, one of which discussed the latest information on the conservation, management, and restoration of Coelenterata in different parts of the world. A total of 16 oral presentations and 5 posters were presented in this session. Of these 21 papers, 11 were related to conservation issues, 7 described management, and 3 discussed restoration. This session provided insights on the current conservation, management, and restoration of coelenterates in different parts of the world. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Applying molecular genetic tools to tiger conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shu-Jin; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2010-12-01

    The utility of molecular genetic approaches in conservation of endangered taxa is now commonly recognized. Over the past decade, conservation genetic analyses based on mitochondrial DNA sequencing and microsatellite genotyping have provided powerful tools to resolve taxonomy uncertainty of tiger subspecies, to define conservation units, to reconstruct phylogeography and demographic history, to examine the genetic ancestry of extinct subspecies, to assess population genetic status non-invasively, and to verify genetic background of captive tigers worldwide. The genetic status of tiger subspecies and populations and implications for developing strategies for the survival of this charismatic species both in situ and ex situ are discussed. © 2010 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  14. The value of recycling on water conservation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludi-Herrera, Katlyn D.

    2013-07-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is working to conserve water through recycling. This report will focus on the water conservation that has been accumulated through the recycling of paper, ceiling tiles, compost, and plastic. It will be discussed the use of water in the process of manufacturing these materials and the amount of water that is used. The way that water is conserved will be reviewed. From the stand point of SNL it will be discussed the amount of material that has been accumulated from 2010 to the first two quarters of 2013 and how much water this material has saved.

  15. Illinois energy conservation plan report: 1979 revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-02-01

    In response to Energy Policy and this Conservation Act (PL 94-163) and Energy Conservation and Production Act (PL 94-385), this paper describes the activities to be undertaken by Illinois to meet the mandatory requirements of the Acts and to carry out other activities to encourage energy conservation by energy-consuming sectors in the state. Programs reach the residential, commercial/industrial, agricultural, educational, transportation, and government sectors. The overall goal of the program is to reduce projected energy consumption in 1980 by 5% through information and educational activities.

  16. Assessment of USDA-NRCS rangeland conservation programs: recommendation for an evidence-based conservation platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briske, D D; Bestelmeyer, B T; Brown, J R; Brunson, M W; Thurow, T L; Tanaka, J A

    2017-01-01

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) was created in response to a request from the Office of Management and Budget that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resource Conservation Service (USDA-NRCS) document the societal benefits anticipated to accrue from a major increase in conservation funding authorized by the 2002 Farm Bill. A comprehensive evaluation of the efficacy of rangeland conservation practices cost-shared with private landowners was unable to evaluate conservation benefits because outcomes were seldom documented. Four interrelated suppositions are presented to examine the causes underlying minimal documentation of conservations outcomes. These suppositions are (1) the benefits of conservation practices are considered a certainty so that documentation in not required, (2) there is minimal knowledge exchange between the USDA-NRCS and research organizations, (3) and a paucity of conservation-relevant science, as well as (4) inadequate technical support for land owners following implementation of conservation practices. We then follow with recommendations to overcome potential barriers to documentation of conservation outcomes identified for each supposition. Collectively, this assessment indicates that the existing conservation practice standards are insufficient to effectively administer large conservation investments on rangelands and that modification of these standards alone will not achieve the goals explicitly stated by CEAP. We recommend that USDA-NRCS modify its conservation programs around a more comprehensive and integrative platform that is capable of implementing evidence-based conservation. Collaborative monitoring organized around landowner-agency-scientist partnerships would represent the focal point of a Conservation Program Assessment Network (CPAN). The primary network objective would be to establish missing information feedback loops between conservation practices and their agricultural and environmental outcomes

  17. Conservation and diversity in flower land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrario, S.I.T.; Immink, R.G.H.; Angenent, G.C.

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade, enormous progress has been made in understanding the molecular regulation of flower development. In particular, homeotic genes that determine the identity of the floral organs have been characterised from different flowering plants, revealing considerable conservation among

  18. Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Eufaula NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  19. Progress and challenges in freshwater conservation planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nel, JL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Freshwater ecosystems and their associated biota are among the most endangered in the world. This, combined with escalating human pressure on water resources, demands that urgent measures be taken to conserve freshwater ecosystems and the services...

  20. Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA) is the primary law governing marine fisheries management in U.S. federal waters. It has since been...

  1. Understanding structural conservation through materials science:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuster-López, Laura; Krarup Andersen, Cecil

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties and the structure of materials are key elements in understanding how structural interventions in conservation treatments affect cultural heritage objects. In this context, engineering mechanics can help determine the strength and stability found in art objects as it can...... provide both explanation and prediction of failure in materials. It has therefore shown to be an effective method for developing useful solutions to conservation problems. Since materials science and mechanics can help conservators predict the long term consequences of their treatments and provide them...... with tools to avoid future problems, it should be present in all conservation-restoration training programs to help promote students’ understanding of the degradation mechanisms in cultural materials (and their correlation with chemical and biological degradation) as well as the implications behind...

  2. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Malheur Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  3. Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Muscatatuck NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  4. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Okefenokee NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  5. Conservation of rock art: a brief overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogerio Candelera, Miguel A.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic Newsletter. CSIC Thematic Network on Cultural Heritage and Network on Science and Technology for the Conservation of Cultural Heritage Instituto de Recursos Naturales y Agrobiología de Sevilla, CSIC, Apartado de Correos 1052, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

  6. ALI Conservation Scorecards Input Data Layers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — In 2014 and 2015, the Arid Lands Initiative developed “Conservation Scorecards” for their Priority Core Areas (PCAs) and Priority Linkage Areas (PLAs). To create...

  7. West Coast Rockfish Conservation Areas, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data delineate Rockfish Conservation Areas (RCA) off the West Coast of the United States for 2015. There are three types of areas closures depicted in this...

  8. NPScape Metric GIS Data - Conservation Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — NPScape conservation status metrics are calculated using data from the USGS Gap Analysis Program (PAD-US), World Protected Areas Database (WDPA), and National Marine...

  9. Santee National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Santee NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  10. Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Mandalay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  11. Patuxent Research Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Patuxent Research Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision...

  12. Trempealeau National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Trempealeau NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  13. Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Turnbull NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  14. Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  15. Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Kootenai Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision...

  16. Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the...

  17. Seney National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Seney NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  18. Does high harmonic generation conserve angular momentum?

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Avner; Diskin, Tzvi; Sidorenko, Pavel; Cohen, Oren

    2013-01-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) is a unique and useful process in which infrared or visible radiation is frequency up converted into the extreme ultraviolet and x ray spectral regions. As a parametric process, high harmonic generation should conserve the radiation energy, momentum and angular momentum. Indeed, conservation of energy and momentum have been demonstrated. Angular momentum of optical beams can be divided into two components: orbital and spin (polarization). Orbital angular momentum is assumed to be conserved and recently observed deviations were attributed to propagation effects. On the other hand, conservation of spin angular momentum has thus far never been studied, neither experimentally nor theoretically. Here, we present the first study on the role of spin angular momentum in extreme nonlinear optics by experimentally generating high harmonics of bi chromatic elliptically polarized pump beams that interact with isotropic media. While observing that the selection rules qualitatively correspond...

  19. Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Piedmont NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  20. Sage-grouse Conservation Assessment Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Boundary of the conservation assessment of Greater Sage-grouse and sagebrush habitat conducted by the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies. The boundary...

  1. A conservation assessment of Rousettus madagascariensis (G ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A conservation assessment of Rousettus madagascariensis (G. Grandidier, 1928, Pteropodidae) roosts in eastern Madagascar. RA Andrianaivoarivelo, D Andriafidison, C Rahaingonirina, S Raharimbola, A Rakotoarivelo, OR Ramilijaona, PA Racey, RKB Jenkins ...

  2. Currituck National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Currituck NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  3. Howland National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Howland NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  4. Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Sherburne NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  5. State Conservation Easements - MS Chapter 84C

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Lands with a State-owned conservation easement interest mapped to the PLS forty and government lot level. Easements in this layer have been determined to meet the...

  6. Prolegomena to conservation: a fisheye review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kury, C.

    1977-07-01

    Philosophies and attitudes toward conservation, such as the views of Walter Firey, Aldo Leopold, Gifford Pinchot, and others are examined and found to have merit, not as sole guides to environmental decisions, but as a framework for analyzing complex resource issues and arriving at rational policies. Objective definitions of conservation are often incomplete, as in the case of Smokey the Bear, who persuaded Americans that forest fires are bad and overlooked their benefits. Conservation is defined, not as a message, but as a permanent medium for optimizing social well-being by reconciling desires and needs in a rational way. A summary of current literature compares and evaluates the different perceptions of conservation as it applies to resource use and development. (DCK)

  7. Culebra National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Culebra NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  8. Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Mattamuskeet NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  9. Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Sevilleta NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  10. Soil Resources Degradation and Conservation Techniques Adopted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Socio-Economic Characteristics of the Farmers in the Study Area ... study area with 45.4%, to tertiary education which is the least having ... as a primary economic activity because majority of them are civil ..... Conservation. Longman, Malaysia.

  11. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Ninigret NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  12. Conservation Reserve Program Acreage by County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information regarding the acreages of land currently (as of 2004) enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) distributed by county and...

  13. Mixed method approaches to evaluate conservation impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens Friis; Burgess, Neil D.; Chamshama, Shabani A.O.

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 10% of the world's total forest area is formally owned by communities and indigenous groups, yet knowledge of the effects of decentralized forest management approaches on conservation (and livelihood) impacts remains elusive. In this paper, the conservation impact of decentralized forest...... assessed on the basis of analyses of Landsat images. This biophysical evidence was then linked to changes in actual management practices, assessed through records, interviews and participatory observations, to provide a measure of the conservation impact of the policy change. Both forests in the study were...... that decentralized management had led to increased control of forest use and the observed divergence in forest disturbance levels appeared to be linked to differences in the way that village-level forest managers prioritized conservation objectives and forest-based livelihood strategies. The study illustrates...

  14. Poverty, livelihoods and the conservation of nature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bouma, JA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the linkages between poverty, livelihoods and nature in four biodiversity hotspots in South Africa. To involve communities in protected area management, biodiversity conservation can be improved and negative livelihood impacts...

  15. Climate change threatens European conservation areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastos Araujo, Miguel; Alagador, Diogo; Cabeza, Mar

    2011-01-01

    Europe has the world's most extensive network of conservation areas. Conservation areas are selected without taking into account the effects of climate change. How effectively would such areas conserve biodiversity under climate change? We assess the effectiveness of protected areas and the Natura...... 2000 network in conserving a large proportion of European plant and terrestrial vertebrate species under climate change. We found that by 2080, 58 ± 2.6% of the species would lose suitable climate in protected areas, whereas losses affected 63 ± 2.1% of the species of European concern occurring...... in Natura 2000 areas. Protected areas are expected to retain climatic suitability for species better than unprotected areas (P...

  16. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Arapaho NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  17. Guam National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Guam NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  18. Systematic conservation planning and adaptive management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Holness

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that systematic conservation planning (SCP is an intrinsic part of the adaptive management approach within SANParks and should not be seen as a separate or different initiative. SCP operates within a complex environment that requires a deliberately adaptive approach. The similarities in philosophy, structure and functional elements of the planning process and approach between adaptive management and SCP, as applied within SANParks, are highlighted. The article distils requirements for ensuring that SCP remains strategically adaptive in its approach.Conservation implication: A deliberately adaptive approach to SCP improves its effectiveness in guiding the implementation of conservation actions and is a requirement for effective conservation planning in a complex environment.

  19. Valentine National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Valentine NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  20. Wapack National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Wapack National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  1. Ouray National Widlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Ouray NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  2. Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Missisquoi NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  3. Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Chassahowitzka NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  4. Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Waccamaw NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  5. Raising the bar for systematic conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, William T; Gordon, Ascelin; Bastin, Lucy; Bekessy, Sarah A; White, Matt D; Newell, Graeme

    2011-12-01

    Systematic conservation planning (SCP) represents a significant step toward cost-effective, transparent allocation of resources for biodiversity conservation. However, research demonstrates important consequences of uncertainties in SCP and of basing methods on simplified circumstances involving few real-world complexities. Current research often relies on single case studies with unknown forms and amounts of uncertainty as well as low statistical power for generalizing results. Consequently, conservation managers have little evidence for the true performance of conservation planning methods in their own complex, uncertain applications. To build effective and reliable methods in SCP, there is a need for more challenging and integrated testing of their robustness to uncertainty and complexity, and much greater emphasis on generalization to real-world situations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Conservative Libertarianism and the Ethics of Borders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Camacho Beltran

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Many conservatives endorse a defence of closed borders grounded in basic liberal rights such as the basic right of association. Some conservatives also endorse libertarian principles of legitimacy. It is not clear though that this sort of defence of closed borders is somehow coherent with these libertarian ideals. I argue that conservative libertarians of this kind must reject this defence of closed borders because either it collapses into a form of statism incoherent with libertarian principles of legitimacy, or into an ideal precept without appeal regarding reality in the here and now that could only be applied to changing the very nature of the societies we know. As a result, at least conservative libertarians need to find a different source of justification for closed borders.

  7. Madagascar Conservation & Development Volume 5, Issue 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madagascar Conservation & Development

    extant mammalian orders present on the island. Lemurs are forest dependent and therefore particularly threatened by the. Abundance and conservation status of two newly described lemur species in northwestern Madagascar. (Microcebus danfossi, Lepilemur grewcockorum). Blanchard RandrianambininaI, Solofonirina.

  8. Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Hatchie NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose and...

  9. Chickasaw National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Chickasaw NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  10. Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Hagerman NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  11. Conservative Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiena, Izak; Patel, Neal; Parihar, Jaspreet S; Calabrese, Marc; Tunuguntla, Hari

    2015-01-01

    Urinary incontinence in women has a high prevalence and causes significant morbidity. Given that urinary incontinence is not generally a progressive disease, conservative therapies play an integral part in the management of these patients. We conducted a nonsystematic review of the literature to identify high-quality studies that evaluated the different components of conservative management of stress urinary incontinence, including behavioral therapy, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle training, lifestyle changes, mechanical devices, vaginal cones, and electrical stimulation. Urinary incontinence can have a severe impact on our healthcare system and patients’ quality of life. There are currently a wide variety of treatment options for these patients, ranging from conservative treatment to surgical treatment. Although further research is required in the area of conservative therapies, nonsurgical treatments are effective and are preferred by some patients. PMID:26543427

  12. Drought Resilience and Water Conservation Technical Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many areas of the US, the frequency, intensity, and duration of drought events are increasing, this brief highlights EPA drought and conservation activities across the nation and includes links to additional materials and reference documents.

  13. Abundance estimation and Conservation Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols, J. D.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001. The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959 and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965 open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992, and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993. However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001. The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004 is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004 emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004 also suggest that

  14. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  15. The role of vocal individuality in conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terry, Andrew Mark Ryder; Peake, Thomas More; McGregor, Peter Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Identifying the individuals within a population can generate information on life history parameters, generate input data for conservation models, and highlight behavioural traits that may affect management decisions and error or bias within census methods. Individual animals can be discriminated...... and techniques for using this to count and monitor populations over time. We present case studies in birds where vocal individuality has been applied to conservation and we discuss its role in mammals....

  16. Translational environmental biology: cell biology informing conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2014-05-01

    Typically, findings from cell biology have been beneficial for preventing human disease. However, translational applications from cell biology can also be applied to conservation efforts, such as protecting coral reefs. Recent efforts to understand the cell biological mechanisms maintaining coral health such as innate immunity and acclimatization have prompted new developments in conservation. Similar to biomedicine, we urge that future efforts should focus on better frameworks for biomarker development to protect coral reefs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Conservative Perspectives on American Federalism: Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Kimberly Hendrickson

    2004-01-01

    Conservatives were regularly criticized by liberals and others for their approach to federalism throughout the twentieth century. This trend began during the Progressive era, when the justices of the “Lochner Court” were vilified for using national judicial power to strike down local regulations. Several decades later, conservative opposition to New Deal programs was seen as insensitive and elitist. Arguments for constitutional limitations on executive power in the 1930s were attributed to th...

  18. Navy Water Conservation Guide for Shore Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    water overuse, abuse, and apa - tation of the principles of water con- thy. DOE estimates that water use servation at your Navy facility will in the...Sacramento, CA: 1994. Camacho, Norma , et. al. Water Conservation Technology Guide. NEESA-1 - 040. Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity...Conservation Technology Document, Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory, page 7-8. Port Hueneme, CA: 1985. Figure 4-7: Camacho, Norma , et. al. NEESA 1-040

  19. Smart Water Conservation System for Irrigated Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    a semi - arid climate , where indoor air is mostly re-circulated, and HVAC unit temperature set points are intentionally high to conserve energy...Traditional Irrigation System • May be applicable in any climate (i.e., arid and/or semi - arid ). • Are economical in many regions of the country where...consumption for irrigation at our DoD installations located in semi - arid regions where alternative water conservation measures are being pursued. The

  20. Conservation, Renewability and Development of Pabung Patham

    OpenAIRE

    Suparb Boonchai; Bunsom Yodmali; Therdchai Pantachai

    2009-01-01

    Problem statement: At present Pabang Patham Flood Plains have been fading away from new generations memories because they have known only community forest or Pa Chum Chon many kinds of plants, herbs, aquatic animals, wild animals and insects are reduced. Furthermore, some kinds of them are become extinct in the future if no conservation. Approach: A qualitative research was used for the study of conservation, renewability and development of cultural landscapes of Pabung Patham Flood Plains in...

  1. DNA marker technology for wildlife conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Arif, Ibrahim A.; Haseeb A. Khan; Bahkali, Ali H.; Al Homaidan, Ali A.; Ahmad H. Al Farhan; Al Sadoon, Mohammad; Shobrak, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Use of molecular markers for identification of protected species offers a greater promise in the field of conservation biology. The information on genetic diversity of wildlife is necessary to ascertain the genetically deteriorated populations so that better management plans can be established for their conservation. Accurate classification of these threatened species allows understanding of the species biology and identification of distinct populations that should be managed with utmost care...

  2. On conservativity of covariant dynamical semigroups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holevo, A. S.

    1993-10-01

    The notion of form-generator of a dynamical semigroup is introduced and used to give a criterion for the conservativity (preservation of the identity) of covariant dynamical semigroups. It allows to reduce the problem of construction of conservative dynamical semigroups to familiar problems of non-explosion for Markov processes and construction of a contraction semigroup in a Hilbert space. Some new classes of unbounded generators, related to the Levy-Khinchin formula, are described.

  3. 77 FR 16051 - Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... Office of the Secretary Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council AGENCY: Office of the... Hunting Heritage Conservation Council (Council). The Council provides advice about wildlife and habitat... nominations to Joshua Winchell, Coordinator, Wildlife and Hunting Heritage Conservation Council, Division of...

  4. 75 FR 48934 - Coral Reef Conservation Program Implementation Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC19 Coral Reef Conservation Program... Implementation Guidelines for the Coral Reef Conservation Program. SUMMARY: This document provides NOAA's revised Grant Program Implementation Guidelines (Guidelines) for the Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP or...

  5. Mass and momentum conservation for fluid simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Lentine, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Momentum conservation has long been used as a design principle for solid simulation (e.g. collisions between rigid bodies, mass-spring elastic and damping forces, etc.), yet it has not been widely used for fluid simulation. In fact, semi-Lagrangian advection does not conserve momentum, but is still regularly used as a bread and butter method for fluid simulation. In this paper, we propose a modification to the semi-Lagrangian method in order to make it fully conserve momentum. While methods of this type have been proposed earlier in the computational physics literature, they are not necessarily appropriate for coarse grids, large time steps or inviscid flows, all of which are common in graphics applications. In addition, we show that the commonly used vorticity confinement turbulence model can be modified to exactly conserve momentum as well. We provide a number of examples that illustrate the benefits of this new approach, both in conserving fluid momentum and passively advected scalars such as smoke density. In particular, we show that our new method is amenable to efficient smoke simulation with one time step per frame, whereas the traditional non-conservative semi-Lagrangian method experiences serious artifacts when run with these large time steps, especially when object interaction is considered. Copyright © 2011 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.

  6. Genealogy of nature conservation: a political perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yrjo Haila

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern nature conservation is a product of post-Enlightenment modernity; I explore the heterogeneity of its conceptual and ideological background. The 19th century legacy comprises concern over human-caused extinctions; protests against excessive hunting and cruelty toward animals; utilitarian care for natural resources; and romantic sensibility concerning the value of nature for human health and spirituality. The 20th century added into conservation thinking increasing consciousness about human biospheric dependence; efforts to identify appropriate conservation targets; and most recently concern over the loss of biodiversity. The politics of nature conservation has taken shape within the framework of politics of nature, that is, choices vis-á-vis nature that have been made either as deliberate decisions on resource use or as side-effects of subsistence practices of various types. Because of tensions and conflicts with alternative ways of using nature, formulating realistic conservation policies has been a complicated task. Problems and uncertainties emerge: pursuing material aspirations of the current world society will necessarily bring about damage to ecological systems of the Earth. The way forward is to identify feasible alternatives in the midst of the tensions and ambiguities that arise, and to open up space for carrying through conservation initiatives.

  7. ATTRIBUTES OF AESTHETIC QUALITY USED BY TEXTILE CONSERVATORS IN EVALUATING CONSERVATION INTERVENTIONS ON MUSEUM COSTUMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna; Axelsson, Östen

    2015-08-01

    Aesthetic quality is central to textile conservators when evaluating a conservation method. However, the literature on textile conservation chiefly focuses on physical properties, and little is known about what factors determine aesthetic quality according to textile conservators. The latter was explored through two experiments. Experiment 1 explored the underlying attributes of aesthetic quality of textile conservation interventions. Experiment 2 explored the relationships between these attributes and how well they predicted aesthetic quality. Rank-order correlation analyses revealed two latent factors called Coherence and Completeness. Ordinal regression analysis revealed that Coherence was the most important predictor of aesthetic quality. This means that a successful conservation intervention is visually well-integrated with the textile item in terms of the material and method.

  8. Historical issues: the basis of Conservation Science and Conservator-Restorer training

    OpenAIRE

    Yacy-Ara Froner

    2016-01-01

    The gradual integration of science into the museum and the strengthening of the collaboration between the conservators-restorers, the conservation scientists, and the curators describe the early history of the Conservation Science. This paper aims to discuss the First International Conference for the Study of Scientific Methods for the Examination and Preservation of Works of Art, which took place in Rome 1930. It was held under the auspices of the International Museums Office (1926-1946), of...

  9. Systematic conservation planning and the cost of tackling conservation conflicts with large carnivores in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondinini, Carlo; Boitani, Luigi

    2007-12-01

    Conservation in Europe (including the establishment of protected areas) is undertaken mainly through legislation and on densely populated private land. Consequently, conflicts of interest arise between human economic activities and biodiversity conservation. We used a systematic approach to conservation planning to explore different conservation scenarios for the Apennine populations of wolves (Canis lupus) and bears (Ursus arctos marsicanus) in Italy. The conservation measures we considered were electrified fences and guard dogs to prevent wolves and bears from preying on sheep. We used habitat suitability models of the two species as an estimate of their distributions. Across the study area, we estimated the potential intensity of conflict caused by predation on sheep and the cost of the antipredator measures. We examined scenarios for the conservation of wolves and bears that identified systems of sites where antipredator measures should be applied to either minimize the economic cost of the plan or tackle a predetermined amount of conflict. The overall cost of the conservation plans ranged between euro1,486,000 and euro16,876,000, depending on the scenario and on the size of the conservation target. Because potential conflict intensity (i.e., potential predation) and cost of conflict resolution were correlated, the scenarios that minimized cost also minimized the amount of conflict that was addressed. Conserving these two species by addressing their predation on sheep was up to 4.36 times more expensive than conserving them by providing suitable habitat in areas of low conflict. Yet avoiding conflicts is not always desirable because it can drastically reduce the options for conservation. Choosing a conservation plan requires consideration of the level of threat to the target species and their sensitivity to conflicts.

  10. Using strategic foresight to assess conservation opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Carly N; Wintle, Bonnie C; Aldrich, Stephen C; Wintle, Brendan A

    2014-12-01

    The nature of conservation challenges can foster a reactive, rather than proactive approach to decision making. Failure to anticipate problems before they escalate results in the need for more costly and time-consuming solutions. Proactive conservation requires forward-looking approaches to decision making that consider possible futures without being overly constrained by the past. Strategic foresight provides a structured process for considering the most desirable future and for mapping the most efficient and effective approaches to promoting that future with tools that facilitate creative thinking. The process involves 6 steps: setting the scope, collecting inputs, analyzing signals, interpreting the information, determining how to act, and implementing the outcomes. Strategic foresight is ideal for seeking, recognizing, and realizing conservation opportunities because it explicitly encourages a broad-minded, forward-looking perspective on an issue. Despite its potential value, the foresight process is rarely used to address conservation issues, and previous attempts have generally failed to influence policy. We present the strategic foresight process as it can be used for proactive conservation planning, describing some of the key tools in the foresight tool kit and how they can be used to identify and exploit different types of conservation opportunities. Scanning is an important tool for collecting and organizing diverse streams of information and can be used to recognize new opportunities and those that could be created. Scenario planning explores how current trends, drivers of change, and key uncertainties might influence the future and can be used to identify barriers to opportunities. Backcasting is used to map out a path to a goal and can determine how to remove barriers to opportunities. We highlight how the foresight process was used to identify conservation opportunities during the development of a strategic plan to address climate change in New York

  11. Conserved intron positions in ancient protein modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Roos Albert DG

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timing of the origin of introns is of crucial importance for an understanding of early genome architecture. The Exon theory of genes proposed a role for introns in the formation of multi-exon proteins by exon shuffling and predicts the presence of conserved splice sites in ancient genes. In this study, large-scale analysis of potential conserved splice sites was performed using an intron-exon database (ExInt derived from GenBank. Results A set of conserved intron positions was found by matching identical splice sites sequences from distantly-related eukaryotic kingdoms. Most amino acid sequences with conserved introns were homologous to consensus sequences of functional domains from conserved proteins including kinases, phosphatases, small GTPases, transporters and matrix proteins. These included ancient proteins that originated before the eukaryote-prokaryote split, for instance the catalytic domain of protein phosphatase 2A where a total of eleven conserved introns were found. Using an experimental setup in which the relation between a splice site and the ancientness of its surrounding sequence could be studied, it was found that the presence of an intron was positively correlated to the ancientness of its surrounding sequence. Intron phase conservation was linked to the conservation of the gene sequence and not to the splice site sequence itself. However, no apparent differences in phase distribution were found between introns in conserved versus non-conserved sequences. Conclusion The data confirm an origin of introns deep in the eukaryotic branch and is in concordance with the presence of introns in the first functional protein modules in an 'Exon theory of genes' scenario. A model is proposed in which shuffling of primordial short exonic sequences led to the formation of the first functional protein modules, in line with hypotheses that see the formation of introns integral to the origins of genome evolution

  12. Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative Boundaries, Feb 2013 update.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset depicts the terrestrial boundaries of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) within Alaska. Those LCCs are: Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands,...

  13. How conserved are the conserved 16S-rRNA regions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Martinez-Porchas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The 16S rRNA gene has been used as master key for studying prokaryotic diversity in almost every environment. Despite the claim of several researchers to have the best universal primers, the reality is that no primer has been demonstrated to be truly universal. This suggests that conserved regions of the gene may not be as conserved as expected. The aim of this study was to evaluate the conservation degree of the so-called conserved regions flanking the hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA gene. Data contained in SILVA database (release 123 were used for the study. Primers reported as matches of each conserved region were assembled to form contigs; sequences sizing 12 nucleotides (12-mers were extracted from these contigs and searched into the entire set of SILVA sequences. Frequency analysis shown that extreme regions, 1 and 10, registered the lowest frequencies. 12-mer frequencies revealed segments of contigs that were not as conserved as expected (≤90%. Fragments corresponding to the primer contigs 3, 4, 5b and 6a were recovered from all sequences in SILVA database. Nucleotide frequency analysis in each consensus demonstrated that only a small fraction of these so-called conserved regions is truly conserved in non-redundant sequences. It could be concluded that conserved regions of the 16S rRNA gene exhibit considerable variation that has to be considered when using this gene as biomarker.

  14. Synthesis and review: delivering on conservation promises: the challenges of managing and measuring conservation outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Vanessa M.; Game, Edward T.; Bode, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Growing threats and limited resources have always been the financial realities of biodiversity conservation. As the conservation sector has matured, however, the accountability of conservation investments has become an increasingly debated topic, with two key topics being driven to the forefront of the discourse: understanding how to manage the risks associated with our conservation investments and demonstrating that our investments are making a difference through evidence-based analyses. A better understanding of the uncertainties associated with conservation decisions is a central component of managing risks to investments that is often neglected. This focus issue presents both theoretical and applied approaches to quantifying and managing risks. Furthermore, transparent and replicable approaches to measuring impacts of conservation investments are noticeably absent in many conservation programs globally. This focus issue contains state of the art conservation program impact evaluations that both demonstrate how these methods can be used to measure outcomes as well as directing future investments. This focus issue thus brings together current thinking and case studies that can provide a valuable resource for directing future conservation investments.

  15. The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veríssimo, Diogo; Keane, Aidan; Knight, Andrew T.

    2017-01-01

    Celebrities are frequently used in conservation marketing as a tool to raise awareness, generate funding and effect behaviour change. The importance of evaluating effectiveness is widely recognised in both marketing and conservation but, to date, little research into the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement as a tool for conservation marketing has been published. Using a combination of interviews and an online choice survey instrument, we investigated the extent to which a sample of UK-based conservation organisations, and other charities, evaluate their own usage of celebrity endorsement, and then carried out an experimental evaluation of a hypothetical marketing campaign. This experiment compared participants' willingness-to-engage (WTE) with, and recall of, a conservation message presented in versions of an advert featuring one of three prominent UK celebrities (David Beckham, Chris Packham or HRH Prince William) or a non-celebrity control treatment (featuring Crawford Allan, a director of TRAFFIC USA). We find that the organisations we interviewed did not routinely evaluate their marketing campaigns featuring celebrities. Furthermore, our experiment provides evidence that celebrity endorsement can produce both positive and negative effects. Participants were more willing to engage when presented with an advert featuring one of the three celebrities than the non-celebrity control, and WTE varied according to the characteristics of the celebrity and the respondent. However, celebrities were less effective at generating campaign message recall than non-celebrities. These findings suggest that celebrity endorsement should be used carefully. Further work is required to fully understand the role celebrity endorsers can play in conservation but, drawing on best practice from the field of marketing, this study introduces an approach to evaluation which could be applied more widely to improve the effectiveness of conservation marketing. PMID:28686595

  16. Conservation and adaptation to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Cassandra

    2008-12-01

    The need to adapt to climate change has become increasingly apparent, and many believe the practice of biodiversity conservation will need to alter to face this challenge. Conservation organizations are eager to determine how they should adapt their practices to climate change. This involves asking the fundamental question of what adaptation to climate change means. Most studies on climate change and conservation, if they consider adaptation at all, assume it is equivalent to the ability of species to adapt naturally to climate change as stated in Article 2 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Adaptation, however, can refer to an array of activities that range from natural adaptation, at one end of the spectrum, to sustainability science in coupled human and natural systems at the other. Most conservation organizations deal with complex systems in which adaptation to climate change involves making decisions on priorities for biodiversity conservation in the face of dynamic risks and involving the public in these decisions. Discursive methods such as analytic deliberation are useful for integrating scientific knowledge with public perceptions and values, particularly when large uncertainties and risks are involved. The use of scenarios in conservation planning is a useful way to build shared understanding at the science-policy interface. Similarly, boundary organizations-organizations or institutions that bridge different scales or mediate the relationship between science and policy-could prove useful for managing the transdisciplinary nature of adaptation to climate change, providing communication and brokerage services and helping to build adaptive capacity. The fact that some nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are active across the areas of science, policy, and practice makes them well placed to fulfill this role in integrated assessments of biodiversity conservation and adaptation to climate change.

  17. The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthie, Elizabeth; Veríssimo, Diogo; Keane, Aidan; Knight, Andrew T

    2017-01-01

    Celebrities are frequently used in conservation marketing as a tool to raise awareness, generate funding and effect behaviour change. The importance of evaluating effectiveness is widely recognised in both marketing and conservation but, to date, little research into the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement as a tool for conservation marketing has been published. Using a combination of interviews and an online choice survey instrument, we investigated the extent to which a sample of UK-based conservation organisations, and other charities, evaluate their own usage of celebrity endorsement, and then carried out an experimental evaluation of a hypothetical marketing campaign. This experiment compared participants' willingness-to-engage (WTE) with, and recall of, a conservation message presented in versions of an advert featuring one of three prominent UK celebrities (David Beckham, Chris Packham or HRH Prince William) or a non-celebrity control treatment (featuring Crawford Allan, a director of TRAFFIC USA). We find that the organisations we interviewed did not routinely evaluate their marketing campaigns featuring celebrities. Furthermore, our experiment provides evidence that celebrity endorsement can produce both positive and negative effects. Participants were more willing to engage when presented with an advert featuring one of the three celebrities than the non-celebrity control, and WTE varied according to the characteristics of the celebrity and the respondent. However, celebrities were less effective at generating campaign message recall than non-celebrities. These findings suggest that celebrity endorsement should be used carefully. Further work is required to fully understand the role celebrity endorsers can play in conservation but, drawing on best practice from the field of marketing, this study introduces an approach to evaluation which could be applied more widely to improve the effectiveness of conservation marketing.

  18. The effectiveness of celebrities in conservation marketing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Duthie

    Full Text Available Celebrities are frequently used in conservation marketing as a tool to raise awareness, generate funding and effect behaviour change. The importance of evaluating effectiveness is widely recognised in both marketing and conservation but, to date, little research into the effectiveness of celebrity endorsement as a tool for conservation marketing has been published. Using a combination of interviews and an online choice survey instrument, we investigated the extent to which a sample of UK-based conservation organisations, and other charities, evaluate their own usage of celebrity endorsement, and then carried out an experimental evaluation of a hypothetical marketing campaign. This experiment compared participants' willingness-to-engage (WTE with, and recall of, a conservation message presented in versions of an advert featuring one of three prominent UK celebrities (David Beckham, Chris Packham or HRH Prince William or a non-celebrity control treatment (featuring Crawford Allan, a director of TRAFFIC USA. We find that the organisations we interviewed did not routinely evaluate their marketing campaigns featuring celebrities. Furthermore, our experiment provides evidence that celebrity endorsement can produce both positive and negative effects. Participants were more willing to engage when presented with an advert featuring one of the three celebrities than the non-celebrity control, and WTE varied according to the characteristics of the celebrity and the respondent. However, celebrities were less effective at generating campaign message recall than non-celebrities. These findings suggest that celebrity endorsement should be used carefully. Further work is required to fully understand the role celebrity endorsers can play in conservation but, drawing on best practice from the field of marketing, this study introduces an approach to evaluation which could be applied more widely to improve the effectiveness of conservation marketing.

  19. Conservation caring: measuring the influence of zoo visitors' connection to wildlife on pro-conservation behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibins, Jeffrey C; Powell, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Zoos in the 21st century are striving to make effective contributions to conservation. Although zoos are extremely popular and host over 600 million visitors worldwide, one challenge zoos face is how to effectively engage visitors and raise awareness and action for conservation. To this end, zoos commonly rely on charismatic megafauna, which have been shown to elicit a connection with zoo visitors. However, little is known about how to measure a connection to a species or how this connection may influence conservation behaviors. This study had two sequential objectives. The first was to develop a scale to measure visitors' connection to a species (Conservation Caring). The second was to investigate the relationship of Conservation Caring to pro-conservation behaviors, following a zoo experience. Pre- (n = 411) and post-visit (n = 452) responses were collected from three sites in order to assess the reliability and validity of a scale to measure Conservation Caring. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship between Conservation Caring and pro-conservation behaviors. Conservation Caring was deemed a valid and reliable scale and was a strong predictor of species oriented behaviors (β = 0.62), for example, "adopting" an animal, but a weak predictor for biodiversity oriented behaviors (β = 0.07), for example, supporting sustainability policies. Results support the role zoos can play in fostering a connection to wildlife and stimulating pro-conservation behaviors. Additionally, visitors connected to a wide array of animals. On the basis of these results, zoos may recruit a wider assemblage of species as potential flagships. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Diffusion Processes Satisfying a Conservation Law Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bakosi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate coupled stochastic differential equations governing N nonnegative continuous random variables that satisfy a conservation principle. In various fields a conservation law requires a set of fluctuating variables to be nonnegative and (if appropriately normalized sum to one. As a result, any stochastic differential equation model to be realizable must not produce events outside of the allowed sample space. We develop a set of constraints on the drift and diffusion terms of such stochastic models to ensure that both the nonnegativity and the unit-sum conservation law constraints are satisfied as the variables evolve in time. We investigate the consequences of the developed constraints on the Fokker-Planck equation, the associated system of stochastic differential equations, and the evolution equations of the first four moments of the probability density function. We show that random variables, satisfying a conservation law constraint, represented by stochastic diffusion processes, must have diffusion terms that are coupled and nonlinear. The set of constraints developed enables the development of statistical representations of fluctuating variables satisfying a conservation law. We exemplify the results with the bivariate beta process and the multivariate Wright-Fisher, Dirichlet, and Lochner’s generalized Dirichlet processes.