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Sample records for congenital neurocutaneuos disorder

  1. Congenital imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Netchine, Irène; Temple, I Karen

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting disorders (IDs) are a group of eight rare but probably underdiagnosed congenital diseases affecting growth, development and metabolism. They are caused by similar molecular changes affecting regulation, dosage or the genomic sequence of imprinted genes. Each ID is characterised...... EUCID.net (European network of congenital imprinting disorders) now aims to promote better clinical care and scientific investigation of imprinting disorders by establishing a concerted multidisciplinary alliance of clinicians, researchers, patients and families. By encompassing all IDs and establishing...

  2. Hereditary congenital unilateral deafness : A new disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, FG; Verheij, JBGM; van Mechelen, M

    2005-01-01

    Congenital unilateral deafness is a rare disorder. The prevalence rates are unknown. The prevalence of children with severe to profound hearing losses that are congenital (or acquired before the development of speech and language) is 0.5 to 3 per 1,000 live births. Evidently, congenital unilateral d

  3. Idiopathic erythermalgia: a congenital disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, J J; van Joost, T; Vuzevski, V D

    1989-11-01

    Idiopathic erythermalgia during early childhood and adolescence is characterized by red, congested, burning pain of the lower extremities provoked by exercise or exposure to warmth. The clinical symptoms of idiopathic erythermalgia in a young woman and her mother are described. Histopathologic and immunofluorescence findings in biopsy specimens of affected areas of skin were consistent with a nonspecific inflammatory process. The condition was completely refractory to any treatment. Even the long-lasting relief of pain with one low dose of aspirin, which is a prerequisite for the diagnosis of thrombocytemic erythromelalgia, was lacking. Idiopathic erythermalgia appears to be a separate clinical entity and congenital disorder.

  4. Diagnosis of congenital fibrinogen disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Aurélien; Casini, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Congenital fibrinogen disorders comprise quantitative disorders defined by a complete absence (afibrinogenemia) or by a decreased level (hypofibrinogenemia) of circulating fibrinogen and qualitative disorders characterized by a discrepancy between the activity and the antigenic levels of fibrinogen (dysfibrinogenemia and hypodysfibrinogenemia). The biological diagnosis is based on a standard haemostasis assessment. All the coagulation tests that depend on the formation of fibrin as the end point are affected; although in dysfibrinogenemia the specificity and sensitivity of routine test depend on reagent and techniques. A genetic exploration permits to confirm the diagnosis and may enhance the prediction of the patient's phenotype. Homozygous or composite heterozygous null mutations are most often responsible for afibrinogenemia while hypofibrinogenemic patients are mainly heterozygous carrier of an afibrinogenemic allele. Heterozygous missense mutations are prevalent in dysfibrinogenemia, with two hot spot localized in exon 2 of the FGA and in the exon 8 of the FGG. The correlation between phenotype and genotype has been identified in some fibrinogen variants, including six mutations clustered in exons 8 and 9 of the FGG leading to hypofibrinogenemia with hepatic inclusions of abnormal fibrinogen aggregates as well as a few mutations associated with an increase risk of thrombotic events. A familial screening and additional functional assays should be carried out when possible.

  5. Congenital Diarrheal Disorders: An Updated Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Castaldo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diarrheal disorders (CDDs are a group of inherited enteropathies with a typical onset early in the life. Infants with these disorders have frequently chronic diarrhea of sufficient severity to require parenteral nutrition. For most CDDs the disease-gene is known and molecular analysis may contribute to an unequivocal diagnosis. We review CDDs on the basis of the genetic defect, focusing on the significant contribution of molecular analysis in the complex, multistep diagnostic work-up.

  6. Italian Registry of Congenital Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, Adele; Abbonizio, Francesca; Arcieri, Romano; Hassan, Hamisa Jane

    2017-01-01

    In Italy, the surveillance of people with bleeding disorders is based on the National Registry of Congenital Coagulopathies (NRCC) managed by the Italian National Institute of Health (Istituto Superiore di Sanità). The NRCC collects epidemiological and therapeutic data from the 54 Hemophilia Treatment Centers, members of the Italian Association of Hemophilia Centres (AICE). The number of people identified with bleeding disorders has increased over the years, with the number rising from approx. 7000 in 2000 to over 11,000 in 2015. The NRCC includes 4020 patients with hemophilia A and 859 patients with hemophilia B. The prevalence of the rare type 3 vWD is 0.20/100,000 inhabitants. Less common congenital bleeding disorders include the following deficiencies: Factor I (fibrinogen), Factor II (prothrombin), Factor V, Factor VII, Factor X, Factor XI and Factor XIII, which affect 1953 patients. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection affects 1561 patients, more than 200 of whom have two infections (HCV + HIV). Estimated hemophilia-related drug consumption in 2015 was approx. 550 million IU of FVIII for hemophilia A patients and approx. 70 million IU of FIX for hemophilia B patients. The NRCC, with its bleeding disorder data set, is a tool that can provide answers to fundamental questions in public health, monitoring care provision and drug treatment, as well as facilitating clinical and epidemiological research. PMID:28335488

  7. Mental and Behavioral Disorders among People with Congenital Deafblindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammeyer, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    The population of people with congenital deafblindness faces challenges concerning communication and mobility. Due to the significance of the sensory loss it is difficult to diagnose mental and behavioral disorders. This article investigates the prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders among 95 congenitally deafblind adults. Seventy-four…

  8. Intracranial hemorrhage in congenital bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibian, Shadi; Motlagh, Hoda; Naderi, Majid; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2017-09-09

    : Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), as a life-threatening bleeding among all kinds of congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs), is a rare manifestation except in factor XIII (FXIII) deficiency, which is accompanied by ICH, early in life, in about one-third of patients. Most inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) are mild to moderate bleeding disorders that can never experience a severe bleeding as in ICH; however, Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, a common and severe inherited platelet function disorder, can lead to ICH and occasional death. This bleeding feature can also be observed in grey platelet syndrome, though less frequently than in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia. In hemophilia, intracerebral hemorrhage is affected by various risk factors one of which is the severity of the disease. The precise prevalence of ICH in these patients is not clear but an estimated incidence of 3.5-4% among newborns with hemophilia is largely ascertained. Although ICH is a rare phenomenon in CBDs, it can be experienced by every patient with severe hemophilia A and B, FXIII deficiency (FXIIID), FVIID, FXD, FVD, FIID, and afibrinogenemia. Upon observing the general signs and symptoms of ICH such as vomiting, seizure, unconsciousness, and headache, appropriate replacement therapies and cranial ultrasound scans must be done to decrease ICH-related morbidity and mortality.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic congenital nail disorder 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Nemours: Your Nails MalaCards: nail disorder nonsyndromic congenital 10 Merck Manual Consumer Version: Deformities, Dystrophies, and Discoloration of the Nails Orphanet: Autosomal recessive nail dysplasia Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (1 link) British ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: ALG12-congenital disorder of glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FW, Aylsworth AS, Freeze HH. Expanding spectrum of congenital disorder of glycosylation Ig (CDG-Ig): sibs with a unique skeletal dysplasia, hypogammaglobulinemia, cardiomyopathy, genital malformations, and early lethality. Am ...

  11. Mental and behavioural disorders among people with congenital deafblindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2011-01-01

    The population of people with congenital deafblindness faces challenges concerning communication and mobility. Due to the significance of the sensory loss it is difficult to diagnose mental and behavioral disorders. This article investigates the prevalence of mental and behavioral disorders among...

  12. South African congenital disorders data, 2006 - 2014

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Network of Congenital Anomalies, collate relevant data to determine ... the surveillance system implemented by the NDoH from 2006 to. 2014. ... School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, University of ... ses) while laboratory or other investigations ... Not recorded.

  13. [Congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia (CDG Ia) - underdiagnosed entity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sätilä, Heli; Kuusela, Anna-Leena; Pietilä, Kati; Niinikoski, Harri; Keskinen, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a relatively recently identified group of multisystem disorders caused by defective glycosylation of N-glycosylated proteins. They mainly involve the central and peripheral nervous system, but other organ systems are involved as well. Type CDG Ia accounts for over 80% of cases, characterized by decreased activity of the enzyme phosphomannomutase caused by mutations in chromosome 16 PMM2 gene. Treatment of CDG Ia remains symptomatic.

  14. Congenital and acquired mitochondrial disorders of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Nikitina; A. N. Pravdina

    2014-01-01

    Clinical presentations of disorders of the nervous system manifest in young and middle-aged patients with congenital and acquired mitochondrial dysfunctions and cognitive disorders manifest in patients with mitochondrial diseases more often. Nowadays the effective methods of initial diagnosing of these conditions are neurological and neuropsychological examination of patients, using of biochemical markers of mitochondrial diseases: the indices of lactate, total homocysteine in plasma and liqu...

  15. The fate of nephrons in congenital and heritable renal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Chevalier

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most chronic kidney disease in infants and children results from congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract, including obstructive nephropathy. Although less common, inherited disorders such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD and cystinosis also lead to progressive tubular injury and nephron loss. At the present time, therapies to slow progression of kidney disease are mainly directed renal interstitial fibrosis, a final common pathway. To target earlier events in congenital renal disorders, we have investigated in animal models the response of the renal proximal tubule, which appears to be particularly susceptible to injury. Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO causes marked oxidative stress and rapid death of proximal tubular cells in the adult mouse, leading to the formation of atubular glomeruli. This occurs also following UUO in the neonate (during completion of nephrogenesis, but tubular cell death is delayed until proximal tubular mitochondrial maturation is complete. In the pcy mutant mouse, a model of autosomal dominant PKD, tubular cysts develop in the neonatal period, and progressively enlarge, eventually causing obstruction of neighboring nephrons and formation of atubular glomeruli. In the ctns mutant mouse with nephropathic cystinosis, injury results from accumulation of cystine crystals. This results in oxidative stress and stimulates flattening (rather than death of proximal tubular cells (“swan neck deformity”, and onset of the Fanconi syndrome. Progression to severe proximal tubular atrophy and formation of atubular glomeruli develops in later adult life. These studies suggest that early treatment of congenital renal disorders should target protection of proximal tubules from oxidative injury. We are currently investigating the use of antioxidants that are selectively concentrated in mitochondria. Since children with congenital renal disorders are born with a reduced nephron number (which cannot be regenerated

  16. Genetic Studies of Strabismus, Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders (CCDDs), and Their Associated Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    Congenital Fibrosis of Extraocular Muscles; Duane Retraction Syndrome; Duane Radial Ray Syndrome; Mobius Syndrome; Brown Syndrome; Marcus Gunn Syndrome; Strabismus Congenital; Horizontal Gaze Palsy; Horizontal Gaze Palsy With Progressive Scoliosis; Facial Palsy; Facial Paresis, Hereditary, Congenital; Third Nerve Palsy; Fourth Nerve Palsy; Sixth Nerve Palsy; Synkinesis; Ocular Motility Disorders; Levator-Medial Rectus Synkinesis; Athabaskan Brainstem Dysgenesis; Tongue Paralysis; Ninth Nerve Disorder; Fifth Nerve Palsy; Seventh Nerve Palsy; Eleventh Nerve Disorder; Twelfth Nerve Disorder; Vagus Nerve Paralysis; Moebius Sequence

  17. Congenital and acquired mitochondrial disorders of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Nikitina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical presentations of disorders of the nervous system manifest in young and middle-aged patients with congenital and acquired mitochondrial dysfunctions and cognitive disorders manifest in patients with mitochondrial diseases more often. Nowadays the effective methods of initial diagnosing of these conditions are neurological and neuropsychological examination of patients, using of biochemical markers of mitochondrial diseases: the indices of lactate, total homocysteine in plasma and liquor. Neuro-visual study (Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, MR spectroscopy, tractography, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, mitochondrial DNA typing is actually used for the differential diagnosing of mitochondrial diseases with other disorders that are accompanied by demyelinating disorders.

  18. Radionuclide angiocardiography in the diagnosis of congenital heart disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.H.; Austin, E.H.; Peter, C.A.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    Radionuclide angiocardiography provides a noninvasive assessment of cardiac function and blood flow through the heart and lungs. During the past three years, this procedure has been used at the Duke University Medical Center for evaluation of 343 patients with congenital heart disorders. A review of this experience shows tat the resulting data were frequently useful in the surgical management of these patients. In patients with abnormal blood flow patterns, noninvasive imaging of blood flow was useful before and after operative correction. Radionuclide measurements of left-to-right intracardiac shunts were sufficiently accurate for use in the initial evaluation of patients with murmurs and to document the absence of shunt after operative closure of intracardiac septal defects. Moreover, measurements of right-to-left cardiac shunts were of benefit in the management of children with cyanotic heart disease. Measurements of left ventricular function obtained during rest and exercise were most useful in patients with origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery and in patients with congenital valvular insufficiency. This experience demonstrates that radionuclide angiocardiography provides important measurements of central hemodynamics and cardiac function which are useful in the management of patients with congenital heart disorders.

  19. Congenital disorders of glycosylation with emphasis on cerebellar involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Rita; Fiumara, Agata; Jaeken, Jaak

    2014-07-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are genetic diseases due to defective glycosylation of proteins and lipids. The authors present an update on these disorders affecting the central nervous system with a focus on cerebellar involvement. The rate of identification of novel CDG shows an exponential increase. Some 76 CDG are actually known, not taking into account the defects in glycan-modifying proteins. Neurologic involvement is present in the large majority of CDG. Screening methods are limited to serum transferrin isoelectrofocusing (for N-glycosylation disorders with sialic acid deficiency), and serum apolipoprotein C-III isoelectrofocusing (for core 1 mucin-type O-glycosylation disorders). Whole exome/genome sequencing is increasingly used in the diagnostic workup of patients with CDG-X. Treatment is greatly lagging behind because only one CDG is efficiently treatable (MPI-CDG). Cerebellar involvement is an important feature of PMM2-CDG, the congenital muscular dystrophies due to dystroglycanopathy, and SRD5A3-CDG. It has also been reported in some patients with ALG1-CDG, ALG3-CDG, ALG9-CDG, ALG6-CDG, ALG8-CDG, PIGA-CDG, DPM1-CDG, DPM2-CDG, B4GALT1-CDG, SLC35A2-CDG, COG1-CDG, COG5-CDG, COG7-CDG, and COG8-CDG.

  20. The role of enterocyte defects in the pathogenesis of congenital diarrheal disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, Arend W.; Posovszky, Carsten; Rings, Edmond H. M. M.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van IJzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diarrheal disorders are rare, often fatal, diseases that are difficult to diagnose (often requiring biopsies) and that manifest in the first few weeks of life as chronic diarrhea and the malabsorption of nutrients. The etiology of congenital diarrheal disorders is diverse, but several are

  1. Ophthalmological abnormalities in children with congenital disorders of glycosylation type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Wosik, H.; Sykut-Cegielska, J.; Adamowicz, M.; Guillard, M.; Wevers, R.A.; Lefeber, D.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) type Ia frequently present with ocular involvement and visual loss. Little is known, however, about the occurrence of ophthalmological abnormalities in other subtypes of CDG syndrome. METHODS: We evaluated 45 children sequentially

  2. Management of congenital quantitative fibrinogen disorders: a Delphi consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casini, A; de Moerloose, P

    2016-11-01

    No evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients suffering from afibrinogenaemia and hypofibrinogenaemia are available. The aim of this study was to harmonize patient's care among invited haemophilia experts from Belgium, France and Switzerland. A Delphi-like methodology was used to reach a consensus on: prophylaxis, bleeding, surgery, pregnancy and thrombosis management. The main final statements are as follows: (i) a secondary fibrinogen prophylaxis should be started after a first life-threatening bleeding in patients with afibrinogenaemia; (ii) during prophylaxis the target trough fibrinogen level should be 0.5 g L(-1) ; (iii) if an adaptation of dosage is required, the frequency of infusions rather than the fibrinogen amount should be modified; (iv) afibrinogenaemic patients undergoing a surgery at high bleeding risk should receive fibrinogen concentrates regardless of the personal or family history of bleeding; (v) moderate hypofibrinogenaemic patients (i.e. ≥0.5 g L(-1) ) without previous bleeding (despite haemostatic challenges) undergoing a surgery at low bleeding risk may not receive fibrinogen concentrates as prophylaxis; (vi) monitoring the trough fibrinogen levels should be performed at least once a month throughout the pregnancy and a foetal growth and placenta development close monitoring by ultrasound is recommended; (vii) fibrinogen replacement should be started concomitantly to the introduction of anticoagulation in afibrinogenaemic patients suffering from a venous thromboembolic event; and (viii) low-molecular-weight heparin is the anticoagulant of choice in case of venous thromboembolism. The results of this initiative should help clinicians in the difficult management of patients with congenital fibrinogen disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ix: review of clinical spectrum and diagnostic steps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Wosik, H.; Karteszi, J.; Guillard, M.; Adamowicz, M.; Sykut-Cegielska, J.; Hadzsiev, K.; Wevers, R.A.; Lefeber, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type I (CDG I) represent a rapidly growing group of inherited multisystem disorders with 13 genetically established subtypes (CDG Ia to CDG Im), and a high number of biochemically unresolved cases (CDG Ix). Further diagnostic effort and prognosis counselling are

  4. Autistic Spectrum Disorder in Two Brothers with Congenital Visual Impairment: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Altun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autistic spectrum disorder is characterized by severe qualitative impairments in socialization, communication, and restricted repetitive behavior, interests and activities. It is a behaviorally defined disorder of unknown etiology that is thought to be influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Congenital visual impairment children are generally reported to be at risk for serious behavioral and psychological problems, such as withdrawal, isolation, and autism. Several studies have described the coexistence of autism or autistic behaviors in visually impaired individuals. To our knowledge, there is no case report about congenital visual impairment and comorbid autistic spectrum disorder in two brothers. In this case report, we aim to emphasise the comorbidity of congenital visual impairment and genetic predisposition which are risk factors for autism separately.

  5. Anaesthetic management of a child with congenital afibrinogenemia - A rare inherited coagulation disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sham Sunder Goyal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital afibrinogenemia is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder, results from mutation that affects plasma fibrinogen concentration. It is frequently associated with bleeding diathesis of varying severity. We describe the case of a 10-year-old child diagnosed of congenital afibrinogenemia who presented to hospital with subperiosteal haematoma and was posted for incision and drainage. Replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment of bleeding episodes in this patient and plasma-derived fibrinogen concentrate is the agent of choice. Cryoprecipitate and fresh frozen plasma are alternative treatments. Appropriate amount of cryoprecipitate were transfused pre-operatively to the child. Individuals with congenital afibrinogenemia should be managed by a comprehensive bleeding disorder care team experienced in diagnosing and managing inherited bleeding disorders. Anaesthesiologist, surgeons and haematologist should work like a unit to manage the surgical emergencies.

  6. Disorder of Sexual Development and Congenital Heart Defect in 47XYY: Clinical Disorder or Coincidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Latrech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. 47XYY syndrome is a rare sex chromosome variation characterized by an additional Y chromosome. Most patients with 47XYY karyotype have normal phenotype. This disorder seems associated with a higher risk of developing behavioral and cognitive problems, tall stature, and infertility in adulthood. Sexual development disorder is a rare finding. We report a first case with an abnormal left coronary artery originating from the pulmonary artery in a 47XYY patient. Case. A one-month-old child was referred for ectopic testis and micropenis. Physical examination revealed facial dysmorphia, micropenis, and curvature of the penis with nonpalpable testis. Laboratory tests showed decreased total testosterone and anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH levels. Blood karyotyping revealed a 47XYY chromosomal formula. At the age of 3 months, the patient developed dyspnea and tachycardia. Echocardiography revealed an anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery with left ventricular dysfunction requiring surgical revascularization by direct reimplantation of the left coronary artery system. Our second case was a 3-year-old child referred for hypospadias with nonpalpable left testicle. Physical examination showed hypertelorism. Blood karyotyping revealed a 47XYY chromosomal formula. Conclusion. To our knowledge, this is the first case of 47XYY syndrome associated with this congenital heart malformation and a sexual development disorder.

  7. Congenital eyelid ptosis: onset and prevalence of amblyopia, associations with systemic disorders, and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, August; Kelly, John P; Weiss, Avery H

    2014-10-01

    To determine the age at onset of amblyopia, the response to occlusion therapy, and the association with systemic disorders in children with congenital eyelid ptosis. Retrospective chart review of children seen at Seattle Children's Hospital with moderate or severe congenital ptosis. Assessments were longitudinal visual acuity development using objective methods, definition of ptosis severity by eyelid margin to pupillary light reflex distance (margin reflex distance [MRD]), age at amblyopia diagnosis, correlation between amblyopia and MRD, and associated systemic disorders. Eighty-four children with moderate-to-severe congenital ptosis met inclusion criteria; the mean longitudinal follow-up was 49.1 months. Fifteen (18%) of these children had amblyopia, of which 9 had deprivation amblyopia (mean age 17.3 months ± 11.2) and 6 had anisometropic or strabismic amblyopia (mean age 60 months ± 11.8). Eleven (73%) of the children with amblyopia were successfully treated with occlusion therapy. Amblyopia was not correlated with MRD. A systemic disorder was identified in 29 (35%) of the children, the most common being genetic, chromosomal, or neurologic conditions. Patients with systemic disorders and developmental delay have significantly lower visual acuity bilaterally compared with patients without systemic disorders (P ≤ .003). Using longitudinal and objective visual acuity assessments, the incidence of amblyopia was 18% in children with moderate to severe congenital ptosis. Visual deprivation was the predominant risk factor that was reliably distinguished by its earlier onset in young children. The best indicator of amblyopia in children is visual acuity rather than MRD measurements. Systemic disorders are frequent in children with moderate to severe congenital ptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 76 FR 66006 - Revised Medical Criteria for Evaluating Congenital Disorders That Affect Multiple Body Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... trisomy (Edwards' syndrome or trisomy E) are usually expected to result in early death. Others such as cri... methods for establishing the existence of non-mosaic Down syndrome and other congenital disorders that... (section 110.00); Revise adult listing 10.06 and childhood listing 110.06 for non-mosaic Down syndrome;...

  9. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Moons, Philip; Heida, Karst Y.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Van Dijk, Arie P.J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Lely, A. Titia; Canobbio, Mary M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Berger, Rudolphus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed consen

  10. Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Patients with Pulmonary Valve Incompetence Complicating Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Susan; Ahmad, Waheed; Bailey, Amy; Hatton, Rachael; Boyle, Andrew; Collins, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Long standing pulmonary regurgitation results in deleterious effects on right heart size and function with late consequences of right heart volume overload including ventricular dilatation, propensity to arrhythmia and right heart failure. As sleep disordered breathing may predispose to elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance and associated negative effects on right ventricular function, we sought to assess this in patients with underlying congenital heart disease. We performed a pilot study to evaluate the incidence of sleep-disordered breathing in a patient population with a history of long standing pulmonary valve incompetence in patients with congenital heart disease using overnight oximetry. Patients with a background of tetralogy of Fallot repair or residual pulmonary incompetence following previous pulmonary valve intervention for congenital pulmonary stenosis were included. Twenty-two patients underwent overnight oximetry. The mean age of the cohort was 34.3 ± 15.2 years with no patients observed to have severe underlying pulmonary hypertension. Abnormal overnight oximetry was seen in 13/22 patients (59.1%) with 2/22 (9.1%) patients considered to have severe abnormalities. An important proportion of patients with a background of pulmonary incompetence complicating congenital heart disease are prone to the development of sleep-disordered breathing as assessed by overnight oximetry. Further study into the prevalence and mechanisms of sleep-disordered breathing in a larger cohort are warranted. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Defining the phenotype and diagnostic considerations in adults with congenital disorders of N-linked glycosylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, D.F.; Janssen, M.C; Cassiman, D.; Lefeber, D.J.; Morava-Kozicz, E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of N-glycosylation (CDG) form a rapidly growing group of more than 20 inborn errors of metabolism. Most patients are identified at the pediatric age with multisystem disease. There is no systematic review on the long-term outcome and clinical presentation in adult patients. Here

  12. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, Willem; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Moons, Philip; Heida, Karst Y.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Van Dijk, Arie P.J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Lely, A. Titia; Canobbio, Mary M.; Pieper, Petronella G.; Berger, Rudolphus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed

  13. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Hoendermis, E.S.; Moons, P.; Heida, K.Y.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Sollie, K.M.; Berger, R.M.; Lely, A.T.; Canobbio, M.M.; Pieper, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed

  14. Challenges in the Evaluation for Possible Abuse: Presentations of Congenital Bleeding Disorders in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jami; Carpenter, Shannon; Anderst, Jim

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To describe children with congenital bleeding disorders that present in a manner that may be concerning for non-accidental trauma (NAT), and to evaluate associations with disease and demographic characteristics. Methods: Ten year retrospective charts of subjects were reviewed at a Hemophilia Treatment Center. Demographic, historical,…

  15. Menstrual cycle and its disorders in women with congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenthen, W.; Hoendermis, E.S.; Moons, P.; Heida, K.Y.; Roos-Hesselink, J.W.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Sollie, K.M.; Berger, R.M.; Lely, A.T.; Canobbio, M.M.; Pieper, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the age at menarche, the prevalence of menstrual cycle (interval) disorders, and determinants in women with congenital heart disease (CHD). DESIGN: Using two CHD registries, 1802 (82%) of the 2196 women with CHD contacted (aged 18-58 years) provided written informed consen

  16. Autistic Spectrum Disorder in Two Brothers with Congenital Visual Impairment: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Hatice Altun

    2013-01-01

    Autistic spectrum disorder is characterized by severe qualitative impairments in socialization, communication, and restricted repetitive behavior, interests and activities. It is a behaviorally defined disorder of unknown etiology that is thought to be influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Congenital visual impairment children are generally reported to be at risk for serious behavioral and psychological problems, such as withdrawal, isolation, and autism. Several studies have descr...

  17. Congenital amusia: a group study of adults afflicted with a music-specific disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Julie; Peretz, Isabelle; Hyde, Krista

    2002-02-01

    The condition of congenital amusia, commonly known as tone-deafness, has been described for more than a century, but has received little empirical attention. In the present study, a research effort has been made to document in detail the behavioural manifestations of congenital amusia. A group of 11 adults, fitting stringent criteria of musical disabilities, were examined in a series of tests originally designed to assess the presence and specificity of musical disorders in brain-damaged patients. The results show that congenital amusia is related to severe deficiencies in processing pitch variations. The deficit extends to impairments in music memory and recognition as well as in singing and the ability to tap in time to music. Interestingly, the disorder appears specific to the musical domain. Congenital amusical individuals process and recognize speech, including speech prosody, common environmental sounds and human voices, as well as control subjects. Thus, the present study convincingly demonstrates the existence of congenital amusia as a new class of learning disabilities that affect musical abilities.

  18. MRI of brain disease in veterinary patients part 1: Basic principles and congenital brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders in veterinary patients and is quickly becoming the imaging modality of choice in evaluation of brain and intracranial disease. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of MRI, a description of sequences and their applications in brain imaging, and an approach to interpretation of brain MRI. A detailed discussion of imaging findings in general intracranial disorders including hydrocephalus, vasogenic edema, brain herniation, and seizure-associated changes, and the MR diagnosis of congenital brain disorders is provided. MRI evaluation of acquired brain disorders is described in a second companion article.

  19. Leber’s congenital amaurosis and the role of gene therapy in congenital retinal disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Sharif

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA and recent gene therapy advancement for treating inherited retinopathies were extensive literature reviewed using MEDLINE, PubMed and EMBASE. Adeno-associated viral vectors were the most utilised vectors for ocular gene therapy. Cone photoreceptor cells might use an alternate pathway which was not reliant of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE derived retinoid isomerohydrolase (RPE65 to access the 11-cis retinal dehydechromophore. Research efforts dedicated on the progression of a gene-based therapy for the treatment of LCA2. Such gene therapy approaches were extremely successful in canine, porcine and rodent LCA2 models. The recombinant AAV2.hRPE65v2 adeno-associated vector contained the RPE65 cDNA and was replication deficient. Its in vitro injection in target cells induced RPE65 protein production. The gene therapy trials that were so far conducted for inherited retinopathies have generated promising results. Phase I clinical trials to cure LCA and choroideremia demonstrated that adeno-associated viral vectors containing RPE genes and photoreceptors respectively, could be successfully administered to inherited retinopathy patients. A phase III trial is presently ongoing and if successful, it will lead the way to additional gene therapy attempts to cure monogenic, inherited retinopathies.

  20. Leber's congenital amaurosis and the role of gene therapy in congenital retinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Walid; Sharif, Zuhair

    2017-01-01

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA) and recent gene therapy advancement for treating inherited retinopathies were extensive literature reviewed using MEDLINE, PubMed and EMBASE. Adeno-associated viral vectors were the most utilised vectors for ocular gene therapy. Cone photoreceptor cells might use an alternate pathway which was not reliant of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) derived retinoid isomerohydrolase (RPE65) to access the 11-cis retinal dehydechromophore. Research efforts dedicated on the progression of a gene-based therapy for the treatment of LCA2. Such gene therapy approaches were extremely successful in canine, porcine and rodent LCA2 models. The recombinant AAV2.hRPE65v2 adeno-associated vector contained the RPE65 cDNA and was replication deficient. Its in vitro injection in target cells induced RPE65 protein production. The gene therapy trials that were so far conducted for inherited retinopathies have generated promising results. Phase I clinical trials to cure LCA and choroideremia demonstrated that adeno-associated viral vectors containing RPE genes and photoreceptors respectively, could be successfully administered to inherited retinopathy patients. A phase III trial is presently ongoing and if successful, it will lead the way to additional gene therapy attempts to cure monogenic, inherited retinopathies.

  1. Uniparental disomy in congenital disorders: A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindor, N.M.; Karnes, P.S.; Michels, V.V. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    Whole chromosome uniparental disomy (UPD) for several different chromosomes has been described in individuals with phenotypes that encompass a broad range of abnormalities. We prospectively searched for UPD in 25 cytogenetically normal individuals who had one or more of the following features: nonsyndromic multiple congenital anomalies, short stature, mental retardation, or dysmorphic findings. Using highly polymorphic microsatellite repeats, biparental inheritance of at least one locus on every chromosome was found in every individual and uniparental inheritance was not detected at any locus. If UPD does exist in this clinical setting, its frequency is less than 13.7% (95% confidence interval). Our data indicate that additional studies will be required to determine the true incidence of UPD in this population. 41 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Unilateral Congenital Knee and Hip Dislocation with Bilateral Clubfoot – A rare Packaging disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Tiwari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: Reduced intrauterine space gives rise to ‘packaging disorder’ which may involve joint dislocations or contractures. We present an unique case where mutiple joints were dislocated involving left congenital knee dislocation (CDK, bilateral congenital hip dislocation (CDH and congenital talipes equino varus (CTEVdeformities. Case Report: A preterm baby boy born to mother with diagnosed oligohydramios presented with left CDK bilateral DDH and CTEV. The knee dislocation was treated first with gradual streaching and weekly above knee cast. At 7th week good flexion was achieved at both knees and abduction splint for DDH (using double diaper with ponseti cast for CTEV was done. At one year follow up all joints were reduced and maintained well with baby able to stand with support. Conclusion: Packaging disorders may present with multiple dislocations and deformities. Early intervention with serial casting and manipulation minimises disability and prevents ambulatory problems. In our case there was a good response to manipulation and serial casting. This differs from cases with inherent pathology like arthrogryposis where response to treatment is not so good. Keywords: Congenital genu recurvatum, Develpmental dysplasia hip, CTEV, Clubfoot, serial manipulation, packaging disorders

  3. Wrinkled skin and fat pads in patients with ALG8-CDG: revisiting skin manifestations in congenital disorders of glycosylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenberg, D.; Gardeitchik, T.; Mohamed, M.; Lefeber, D.J.; Morava, E.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is the posttranslational coupling of sugar chains to proteins or lipids. Proper glycosylation is essential for normal protein structure, function, and trafficking. Mutations in the glycosylation pathway lead to a phenotypically heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders, the congenital

  4. Frequency of congenital malformations and chromosomal disorders in Bacau and Vaslui counties (Romania)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cristina-Elena Popa; Gogu Ghiorghiţă

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the state of genetic health of the human populations in two Romanian counties, Bacau and Vaslui, as they are different in area, number of inhabitants, level of economic and social development, etc. The data presented in this paper is from the Public Health Directions of the two counties, reflecting the situation recorded during 2006–2013. In the 8 years study, 1894 cases of congenital and chromosomal disorders were recorded in the newborns from the populations in the two counties. The identified cases were distributed based on years, categories of disorders and sexes. The average frequency of congenital disorders in the two populations over the investigated period was about 1.65 in Bacau county and 1.83% in Vaslui counties. In the population of Bacau county, these disorders affect in the same number in both the sexes (49.62% female cases and 50.38% male cases), while in Vaslui, the male cases are more than the females (53.92 and 46.08%, respectively). The main congenital disorders observed were: cardiovascular system anomalies, musculoskeletal system, urogenital system, etc. During the investigation period, in the human population of Bacau county, 97 cases of newborns with chromosomal disorders were diagnosed (0.16% of the living newborns), while in Vaslui county there were 106 cases (0.26% of the living newborns). Among these disorders, the Down’s syndrome was the most frequent one, representing 83.5 and 85.8% of cases in the population of Bacau county, and Vaslui counties.

  5. Bilateral congenital corneal anesthesia in a patient with SCN9A mutation, confirmed primary erythromelalgia, and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David Ta; Rossignol, Elsa; Najem, Kinda; Ospina, Luis H

    2015-10-01

    The SCN9A gene codes for the sodium voltage-gated channel NaV 1.7. Gain of function mutations cause pain disorders such as primary erythromelalgia, paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, and small fiber neuropathy. Loss of function mutations lead to congenital insensitivity to pain. We report the case of a 6-year-old girl with a SCN9A mutation who presented with both gain of function and loss of function phenotypes, including congenital corneal anesthesia.

  6. MPDU1 mutations underlie a novel human congenital disorder of glycosylation, designated type If

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk, Barbara; Imbach, Timo; Frank, Christian G.; Grubenmann, Claudia E.; Raymond, Gerald V.; Hurvitz, Haggit; Raas-Rotschild, Annick; Luder, Anthony S.; Berger, Eric G.; Matthijs, Gert; Hennet, Thierry; Aebi, Markus; Jaeken, Jaak

    2003-01-01

    Deficiencies in the pathway of N-glycan biosynthesis lead to severe multisystem diseases, known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The clinical appearance of CDG is variable, and different types can be distinguished according to the gene that is altered. In this report, we describe the molecular basis of a novel type of the disease in three unrelated patients diagnosed with CDG-I. Serum transferrin was hypoglycosylated and patients’ fibroblasts accumulated incomplete lipid-linked...

  7. Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruszewicz, Antoni; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Wojnowski, Waldemar; Czerniejewska, Hanna; Jackowska, Joanna; Jarmuż, Małgorzata; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Leszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2014-01-01

    Female, 6 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Phenotype-genotype discordance in congenital malformations with communication disorders resembling trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) Symptoms: - - Clinical Procedure: - Specialty: Otolaryngology. Congenital defects. Communication process disorders are very frequent in rare cases of chromosomal aberrations (deletions, insertions, and trisomies) such as Down syndrome (trisomy 21), Turner syndrome, Edwards syndrome (trisomy 18), or Patau syndrome (trisomy 13). Sometimes phenotype may delusively correspond to the characteristic features of a given syndrome, but genotype tests do not confirm its presence. We present the case of a 6-year-old girl admitted to the Clinic of Phoniatrics and Audiology for the assessment of communication in the course of congenital malformations with phenotype characteristic for trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome). Immediately upon birth, dysmorphic changes suggesting trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) were observed, but trisomy 18 was excluded after karyotype test results were normal (46, XX). DISTURBED ARTICULATION WAS DIAGNOSED: deformed linguo-dental and palatal sounds, interdental realization with flat tongue of the /s/, /z/, /c/, /dz/, /ś/, /ź/, /ć/, /dz/ sounds (sigmatismus interdentalis). Hearing loss was confirmed.

  8. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that ... function, even though there are normal platelet numbers. Most ...

  9. Treatment for preventing bleeding in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Antonio; Windyga, Jerzy; Tufano, Antonella; Yeung, Cindy; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-02-09

    In people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgical interventions, haemostatic treatment is needed in order to correct the underlying coagulation abnormalities and minimise the bleeding risk. This treatment varies according to the specific haemostatic defect, its severity and the type of surgical procedure. The aim of treatment is to ensure adequate haemostatic coverage for as long as the bleeding risk persists and until wound healing is complete. To assess the effectiveness and safety of different haemostatic regimens (type, dose and duration, modality of administration and target haemostatic levels) administered in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders for preventing bleeding complications during and after surgical procedures. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of the last search: 20 November 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing any hemostatic treatment regimen to no treatment or to another active regimen in children and adults with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders undergoing any surgical intervention. Two authors independently assessed trials (eligibility and risks of bias) and extracted data. Meta-analyses were performed on available and relevant data. Of the 16 identified trials, four (112 participants) were eligible for inclusion.Two trials evaluated 59 people with haemophilia A and B undergoing 63 dental extractions. Trials compared the use of a different type (tranexamic acid or epsilon-aminocaproic acid) and regimen of antifibrinolytic agents as haemostatic support to the initial replacement treatment. Neither trial specifically addressed mortality (one of this review's primary outcomes); however, in the frame

  10. PGM3 mutations cause a congenital disorder of glycosylation with severe immunodeficiency and skeletal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Backe, Paul H; Sorte, Hanne S; Mørkrid, Lars; Chokshi, Niti Y; Erichsen, Hans Christian; Gambin, Tomasz; Elgstøen, Katja B P; Bjørås, Magnar; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Krüger, Marcus; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Patel, Ankita; Raymond, Kimiyo M; Sasa, Ghadir S; Krance, Robert A; Martinez, Caridad A; Abraham, Shirley M; Speckmann, Carsten; Ehl, Stephan; Hall, Patricia; Forbes, Lisa R; Merckoll, Else; Westvik, Jostein; Nishimura, Gen; Rustad, Cecilie F; Abrahamsen, Tore G; Rønnestad, Arild; Osnes, Liv T; Egeland, Torstein; Rødningen, Olaug K; Beck, Christine R; Boerwinkle, Eric A; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Orange, Jordan S; Lausch, Ekkehart; Hanson, I Celine

    2014-07-03

    Human phosphoglucomutase 3 (PGM3) catalyzes the conversion of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc)-6-phosphate into GlcNAc-1-phosphate during the synthesis of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-GlcNAc, a sugar nucleotide critical to multiple glycosylation pathways. We identified three unrelated children with recurrent infections, congenital leukopenia including neutropenia, B and T cell lymphopenia, and progression to bone marrow failure. Whole-exome sequencing demonstrated deleterious mutations in PGM3 in all three subjects, delineating their disease to be due to an unsuspected congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). Functional studies of the disease-associated PGM3 variants in E. coli cells demonstrated reduced PGM3 activity for all mutants tested. Two of the three children had skeletal anomalies resembling Desbuquois dysplasia: short stature, brachydactyly, dysmorphic facial features, and intellectual disability. However, these additional features were absent in the third child, showing the clinical variability of the disease. Two children received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of cord blood and bone marrow from matched related donors; both had successful engraftment and correction of neutropenia and lymphopenia. We define PGM3-CDG as a treatable immunodeficiency, document the power of whole-exome sequencing in gene discoveries for rare disorders, and illustrate the utility of genomic analyses in studying combined and variable phenotypes.

  11. Evidence supporting the use of recombinant activated factor VII in congenital bleeding disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär I Johansson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pär I Johansson, Sisse R OstrowskiCapital Region Blood Bank, Section for Transfusion Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven® was introduced in 1996 for the treatment of hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factor VIII or IX.Objective: To review the evidence supporting the use of rFVIIa for the treatment of patients with congenital bleeding disorders.Patients and methods: English-language databases were searched in September 2009 for reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating the ability of rFVIIa to restore hemostasis in patients with congenital bleeding disorders.Results: Eight RCTs involving 256 hemophilic patients with antibodies against coagulation factors, also known as inhibitors, were identified. The evidence supporting the use of rFVIIa in these patients was weak with regard to dose, clinical setting, mode of administration, efficacy, and adverse events, given the limited sample size of each RCT and the heterogeneity of the studies.Conclusion: The authors suggest that rFVIIa therapy in hemophilic patients with inhibitors should be based on the individual’s ability to generate thrombin and form a clot, and not on the patient’s weight alone. Therefore, assays for thrombin generation, such as whole-blood thromboelastography, have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of these patients.Keywords: hemophilia, inhibitors, coagulation factor VIII, coagulation factor IX, rFVIIa, NovoSeven, FEIBA, hemostasis, RCT

  12. MALDI-TOF MS applied to apoC-III glycoforms of patients with congenital disorders affecting O-glycosylation. Comparison with two-dimensional electrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yen-Nicolay, S.; Boursier, C.; Rio, M. del; Lefeber, D.J.; Pilon, A.; Seta, N.; Bruneel, A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The O-glycan abnormalities accompanying some congenital disorders of glycosylation, namely conserved oligomeric Golgi-congenital disorders of glycosylation (COG-CDGs) and ATP6V0A2-CDGs, are mainly detected using electrophoresis methods applied to circulating apolipoprotein C-III. The object

  13. Prevalence and Correlates of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Adults With Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lisa X; Khan, Abigail May; Drajpuch, David; Fuller, Stephanie; Ludmir, Jonathan; Mascio, Christopher E; Partington, Sara L; Qadeer, Ayesha; Tobin, Lynda; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Kim, Yuli Y

    2016-03-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with adverse outcomes and increased mortality in cardiac patients. No studies have examined PTSD in the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of self-reported symptoms of PTSD in patients with ACHD and explore potential associated factors. Patients were enrolled from an outpatient ACHD clinic and completed several validated measures including the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Clinical data were abstracted through medical data review. A total of 134 participants (mean age 34.6 ± 10.6; 46% men) were enrolled. Of the 127 participants who completed the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, 14 (11%) met criteria for elevated PTSD symptoms specifically related to their congenital heart disease or treatment. Of the 134 patients who completed PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version, 27 (21%) met criteria for global PTSD symptoms. In univariate analyses, patients with congenital heart disease-specific PTSD had their most recent cardiac surgery at an earlier year (p = 0.008), were less likely to have attended college (p = 0.04), had higher rates of stroke or transient ischemic attack (p = 0.03), and reported greater depressive symptoms on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (7 vs 2, p PTSD were depressive symptoms (p PTSD is present in 11% to 21% of subjects seen at a tertiary referral center for ACHD. The high prevalence of PTSD in this complex group of patients has important implications for the medical and psychosocial management of this growing population.

  14. Neural and Synaptic Defects in slytherin a Zebrafish Model for Human Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Song; J Willer; P Scherer; J Panzer; A Kugath; E Skordalakes; R Gregg; G Willer; R Balice-Gordon

    2011-12-31

    Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIc (CDG IIc) is characterized by mental retardation, slowed growth and severe immunodeficiency, attributed to the lack of fucosylated glycoproteins. While impaired Notch signaling has been implicated in some aspects of CDG IIc pathogenesis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have identified a zebrafish mutant slytherin (srn), which harbors a missense point mutation in GDP-mannose 4,6 dehydratase (GMDS), the rate-limiting enzyme in protein fucosylation, including that of Notch. Here we report that some of the mechanisms underlying the neural phenotypes in srn and in CGD IIc are Notch-dependent, while others are Notch-independent. We show, for the first time in a vertebrate in vivo, that defects in protein fucosylation leads to defects in neuronal differentiation, maintenance, axon branching, and synapse formation. Srn is thus a useful and important vertebrate model for human CDG IIc that has provided new insights into the neural phenotypes that are hallmarks of the human disorder and has also highlighted the role of protein fucosylation in neural development.

  15. Women's Attitudes Regarding Prenatal Testing for a Range of Congenital Disorders of Varying Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Mary E; Nakagawa, Sanae; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2014-01-21

    Little is known about women's comparative attitudes towards prenatal testing for different categories of genetic disorders. We interviewed women who delivered healthy infants within the past year and assessed attitudes towards prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, as well as pregnancy termination, for Down syndrome (DS), fragile X (FraX), cystic fibrosis (CF), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), phenylketonuria (PKU) and congenital heart defects (CHD). Ninety-five women aged 21 to 48 years participated, of whom 60% were Caucasian, 23% Asian, 10% Latina and 7% African American; 82% were college graduates. Ninety-five to ninety-eight percent indicated that they would have screening for each condition, and the majority would have amniocentesis (64% for PKU to 72% for SMA). Inclinations regarding pregnancy termination varied by condition: Whereas only 10% reported they would probably or definitely terminate a pregnancy for CHD, 41% indicated they would do so for DS and 62% for SMA. Most women in this cohort reported that they would undergo screening for all six conditions presented, the majority without the intent to terminate an affected pregnancy. These women were least inclined to terminate treatable disorders (PKU, CHD) versus those associated with intellectual disability (DS, FraX) and were most likely to terminate for SMA, typically lethal in childhood.

  16. Cryptogenic liver disease in four children: a novel congenital disorder of glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, Claudia; Brive, Lena; Miura, Yoshiaki; Davis, Joseph Alex; Di Cosmo, Nicolina; Lucariello, Stefania; Pagliardini, Severo; Seo, Neung-Seon; Parenti, Giancarlo; Vecchione, Raffaella; Freeze, Hudson H; Vajro, Pietro

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the metabolic defect(s) of four children who presented with isolated cryptogenic chronic liver disease, coagulopathy, and abnormalities of several unrelated serum glycoproteins. Analysis of the patients' serum glycoproteins and fibroblasts suggest they have a novel congenital disorder of glycosylation (CDG). All had abnormal transferrin (Tf) isoelectric focusing (IEF) profiles. More detailed analysis of Tf by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) showed a plethora of abnormal glycosylations that included loss of 1-2 sialic acids and 1-2 galactose units, typical of Group II defects. Tf from two patients also lacked 1-2 entire oligosaccharide chains, typical of Group One disorders. Total serum N-glycans were analyzed by HPLC and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry and also showed increased proportion of neutral glycan chains lacking sialic acids and galactose units. Analysis of patient fibroblasts eliminated CDG-Ia, through CDG-Ih, -IL and CDG-IId. Our results suggest that a subset of children with clinically asymptomatic, cryptogenic hypertransaminasemia and/or liver steato-fibrosis may represent a novel type of CDG-X with an unknown defect(s). Clinicians are encouraged to test such patients for abnormal Tf glycosylation by ESI-MS.

  17. Women’s Attitudes Regarding Prenatal Testing for a Range of Congenital Disorders of Varying Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Norton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about women’s comparative attitudes towards prenatal testing for different categories of genetic disorders. We interviewed women who delivered healthy infants within the past year and assessed attitudes towards prenatal screening and diagnostic testing, as well as pregnancy termination, for Down syndrome (DS, fragile X (FraX, cystic fibrosis (CF, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, phenylketonuria (PKU and congenital heart defects (CHD. Ninety-five women aged 21 to 48 years participated, of whom 60% were Caucasian, 23% Asian, 10% Latina and 7% African American; 82% were college graduates. Ninety-five to ninety-eight percent indicated that they would have screening for each condition, and the majority would have amniocentesis (64% for PKU to 72% for SMA. Inclinations regarding pregnancy termination varied by condition: Whereas only 10% reported they would probably or definitely terminate a pregnancy for CHD, 41% indicated they would do so for DS and 62% for SMA. Most women in this cohort reported that they would undergo screening for all six conditions presented, the majority without the intent to terminate an affected pregnancy. These women were least inclined to terminate treatable disorders (PKU, CHD versus those associated with intellectual disability (DS, FraX and were most likely to terminate for SMA, typically lethal in childhood.

  18. Congenital third nerve palsy with synergistic depression on attempted adduction and trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis: Underpinnings of a spectral dysinnervation disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a case of congenital partial pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy with absent adduction, synergistic depression of globe and widening of palpebral fissure on attempted adduction and synergistic elevation and adduction on mouth opening and sideways thrusting of jaw. The case illustrates trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis associated with congenital third nerve palsy. The possible mechanism of miswiring involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus and trigeminal nuclei is discussed. At least some cases of congenital third cranial nerve palsy may fall in the realm of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs sharing a much wider spectrum of presentation.

  19. Congenital third nerve palsy with synergistic depression on attempted adduction and trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis: Underpinnings of a spectral dysinnervation disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Pramod Kumar; Bhambhwani, Vishaal; Ranjith, P C; Kadav, Mandar; Aparnaa, C

    2016-05-01

    The authors describe a case of congenital partial pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy with absent adduction, synergistic depression of globe and widening of palpebral fissure on attempted adduction and synergistic elevation and adduction on mouth opening and sideways thrusting of jaw. The case illustrates trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis associated with congenital third nerve palsy. The possible mechanism of miswiring involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus and trigeminal nuclei is discussed. At least some cases of congenital third cranial nerve palsy may fall in the realm of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs) sharing a much wider spectrum of presentation.

  20. MPDU1 mutations underlie a novel human congenital disorder of glycosylation, designated type If

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Barbara; Imbach, Timo; Frank, Christian G.; Grubenmann, Claudia E.; Raymond, Gerald V.; Hurvitz, Haggit; Raas-Rotschild, Annick; Luder, Anthony S.; Jaeken, Jaak; Berger, Eric G.; Matthijs, Gert; Hennet, Thierry; Aebi, Markus

    2001-01-01

    Deficiencies in the pathway of N-glycan biosynthesis lead to severe multisystem diseases, known as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). The clinical appearance of CDG is variable, and different types can be distinguished according to the gene that is altered. In this report, we describe the molecular basis of a novel type of the disease in three unrelated patients diagnosed with CDG-I. Serum transferrin was hypoglycosylated and patients’ fibroblasts accumulated incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharide precursors for N-linked protein glycosylation. Transfer of incomplete oligosaccharides to protein was detected. Sequence analysis of the Lec35/MPDU1 gene, known to be involved in the use of dolichylphosphomannose and dolichylphosphoglucose, revealed mutations in all three patients. Retroviral-based expression of the normal Lec35 cDNA in primary fibroblasts of patients restored normal lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis. We concluded that mutations in the Lec35/MPDU1 gene cause CDG. This novel type was termed CDG-If. PMID:11733564

  1. Congenital rubella syndrome and autism spectrum disorder prevented by rubella vaccination - United States, 2001-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Saad B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS is associated with several negative outcomes, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. The objective of this study was to estimate the numbers of CRS and ASD cases prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States from 2001 through 2010. Methods Prevention estimates were calculated through simple mathematical modeling, with values of model parameters determined from published literature. Model parameters included pre-vaccine era CRS incidence, vaccine era CRS incidence, the number of live births per year, and the percentage of CRS cases presenting with an ASD. Results Based on our estimates, 16,600 CRS cases (range: 8300-62,250 were prevented by rubella vaccination from 2001 through 2010 in the United States. An estimated 1228 ASD cases were prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States during this time period. Simulating a slight expansion in ASD diagnostic criteria in recent decades, we estimate that a minimum of 830 ASD cases and a maximum of 6225 ASD cases were prevented. Conclusions We estimate that rubella vaccination prevented substantial numbers of CRS and ASD cases in the United States from 2001 through 2010. These findings provide additional incentive to maintain high measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccination coverage.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetus in congenital intrathoracic disorders: preliminary observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xiang; Ashtari, M.; Leonidas, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Schneider Children' s Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, NY (United States); Chan Ying [Fetal-Maternal Medicine, Schneider Children' s Hospital, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Background and objective. Advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide high-quality images of the intrathoracic organs. We studied the ability of MRI to define spatial relationships of the fetal lungs and measured lung volume in two cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), one of severe oligohydramnios secondary to bilateral cystic renal dysplasia and one case of prenatal chylothorax. Patients and methods. We performed pelvic MRI using single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) pulse sequence in four pregnant women referred because of abnormal prenatal ultrasound (US) findings associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. Results. The exact anatomic position of the contents of the hernia in CDH, including the position of the liver, was better defined with MRI. Pleural effusions were identified as well as the renal abnormality in the case of oligohydramnios. Lung volume was measured and the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia was quantified in every case. Lung-to-thorax ratio was calculated in the case of fetal chylothorax. Conclusion. Ongoing work suggests that MRI can provide additional detailed quantitative information in prenatal disorders associated with fetal lung compression and resulting hypoplasia. Correlation of fetal lung volume with postnatal management and outcome may affect prognosis in these cases. (orig.)

  3. Global serum glycoform profiling for the investigation of dystroglycanopathies & Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

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    Wendy E. Heywood

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG are an expanding group of genetic disorders which encompass a spectrum of glycosylation defects of protein and lipids, including N- & O-linked defects and among the latter are the muscular dystroglycanopathies (MD. Initial screening of CDG is usually based on the investigation of the glycoproteins transferrin, and/or apolipoprotein CIII. These biomarkers do not always detect complex or subtle defects present in older patients, therefore there is a need to investigate additional glycoproteins in some cases. We describe a sensitive 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE method that provides a global analysis of the serum glycoproteome. Patient samples from PMM2-CDG (n = 5, CDG-II (n = 7, MD and known complex N- & O-linked glycosylation defects (n = 3 were analysed by 2D DIGE. Using this technique we demonstrated characteristic changes in mass and charge in PMM2-CDG and in charge in CDG-II for α1-antitrypsin, α1-antichymotrypsin, α2-HS-glycoprotein, ceruloplasmin, and α1-acid glycoproteins 1&2. Analysis of the samples with known N- & O-linked defects identified a lower molecular weight glycoform of C1-esterase inhibitor that was not observed in the N-linked glycosylation disorders indicating the change is likely due to affected O-glycosylation. In addition, we could identify abnormal serum glycoproteins in LARGE and B3GALNT2-deficient muscular dystrophies. The results demonstrate that the glycoform pattern is varied for some CDG patients not all glycoproteins are consistently affected and analysis of more than one protein in complex cases is warranted. 2D DIGE is an ideal method to investigate the global glycoproteome and is a potentially powerful tool and secondary test for aiding the complex diagnosis and sub classification of CDG. The technique has further potential in monitoring patients for future treatment strategies. In an era of shifting emphasis from gel- to mass-spectral based

  4. Synaptic roles for phosphomannomutase type 2 in a new Drosophila congenital disorder of glycosylation disease model

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    William M. Parkinson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs constitute a rapidly growing family of human diseases resulting from heritable mutations in genes driving the production and modification of glycoproteins. The resulting symptomatic hypoglycosylation causes multisystemic defects that include severe neurological impairments, revealing a particularly critical requirement for tightly regulated glycosylation in the nervous system. The most common CDG, CDG-Ia (PMM2-CDG, arises from phosphomannomutase type 2 (PMM2 mutations. Here, we report the generation and characterization of the first Drosophila CDG-Ia model. CRISPR-generated pmm2-null Drosophila mutants display severely disrupted glycosylation and early lethality, whereas RNAi-targeted knockdown of neuronal PMM2 results in a strong shift in the abundance of pauci-mannose glycan, progressive incoordination and later lethality, closely paralleling human CDG-Ia symptoms of shortened lifespan, movement impairments and defective neural development. Analyses of the well-characterized Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ reveal synaptic glycosylation loss accompanied by defects in both structural architecture and functional neurotransmission. NMJ synaptogenesis is driven by intercellular signals that traverse an extracellular synaptomatrix and are co-regulated by glycosylation and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs. Specifically, trans-synaptic signaling by the Wnt protein Wingless (Wg depends on the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG co-receptor Dally-like protein (Dlp, which is regulated by synaptic MMP activity. Loss of synaptic MMP2, Wg ligand, Dlp co-receptor and downstream trans-synaptic signaling occurs with PMM2 knockdown. Taken together, this Drosophila CDG disease model provides a new avenue for the dissection of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying neurological impairments and is a means by which to discover and test novel therapeutic treatment strategies.

  5. Major Congenital Metabolic Disorders in the First 12 years of Life in 79,100 Consecutively Born Children in Qazvin Province

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    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDeficient enzyme activity may cause congenital metabolic defects. These defectsare inherited in an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linkedpatterns. This study was aimed at investigating the occurrence of metabolicdiseases in Qazvin Province.Materials & MethodsThis cross-sectional study was performed on 79,100 children aged 12 years orless between 2000 and 2010. Clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and allother essential information were assessed to precisely diagnose the metabolicdiseases. The sorted information on congenital metabolic defects of the patients,information included in a checklist, and data were analyzed usnig SPSS.ResultsA total of 57 metabolic disorders were recorded. The difference in the prevalenceof metabolic disorders between male (29 cases and female (28 cases wasnot statistically significant. The most frequent congenital metabolic disorderamong our patients was phenylketonuria (PKU; 5 per 1,000 cases, and the leastcommon disorder was galactosemia (3 per 1,000 cases.ConclusionTimely detection and management of congenital metabolic disorders canhelp save the affected children. Prenatal screening programs, molecular genetherapy, and counseling for consanguineous marriage can play important rolesin reducing the rate of metabolic disorders in this province.Keywords: Congenital metabolic disorders; prevalence; population; Qazvin

  6. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

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    Park, S.; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causin...

  7. Hydrophobic Man-1-P derivatives correct abnormal glycosylation in Type I congenital disorder of glycosylation fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklund, Erik A; Merbouh, Nabyl; Ichikawa, Mie; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Clima, Jessica M; Dorman, James A; Norberg, Thomas; Freeze, Hudson H

    2005-11-01

    Patients with Type I congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG-I) make incomplete lipid-linked oligosaccharides (LLO). These glycans are poorly transferred to proteins resulting in unoccupied glycosylation sequons. Mutations in phosphomannomutase (PMM2) cause CDG-Ia by reducing the activity of PMM, which converts mannose (Man)-6-P to Man-1-P before formation of GDP-Man. These patients have reduced Man-1-P and GDP-Man. To replenish intracellular Man-1-P pools in CDG-Ia cells, we synthesized two hydrophobic, membrane permeable acylated versions of Man-1-P and determined their ability to normalize LLO size and N-glycosylation in CDG-Ia fibroblasts. Both compounds, compound I (diacetoxymethyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl phosphate) (C-I) and compound II (diacetoxymethyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-ethyloxycarbonyl-alpha-D-mannopyranosyl phosphate) (C-II), contain two acetoxymethyl (CH2OAc) groups O-linked to phosphorous. C-I contains acetyl esters and C-II contains ethylcarbonate (CO2Et) esters on the Man residue. Both C-I and C-II normalized truncated LLO, but C-II was about 2-fold more efficient than C-I. C-II replenished the GDP-Man pool in CDG-Ia cells and was more efficiently incorporated into glycoproteins than exogenous Man at low concentrations (25-75 mM). In a glycosylation assay of DNaseI in CDG-Ia cells, C-II restored glycosylation to control cell levels. C-II also corrected impaired LLO biosynthesis in cells from a Dolichol (Dol)-P-Man deficient patient (CDG-Ie) and partially corrected LLO in cells from an ALG12 mannosyltransferase-deficient patient (CDG-Ig), whereas cells from an ALG3-deficient patient (CDG-Id) and from an MPDU1-deficient patient (CDG-If) were not corrected. These results validate the general concept of using pro-Man-1-P substrates as potential therapeutics for CDG-I patients.

  8. Congenital amusias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap."

  9. Major Congenital Metabolic Disorders in the First 12 years of Life in 79,100 Consecutively Born Children in Qazvin Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveDeficient enzyme activity may cause congenital metabolic defects. These defectsare inherited in an autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, and X-linkedpatterns. This study was aimed at investigating the occurrence of metabolicdiseases in Qazvin Province.Materials & MethodsThis cross-sectional study was performed on 79,100 children aged 12 years orless between 2000 and 2010. Clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and allother essential information were assessed to precisely diagnose the metabolicdiseases. The sorted information on congenital metabolic defects of the patients,information included in a checklist, and data were analyzed usnig SPSS.ResultsA total of 57 metabolic disorders were recorded. The difference in the prevalenceof metabolic disorders between male (29 cases and female (28 cases wasnot statistically significant. The most frequent congenital metabolic disorderamong our patients was phenylketonuria (PKU; 5 per 1,000 cases, and the leastcommon disorder was galactosemia (3 per 1,000 cases.ConclusionTimely detection and management of congenital metabolic disorders canhelp save the affected children. Prenatal screening programs, molecular genetherapy, and counseling for consanguineous marriage can play important rolesin reducing the rate of metabolic disorders in this province.

  10. Neuropathological Changes and Clinical Features of Autism Spectrum Disorder Participants Are Similar to that Reported in Congenital and Chronic Cerebral Toxoplasmosis in Humans and Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Anatomic, histopathologic, and MRI/SPET studies of autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) patients' brains confirm existence of very early developmental deficits. In congenital and chronic murine toxoplasmosis several cerebral anomalies also have been reported, and worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with T. "gondii"…

  11. Genetic screening of Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome patients confirms CLMP as the major gene involved in the recessive form of this disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves, Maria M.; Halim, Danny; Maroofian, Reza; de Graaf, Bianca M.; Rooman, Raoul; van der Werf, Christine S.; Van de Vijver, Els; Mehrjardi, Mohammad Y. V.; Aflatoonian, Majid; Chioza, Barry A.; Baple, Emma L.; Dehghani, Mohammadreza; Crosby, Andrew H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital short bowel syndrome (CSBS) is an intestinal pediatric disorder, where patients are born with a dramatic shortened small intestine. Pathogenic variants in CLMP were recently identified to cause an autosomal recessive form of the disease. However, due to the rare nature of CSBS, only a sma

  12. Subcutaneous fat pads on body MRI - an early sign of congenital disorder of glycosylation PMM2-CDG (CDG1a)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher A.; Schulze, Andreas [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada); Miller, Elka [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Yoon, Grace [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Division of Neurology, Toronto (Canada); Blaser, Susan I. [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Paediatric Neuroradiology, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Infants with phosphomannomutase 2 - congenital disorder of glycosylation (PMM2-CDG), formerly known as CDG1a, present with failure to thrive, visceral dysfunction, thromboembolic events and developmental delays noted before 6 months of age. Diagnosis is often delayed due to the considerable variability in phenotype. Characteristic, but not universal, features include inverted nipples and abnormal subcutaneous fat pads. Neuroimaging performed in the first 4 months of life may be normal, although cerebellar and brainstem atrophy is usual after 3 months of age. Cerebellar and brainstem atrophy have been noted as early as 11 days of life. We present an infant whose typical subcutaneous and retroperitoneal fat deposits were clinically occult, but identified on body MRI. (orig.)

  13. Congenital Insensitivity to Pain

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    Praveen Kumar B,

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Insensitivity to Pain belongs to the family of Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies (HSAN. It is a rare disorder of unknown etiology associated with loss of pain sensation. Cognition and sensation is otherwise normal and there is no detectable physical abnormality. We report a case of Congenital Insensitivity to Pain in a 3 year old female child.

  14. Aplasia of the anterior arch of atlas associated with multiple congenital disorders: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Kalani, M Yashar S; Maughan, Peter H; Theodore, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    Congenital clefts and aplasias of the atlas vertebra are rare. A nonfused posterior arch occurs in 4% of the population; in contrast, a nonfused anterior arch occurs in only 0.1%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the combination of anterior arch aplasia and a cleft of the posterior arch of the atlas associated with Klippel-Feil and Treacher-Collins syndromes and Sprengel deformity. An 11-year-old girl presented with neck pain and symptoms of myelopathy, including upper- and lower-extremity paresthesia. Computed tomography revealed significant congenital bony anomalies of the cervical spine, with congenital fusion of C2 through C5. There was aplasia of the anterior ring of C1 (A 2.3-cm gap was present within the anterior aspect of the lateral masses). The posterior elements of C3 and C4 were fused, and signs of Sprengel deformity were present. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed effacement of the ventral cerebrospinal fluid space at the craniocervical junction and mild mass effect at the cervicomedullary junction. Flexion and extension views showed abnormal motion at the craniocervical junction. There was no evidence of atlantoaxial instability, basilar invagination, or Chiari malformation. Occipito-C4-scapular fusion was performed to prevent spinal cord injury and further neurological symptoms. Postoperatively, the patient did extremely well, and her preoperative symptoms resolved. We describe a rare case of aplasia of the anterior arch of the atlas and posterior arch midline cleft in association with Treacher-Collins syndrome, Klippel-Feil syndrome, and Sprengel deformity. The patient's atlantoaxial instability was managed surgically with a unique construct that provided occipito-C4-scapular fusion.

  15. [Congenital hydrocephalus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón-Valdez, J

    2006-04-10

    Congenital hydrocephalus or ventriculomegaly is a disorder that now can be diagnosed in uterus with ultrasonography, this gives the chance of being able to give a treatment the earliest as possible. The clinical manifestations are reviewed, the diagnosis, the frequent treatment and causes of congenital hydrocephalus, being the first agenesis of the Sylvius' aqueduct, followed by Arnold-Chiari's malformations with mielomeningocele. In most of the cases the peritoneal-ventricle shunt is the best surgery treatment and now, the treatment with ventriculostomy of third ventricle by endoscopy has fewer complications apparently and in several cases it is the definitive treatment. The evolution of the diagnosis with the support of specific therapies is effective and the early treatment is good, of course taking into account the etiology.

  16. Paternal aging and increased risk of congenital disease, psychiatric disorders, and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon L Conti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As couples are increasingly delaying parenthood, the effect of the aging men and women on reproductive outcomes has been an area of increased interest. Advanced paternal age has been shown to independently affect the entire spectrum of male fertility as assessed by reductions in sperm quality and fertilization (both assisted and unassisted. Moreover, epidemiological data suggest that paternal age can lead to higher rates of adverse birth outcomes and congenital anomalies. Mounting evidence also suggests increased risk of specific pediatric and adult disease states ranging from cancer to behavioral traits. While disease states associated with advancing paternal age have been well described, consensus recommendations for neonatal screening have not been as widely implemented as have been with advanced maternal age.

  17. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  18. Gender development in women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia as a function of disorder severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F L; Dolezal, Curtis; Baker, Susan W; Ehrhardt, Anke A; New, Maria I

    2006-12-01

    Prenatal-onset classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in 46,XX individuals is associated with variable masculinization/defeminization of the genitalia and of behavior, presumably both due to excess prenatal androgen production. The purpose of the current study was threefold: (1) to extend the gender-behavioral investigation to the mildest subtype of 46,XX CAH, the non-classical (NC) variant, (2) to replicate previous findings on moderate and severe variants of 46,XX CAH using a battery of diversely constructed assessment instruments, and (3) to evaluate the utility of the chosen assessment instruments for this area of work. We studied 63 women with classical CAH (42 with the salt wasting [SW] and 21 with the simple virilizing [SV] variant), 82 women with the NC variant, and 24 related non-CAH sisters and female cousins as controls (COS). NC women showed a few signs of gender shifts in the expected direction, SV women were intermediate, and SW women most severely affected. In terms of gender identity, two SW women were gender-dysphoric, and a third had changed to male in adulthood. All others identified as women. We conclude that behavioral masculinization/defeminization is pronounced in SW-CAH women, slight but still clearly demonstrable in SV women, and probable, but still in need of replication in NC women. There continues a need for improved instruments for gender assessment.

  19. Congenital hydrocephalus in clinical practice : A genetic diagnostic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Krapels, P. C.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; van Lint, F. H. M.; Willekes, C.; Weber, J. W.; Gavilanes, A. W. D.; Macville, M. V. E.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Engelen, J. J. M.; Bakker, J.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. The etiology is very heterogeneous. Little is known about the genetic causes of congenital hydrocephalus. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with primary congenital hydrocephalus referred to the Department of

  20. Diagnostic value of CT in congenital disorders of the great vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Zenju; Morooka, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Shigeru; Masuda, Yoshiaki; Inagaki, Yoshiaki (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Yoshida, Hideo

    1983-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) studies of the cardiovascular system were performed on 850 cases at our institute during the last five years. The aorta was clearly demonstrated by CT from the aortic root to the bifurcation of the iliac artery, and in most cases the main aortic branches including the coronary, brachiocephalic, common carotid, subclavian, celiac, superior mesenteric, renal and iliac arteries were satisfactorily evaluated. Therefore CT renders us encouraging to detect the abnormality of these arteries. This paper described the CT finings of congenital anomalies of the great vessels in 14 patients with 16 anomalies including two cases of l-corrected transposition of the great vessels, two of double aortic arch, one of aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, six of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and five of right-sided descending aorta, two of which had double aortic arch aforementioned and the remaining three had dextrocardia. The diagnosis of these abnormalities except for PDA were made only by CT. For instance, l-corrected transposition of the great vessels was diagnosed easily by observing the side-to-side relationship of the great vessels, the aorta is situated to the left and anterior to the pulmonary artery. In the case of double aortic arch, not only the left and right aortic arch, but also the degree of narrowing as well as compression of the trachea and esophagus were well evaluated. The diagnosis of aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva was made by the characteristically marked dilatation of the aorta at the level of sinus of Valsalva on CT. Only in one case of PDA, the ductus connecting the descending aorta to the left pulmonary artery was demonstrated by CT. Plain CT was well tolerable, but enhanced CT was much more informative to detect cardiovascular abnormalities, and moreover, dynamic CT was rewarding in the detailed evaluation of blood flow in the cardiovascular system.

  1. Dental health in children with congenital bleeding disorders in and around Davangere: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Nagaveni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was carried out to investigate the dental and some other aspects of oral health status of young patients with congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs and compared with controls. Materials and Methods: Decayed, missed, filled tooth surfaces (DMFS-dmfs in permanent and primary teeth scores, simplified oral hygiene index, occlusion, occurrence of hypoplasia, fluorosis other hard tissue and soft tissue findings of 50 CBD patients at the age range of 4-15 years and 50 of other children as control were compared. Data were analyzed by Chi-square and Student′s unpaired t-test. Results: Patients were significantly more caries-free with less decayed teeth in primary-permanent dentition (P < 0.05 and with lower scores for overall hygiene. Conclusion: By this, it can be concluded that children with CBD have a significantly lower prevalence of dental caries and better oral hygiene compared with matched, healthy controls.

  2. A zebrafish model of congenital disorders of glycosylation with phosphomannose isomerase deficiency reveals an early opportunity for corrective mannose supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Chu

    2013-01-01

    Individuals with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG have recessive mutations in genes required for protein N-glycosylation, resulting in multi-systemic disease. Despite the well-characterized biochemical consequences in these individuals, the underlying cellular defects that contribute to CDG are not well understood. Synthesis of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide (LLO, which serves as the sugar donor for the N-glycosylation of secretory proteins, requires conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to mannose-6-phosphate via the phosphomannose isomerase (MPI enzyme. Individuals who are deficient in MPI present with bleeding, diarrhea, edema, gastrointestinal bleeding and liver fibrosis. MPI-CDG patients can be treated with oral mannose supplements, which is converted to mannose-6-phosphate through a minor complementary metabolic pathway, restoring protein glycosylation and ameliorating most symptoms, although liver disease continues to progress. Because Mpi deletion in mice causes early embryonic lethality and thus is difficult to study, we used zebrafish to establish a model of MPI-CDG. We used a morpholino to block mpi mRNA translation and established a concentration that consistently yielded 13% residual Mpi enzyme activity at 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, which is within the range of MPI activity detected in fibroblasts from MPI-CDG patients. Fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis detected decreased LLO and N-glycans in mpi morphants. These deficiencies resulted in 50% embryonic lethality by 4 dpf. Multi-systemic abnormalities, including small eyes, dysmorphic jaws, pericardial edema, a small liver and curled tails, occurred in 82% of the surviving larvae. Importantly, these phenotypes could be rescued with mannose supplementation. Thus, parallel processes in fish and humans contribute to the phenotypes caused by Mpi depletion. Interestingly, mannose was only effective if provided prior to 24 hpf. These data provide insight into treatment efficacy

  3. Congenital thrombocytopenia with nephritis: The first case of MYH9 related disorder in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmanović Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The group of autosomal dominant disorders - Epstein syndrome, Sebastian syndrome, Fechthner syndrome and May-Hegglin anomaly - are characterised by thrombocytopenia with giant platelets, inclusion bodies in granulocytes and variable levels of deafness, disturbances of vision and renal function impairment. A common genetic background of these disorders are mutations in MYH9 gene, coding for the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA. Differential diagnosis is important for the adequate treatment strategy. The aim of this case report was to present a patient with MYH9 disorder in Serbia. Case report. A 16-year-old boy was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of resistant immune thrombocytopenia for splenectomy. Thrombocytopenia was incidentally discovered at the age of five. The treatment with corticosteroids on several occasions was unsuccessful. Although the platelet count was below 10 × 109/L, there were no bleeding symptoms. Besides thrombocytopenia with giant platelets, on admission the patient also suffered sensorineuronal hearing loss and proteinuria. The diagnosis was confirmed with immunofluorescence and genetic analyses. Conclusion. Early recognition of MYH9-related diseases is essential to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful treatments for misdiagnosed immune thrombocytopenia, and also for timely and proper therapy in attempt to delay end-stage renal failure and improve quality of life. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175056 i br. 15079

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  5. Phenotype analysis of congenital and neurodevelopmental disorders in the next generation sequencing era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John C

    2017-09-01

    The designation, phenotype, was proposed as a term by Wilhelm Johannsen in 1909. The word is derived from the Greek, phano (showing) and typo (type), phanotypos. Phenotype has become a widely recognized term, even outside of the genetics community, in recent years with the ongoing identification of human disease genes. The term has been defined as the observable constitution of an organism, but sometimes refers to a condition when a person has a particular clinical presentation. Analysis of phenotype is a timely theme because advances in the understanding of the genetic basis of human disease and the emergence of next generation sequencing have spurred a renewed interest in phenotype and the proposal to establish a "Human Phenome Project." This article summarizes the principles of phenotype analysis that are important in medical genetics and describes approaches to comprehensive phenotype analysis in the investigation of patients with human disorders. I discuss the various elements related to disease phenotypes and highlight neurofibromatosis type 1 and the Elements of Morphology Project as illustrations of the principles. In recent years, the notion of "deep phenotyping" has emerged. Currently there are now a number of proposed strategies and resources to approach this concept. Not since the 1960s and 1970s has there been such an exciting time in the history of medicine surrounding the analysis of phenotype in genetic disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Associations of prenatally detected choroid plexus cysts with biochemical risk for congenital disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielius Serapinas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: C horoid plexus cysts are one of the foetus ultrasonography findings that raise parents’ concerns about their child’s health. Usually cysts are found in an estimated 1% all performed ultrasonographies. Aim of the research: To evaluate the risk of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect when choroid plexus cysts are found. Material and methods : The risks of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect were calculated by using second-trimester biomarkers (a-fetoprotein, human choriongonadotropin, unconjugated estriol for patients with choroid plexus cysts. A control group was selected randomly with calculated risks and without any abnormal ultrasonography findings. These risks were compared between the two groups. Results: Twelve pregnancies with diagnosed choroid plexus cysts were included in this study during the year 2012. Choroid plexus cyst findings during this case/control study have shown that only one case from the test group had progressed to more serious foetal aberrations (Edward’s syndrome; nonetheless, this progression did not influence statistically significant changes in the test and control groups. No statistically significant changes between the risks of disorders according the PRISCA method were observed in the appearance of Down syndrome or neural tube defect.  Conclusions : There is no data that choroid plexus cysts increase the risk of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect.

  7. Alteraciones neuropsicológicas en la hiperplasia adrenal congénita Neuropsychological disorders related to congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Ramírez Benítez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN: la hiperplasia adrenal congénita engloba un conjunto de enfermedades genéticas de transmisión autosómica recesiva caracterizadas por un trastorno de la esteroidogénesis suprarrenal. Constituye un caso típico de daño cerebral por el efecto patológico de las hormonas sexuales en el sistema nervioso en desarrollo, y a esto se le suman las secuelas secundarias al cuadro grave de crisis adrenal que aparece en la forma clásica a los pocos días de vida. MÉTODOS: estudio de caso en un niño de 6 años de edad con antecedentes de hiperplasia adrenal congénita perdedora de sal. Se determinaron los puntos débiles y fuertes en el desarrollo a través de la batería neuropsicológica Luria Inicial. Como complementario a la evaluación se aplicó la Escala de Inteligencia de Weschler y el Cuestionario de Comportamiento Infantil para padres y profesores. RESULTADOS: el niño presenta un perfil neuropsicológico caracterizado por bajas puntuaciones en: motricidad manual, habilidades viso-espaciales, impulsividad, pobre vocabulario, dificultades en operaciones de cálculos sencillos, en el reconocimiento de objetos por el tacto sin la ayuda visual y en la rapidez de procesamiento. La capacidad de inteligencia está en límites normales con un rendimiento más bajo en la escala no verbal. En la escala de comportamiento se identificaron las dificultades en la atención y en el aprendizaje. CONCLUSIONES: el perfil neuropsicológico se caracteriza por tener bajas ejecuciones en tareas verbales, no verbales y en la velocidad de procesamiento. El tratamiento hormonal en los primeros días de nacido permite que el desarrollo siga un curso "normal", pero todo proceso tiene un costo que se refleja en la adquisición de habilidades psicológicas superioresCongenital adrenal hyperplasia includes a series of genetic diseases of autosomal recessive transmission characterized by a disorder of suprarenal esteroidogenesis. This is a typical case of

  8. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Congenital Hypothyroidism March 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... Pediatric Endocrine Society MedlinePlus (NIH) What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  9. Initial diagnosis of the congenital disorder of glycosylation PMM2-CDG (CDG1a) in a 4-year-old girl after neurosurgical intervention for cerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanits, Harald; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Kuess, Magnus; Milenkovic, Ivan; Matula, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The congenital disorder of glycosylation characterized by a deficiency of phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2-CDG) is the most common variant of congenital disorders of glycosylation. Besides typical clinical features, such as dysmorphism and abnormal body fat distribution, coagulation abnormities often lead to thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events in these patients. However, only 2 cases of intracerebral bleeding in patients with PMM2-CDG have been described so far. A 4-year-old girl who initially presented with symptoms resulting from raised intracranial pressure underwent acute neurosurgical intervention for intracranial hemorrhage. The differential diagnoses after MRI included arteriovenous malformation and intraparenchymal brain tumor. However, clinical investigations promoted the diagnosis of PMM2-CDG, which was supported further by neuropathological findings and finally confirmed by isoelectric focusing and mutational analysis. No major complications or neurological deficits were evident after surgery, and the patient was able to attend an integrated kindergarten. Unexplained intracranial hemorrhage should raise suspicion of a metabolic disorder and should be discussed with specialists to rule out an orphan disease such as PMM2-CDG.

  10. Leber congenital amaurosis - a model for efficient genetic testing of heterogeneous disorders: LXIV Edward Jackson Memorial Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Edwin M

    2007-12-01

    To critically evaluate our experience in molecular testing of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and to use this information to devise a general approach to heterogeneous recessive disorders. Careful clinical and molecular characterization of large cohorts of patients affected with inherited eye diseases will be an essential step in the development of effective therapy for these diseases, especially when the therapy involves gene replacement. A molecular genetic case-control study. Six hundred forty-two unrelated individuals with the clinical diagnosis of LCA and 200 unrelated control individuals were screened for disease-causing sequence variations in eight genes using various combinations of single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis (SSCP), automated DNA sequencing, multiplex allele-specific ligation analysis (SNPlex), and high-density solid-phase single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Four hundred forty instances of 189 different disease-causing sequence variations were observed in this study, 98 of which have not been previously reported. One hundred forty-six of the 189 variations (77%) were observed in only a single individual. The observed variations were not evenly distributed among the LCA patients or among the eight genes. Empirical analysis of this uneven distribution was used to devise a multi-platform mutation detection strategy that is four times more efficient than a more conventional strategy of completely sequencing all of the coding regions of all LCA genes in all subjects. Hardy-Weinberg analysis of the observed mutations suggests that these eight genes are collectively responsible for about 70% of the cases of LCA in North America. The carrier frequency of the most common LCA allele (an intron 26 variation in CEP290) was found to be 2/3,248, which suggests that the overall prevalence of LCA in this population is about 1/81,000. An allele-specific ligation assay (SNPlex) was designed to detect 68 of the most common LCA-causing alleles

  11. "The choledocho-pancreatic long common channel disorders" in relation to the etiology of congenital biliary dilatation and other biliary tract disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyano, T; Suruga, K; Suda, K

    1981-10-01

    The amylase level of bile and various cholangiograms was studied in 36 cases of congenital biliary dilatation. (C.B.D.) The amylase level above 10000 U/L was considered to suggest the existence of choledocho-pancreatic long common channel formation. Radiologically, the dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct was seen in 9 out of 19 (47%) Type I cases and in all (100%) Type II cases. The cystic dilatation of intrahepatic bile duct was seen in all Type I cases which have cystic choledochal dilatation. On the other hand, fusiform dilatation was seen in all Type II cases with fusiform choledochal dilatation. End to side Choledocho-pancreatic anastomosis was performed to produce an experimental model of human choledocho-pancreatic long common channel disorders, thus leading to the dilatation of the common bile duct as well as the reflux of pancreatic juice into the bile duct. The reflux of Pancreatic juice and congenital stricture due to the choledocho-pancreatic long common channel formation were considered to be the important causative factors in the etiology of C.B.D.. Furthermore, pathology of the choledocho-pancreatic long common channel disorders was found to be important in relation to the etiology of both C.B.D. and other lesions of the biliary tract and pancreas.

  12. CONGENITAL ANTERIOR TIBIOFEMURAL SUBLUXATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahla

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anterior tibiofemoral subluxation is an extremely rare disorder. All reported cases accompanied by other abnormalities and syndromes. A 16-year-old high school girl referred to us with bilateral anterior tibiofemoral subluxation as the knees were extended and reduced at more than 30 degrees flexion. Deformities were due to tightness of the iliotibial band and biceps femuris muscles and corrected by surgical release. Associated disorders included bilateral anterior shoulders dislocation, short metacarpals and metatarsals, and right calcaneuvalgus deformity.

  13. Subcutaneous fat pads on body MRI--an early sign of congenital disorder of glycosylation PMM2-CDG (CDG1a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher A; Miller, Elka; Schulze, Andreas; Yoon, Grace; Blaser, Susan I

    2014-02-01

    Infants with phosphomannomutase 2 - congenital disorder of glycosylation (PMM2-CDG), formerly known as CDG1a, present with failure to thrive, visceral dysfunction, thromboembolic events and developmental delays noted before 6 months of age. Diagnosis is often delayed due to the considerable variability in phenotype. Characteristic, but not universal, features include inverted nipples and abnormal subcutaneous fat pads. Neuroimaging performed in the first 4 months of life may be normal, although cerebellar and brainstem atrophy is usual after 3 months of age. Cerebellar and brainstem atrophy have been noted as early as 11 days of life. We present an infant whose typical subcutaneous and retroperitoneal fat deposits were clinically occult, but identified on body MRI.

  14. Congenital pachygyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-xia HU

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the imaging and clinicopathological features of pachygyria limited in the right temporo-parieto-occipital lobe and the key points of its diagnosis and treatment, in order to improve the recognition of this disease.  Methods and Results A 2-year-old boy was admitted to hospital because of paroxysmal loss of consciousness and convulsion for 18 months with progressive aggravation. MRI showed malformations of cortical development in the right temporo-parieto-occipital lobe. Epileptic foci resection on the right temporo-parieto-occipital lobe was made. Histological examination after operation showed uneven thickening of gray matter, shrinking of white matter and disappearing cortical stratification, while a lot of dysmorphic neurons, balloon cells and scattered balloon cells in white matter appeared. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that dysmorphic neurons were positive for non-phosphorylated neurofilament protein SMI-32, microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2 and vimentin (Vim or neurofilament protein (NF. Both dysmorphic neurons and balloon cells expressed phosphorylated ribosomal S6 protein (RPS6, while the former was stronger than the latter. Balloon cells were not positive for MAP-2 or Vim. No disturbance of consciousness or limb twitches occurred in this patient during one-year follow-up.  Conclusions Congenital pachygyria was cortical dysplasia caused by the early proliferation and migration disorder of brain, and should be distinguished with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD type Ⅱ b and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC. Clinical history, imaging and histological features should be included in the diagnosis. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.02.005

  15. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin.

  16. Congenital Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... evaluate the electrical activity of the muscle, a muscle biopsy, and genetic testing. There are currently seven distinct types of congenital myopathy, with some variation in symptoms, complications, treatment options, and outlook. Nemaline ...

  17. Congenital syphilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital syphilis is caused by the bacteria Treponema pallidum , which is passed from mother to child during fetal development or at birth. Nearly half of all children infected with syphilis while they ...

  18. Genetic Disorders with Dyshidrosis: Ectodermal Dysplasia, Incontinentia Pigmenti, Fabry Disease, and Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Sweating is regulated by various neurohormonal mechanisms. A disorder in any part of the sweating regulatory pathways, such as the thermal center, neurotransmitters in the central to peripheral nerve, innervation of periglandular neurotransmission, and sweat secretion in the sweat gland itself, induces dyshidrosis. Therefore, hereditary disorders with dyshidrosis result from a variety of causes. These diseases have characteristic symptoms derived from each pathogenesis besides dyshidrosis. The information in this chapter is useful for the differential diagnosis of representative genetic disorders with dyshidrosis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Feldman Witchel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH.

  20. Early detection of neurodevelopment disorders in the first years of life in children with congenital heart diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª del Rosario Mendoza Carretero

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in order to report on existing morbidities in the development of children with congenital heart disease (CHD who underwent Extracorporeal Circulation (ECC surgery. The purpose of the study is also to design guidelines for the monitoring and early intervention of these conditions. A quantitative study (N=30, based on the following inclusion criteria: age, type of CHD and surgery by ECC, located in an age range of 11 to 42 months, was made. The motor, cognitive and language development was evaluated with help of the Scales of Infant and Toddler Development Bayley-III. The results highlight that the participants present morbidities in the communicative-linguistic and the motor areas. There are biomedical indicators (age in the maturational development. In order to normalize their development the children would need to participate in early intervention programs (EIP. The conclusion is that this population needs early intervention (EI and interdisciplinary protocols for detection, screening and intervention that, on this time, are not available.

  1. Autismo infantil, transtorno bipolar e retardo mental em portador de síndrome da rubéola congênita: relato de caso Autism, bipolar disorder and mental retardation in a male adolescent with congenital rubella: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Baptista Assumpção Jr

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Descrevemos o caso de paciente masculino, autista, portador de síndrome da rubéola congênita, em cuja evolução foi diagnosticado transtorno bipolar, discutindo as possíveis implicações terapêuticas e diagnósticas.We describe an autistic male adolescent with congenital rubella who has developed bipolar disorder, discussing possible diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

  2. Bilateral population receptive fields in congenital hemihydranencephaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracasso, Alessio; Koenraads, Yvonne; Porro, Giorgio L.; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Congenital hemihydranencephaly (HH) is a very rare disorder characterised by prenatal near-complete unilateral loss of the cerebral cortex. We investigated a patient affected by congenital right HH whose visual field extended significantly into the both visual hemifields, suggesting a reorg

  3. Congenital hydrocephalus in clinical practice : A genetic diagnostic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Krapels, P. C.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; van Lint, F. H. M.; Willekes, C.; Weber, J. W.; Gavilanes, A. W. D.; Macville, M. V. E.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Engelen, J. J. M.; Bakker, J.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. The etiology is very heterogeneous. Little is known about the genetic causes of congenital hydrocephalus. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with primary congenital hydrocephalus referred to the Department of Cli

  4. Identification and functional analysis of a defect in the human ALG9 gene: definition of congenital disorder of glycosylation type IL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christian G; Grubenmann, Claudia E; Eyaid, Wafaa; Berger, Eric G; Aebi, Markus; Hennet, Thierry

    2004-07-01

    Defects of lipid-linked oligosaccharide assembly lead to alterations of N-linked glycosylation known as "type I congenital disorders of glycosylation" (CDG). Dysfunctions along this stepwise assembly pathway are characterized by intracellular accumulation of intermediate lipid-linked oligosaccharides, the detection of which contributes to the identification of underlying enzymatic defects. Using this approach, we have found, in a patient with CDG, a deficiency of the ALG9 alpha 1,2 mannosyltransferase enzyme, which causes an accumulation of lipid-linked-GlcNAc(2)Man(6) and -GlcNAc(2)Man(8) structures, which was paralleled by the transfer of incomplete oligosaccharides precursors to protein. A homozygous point-mutation 1567G-->A (amino acid substitution E523K) was detected in the ALG9 gene. The functional homology between the human ALG9 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ALG9, as well as the deleterious effect of the E523K mutation detected in the patient with CDG, were confirmed by a yeast complementation assay lacking the ALG9 gene. The ALG9 defect found in the patient with CDG--who presented with developmental delay, hypotonia, seizures, and hepatomegaly--shows that efficient lipid-linked oligosaccharide synthesis is required for proper human development and physiology. The ALG9 defect presented here defines a novel form of CDG named "CDG-IL."

  5. Massively parallel sequencing of patients with intellectual disability, congenital anomalies and/or autism spectrum disorders with a targeted gene panel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Brett

    Full Text Available Developmental delay and/or intellectual disability (DD/ID affects 1-3% of all children. At least half of these are thought to have a genetic etiology. Recent studies have shown that massively parallel sequencing (MPS using a targeted gene panel is particularly suited for diagnostic testing for genetically heterogeneous conditions. We report on our experiences with using massively parallel sequencing of a targeted gene panel of 355 genes for investigating the genetic etiology of eight patients with a wide range of phenotypes including DD/ID, congenital anomalies and/or autism spectrum disorder. Targeted sequence enrichment was performed using the Agilent SureSelect Target Enrichment Kit and sequenced on the Illumina HiSeq2000 using paired-end reads. For all eight patients, 81-84% of the targeted regions achieved read depths of at least 20×, with average read depths overlapping targets ranging from 322× to 798×. Causative variants were successfully identified in two of the eight patients: a nonsense mutation in the ATRX gene and a canonical splice site mutation in the L1CAM gene. In a third patient, a canonical splice site variant in the USP9X gene could likely explain all or some of her clinical phenotypes. These results confirm the value of targeted MPS for investigating DD/ID in children for diagnostic purposes. However, targeted gene MPS was less likely to provide a genetic diagnosis for children whose phenotype includes autism.

  6. Symptoms of Autism Among Children with Congenital Deafblindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2014-01-01

    Associations between congenital deafness or blindness and autism have been found. The main consequences of congenital sensory impairment, being barriers for communication, language and social interaction development, may lead to symptoms of autism. To date only few studies have been reported...... concerning individuals with congenital deafblindness. This study examines symptoms of autism among 71 children with congenital deafblindness using the Autism Behavior Checklist. The cohort of children with congenital deafblindness was found to have symptoms of autism on a level similar to children...... with another developmental disorder than autism for example intellectual disability. No association was found between severity of congenital sensory impairment and severity or type of symptoms of autism....

  7. Congenital lipodystrophies and dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieur, Xavier; Le May, Cedric; Magré, Jocelyne; Cariou, Bertrand

    2014-09-01

    Lipodystrophies are rare acquired and genetic disorders characterized by the selective loss of adipose tissue. One key metabolic feature of patients with congenital inherited lipodystrophy is hypertriglyceridemia. The precise mechanisms by which the lack of adipose tissue causes dyslipidemia remain largely unknown. In recent years, new insights have arisen from data obtained in vitro in adipocytes, yeast, drosophila, and very recently in several genetically modified mouse models of generalized lipodystrophy. A common metabolic pathway involving accelerated lipolysis and defective energy storage seems to contribute to the dyslipidemia associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy syndromes, although the pathophysiological changes may vary with the nature of the mutation involved. Therapeutic management of dyslipidemia in patients with lipodystrophy is primarily based on specific approaches using recombinant leptin therapy. Preclinical studies suggest a potential efficacy of thiazolidinediones that remains to be assessed in dedicated clinical trials.

  8. Congenital diaphramatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Fetal Care Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia, despite advances in therapy, remains a complex condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The etiology of the disorder is still incompletely understood, though the pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension that develop secondarily must be overcome to improve survival. Prenatal US and fetal MRI have helped in the development of a greater understanding of this disease. Also with these modalities, measurement techniques have been developed in an attempt to provide prognosticators for the development of pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. There is a broad range of approaches for performing these measurements, and variability among imaging centers is noted. Despite inconsistent approaches, these techniques have become the foundation for counseling and prenatal and postnatal therapy. It is hoped that with further research with prenatal US and fetal MRI and the development of innovative medical and surgical therapies that the morbidity and mortality of children with congenital diaphragmatic hernias can be significantly reduced. (orig.)

  9. Congenital alopecia universalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente de Jesús Alvarez Yabor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital alopecia universalis is a type of infrequent recessive autosomal alopecia caused by genetic mutations; it is characterized by the total or localized absence of hair due to any birth disorder. This is a case of a 4-year-old female patient born with total absence of hair, both her scalp and whole body; she received medical treatment without satisfactory results. All the investigations were within normal limits, the differential diagnosis was ruled out through the analysis of family medical history and not showing alterations in bone or teeth structure, as well as normal sweating; the final diagnosis was confirmed through a scalp biopsy that revealed dermis with rudimentary sebaceous glands, immature and scarce hair follicles and corneous plugs compatible with congenital alopecia universalis without associated defects. The patient is treated and followed in dermatology and psychology consultations. The clinical situation has not been resolved to the moment.

  10. [Congenital epulis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Tavares, H; Santos, H; M-Pinto, I; Ramos, M; de Sousa, P

    2009-01-01

    Congenital epulis or gingival granular cell tumor is an uncommon benign tumor, usually diagnosed at birth as a pediculated maxilar gingival mass. Although some cases of spontaneous regression have been described, most of the lesions are surgically removed with excelent prognosis and cosmetic final result. The authors describe a case report as well as a short revision on this pathology.

  11. Functional analysis of three splicing mutations identified in the PMM2 gene: toward a new therapy for congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Ana I; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Desviat, Lourdes R; Matthijs, Gert; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén

    2009-05-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of diseases caused by genetic defects affecting N-glycosylation. The most prevalent form of CDG-type Ia-is caused by defects in the PMM2 gene. This work reports the study of two new nucleotide changes (c.256-1G>C and c.640-9T>G) identified in the PMM2 gene in CDG1a patients, and of a previously described deep intronic nucleotide change in intron 7 (c.640-15479C>T). Cell-based splicing assays strongly suggest that all these are disease-causing splicing mutations. The c.256-1G>C mutation was found to cause the skipping of exons 3 and 4 in fibroblast cell lines and in a minigene expression system. The c.640-9T>G mutation was found responsible for the activation of a cryptic intronic splice-site in fibroblast cell lines and in a hybrid minigene when cotransfected with certain serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. Finally, the deep intronic change c.640-15479C>T was found to be responsible for the activation of a pseudoexon sequence in intron 7. The use of morpholino oligonucleotides allowed the production of correctly spliced mRNA that was efficiently translated into functional and immunoreactive PMM protein. The present results suggest a novel mutation-specific approach for the treatment of this genetic disease (for which no effective treatment is yet available), and open up therapeutic possibilities for several genetic disorders in which deep intronic changes are seen.

  12. Major congenital anomalies in a Danish region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Birkelund, Anne Sofie;

    2014-01-01

    : diabetes, epilepsy, mental disorder, thyroid disease, asthma, or inflammatory bowel disease. Medication for these conditions accounted for 46% of maternal drug use. CONCLUSION: Maternal morbidity and use of potentially teratogenic medication have increased among congenital anomaly cases. Foetal and infant...

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Niermeijer (Martinus)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractPrenatal diagnosis of a number of congenital diseases is possible by amniocentesis in the 14th - 16th week of pregnancy and subsequent analysis of cultured amniotic fluid cells or amniotic fluid supernatant. Parents at risk for a child with a chromosomal disorder, an X-linked disease, a

  14. Characterizing congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Lauren

    2011-04-01

    The ability to make sense of the music in our environment involves sophisticated cognitive mechanisms that, for most people, are acquired effortlessly and in early life. A special population of individuals, with a disorder termed congenital amusia, report lifelong difficulties in this regard. Exploring the nature of this developmental disorder provides a window onto the cognitive architecture of typical musical processing, as well as allowing a study of the relationship between processing of music and other domains, such as language. The present article considers findings concerning pitch discrimination, pitch memory, contour processing, experiential aspects of music listening in amusia, and emerging evidence concerning the neurobiology of the disorder. A simplified model of melodic processing is outlined, and possible loci of the cognitive deficit are discussed.

  15. [Congenital aniridia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiruţa, Daria; Stan, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Aniridia is a rare congenital, hereditary, bilateral disease which is associated with various systemic and ocular defects. We present the case of a 61 year old patient who was admitted in the hospital of ophthalmology Cluj Napoca, for the symptoms caused by the ocular defects associated with aniridia. In this case, aniridia is autosomal dominant transmitted with incomplete penetrance and it is not accompanied by any systemic defects. The disease also affects three of her sons and two nephews of the patient.

  16. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure.

  17. Congenital Thrombocytopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆钺

    2011-01-01

    @@ Platelets are essential for normal hemostasis.Platelets adhere to damaged blood vessels, and then aggregate and promote activation of coagulation factors, resulting to ceasing bleeding.Both quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of platelets can cause bleeding problems.Among them, immune thrombocytopenias are the most common conditions.However, congenital thrombocytopenias are often neglected because of their relative rarity and complex laboratory tests.That causes misdiagnosis and unnecessary and potentially harmful treatments for many patients.

  18. Congenital diplopodia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Jason S.; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Costouros, John G.; Boakes, Jennette; Greenspan, Adam [University of California, Davis, Department of Radiology, 4860 Y. Street, Suite 3100, CA 95817, Davis (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Diplopodia, or duplicated foot, is a rare congenital anomaly. It differs from polydactyly in that supernumerary metatarsal and tarsal bones are present as well as extra digits. Only a few cases of this anomaly have been reported in the literature to date. We present a newborn male without intrauterine teratogen exposure who was born with a duplicate foot of the left lower extremity and imperforate anus. (orig.)

  19. [Congenital ranula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Maria Inês; Morais, Sofia; Coutinho, Sílvia; de Castro, Ochoa; Rei, Ana Isabel

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a case of congenital ranula diagnosed by a routine prenatal ultrasonography at 21 weeks of gestation. The fetal kariotype was normal. Follow-up ultrasound scans revealed no changes in the size or the position of the cyst. Fetal growth was normal as was the amniotic fluid volume. Surgical treatment was performed 3 days after a normal vaginal delivery, with excellent results.

  20. Congenital acute megakaryocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N B Mathur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital leukemia (CL is an extremely rare disorder in the newborn, significant proportion of which is of myeloid origin, primarily of M4 or M5 morphology. As compared to pediatric leukemia, CL is a more aggressive disease. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML-M7 or acute megakaryocytic leukemia is a rare type of AML with an incidence of 0.5 per million per year. Median age of presentation is 6 years, and children may present with a broad variety of symptoms including low-grade fever, diarrhea, easy bruising, failure to gain weight and life-threatening conditions.

  1. Normal sex differences in prenatal growth and abnormal prenatal growth retardation associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development are absent in newborns with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmers Laura J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most common presentation of a disorder of sex development (DSD in genetic females. A report of prenatal growth retardation in cases of 46,XY DSD, coupled with observations of below-optimal final height in both males and females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, prompted us to investigate prenatal growth in the latter group. Additionally, because girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia are exposed to increased levels of androgens in the absence of a male sex-chromosome complement, the presence or absence of typical sex differences in growth of newborns would support or refute a hormonal explanation for these differences. Methods In total, 105 newborns with congenital adrenal hyperplasia were identified in our database. Gestational age (weeks, birth weight (kg, birth length (cm and parental heights (cm were obtained. Mid-parental height was considered in the analyses. Results Mean birth weight percentile for congenital adrenal hyperplasia was 49.26%, indicating no evidence of a difference in birth weight from the expected standard population median of 50th percentile (P > 0.05. The expected sex difference in favor of heavier males was not seen (P > 0.05. Of the 105 subjects, 44 (27%; 34 females, 10 males had birth length and gestational age recorded in their medical chart. Mean birth length for this subgroup was 50.90 cm (63rd percentile, which differed from the expected standard population median of 50th percentile (P = 0.0082. The expected sex difference in favor of longer males was also not seen (P > 0.05. Conclusion The prenatal growth retardation patterns reported in cases of 46,XY disorders of sex development do not generalize to people with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Sex differences in body weight and length typically seen in young infants were not seen in the subjects who

  2. rhIGF-1 Therapy for Growth Failure and IGF-1 Deficiency in Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation Ia (PMM2 Deficiency

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    Bradley S. Miller MD, PhD

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG are a group of rare disorders in which glycosylation required for proper protein-protein interactions and protein stability is disrupted, manifesting clinically with multiple system involvement and growth failure. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF system plays an important role in childhood growth and has been shown to be dysfunctional with low IGF-1 levels in children with CDG type Ia (PMM2 deficiency. Case report. A 3-year-old Caucasian male with failure to thrive was diagnosed with PMM2-CDG at 5 months of age. Initially, his length and weight were less than −2 standard deviation score, IGF-1 <25 ng/mL (normal 55-327 ng/mL, IGFBP-3 1.0 µg/mL (normal 0.7-3.6 ng/mL, and acid-labile subunit 1.3 mg/L (normal 0.7-7.9 mg/L. Despite aggressive feeding, he continued to show poor linear growth and weight gain. At 17 months, he underwent an IGF-1 generation test with growth hormone (0.1 mg/kg/d for 7 days; baseline IGF-1of 27 ng/mL (normal 55-327 ng/mL stimulated to only 33 ng/mL. Recombinant human IGF-1 (rhIGF-1 therapy (up to 130 µg/kg/dose twice daily was initiated at 21 months of age resulting in an excellent linear growth response with height increasing from −2.73 to −1.39 standard deviation score over 22 months. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels also increased. Conclusion. This is the first case report of rhIGF-1 therapy in a patient with PMM2-CDG. The child had an excellent linear growth response. These results provide additional in vivo evidence for IGF dysfunction in PMM2-CDG and suggest that rhIGF-1 may be a novel treatment for growth failure in PMM2-CDG.

  3. Congenital syphilis

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    Lee, Sang Wook; Kim, Kyung Soo; Hur, Don [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-12-15

    In recent years, marked increase in incidence of congenital syphilis has occurred throughout the world due to changes in social norms and development of penicillin-resistant strains. Early diagnosis plays an important role in congenital syphilis as the clinical manifestations may simulate many other conditions in the paediatric age group. The authors analyzed 52 cases of congenital syphilis admitted to the department of paediatrics, Chosun University Hospital, clinically and radiologically. Among them, 18 cases were born in this hospital and 34 cases were admitted from OPD, during the period of 8 years from January, 1975 to December, 1982. The results obtained were as follows; 1. In 28 of 34 cases (82%), the first clinical manifestations were below the age of 3 months. 2. Among the 52 cases, a male predominance was observed with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. 3. The serologic test (VDRL) of the 52 studied cases showed reactive response in 49 cases (94%), and that of syphilitic mothers except 6 cases, reactive in all studied cases. 4. The major manifestations of the 52 cases were bone tenderness (12%) and swelling of the joints (7%) in skeletal system, hepatosplenomegaly (79%) and skin lesions (73%) in extraskeletal one. 5. The radiological skeletal changes were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were detected in 45 of 52 cases (87%), and the commonest findings were metaphysitis (83%) and periostitis (81%). The most characteristic type of metaphysitis were transverse trophic line (74%) and zone of rarefaction (65%). 6. The commonest bones to be affected were growing metaphyses of the long bones, particulary about the wrist and the knee. The order of frequency were radius (80%), uina (80%), tibia (77%), femur (69%) and humerus (40%)

  4. Congenital hypoaldosteronism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethupathi, Vanathi; Vijayakumar, M; Janakiraman, Lalitha; Nammalwar, B R

    2008-08-01

    Congenital hypoaldosteronism due to an isolated aldosterone biosynthesis defect is rare. We report a 4 month old female infant who presented with failure to thrive, persistent hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. Investigations revealed normal serum 17 hydroxy progesterone and cortisol. A decreased serum aldosterone and serum 18 hydroxy corticosterone levels with a low 18 hydroxy corticosterone: aldosterone ratio was suggestive of corticosterone methyl oxidase type I deficiency. She was started on fludrocortisone replacement therapy with a subsequent normalization of electrolytes. Further molecular analysis is needed to ascertain the precise nature of the mutation.

  5. Glycomic Characterization of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from a Patient Suffering from Phosphomannomutase 2 Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation (PMM2-CDG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiesler, Christina T; Cajic, Samanta; Hoffmann, Dirk; Thiel, Christian; van Diepen, Laura; Hennig, René; Sgodda, Malte; Weiβmann, Robert; Reichl, Udo; Steinemann, Doris; Diekmann, Ulf; Huber, Nicolas M B; Oberbeck, Astrid; Cantz, Tobias; Kuss, Andreas W; Körner, Christian; Schambach, Axel; Rapp, Erdmann; Buettner, Falk F R

    2016-04-01

    PMM2-CDG, formerly known as congenital disorder of glycosylation-Ia (CDG-Ia), is caused by mutations in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2). This disease is the most frequent form of inherited CDG-diseases affecting protein N-glycosylation in human. PMM2-CDG is a multisystemic disease with severe psychomotor and mental retardation. In order to study the pathophysiology of PMM2-CDG in a human cell culture model, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of a PMM2-CDG-patient (PMM2-iPSCs). Expression of pluripotency factors andin vitrodifferentiation into cell types of the three germ layers was unaffected in the analyzed clone PMM2-iPSC-C3 compared with nondiseased human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), revealing no broader influence of the PMM2 mutation on pluripotency in cell culture. Analysis of gene expression by deep-sequencing did not show obvious differences in the transcriptome between PMM2-iPSC-C3 and nondiseased hPSCs. By multiplexed capillary gel electrophoresis coupled to laser induced fluorescence detection (xCGE-LIF) we could show that PMM2-iPSC-C3 exhibit the common hPSC N-glycosylation pattern with high-mannose-type N-glycans as the predominant species. However, phosphomannomutase activity of PMM2-iPSC-C3 was 27% compared with control hPSCs and lectin staining revealed an overall reduced protein glycosylation. In addition, quantitative assessment of N-glycosylation by xCGE-LIF showed an up to 40% reduction of high-mannose-type N-glycans in PMM2-iPSC-C3, which was in concordance to the observed reduction of the Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 lipid-linked oligosaccharide compared with control hPSCs. Thus we could model the PMM2-CDG disease phenotype of hypoglycosylation with patient derived iPSCsin vitro Knock-down ofPMM2by shRNA in PMM2-iPSC-C3 led to a residual activity of 5% and to a further reduction of the level of N-glycosylation. Taken together we have developed human stem cell-based cell culture models with stepwise reduced

  6. Unilateral straight hair and congenital horner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Frederick M; Wertenbaker, Christian; Cho, Hyung; Marmor, Maury A; Ahn-Lee, Sandra S; Bernard, Bruno A

    2012-06-01

    Congenital Horner syndrome is a rare disorder that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of Horner syndrome. Like Horner syndrome in general, it consists primarily of ptosis, miosis, and anhidrosis. Congenital Horner syndrome may manifest some special features such as iris heterochromia since the sympathetic nervous system is an essential component for the development and maintenance of eye color. We present 3 cases of unilateral straight hair in association with congenital Horner syndrome in which the patients had straight hair ipsilateral to the Horner syndrome, whereas on the contralateral side, it was curly, and we discuss possible mechanisms for this phenomenon.

  7. Classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia: A delayed presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz Siddiqui, Saima; Soomro, Nargis; Ganatra, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a rare congenital disorder, which in cases of female genotype may result in virilization. Specific enzyme deficiencies in adrenocorticoid hormones biosynthetic pathway lead to excess androgen production causing virilization. Classic type presents early in infant life as salt losing or simple virilizing type, whereas non classic form presents late at puberty or in adult life. Depending on the type of classic CAH, type of adrenocorticoid deficiency, exten...

  8. New non-renal congenital disorders associated with medullary sponge kidney (MSK) support the pathogenic role of GDNF and point to the diagnosis of MSK in recurrent stone formers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ria, Paolo; Fabris, Antonia; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Zaza, Gianluigi; Lupo, Antonio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2016-08-29

    Medullary sponge kidney (MSK) is a congenital renal disorder. Its association with several developmental abnormalities in other organs hints at the likelihood of some shared step(s) in the embryogenesis of the kidney and other organs. It has been suggested that the REarranged during Transfection (RET) proto-oncogene and the Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF) gene are defective in patients with MSK, and both RET and GDNF are known to have a role in the development of the central nervous system, heart, and craniofacial skeleton. Among a cohort of 143 MSK patients being followed up for nephrolithiasis and chronic kidney disease at our institution, we found six with one or more associated non-renal anomalies: one patient probably has congenital hemihyperplasia and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with adipose metaplasia and mitral valve prolapse; one has Marfan syndrome; and the other four have novel associations between MSK and nerve and skeleton abnormalities described here for the first time. The discovery of disorders involving the central nervous system, cardiovascular system and craniofacial skeleton in MSK patients supports the hypothesis of a genetic alteration on the RET-GDNF axis having a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of MSK, in a subset of patients at least. MSK seems more and more to be a systemic disease, and the identification of extrarenal developmental defects could be important in arousing the suspicion of MSK in recurrent stone formers.

  9. SYSTEMIC DISORDERS AFFECTING DENTAL PATHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic R. Milan; Andjelic S. Gordana; Knezevic M. Milena

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective overview of systemic disorders which might be associated with dental pathology is made. They are grouped as follows: (a) congenital dental developmental disorders, (b) chromosomal anomalies, (c) radiations, (d) immune disorders, (e) intoxications, (f) neurological alterations, (g) gastrointestinal diseases, (h) osteodystrophy and associated conditions, (i) skin diseases, (j) metabolic and endocrine disorders, (k) craniofacial malformation syndromes and other congenital g...

  10. [Genetics of congenital deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundes, Víctor; Pardo, Rosa Andrea; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    2012-10-20

    Congenital deafness is defined as the hearing loss which is present at birth and, consequently, before speech development. It is the most prevalent sensor neural disorder in developed countries, and its incidence is estimated between 1-3 children per 1,000 newborns, of which more than 50% are attributable to genetics causes. Deafness can be classified as syndromic or non-syndromic. In the first case, it is associated with outer ear malformations and/or systemic findings. More than 400 syndromes accompanied of deafness have been described, which represent about 30% of cases of congenital hearing loss. The remaining percentage corresponds to non-syndromic cases: 75-85% are autosomal recessive, 15-24% are autosomal dominant, and 1-2% are X-linked. The evaluation of a child with deafness requires a multidisciplinary collaboration among specialists, who must coordinate themselves and give information to the affected family. The aims of establishing a diagnosis are to predict other manifestations that may suggest some syndrome and to anticipate their management, as well as to perform genetic counseling to parents and affected individuals.

  11. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  12. Insight into Natural History of Congenital Vitiligo: A Case Report of a 23-Year-Old with Stable Congenital Vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Casey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disorder of skin pigmentation. It affects approximately 1% of the world’s population. Vitiligo occurs equally between the sexes with no racial predilections. The majority of cases are acquired and arise between the second and third decades of life. Acquired vitiligo has an unpredictable clinical course. Congenital vitiligo is rare with few reported cases. Due to the rarity of congenital vitiligo, little is known about the clinical course. For patients with acquired or congenital vitiligo, the psychosocial burden can have a profound impact on quality of life. The unknown course of congenital vitiligo can exacerbate the feelings of distress and embarrassment. We report of a case of congenital vitiligo that has been stable for 23 years. The patient had no associated autoimmune disease. The pathogenesis of congenital vitiligo is unknown. This case may be useful to assist clinicians caring for newborns with congenital vitiligo in reassuring parents.

  13. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  14. Congenital hypothyroidism: Screening dilemma

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    Meena P Desai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sporadic congenital hypothyroidism (CH is the most common cause of hypothyroidism infancy early childhood in iodine sufficient region. Screening for neonatal CH began in 1970s. The rationale and reason for neonatal screening for CH (NSCH are well established. It is mandatory in most developed countries along with the screen for metabolic disorder. The possibility of measuring TSH and thyroid hormones in cord blood paved the way for newborn screening (NS for CH. Worldwide it is estimated that 25% of the live born population of 130 million babies undergo NSCH. Klein et al., by 1972 had shown improved CNS prognosis in CH treated by age 3 months. NSCH has largely eradicated the severe irreversible neurodevelopmental damage and reversed the chances of growth failure in infancy and early childhood.

  15. Congenital hypothyroidism: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayal D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Devi Dayal, Rajendra Prasad Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Unit, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India Abstract: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH, the most common pediatric endocrine disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1:2,000 to 1:4,000, is an under-recognized problem in countries without routine newborn screening (NBS programs. Thyroid dysgenesis (TD is the most common cause of primary CH accounting for approximately 85% of all cases; most of the remaining patients have dyshormonogenesis. Transient CH and CH with eutopic gland, are increasingly being identified after introduction of routine NBS. The clinical features of CH are often subtle resulting in delayed diagnosis and eventually poor intellectual outcome. In developed countries, detection by NBS and early initiation of treatment has largely eliminated the intellectual disability caused by this disorder. The lower screening thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH cutoff and changes in birth demographics in some countries have been associated with an increase in the reported incidence of CH. However, the additional cases detected by the lower TSH cutoff tend to have either milder or transient hypothyroidism. Diagnosis of CH is made on the basis of serum concentrations of TSH and thyroxine (T4. Thyroid ultrasound, radionuclide scintigraphy, serum thyroglobulin (TG levels and specific genetic tests help ascertaining the exact etiological diagnosis. Non-availability of later tests should not deter the pediatrician from initiation of treatment. Age at initiation of treatment and starting dose of levothyroxine are critical factors that determine the long-term outcome. Higher doses of levothyroxine at 10–15 µg/kg/day are required in infants, with titration based on T4 and TSH levels, which are repeated frequently. Coexistence of other congenital anomalies in children with CH adds to the morbidity. Approximately 70% of babies

  16. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  17. Severe congenital cyclic neutropenia: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vidyavathi H; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Balikai, Girish; Patil, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cyclic neutropenia syndrome is a constitutional genetic disorder which is characterized by very low number of neutrophils (neutropenia). Patients suffering from this disorder clinically present with neutropenia at early age, history of recurrent fever, ulcerations in the oral cavity, gingivitis, and other recurrent infections. This paper describes a case report of a child with recurrent mouth ulcers, fever, and later diagnosed with severe congenital cyclic neutropenia. This also emphasizes the importance of identification of rare causes of immunosuppressive conditions in children presenting with recurrent oral ulcers and poor dental hygiene, to prevent long-term complications of oral cavity and also morbidity and mortality secondary to neutropenic sepsis. PMID:27857902

  18. Polymicrogyria and Congenital Parvovirus B19 Infection

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    Grant S. Schulert

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetal parvovirus B19 infection causes anemia, hydrops, and pregnancy loss but is generally not considered teratogenic. Nevertheless, disturbances of neuronal migration have been described with congenital parvovirus infection. We evaluated a term infant with congenital parvovirus disease and polymicrogyria. We compared this case with four other reports of central nervous system disease after birth to parvovirus-infected mothers. After an extensive diagnostic evaluation, this infant was found to have congenital parvovirus disease with severe anemia and nonimmune hydrops as well as extensive polymicrogyria. Although rare, this report and literature review suggest that parvovirus B19 has the potential to disrupt normal neurodevelopment. We suggest that infants with severe congenital parvovirus infection have close developmental surveillance and if symptomatic undergo neuroimaging to assess for disorders of neuromigration.

  19. Impaired Pitch Perception and Memory in Congenital Amusia: The Deficit Starts in the Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, Philippe; Mattout, Jeremie; Bouet, Romain; Maby, Emmanuel; Sanchez, Gaetan; Aguera, Pierre-Emmanuel; Daligault, Sebastien; Delpuech, Claude; Bertrand, Olivier; Caclin, Anne; Tillmann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder of music perception and production. The present study investigated the cerebral bases of impaired pitch perception and memory in congenital amusia using behavioural measures, magnetoencephalography and voxel-based morphometry. Congenital amusics and matched control subjects performed two melodic tasks (a…

  20. Impaired Pitch Perception and Memory in Congenital Amusia: The Deficit Starts in the Auditory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, Philippe; Mattout, Jeremie; Bouet, Romain; Maby, Emmanuel; Sanchez, Gaetan; Aguera, Pierre-Emmanuel; Daligault, Sebastien; Delpuech, Claude; Bertrand, Olivier; Caclin, Anne; Tillmann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong disorder of music perception and production. The present study investigated the cerebral bases of impaired pitch perception and memory in congenital amusia using behavioural measures, magnetoencephalography and voxel-based morphometry. Congenital amusics and matched control subjects performed two melodic tasks (a…

  1. ISOLATED CONGENITAL CHOLESTEATOMA OF THE MASTOID PROCESS: A CASE REPORT

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    Shankar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Cholesteatomas have historically been considered a rare disorder, an incidence ranging from 4 to 24%. The most common sites of presentation on physical examination are Anterior superior and posterior superior quadrants of the tympanic membrane; conductive hearing loss is the most common presenting symptom. There is a lack of uniformity of reporting and classifying congenital cholesteatomas. Recidivism of the lesion appears more commonly with posterior superior congenital cholesteatomas. Treatment of Congenital Cholesteatoma is still surgical. We are here presenting a case of isolated congenital cholesteatoma in Mastoid process treated with modified radical mastoidectomy and tympanoplasty, patient followed up to one year no recurrent was found, hearing also improved, heightened awareness and early diagnosis of congenital cholesteatoma is imperative, early treatment decreases the extent of the disease and reduces the risk of recidivism and complications.

  2. Puberty and fertility in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otten, B.J.; Stikkelbroeck, M.M.L.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a disorder of adrenal steroid synthesis. The symptoms and signs of CAH depend on the degree of enzyme deficiency; severe salt-wasting (SW) form, less severe simple virilizing (SV) form and mild nonclassic (NC) form. In this paper, puberty and fertility in CAH

  3. [A girl with congenital hemifacial hypertrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, S.M. van den; Wolvius, E.B.; Adrichem, L.N. van; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    A girl with congenital hemifacial hypertrophy had been observed and treated by a multidisciplinary team for craniofacial disorders in an academic medical centre since birth. At the age of 8 she was treated on account of considerable facial asymmetry and multiple intraoral problems. The two-step surg

  4. Septo-optic dysplasia with bilateral congenital corneal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Clement C; Kapur, Rashmi; Wood, Michael G; Setabutr, Pete; Tu, Elmer Y

    2009-10-01

    Septo-optic dysplasia, or de Morsier syndrome, is characterized by optic nerve hypoplasia with an absent septum pellucidum and/or pituitary abnormalities. Congenital corneal anesthesia is a rare disorder that has been associated with many neurological disorders. Here we present a patient with both conditions who was successfully treated with permanent lateral tarsorrhaphy and aggressive lubrication. To our knowledge, congenital corneal anesthesia has not been reported in association with septo-optic dysplasia. The purpose of this report is to make pediatric ophthalmologists aware of a potential association since the diagnosis of congenital corneal anesthesia is often difficult and delayed.

  5. Congenital right hemidiaphragmatic agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Mirza; Zahid Bashir; Afzal Sheikh

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm through which intestine and other viscera herniate into the chest. In extreme form of diaphragmatic maldevelopment, there might be a complete agenesis of diaphragm. A 45-day old male infant was presented with fever, cough and respiratory distress for a week. Chest radiograph showed right-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The patient underwent surgical exploration and found to have an unusual and large defect of right...

  6. Uniparental disomy of chromosome 8 leading to homozygosity of a CYP11B1 mutation in a patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: implication for a rare etiology of an autosomal recessive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Keiko; Kataoka, Naoki; Ogita, Satoko; Sano, Shinichiro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Fukami, Maki; Katsumata, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disorder that usually results from paternally and maternally transmitted mutations in genes for steroidogenic enzymes. Recent studies on steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the most common form of CAH, have revealed that a small percentage of patients have a non-carrier parent; uniparental disomy (UPD) and de novo mutations were reported as disease-causing mechanisms in these patients. However, it remains unknown whether UPD and de novo mutations underlie other forms of CAH. Here, we report a male patient with steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11OHD) born to a non-carrier mother. The patient was identified by an elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone level at a neonatal mass-screening test. His clinical features were comparable to those of previously reported patients with 11OHD. Direct sequencing of CYP11B1 identified a homozygous IVS7+1G>A mutation in the patient, which was not shared by his mother. Comparative genomic hybridization of the patient detected UPD of chromosome 8 [UPD(8)]. Microsatellite analysis indicated non-maternal origin of the UPD(8) and confirmed parentage of other chromosomes. This study shows for the first time that 11OHD can be caused by UPD in the presence of a non-carrier parent. Awareness of such rare cases should improve the accuracy of genetic counseling for families with CAH. Our data support the importance of UPD as an underlying mechanism of autosomal recessive disorders.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  8. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Congenital Heart Defects? Congenital (kon-JEN-ih-tal) heart defects are problems ... carry blood to the heart or the body Congenital heart defects change the normal flow of blood through the ...

  9. Rapidly fatal "congenital lung dysplasia": a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Don, Massimiliano; Orsaria, Maria; Da Dalt, Eva; Tringali, Carmela; Sacher, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    Acinar dysplasia congenital alveolar dysplasia and alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins belong to the diffuse developmental disorders (congenital lung dysplasia), very rare fatal disorders of infancy that occur early in lung development. A case of quickly fatal congenital lung dysplasia in a full-term infant is presented and underlines the necessity to suspect this disease in a newborn suffering from severe and refractory respiratory distress.

  10. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campisi Corradino

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (PL is a rare developmental disorder involving the lung, and characterized by pulmonary subpleural, interlobar, perivascular and peribronchial lymphatic dilatation. The prevalence is unknown. PL presents at birth with severe respiratory distress, tachypnea and cyanosis, with a very high mortality rate at or within a few hours of birth. Most reported cases are sporadic and the etiology is not completely understood. It has been suggested that PL lymphatic channels of the fetal lung do not undergo the normal regression process at 20 weeks of gestation. Secondary PL may be caused by a cardiac lesion. The diagnostic approach includes complete family and obstetric history, conventional radiologic studies, ultrasound and magnetic resonance studies, lymphoscintigraphy, lung functionality tests, lung biopsy, bronchoscopy, and pleural effusion examination. During the prenatal period, all causes leading to hydrops fetalis should be considered in the diagnosis of PL. Fetal ultrasound evaluation plays a key role in the antenatal diagnosis of PL. At birth, mechanical ventilation and pleural drainage are nearly always necessary to obtain a favorable outcome of respiratory distress. Home supplemental oxygen therapy and symptomatic treatment of recurrent cough and wheeze are often necessary during childhood, sometimes associated with prolonged pleural drainage. Recent advances in intensive neonatal care have changed the previously nearly fatal outcome of PL at birth. Patients affected by PL who survive infancy, present medical problems which are characteristic of chronic lung disease.

  11. Syngnathia-congenital unilateral bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Ramachandra Reddy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital disorders involving orofacial region represents approximately 20% of all birth defects. Out of these disorders, congenital bony fusion of the maxilla and mandible (syngnathia is rare. Usually syngnathia is associated with other anomalies and syndromes. This case report presents a unilateral fusion of maxilla and mandible with no other anomalies.

  12. Congenital Malalignment of the Great Toenail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Arias, Leonel; Morales-Martínez, André; Zazueta-López, Rosa María; Ramírez-Dovala, Silvia; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María

    2015-01-01

    Congenital malalignment of the great toenail (CMA) is a disorder of the anatomic orientation of the ungual apparatus, in which the longitudinal axis of the nail plate is not parallel with the axis of the distal phalanx but is deflected sideways. This disorder is understood to arise from multiple factors. Although many theories have been proposed about its origin, its pathogenesis is not fully known. Besides the cosmetic impact, this disorder causes such problems in the medium and long term as onychocryptosis and difficulty in motion. Some cases may regress spontaneously, although persistent cases may require a specialized surgical approach. Congenital malalignment of the great toenail is poorly understood and described medical condition that is often treated incorrectly; thus, reviewing the subject is important. A symptombased clinical classification system is proposed to guide diagnosis and treatment modality decisions.

  13. Multifocal Congenital Hemangiopericytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robl, Renata; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Uber, Marjorie; Lichtvan, Leniza Costa Lima; Werner, Betina; Mehrdad Nadji, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with less aggressive behavior and a more favorable prognosis than similar tumors in adults. Multifocal presentation is even less common than isolated HPC and hence its clinical and histologic recognition may be challenging. A newborn infant with multifocal congenital HPC causing severe deformity but with a favorable outcome after chemotherapy and surgical removal is reported.

  14. Key aspects congenital infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The key questions to solve the problem of congenital infection in the Russian Federation are: using in national practice over world accepted terminology adapted to the recommendations of the World Health Organization; representation of the modern concepts of an infectious process in the classification of congenital infections; scientific development and introducing in clinical practice the «standard case definitions», applied to different congenital infections; optimization of protocols and clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of congenital infections; improvement a knowledge in the infectious disease for all  pecialists involved in the risk assessment of congenital infections, manage pregnancy and children. Based on our experience and analysis of publications, the authors suggest possible solutions.

  15. Systemic disorders affecting dental pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Milan R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective overview of systemic disorders which might be associated with dental pathology is made. They are grouped as follows: (a congenital dental developmental disorders, (b chromosomal anomalies, (c radiations, (d immune disorders, (e intoxications, (f neurological alterations, (g gastrointestinal diseases, (h osteodystrophy and associated conditions, (i skin diseases, (j metabolic and endocrine disorders, (k craniofacial malformation syndromes and other congenital general malformations. The associated dental pathology is described in each case.

  16. Congenital cutaneous histiocytosis in a piglet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélie, P; Kiupel, M; Drolet, R

    2014-07-01

    A 2-week-old crossbred male piglet with numerous congenital, variably sized macules, plaques, and papules distributed all over the body was submitted for necropsy. Significant gross and histological lesions were restricted to the skin. On light microscopic examination, these cutaneous lesions corresponded to dermal and/or subcutaneous masses composed of spindle-shaped to round cells that multifocally contained hemosiderin; epidermotropism was not observed. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were strongly positive for CD204; moderately positive for CD163, lysozyme, and vimentin; and negative for Mac 387, α-1-antitrypsin, S-100 protein and E-cadherin; frozen tissues were not available for CD1a and CD11c. Transmission electron microscopic examination of sections from formalin-fixed tissues did not reveal Birbeck's granules. The clinical, morphological, and immunohistochemical results were consistent with a congenital cutaneous histiocytosis of non-Langerhans cell origin. The condition most resembled juvenile xanthogranuloma in humans, a generally skin-limited non-Langerhans histiocytic disorder that can be congenital. Cutaneous and/or systemic histiocytic disorders are well characterized in dogs and have been described in cats, and a case with some similarities to ours has been reported in a neonatal piglet, but this is to our knowledge the first immunohistochemically supported report of histiocytosis in the pig and congenital histiocytosis in animals.

  17. Congenital short pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Juan; XU Guo-qiang; XU Ping; JIN En-yun; LIU Qiong; LI You-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Congenital short pancreas, also known as partial agenesis or hypoplasia of the dorsal pancreas1 is a rare congenital abnormality consisting of the parenchyma and ductal system restricted to the head with some residual dorsal tapering and arborizing ducts communicating with the minor papill.2 Complete pancreatic agenesis is fatal, and only nine possible examples of partial agenesis have been previously reported in adults in the literature.3-10 Three of them were polysplenia syndrome associated with short pancreas,and only six patients with congenital short pancreas with normal situs. Here we present a new case associated with steatorrhoea.

  18. Congenital symmastia revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Nanna H; Hölmich, Lisbeth R; Siersen, Hans Erik

    2012-01-01

    Symmastia is defined as medial confluence of the breast. The term 'symmastia' is modified from Greek (syn meaning 'together', and mastos meaning 'breast') and was first presented by Spence et al. in 1983. Two forms of symmastia exist: an iatrogenic and a congenital version. Congenital symmastia...... is a rare condition in which web-like soft tissue traverses the sternum to connect the breasts medially. The literature on congenital symmastia is limited, few cases have been published, and knowledge about ideal treatment is still insufficient....

  19. PHACE syndrome and congenitally absent thyroid gland at MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, Mark D; Yu, John-Paul J; Asch, Sarah; Mathes, Erin F

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterized by posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, and abnormalities of the eye. Thyroid disorders associated with PHACE syndrome have been described, although there are limited reports of this rare occurrence. We report a case of PHACE syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism in an infant, for which absent thyroid gland was diagnosed at magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection: new prospects for prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Elizabeth C; Schleiss, Mark R

    2013-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the commonest congenital viral infection in the developed world, with an overall prevalence of approximately 0.6%. Approximately 10% of congenitally infected infants have signs and symptoms of disease at birth, and these symptomatic infants have a substantial risk of subsequent neurologic sequelae. These include sensorineural hearing loss, mental retardation, microcephaly, development delay, seizure disorders, and cerebral palsy. Antiviral therapy for children with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection is effective at reducing the risk of long-term disabilities and should be offered to families with affected newborns. An effective preconceptual vaccine against CMV could protect against long-term neurologic sequelae and other disabilities.

  1. Congenital sideroblastic anemia: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Sanjeev

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemia, comprising of acquired and congenital forms, is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital sideroblastic anemia is a rare condition which is mostly X-linked, caused by mutations of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2. We describe two cases of congenital sideroblastic anemia, one of them indicating an autosomal recessive inheritance, with their clinico-hematological profile. It is important to recognize this entity early in life as a significant percentage of cases respond to pyridoxine thus avoiding any long-term complications.

  2. Congenital malformations of the supratentorial brain. Pt. 2. Disorders of the corpus callosum and holoprosencephalies; Kongenitale Malformationen des Grosshirns. Teil 2: Entwicklungsstoerungen des Balkens und Holoprosenzephalien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummeny, C. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany); Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Muenchen (Germany); Ertl-Wagner, B.; Reiser, M.F. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    The corpus callosum is formed between the 7th and the 20th gestational week. If this process is disrupted, partial or complete callosal agenesis may ensue. As large parts of the supra- and infratentorial brain are created druing this critical period, associated anomalies need always to be searched for when callosal agenesis is present. Associations with neuro-genetic syndromes also exist. The corpus callosum is generally formed from front to back (''front-to-back rule''). Therefore, a partial callosal agenesis usually involves the posterior portion of the corpus callosum, while a secondary lesion of the corpus callosum does not follow this rule. Holoprosencephalies are a notable exception to this rule, as the frontal part of the corpus callosum is absent in spite of their classification as congenital malformations. They represent a disturbance of the differentiation and cleavage of the prosencephalon with a disruption of the separation of the cerebral hemispheres. Holoprosencephalies can be due to genetic causes, but also to intrauterine infections or other teratogenic causes. The holoprosencephalies are subdivided into alobar, semilobar and lobar holoprosencephalies. This article aims to describe the most important features of callosal agenesis and holoprosencephalies highlighting the respective imaging characteristics. (orig.) [German] Die Anlage des Balkens findet in der 7.-20. Woche nach Gestation statt. Stoerungen in dieser Entwicklungsphase koennen zu einer Balkenagenesie oder zu einer Balkenhypogenesie fuehren. Da in diesem Entwicklungsstadium grosse Anteile des Gross- und Kleinhirns angelegt werden, muss immer nach assoziierten Anlagestoerungen gesucht werden. Ebenso treten auch Kombinationen mit genetisch bedingten Syndromen auf. Die Entwicklung des Balkens folgt der sog. anterioren-posterioren Sequenz (''front-to-back rule''). Sekundaere Schaedigungen bei der Balkenentwicklung folgen dieser Regel nicht, und lassen

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amaurosis, Leber congenital congenital amaurosis of retinal origin congenital retinal blindness CRB dysgenesis neuroepithelialis retinae hereditary epithelial dysplasia of retina hereditary retinal aplasia heredoretinopathia congenitalis LCA ...

  4. Congenital orbital teratoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Aiyub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of mature congenital orbital teratoma managed with lid-sparing exenteration and dermis fat graft. This is a case report on the management of congenital orbital teratoma. A full-term baby was born in Fiji with prolapsed right globe which was surrounded by a nonpulsatile, cystic mass. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with congenital orbital teratoma. Due to limited surgical expertise, the patient was transferred to Adelaide, Australia for further management. The patient underwent a lid-sparing exenteration with frozen section control of the apical margin. A dermis fat graft from the groin was placed beneath the lid skin to provide volume. Histopathology revealed mature tissues from each of the three germ cell layers which confirmed the diagnosis of mature teratoma. We describe the successful use of demis fat graft in socket reconstruction following lid-sparing exenteration for congenital orbital teratoma.

  5. Congenital Ocular Motor Apraxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The clinical and neuroradiological findings, and long-term intellectual prognosis in 10 patients (4 boys and 6 girls with congenital ocular motor apraxia (COMA are reviewed by researchers at Tottori University, Yonago, Japan.

  6. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Speiser, Phyllis W

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group...

  7. Congenital cutis laxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acharya K

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A 16 days old male baby had congenital cutis laxa without family history. He had redundant and lax skin all over the body with slanting of the palpebral fissures medially and broad nasal root.

  8. Congenital lobar emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural-Kara, Tuğçe; Özdemir, Halil; Çiftçi, Ergin; İnce, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    Congenital lobar emphysema is a rare disease, which is characterized by pulmoner hyperinflation. Depending on the degree of bronchial obstruction, the clinical presentation may be variable. We report a rare case with congenital lobar emphysema in a 38-days-old male infant who presented with severe respiratory distress and hypertension. Air trapping in the left upper lung and significant mediastinal shift to the right were observed on the chest x-ray. Emphysematous changes were detected on the thorax computed tomography and considered as congenital lobar emphysema. The upper left lobectomy was successfully performed by pediatric surgeons. On postoperative follow up, no sign of respiratory distress occurred and the patient was normotensive. In this report, a case with congenital lobar emphysema, which is a rare cause of respiratory distress and hypertension is discussed. PMID:27381542

  9. Congenital tracheobiliary fistula.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, F.; Nieuwaal, N.H. van; Heijst, A.F.J. van; Enk, G.J. van

    2010-01-01

    Congenital tracheobiliary fistula is a rare malformation that can present with a variety of respiratory symptoms. We present a case of a newborn patient with a tracheobiliary fistula and severe respiratory insufficiency needing extracorporal membrane oxygenation to recover.

  10. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to treat congenital adrenal hyperplasia do not usually cause side effects such as obesity or weak bones, because the doses replace the hormones that the child's body cannot make. It is important for parents ...

  11. Congenital malformations of the supratentorial brain. Pt. 1. Disorders of cortical development; Kongenitale Malformationen des Grosshirns. Teil 1: Entwicklungsstoerungen des Kortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany); Institut fuer klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377, Muenchen (Germany); Rummeny, C.; Reiser, M.F. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    Disorders of supratentorial cortical development are usually divided into disorders of neuronal proliferation, neuronal migration and cortical organization. Based upon molecular biologic discoveries, a modified classification has recently been proposed. The category of malformations of abnormal neuronal and glial proliferation and apoptosis now includes microlissencephalies, megalencephalies, hemimegalencephalies and cortical dysplasias with balloon cells. Malformations due to abnormal neuronal migration now subsume the lissencephaly spectrum including the subcortical band heterotopias, the cobblestone complex and the group of heterotopias. Malformations due to abnormal cortical organization include the spectrum of polymicrogyria and schizencephaly as well as cortical dysplasias without balloon cells. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to an increasing awareness of these malformations. This article aims to illustrate the classification, MRI presentation and relevant clinical features of the most commonly encountered disorders of cortical development. (orig.) [German] Entwicklungsstoerungen des Kortex werden in der Regel eingeteilt in Stoerungen der zellulaeren Proliferation und Apoptose, der neuronalen Migration und der kortikalen Organisation. Basierend auf neueren molekularbiologischen und histopathologischen Erkenntnissen wurde vor kurzem eine modifizierte Klassifikation eingefuehrt. Zu den Stoerungen der neuronalen und glialen Proliferation und Apoptose werden nun die Mikrolissenzephalie und andere Formen der Mikrozephalie, die Megalenzephalien, die kortikalen Hamartome der tuberoesen Sklerose, die kortikalen Dysplasien mit Ballonzellen und die Hemimegalenzephalie gezaehlt. Zu den neuronalen Migrationsstoerungen rechnet man das Spektrum der Lissenzephalien, einschliesslich der bandfoermigen Heterotopien, die Pflastersteinlissenzephalien sowie die Gruppe der Heterotopien. Unter Organisationsstoerungen des Kortex subsumiert man den Komplex

  12. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type 1 with a novel mutation in the CDAN1 gene previously diagnosed as congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Hisanori; Doisaki, Sayoko; Park, Young-Dong; Hama, Asahito; Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji; Sumimoto, Shinichi

    2013-05-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders of red cell production. They are characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and dyserythropoiesis. Here, we present the clinical description and mutation analysis of a Japanese female with CDA type 1. She has long been diagnosed with unclassified congenital hemolytic anemia from the neonatal period. However, bone marrow morphology and genetic testing of the CDAN1 gene at the age of 12 years confirmed the afore-mentioned diagnosis. Thus, we should be aware of the possibility of CDA if the etiology of congenital anemia or jaundice cannot be clearly elucidated.

  13. Galactose uncovers face recognition and mental images in congenital prosopagnosia : the first case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Esins, J.; Schultz, J; Bülthoff, I.; Kennerknecht, I.

    2014-01-01

    A woman in her early 40s with congenital prosopagnosia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder observed for the first time sudden and extensive improvement of her face recognition abilities, mental imagery, and sense of navigation after galactose intake. This effect of galactose on prosopagnosia has never been reported before. Even if this effect is restricted to a subform of congenital prosopagnosia, galactose might improve the condition of other prosopagnosics. Congenital prosopagnosia...

  14. Anaesthetic Management of a Case with Congenital Complete Heart Block Posted for Lower Segment Caesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Varsha T; Vaijanath; Chandra Sekhar CN

    2017-01-01

    Complete heart block in pregnancy is relatively a rare problem. It may be congenital or acquired. Congenital complete heart block may be asymptomatic. Acquired causes may be secondary to cardiac surgery, rheumatic heart disease, infectious disorders. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management of a case with complete heart block is to preserve the heart rate and maintain hemodynamic stability. Herein, we report the anaesthetic management of a case with congenital complete hea...

  15. NonClassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azziz Ricardo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and "on-time" puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH.

  16. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract.

  17. Congenital methemoglobinemia. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zárate Aspiros Romeo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Methemoglobinemia is a condition in which there are high blood levels of methemoglobin. It may be congenital or acquired. The congenital form (which is rare is the result of a defect in the methemoglobin reductase enzyme, dependent of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH; it is also caused by hemoglobinopathies. Congenital methemoglobinemia type 2 constitutes 10% of all cases and is usually fatal in early life. Its main feature is progressive neurological deterioration associa- ted with mental retardation, microcephaly, opisthotonos, athetotic movements, and generalized hypertonia. We report the case of a newborn with cyanosis from birth in whom perinatal hypoxia, pulmonary disease, heart failure and sepsis were ruled out, hence methemoglobin levels were requested, which led to the diagnosis of congenital methemoglobinemia based on a methemoglobin of 29.6%. Methemoglobin values were investigated in his 2 years old brother, who was cyanotic and showed progressive psychomotor retardation from birth; his methemoglobin was 30%. We concluded that both patients had type 2 hereditary methemoglobinemia in view of the severe neu- rological disorders of the older brother. Treatment with ascorbic acid was initiated in both siblings, resulting in the disappearance of cyanosis in the newborn.

  18. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Aug 29,2017 ... the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: Adults with ...

  19. A family of congenital hepatic fibrosis and atypical retinitis pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Pawar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a rare cause of portal hypertension and esophageal varices in children. We report cases of siblings with biopsy proven congenital hepatic fibrosis and with atypical retinitis pigmentosa. They presented with repeated episodes of jaundice along with progressive decrease of vision in night. They had hepatosplenomegaly and portal hypertension with esophageal varices. One of the siblings had a large regenerating nodule replacing the entire right lobe of the liver and other one developed repeated hematemesis. This constellation of diagnosis belongs to the ciliopathy group of disorders. The spectrum of ciliopathy disorders has been evolving, and it varies from mild to severe manifestations.

  20. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Congenital cataract screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  2. Congenital Syphilis: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chaida Sonda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is an infectious disease caused by Treponema pallidum and has high rates of vertical transmission, which can reach 100% depending on the maternal disease and stage of pregnancy. The diagnosis of gestational syphilis is simple and its screening is required during the prenatal period. However, this disease still has a high prevalence, affecting two million pregnant women worldwide. The procedures performed in newborns with congenital syphilis represent costs that are three-fold higher than the ones spent with a baby without this infection. The treatment is generally carried out with penicillin and must be extended to sexual partners. Inadequate or lack of treatment of congenital syphilis can result in miscarriage, premature birth, acute complications and other fetal sequelae. KEYWORDS: Congenital syphilis. Treponema pallidum. Vertical transmission.

  3. Congenital right hemidiaphragmatic agenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Mirza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm through which intestine and other viscera herniate into the chest. In extreme form of diaphragmatic maldevelopment, there might be a complete agenesis of diaphragm. A 45-day old male infant was presented with fever, cough and respiratory distress for a week. Chest radiograph showed right-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The patient underwent surgical exploration and found to have an unusual and large defect of right hemidiaphragm. The diaphragm was absent on anterior and lateral aspects of the chest wall and only a small rim of diaphragm was present on posterior aspect. The defect was identified as agenesis of right hemidiaphragm and successfully managed by suturing the posterior rim of diaphragm to the intercostal muscles and ribs. This report describes successful management of hemidiaphragmatic agenesis without incorporating a prosthetic material.

  4. Congenital right hemidiaphragmatic agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Bilal; Bashir, Zahid; Sheikh, Afzal

    2012-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital defect of the diaphragm through which intestine and other viscera herniate into the chest. In extreme form of diaphragmatic maldevelopment, there might be a complete agenesis of diaphragm. A 45-day old male infant was presented with fever, cough and respiratory distress for a week. Chest radiograph showed right-sided congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The patient underwent surgical exploration and found to have an unusual and large defect of right hemidiaphragm. The diaphragm was absent on anterior and lateral aspects of the chest wall and only a small rim of diaphragm was present on posterior aspect. The defect was identified as agenesis of right hemidiaphragm and successfully managed by suturing the posterior rim of diaphragm to the intercostal muscles and ribs. This report describes successful management of hemidiaphragmatic agenesis without incorporating a prosthetic material.

  5. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  6. Congenital Cataract Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  7. Dominant collagen VI mutations are a common cause of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, NL; Morgelin, M; Peat, R; Goemans, N; North, KN; Bateman, JF; Lamande, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). UCMD, a severe disorder characterized by congenital muscle weakness, proximal joint contractures and marked distal joint hyperextensibility, has been considered

  8. Congenital Amusia: A Short-Term Memory Deficit for Non-Verbal, but Not Verbal Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Schulze, Katrin; Foxton, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital amusia refers to a lifelong disorder of music processing and is linked to pitch-processing deficits. The present study investigated congenital amusics' short-term memory for tones, musical timbres and words. Sequences of five events (tones, timbres or words) were presented in pairs and participants had to indicate whether the sequences…

  9. Familial congenital hepatic fibrosis: report of a family with three affected children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Farahmand

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF is a developmental disorder of the biliary system, characterized by defective remodeling of the ductal plate. Herein a family of three children, from consanguineous parents, with minor thalassemia is presented who suffered from congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF. Prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid further complications in the affected patients.

  10. Dominant collagen VI mutations are a common cause of Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, NL; Morgelin, M; Peat, R; Goemans, N; North, KN; Bateman, JF; Lamande, [No Value

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the three collagen VI genes COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 cause Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). UCMD, a severe disorder characterized by congenital muscle weakness, proximal joint contractures and marked distal joint hyperextensibility, has been considered

  11. Congenital Amusia: A Short-Term Memory Deficit for Non-Verbal, but Not Verbal Sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Schulze, Katrin; Foxton, Jessica M.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital amusia refers to a lifelong disorder of music processing and is linked to pitch-processing deficits. The present study investigated congenital amusics' short-term memory for tones, musical timbres and words. Sequences of five events (tones, timbres or words) were presented in pairs and participants had to indicate whether the sequences…

  12. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Congenital Heart Defects KidsHealth > For Parents > Congenital Heart Defects A A A What's in this article? How ... a Problem en español Anomalías cardíacas congénitas A congenital heart defect is a problem in the heart's structure that ...

  13. Congenital Abdominal Wall Defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risby, Kirsten; Jakobsen, Marianne Skytte; Qvist, Niels

    2016-01-01

    complications were seen in five (15%) children: four had detachment of the mesh and one patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Mesh related clinical infection was observed in five children. In hospital mortality occurred in four cases (2 gastroschisis and 2 omphalocele) and was not procedure......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical utility of GORE® DUALMESH (GDM) in the staged closure of large congenital abdominal wall defects. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data of patients with congenital abdominal wall defects managed with GDM was analyzed for outcome regarding complete fascial closure; mesh...

  14. Congenital Toxoplasmosis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Marissa Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Acute infection of toxoplasmosis during pregnancy is detrimental to the developing fetus. In the United States, approximately 1 in 10,000 live births are affected by congenital toxoplasmosis. Although multifactorial in etiology, maternal infection is primarily attributed to the consumption of contaminated meat or water. Infection and transmission to the fetus may result in devastating neurologic impairment. Screening methods for all pregnant women should be implemented in routine prenatal care. This article will highlight the inherent dangers of congenital toxoplasmosis, while including general care of the fetus for prevention of transmission, medical management, and long-term outcomes.

  15. Congenital preduodenal portal vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Mi Soo; Huh, Young Soo; Park, Bok Hwan [College of Medicine, Youngnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-03-15

    Congenital preduodenal portal vein, first reported by Knight in 1921, is an extremely rare congenital anomaly in which the portal vein passes anteriorly to the duodenum rather than posteriorly in its normal location. It is of surgical significance because it may cause difficulties in operations involving the gall bladder, biliary duct, or duodenum. Recently, we experienced 2 cases of preduodenal portal vein. One was found during surgical exploration for the diagnosis and correction of malrotation of the bowels and the other in a 3 day-old male newborn associated with dextrocardia, situs inversus, and duodenal obstruction by diaphragm. We report these 2 cases with a review of the literature.

  16. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.Key words: Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, collgen VI genes, Bethlemmyopathy, autophagy.

  17. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goknur Haliloglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenital muscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in the Western world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagen VI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may be overlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There has been some radical efforts for cure especially through the apoptosis cascades.

  18. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950283 Surgical treatment of congenital coronaryartery fistula.CAO Qingheng(曹庆亨),et al.DeptCardiovasc Surg,Shanghai Chest Hosp,Shanghai,200030.Shanghai Med J 1995;18(1):10-12.From October 1957 through December 1990,twenty-five patients with congenital coronary artery fistula(CCAF),including 3 cases complicated with giantcoronary artery aneurysms,underwent surgical repair.The ages ranged from 4 to 47 years (mean 19.8years).CCAF originated from the right coronaryartery in 17 cases (68.0%) and terminated into RA,RV,pulmonary artery (PA) or LV,in 8 cases (32.

  19. Congenital laryngeal anomalies,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is essential for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to be cognizant of the fact that infants with congenital laryngeal anomalies are at particular risk for an unstable airway. Objectives: To familiarize clinicians with issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to present a succinct description of the diagnosis and management of an array of congenital laryngeal anomalies. Methods: Revision article, in which the main aspects concerning airway management of infants will be analyzed. Conclusions: It is critical for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants.

  20. Pseudoamblyopia in Congenital Cyclotropia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Frattolillo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the effect of surgery on amblyopia and suppression associated with congenital cyclovertical strabismus. Methods. The fixation pattern was investigated with microperimetry before and soon after surgery in ten consecutive children operated for congenital superior oblique palsy at the S. Martino Hospital, Belluno, Italy, between September 2014 and December 2015. Changes in visual performance in terms of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and stereopsis between the day before and one week after surgery were also evaluated. No other amblyopia treatment has been administered during the time study. Results. Surgical correction of the excyclodeviation in congenital SO palsy determined monocular and binocular sensory consequences: monocularly, in the cyclodeviated amblyopic eye, BCVA (0.46–0.03 LogMAR; p<0.0001 and the fixation pattern improved, as demonstrated by microperimetry examination. Binocularly, stereopsis improved or emerged while suppression at the Worth four-dot test disappeared. Conclusions. In the absence of further amblyopic factors such as coexisting constant vertical and/or horizontal deviation and anisometropia, the amblyopia encountered in congenital SO palsy may resolve soon after the surgical alignment. Therefore, it may be considered and defined “pseudoamblyopia.”

  1. Identification of congenital deafblindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    the complexity in identifying congenital deafblindness. It is concluded that determining deafblindness should not be limited to medical procedures (vision and hearing tests) alone, but may also involve a lengthy process to assess the level of sense functioning the individual possesses....

  2. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria (CEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov Website: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/ References JOURNAL ARTICLES Christiansen AL, Aagaard L, Krag A, Rasmussen ... homeostasis of human uroporphyrinogen III synthase by enzyme engineering at a single hotspot of congenital erythropoietic ... a Doctor Clinical Studies Porphyria featured Television and Other Media AIP ...

  3. Congenital cutis laxa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavithran K

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of congenital cutis laxa is reported in a male infant. Heavy wrinkles on the forehead, ectropion of the lower eyelids and sagging of the skin of the cheeks and chin gave the appearance of ar, old man. In spite of extensive skin involvement, the general health of the child remained unaffected.

  4. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications...

  5. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  6. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkreim, I; Skogland, L B; Trygstad, O

    1976-06-01

    Five cases of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) are reported. Three belong to the one family. CCA has often been mistaken for Marfan's disease and arthrogrypois multiplex. Because CCA has a more favourable prognosis, it is very important to be able to recognize this syndrome.

  7. Congenital heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970296 Evaluating the degree of pulmonary vascularlesions in congenital heart disease with selective pul-monary angiography. PAN Shiwei(潘世伟), et al.Fuwai Hosp, CAMS & PUMC, Beijing, 100037. Chin JCardiol 1997; 25(1): 39-41. Objective: To evaluate the degree of pulmonary vas-

  8. Congenital Absence of Tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudesh Sharma, Saleem Mir, Vikrant Sharma, Irshad Dar, Rafee

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Congenital absence of tibia is a rare anomaly. We repol1 a case who presented at the age of 3 years withabsence of tibia right side with associated anomolies and was managed by reconstruction of the kneeand ankle joints b transfer of fibula

  9. Congenital Lumbar Hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Sharma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernia is a rare hernia. It constitutes less than one percent of all abdominal hernias. It can becongenital or acquired. Acquired can occur either spontaneously or after surgery or trauma. Only 300cases of lumbar hernia are reported till date. We report a case of congenital lumbar hernia in one month oldmale baby

  10. Sleep Disorders in Childhood Neurogenetic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Beth Mann Dosier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic advances in the past three decades have transformed our understanding and treatment of many human diseases including neurogenetic disorders. Most neurogenetic disorders can be classified as “rare disease,” but collectively neurogenetic disorders are not rare and are commonly encountered in general pediatric practice. The authors decided to select eight relatively well-known neurogenetic disorders including Down syndrome, Angelman syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Smith–Magenis syndrome, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, achondroplasia, mucopolysaccharidoses, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Each disorder is presented in the following format: overview, clinical characteristics, developmental aspects, associated sleep disorders, management and research/future directions.

  11. Congenitally corrected transposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debich-Spicer Diane

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenitally corrected transposition is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by the combination of discordant atrioventricular and ventriculo-arterial connections, usually accompanied by other cardiovascular malformations. Incidence has been reported to be around 1/33,000 live births, accounting for approximately 0.05% of congenital heart malformations. Associated malformations may include interventricular communications, obstructions of the outlet from the morphologically left ventricle, and anomalies of the tricuspid valve. The clinical picture and age of onset depend on the associated malformations, with bradycardia, a single loud second heart sound and a heart murmur being the most common manifestations. In the rare cases where there are no associated malformations, congenitally corrected transposition can lead to progressive atrioventricular valvar regurgitation and failure of the systemic ventricle. The diagnosis can also be made late in life when the patient presents with complete heart block or cardiac failure. The etiology of congenitally corrected transposition is currently unknown, and with an increase in incidence among families with previous cases of congenitally corrected transposition reported. Diagnosis can be made by fetal echocardiography, but is more commonly made postnatally with a combination of clinical signs and echocardiography. The anatomical delineation can be further assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and catheterization. The differential diagnosis is centred on the assessing if the patient is presenting with isolated malformations, or as part of a spectrum. Surgical management consists of repair of the associated malformations, or redirection of the systemic and pulmonary venous return associated with an arterial switch procedure, the so-called double switch approach. Prognosis is defined by the associated malformations, and on the timing and approach to palliative surgical care.

  12. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  13. Genotype-Phenotype Analysis in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krone, Nils; Reisch, Nicole; Idkowiak, Jan; Dhir, Vivek; Ivison, Hannah E.; Hughes, Beverly A.; Rose, Ian T.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Smith, Matthew J.; MacDonald, Fiona; Cole, Trevor R.; Adolphs, Nicolai; Barton, John S.; Blair, Edward M.; Braddock, Stephen R.; Collins, Felicity; Cragun, Deborah L.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Day, Ruth; Dougan, Shelley; Feist, Miriam; Gottschalk, Michael E.; Gregory, John W.; Haim, Michaela; Harrison, Rachel; Olney, Ann Haskins; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Jira, Petr E.; Kempers, Marlies; Kerstens, Michiel N.; Khalifa, Mohamed M.; Koehler, Birgit; Maiter, Dominique; Nielsen, Shelly; O'Riordan, Stephen M.; Roth, Christian L.; Shane, Kate P.; Silink, Martin; Stikkelbroeck, Nike M. M. L.; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Waterson, John R.; Williamson, Lori; Hartmann, Michaela F.; Taylor, Norman F.; Wudy, Stefan A.; Malunowicz, Ewa M.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Arlt, Wiebke; Smith, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a unique congenital adrenal hyperplasia variant that manifests with glucocorticoid deficiency, disordered sex development (DSD), and skeletal malformations. No comprehensive data on genotype-phenotype correlations in Caucasian patients are available.

  14. A rare cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia : Antley-Bixler syndrome due to POR deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herkert, J. C.; Blaauwwiekel, E. E.; Hoek, A.; Veenstra-Knol, H. E.; Kema, I. P.; Arlt, W.; Kerstens, M. N.

    Cytochrome P(450) oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency is a recently discovered new variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Distinctive features of POR deficiency are the presence of disorders of sexual development in both sexes, glucocorticoid deficiency and skeletal malformations similar to those

  15. Human syndromes with congenital patellar anomalies and the underlying gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, E.M.H.F.; Kampen, A. van; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van; Knoers, N.V.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Genetic disorders characterized by congenital patellar aplasia or hypoplasia belong to a clinically diverse and genetically heterogeneous group of lower limb malformations. Patella development involves different molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating dorso-ventral patterning, cartilage and

  16. Non-congenital heart disease associated pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Ivy, D D; Feinstein, J. A.; Humpl, T; Rosenzweig, E. B.

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of causes of pulmonary hypertension other than congenital heart disease is increasing in children. Diagnosis and treatment of any underlying cause of pulmonary hypertension is crucial for optimal management of pulmonary hypertension. This article discusses the available knowledge regarding several disorders associated with pulmonary hypertension in children: idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis, pulmonary veno-occlusive disease, he...

  17. [Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: clinical aspects and neonatal screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stikkelbroeck, M.M.L.; Otten, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a disorder of adrenal steroid synthesis. In 95% of CAH cases, it is caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency, leading to cortisol deficiency and (in most cases) aldosterone deficiency. The compensatory increase in ACTH secretion by the pituitary gland leads to stim

  18. Impaired cognitive function in women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Trine H.; Ripa, Caroline P.L.; Reinisch, June M.

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a disorder with a wide spectrum of severity. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate cognitive function in CAH women. DESIGN: This was a case-control study. SETTING: This study was conducted at a tertiary center for pediatric...

  19. Radiological findings of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Jeong; Shin, Joo Yong; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Jin Hee; Sohn, Cheol Ho; Lee, Sung Moon; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Ji [Keimyung Univ. School of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the marked accumulation of lipids and cholesterol in the adrenal cortex, and the failure of adrenal steroids to synthesise. We report the ultrasound (US), computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings in a four-day-old female neonate with CLAH.

  20. Mistaken gender identity in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Kukreti, Prerna; Kandpal, Manish; Jiloha, R C

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity is the sense of belonging that one feels for a particular sex psychologically and socially, independent of one's biological sex. There is much less systematic data on gender identity in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report a case of non-classical CAH presenting as a case of gender identity disorder.

  1. Mistaken gender identity in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukreti, Prerna; Kandpal, Manish; Jiloha, R C

    2014-04-01

    Gender identity is the sense of belonging that one feels for a particular sex psychologically and socially, independent of one's biological sex. There is much less systematic data on gender identity in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report a case of non-classical CAH presenting as a case of gender identity disorder.

  2. [Different congenital forms of Steinert's myopathy: contribution of EMG].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D; Senant, J; Tron, P; Reigner, R

    1984-04-01

    The study of two families with myotonic dystrophy enables us to recall the existence of two congenital forms: one severe form with important neonatal hypotonia and one mild form with talipes equinovarus and intellectual deficiency. In both forms EMG detection is very often of the myogenic type. It confirms the diagnosis of myopathic disorder.

  3. Early Hormonal Influences on Cognitive Functioning in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Susan M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reports the results of cognitive test performance and early childhood activities in individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with elevated prenatal adrenal androgen levels, demonstrating the effects of early exposure to excess androgenizing hormones on sexually dimorphic cognitive functioning.…

  4. Genetics Home Reference: congenital mirror movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 Feb 10;90(2):301-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.12.002. Epub 2012 Feb ... Apr 15;351(1-2):140-5. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2015.03.006. Epub 2015 Mar ... Neurobiol. 2013 Feb;23(1):109-18. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2012.08.007. Epub 2012 Sep ...

  5. Congenital Pouch Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Gharpure

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Face The Examiner:QUESTIONS1. What are the diagnostic features of congenital pouch colon (CPC?Ans: A male patient with CPC often have a wide colovesical fistula and present with anorectal malformation and meconuria; on plain abdominal film, a single large bowel loop occupying more than 50% of the abdominal cavity is also a diagnostic sign. Girls (persistent cloaca/vestibular fistula/anteriorly placed anus etc. often present late with intractable constipation or multiple episodes of enterocolitis and persistent abdominal distension with common cloaca or anterior ectopic anus/ rectovestibular fistula. The congenital pouch colon can be identified as replacement of a part or entire colon in the configuration of pouch that lacks taenia coli, haustrations, appendices epiploicae, abnormal blood supply and a wide fistula with genitourinary system in a patient of anorectal malformation.

  6. Fetal congenital lobar emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Chun-Chieh; Huang, Soon-Cen; Liu, Min-Chang; Se, Tung-Yi

    2007-03-01

    To report a rare fetal congenital lung anomaly characterized by over inflation of a pulmonary lobe. A 28-year-old systemic lupus erythematous mother, gravida 1 para 0, who had normal prenatal care in our department, was admitted for labor pain and an abnormal fetal heart location was noted incidentally during labor. The baby showed rib retraction in room air but no obvious cyanotic change after delivery. Both the fetus chest X-ray and ultrasound showed a hyperechogenic tumor in the left thoracic cavity with a right-side-shifted heart and trachea. Computed tomography showed a hypodense and multiseptal tumor in the left thoracic cavity with right-sided shift of the heart and trachea. It was a soft, solid tumor in the parenchyma of the left lung and the histopathology confirmed it to be benign congenital lobar emphysema. The favorable outcome in both asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic children suggests that a nonsurgical approach should be considered for these patients.

  7. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Dušan Đ.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a disease which leads to protein losing enteropathy. Tortous, dilated lymphatic vessels in the intestinal wall and mesenterium are typical features of the disease. Clinical manifestations include malabsorption, diarrhea, steatorrhea, edema and effusions. Specific diet and medication are required for disease control. Case report. A 19-year old male patient was hospitalized due to diarrhea, abdominal swelling, weariness and fatigue. Physical examination revealed growth impairment, ascites, and lymphedema of the right hand and forearm. Laboratory assessment indicated iron deficiency anaemia, lymphopenia, malabsorption, inflammatory syndrome, and urinary infection. Enteroscopy and video capsule endoscopy demonstrated dilated lymphatic vessels in the small intestine. The diagnosis was confirmed by intestinal biopsy. The patient was put on high-protein diet containing medium-chain fatty acids, somatotropin and suportive therapy. Conclusion. Congenital intestinal lymphangiectasia is a rare disease, usually diagnosed in childhood. Early recognition of the disease and adequate treatment can prevent development of various complications.

  8. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Deshingkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge.

  9. Congenital Generalized Hypertrichosis Terminalis with Gingival Hyperplasia and a Coarse Face: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazandjieva Jana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital generalized hypertrichosis, in its most common form, is idiopathic. In the absence of underlying endocrine or metabolic disorders, congenital generalized hypertrichosis is rare in humans, affecting as few as one in a billion individuals and may be an isolated condition of the skin, or a component feature of other disorders or syndromes. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis is an extremely rare condition, a distinct subset of disorders with congenital hypertrichosis, presenting with excessive hair as the primary clinical feature. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis is characterized by universal excessive growth of pigmented terminal hair and often accompanied with gingival hyperplasia and/or a coarse face. Gingival hyperplasia may be delayed even until puberty. Its pathogenesis may be caused by one of the following mechanisms: conversion of vellus to terminal hairs and/or prolonged anagenetic stage, and/or increase in the number of hair follicles. Since the Middle Ages, less than 60 individuals with congenital hypertrichosis terminalis have been described, and, according to the most recent estimates, less than 40 cases were documented adequately and definitively in the literature. Recent articles identified congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis as a genomic disorder.

  10. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debnath Ujjwal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions and patient′s age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the

  11. Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveUllrich congenital muscular dystrophy is a rather severe type of congenitalmuscular dystrophy with early onset features related to motor development.In general it is inherited in autosomal recessive principles, however in theWestern world mostly seen with de novo dominant mutations in the collagenVI genes. Milder form of the condition is the Bethlem myopathy. There may beoverlap forms in the clinic resembling the Ehler-Danlos syndrome. There hasbeen some radical efforts for cure espe...

  12. Congenital neutropenia: diagnosis, molecular bases and patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantelot Christine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term congenital neutropenia encompasses a family of neutropenic disorders, both permanent and intermittent, severe ( When neutropenia is detected, an attempt should be made to establish the etiology, distinguishing between acquired forms (the most frequent, including post viral neutropenia and auto immune neutropenia and congenital forms that may either be isolated or part of a complex genetic disease. Except for ethnic neutropenia, which is a frequent but mild congenital form, probably with polygenic inheritance, all other forms of congenital neutropenia are extremely rare and have monogenic inheritance, which may be X-linked or autosomal, recessive or dominant. About half the forms of congenital neutropenia with no extra-hematopoetic manifestations and normal adaptive immunity are due to neutrophil elastase (ELANE mutations. Some patients have severe permanent neutropenia and frequent infections early in life, while others have mild intermittent neutropenia. Congenital neutropenia may also be associated with a wide range of organ dysfunctions, as for example in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (associated with pancreatic insufficiency and glycogen storage disease type Ib (associated with a glycogen storage syndrome. So far, the molecular bases of 12 neutropenic disorders have been identified. Treatment of severe chronic neutropenia should focus on prevention of infections. It includes antimicrobial prophylaxis, generally with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and also granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF. G-CSF has considerably improved these patients' outlook. It is usually well tolerated, but potential adverse effects include thrombocytopenia, glomerulonephritis, vasculitis and osteoporosis. Long-term treatment with G-CSF, especially at high doses, augments the spontaneous risk of leukemia in patients with congenital neutropenia.

  13. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  14. Clinical presentation and management of congenital ptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenco, Marco; Macchi, Ilaria; Macchi, Iacopo; Galassi, Emilio; Massaro-Giordano, Mina; Lambiase, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Congenital ptosis is a rare condition characterized by lower positioning of the upper eyelid that is present at birth and is a clinical condition that is persistent if not treated. It may be unilateral or bilateral and may be associated with other ocular disorders or systemic conditions, including Marcus Gunn, Horner, and Duane syndromes. It is a benign condition but causes functional, cosmetic, and psychological problems in children. However, not all patients need to undergo surgery, and usually only patients at risk of amblyopia need a prompt surgical correction, while in other cases, surgery can be postponed. The grade of ptosis, the eyelid function, and the amblyopic risk are the parameters that affect the ophthalmologist’s decision on timing of surgery and the surgical technique to be used. In fact, there are several types of surgical techniques to correct a congenital ptosis, although very often more than one is needed to obtain an acceptable result. This paper reviews the causes of congenital ptosis and associated diseases. Particular emphasis is given to surgical management and different procedures available to correct the upper eyelid anomaly and avoid permanent damage to visual function. PMID:28280295

  15. CONGENITAL MYOTONIC DYSTROPHY – CASE REPORT

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    David Neubauer

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myotonic dystrophy is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by myotonia, myopathy of voluntary and involuntary muscles, frontal baldness in men, cardiac conduction abnormalities, catharacts, intellectual deterioration and endocrinopathy. Men with this disorder have often gonadal atrophy and infertility. On the other hand women are generally fertile. During pregnancy their myopathy worsens, often causing severe obstetrical complications. Their children may develop congenital form of the disease with signs of myopathy in utero and have great difficulties in maintaining life functions after birth, together with other characteristical signs of this form: bilateral facial weakness, severe hypotonia, feeding difficulties, talipes equinovarus and mental retardation. The authors present a female newborn with such congenital form of myotonic dystrophy.Conclusions. The authors have emphasized the importance of medical history, regular updating of all the cases of neuromuscular diseases in the region and clinical characteristics for the recognition of congenital form of myotonic dystrophy because of possible prenatal diagnostics and better antenatal and postantal care.

  16. Congenital defects of the pericardium: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit B; Kronzon, Itzhak

    2015-08-01

    Pericardial defects are a rare disorder that can be characterized as acquired or congenital. Congenital defects can be further characterized by location and size of the defect, e.g. left- or right-sided and partial or complete absence of the pericardium. While physical examination and electrocardiogram are not diagnostic, chest radiographs and echocardiography have findings that should alert the clinician to the absence of the pericardium as a possible diagnosis. Despite its limitations with visualizing the normal pericardium in areas of minimal adipose, cardiac magnetic resonance is currently the gold standard for diagnosing the congenital absence of the pericardium. Patients have a similar life expectancy to those without pericardial defects; however in certain cases, herniation and strangulation of cardiac chambers can be life threatening and lead to sudden cardiac death. Treatment is tailored to the patient's symptoms, presentation, and the size and location of the defect. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. An integrated diagnosis strategy for congenital myopathies.

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    Johann Böhm

    Full Text Available Congenital myopathies are severe muscle disorders affecting adults as well as children in all populations. The diagnosis of congenital myopathies is constrained by strong clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Moreover, the majority of patients present with unspecific histological features, precluding purposive molecular diagnosis and demonstrating the need for an alternative and more efficient diagnostic approach. We used exome sequencing complemented by histological and ultrastructural analysis of muscle biopsies to identify the causative mutations in eight patients with clinically different skeletal muscle pathologies, ranging from a fatal neonatal myopathy to a mild and slowly progressive myopathy with adult onset. We identified RYR1 (ryanodine receptor mutations in six patients and NEB (nebulin mutations in two patients. We found novel missense and nonsense mutations, unraveled small insertions/deletions and confirmed their impact on splicing and mRNA/protein stability. Histological and ultrastructural findings of the muscle biopsies of the patients validated the exome sequencing results. We provide the evidence that an integrated strategy combining exome sequencing with clinical and histopathological investigations overcomes the limitations of the individual approaches to allow a fast and efficient diagnosis, accelerating the patient's access to a better healthcare and disease management. This is of particular interest for the diagnosis of congenital myopathies, which involve very large genes like RYR1 and NEB as well as genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity.

  18. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis

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    Sara Albarella

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital malformations most frequently reported in literature or signaled by breeders to the Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production of the University Federico II (Naples, Italy in river buffalo are: musculoskeletal defects (transverse hemimelia, arthrogryposis, umbilical hernia and disorders of sexual development. In conclusion this review put in evidence that river buffalo have a great variety of malformations due to genetic causes, and TH and omphalocele are the most frequent and that several cases are still not reported, leading to an underestimation of the real weight of genetic diseases in this species.

  19. Hyperpyrexia associated with congenital Long QT Syndrome

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    Nuriye Tarakci

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital long QT syndrome (CLQTS is a genetic disorder presented with prolonged QT interval. In these patients, risk of sudden cardiac death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias is high. Bradycardia may exhibit as a result of intrauterine fetal atrioventricular block, sinus bradycardia, tachycardia in these patient. Prolonged QT interval and multisystem involvement such as sensorineural hearing loss, muscle paralysis, immune deficiency, syndactyly have been reported in these patient . We have detected hyperpyrexia without clinical immunodeficiency and infection in our patient. To our knowledge, our patient is the first case in the literature . [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 909-903

  20. A success story in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriplani, Alka; Lunkad, Amol; Agarwal, Nutan; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Ariachery, C Aminni

    2012-12-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by enzyme defects in adrenal steroidogenic pathways. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95 % of cases. This case was diagnosed to have simple virilizing type of CAH and started on dexamethasone, and underwent genitoplasty and clitoroplasty at 25 years of age, then was married 3 years after surgery and conceived spontaneously 2 years after marriage, to deliver a healthy male baby. Thus, proper diagnosis and treatment with steroids and genitoplasty can give females with CAH a normal sexual, normal menstrual, and reproductive function.

  1. Congenital syphilis, still a reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajat; Vora, Rita V

    2013-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is a potentially serious pathology affecting newborns of infected mothers. Even one case of congenital syphilis is a sentinel public health event, since timely diagnosis and treatment of syphilis infected pregnant woman should prevent transmission almost entirely. Here, we are reporting a case of early symptomatic congenital syphilis presented with severe desquamating papulosquamous lesions over multiple body parts along with erosive lesions around oral cavity and nostrils.

  2. Congenital agenesis of seminal vesicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Fei Wu; Di Qiao; Li-Xin Qian; Ning-Hong Song; Ning-Han Feng; Li-Xin Hua; Wei Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of the seminal vesicle (CASV) is frequently associated with congenital absence of the vas deferens (CAVD) or ipsilateral congenital vasoureteral communication. We reported two cases of a rare condition that the vas deferens open ectopically into Mullerian duct cyst associated with agenesis of the ipsilateral seminal vesicle. The diagnosis was confirmed by vasography. Transurethral unroofing of the Mullerian duct cyst was performed in both patients with favourable results, however, assisted reproductive technology (ART) was still necessary for them to father children.

  3. Early detection of congenital syphilis

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    Nagalakshmi Chowdhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Late congenital syphilis is a very rare clinical entity, and its early diagnosis and treatment is essential. Dental findings often provide valuable evidence for the diagnosis of late congenital syphilis. It occurs due to the transmission of the disease from an infected mother to her fetus through placenta. This long forgotten disease continues to effect pregnant women resulting in perinatal morbidity and mortality. Congenital syphilis is a preventable disease, and its presence reflects a failure of prenatal care delivery system, as well as syphilis control programs. We are reporting a case of late congenital syphilis with only Hutchinson′s teeth.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions critical congenital heart disease critical congenital heart disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital diaphragmatic hernia congenital diaphragmatic hernia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a defect in the diaphragm. The diaphragm, ...

  6. Congenital long QT syndrome in children

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    Cerović Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization disorder characterized by prolonged QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG and increased propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac events. LQTS might be acquired or congenital, which presents a group of channelopathies that occur due to mutation in one of 15 so far identified genes. The most frequent types of congenital LTQS are LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3. Prolonged or delayed repolarization leads to the increase of action potential duration which predisposes early afterdepolarization, as well as the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization, both contributing to the development of Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia. Clinical manifestations of LQTS are palpitations, syncope, aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death, but it can also be asymptomatic. Trigger factors for symptoms are specific for certain genotype. LQTS examination includes thorough clinical and family history focused on distinctive data (repeated syncopes, cases of sudden cardiac death in the family, hereditary arrhythmias, resting ECG, exercise stress testing and genetic analysis, with additional methods (serial ECG records, 24h ECG Holter, epinephrine test. Clinical LQTS diagnosis is based on Schwartz's scoring system, while the criteria for final diagnosis of LQTS depend on Schwartz's score, QT interval duration, presence of pathogenic mutation and clinical symptoms. Treatment approach begins with lifestyle modifications and β-blockers therapy, while other options include implantable cardioverter- defibrillator, permanent pacemaker or surgical sympathectomy. Sudden cardiac death is the reason of 90% of sudden deaths in young athletes, while LQTS is one of its causes. Recommendations for physical activities in children with congenital LQTS arise from the ones for adults and they presume very strict limitations. Further researches are expected to advance the understanding of genotype

  7. Congenital Bilateral Saccular Cysts and Bifid Epiglottis: Presentation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Rawan; Al-Khatib, Talal; Daghistani, Razan; Shalabi, Maher

    2016-03-01

    Saccular disorders are rare representing only 1.5 % of all laryngeal anomalies. Bifid epiglottis is also an extremely rare congenital anomaly that usually occurs in a syndromic picture in association with other anomalies such as polydactyly, cleft palate and micrognathia, which are seen in Pallister-Hall Syndrome and rarely with other syndromes. We report a case of bilateral saccular cysts and bifid epiglottis in a full term neonate presenting with stridor. The patient's other congenital anomalies included microretrognathia, short neck, polydactyly of four extremities and hypospadias. The patient underwent staged endoscopic microsurgical marsupialization of both cysts and endoscopic repair of the bifid epiglottis.

  8. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (Beals syndrome

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    Alanay Yasemin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (Beals syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by multiple flexion contractures, arachnodactyly, severe kyphoscoliosis, abnormal pinnae and muscular hypoplasia. It is caused by a mutation in FBN2 gene on chromosome 5q23. Although the clinical features can be similar to Marfan syndrome (MFS, multiple joint contractures (especially elbow, knee and finger joints, and crumpled ears in the absence of significant aortic root dilatation are characteristic of Beals syndrome and rarely found in Marfan syndrome. The incidence of CCA is unknown and its prevalence is difficult to estimate considering the overlap in phenotype with MFS; the number of patients reported has increased following the identification of FBN2 mutation. Molecular prenatal diagnosis is possible. Ultrasound imaging may be used to demonstrate joint contractures and hypokinesia in suspected cases. Management of children with CCA is symptomatic. Spontaneous improvement in camptodactyly and contractures is observed but residual camptodactyly always remains. Early intervention for scoliosis can prevent morbidity later in life. Cardiac evaluation and ophthalmologic evaluations are recommended.

  9. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-08

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  10. Mutations in different functional domains of the human muscle acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit in patients with the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croxen, R; Newland, C; Beeson, D; Oosterhuis, H; Chauplannaz, G; Vincent, A; NewsomDavis, J

    1997-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a group of rare genetic disorders that compromise neuromuscular transmission. A subset of these disorders, the slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCCMS), is dominantly inherited and has been shown to involve mutations within the muscle acetylcholine rece

  11. Prevalence of Congenital Malformations

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    Akhavan Karbasi Sedighah

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital malformation (CM will begin to emerge as one of the major childhood health problems .Treatment and rehabilitation of children with congenital malformations are costly and complete recovery is usually impossible. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of CM in Yazd central city of the Islamic Republic of Iran to find out if there has been any difference in the rate and types of CM in this area. This descriptive-observational study carried on 4800 births delivered at all maternity hospitals in Yazd from October 2003 to June 2004. Prevalence of CM was 2.83% (2.86 % in male and 2.68 % in female out of the 136 cases 69(51.88% were males and 64 (48.12% were females and 3 with ambiguous genitalia. Positive family history of CM in sibling was in only 6 cases (4.41%.Overall, musculoskeletal (0.83%, central nerv-ous system (0.47% and genital system (0.37% were accounted as the most common. Frequency of CM was more seen in still birth (12.5% as in comparison to live birth (2.71%. There was not statistical difference be-tween prevalence of CM and neonatal's gender, gestational age, birth order and mother's age, drug ingestion, illness and parental consanguinity. In this study the overall prevalence of congenital malformation among the newborn was higher than those previous reported in Iran and determining the causes of this difference needs more extensive studies.

  12. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

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    Tovar Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is

  13. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria

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    Wen-Hao Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP, or “Günther disease”, is a rare variant of porphyria. It is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficient uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-III-synthase, the fourth enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. We herein report a case of a man with the typical clinical presentations of hyper- and hypo-pigmentation and blister formation over sun-exposed areas, mutilation of the fingers, dark-purple urine, and erythrodontia with pinkish fluorescence under a Wood’s lamp. The diagnosis was confirmed by decreased activity of URO-III-synthase in red blood cells (RBC and a porphyrin profile compatible with CEP.

  14. Surgery for Congenital Cataract

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    David Yorston FRCS FRCOphth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of congenital cataract is very different to the treatment of a routine age-related cataract. In adults, surgery may be delayed for years without affecting the visual outcome. In infants, if the cataract is not removed during the first year of life, the vision will never be fully regained after surgery. In adults, if the aphakia is not corrected immediately, it can be corrected later. In young children, if the aphakia is not corrected, the vision will never develop normally.

  15. Congenital familial hypertonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLuca, Carl F; Cashore, William J

    2002-09-01

    1. This complex of symptoms appears to be congenital, familial, and hereditary. It is apparently transmitted by a dominant gene, probably on chromosome 5. 2. Hypertonicity with rigidity of all voluntary muscles usually presents at birth. 3. Feeding problems are due to dysphagia or laryngospasm associated with aspiration and dyspnea. 4. Respiratory problems are characterized by apneic episodes due to muscle spasm. 5. Prolonged episodes of muscular rigidity secondary to sudden stimuli result in frequent falls, characteristically en bloc, like a statue. 6. Continuous electromyographic activity even at rest (with absence of fasciculations) improves after intravenous diazepam.

  16. Systemic congenital lymphangiomatosis

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    Ligia Maria Suppo de Souza

    Full Text Available Systemic lymphangiomatosis is a rare disease characterized by the exageration of lymphatic channel proliferation, occurring in children and young adults. We describe an extremely rare case of congenital systemic lymphangiomatosis in a newborn who had ascitis and respiratory failure develop immediately after delivery. Death occurred during the first hour of life. Autopsy findings showed numerous cysts in soft tissues of the cervical area, mediastinum and diaphragm, and several other organs including the liver, spleen, thyroid and kidneys. The severe and diffuse involvement with cysts in both lungs by lymphangiomatosis was associated with poor prognosis and death in our case.

  17. Congenital granular cell epulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Rachel; Perez, Mia C N

    2014-01-01

    Congenital granular cell epulis is a rarely reported lesion of unknown histogenesis with a strong predilection for the maxillary alveolar ridge of newborn girls. Microscopically, it demonstrates nests of polygonal cells with granular cytoplasm, a prominent capillary network, and attenuated overlying squamous epithelium. The lesion lacks immunoreactivity for S-100, laminin, chromogranin, and most other markers except neuron-specific enolase and vimentin. Through careful observation of its unique clinical, histopathologic, and immunohistochemical features, this lesion can be distinguished from the more common adult granular cell tumor as well as other differential diagnoses.

  18. Congenital nystagmus and negative electroretinography

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    Roussi M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mirella Roussi, Hélène Dalens, Jean Jacques Marcellier, Franck BacinDepartment of Ophthalmology, Clermont-Ferrand University, Clermont-Ferrand, FranceAbstract: Congenital nystagmus is a pathologic oculomotor state appearing at about three to four months of age. The precise diagnosis requires detailed clinical examination and electrophysiological findings. This case report presents two male patients with congenital nystagmus examined longitudinally from the age of six months until 17-18 years of age. Clinical and electrophysiological protocols were detailed. The first results showed electronegative electroretinography in the two cases and examination combined with electroretinographic findings helped us to make the diagnosis of Congenital Night Stationary Blindness (CSNB. This diagnosis was confirmed by genetic studies. CSNB is interesting to study because through electrophysiological findings, it enables a better understanding of the physiology of neural transmission in the outer part of the retina.Keywords: Congenital nystagmus, negative electroretinography, congenital night stationary blindness

  19. [Complex diagnosis of congenital cranial dysostosis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakubov, R K; Azimov, M I

    2002-01-01

    Ten patients (aged 3-15 years) with congenital cranial dysostosis were examined by a pediatrician, geneticist, gastroenterologist, neuropathologist, ophthalmologist, endocrinologist, and orthopaedist. In addition to the clinical signs characteristic of hereditary multiple developmental defects, the study revealed changes in the jaws and temporomandibular joint and local factors promoting the progress of deformations of the jaws. Manifest and inapparent pathological changes and dysfunctions in gastrointestinal organs were paralleled by dysfunctions of the central and autonomic nervous systems, risk of maxillofacial and general deformations, and signs of congenital disorders in calcium, lactic acid, and pyridoxine metabolism. The results necessitate analyses of the blood and urine and development of new methods for the diagnosis of congenital cranial dysostosis and improvement of methods for the correction of this condition.

  20. Congenital cholesteatoma of the middle ear - uncommon clinical presentation

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    Bukurov Bojana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital cholesteatoma of the middle ear is un uncommon and yet not well-defined disease. Only few cases of cholesteatoma in the fossa ovalis with unusual clinical presentation have been reported in medical literature. Case report. We reported a 16-year-old girl with congenital cholesteatoma in the fossa ovalis with minimal clinical presentation. A small mass was found occluding the fossa ovalis and mimicking otosclerotic process within tympanic cavity. The operation started as stapedotomy, and when the process was confirmed it converted to mastoidectomy via the retroauricular approach. Conclusion. The diagnosis of congenital cholesteatoma in children should always be considered, even if the clinical symptoms imitate other ear disorders, in our case otosclerosis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179055: Cochlear implantation impact on education of deaf and hearing-impaired

  1. A case of Fabry's disease with congenital agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Yeol; Jeon, Su-Young; Hong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sung-Eun; Song, Ki-Hoon; Kim, Young-Hun; Kim, Ki-Ho

    2011-07-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by abnormalities in the α-galactosidase A (GLA) gene, which leads to a GLA deficiency and to the intracellular deposition of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) within vascular endothelium and other tissues. It manifests as progressive multiple organ dysfunctions caused by the deposition of Gb3. On the other hand, congenital agammaglobulinemia is usually caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene with X-linked dominence, suppresses B cell maturation, and causes recurrent pyogenic infections. In former reports, the distance between the loci in the Xq22 region of the human X chromosome was found to be about 69 kilobases. A 23-yr-old man diagnosed with congenital agammaglobulinemia at age 5, showed typical clinical and laboratory and histopathological findings of Fabry's disease. The genetic basis of this combination of the two syndromes was studied in this patient. Here, we report a case of Fabry's disease with congenital agammaglobulinemia.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Requejo, I.; Fernandez, R. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruma (Spain); Raposo, I. [Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruna (Spain)

    1998-05-01

    This article outlines the ability of MR imaging in the detection and presurgical evaluation of congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta (CATA). Congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta may be found incidentally on chest radiographs in patients without symptoms, or it can be associated with clinical findings which are very variable depending on the association with congenital cardiac malformations or vascular ring. When CATA is suspected as the cause of anomalies in the mediastinum in asymptomatic patients, confirmation of the abnormality should be by MR imaging allowing precise evaluation of the thoracic aorta and origin of the principal arteries. When CATA is considered because clinical findings indicate coarctation of the aorta, vascular ring or associated cardiac disorder, evaluation with ultrasound can be complemented by MR, which in most cases will replace the diagnostic catheterization. (orig.) With 12 figs., 24 refs.

  3. TREATMENT OF NEUROLOGICAL CONGENITAL HIP LUXATION

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    Iulian ICLEANU

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hip luxation is a disorder which evolves in time. Teratological hip dislocation is a distinct form of hip luxation, which usually appears with other disorders. These hips are dislocated before birth. In this thesis we will try to elaborate a recovery program, through physical exercises, which will help us realize our treatment objectives: diminishing articular stiffness, increasing articular mobility, increasing muscle strength, recalibration of agonist and antagonist balances and reeducating gait. The specific objectives of the study consist of the particularization of the recovery programs based on age, illness stage (dysplasia or luxation and either surgical or non-surgical intervention. To show the importance of physiotherapy in gait rehabilitation of a child with hip dislocation we started from the hypothesis: using an adequate rehabilitation program after an individualized methodology, optimizes the functional recovery and ensures the gains of hip stability and the formation of an engram of gait as close as it could be to the normal one. We present a case of neurological congenital hip dislocation where the treatment initiated early is showing good results. Results obtained are significantly different and we came to the conclusion that starting an untimely analytical kinetic treatment and globally personalizing it to every patient has better biomechanical results for the hip.

  4. Imaging findings in congenital hepatic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)]. E-mail: akhano@tr.net; Karaosmanoglu, Ali Devrim [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Ergen, Bilge [Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-01-15

    Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF) is a rare congenital multisystemic disorder, mostly inherited in autosomal recessive fashion, primarily affecting renal and hepatobiliary systems. Main underlying process of the disease is the malformation of the ductal plate, the embryological precursor of the biliary system, and secondary biliary strictures and periportal fibrosis ultimately leading to portal hypertension. The natural course of the disease is highly variable ranging from minimally symptomatic disease to true cirrhosis of the liver. However, in most patients the most common manifestations of the diseases that are related to portal hypertension, particularly splenomegaly and bleeding varices. Many other disease processes may co-exist with the disease including Caroli's disease, choledochal cysts and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) reflecting the mulstisystemic nature of the disease. The associating biliary ductal disease led the authors to think that all these entities are a continuum and different reflections of the same underlying pathophysiological process. Although, conventional method of diagnosis of CHF is the liver biopsy the advent of imaging technologies and modalities, today, may permit the correct diagnosis in a non-invasive manner. Characteristic imaging features are generally present and recognition of these findings may obviate liver biopsy while preserving the diagnostic accuracy. In this article, it is aimed to increase the awareness of the practising radiologists to the imaging findings of this uncommon clinical disorder and trail the blaze for future articles relating to this issue.

  5. Selected disorders of malabsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zafreen; Osayande, Amimi S

    2011-09-01

    Malabsorption syndrome encompasses numerous clinical entities that result in chronic diarrhea, abdominal distention, and failure to thrive. These disorders may be congenital or acquired and include cystic fibrosis and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome; the rare congenital lactase deficiency; glucose-galactose malabsorption; sucrase-isomaltase deficiency; adult-type hypolactasia leading to acquired lactose intolerance. The pathology may be due to impairment in absorption or digestion of nutrients resulting in Nutritional deficiency, gastrointestinal symptoms, and extra gastrointestinal symptoms. Treatment is aimed at correcting the deficiencies and symptoms to improve quality of life. Common disorders of malabsorption celiac disease, pernicious anemia, and lactase deficiency are discussed in this article.

  6. Congenital peritoneal encapsulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Diana; Teixeira; Vítor; Costa; Paula; Costa; Carlos; Alpoim; Pinto; Correia

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal encapsulation(PE) is a rare congenital malformation, characterized by a thin accessory peritoneal membrane which covers all or part of the small bowel, forming an accessory peritoneal sac. Most cases areasymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during surgery and/or autopsy. Clinical presentation with intestinal obstruction is extremely rare and we report a case. A 25-year-old male, referred to emergency department with diffuse abdominal pain, crampy, with 8 h evolution, associated with nausea, vomiting and constipation in the last 48 h. The abdominal examination revealed an asymmetric and fixed distension, with hard consistency on palpation of lower abdominal quadrants. The abdominal radiography reveals a small bowel distension and fluid levels. Submitted to laparoscopic surgery that recourse to conversion because there is a total peritoneal encapsulation of the small bowel. After opening the peritoneal sac, we find a rotation of mesentery, at its root, conditioning twisting of small bowel and consequently occlusion. Uneventful postoperative with discharged at the 6th day. The PE is a very rare congenital anomaly characterized by abnormal bowel back into the abdominal cavity in the early stages of development. Your knowledge becomes important because, although rare, it might be diagnosis in patients with intestinal obstruction, in the absence of other etiologic factors.

  7. Congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Conor P.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Babyn, Paul S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, M5G 1X8, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-09-01

    A congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (CEPS) is uncommon. A type 1 CEPS exists where there is absence of intrahepatic portal venous supply and a type 2 CEPS where this supply is preserved. The diagnosis of congenital portosystemic shunt is important because it may cause hepatic encephalopathy. To describe the clinical and imaging features of three children with CEPS and to review the cases in the published literature. The diagnostic imaging and medical records for three children with CEPS were retrieved and evaluated. An extensive literature search was performed. Including our cases, there are 61 reported cases of CEPS, 39 type 1 and 22 type 2. Type 1 occurs predominantly in females, while type 2 shows no significant sexual preponderance. The age at diagnosis ranges from 31 weeks of intrauterine life to 76 years. Both types of CEPS have a number of associations, the most common being nodular lesions of the liver (n=25), cardiac anomalies (n=19), portosystemic encephalopathy (n=10), polysplenia (n=9), biliary atresia (n=7), skeletal anomalies (n=5), and renal tract anomalies (n=4). MRI is recommended as an important means of diagnosing and classifying cases of CEPS and examining the associated cardiovascular and hepatic abnormalities. Screening for CEPS in patients born with polysplenia is suggested. (orig.)

  8. Congenital candidiasis as a subject of research in medicine and human ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoczylas, Michał M; Walat, Anna; Kordek, Agnieszka; Loniewska, Beata; Rudnicki, Jacek; Maleszka, Romuald; Torbé, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Congenital candidiasis is a severe complication of candidal vulvovaginitis. It occurs in two forms,congenital mucocutaneous candidiasis and congenital systemic candidiasis. Also newborns are in age group the most vulnerable to invasive candidiasis. Congenital candidiasis should be considered as an interdisciplinary problem including maternal and fetal condition (including antibiotic therapy during pregnancy), birth age and rare genetic predispositions as severe combined immunodeficiency or neutrophil-specific granule deficiency. Environmental factors are no less important to investigate in diagnosing, treatment and prevention. External factors (e.g., food) and microenvironment of human organism (microflora of the mouth, intestine and genitalia) are important for solving clinical problems connected to congenital candidiasis. Physician knowledge about microorganisms in a specific compartments of the microenvironment of human organism and in the course of defined disorders of homeostasis makes it easier to predict the course of the disease and allows the development of procedures that can be extremely helpful in individualized diagnostic and therapeutic process.

  9. Congenital Malformations in River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarella, Sara; Ciotola, Francesca; D’Anza, Emanuele; Coletta, Angelo; Zicarelli, Luigi; Peretti, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Congenital malformations (due to genetic causes) represent a hidden danger for animal production, above all when genetic selection is undertaken for production improvements. These malformations are responsible for economic losses either because they reduce the productivity of the farm, or because their spread in the population would decrease the total productivity of that species/breed. River buffalo is a species of increasing interest all over the world for its production abilities, as proved by the buffalo genome project and the genetic selection plans that are currently performed in different countries. The aim of this review is to provide a general view of different models of congenital malformations in buffalo and their world distribution. This would be useful either for those who performed buffalo genetic selection or for researchers in genetic diseases, which would be an advantage to their studies with respect to the knowledge of gene mutations and interactions in this species. Abstract The world buffalo population is about 168 million, and it is still growing, in India, China, Brazil, and Italy. In these countries, buffalo genetic breeding programs have been performed for many decades. The occurrence of congenital malformations has caused a slowing of the genetic progress and economic loss for the breeders, due to the death of animals, or damage to their reproductive ability or failing of milk production. Moreover, they cause animal welfare reduction because they can imply foetal dystocia and because the affected animals have a reduced fitness with little chances of survival. This review depicts, in the river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) world population, the present status of the congenital malformations, due to genetic causes, to identify their frequency and distribution in order to develop genetic breeding plans able to improve the productive and reproductive performance, and avoid the spreading of detrimental gene variants. Congenital

  10. Developmental disorders of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaburda, Albert M; Duchaine, Bradley C

    2003-08-01

    This review of developmental disorders of vision focuses on only a few of the many disorders that disrupt visual development. Given the enormity of the human visual system in the primate brain and complexity of visual development, however, there are likely hundreds or thousands of types of disorders affecting high-level vision. The rapid progress seen in developmental dyslexia and WMS demonstrates the possibilities and difficulties inherent in researching such disorders, and the authors hope that similar progress will be made for congenital prosopagnosia and other disorders in the near future.

  11. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells, spherocytosis Blood cells References Gallagher PG. Red blood cell membrane disorders. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... chap 43. Klatt EC, Kumar V. Hematopathology of red blood cells and bleeding disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  12. Congenital Zika Virus Infection: Beyond Neonatal Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Adriana Suely de Oliveira; Aguiar, Renato Santana; Amorim, Melania Maria Ramos; Arruda, Monica B; Melo, Fabiana de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Suelem Taís Clementino; Batista, Alba Gean Medeiros; Ferreira, Thales; Dos Santos, Mayra Pereira; Sampaio, Virgínia Vilar; Moura, Sarah Rogéria Martins; Rabello, Luciana Portela; Gonzaga, Clarissa Emanuelle; Malinger, Gustavo; Ximenes, Renato; de Oliveira-Szejnfeld, Patricia Soares; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Chimelli, Leila; Silveira, Paola Paz; Delvechio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza; Campanati, Loraine; Nogueira, Rita M R; Filippis, Ana Maria Bispo; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Voloch, Carolina Moreira; Ferreira, Orlando C; Brindeiro, Rodrigo M; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have reported an increase in the number of fetuses and neonates with microcephaly whose mothers were infected with the Zika virus (ZIKV) during pregnancy. To our knowledge, most reports to date have focused on select aspects of the maternal or fetal infection and fetal effects. To describe the prenatal evolution and perinatal outcomes of 11 neonates who had developmental abnormalities and neurological damage associated with ZIKV infection in Brazil. We observed 11 infants with congenital ZIKV infection from gestation to 6 months in the state of Paraíba, Brazil. Ten of 11 women included in this study presented with symptoms of ZIKV infection during the first half of pregnancy, and all 11 had laboratory evidence of the infection in several tissues by serology or polymerase chain reaction. Brain damage was confirmed through intrauterine ultrasonography and was complemented by magnetic resonance imaging. Histopathological analysis was performed on the placenta and brain tissue from infants who died. The ZIKV genome was investigated in several tissues and sequenced for further phylogenetic analysis. Description of the major lesions caused by ZIKV congenital infection. Of the 11 infants, 7 (63.6%) were female, and the median (SD) maternal age at delivery was 25 (6) years. Three of 11 neonates died, giving a perinatal mortality rate of 27.3%. The median (SD) cephalic perimeter at birth was 31 (3) cm, a value lower than the limit to consider a microcephaly case. In all patients, neurological impairments were identified, including microcephaly, a reduction in cerebral volume, ventriculomegaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, lissencephaly with hydrocephalus, and fetal akinesia deformation sequence (ie, arthrogryposis). Results of limited testing for other causes of microcephaly, such as genetic disorders and viral and bacterial infections, were negative, and the ZIKV genome was found in both maternal and neonatal tissues (eg, amniotic fluid, cord blood, placenta, and

  13. A Dominant Mutation in the Gene Encoding the Erythroid Transcription Factor KLF1 Causes a Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, L.; Saison, C.; Helias, V.

    2010-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited red blood cell disorders whose hallmarks are ineffective erythropoiesis, hemolysis, and morphological abnormalities of erythroblasts in bone marrow We have identified a missense mutation in KLF1 of patients with a hitherto unclasified...

  14. A dominant mutation in the gene encoding the erythroid transcription factor KLF1 causes a congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnaud, Lionel; Saison, Carole; Helias, Virginie

    2010-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited red blood cell disorders whose hallmarks are ineffective erythropoiesis, hemolysis, and morphological abnormalities of erythroblasts in bone marrow. We have identified a missense mutation in KLF1 of patients with a hitherto unclassified...

  15. Congenital Goitre in Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Cheema, A. Shakoor and A. H. Shahzad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One full-term, dead foetus was successfully removed from a 5-year old, crossbred black and white goat. The goat was stall-fed with green fodder and it delivered two dead foetuses in the previous pregnancy. The foetus had a large swelling in the cranio-ventral neck region. Upon cutting skin, the swelling revealed extremely enlarged thyroid gland having two asymmetrical lobes with the right lobe was 8.10 x 15.0 cm and the left 5.5 x 8.6 cm in size. The skin was devoid of hair, pale-white and thickened with myxedema. Histologically, the enlarged thyroid consisted of colloid goitre and the lungs were oedematous. This case of congenital goitre was unusual and differed from the reported cases in two aspects viz 1 the two lobes were enlarged but unequal and 2 histologically goitre was colloid instead of usual hyperplastic type.

  16. Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osovsky, Micky [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Petach Tikvah (Israel); Rabin Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Schneider Children' s Medical Center of Israel, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikvah (Israel); Aizer-Danon, Anat; Horev, Gadi [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Petach Tikvah (Israel); Sirota, Lea [Schneider Pediatric Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Petach Tikvah (Israel)

    2007-01-15

    Nasal airway obstruction is a potentially life-threatening condition in the newborn. Neonates are obligatory nasal breathers. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior bony portion of the nasal airway, and a decrease in its cross-sectional area will significantly increase nasal airway resistance. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare, unusual form of nasal obstruction. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper airway compromise. It is important to differentiate this level of obstruction from the more common posterior choanal stenosis or atresia. CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclical cyanosis. (orig.)

  17. Congenital Amusia in Speakers of a Tone Language: Association with Lexical Tone Agnosia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Yun; Sun, Yanan; Peretz, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurogenetic disorder that affects the processing of musical pitch in speakers of non-tonal languages like English and French. We assessed whether this musical disorder exists among speakers of Mandarin Chinese who use pitch to alter the meaning of words. Using the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia, we tested 117…

  18. Congenital heart defects and medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehin, Connie; Ragsdale, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Radiologic technologists perform imaging studies that are useful in the diagnosis of congenital heart defects in infants and adults. These studies also help to monitor congenital heart defect repairs in adults. This article describes the development and functional anatomy of the heart, along with the epidemiology and anatomy of congenital heart defects. It also discusses the increasing population of adults who have congenital heart defects and the most effective modalities for diagnosing, evaluating, and monitoring congenital heart defects.

  19. Perpetual dilemma: Pleural or parenchymal/congenital or acquired solitary cystic lesion with fluid level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Deepak; Jha, Onkar; Sharma, Rahul Kumar; Saxena, Rajat

    2017-01-01

    Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformations (CCAMs) are rare congenital, nonhereditary developmental anomalies of the lung with unknown etiology. CCAM is predominantly a disorder of infancy with the majority of the cases being diagnosed within the first 2 years of life. When CCAM presents in adults, it represents a diagnostic dilemma and requires careful evaluation. We here report a case of large solitary congenital pulmonary cystic adenomatoid malformation with infection and hemorrhage, which was diagnosed as encysted hydropneumothorax on computerized tomography scans but turned out to be infected pulmonary cystic adenomatoid malformation after surgical excision.

  20. A Case of Congenital Syndromic Hydrocephalus: A Subtype of ‘Game-Friedman-Paradice Syndrome'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Jana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human hydrocephalus is a disorder of abnormality in CSF flow or resorption, which has been classified in pertinent literature as congenital and acquired. Congenital hydrocephalus can present as an isolated phenomenon which is common; or with associated anomalies affecting other organs, disturbing physiology or presenting as a syndrome. This report describes a case with congenital foetal hydrocephalus, hypoplastic lungs with super-numery lobations and large left lobe of liver compared to right. Thus far, a review of the literature indicates that this case can be postulated as a subtype of Game-Friedman-Paradice syndrome.

  1. Congenital combined eyelid imbrication and floppy eyelid syndrome: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivcharan Lal Chandravanshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital eyelid imbrication syndrome (CEIS is an extremely rare, benign, transient, self-limiting eyelid malposition disorder. The classic triad of signs in patients with a CEIS consists of bilateral upper eyelids overriding the lower eyelids when child was in sleep, bilateral medial and lateral canthal tendon laxity and tarsal conjunctival hyperemia. We report a third case of congenital combined eyelid imbrication and floppy eyelid syndrome in healthy neonate that was resolved within a week with conservative treatment.

  2. Identification of Changes along a Continuum of Speech Intonation is Impaired in Congenital Amusia

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchins, Sean; Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    A small number of individuals have severe musical problems that have neuro-genetic underpinnings. This musical disorder is termed “congenital amusia,” an umbrella term for lifelong musical disabilities that cannot be attributed to deafness, lack of exposure, or brain damage after birth. Amusics seem to lack the ability to detect fine pitch differences in tone sequences. However, differences between statements and questions, which vary in final pitch, are well perceived by most congenital amus...

  3. Identification of changes along a continuum of speech intonation is impaired in congenital amusia

    OpenAIRE

    Sean eHutchins; Nathalie eGosselin; Isabelle ePeretz

    2010-01-01

    A small number of individuals have severe musical problems that have neuro-genetic underpinnings. This musical disorder is termed congenital amusia, an umbrella term for lifelong musical disabilities that cannot be attributed to deafness, lack of exposure, or brain damage after birth. Amusics seem to lack the ability to detect fine pitch differences in tone sequences. However, differences between statements and questions, which vary in final pitch, are well perceived by most congenital amusic...

  4. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshith Chandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy.

  5. Congenital Mirror Movements in Gorlin Syndrome: A Case Report With DTI and Functional MRI Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Erdal; Gocmen, Rahsan; Yildiz, F Gokcem; Ozturk, Zeynelabidin; Temucin, Cagri; Teksam, Ozlem; Utine, Eda

    2016-03-01

    Congenital mirror movements are rare conditions that define the inability to perform unimanual movements. Gorlin syndrome, also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is a genetic disorder with multiple nevi predisposing to basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal malformations. Herein we report on an adolescent patient with Gorlin syndrome and coexisting congenital mirror movements. To our knowledge, this is the first patient in the literature who has both of these very rare conditions.

  6. Primary congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report with perinatal serial follow-up imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im; Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin Wook; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sang Joon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Seo, Jeong-Wook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea)

    2008-11-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms in neonates and infants are rare and are usually associated with infection, vasculitis, connective tissue disorder, or iatrogenic trauma such as umbilical catheterization. An idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm is the least common category and there are few descriptions of the imaging features. We present the antenatal and postnatal imaging findings of an idiopathic congenital abdominal aortic aneurysm including the findings on US, MRI and CT. (orig.)

  7. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart develops. Examples of Simple Congenital Heart Defects Holes in the Heart (Septal Defects) The septum is ... Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA NO FEAR ACT OIG CONTACT US National Institutes of Health ...

  8. CONGENITAL QUADRICUSPID AORTIC-VALVE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, MHJ; DEGRAAF, JJ; EBELS, T

    1993-01-01

    Two patients with a quadricuspid aortic valve are described, one of them with concomitant juxtaposed coronary orifices facing the right hand facing sinus. The etiology and incidence of this congenital anomaly will be discussed.

  9. A case of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Hashemipour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH, a rare disorder of steroid biosynthesis, is the most severe form of CAH. In this disorder the synthesis of glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids and sex steroids is impaired which result in adrenal failure, severe salt wasting crisis and hyperpigmentation in phenotypical female infants irrespective of genetic sex. In this report, we presented a 28-day-old phenotypic female infant, which referred with lethargy, failure to thrive and electrolyte abnormalities. Considering the clinical and biochemical findings, lipoid CAH was diagnosed and replacement therapy with standard doses of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid and sodium chloride was initiated. During follow-up, she had good clinical condition, but at 6 years of age, she refers with hypertension and adrenal insufficiency because of arbitrary drug discontinuation by mother. In ultrasonography an abdominal mass (the testicles was reported. Chromosome study showed 46XY pattern. Orchiectomy was performed. We recommended that in cases with clinical presentation of adrenal insufficiency if there is not the facility to determine the karyotype, repeated ultrasonography perform during follow-up. In addition, investigating the genetic bases of the disorder would help us to determine the pathogenesis of lipoid CAH in our community. It would be helpful in prenatal diagnosis and treatment of the disorder to prevent its related comorbidities.

  10. Clinical presentation and management of congenital ptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marenco M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Marco Marenco,1,* Ilaria Macchi,2,* Iacopo Macchi,3 Emilio Galassi,4 Mina Massaro-Giordano,5 Alessandro Lambiase1 1Department of Sense Organs, University of Rome “Sapienza”, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Campus Bio-Medico University of Rome, Rome, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University of Catania, Catania, 4Ophthalmic Clinic, Department of Ophthalmology, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila, Italy; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Congenital ptosis is a rare condition characterized by lower positioning of the upper eyelid that is present at birth and is a clinical condition that is persistent if not treated. It may be unilateral or bilateral and may be associated with other ocular disorders or systemic conditions, including Marcus Gunn, Horner, and Duane syndromes. It is a benign condition but causes functional, cosmetic, and psychological problems in children. However, not all patients need to undergo surgery, and usually only patients at risk of amblyopia need a prompt surgical correction, while in other cases, surgery can be postponed. The grade of ptosis, the eyelid function, and the amblyopic risk are the parameters that affect the ophthalmologist’s decision on timing of surgery and the surgical technique to be used. In fact, there are several types of surgical techniques to correct a congenital ptosis, although very often more than one is needed to obtain an acceptable result. This paper reviews the causes of congenital ptosis and associated diseases. Particular emphasis is given to surgical management and different procedures available to correct the upper eyelid anomaly and avoid permanent damage to visual function. Keywords: ptosis, extraocular muscle development, neurologic dysfunction, surgical approach

  11. Assessing the influence of consanguinity on congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan H Bittles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous articles have been published linking consanguineous marriage to an elevated prevalence of congenital heart disease, with ventricular septal defects and atrial septal defects the most commonly cited disorders. While initially persuasive, on closer examination many of these studies have fundamental shortcomings in their design and in the recruitment of study subjects and controls. Improved matching of cases and controls, to include recognition of the long-established community boundaries within which most marriages are contracted, and the assessment of consanguinity within specific levels and types of marital union would improve and help to focus the study outcomes. At the same time, major discrepancies between studies in their reported prevalence and types of congenital heart disease suggest an urgent need for greater standardization in the classification and reporting of these disorders.

  12. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  13. [Congenital galactosaemia: an unusual presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, M O; Laporte-Turpin, E; Alberge, C; Fournie-Gardini, E; Castex, M P; Rolland, M; Brivet, M; Broue, P

    2005-02-01

    Congenital galactosaemia reveals usually in the second and third weeks of life with a severe liver dysfunction. We report on a case of congenital galactosaemia with, on the one hand, an early onset liver failure, without any free interval, and on the other hand, an hemophagocytic syndrome as a severe secondary outbreak with pulmonary haemorrhage. Appropriate diet led to normalisation of liver function. Hemophagocytosis, probably linked to an associated Klebsiella Pneumoniae sepsis, had a favourable outcome after antibiotic and corticosteroid therapy.

  14. Congenital and perinatal cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Soo Kim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is currently the most common agent of congenital infection and the leading infectious cause of brain damage and hearing loss in children. Symptomatic congenital CMV infections usually result from maternal primary infection during early pregnancy. One half of symptomatic infants have cytomegalic inclusion disease (CID, which is characterized by involvement of multiple organs, in particular, the reticuloendothelial and central nervous system (CNS. Moreover, such involvement may or may not include ocular and auditory damage. Approximately 90% of infants with congenital infection are asymptomatic at birth. Preterm infants with perinatal CMV infection can have symptomatic diseases such as pneumonia, hepatitis, and thrombocytopenia. Microcephaly and abnormal neuroradiologic imaging are associated with a poor prognosis. Hearing loss may occur in both symptomatic and asymptomatic infants with congenital infection and may progress through childhood. Congenital infection is defined by the isolation of CMV from infants within the first 3 weeks of life. Ganciclovir therapy can be considered for infants with symptomatic congenital CMV infection involving the CNS. Pregnant women of seronegative state should be counseled on the importance of good hand washing and other control measures to prevent CMV infection. Heat treatment of infected breast milk at 72?#608;for 5 seconds can eliminate CMV completely.

  15. Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula in adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Shi Zhang; Nai-Kang Zhou; Chang-Hai Yu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and surgical treatment of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae in adults. METHODS: Eleven adult cases of congenital bronchoesophageal fistula diagnosed and treated in our hospital between May 1990 and August 2010 were reviewed. Its clinical presentations, diagnostic methods, anatomic type, treatment, and follow-up were recorded. RESULTS: Of the chief clinical presentations, nonspecific cough and sputum were found in 10 (90.9%), recurrent bouts of cough after drinking liquid food in 6 (54.6%), hemoptysis in 6 (54.6%), low fever in 4 (36.4%), and chest pain in 3 (27.3%) of the 11 cases, respectively. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis ranged 5-36.5 years. The diagnosis of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae was established in 9 patients by barium esophagography, in 1 patient by esophagoscopy and in 1 patient by bronchoscopy, respectively. The congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae communicated with a segmental bronchus, a main bronchus, and an intermediate bronchus in 8, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. The treatment of congenital bronchoesophageal fistulae involved excision of the fistula in 10 patients or division and suturing in 1 patient. The associated lung lesion was removed in all patients. No long-term sequelae were found during the postoperative follow-up except in 1 patient with bronchial fistula who accepted reoperation before recovery. CONCLUSION: Congenital bronchoesophageal fistula is rare in adults. Its most useful diagnostic method is esophagography. It must be treated surgically as soon as the diagnosis is established.

  16. Imprinting disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Perez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Maher, Eamonn R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital imprinting disorders (IDs) are characterised by molecular changes affecting imprinted chromosomal regions and genes, i.e. genes that are expressed in a parent-of-origin specific manner. Recent years have seen a great expansion in the range of alterations in regulation, dosage or DNA...... impacts upon growth, development and metabolism. Thus, detailed and systematic analysis of IDs can not only identify unifying principles of molecular epigenetics in health and disease, but also support personalisation of diagnosis and management for individual patients and families....

  17. Practical stepwise approach to rhythm disturbances in congenital heart diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, June

    2010-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart diseases (CHD) are confronted with early- and late-onset complications, such as conduction disorders, arrhythmias, myocardial dysfunction, altered coronary flow, and ischemia, throughout their lifetime despite successful hemodynamic and/or anatomical correction. Rhythm disturbance is a well-known and increasingly frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CHD. Predisposing factors to rhythm disturbances include underlying cardiac defects, hemodyn...

  18. Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face with hemimegalencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, O; Yildirim, T; Seyhan, T; Erbay, G; Erol, I

    2009-06-01

    Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CILF) is a rare disorder, causing unilateral facial asymmetry characterized by enlargement of the cheek or chin. Hemimegalencephaly is a unique malformation characterized by enlargement of a cerebral hemisphere. The association of CILF and hemimegalencephaly has rarely been reported. We present a case of unilateral facial swelling in a 1.5-year-old boy in whom magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed CILF associated with unilateral megalencephaly.

  19. ACTN1 mutations cause congenital macrothrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishima, Shinji; Okuno, Yusuke; Yoshida, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Sanada, Masashi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyazaki, Koji; Sakai, Michio; Ohtake, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Iguchi, Akihiro; Niimi, Gen; Otsu, Makoto; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Seiji; Ogawa, Seishi

    2013-03-01

    Congenital macrothrombocytopenia (CMTP) is a heterogeneous group of rare platelet disorders characterized by a congenital reduction of platelet counts and abnormally large platelets, for which CMTP-causing mutations are only found in approximately half the cases. We herein performed whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing to identify mutations that cause CMTP, in which a dominant mode of transmission had been suspected but for which no known responsible mutations have been documented. In 13 Japanese CMTP-affected pedigrees, we identified six (46%) affected by ACTN1 variants cosegregating with CMTP. In the entire cohort, ACNT1 variants accounted for 5.5% of the dominant forms of CMTP cases and represented the fourth most common cause in Japanese individuals. Individuals with ACTN1 variants presented with moderate macrothrombocytopenia with anisocytosis but were either asymptomatic or had only a modest bleeding tendency. ACTN1 encodes α-actinin-1, a member of the actin-crosslinking protein superfamily that participates in the organization of the cytoskeleton. In vitro transfection experiments in Chinese hamster ovary cells demonstrated that altered α-actinin-1 disrupted the normal actin-based cytoskeletal structure. Moreover, transduction of mouse fetal liver-derived megakaryocytes with disease-associated ACTN1 variants caused a disorganized actin-based cytoskeleton in megakaryocytes, resulting in the production of abnormally large proplatelet tips, which were reduced in number. Our findings provide an insight into the pathogenesis of CMTP.

  20. Congenital fiber type disproportion--30 years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Nigel F; North, Kathryn N

    2003-10-01

    Thirty years ago, M. H. Brooke coined the term "congenital fiber type disproportion" (CFTD) to describe 12 children who had clinical features of a congenital myopathy and relative type 1 fiber hypotrophy on muscle biopsy. It is now clear that this histological pattern can accompany a wide range of neurological disorders, leading to disillusionment with CFTD as a distinct nosological entity. To determine whether the CFTD has clinical utility as a diagnostic entity, we have reviewed the literature for cases of type 1 fiber hypotrophy and have used strict exclusion criteria to identify 67 cases of CFTD. Most patients presented at birth with weakness and hypotonia, had normal intelligence, and followed a static or improving clinical course. In 43% of families, more than 1 individual was affected. Failure to thrive was common and 25% of patients had contractures or spinal deformities. Bulbar weakness and ophthalmoplegia were less common and cardiac involvement was rare. Twenty-five percent followed a severe course and 10% had died at the time of reporting, all from respiratory failure. Ophthalmoplegia and facial and bulbar weakness were significantly associated with a poorer prognosis. The relatively homogeneous phenotype supports the retention of CFTD as a distinct diagnostic entity and familial occurrence suggests a genetic basis. Regarding the diagnosis of CFTD, we found no strong evidence that the minimum difference between type 1 and type 2 fiber sizes should be increased from 12% to 25%. We also list the other reported causes of relative type 1 fiber hypotrophy to aid their exclusion from CFTD.

  1. Emerging cellular and gene therapies for congenital anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Leif S; Khajuria, Rajiv K; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-12-01

    Congenital anemias comprise a group of blood disorders characterized by a reduction in the number of peripherally circulating erythrocytes. Various genetic etiologies have been identified that affect diverse aspects of erythroid physiology and broadly fall into two main categories: impaired production or increased destruction of mature erythrocytes. Current therapies are largely focused on symptomatic treatment and are often based on transfusion of donor-derived erythrocytes and management of complications. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative option currently available for the majority of congenital anemias. Recent advances in gene therapy and genome editing hold promise for the development of additional curative strategies for these blood disorders. The relative ease of access to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment, as well as the possibility of genetic manipulation ex vivo and subsequent transplantation in an autologous manner, make blood disorders among the most amenable to cellular therapies. Here we review cell-based and gene therapy approaches, and discuss the limitations and prospects of emerging avenues, including genome editing tools and the use of pluripotent stem cells, for the treatment of congenital forms of anemia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. 78 FR 955 - Secretary's Advisory Committee on Heritable Disorders in Newborns and Children; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-07

    ... screening for Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD) and Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorder (SCID.... Individuals who are associated with groups or have ] similar interests may be requested to combine...

  3. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  4. Congenital parotid fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiggaon Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parotid fistula is a cause of great distress and embarrassment to the patient. Parotid fistula is most commonly a post-traumatic situation. Congenital parotid salivary fistulas are unusual entities that can arise from accessory parotid glands or even more infrequently, from normal parotid glands through an aberrant Stensen′s duct. The treatment of fistulous tract is usually surgical and can be successfully excised after making a skin incision along the skin tension line around the fistula opening. This report describes a case of right accessory parotid gland fistula of a 4-year-old boy with discharge of pus from right cheek. Computed tomography (CT fistulography and CT sialography demonstrated fistulous tract arising from accessory parotid gland. Both CT fistulography and CT sialography are very helpful in the diagnosis and surgical planning. In this case, superficial parotidectomy is the treatment of choice. A detailed history, clinical and functional examination, proper salivary gland investigations facilitates in correct diagnosis followed by immediate surgical intervention helps us to restore physical, psychological health of the child patient.

  5. Congenital hypothyroidism in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneela Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Congenital hypothyroidism (CH is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation in children and it occurs in approximately 1:2,000-1:4,000 newborns. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of CH in neonates. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional study was conducted in neonatal units of the Department of Pediatrics Unit-I, King Edward Medical University/Mayo Hospital, Lahore and Lady Willington Hospital Lahore in 6 months (January-June 2011. Materials and Methods: Sample was collected by non-probability purposive sampling. After consent, 550 newborn were registered for the study. Demographic data and relevant history was recorded. After aseptic measures, 2-3 ml venous blood analyzed for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH level by immunoradiometric assay. Treatment was started according to the individual merit as per protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Data was analyzed by SPSS 17 and Chi-square test was applied to find out the association of CH with different variables. Results: The study population consisted of 550 newborns. Among 550 newborns, 4 (0.8% newborns had elevated TSH level. CH had statistically significant association with mother′s hypothyroidism (P value 0.000 and mother′s drug intake during the pregnancy period (P value 0.013. Conclusion: CH is 0.8% in neonates. It has statistically significant association with mother′s hypothyroidism and mother′s drug intake during pregnancy.

  6. Congenital hyperthyroidism: autopsy report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima Marcus Aurelho de

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the autopsy of a stillborn fetus with congenital hyperthyroidism born to a mother with untreated Graves' disease, whose cause of death was congestive heart failure. The major findings concerned the skull, thyroid, heart, and placenta. The cranial sutures were closed, with overlapping skull bones. The thyroid was increased in volume and had intense blood congestion. Histological examination showed hyperactive follicles. The heart was enlarged and softened, with dilated cavities and hemorrhagic suffusions in the epicardium. The placenta had infarctions that involved at least 20% of its surface, and the vessels of the umbilical cord were fully exposed due to a decrease in Wharton 's jelly. Hyperthyroidism was confirmed by the maternal clinical data, the fetal findings of exophthalmia, craniosynostosis, and goiter with signs of follicular hyperactivity. Craniosynostosis is caused by the anabolic action of thyroid hormones in bone formation during the initial stages of development. The delayed initiation of treatment in the present case contributed to the severity of fetal hyperthyroidism and consequent fetal death.

  7. Congenital Short QT Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Antzelevitch

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Long QT intervals in the ECG have long been associated with sudden cardiac death. The congenital long QT syndrome was first described in individuals with structurally normal hearts in 1957.1 Little was known about the significance of a short QT interval. In 1993, after analyzing 6693 consecutive Holter recordings Algra et al concluded that an increased risk of sudden death was present not only in patients with long QT interval, but also in patients with short QT interval (<400 ms.2 Because this was a retrospective analysis, further evaluation of the data was not possible. It was not until 2000 that a short-QT syndrome (SQTS was proposed as a new inherited clinical syndrome by Gussak et al.3 The initial report was of two siblings and their mother all of whom displayed persistently short QT interval. The youngest was a 17 year old female presenting with several episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation requiring electrical cardioversion.3 Her QT interval measured 280 msec at a heart rate of 69. Her 21 year old brother displayed a QT interval of 272 msec at a heart rate of 58, whereas the 51 year old mother showed a QT of 260 msec at a heart rate of 74. The authors also noted similar ECG findings in another unrelated 37 year old patient associated with sudden cardiac death.

  8. Congenital Progressive Mutilating Hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Chokoeva

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old male patient was admitted with symptoms of decompensated cardiac and pulmonary insufficiency with long-lasting history. A tumor-like formation was observed within the clinical examination, covering the whole skin of the nose, paranasal region of the left part of the face, as well as the upper and lower left eyelids. The lesion was with yellow to brownish surface and dark-reddish to violet discolored peripheral area, composed of nodular formations, smooth central surface and firm texture on palpation. The histopathological examination verified the diagnosis of hemangioma, which had been congenital, regarding the patient’s history, treated surgically about 50 years ago, with signs of recurrence. The presented patient had been treated surgically at the age of 20, without medical evidence of the type of the performed excision. The recurrence occurs almost 50 years later, at the age of 78. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported recurrence of infantile hemangioma, treated surgically almost 50 years ago.

  9. [Congenital cataract: general review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, O; Beby, F; Orssaud, C; Dupont Monod, S; Dufier, J L

    2006-04-01

    Cataract is a loss of lens transparency because of a protein alteration. Etiopathogenesis is poorly understood but new mutations of different developmental genes involved are found in 25% of cases. Frequency of onset, particularly when different ocular development anomalies occur, is related to the lens induction phenomena on the eye's anterior segment structure during embryologic development. Genetic transmission is often found on the dominant autosomal mode. Diagnosis is based on a complete and detailed examination of the eye, often with general anaesthesia. This condition predisposes children to later, sometimes serious amblyopia. Different clinical aspects can be observed: from cataract with ocular and/or systemic anomalies to polymalformative syndrome, skeletal, dermatological, neurological, metabolic, and genetic or chromosomal diseases. A general systematic pediatric examination is necessary. Congenital cataract requires first and foremost early diagnosis and a search for all etiologies. Surgical treatment is adapted case by case but it has progressed with the quality of today's intraocular lenses even if systematic implantation continues to be debated. Life-long monitoring is absolutely necessary.

  10. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  11. Congenital Fibrosis of the Extraocular Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla Niyaz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM is a rare disorder characterized by hereditary non-progressive restrictive strabismus and blepharoptosis. Although most of the cases are bilateral and isolated, some patients may have systemic findings. CFEOM is divided into three groups as CFEOM 1, 2, and 3 according to the phenotype. Primary responsible genes are KIF21A for CFEOM type 1 and 3 and PHOX2A/ARIX gene for CFEOM type 2. Studies suggest that abnormal innervation of the extraocular muscles is the cause of muscle fibrosis. Early treatment is important because of the risk of amblyopia. Surgery is the primary treatment option for strabismus and blepharoptosis. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 312-5

  12. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Treatment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Feki, Mouna Mnif; Sfar, Mohamed Habib; Abid, Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders where there is impairment of cortisol biosynthesis. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95% of cases and shows a wide range of clinical severity. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapies are the mainstays of treatment of CAH. The optimal treatment for adults with CAH continues to be a challenge. Important long-term health issues for adults with CAH affect both men and women. These issues may either be due to the disease or to steroid treatment and may affect final height, fertility, cardiometabolic risk, bone metabolism, neuro-cognitive development and the quality-of-life. Patients with CAH should be regularly followed-up from childhood to adulthood by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH. Optimal replacement therapy, close clinical and laboratory monitoring, early life-style interventions, early and regular fertility assessment and continuous psychological management are needed to improve outcome.

  13. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Treatment and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Kamoun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders where there is impairment of cortisol biosynthesis. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95% of cases and shows a wide range of clinical severity. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapies are the mainstays of treatment of CAH. The optimal treatment for adults with CAH continues to be a challenge. Important long-term health issues for adults with CAH affect both men and women. These issues may either be due to the disease or to steroid treatment and may affect final height, fertility, cardiometabolic risk, bone metabolism, neuro-cognitive development and the quality-of-life. Patients with CAH should be regularly followed-up from childhood to adulthood by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH. Optimal replacement therapy, close clinical and laboratory monitoring, early life-style interventions, early and regular fertility assessment and continuous psychological management are needed to improve outcome.

  14. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria with undescended testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys. The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting.

  15. Congenital Erythropoietic Porphyria with Undescended Testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sandeep; Harith, Arun Kumar; Sodhi, Neha

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders of heme biosynthesis pathway that are characterized by acute neurovisceral symptoms, skin lesions, or both. Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an extremely rare disease with a mutation in the gene that codes for uroporphyrinogen III synthase leading to accumulation of porphyrin in different tissues and marked cutaneous photosensitivity. We report a case of CEP with infancy onset blistering, photosensitivity, red colored urine, and teeth along with scarring. Examination revealed an undescended testis of the left side. Mutation analysis revealed mutation in the uroporphyrinogen III synthase gene (UROS) resulting in c. 56 A > G (Tyr19Cys). The presence of undescended testis with a rare mutation in a case of CEP which itself is an extremely rare condition make the case interesting.

  16. Abnormal electrical brain responses to pitch in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Brattico, Elvira; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2005-09-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong disability that prevents afflicted individuals from enjoying music as ordinary people do. The deficit is limited to music and cannot be explained by prior brain lesion, hearing loss, or any cognitive or socio-affective disturbance. Recent behavioral results suggest that this disorder is critically dependent on fine-grained pitch discrimination. Here, we present novel electrophysiological evidence that this disorder can be traced down to a right-lateralized N2-P3 response elicited by pitch changes. This abnormal brain response begins as early as 200 milliseconds after tone onset and may serve as a marker of an anomaly in music acquisition.

  17. Congenital Scoliosis (Mini-review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis is a lateral deformity of the spine with a disturbance of the sagittal profile caused by malformations of vertebra and ribs. Typically, early surgical intervention is the suggested treatment (before three-years-old) for young patients with congenital scoliosis. While a previous study was conducted in 2011 to investigate long-term studies supporting the necessity for this recommendation and no evidence was found, this current review, is an updated search for evidence published from 2011 through March 2015. This also failed to find any prospective or randomized controlled studies to support the hypothesis that spinal fusion surgery in patients with congenital scoliosis should be considered as evidence-based treatment. Contradictory results exist on the safety of hemivertebra resection and segmental fusion using pedicle screw fixation. When using the VEPTR (vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib) device, studies show a high rate of complications exist. It is difficult to predict the final outcome for patients with congenital scoliosis. However, it is possible that many patients with congenital scoliosis may be able to avoid spinal surgery with the application of advanced bracing technology. Therefore, it is only prudent to advocate for conservative management first before spinal surgery is considered.

  18. Congenital segmental spinal muscular atrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaş, Tülin; Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies are genetic disorders in which anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor nuclei of the brainstem are progressively lost. We present a patient with arthrogryposis due to congenital spinal muscular atrophy predominantly affecting the upper limbs. Spinal muscular atrophies with onset at birth may be a cause of arthrogryposis. Localized forms of neurogenic arthrogryposis have been divided into cervical and caudal forms. Our case is similar to the cases described by Hageman et al (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1993;56:365-368): severe symmetric lower motor neuron deficit in the upper extremities at the time of birth, no history of injury to the cervical spinal cord or the brachial plexus during delivery, and severe muscle wasting suggesting chronic denervation in utero. Because there was improvement of our patient's situation, her disease was also possibly nonprogressive and sporadic. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Turkish patient with congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy affecting predominantly the upper limbs is a relatively rare form of motor neuron disease and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants with congenital contractures and severe muscle weakness by wasting mainly confined to the upper limbs.

  19. Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis: An Uncommon Cause of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Azarfar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis (CHF is a rare disease that affects both the liver and kidneys.  Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF is an autosomal recessive inherited malformation defined pathologically by a variable degree of periportal fibrosis and irregularly shaped proliferating bile ducts. Affected individuals also have impaired renal function, usually caused, in children and teenagers, by an autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD. Impaired renal function associated with CHF in adults is caused by an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Case presentation: We report the case of a 8-year-old Iranian girlwas admitted to our hospital for evaluation ofrenal failure. In patient hepatomegaly was noted incidentally on a routine physical examination and then kidney biopsy showed global sclerosis and   A liver biopsy revealed proliferation of collagen fibres surrounding the portal area, a finding that was compatible with congenital hepatic fibrosisand our patient was scheduled for kidney and  liver transplantation. Conclusion: The relationship of ARPKD to CHF is the subject of substantial controversy. Some clinicians suggest that the two conditions represent one disorder with a range of clinical/pathological presentations Key word: Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis Polycystic Kidney Disease, CRF.

  20. Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Ivan K; Shearer, William T

    2015-11-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency disorders represent pediatric emergencies due to absence of adaptive immune responses to infections. The conditions result from either intrinsic defects in T-cell development (ie, severe combined immunodeficiency disease [SCID]) or congenital athymia (eg, complete DiGeorge anomaly). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant provides the only clinically approved cure for SCID, although gene therapy research trials are showing significant promise. For greatest survival, patients should undergo transplant before 3.5 months of age and before the onset of infections. Newborn screening programs have yielded successful early identification and treatment of infants with SCID and congenital athymia in the United States.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: congenital leptin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity? National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Active at Any Size! Educational Resources (6 links) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Obesity and Genetics MalaCards: congenital leptin deficiency Orphanet: Obesity due to congenital leptin deficiency ...

  2. Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Five Facts about Congenital Heart Defects Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Congenital heart defects are the most common types of birth defects. ...

  3. Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Genetic Counseling for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 ... with congenital heart disease considers having children. Genetic counseling can help answer these questions and address your ...

  4. ROLE OF ULTRASOUND IN THYROID DISORDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Janani Parkkunam; Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonography has established itself has a useful tool in evaluating and managing thyroid disorders. This article provides an overview of basic principles of ultrasound, how it is used in different thyroid disorders, different sonographic pattern of thyroid disorders, comparative features of malignant and benign nodule, ultrasound features of diffuse thyroid disorders and congenital thyroid disorders, ultrasound guided FNAC, advanced techniques of ultrasound in thyroid imaging.

  5. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  6. Paternal transmission of congenital myotonic dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bergoffen, J; Kant, J.; Sladky, J; McDonald-McGinn, D; Zackai, E H; Fischbeck, K H

    1994-01-01

    The congenital form of myotonic dystrophy is reported to be almost exclusively, if not exclusively, maternally transmitted. We present a case of congenital myotonic dystrophy which was inherited from a mildly affected father. This family illustrates that the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy can occur without intrauterine or other maternal factors related to the disease. The possibility of paternal transmission of the congenital form of myotonic dystrophy could be considered when counsell...

  7. A novel CYP1B1 mutation with congenital glaucoma and total aniridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzuhairy, Sultan; Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Al-Shahwan, Sami; Edward, Deepak P

    2015-03-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma is a common disorder in the Middle East mainly caused by mutations in the the CYP1Bl gene. We report a family with three siblings that presented with recalcitrant childhood glaucoma, aniridia in two siblings with a novel CYP1B1 gene mutation. Review of pedigree, clinical history and clinical course of the family. Genetic testing in the affected family members. Three sisters presented with clinical findings of severe congenital glaucoma and a positive family history. Clinical examination of two of sisters revealed corneal scarring, bilateral aniridia with severe glaucoma that required multiple surgical procedures to control intraocular pressure. The third sibling presented with garden-variety primary congenital glaucoma. Genetic analysis revealed a novel CYP1B1 gene mutation (g.8291 C > T; p.S485F). CYP1B1 mutation related congenital glaucoma can present with an extreme form of anterior segment dysgenesis that includes recalcitrant glaucoma, corneal opacification and aniridia.

  8. CONGENITAL COMPLETE HEART BLOCK IN DOWN SYNDROME: A RARE CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwanath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome ( T risomy 21 is the commonest disorder among chromosomal anomalies having incidence of 1:650 – 1:1000 live births. [1] The clinical manifestations of Down syndrome are numerous and can present in any body system. Down association of congenital heart disease is well known. Among all cases of congenital heart diseases, 4% - 10% are with Down syndrome, and 40% - 60% of Down syndrome patients have congenital heart disease. The most common congenital cardiac anomaly in Down syndrome is Atrioventricular septal defects, followed by patent ductus arteriosus and atrial septal defects. Oth er forms of complex heart disease can occur including overriding aorta and Tetralogy of fallot. [2] The pure Conduction defect are very rare to have association with the Down syndrome and is not reported in infancy so far.

  9. Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Congenital Heart Defects? Many congenital heart defects cause few or no signs and symptoms. A ... lips, and fingernails) Fatigue (tiredness) Poor blood circulation Congenital heart defects don't cause chest pain or other painful ...

  10. Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Care and Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Oct 26,2015 Not all people with ... supports you in your pursuit of heart health. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The Impact of ...

  11. [Congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero Candau, R; Garrido Morales, M

    2007-04-01

    We report a new case of congenital lumbar hernia. This is first case reported of congenital lumbar hernia and bilateral renal agenesis. We review literature and describe associated malformations reported that would be role out in every case of congenital lumbar hernia.

  12. Schinzel-Giedion syndrome and congenital megacalyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, T E; Sweetser, D A; McAlister, W H; Dowton, S B

    1993-01-01

    The Schinzel-Giedion syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive condition with typical facies, skeletal manifestations and congenital hydronephrosis. We report an infant with characteristic findings who had bilateral congenital megacalyces. Congenital megacalyces is believed to be a developmental abnormality, occurs in other malformation syndromes and has not previously been described in the Schinzel-Giedion syndrome.

  13. MRI of congenital urethroperineal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadimi-Mahani, Maryam; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Pai, Deepa; DiPietro, Michael [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Section of Pediatric Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Park, John [C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Urology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present the MRI features of a congenital urethroperineal fistula diagnosed in a 12-year-old boy being evaluated after a single urinary tract infection. This diagnosis was initially suggested by voiding cystourethrogram and confirmed by MRI. Imaging revealed an abnormal fluid-filled tract arising from the posterior urethra and tracking to the perineal skin surface that increased in size during micturition. Surgical resection and histopathological evaluation of the abnormal tract confirmed the diagnosis of congenital urethroperineal fistula. MRI played important roles in confirming the diagnosis and assisting surgical planning. (orig.)

  14. Congenital syphilis surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Marangoni

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Congenital syphilis (CS is mainly a consequence of the lack of antenatal care and control of sexually transmitted infections.The bedrock of the prevention of CS is syphilis diagnosis by serological screening during pregnancy.Current Italian guidelines suggest that all the pregnant women should be tested in the first trimester. Due to the frequently absence of specific signs of infection at birth, laboratory tests are often the only method for a correct CS diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Treponema pallidum IgM Western Blot (WB and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF as an aid in the diagnosis of CS during a prospective surveillance study carried out at St. Orsola Hospital in Bologna, Italy, from November 2000 through June 2010. All pregnant women during pregnancy and at delivery were screened for syphilis by ARCHITECT® Syphilis TP, Abbott. Positive samples were further analysed by Treponema Pallidum Hemagglutination Test (TPHA and Rapid Plasma Reagin (RPR tests, Radim.An in-house Western Blot (WB was also performed. Infants born to syphilis seropositive mothers were enrolled in a prospective follow up. At birth, tests were performed (including IgM WB. Infants with positive RPR tests at birth born to mothers not adequately treated received also a long bone radiograph as well as a complete CSF analysis, including Veneral Disease Research Laboratori (VDRL (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics and PCR testing. All seroreactive infants received careful follow up examinations and serological testing at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 months or until the tests became negative. In this study, positive syphilis serology was noted in 151 pregnant women delivering in our hospital. Fifteen women had never been adequately treated, and 9 out 15 gave birth to infected newborns.All these 9 infants had positive IgM WB results on serum samples. Two babies had characteristic long bone lesions at X-ray examination and 3 were born

  15. Congenital anomalies in Primorsky region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, P; Voronin, S; Golokhvast, K

    2015-01-01

    According to WHO hereditary diseases and congenital malformations contribute significantly to the health of population. Thus, the problems of epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of congenital abnormalities are of interest for many researchers [2]. In addition, the dynamic accounting for the incidence of congenital malformations and hereditary diseases allows the researchers to assess the ecological situation in the region [1]. The occurrence of congenital anomalies in the world varies; it depends heavily on how carefully the data is collected [4]. Multifactorial or polygenic diseases develop under the influence of environmental factors in the presence of defective genes. They can constitute up to 90% of all chronic pathology [2-5]. To determine the incidence of congenital anomalies under the influence of environmental factors. The study used the methodology of system evaluation of congenital anomalies incidence in Primorsky region, depending on bio-climatic and environmental conditions. The authors used health statistics for the period from 2000 to 2014, F.12 class for congenital abnormalities in adolescents and children that were compared in geographical and temporal aspects with environmental factors of 33 settlements in Primorsky region. The environment is represented by nature and climate (6 factor modules) and sanitation (7 factor modules) blocks of factors. When formalizing the information database of the environment a specially developed 10-point assessment scale was used. Statistical processing of the information was carried out using Pearson's chi-squared test and multiple regression method from SSPS application program package. The study found that over the 15-year period the level of congenital abnormalities in children increased by 27.5% and in adolescents - by 35.1%, and in 2014 it amounted to 1687.6 and 839.3 per 100 000 people, respectively. The predictive model shows a steady further growth of this pathology. The incidence

  16. Covert face recognition relies on affective valence in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Sarah; Haslam, Catherine; Jansari, Ashok; Hodgson, Timothy L

    2009-06-01

    Dominant accounts of covert recognition in prosopagnosia assume subthreshold activation of face representations created prior to onset of the disorder. Yet, such accounts cannot explain covert recognition in congenital prosopagnosia, where the impairment is present from birth. Alternatively, covert recognition may rely on affective valence, yet no study has explored this possibility. The current study addressed this issue in 3 individuals with congenital prosopagnosia, using measures of the scanpath to indicate recognition. Participants were asked to memorize 30 faces paired with descriptions of aggressive, nice, or neutral behaviours. In a later recognition test, eye movements were monitored while participants discriminated studied from novel faces. Sampling was reduced for studied--nice compared to studied--aggressive faces, and performance for studied--neutral and novel faces fell between these two conditions. This pattern of findings suggests that (a) positive emotion can facilitate processing in prosopagnosia, and (b) covert recognition may rely on emotional valence rather than familiarity.

  17. Temporary diazepam responsive apneic attacks and congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yis, Uluç; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Oztura, Ibrahim; Ozden, Omer; Akinci, Gülçin; Dirik, Eray

    2009-07-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular junction. Mutations in the gene encoding choline acetyltransferase cause presynaptic defects. The missense mutation I336T has been identified in Turkish population, and most of the cases carrying this mutation present with exercise-induced fatigability and ptosis. Although apneic attacks occur in these cases during febrile illness in childhood, the number of reported respiratory distress episodes during infancy is scarce. Another important feature of these cases is that response to esterase inhibitors is satisfactory. We present a case of congenital myasthenic syndrome with I336T choline acetyltransferase mutation who presented with numerous attacks of respiratory distress in the infancy period. Interestingly, the patient had myopathic findings on electromyography and diazepam decreased severity of apneic attacks. There was also no improvement with esterase inhibitors.

  18. Evaluation of congenital dysautonomia other than Riley-Day syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, E; Ferrer, T; Pérez-Conde, C; López-Terradas, J M; Pérez-Jiménez, A; Ramos, M J

    1996-02-01

    We report on four children, from different families, who suffer from a congenital autonomic disorder, presumably inherited. Three of them have a sensory neuropathy but do not fit any described hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy. All four were examined along with some of their immediate family members. We assessed the cardiovagal, sympathetic adrenergic and sympathetic cholinergic functions with a battery of non-invasive tests. Results demonstrated that sudomotor and cardiovascular orthostatic regulation exhibited the greatest abnormalities, pointing to a predominant impairment of sympathetic components, both cholinergic and adrenergic. The overall examination showed a heterogeneous group of congenital dysautonomia, exclusive of Riley-Day or other recognized hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies. We emphasize the importance of studying whole family groups to diagnose subclinical impairment and to provide correct genetic counselling.

  19. [Dysphonia in children due to congenital laryngeal web. Case series].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Hugo; Cuestas, Giselle; Zanetta, Adrián

    2013-01-01

    Dysphonia is common in children. Its main cause is the abuse or misuse of the voice. Congenital, neoplastic, infectious, neurological or iatrogenic causes are less frequent. The laryngeal web is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from an incomplete recanalization of the primitive larynx. This condition should be suspected in any newborn with dysphonic cry with or without stridor and respiratory distress. The diagnosis is confirmed by endoscopic examination. Therapy depends on the extent and thickness of the membrane and the severity of the symptoms. We describe our experience with 8 patients suffering this condition, and we emphasize the need to recognize voice disorders and to evaluate the airway for accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment in every newborn, infant or child with persistent dysphonia.

  20. [SD-OCT contribution in congenital achromatopsia diagnosis (6 patients)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largueche, L; Chebil, A; Bouladi, M; Bouraoui, R; Kort, F; Charfi, H; El Matri, L

    2014-04-01

    Achromatopsia (ACH) is a congenital autosomal recessive cone disorder. The puspose is to describe particular SD-OCT macular images in ACH. The study included 6 patients from 3 consanguineous Tunisian families with congenital nystagmus and amblyopia with ACH. All patients had clinical examination with fundus photography, autofluorescence, 100-Hue Color vision and the appearance and thickness of all retinal layers were evaluated by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). All patients had ACH. The feature was loss of inner- and outer-segments (IS/OS) with disruption of the ciliary layer on OCT and an appearance of partial-thickness hole in the outer macular retina. This feature seems to be characteristic of ACH. SD-OCT correlated to clinic signs help the diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy in two siblings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy (BSCL is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by various dermatological and systemic manifestations such as lipoatrophy, hypertriglyceridemia, hepatomegaly, acanthosis nigricans, and acromegaloid features. BSCL type 2 is more common and severe, with onset in the neonatal period or in early infancy. The locus for BSCL2 has been identified on chromosome 11q13. Early recognition and differentiation from other congenital generalized lipodystrophies help in the initiation of appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures such as lifestyle modification and pharmacotherapy that helps postpone the onset of metabolic syndrome. We report BSCL type 2 in two siblings with several cutaneous manifestations like acanthosis nigricans, hypertrichosis, prominent subcutaneous veins, and increased lanugo hair.

  2. DANDY-WALKER MALFORMATION: A RARE CONGENITAL ANOMALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dandy Walker Malformation (DWM is a congenital malformation involving the cerebellum and fluid filled spaces around it. A key feature of this syndrome is partial or complete absence of a part of brain located between two cerebellar hemispheres ie. cerebellar vermis.(1 Dandy walker malformation was originally described in 1887 by Sutton and further characterized by Dandy and Blackfan in 1914 followed by Tagart and Walker in 1942. Benda finally labeled this disease as Dandy Walker in 1954. (2 Since the original description, additional studies have reported on various morphological features of this syndrome. It is a genetically sporadic disorder that occurs one in every 30,000live births. (3 Because of its rarity, here we report a case of DWM, in a fetus in which the diagnosis was made prenatally on USG. Later on, MTP was done by expulsion. Fetus was sent for autopsy to rule out other associated congenital abnormalities

  3. Congenital upper lip pit: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena James

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the rarest developmental malformations of the lip is congenital lip pits. They are usually seen as bilateral depressions in the vermilion zone of the lip and occur on the paramedian portion of the vermilion border of the lip. They are extremely rare in the upper lip. Lip pits are due to the failure of complete union of embryonic lateral sulci of the lip/notching of lip at an early stage of development with fixation of tissues of the base of the notch. Lip pits have also been associated with a variety of other congenital disorders and other malformations. The clinical and pathologic picture and the therapeutic aspects of this condition are discussed in this paper.

  4. Oral pathology case: congenital epulides

    OpenAIRE

    Amorim, J.

    2010-01-01

    A one month-old girl was referred to our department due a neoformation of the mandible. The excisional biopsy of the lesion revealed a congenital epulides of the newborn. This is an uncommon lesion, easy to diagnose, as it has a typical appearance and localisation. Surgical treatment is the option, namely when it impairs feeding, swallowing or breathing.

  5. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral pathology case: congenital epulides

    OpenAIRE

    Amorim, J

    2010-01-01

    A one month-old girl was referred to our department due a neoformation of the mandible. The excisional biopsy of the lesion revealed a congenital epulides of the newborn. This is an uncommon lesion, easy to diagnose, as it has a typical appearance and localisation. Surgical treatment is the option, namely when it impairs feeding, swallowing or breathing.

  7. Congenital dacryocystocele: prenatal MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazici, Zeynep [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Uludag University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey); Kline-Fath, Beth M.; Rubio, Eva I.; Calvo-Garcia, Maria A.; Linam, Leann E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Yazici, Bulent [Uludag University, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Bursa (Turkey)

    2010-12-15

    Congenital dacryocystocele can be diagnosed prenatally by imaging. Prenatal MRI is increasingly utilized for fetal diagnosis. To present the radiological and clinical features of seven fetuses with congenital dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI. The institutional database of 1,028 consecutive prenatal MR examinations performed during a period of 4 years was reviewed retrospectively. The cases of congenital dacryocystocele were identified by reading the report of each MRI study. The incidence of dacryocystocele diagnosed with prenatal MRI was 0.7% (n=7/1,028). The dacryocystocele was bilateral in three fetuses. Mean gestational age at the time of diagnosis was 31 weeks. The indication for prenatal MRI was the presence or the suspicion of central nervous system abnormality in six fetuses and diaphragmatic hernia in one. Dacryocystocele was associated with an intranasal cyst in six of ten eyes. Prenatal sonography revealed dacryocystocele in only two of seven fetuses. Of eight eyes with postnatal follow-up, four did not have any lacrimal symptoms. Prenatal MRI can delineate congenital dacryocystocele more clearly and in a more detailed fashion than ultrasonography. Presence of dacryocystocele was symptomatic in only 50% of our patients, supporting that prenatal diagnosis of dacryocystocele might follow a benign course. (orig.)

  8. Embryology of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluth, D; Keijzer, R; Hertl, M; Tibboel, D

    1996-11-01

    It is still generally believed that the defect in congenital diaphragmatic hernia results from failure of the so-called pleuroperitoneal canals (PPCs) to close at the end of the embryonic period (8th gestational week). Furthermore, it is assumed that gut could enter the thoracic cavity through this defect, causing compression and finally hypoplasia of the lung. However, this sequence of embryological events has never been studied, and many details even of normal diaphragmatic development are still unknown. Using scanning electron microscopy and a new animal model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), the nitrofen rat model, the normal embryology of the diaphragm was reinvestigated and, for the first time, the crucial developmental steps of congenital diaphragmatic hernia formation were studied. The basic results were: (1) In normal development, the PPCs are never wide enough to allow herniation of gut loops. (2) The formation of the defect happens in an early embryonic period. (3) The early ingrowth of liver through the defect is of major importance for the formation of CDH. In another set of experiments, the nitrofen rat model of congenital diaphragmatic hernias was used to study the cellular mechanisms involved during epithelial and mesenchymal growth and differentiation in normal and in abnormal lungs. These results, combined with selected culture techniques (eg, branching morphogenesis and epithelio-mesenchymal interaction) probably open new ways to a better understanding of the mechanisms that finally lead to an abnormal lung in CDH.

  9. Congenital Chagas disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Yves; Sosa-Estani, Sergio; Luquetti, Alejandro O; Buekens, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Congenital infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a global problem, occurring on average in 5% of children born from chronically infected mothers in endemic areas, with variations depending on the region. This presentation aims to focus on and update epidemiological data, research methods, involved factors, control strategy and possible prevention of congenital infection with T. cruzi. Considering that etiological treatment of the child is always effective if performed before one year of age, the diagnosis of infection in pregnant women and their newborns has to become the standard of care and integrated into the surveillance programs of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the standard tests, polymerase chain reaction performed on blood of neonates of infected mothers one month after birth might improve the diagnosis of congenital infection. Recent data bring out that its transmission can be prevented through treatment of infected women before they become pregnant. The role of parasite genotypes and host genetic factors in parasite transmission and development of infection in foetuses/neonates has to be more investigated in order to better estimate the risk factors and impact on health of congenital infection with T. cruzi.

  10. Congenital Chagas disease: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Carlier

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital infection with Trypanosoma cruzi is a global problem, occurring on average in 5% of children born from chronically infected mothers in endemic areas, with variations depending on the region. This presentation aims to focus on and update epidemiological data, research methods, involved factors, control strategy and possible prevention of congenital infection with T. cruzi. Considering that etiological treatment of the child is always effective if performed before one year of age, the diagnosis of infection in pregnant women and their newborns has to become the standard of care and integrated into the surveillance programs of syphilis and human immunodeficiency virus. In addition to the standard tests, polymerase chain reaction performed on blood of neonates of infected mothers one month after birth might improve the diagnosis of congenital infection. Recent data bring out that its transmission can be prevented through treatment of infected women before they become pregnant. The role of parasite genotypes and host genetic factors in parasite transmission and development of infection in foetuses/neonates has to be more investigated in order to better estimate the risk factors and impact on health of congenital infection with T. cruzi.

  11. Histopathological study of congenital aortic valve malformations in 32 children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ping; WANG Hongwei; LI Yanping; CHENG Peixuan; LIU Qingjun; ZHANG Zhenlu; LIU Jianying

    2007-01-01

    The histopathological characteristics of congenital aortic valve malformations in children were investigated.All the native surgically excised aortic valves from 32 pediatric patients suffering from symptomatic aortic valve dysfunction due to congenital aortic valve malformations between January 2003 and December 2005 were studied macroscopically and microscopically.The patients' medical records were reviewed and the clinical information was extracted.The diagnosis was made by the clinical presentation,preoperative echocardiography,intraoperative examination,and postoperative histopathological study,excluding rheumatic ot degenerative aortic valve diseases,infective endocarditis and primary connective tissue disorders,e.g.Marfan syndrome.Among 32 children with congenital aortic valve malformations,the age was ranged from six to 18 years,with a mean of 14.9 years,and there were 27 boys and five girls (male:female = 5.4:1).There were five cases of aortic stenosis (AS,15.62%),25 cases of aortic insufficiency (AI,78.13 %)and two cases of AS-AI (6.25%),without other valve diseases.Twenty cases still had other congenital heart diseases:ventricular septal defect (19 cases),patent ductus arteriosus (two cases),double-chambered right ventricle (one case),aneurysm of the right anterior aortic sinus of valsalva (three cases).Histopathological examination indicated that the cusps became thickening with unequal size,irregular shape (coiling and prolapse edge),enhanced hardness,and partly calcification.Microscopic investigation revealed the unsharp structure of valve tissue,fibrosis,myxomatous,reduced collagen fiber,rupture of elastic fibers,different degrees of infiltration of inflammatory cells,secondary calcareous and lipid deposit,and secondary fibrosis.Congenital aortic valve malformations in children involve males more than females,mostly associated with other congenital heart diseases.Aortic insufficiency is more common in children with congenital aortic valve

  12. Comprehensive clinical and molecular assessment of 32 probands with congenital contractural arachnodactyly: report of 14 novel mutations and review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callewaert, B.L.; Loeys, B.L.; Ficcadenti, A.; Vermeer, S.; Landgren, M.; Kroes, H.Y.; Yaron, Y.; Pope, M.; Foulds, N.; Boute, O.; Galan, F.; Kingston, H.; Aa, N. van der; Salcedo, I.; Swinkels, M.E.; Wallgren-Pettersson, C.; Gabrielli, O.; Backer, J. de; Coucke, P.J.; Paepe, A.M. De

    2009-01-01

    Beals-Hecht syndrome or congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is a rare, autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by crumpled ears, arachnodactyly, contractures, and scoliosis. Recent reports also mention aortic root dilatation, a finding previously thought to differentiate

  13. Comprehensive Clinical and Molecular Assessment of 32 Probands With Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly : Report of 14 Novel Mutations and Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callewaert, Bert L.; Loeys, Bart L.; Ficcadenti, Anna; Vermeer, Sascha; Landgren, Magnus; Kroes, Hester Y.; Yaron, Yuval; Pope, Michael; Foulds, Nicola; Boute, Odile; Galan, Francisco; Kingston, Helen; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Salcedo, Iratxe; Swinkels, Marielle E.; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Gabrielli, Orazio; De Backer, Julie; Coucke, Paul J.; De Paepe, Anne M.

    Beals-Hecht syndrome or congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is a rare, autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by crumpled ears, arachnodactyly, contractures, and scoliosis. Recent reports also mention aortic root dilatation, a finding previously thought to differentiate

  14. Comprehensive clinical and molecular assessment of 32 probands with congenital contractural arachnodactyly: report of 14 novel mutations and review of the literature.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callewaert, B.L.; Loeys, B.L.; Ficcadenti, A.; Vermeer, S.; Landgren, M.; Kroes, H.Y.; Yaron, Y.; Pope, M.; Foulds, N.; Boute, O.; Galan, F.; Kingston, H.; Aa, N. van der; Salcedo, I.; Swinkels, M.E.; Wallgren-Pettersson, C.; Gabrielli, O.; Backer, J. de; Coucke, P.J.; Paepe, A.M. De

    2009-01-01

    Beals-Hecht syndrome or congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is a rare, autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by crumpled ears, arachnodactyly, contractures, and scoliosis. Recent reports also mention aortic root dilatation, a finding previously thought to differentiate

  15. Comprehensive Clinical and Molecular Assessment of 32 Probands With Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly : Report of 14 Novel Mutations and Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callewaert, Bert L.; Loeys, Bart L.; Ficcadenti, Anna; Vermeer, Sascha; Landgren, Magnus; Kroes, Hester Y.; Yaron, Yuval; Pope, Michael; Foulds, Nicola; Boute, Odile; Galan, Francisco; Kingston, Helen; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Salcedo, Iratxe; Swinkels, Marielle E.; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Gabrielli, Orazio; De Backer, Julie; Coucke, Paul J.; De Paepe, Anne M.

    2009-01-01

    Beals-Hecht syndrome or congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is a rare, autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder characterized by crumpled ears, arachnodactyly, contractures, and scoliosis. Recent reports also mention aortic root dilatation, a finding previously thought to differentiate

  16. A case of congenital afibrinogenemia complicated with thromboembolic events that required repeated amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Mehmet A; Işik, Bilgen; Patiroglu, Turkan; Karakukcu, Musa; Mutlu, Fatma T; Yilmaz, Ebru; Unal, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    Although congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder, it can be more frequently encountered in countries where consanguineous marriages are common. Congenital afibrinogenemia is characterized by the undetectable low level of fibrinogen, which causes hemorrhagic diathesis. Paradoxically, arterial and venous thromboembolic complications can develop in patients with afibrinogenemia, which may cause a diagnostic problem to anyone unfamiliar with its clinical features. We report a case of congenital afibrinogenemia presenting with bilateral ischemic lesions of bilateral foot and ankle that required amputations. The patient was treated with fibrinogen concentrate, low-molecular-weight heparin, aspirin, and nifedipine. In conclusion, arterial and venous thromboembolic complications are rare, but severe complications of afibrinogenemia. The management of thromboembolic complications in patients with afibrinogenemia is a balance game. At one end of the scale, there is a bleeding disorder, and at the other end, there is a thrombosis. This fine adjustment is a job of mastery.

  17. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel CACNA1C-Mediated Cardiac Disorder Characterized by Prolonged QT Intervals with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy, Congenital Heart Defects, and Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Nicole J.; Ye, Dan; Jin, Fang; Tester, David J.; Huseby, April; Bos, J. Martijn; Johnson, Aaron J.; Kanter, Ronald; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A portion of sudden cardiac deaths (SCD) can be attributed to structural heart diseases such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) or cardiac channelopathies such as long QT syndrome (LQTS); however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are quite distinct. Here, we identify a novel CACNA1C missense mutation with mixed loss-of-function/gain-of-function responsible for a complex phenotype of LQTS, HCM, SCD, and congenital heart defects (CHDs). Methods and Results Whole exome sequencing (WES) in combination with Ingenuity Variant Analysis was completed on three affected individuals and one unaffected individual from a large pedigree with concomitant LQTS, HCM, and CHDs and identified a novel CACNA1C mutation, p.Arg518Cys, as the most likely candidate mutation. Mutational analysis of exon 12 of CACNA1C was completed on 5 additional patients with a similar phenotype of LQTS plus a personal or family history of HCM-like phenotypes, and identified two additional pedigrees with mutations at the same position, p.Arg518Cys/His. Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to assess the electrophysiological effects of the identified mutations in CaV1.2, and revealed a complex phenotype, including loss of current density and inactivation in combination with increased window and late current. Conclusions Through WES and expanded cohort screening, we identified a novel genetic substrate p.Arg518Cys/His-CACNA1C, in patients with a complex phenotype including LQTS, HCM, and CHDs annotated as cardiac-only Timothy syndrome. Our electrophysiological studies, identification of mutations at the same amino acid position in multiple pedigrees, and co-segregation with disease in these pedigrees provides evidence that p.Arg518Cys/His is the pathogenic substrate for the observed phenotype. PMID:26253506

  18. Surgical cardiac denervation therapy for treatment of congenital ion channelopathies in pediatric patients: a contemporary, single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, John P; Wilson, Jennifer K; Louis, Clauden; Peer, Syed M; Zurakowski, David; Nadler, Evan P; Qureshi, Faisal G; Jonas, Richard A; Greene, E Anne; Berul, Charles I; Moak, Jeffrey P; Nath, Dilip S

    2015-01-01

    Congenital ion channel disorders, including congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS), cause significant morbidity in pediatric patients. When medication therapy does not control symptoms or arrhythmias, more invasive treatment strategies may be necessary. This study examines our institution's clinical experience with surgical cardiac denervation therapy for management of these arrhythmogenic disorders in children. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review identified ten pediatric patients with congenital ion channelopathies who underwent surgical cardiac denervation therapy at a single institution between May 2011 and April 2014. Eight patients had a diagnosis of congenital LQTS, two patients were diagnosed with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). All patients underwent sympathectomy and partial stellate ganglionectomy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Six of the ten patients had documented ventricular arrhythmias preoperatively, and 70% of the patients had preoperative syncope. The corrected QT interval decreased in 75% of patients with LQTS following sympathectomy. Postoperative arrhythmogenic symptoms were absent in 88% of congenital LQTS patients, but both patients with CPVT continued to have symptoms throughout the duration of follow-up. All patients were alive after a median follow-up period of 10 months. Surgical cardiac denervation therapy via VATS is a useful treatment strategy for congenital LQTS patients who fail medical management, and its potential benefit in the management of CPVT is unclear. A prospective comparison of the efficacy of surgical cardiac denervation therapy and implantable cardioverter-defibrillator use in congenital ion channelopathies is timely and crucial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Identification of Mutations in SDR9C7 in 6 Families with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Ichthyosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotz, A; Fagerberg, C; Vahlquist, A

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a heterogeneous group of disorders of keratinization. To date, ARCI has been associated with following genes: ABCA12, ALOX12B, ALOXE3, CERS3, CYP4F22, NIPAL4, TGM1, PNPLA1 and recently SDR9C7 and SULT2B1.(1-6) Furthermore, seven patients from...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia, and nail dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alopecia, and nail dystrophy is a type of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which is a group of disorders characterized ... Diseases Educational Resources (7 links) Boston Children's Hospital: Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease InfoSearch: T-cell immunodeficiency, congenital alopecia and ...

  1. An investigation of impulsivity in children with early-treated congenital hypothyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L; Vulsma, T; van der Meere, J

    2004-01-01

    The main feature of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is a total or partial absence of thyroid hormone, caused by a developmental disorder of the thyroid gland. Introduction of neonatal thyroid screening allows early treatment with replacement hormone. As a result the prognosis of CH has greatly improv

  2. Identification of a Kir3.4 Mutation in Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yanzong; Yang, Yiqing; Liang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary disorder that leads to sudden cardiac death secondary to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Although many genes for LQTS have been described, the etiology remains unknown in 30%-40% of cases. In the present study, a large Chinese family (four generations...

  3. Combined mucopolysaccharidosis type VI and congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a child: Anesthetic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a child posted for magnetic resonance imaging of brain under general anesthesia with the rare combination of mucopolysachharidosis type VI and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The presence of both these disorders has important anesthetic implications. The pathophysiology of this rare combination of disease is reviewed with emphasis on the anesthesia management.

  4. Alveolar capillary dysplasia with multiple congenital anomalies and bronchoscopic airway abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamkonda-Athmaram, V; Sulman, C G; Basel, D G; Southern, J; Konduri, G G; Basir, M A

    2014-04-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia is a rare and fatal disease of newborn infants. Here we describe a patient with alveolar capillary dysplasia, multiple congenital anomalies, a novel genetic mutation and previously undocumented airway findings on bronchoscopy. Knowledge of these associations may help diagnose this rare disorder in neonates with hypoxemic respiratory failure.

  5. Identification of a Kir3.4 Mutation in Congenital Long QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yanzong; Yang, Yiqing; Liang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary disorder that leads to sudden cardiac death secondary to fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Although many genes for LQTS have been described, the etiology remains unknown in 30%-40% of cases. In the present study, a large Chinese family (four generations...

  6. A rare cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia : Antley-Bixler syndrome due to POR deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herkert, J. C.; Blaauwwiekel, E. E.; Hoek, A.; Veenstra-Knol, H. E.; Kema, I. P.; Arlt, W.; Kerstens, M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome P(450) oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency is a recently discovered new variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Distinctive features of POR deficiency are the presence of disorders of sexual development in both sexes, glucocorticoid deficiency and skeletal malformations similar to those ob

  7. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia--pharmacologic interventions from the prenatal phase to adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Stikkelbroeck, N.M.; Otten, B.J.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common inherited autosomal recessive disorders, caused by deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis. The clinical picture of the most prevalent form, i.e. 21-hydroxylase deficiency, is characterized by cortisol and mostly a

  8. Lethal congenital muscular dystrophy with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita : three new cases and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sombekke, B H; Molenaar, W M; Essen, A J van; Schoots, C J

    1994-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) comprises a heterogeneous group of muscle disorders. We report on two stillborn sibs with early lethal CMD and a prematurely born boy who died within minutes after birth. The pregnancies were complicated by polyhydramnios. All presented with arthrogryposis

  9. High levels of soluble serum hemojuvelin in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalev, H.; Perez-Avraham, G.; Kapelushnik, J.; Levi, I.; Rabinovich, A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Brasse-Lagnel, C.; Tamary, H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) is a rare group of red blood cell disorders with ineffective erythropoiesis and secondary hemochromatosis. Inappropriate suppression of hepcidin and high levels of growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) have been described in CDA I and II patien

  10. Elevated growth differentiation factor 15 expression in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamary, H.; Shalev, H.; Perez-Avraham, G.; Zoldan, M.; Levi, I.; Swinkels, D.W.; Tanno, T.; Miller, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) is a rare group of red blood cell disorders characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and increased iron absorption. To determine whether growth differentation factor 15 (GDF15) hyper-expression is associated with the ineffective erythropoiesis and iron-lo

  11. High levels of soluble serum hemojuvelin in patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shalev, H.; Perez-Avraham, G.; Kapelushnik, J.; Levi, I.; Rabinovich, A.; Swinkels, D.W.; Brasse-Lagnel, C.; Tamary, H.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) is a rare group of red blood cell disorders with ineffective erythropoiesis and secondary hemochromatosis. Inappropriate suppression of hepcidin and high levels of growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) have been described in CDA I and II patien

  12. Clinical profile of patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21 Hydroxylase defiiciency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeraz Ahmad Dar

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a unique disorder due to very adverse outcomes and even death resulting from enzyme deficiency if left untreated; and associated social taboos There is a need to start neonatal screening for CAH in our country. [Natl J Med Res 2016; 6(2.000: 177-180

  13. Congenital heart defects in two siblings in an Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkus, Mehmet Necdet; Argin, Atilla

    2010-04-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by anomalies of the anterior segment of the eye, face, teeth, and umbilicus. Many other extraocular findings, including congenital heart defects, have been reported in association with this syndrome. It has been suggested by some investigators that the coexistence of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome and congenital heart defects is not a chance event but it represents a distinct entity. We report a family in which four members in three generations have typical ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome. Two of them, who are siblings, also have congenital heart defects. The congenital heart defect was bicuspid aortic valve anomaly with severe stenosis and mild regurgitation in one sibling and ostium secundum atrial septal defect in the other. To our knowledge, the combination of congenital heart defects with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome in siblings has not been reported previously. Our observation further strengthens the notion that Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome associated with congenital heart defects is not a chance event.

  14. Congenital absence of uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Ravi Lakshmy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cervical agenesis or dysgenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly. Patients with congenital absence of the cervix present with primary amenorrhea and infertility. Though it poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician, correct diagnosis prior to surgery is possible with the help of ultrasound. Early diagnosis offers significant advantages in patient care and effective presurgical planning. This case report reviews two cases of cervical agenesis diagnosed with the help of ultrasound and later confirmed with the help of MRI. Ultrasonography is the modality of choice to define the internal genital anatomy and helps us to classify the level of obstruction or aplasia in obstructive uterine anomalies. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(10.000: 3634-3636

  15. Congenital myotonia in related kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickford, F H; Jones, B R; Gething, M A; Pack, R; Alley, M R

    1998-06-01

    Four closely related domestic shorthair kittens were investigated following the detection of abnormalities in their gait, difficulty opening their mouths and muscle hypertrophy. They walked with a stiff, stilted gait, with the stiffness reducing during exercise. Startling of the kittens resulted in hyperextension of the limbs and falling to lateral recumbency, or spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle, prolonged prolapse of the nictitating membranes and flattening of the ears. One kitten was intermittently dysphonic. Endotracheal intubation of the anaesthetised kittens was difficult due to an inability to open the mouth to a wide angle, and narrowing of the glottis due to muscle spasm. A diagnosis of congenital myotonia was made based on the clinical signs, the kittens' ages, typical myotonic discharges on electromyography, and the histopathological and histochemical findings in muscle. This is the first report of congenital myotonia in this species.

  16. [Radiological evaluation of congenital tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado del Hoyo, A; Ruiz Martín, Y; Lancharro Zapata, Á; Marín Rodríguez, C; Gordillo Gutiérrez, I

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we consider tumors that are diagnosed during pregnancy or in the first three months of life. This is a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with special biological and epidemiological characteristics that differentiate them from tumors arising in children or adults. In the last two decades, the prenatal detection of congenital tumors has increased due to the generalized use of prenatal sonographic screening. Advances in imaging techniques, especially in fetal magnetic resonance imaging, have enabled improvements in the diagnosis, follow-up, clinical management, and perinatal treatment of these tumors. This image-based review of the most common congenital tumors describes their histologic types, locations, and characteristics on the different imaging techniques used.

  17. Congenital syphilis: The continuing scourge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Prachi G; Joshi, Rajesh; Kharkar, Vidya D; Bhaskar, M V

    2014-01-01

    Congenital syphilis is a severe, disabling infection that occurs due to the transmission of Treponema pallidum across the placenta during pregnancy or from contact with an infectious genital lesion during delivery. However, its early diagnosis is often difficult because more than half of the affected infants are asymptomatic, and the signs in symptomatic infants may be subtle and nonspecific. Although its incidence is declining, this long-forgotten disease continues to affect pregnant women, resulting in considerable perinatal morbidity and mortality. We hereby report a case of a 2-month-old infant with early congenital syphilis presenting with joint swellings and Parrot's pseudoparalysis, a comparative rarity in the present scenario. The report also stresses upon the importance of implementing the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation that all the pregnant women should be screened for syphilis in the first antenatal visit in the first trimester and again in late pregnancy.

  18. Congenital Absence of the Pericardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, David; Asher, Craig R

    Congenital absence of the pericardium (CAP) is one of the rarest cardiac congenital anomalies. It can occur as a complete absence of the entire pericardium, absence of the right or left portion of the pericardium or a partial, foramen-like defect of the right or left pericardium. While the majority of cases are clinically silent, multiple reports associate CAP with symptomatic presentation. The most feared complication of CAP is sudden death due to cardiac strangulation across a partial defect of the left pericardium. Given its rare occurrence, most clinicians and imaging specialists will have little experience with this condition and may fail to recognize it on thoracic or cardiac studies. Thus, the purpose of this review is to highlight the common clinical and multimodality imaging features associated with this anomaly and suggest a management algorithm. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Prenatal education for congenital toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mario, Simona; Basevi, Vittorio; Gagliotti, Carlo; Spettoli, Daniela; Gori, Gianfranco; D'Amico, Roberto; Magrini, Nicola

    2015-10-23

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is considered a rare but potentially severe infection. Prenatal education about congenital toxoplasmosis could be the most efficient and least harmful intervention, yet its effectiveness is uncertain. To assess the effects of prenatal education for preventing congenital toxoplasmosis. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 May 2015), and reference lists of relevant papers, reviews and websites. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials of all types of prenatal education on toxoplasmosis infection during pregnancy. Cluster-randomized trials were eligible for inclusion. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two cluster-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) (involving a total of 5455 women) met the inclusion criteria. The two included trials measured the effectiveness of the intervention in different ways, which meant that meta-analysis of the results was not possible. The overall quality of the two studies, as assessed using the GRADE approach, was low, with high risk of detection and attrition bias in both included trials.One trial (432 women enrolled) conducted in Canada was judged of low methodological quality. This trial did not report on any of the review's pre-specified primary outcomes and the secondary outcomes reported results only as P values. Moreover, losses to follow-up were high (34%, 147 out of 432 women initially enrolled). The authors concluded that prenatal education can effectively change pregnant women's behavior as it increased pet, personal and food hygiene. The second trial conducted in France was also judged of low methodological quality. Losses to follow-up were also high (44.5%, 2233 out of 5023 women initially enrolled) and differential (40% in the intervention group and 52% in the control group). The authors concluded that prenatal education for congenital toxoplasmoses has a

  20. [Congenital ranula in a newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, M K; Hückel, D; Hamala, D

    2007-05-01

    Ranulas are cystic lesions in the floor of the mouth. They are either retention cysts of the excretory duct of the sublingual gland or pseudocysts formed by excretory duct rupture followed by extravasation and accumulation of mucus in the surrounding tissue. We report the case of a premature newborn with a congenital ranula in the floor of mouth. The ranula caused no discomfort or complications, so that immediate intervention was not necessary. The cyst resolved completely by the age of 4 months. Complications in newborns especially include airway obstruction and feeding difficulties. Surgical treatment options are needle aspiration, excision of the ranula, marsupialization, cryosurgery, and--in addition to excision of the cyst--removal of the ipsilateral sublingual gland. Sclerotherapy has shown good results as well. As many congenital cysts resolve or rupture spontaneously, they should be observed for potential resolution for several months in uncomplicated cases.

  1. Congenital hypopituitarism and renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Atreja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hypopituitarism is potentially fatal in the newborn period but treatable if the diagnosis is made early. We report a neonate who presented with hypothermia and severe hypoglycemia. He also had undescended testis and micropenis. Initial screening revealed panhypopituitarism, which was corrected promptly. He developed renal failure due to initial cardiovascular compromise related to hypotension but recovered quickly with standard management. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed absent stalk of anterior pituitary.

  2. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  3. Laboratory Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that screening and treatment for toxoplasmosis during gestation result in a decrease of vertical transmission and clinical sequelae. Early treatment was associated with improved outcomes. Thus, laboratory methods should aim for early identification of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). Diagnostic approaches should include, at least, detection of Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA and a comprehensive review of maternal history, including the gestational age ...

  4. Clinicobacteriological Significance in Congenital Dacryocystitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavna Raina, Sudhir Bhagotra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, 37 eyes of 30 congenital dacryocystitis patients (7 bilateral were studied, out ofwhich 60% of patients were male and 40% female. Gram positive cocci constituted the major bacterialisolate (56.7% with Streptococcus pneumoniae (27.9% predominating. Most effective antibiotics againstthe commonest organism Streptococcus pneumoniae were Tobramycin and Gentamycin showing 100%effectivity. Staphylococcus albus 17.4% was the most common normal conjunctival commensal isolated.

  5. CONGENITAL PSEUDARTHROSIS OF THE CLAVICLE

    OpenAIRE

    de Figueiredo, Marina Juliana Pita Sassioto Silveira; dos Reis Braga, Susana; Akkari,Miguel; Prado, José Carlos Lopes; Santili, Cláudio

    2015-01-01

    Congenital pseudarthrosis of the clavicle (PCC) is a rare affection, that can be diagnosed at birth and represent a disturbance of union of the ossification centers. It's more common in girls and in the right side. This study objectives to proceed a revision about the subject, that was searched in online database of LILACS and MEDLINE. We found 56 articles till present data. Besides be a bit infrequent, the PCC must not be missed or even forgotten, especially as differential diagnosis with ac...

  6. Congenital myasthenic syndrome : report of four cases and brief review of literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja G

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The term ′congenital myasthenic syndrome′ (CMS encompasses a number of heterogeneous disorders characterised by myasthenic symptoms since birth, usually with positive family history and absence of acetyl choline receptor antibodies. Recent advances in electrophysiology and ultrastructural analysis of neuromuscular junction have made it possible to identify the various defects underlying these disorders. We report four cases of CMS, with a review of literature.

  7. Evidence of an eye movement-based memory effect in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Sarah; Haslam, Catherine; Tree, Jeremy J; Hodgson, Timothy L

    2008-01-01

    While extensive work has examined the role of covert recognition in acquired prosopagnosia, little attention has been directed to this process in the congenital form of the disorder. Indeed, evidence of covert recognition has only been demonstrated in one congenital case in which autonomic measures provided evidence of recognition (Jones and Tranel, 2001), whereas two investigations using behavioural indicators failed to demonstrate the effect (de Haan and Campbell, 1991; Bentin et al., 1999). In this paper, we use a behavioural indicator, an "eye movement-based memory effect" (Althoff and Cohen, 1999), to provide evidence of covert recognition in congenital prosopagnosia. In an initial experiment, we examined viewing strategies elicited to famous and novel faces in control participants, and found fewer fixations and reduced regional sampling for famous compared to novel faces. In a second experiment, we examined the same processes in a patient with congenital prosopagnosia (AA), and found some evidence of an eye movement-based memory effect regardless of his recognition accuracy. Finally, we examined whether a difference in scanning strategy was evident for those famous faces AA failed to explicitly recognise, and again found evidence of reduced sampling for famous faces. We use these findings to (a) provide evidence of intact structural representations in a case of congenital prosopagnosia, and (b) to suggest that covert recognition can be demonstrated using behavioural indicators in this disorder.

  8. Syndromes with congenital brittle bones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotkin Horacio

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is no clear definition of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI. The most widely used classification of OI divides the disease in four types, although it has been suggested that there may be at least 12 forms of OI. These forms have been named with numbers, eponyms or descriptive names. Some of these syndromes can actually be considered congenital forms of brittle bones resembling OI (SROI. Discussion A review of different syndromes with congenital brittle bones published in the literature is presented. Syndromes are classified in "OI" (those secondary to mutations in the type I pro-collagen genes, and "syndromes resembling OI" (those secondary to mutations other that the type I pro-collagen genes, identified or not. A definition for OI is proposed as a syndrome of congenital brittle bones secondary to mutations in the genes codifying for pro-collagen genes (COL1A1 and COL1A2. Summary A debate about the definition of OI and a possible clinical and prognostic classification are warranted.

  9. Congenital Portosystemic Shunt: Our Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Timpanaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital portosystemic venous malformations are rare abnormalities in which the portal blood drains into a systemic vein and which are characterized by extreme clinical variability. Case Presentations. The authors present two case reports of a congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunt (Type II. In the first patient, apparently nonspecific symptoms, such as headache and fatigue, proved to be secondary to hypoglycemic episodes related to the presence of a portosystemic shunt, later confirmed on imaging. During portal vein angiography, endovascular embolization of the portocaval fistula achieved occlusion of the anomalous venous tract. In the second patient, affected by Down’s syndrome, the diagnosis of a portosystemic malformation was made by routine ultrasonography, performed to rule out concurrent congenital anomalies. Because of the absence of symptoms, we chose to observe this patient. Conclusions. These two case reports demonstrate the clinical heterogeneity of this malformation and the need for a multidisciplinary approach. As part of a proper workup, clinical evaluation must always be followed by radiographic diagnosis.

  10. Major congenital anomalies in a Danish region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Birkelund, Anne Sofie

    2014-01-01

    congenital anomaly, 13.9% had a chromosomal anomaly and 7.7% were multiple congenital anomalies. The combined foetal and infant mortality in the study area was 11.6 per 1,000 births. 19% (2.2 per 1,000) of these deaths were foetuses and infants with major congenital anomalies. Combined foetal and infant......INTRODUCTION: This study describes the prevalence of congenital anomalies and changes over time in birth outcome, mortality and chronic maternal diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on population data from the EUROCAT registry covering the Funen County, Denmark, 1995......-2008. The registry covers live births, foetal deaths with a gestational age (GA) of 20 weeks or more, and terminations of pregnancy due to congenital anomalies (TOPFA). RESULTS: The overall prevalence of congenital anomalies was 2.70% (95% confidence interval: 2.58-2.80). The majority of cases had an isolated...

  11. Does tonality boost short-term memory in congenital amusia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, Philippe; Schulze, Katrin; Caclin, Anne; Tillmann, Barbara

    2013-11-06

    Congenital amusia is a neuro-developmental disorder of music perception and production. Recent findings have demonstrated that this deficit is linked to an impaired short-term memory for tone sequences. As it has been shown before that non-musicians' implicit knowledge of musical regularities can improve short-term memory for tone information, the present study investigated if this type of implicit knowledge could also influence amusics' short-term memory performance. Congenital amusics and their matched controls, who were non-musicians, had to indicate whether sequences of five tones, presented in pairs, were the same or different; half of the pairs respected musical regularities (tonal sequences) and the other half did not (atonal sequences). As previously reported for non-musician participants, the control participants showed better performance (as measured with d') for tonal sequences than for atonal ones. While this improvement was not observed in amusics, both control and amusic participants showed faster response times for tonal sequences than for atonal sequences. These findings suggest that some implicit processing of tonal structures is potentially preserved in congenital amusia. This observation is encouraging as it strengthens the perspective to exploit implicit knowledge to help reducing pitch perception and memory deficits in amusia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CYP1B1-mediated Pathobiology of Primary Congenital Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiq, Muneeb A; Dada, Rima; Qadri, Rizwana; Dada, Tanuj

    2015-01-01

    CYP1B1 is a dioxin-inducible enzyme belonging to the cytochrome P450 superfamily. It has been observed to be important in a variety of developmental processes including in utero development of ocular structures. Owing to its role in the developmental biology of eye, its dysfunction can lead to ocular developmental defects. This has been found to be true and CYP1B1 mutations have been observed in a majority of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) patients from all over the globe. Primary congenital glaucoma is an irreversibly blinding childhood disorder (onset at birth or early infancy) typified by anomalous development of trabecular meshwork (TM). How CYP1B1 causes PCG is not known; however, some basic investigations have been reported. Understanding the CYP1B1 mediated etiopathomechanism of PCG is very important to identify targets for therapy and preventive management. In this perspective, we will make an effort to reconstruct the pathomechanism of PCG in the light of already reported information about the disease and the CYP1B1 gene. How to cite this article: Faiq MA, Dada R, Qadri R, Dada T. CYP1 B1-mediated Pathobiology of Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2015;9(3):77-80.

  13. Quality of life in Swedish children with congenital ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Gånemo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Congenital ichthyosis encompasses a large group of keratinizing disorders with widespread scaling and a variable degree of erythema. Little is known about the quality of life in children with congenital ichthyosis and the impact of the disease on their family. Fifteen children aged 5-16 years with lamellar ichthyosis, Netherton’s syndrome, epidermolytic hyperkeratosis or Harlequin ichthyosis, were investigated concerning the effect of their ichthyosis on their quality of life. This was measured with the established Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (CDLQI, and the Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI modified by substituting the word ichthyosis for eczema. The questionnaires covered the preceding seven days and each had a maximum score of 30: the higher the score, the greater the Quality of Life impairment. The median score was 9.0 (range 2-19 for the CDLQI and 9.0 (range 3-21 for DFI. There was a significant correlation between the DFI and the CDLQI scores. The item in the CDLQI questionnaire that showed the highest score was “itchy, scratchy, sore or painful skin” and the most highly scored item in the DFI questionnaire was effect on “housework, e.g. washing, cleaning”; both items related to the children’s symptoms. The results of the study clearly establish that congenital ichthyosis impairs the quality of life of the affected children and their families.

  14. A columellar deformity caused by a congenital schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Bouihi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma is a benign neoplasm arising from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve. It very rarely located in the nasal tip. We report two cases of congenital schwannoma of the nasal columella and discuss the surgical approach of such tumor.Case report: Case 1: An 18 year-old female was referred to us for a very slow growing tumor of the columella. The deformity had been present since the birth. The patient underwent an excision of its tumor using an open rhinoplasty approach. The histological examination revealed a schwannoma. No recurrence was found within 2 years of follow up.Case 2: A 4 month male baby presenting a congenital tumor of his columella. He underwent an excision using open rhinoplasty approach. The histological examination showed a plexiform schwannoma.Discussion: Schwannoma of the nasal tip is a benign tumor that gradually causes aesthetic and functional disorders. Congenital schwannoma of columella is an extremely rare clinical situation. Its diagnosis and treatment can pose certain challenges. The treatment is surgical excision and histological analysis of the specimen. Open rhinoplasty approach provided a good surgical exploration and a good cosmetic result on this nasal tip tumor.

  15. Planar Cell Polarity Signaling Pathway in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is a common cardiac disorder in humans. Despite many advances in the understanding of CHD and the identification of many associated genes, the fundamental etiology for the majority of cases remains unclear. The planar cell polarity (PCP signaling pathway, responsible for tissue polarity in Drosophila and gastrulation movements and cardiogenesis in vertebrates, has been shown to play multiple roles during cardiac differentiation and development. The disrupted function of PCP signaling is connected to some CHDs. Here, we summarize our current understanding of how PCP factors affect the pathogenesis of CHD.

  16. Congenital pseudoarthrosis associated with venous malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hadidy, A.; Haroun, A.; Al-Ryalat, N. [Jordan University Hospital, Radiology Department, P.O. Box 340621, Amman (Jordan); Hamamy, H. [Endocrinology and Genetics, National Center for Diabetes, Amman (Jordan); Al-Hadidi, S. [Jordan University Hospital, Departments of Orthopedics, Amman (Jordan)

    2007-06-15

    Congenital pseudoarthrosis is a pathologic entity that may be isolated, or may be associated with neurofibromatosis. We report the case of a 3-year-old female with congenital pseudoarthrosis involving the right tibia and fibula. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and complementary magnetic resonance angiogram (MRA) revealed a lobulated mass with vivid enhancement, which led to the diagnosis of venous malformation. This is the first report of congenital pseudoarthrosis caused by the presence of a vascular malformation. (orig.)

  17. [Congenital retinal folds in different clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, M

    2005-01-01

    We present 12 clinical cases of congenital retinal folds with different etiologies: posterior primitive vitreous persistency and hyperplasia (7 cases),retinocytoma (1 case). retinopathy of prematurity (1 case), astrocytoma of the retina (1 case), retinal vasculitis (1 case), Goldmann-Favre syndrome (1 case). Etiopathogenic and nosological aspects are discussed; the congenital retinal folds are interpreted as a symptom in a context of a congenital or acquired vitreo-retinal pathology.

  18. Congenital Pseudoarthrosis of the Tibia: Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bulut

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia is rarely seen disease which is very difficult to treat. Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia is frequently seen together with neurofibromatosis. Especially according to Boyd classification, type II and V are in the high risk group. In this study, we presented the treatment result of the three years old male patient with type V congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia.

  19. Development and Congenital Anomalies of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tadokoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the pancreas develops is essential to understand the pathogenesis of congenital pancreatic anomalies. Recent studies have shown the advantages of investigating the development of frogs, mice, and chickens for understanding early embryonic development of the pancreas and congenital anomalies, such as choledochal cysts, anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction, annular pancreas, and pancreas divisum. These anomalies arise from failure of complete rotation and fusion during embryogenesis. There are many theories in the etiology of congenital anomalies of the pancreas. We review pancreas development in humans and other vertebrates. In addition, we attempt to clarify how developmental failure is related to congenital pancreatic anomalies.

  20. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle with bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar Magu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital pseudoarthrosis of clavicle is a rare clinical entity. It usually presents as a swelling in the clavicular region at birth or soon after birth. Fitzwilliam′s original description of 60 subtypes of congenital pseudoarthrosis of clavicle have addressed several anatomical variants, e.g. association with cervical rib and abnormally vertical and elevated upper ribs. However, congenital pseudoarthrosis of clavicle associated with bifurcation is an atypical anatomic variant. To the best of our knowledge, this variant has never been mentioned in the literature. In the present report, we have described this subtype of symptomatic congenital pseudoarthrosis of the clavicle with bifurcation and its possible management.

  2. Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Challenges Faced by Parents of Children with Congenital Heart Disease Page Content ​​​The first thing most parents want ... common and expected. About Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth ...

  3. Congenital anosmia and emotion recognition: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemogne, Cédric; Smadja, Julien; Zerdazi, El-Hadi; Soudry, Yaël; Robin, Marion; Berthoz, Sylvie; Limosin, Frédéric; Consoli, Silla M; Bonfils, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Patients with anosmia are not able to detect volatile chemicals signaling the presence of infectious and non-infectious environmental hazards, which typically elicit disgust and fear, respectively. Social animals may compensate a loss of olfaction by taking advantage of signals of threat that are produced by their conspecifics. Among humans and other primates, body postures and facial expressions are powerful cues conveying emotional information, including fear and disgust. The aim of the present study was to examine whether humans with agenesis of the olfactory bulb, a rare disorder characterized by congenital anosmia, would be more accurate in recognizing facial expressions of fear and disgust. A total of 90 participants with no history of mental disorder or traumatic brain injury were recruited, including 17 patients with congenital anosmia (10 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.5 ± 14.8 years), 34 patients with acquired anosmia (18 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 57.2 ± 11.8 years) and 39 healthy subjects (22 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.7 ± 13.2 years). For each patient with congenital anosmia, the agenesis of the olfactory bulb was ascertained through magnetic resonance imaging. Emotion recognition abilities were examined with a dynamic paradigm in which a morphing technique allowed displaying emotional facial expressions increasing in intensity over time. Adjusting for age, education, depression and anxiety, patients with congenital anosmia required similar levels of intensity to correctly recognize fear and disgust than healthy subjects while they displayed decreased error rates for both fear (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -28.3% [-46.3%, -10.2%], P = 0.003) and disgust (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -15.8% [-31.5%, -0.2%], P = 0.048). Furthermore, among patients with acquired anosmia, there was a negative correlation between duration of anosmia and the rate of errors for fearful (Spearman's ρ = -0.531, P

  4. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  5. Neural bases of congenital amusia in tonal language speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caicai; Peng, Gang; Shao, Jing; Wang, William S-Y

    2017-03-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong neurodevelopmental disorder of fine-grained pitch processing. In this fMRI study, we examined the neural bases of congenial amusia in speakers of a tonal language - Cantonese. Previous studies on non-tonal language speakers suggest that the neural deficits of congenital amusia lie in the music-selective neural circuitry in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). However, it is unclear whether this finding can generalize to congenital amusics in tonal languages. Tonal language experience has been reported to shape the neural processing of pitch, which raises the question of how tonal language experience affects the neural bases of congenital amusia. To investigate this question, we examined the neural circuitries sub-serving the processing of relative pitch interval in pitch-matched Cantonese level tone and musical stimuli in 11 Cantonese-speaking amusics and 11 musically intact controls. Cantonese-speaking amusics exhibited abnormal brain activities in a widely distributed neural network during the processing of lexical tone and musical stimuli. Whereas the controls exhibited significant activation in the right superior temporal gyrus (STG) in the lexical tone condition and in the cerebellum regardless of the lexical tone and music conditions, no activation was found in the amusics in those regions, which likely reflects a dysfunctional neural mechanism of relative pitch processing in the amusics. Furthermore, the amusics showed abnormally strong activation of the right middle frontal gyrus and precuneus when the pitch stimuli were repeated, which presumably reflect deficits of attending to repeated pitch stimuli or encoding them into working memory. No significant group difference was found in the right IFG in either the whole-brain analysis or region-of-interest analysis. These findings imply that the neural deficits in tonal language speakers might differ from those in non-tonal language speakers, and overlap partly with the

  6. Associated noncardiac congenital anomalies among cases with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-02-01

    Cases with congenital heart defects (CHD) often have other associated anomalies. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the prevalence and the types of associated anomalies in CHD in a defined population. The anomalies associated with CHD were collected in all live births, stillbirths and terminations of pregnancy during 26 years in 346,831 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome in the area covered by our population based registry of congenital anomalies. Of the 4005 cases with CHD born during this period (total prevalence of 115.5 per 10,000), 1055 (26.3%) had associated major anomalies. There were 354 (8.8%) cases with chromosomal abnormalities including 218 trisomies 21, and 99 (2.5%) nonchromosomal recognized dysmorphic conditions. There were no predominant recognized dysmorphic conditions, but VACTERL association. However, other recognized dysmorphic conditions were registered including Noonan syndrome, fetal alcohol syndrome, and skeletal dysplasias. Six hundred and two (15.0%) of the cases had non syndromic, non chromosomal multiple congenital anomalies (MCA). Anomalies in the urinary tract, the musculoskeletal, the digestive, and the central nervous systems were the most common other anomalies. Prenatal diagnosis was obtained in 18.7% of the pregnancies. In conclusion the overall prevalence of associated anomalies, which was one in four infants, emphasizes the need for a thorough investigation of cases with CHD. A routine screening for other anomalies may be considered in infants and in fetuses with CHD. One should be aware that the anomalies associated with CHD can be classified into a recognizable anomaly, syndrome or pattern in one out of nine cases with CHD.

  7. Treacher Collins syndrome with multiple congenital heart defects after paroxetine exposure: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinlen, N; Zenciroğlu, A; Dilli, D; Aydin, B; Beken, S; Okumuş, N

    2014-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with an incidence of I in 40,000 to in 70,000 live births. It is characterized by abnormalities of the pinnae which are frequently associated with atresia of the external auditory canals and anomalies of the middle ear ossicles. Rarely congenital heart defects can be present. Prenatal paroxetine exposure may enhance the risks of major malformation, particularly cardiac defects. This article reports a newborn, whose mother used paroxetine during pregnancy, presenting with multiple congenital heart defects associated to typical physical characteristics of Treacher Collins syndrome.

  8. Congenital generalized lipodystrophia: a case report; Lipodistrofia generalizada congenita: relato de um caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malheiros, N.R.; Marchiori, E.; Praxedes, M.C.; Machado, D.M.; Carvalho, A.A.V. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    1995-01-01

    Congenital generalized lipodystrophia is a rare genetic disorder, transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait and is prevalent on female. This paper presents a case of a man, 36-year-old, suffering from congenital generalized lipodystrophia with clinical features of diabetes mellitus and dyspnea. Radiographic findings have shown cystic areas in the skeleton, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and paucity of abdominal fat. Radiological and anatomo-pathological aspects are presented as well as a review of the medical literature about the case. (author). 8 refs, 4 figs.

  9. Pharmacologic Agents in the Management of Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    patients with mild congenital and well as vitamin K in patients with cirrn-,sis. The use of acquired bleeding disorders. Despite intensive screen- DDAVP and...induce hemostasis during surgical pro- Moderate doses of aspirin 0 2 or drugs such as diphen- cedures such as renal biopsies. hydramine and diazepam ...Harris AS, Sjorin E, Nilsson IM. Intranasal andmnfor congenital an acquired bleeding disorders. Blood intravenous administration of desmopressin

  10. Congenital myotonic dystrophy can show congenital fiber type disproportion pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kayo; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Goto, Kanako; Minami, Narihiro; Noguchi, Satoru; Nonaka, Ikuya; Miki, Tetsuro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2010-04-01

    Congenital myotonic dystrophy (CDM) is associated with markedly expanded CTG repeats in DMPK. The presence of numerous immature fibers with peripheral halo is a characteristic feature of CDM muscles together with hypotrophy of type 1 fibers. Smaller type 1 fibers with no structural abnormality are a definitive criterion of congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD). Nonetheless, we recently came across a patient who was genetically confirmed as CDM, but had been earlier diagnosed as CFTD when he was an infant. In this study, we performed clinical, pathological, and genetic analyses in infantile patients pathologically diagnosed as CFTD to evaluate CDM patients indistinguishable from CFTD. We examined CTG repeat expansion in DMPK in 28 infantile patients pathologically diagnosed as CFTD. Mutation screening of ACTA1 and TPM3 was performed, and we compared clinical and pathological findings of 20 CDM patients with those of the other cohorts. We identified four (14%) patients with CTG expansion in DMPK. ACTA1 mutation was identified in four (14%), and TPM3 mutation was found in two (7%) patients. Fiber size disproportion was more prominent in patients with ACTA1 or TPM3 mutations as compared to CFTD patients with CTG expansion. A further three patients among 20 CDM patients showed pathological findings similar to CFTD. From our results, CDM should be excluded in CFTD patients.

  11. Endocrine disruptors and congenital anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Rittler

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The specialized literature was reviewed concerning the suspected increasing secular trends in the frequency of female births, male genital congenital anomalies, abnormal sperm counts, and testicular cancer. Although no risk factors could be identified yet, the observed sex ratio decline during the last decades has been considered to be an effect of certain pollutants on normal hormone activity, and human reproductive development. Reported increasing trends in the frequencies of hypospadias and cryptorchidism are very difficult to be interpreted due to the large variability in the registered frequency of these malformations due to operational as well as biological reasons.

  12. Laboratory Diagnosis of Congenital Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomares, Christelle; Montoya, Jose G

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that screening and treatment for toxoplasmosis during gestation result in a decrease of vertical transmission and clinical sequelae. Early treatment was associated with improved outcomes. Thus, laboratory methods should aim for early identification of infants with congenital toxoplasmosis (CT). Diagnostic approaches should include, at least, detection of Toxoplasma IgG, IgM, and IgA and a comprehensive review of maternal history, including the gestational age at which the mother was infected and treatment. Here, we review laboratory methods for the diagnosis of CT, with emphasis on serological tools. A diagnostic algorithm that takes into account maternal history is presented.

  13. Congenital Diverticular Disease of the Entire Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital or true colonic diverticulosis is a rare condition typified by the preservation of the colonic wall architecture within the diverticular outpouching. Cases of multiple jejunal diverticula have been reported as well as cases of solitary giant diverticula of the colon. There have been no reports in the literature of pancolonic congenital diverticulosis.

  14. Congenital Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, Melissa; Szymanski, Ann Marie; Slovin, Ariella; Wong, Edward C C; DeBiasi, Roberta L

    2017-01-11

    Congenital malaria is rare in the United States, but is an important diagnosis to consider when evaluating febrile infants. Herein, we describe a case of congenital Plasmodium falciparum malaria in a 2-week-old infant born in the United States to a mother who had emigrated from Nigeria 3 months before delivery. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  15. Multiple congenital defects in a newborn foal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.F. Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of multiple congenital defects in a newborn foal is reported. The animal showed hypoplasia of the left pelvic limb bones, uterus unicornis, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and unilateral renal and ureteral agenesis. This report includes the macroscopic and microscopic lesions observed in the case.

  16. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, Carianne L.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Velde, Enno T.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Pieper, Petronella G.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was used to assess mortality pre

  17. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regressio

  18. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....

  19. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. Verheugt (Carianne); C.S.P.M. Uiterwaal (Cuno); E.T. van der Velde (Enno); F.J. Meijboom (Folkert); P.G. Pieper (Petronella); A.P.J. van Dijk (Arie); H.W. Vliegen (Hubert); D.E. Grobbee (Diederick); B.J.M. Mulder (Barbara)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAimsMortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear.Methods and resultsThe Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's

  20. Mortality in adult congenital heart disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheugt, C.L.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Velde, E.T. van der; Meijboom, F.J.; Pieper, P.G.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Vliegen, H.W.; Grobbee, D.E.; Mulder, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: Mortality in adults with congenital heart disease is known to be increased, yet its extent and the major mortality risks are unclear. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Dutch CONCOR national registry for adult congenital heart disease was linked to the national mortality registry. Cox's regression was

  1. [Orthopedic aspects of congenital insensitivity to pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfen, C; Bensahel, H; Teule, J G

    1985-01-01

    The congenital insensitivity to pain regroups some rare diseases which are mainly 5: congenital insensitivity to pain; congenital sensitive neuropathies; distal sensitive neuropathies; Riley-Day syndrome or hereditary dysautonomia; at last, miscellaneous troubles. Three different cases are reported in children: true congenital insensitivity to pain; hereditary dysautonomia or Riley-Day syndrome; congenital insensitivity to pain localised to a lower limb joined to amniotic disease and abnormality of this limb. The orthopedic symptoms (osteomyelitis, arthropathies as Charcot type, dislocations, fractures) lead often to diagnosis and they are an important step of the prognosis. Scoliosis seems to be frequent in this disease. The orthopedic and surgical treatment, according to each localization, is difficult and must emphasize the prevention of bones and joints injuries.

  2. [Lowe syndrome revealed by prenatal diagnosis of congenital cataract with brain abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zéphir, P; Decramer, S; Sartor, A; Vayssière, C

    2014-05-01

    Congenital cataract is a rare disease whose incidence is estimated to 0.5% of birth in France. A study of the literature shows that congenital cataract is idiopathic in 50% of cases, hereditary forms representing 25% of cases. Other causes of congenital cataract are represented by viral embryofoetopathies acquired during pregnancy, metabolic disorders and chromosomal aberrations within the scope of malformative syndromes. The authors report the case of a neonatal diagnosis of Lowe syndrome suspected by the discovery of bilateral cataract initially isolated. The morphological exploration was completed by secondary brain abnormalities (periventricular lesions). The etiological prenatal exploration was negative. Lowe syndrome is a rare cause of antenatal cataract, which so far only one case has been reported.

  3. Study of cognitive sphere in children and adolescents with congenital myopathy (theoretical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Erokhina

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of current approaches to the study of states of higher mental functions in children and adolescents suffering from various forms of hereditary myopathies. The aim of this work is to study the theoretical rationale and the possibility of specific disorders of mental function in children and adolescents with congenital myopathies. To achieve this objective during the study it was necessary to solve the following problems: give a description of the various groups and forms of congenital myopathies, their clinical characteristics; justify the possibility of considering the hereditary myopathies as a factor in the formation of changes in visual-spatial activities and thinking; evaluate the possibility to use complex neuropsychological psycho-diagnostic techniques for investigating the state of the higher mental functions of children with congenital myopathies. The possibility of neuropsychological correction for this category of patients is discussed also.

  4. Liposuction for lower limb lipodystrophy in congenital analbuminaemia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandamany, Nanda; Munnoch, Alex

    2014-02-01

    Congenital analbuminaemia is a very rare autosomal dominant disorder in which patients have no serum albumin and markedly low serum total protein concentration. Clinically patients present with mild oedema, hypotension, fatigue and lipodystrophy often with abnormal body habitus. With only around 50 reported cases in the literature worldwide, management of the resulting lipodystrophy remains unclear. A 42-year-old male who was diagnosed with congenital analbuminaemia presented with bilateral lower limb lipodystrophy disproportionately affecting his thighs. This was associated with concerns over appearance, difficulties with mobility and finding clothing. He successfully underwent bilateral lower leg liposuction and has had no recurrence of his symptoms after 12 months. We have demonstrated that liposuction along with controlled compression therapy is a safe and effective treatment for managing lipodystrophy secondary to congenital analbuminaemia. Although rare, clinicians need to be aware that liposuction is a successful treatment modality, which should be made available to this select group of patients.

  5. A gene for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus localizes to 6p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrison, J.B.; Arnould, V.J.; Koenekoop, R.K. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Congenital nystagmus is an idiopathic disorder characterized by bilateral ocular oscillations usually manifest during infancy. Vision is typically decreased due to slippage of images across the fovea. As such, visual acuity correlates with nystagmus intensity, which is the amplitude and frequency of eye movements at a given position of gaze. X-linked, autosomal dominant, and autosomal recessive pedigrees have been described, but no mapping studies have been published. We recently described a large pedigree with autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus. A genome-wide search resulted in six markers on 6p linked by two-point analysis at {theta} = 0 (D6S459, D6S452, D6S465, FTHP1, D6S257, D6S430). Haplotype analysis localizes the gene for autosomal dominant congenital motor mystagmus to an 18-cM region between D6S271 and D6S455. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. A case of successful management with splenectomy of intractable ascites due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type Ⅱ-induced cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Themistoklis Vassiliadis; Ioannis Tsitouridis; Antonios Antoniadis; Panagiotis Semertzidis; Anna Kioumi; Evangelos Premetis; Nikolaos Eugenidis; Vassilia Garipidou; Vassilios Perifanis; Konstantinos Tziomalos; Olga Giouleme; Kalliopi Patsiaoura; Michalis Avramidis; Nikolaos Nikolaidis; Sofia Vakalopoulou

    2006-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias comprise a group of rare hereditary disorders of erythropoiesis,characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis as the predominant mechanism of anemia and by characteristic morphological aberrations of the majority of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type Ⅱ is the most frequent type. All types of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias distinctly share a high incidence of iron loading. Iron accumulation occurs even in untransfused patients and can result in heart failure and liver cirrhosis. We have reported about a patient who presented with liver cirrhosis and intractable ascites caused by congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type Ⅱ. Her clinical course was further complicated by the development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Splenectomy was eventually performed which achieved complete resolution of ascites, increase of hemoglobin concentration and abrogation of transfusion requirements.

  7. Recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital nemaline myopathy with ophthalomoplegia identified through massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Eri; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Inaba, Yuji; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ishida, Takefumi; Baba, Atsushi; Koike, Kenichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Furukawa, Toru; Saito, Kayoko

    2012-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a group of congenital myopathies, characterized by the presence of distinct rod-like inclusions "nemaline bodies" in the sarcoplasm of skeletal muscle fibers. To date, ACTA1, NEB, TPM3, TPM2, TNNT1, and CFL2 have been found to cause NM. We have identified recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital NM, through high-throughput screening of congenital myopathy/muscular dystrophy-related genes using massively parallel sequencing with target gene capture. The patient manifested fetal akinesia, neonatal severe hypotonia with muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, swallowing disturbance, and ophthalomoplegia. Skeletal muscle histology demonstrated nemaline bodies and small type 1 fibers, but without central cores or minicores. Congenital myopathies, a molecularly, histopathologically, and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders are considered to be a good candidate for massively parallel sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Mild gestational diabetes as a risk factor for congenital cryptorchidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Helena E; Tapanainen, Anna E; Kaleva, Marko M

    2006-01-01

    of cryptorchidism, e.g. prematurity and weight for gestational age, abnormal maternal glucose metabolism was significantly more common in the group of cryptorchid boys [diet-treated gestational diabetes, P = 0.0001; odds ratio, 3.98 (95% confidence interval, 1.97-8.05); diet-treated gestational diabetes or only......CONTEXT: Cryptorchidism is the most common malformation in newborn boys. Maternal diabetes has previously been suggested to be a risk factor for this disorder in one epidemiological study. OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the prevalence of maternal glucose metabolism disorders during pregnancy in newborn...... boys having normal testicular descent or congenital cryptorchidism. DESIGN: Postnatal analysis of maternal history concerning glucose metabolism abnormalities during pregnancy among cryptorchid and healthy Finnish boys. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The material of this case-control study comprises 1163...

  9. Congenital heart disease in adults and its problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Ontoseno

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available There were 40 adult congenital heart disease (CHD patients seen in the Cardiology Division during 1 year (February 1993 - February 1994. The most frequently seen defect was atrial septal defect; however there were also cases with patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonary stenosis, ventricular septal defect, and tetralogy of Fallot. Hemodynamic disorder, serious hindrance to education achievement, and occupational threat due to limited physical capabilities as well as malnutrition are some of prominent issues to be closely anticipated. In general the older the patients the more serious hemodynamic disorder they suffer due CHD. It is worth thinking how to improve the quality of life of CHD patients who succeed to live their adult lives and minimize any possible fatal complication risks.

  10. Expression profiling of muscles from Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy and laminin-alpha 2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy; is congenital muscular dystrophy a primary fibrotic disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Mariko; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Noguchi, Satoru; Sese, Jun; Okinaga, Takeshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi; Guicheney, Pascale; Ozono, Keiichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Morishita, Shinichi; Toda, Tatsushi

    2006-04-07

    Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) and laminin-alpha2 deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) are congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) and they both are categorized into the same clinical entity of muscular dystrophy as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). All three disorders share a common etiologic defect in the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, which connects muscle structural proteins with the extracellular basement membrane. To investigate the pathophysiology of these CMDs, we generated microarray gene expression profiles of skeletal muscle from patients in various clinical stages. Despite diverse pathological changes, the correlation coefficient of overall gene expression among these samples was considerably high. We performed a multi-dimensional statistical analysis, the Distillation, to extract determinant genes that distinguish CMD muscle from normal controls. Up-regulated genes were primarily extracellular matrix (ECM) components, whereas down-regulated genes included structural components of mature muscle. These observations reflect active interstitial fibrosis with less active regeneration of muscle cell components in the CMDs, characteristics that are clearly distinct from those of DMD. Although the severity of fibrosis varied among the specimens tested, ECM gene expression was consistently high without substantial changes through the clinical course. Further, in situ hybridization showed more prominent ECM gene expression on muscle cells than on interstitial tissue cells, suggesting that ECM components are induced by regeneration process rather than by 'dystrophy.' These data imply that the etiology of FCMD and MDC1A differs from that of the chronic phase of classical muscular dystrophy, and the major pathophysiologic change in CMDs might instead result from primary active fibrosis.

  11. [Congenital malformations: care or predict?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellerin, D

    1993-02-01

    Spectacular scientific and technological advances made in the last decade have had such a profound impact on biological and medical science that they have dramatically modified the citizen's behaviour concerning life events, especially congenital malformation. Prenatal diagnosis (PND) leads to do the diagnosis of almost all fetal internal and external malformations. The matter is, not only to care, but, first to know. The positive efficiency of PND is sometimes preparing the best cares and, of course, to recognize many severe anomalies postnatally diagnosed before PND time, and carrying wellknown 50% rate mortality by neo-natal surgery. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is pointed out as a good example of it, and of hopes and disappointing in utero foetal surgery. New protocol of assessment of fetal renal function is an appreciated method to do prognosis of some fetal uropathies before late in utero drainage, for a short time waiting for necessary maturation of lungs allowing premature delivery. The possibility to do PND of small and benign malformation leads to ask for the question of utility of to know. In spite of the respect of quality of life, can we really allow this type of human selection to be made? The next knowledges of the human genoma map bring us into the predictive medicine. Using "compulsory" PND is a real risk to practice dangerously, a soft eugenism. PND must be, and remain an outstanding advance to provide better treatment.

  12. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  13. Fine motor skills and expressive language: a study with children with congenital hypotyreoidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frezzato, Renata Camargo; Santos, Denise Castilho Cabrera; Goto, Maura Mikie Fukujima; Ouro, Michelle Prado Cabral do; Santos, Carolina Taddeo Mendes Dos; Dutra, Vivian; Lima, Maria Cecília Marconi Pinheiro

    2017-03-09

    To screen the global development of children with and without congenital hypothyroidism and to investigate the association between fine motor skills and expressive language development in both groups. This is a prospective study of a cohort of children diagnosed with Congenital Hypothyroidism and monitored in a reference service for congenital hypothyroidism of a public hospital and of children without this disorder. The screening was performed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development III in the cognitive, gross and fine motor skills, and receptive and expressive language domains. The children's performance was expressed in three categories: competent, and non-competent. We screened 117 children with average age of 21 months diagnosed with Congenital Hypothyroidism at birth, with the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) level normalized during screening, and 51 children without the condition. The children with Congenital Hypothyroidism presented lower performance in gross and fine motor skills upon comparison between the two groups, and no differences were found in the cognitive and receptive and expressive language domains. The association between fine motor skills and language persisted in the group with Hypothyroidism, demonstrating that the interrelationship of skills is present in all individuals, although this group is two times more likely to present expressive language impairment when fine motor skills are already compromised. In the development process, both skills - motor and expressive language - might be associated and/or dependent on each other in the sample assessed.

  14. A missense mutation S228P in the CRYBB1 gene causes autosomal dominant congenital cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; MA Xu; GU Feng; LIU Ning-pu; HAO Xiao-lin; WANG Kai-jie; WANG Ning-li; ZHU Si-quan

    2007-01-01

    Background Congenital cataract is a highly heterogeneous disorder at both the genetic and phenotypic levels. This study was conducted to identify disease locus for autosomal dominant congenital cataracts in a four generation Chinese family.Methods Family history and clinical data were recorded. All the members were genotyped with microsatellite markers which are close to the known genetic loci for autosomal congenital cataracts. Two-point Lod scores were obtained using the MLINK of the LINKAGE program package (ver 5.1). Candidate genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct cycle sequencing.Results The maximum Lod score of Zmax=2.11 was obtained with three microsatellite markers D22S258, D22S315,and D22S1163 at recombination fraction θ= 0. Haplotype analysis showed that the disease gene was localized to a 18.5 Mbp region on chromosome 22 flanked by markers D22S1174 and D22S270, spanning the β-crystallin gene cluster. A c.752T-->C mutation in exon 6 of CRYBB1 gene, which resulted in a heterozygous S228P mutation in predicted protein,was found to cosegregate with cataract in the family.Conclusions This study identified a novel mutation in CRYBB1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. These results provide strong evidence that CRYBB1 is a pathogenic gene for congenital cataract.

  15. Identification of a GJA3 Mutation in a Large Family with Bilateral Congenital Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Liu, Yuying; Liu, Yaning; Guo, Hui; Hu, Zhengmao; Xia, Kun; Jin, Xuemin

    2016-03-01

    The congenital cataract has been a clinically important cause of impaired vision development, making up about 10% of the cases of childhood blindness. Mutations of more than 40 genes have been identified causing congenital cataract with Mendelian inheritance, which indicated that it has an extremely high genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we recruited a large congenital cataract family and identified a missense mutation (c.143A>G: p.E48G) within gap junction protein alpha-3 (GJA3) gene in the proband using whole exome sequencing. Subsequent Sanger sequencing of this mutation in all family members revealed that this mutation cosegregated with the phenotype in the family with full penetrance. Our study identified a mutation in GJA3 that correlated with congenital cataract phenotype, which was not reported previously, and would be of benefit to the diagnosis of this genetic disorder. This finding expands the mutation spectrum of GJA3 and provides useful information for further study of the molecular pathogenesis of congenital cataract.

  16. Congenital Zika syndrome with arthrogryposis: retrospective case series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Epitacio Leite Rolim; Lins, Otavio Gomes; Aragão, Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra Mertens; Cruz, Danielle Di Cavalcanti Sousa; Rocha, Maria Angela Wanderley; Sobral da Silva, Paula Fabiana; Carvalho, Maria Durce Costa Gomes; do Amaral, Fernando José; Gomes, Joelma Arruda; Ribeiro de Medeiros, Igor Colaço; Ventura, Camila V; Ramos, Regina Coeli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical, radiological, and electromyographic features in a series of children with joint contractures (arthrogryposis) associated with congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus. Design Retrospective case series study. Setting Association for Assistance of Disabled Children, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Participants Seven children with arthrogryposis and a diagnosis of congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus during the Brazilian microcephaly epidemic. Main outcome measures Main clinical, radiological, and electromyographic findings, and likely correlation between clinical and primary neurological abnormalities. Results The brain images of all seven children were characteristic of congenital infection and arthrogryposis. Two children tested positive for IgM to Zika virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. Arthrogryposis was present in the arms and legs of six children (86%) and the legs of one child (14%). Hip radiographs showed bilateral dislocation in seven children, subluxation of the knee associated with genu valgus in three children (43%), which was bilateral in two (29%). All the children underwent high definition ultrasonography of the joints, and there was no evidence of abnormalities. Moderate signs of remodeling of the motor units and a reduced recruitment pattern were found on needle electromyography (monopolar). Five of the children underwent brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the remaining two CT only. All presented malformations of cortical development, calcifications predominantly in the cortex and subcortical white matter (especially in the junction between the cortex and white matter), reduction in brain volume, ventriculomegaly, and hypoplasia of the brainstem and cerebellum. MRI of the spine in four children showed apparent thinning of the cord and reduced ventral roots. Conclusions Congenital Zika syndrome should be added to the differential diagnosis of congenital

  17. Prevalence of Congenital Heart Diseases in Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel Megied Abo El-Magd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to assess the prevalence of cardiac anomalies in primary congenital hypothyroidism (PCH patients. Fifty patients with PCH recruited after diagnosis by ultrasonography or scintigraphy (64% Dysgenesis, 36% Dyshormonogenesis. The prevalence of cardiac anomalies was 18%, with renal anomalies being 8%. There was no significant difference in the longitudinal follow-up of growth and sexual maturation between a hypothyroid with and without anomalies. Statistically significant difference was found with replacement therapy of both groups. Hence, echocardiography should be done to screen this birth defect as soon as possible so as to prevent or delay the possible complications. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2013; 2(2.000: 85-91

  18. Corpus luteum hemorrhage in women with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ron; Brenner, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Bleeding into the corpus luteum following ovulation rarely has clinical significance in healthy women, but may lead to life-threatening hemorrhage in women with congenital or acquired bleeding disorders. Women who are at an increased risk for corpus luteum hemorrhage (CLH) can be divided in two categories; first, those taking anticoagulants because of a thrombotic disorder; and second, women with congenital bleeding disorders. The management and prevention of CLH is still unsettled and the literature dealing with this problem is based on case reports only. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment options of an acute bleeding event and prevention modalities of CLH in women with bleeding disorders.

  19. Angiographic analysis of congenital mitral stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-09-15

    Congenital mitral stenosis may be defined as a development abnormality of the mitral valve leaflets, commissures, interchordal spaces, papillary muscles, annulus or immediate supravalvular area producing obstruction to left ventricular filling. Authors had experience of nine case of congenital mitral stenosis confirmed by two dimensional echocardiography, angiocardiography and surgery in recent 5 years since 1979, and analyzed them with emphasis on the angiographic findings. The results are as follows: 1. Among 9 cases, 6 patients were male and 3 were female. Age distribution was from 4 month to 11 years. 2. The types of congenital mitral stenosis were 1 typical congenital mitral stenosis, 5 cases of parachute mitral valve and 3 cases of supramitral ring. 3. Angiographically typical congenital mitral stenosis showed narrowing of mitral valvular opening, parachute mitral valve displayed single large papillary muscle with narrowing valvular opening and supramitral ring disclosed semilunar shaped filling defect between left atrium and ventricle. 4. Associated cardiac and extracardiac anomalies of congenital mitral stenosis, as frequency wise, were ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of aorta, supra and subvalvular aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation and double outlet right ventricle. 5. Cardiac angiography is essential to diagnose congenital mitral stenosis, but the need of two dimensional echocardiography cannot be ignored.

  20. [Severe mental illness in mothers and congenital malformations in newborns: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Priscila Krauss; Lima, Lúcia Abelha; Magnanini, Mônica Maria Ferreira; Legay, Leticia Fortes; Lovisi, Giovanni Marcos

    2011-12-01

    The risk of congenital malformations appears to be higher in infants of mothers with mental disorders as compared to those of mothers with no history of psychiatric illness. This article presents a meta-analysis of studies on the association between maternal mental illness and congenital malformations. The review consisted of an article search in the MEDLINE, ISIWEB, Scopus, and SciELO databases, using the following key words: "mental disorders" OR "mental health" OR "psychotic disorders" OR "schizophrenia" AND "congenital abnormalities" OR "birth defects". A total of 108 studies were identified, and five articles were selected according to the established criteria. These articles were included in a meta-analysis, involving a total of 4,194 children of mothers with mental illness and 249,548 children of mothers with no such disorders. Pooled relative risk showed a significant association between exposure to mental illness in mothers and risk of malformations in newborns (RR = 2.06, 95%CI: 1.46-2.67). The study highlights the relationship between maternal mental health during pregnancy and its effects on the infant's health.

  1. Congenital amusia persists in the developing brain after daily music listening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Mignault Goulet

    Full Text Available Congenital amusia is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects about 3% of the adult population. Adults experiencing this musical disorder in the absence of macroscopically visible brain injury are described as cases of congenital amusia under the assumption that the musical deficits have been present from birth. Here, we show that this disorder can be expressed in the developing brain. We found that (10-13 year-old children exhibit a marked deficit in the detection of fine-grained pitch differences in both musical and acoustical context in comparison to their normally developing peers comparable in age and general intelligence. This behavioral deficit could be traced down to their abnormal P300 brain responses to the detection of subtle pitch changes. The altered pattern of electrical activity does not seem to arise from an anomalous functioning of the auditory cortex, because all early components of the brain potentials, the N100, the MMN, and the P200 appear normal. Rather, the brain and behavioral measures point to disrupted information propagation from the auditory cortex to other cortical regions. Furthermore, the behavioral and neural manifestations of the disorder remained unchanged after 4 weeks of daily musical listening. These results show that congenital amusia can be detected in childhood despite regular musical exposure and normal intellectual functioning.

  2. Radiological and clinical outcome after operations in patients with congenital deficiencies of the wrist and hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelzer-Schmied, Nicole; Jung, Martin [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Heidelberg (Germany); Ludwig, Karl, E-mail: karl.ludwig@klinikum-herford.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum Herford (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence, therapy results, complications and radiologic workup of operatively treated congenital disorders of the hand and wrist in a large university center during a 10-year period. Methods: The institutional database was retrospectively analysed for patients with congenital disorders of the hand and wrist treated operatively during a 10-year period (1998-2007). Disorders were classified according to Van Schoonhoven into 11 different entities. For each entity the incidence, the patients' age at the time of operation, the pre- and postoperative clinical and radiological workup and the frequency of complications and reoperations were evaluated. Results: A total of 278 patients was treated operatively for congenital disorders of the hand and wrist with syndactyly being present in 112, thumb hypoplasia in 15, polydactyly in 11, radial clubhand in 7, radioulnar synostosis in 6, clinodactyly in 6, thumb duplication in 6, brachydactyly in 4 and macrodactyly in 4 cases. Patients' age at the time of operation varied substantially between the different entities with a mean age between 0.9 and 6.2 years. There were 9 complications (3%, n = 278) - all of them infections. There were 28 reoperations (10%, n = 278), 13 of them (5%, n = 278) due to reoccurring webs in syndactyly. Conclusion: Congenital disorders of the hand and wrist include various rare diseases with syndactyly and thumb hypoplasia being the most frequent entities. As a rule, diagnosis is obtained clinically. Radiologic workup typically consists of plain radiography. Complications are rare, whereas reoperations are frequent, mostly due to reoccurring webs in syndactyly.

  3. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis and progressing acro-osteolysis: a case report with 7-year follow-up

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun; ZHANG Ai-bin; LIN Zhen; ZHOU Jiang-nan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Congenital insensitivity to pain is a rare disorder,first described by Dearborn1 in 1932. Since the discovery of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis or hereditary sensory neuropathy type Ⅳin 1983,2 fewer than 60 cases have been reported.3Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis and progressing acro-osteolysis is a very rare disorder characterized by absence of painful perception after birth. Severe problems may arise if pain sensation is absent, causing injury to oral structures as teeth, lips and the tongue by self mutilation. The patient is at a risk of late presentation with systemic illnesses associated with pain, such as fracture and joint dislocation. Importantly, the patient may suffer from acro-osteolysis with growth, for instance, osteolysis of the distal extremities.

  4. [Congenital hepatic fibrosis: apropos of 12 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murga, M L; Jara, P; Díaz, M C; de la Rubia, L; Arroba, M L; Larrauri, J; Vázquez, C

    1988-02-01

    Twelve patients with congenital hepatic fibrosis have been retrospectively studied and followed for 1 to 14 years. Clinical features, hepatic function tests and biopsy have been analyzed. Presence of portal hypertension and congenital malformation have been investigated. Clinical presentations varies from newborn to nine years of age without male or female predominance. Most frequent clinical form has been hypertensive type. Cholangitic type has worse prognosis. Familiar recurrence rate is 20%. Congenital malformations are associated in 92% most frequently infantile polycystic kidney disease. Hepatic biopsy has confirmed diagnosis in all patients.

  5. Right congenital pleuro-peritoneal hiatus hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DK

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are of various types which are due to the defect in the diaphragm and can be encountered in any period of life. Left mediastinal shift with right congenital diaphragmatic hernia is rare and life threatening malformation. We describe a case of right congenital diaphragmatic hernia of a newborn male infant, which died shortly after birth. The lobes of the liver were enlarged and occupied whole of the abdominal cavity. The stomach and intestinal loops were herniated into the right pleural cavity and partly into the left pleural cavity. Severe hypoplastic right lung, trilobed left lung and dextrocardia also were observed.

  6. The prevalence of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolk, Helen; Loane, Maria; Garne, Ester

    2010-01-01

    anomalies overwhelmingly concern children surviving the early neonatal period, who have important medical, social or educational needs. The prevalence of chromosomal anomalies was 3.6 per 1,000 births, contributing 28% of stillbirths/fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation with congenital anomaly, and 48...... of 23.9 per 1,000 births for 2003-2007. 80% were livebirths. 2.5% of livebirths with congenital anomaly died in the first week of life. 2.0% were stillbirths or fetal deaths from 20 weeks gestation. 17.6% of all cases were terminations of pregnancy following prenatal diagnosis (TOPFA). Thus, congenital...

  7. [Sex differences in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, P; Demian, H

    2016-12-01

    Gender influences the clinical presentation and the management of some acquired cardiovascular diseases, such as coronary artery disease, resulting in different outcomes. Differences between women and men are also noticed in congenital heart disease. They are mainly related to the prevalence and severity of some congenital heart defects at birth, and in adulthood to the prognosis, incidence of Eisenmenger syndrome and risks of pregnancy. The role of gender on the risk of operative mortality of congenital heart surgery remains debated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Congenital anomalies surveillance in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, R Brian

    2008-01-01

    Congenital anomalies (CA) are present in approximately 3% of all newborn babies and account for about 12% of paediatric hospital admissions. They represent an important public health problem. Surveillance is especially important so that preventive measures such as folic acid fortification can be properly assessed without resorting to a series of ad hoc studies. Canada's surveillance of CAs is weak, with only Alberta and British Columbia having established sytems. Most provinces have perinatal systems but their CA data are incomplete and they do not capture terminations of pregnancy. The same is true of the Public Health Agency of Canada's system. A new system, the Fetal Alert Network, has been proposed for Ontario, which represents a start but will require additional sources of ascertainment if it is to be a truly population-based system for Ontario.

  9. Congenital duplication of the gallbladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioleas, Michael C; Papavassiliou, Vassilios G; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Angouras, Dimitrios C; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-03-01

    Duplication of the gallbladder is a rare congenital anomaly of the biliary system. In this article, two cases of gallbladder duplication are presented. The first case is a patient with double gallbladder and concomitant choledocholithiasis. The probable diagnosis of double gallbladder was made preoperatively by computed tomography. The patient underwent a successful open cholecystectomy and common bile duct exploration. In the second case, two cystic formations in the place of gallbladder are demonstrated with ultrasound scan in a woman with acute cholecystitis. At surgery, two gallbladders were found. A brief review of epidemiology and anatomy of double gallbladder is included, along with a discussion of the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment of this condition.

  10. CONGENITAL SENSORY NEUROPATHY (HSAN II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Chalam

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 5 year old girl having hereditary sensory neuropathy, type II manifesting as congenital absence of pain sensation and trophic changes in the skin is reported. This child presented with presented with multiple ulcers over hands and feet since 2 years of age. The ulcers were non - healing type with serosanguineous discharge. There is abnormal gait and weakness in upper and lower limbs. On examination there are deep ulcers measuring 5x7x2cms over left feet. Fingers of both hands and feet were mutilated with loss of phalanges, sensations to fine touch, pain and temperature are decreased bilaterally below the mid arm and feet, vibration sensations were normal, proprioception could not be tested due to deformities. Sensory and motor nerve conduction studies showed evidence of sensorimotor axonal neuropathy.

  11. Congenital epulis of the newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Mahesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital epulis, a benign tumor of the oral cavity, is an extremely rare condition in newborn. It may lead to mechanical obstruction, therefore resulting in respiratory distress and difficulty in feeding. Addressing the problem may need a multidisciplinary team approach at the time of birth. Antenatal ultrasonography and perinatal magnetic resonance imaging are an adjunct to treatment planning. Prenatal diagnosis remains difficult as the findings are nonspecific due to the late development of the tumor. Surgical excision is, therefore, the treatment of choice. Our report discusses this condition and the treatment thereafter on a newborn, with an epulis originating from the upper alveolar ridge discovered at birth. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of large polygonal granular cells. The mass was excised under general anesthesia, and the outcome was good after surgery allowing regular feeds on the second postoperative day.

  12. Imaging of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, George A.; Estroff, Judy A. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); Atalabi, Omolola M. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA (United States); The College of Medicine/University College Hospital, Ibadan (Nigeria)

    2009-01-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernias are complex and life-threatening lesions that are not just anatomic defects of the diaphragm, but represent a complex set of physiologic derangements of the lung, the pulmonary vasculature, and related structures. Imaging plays an increasingly important role in the care of these infants. Prenatal sonography and MRI have allowed early and accurate identification of the defect and associated anomalies. These tools have also been the key to defining the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia and to predicting neonatal survival and need for aggressive respiratory rescue strategies. In the postnatal period, conventional radiography supplemented by cross-sectional imaging in selected cases can be very useful in sorting out the differential diagnosis of intrathoracic masses, in the detection of associated anomalies, and in the management of complications. Understanding the pathogenesis of diaphragmatic defects, the underlying physiologic disturbances, and the strengths and limitations of current imaging protocols is essential to the effective and accurate management of these complex patients. (orig.)

  13. X-linked congenital retinoschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, U; Brümmer, S; Foerster, M H; Wessing, A

    1990-01-01

    The natural history and electrophysiological findings of 52 patients with X-linked congenital retinoschisis with a follow-up of up to 26 years are described. The mean visual acuity was reduced to 0.24 +/- 0.2 and remained unchanged in most patients during this time. If visual loss occurred, it usually happened in the first decennium. The complications were retinal detachments in 11% and vitreous hemorrhages in 4% of the eyes. In general, the vitreous hemorrhages resolved spontaneously. Retinal detachments were treated successfully with conventional buckling procedures. Redetachments occurred in about 40%. Prophylactic laser coagulation was of no use because it was complicated by detachment in 43% of our series. The electro-oculogram was usually normal. In addition to the known electrorentinographic findings of normal a-wave and reduced b-wave amplitudes, we found prolonged b-wave latencies and implicit times, as well as a reduced 30 Hz flicker response.

  14. Pediatric red cell disorders and pure red cell aplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Sherrie L

    2004-12-01

    Anemia in children may arise from a wide variety of pathogenetic mechanisms that include congenital and acquired disorders. Often the diagnostic considerations include disorders that are not seen commonly in adults and lifelong disorders that arise in children and persist throughout life. Consideration of diverse causes of anemia such as red cell membrane disorders, red cell enzymopathies, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias, and hereditary pure red cell aplasia (Diamond-Blackfan anemia), as well as infectious causes such as parvovirus B19 infection, often is required when diagnosing anemia in an infant or young child. Knowledge of these entities that are important causes of anemia in the pediatric population, including clinical manifestations and laboratory workup, will aid in recognition of the specific disease entities and effective workup of pediatric red cell disorders.

  15. [Congenital prosopagnosia: symptoms, cognition, and neural correlates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iidaka, Tetsuya

    2014-04-01

    Congenital prosopagnosia (CP) refers to lifelong and severe impairment of face processing, which is apparent from birth, despite intact visual and intellectual abilities. Usually, individuals with CP do not exhibit brain lesions or neurological disorders that account for their specific impairment. An epidemiological survey revealed that the prevalence rate of CP was approximately 2.5% in a young Caucasian population. CP frequently runs in families, suggesting a genetic component in this disturbance. Detailed neuropsychological investigations demonstrated that individuals with CP show reduced performance in face tasks including famous face recognition, face matching, and encoding/retrieval of novel faces. In contrast, they can judge facial expression and eye gaze almost as well as healthy controls. These results suggest an impairment of holistic processing of faces in individuals with CP. Neurophysiological investigation using ERP showed that individuals with CP, as a group, had reduced voltage of the N170 component, which is a hallmark of face processing in the temporal lobe. However, there were large variations in the results of N170 among individuals with CP. Structural MRI showed that the impairments could be due to reduced volume of grey matter and microstructure of white matter in a part of the temporal lobe. Studies using fMRI and face tasks revealed mixed results with regard to face-selective activation in the fusiform gyrus. These findings indicate the heterogeneity of CP, and further investigation is needed to clarify neurodevelopmental substrates of face processing. Results from normative data obtained using the Japanese version of a questionnaire for screening of hereditary prosopagnosia is presented.

  16. Molecular Diagnostics and Genetic Counseling in Primary Congenital Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiq, Muneeb; Mohanty, Kuldeep; Dada, Rima; Dada, Tanuj

    2013-01-01

    Primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) is a childhood irreversible blinding disorder with onset at birth or in the first year of life. It is characterized by the classical traid of symptoms viz. epiphora (excessive tearing), photophobia (hypersensitivity to light) and blepharospasm (inflammation of eyelids). The only anatomical defect seen in PCG is trabecular meshwork dysgenesis. PCG shows autosomal recessive mode of inheritance with considerable number of sporadic cases. The etiology of this disease has not been fully understood but some genes like CYP1B1, MYOC, FOXC1, LTBP2 have been implicated. Various chromosomal aberrations and mutations in mitochondrial genome have also been reported. Molecular biology has developed novel techniques in order to do genetic and biochemical characterization of many genetic disorders including PCG. Techniques like polymerase chain reaction, single strand conformational polymorphism and sequencing are already in use for diagnosis of PCG and other techniques like protein truncation testing and functional genomics are beginning to find their way into molecular workout of this disorder. In the light of its genetic etiology, it is important to develop methods for genetic counseling for the patients and their families so as to bring down its incidence. In this review, we ought to develop a genetic insight into PCG with possible use of molecular biology and functional genomics in understanding the disease etiology, pathogenesis, pathology and mechanism of inheritance. We will also discuss the possibilities and use of genetic counseling in this disease. How to cite this article: Faiq M, Mohanty K, Dada R, Dada T. Molecular Diagnostics and Genetic Counseling in Primary Congenital Glaucoma. J Current Glau Prac 2013;7(1):25-35.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: congenital insensitivity to pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a complete loss of the sense of smell (anosmia). Congenital insensitivity to pain is considered a ... to cells that detect sensations such as touch, smell, and pain. Related Information What does it mean ...

  18. Congenital clinical malaria: Incidence, management and outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... were the admitted neonates to the emergency paediatric unit and the Special ... no mortality occurred in congenital clinical malaria, however, a diverse pattern of ... mothers of the importance of ante natal clinic visits for prescription of malaria ...

  19. Congenital asymmetric crying face: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Kara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Congenital asymmetric crying face is an anomalia caused by unilateral absence or weakness of depressor anguli oris muscle The major finding of the disease is the absence or weakness in the outer and lower movement of the commissure during crying. The other expression muscles are normal and the face is symmetric at rest. The asymmetry in congenital asymmetric crying face is most evident during infancy but decreases by age. Congenital asymmetric crying face can be associated with cervicofacial, musclebone, respiratory, genitourinary and central nervous system anomalia. It is diagnosed by physical examination. This paper presents a six days old infant with Congenital asymmetric crying face and discusses the case in terms of diagnosis and disease features.

  20. Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude;

    2014-01-01

    with influenza. RESULTS: We detected statistically significant seasonality in prevalence of anomalies previously associated with influenza, but the conception peak was in June (2.4% excess). We also detected seasonality in congenital cataract (April conceptions, 27%), hip dislocation and/or dysplasia (April, 12......%), congenital hydronephrosis (July, 12%), urinary defects (July, 5%), and situs inversus (December, 36%), but not for nonchromosomal anomalies combined, chromosomal anomalies combined, or other anomalies analyzed. CONCLUSION: We have confirmed previously described seasonality for congenital cataract and hip......BACKGROUND: This study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relation...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: giant congenital melanocytic nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that is composed of pigment-producing cells called melanocytes . It is present from birth (congenital) or is ... is the presence of pigment-producing skin cells (melanocytes) in the tissue that covers the brain and ...

  2. Stroke Recurrence in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada identified 135 patients with congenital heart disease diagnosed with arterial ischemic stroke during 1992-2008 and registered in the Canadian Pediatric Stroke Registry-Toronto site.

  3. Brain MRI Findings in Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings in 13 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (MDCIC and Fukutin-related protein (FKRP gene mutations were retrospectively reviewed in a study at Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, and European centers.

  4. Congenital microgastria and hypoplastic upper limb anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueder, G T; Fitz-James, A; Dowton, S B

    1989-03-01

    Six cases of congenital microgastria associated with limb anomalies are reviewed. The microgastria-hypoplastic upper limb association may arise as a result of aberrant mesodermal development in the 5th embryonic week.

  5. Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Congenital Heart Defects and Physical Activity Updated:Apr 19,2016 Exercise Is for Everyone ... almost all patients do some form of regular physical activity. There are a few exceptions, so it's good ...

  6. [Congenital anomalies of poor prognosis. Genetics Consensus Committee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo Vargas, Rosa A; Aracena, Mariana; Aravena, Teresa; Cares, Carolina; Cortés, Fanny; Faundes, Víctor; Mellado, Cecilia; Passalacqua, Cristóbal; Sanz, Patricia; Castillo Taucher, Silvia

    The Genetic Branch of the Chilean Society of Paediatrics, given the draft Law governing the decriminalisation of abortion on three grounds, focusing on the second ground, which considers the "embryo or foetus suffering from a congenital structural anomaly or a genetic disorder incompatible with life outside the womb", met to discuss the scientific evidence according to which congenital anomalies (CA) may be included in this draft law. Experts in clinical genetics focused on 10 CA, reviewed the literature evidence, and met to discuss it. It was agreed not to use the term "incompatible with life outside the womb", as there are exceptions and longer survivals, and change to "congenital anomaly of poor prognosis (CAPP)". Ten CA were evaluated: serious defects of neural tube closure: anencephaly, iniencephaly and craniorachischisis, pulmonary hypoplasia, acardiac foetus, ectopia cordis, non-mosaic triploidy, "limb body wall" complex, "body stalk" anomaly, trisomy 13, trisomy 18, and bilateral renal agenesis. Findings on the prevalence, natural history, prenatal diagnostic methods, survival, and reported cases of prolonged survival were analysed. Post-natal survival, existence of treatments, and outcomes, as well as natural history without intervention, were taken into account in classifying a CA as a CAPP. A CAPP would be: anencephaly, severe pulmonary hypoplasia, acardiac foetus, cervical ectopia cordis, non-mosaic triploidy, limb body wall complex, body stalk anomaly, non-mosaic trisomy 13, non-mosaic trisomy 18, and bilateral renal agenesis. For their diagnosis, it is required that all pregnant women have access to assessments by foetal anatomy ultrasound and occasionally MRI, and cytogenetic and molecular testing. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbohydrate digestion in congenital sucrase isomaltase deficient and recurrent abdominal pain children assesed by 13C- starch breath test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starches contribute about half of the food energy needs to the weaned child's diet. Malabsorption of sucrose is associated with abdominal pain, bloating and diarrhea. A genetic disorder called Congenital Sucrase-Isomaltase Deficiency (CSID) is suspected when these symptoms follow sugar ingestion and...

  8. Alterations in the ankyrin domain of TRPV4 cause congenital distal SMA, scapuloperoneal SMA and HMSN2C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Olschewski, Andrea; Papic, Lea; Kremer, Hannie; McEntagart, Meriel E.; Uhrig, Sabine; Fischer, Carina; Froehlich, Eleonore; Balint, Zoltan; Tang, Bi; Strohmaier, Heimo; Lochmueller, Hanns; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Senderek, Jan; Krebs, Angelika; Dick, Katherine J.; Petty, Richard; Longman, Cheryl; Anderson, Neil E.; Padberg, George W.; Schelhaas, Helenius J.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Pieber, Thomas R.; Crosby, Andrew H.; Guelly, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMA, also known as hereditary motor neuropathies) and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Here we report that mutations in the TRPV4 gene cause congenital distal SMA, scap

  9. Alterations in the ankyrin domain of TRPV4 cause congenital distal SMA, scapuloperoneal SMA and HMSN2C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auer-Grumbach, M.; Olschewski, A.; Papic, L.; Kremer, J.M.J.; McEntagart, M.E.; Uhrig, S.; Fischer, C.; Frohlich, E.; Balint, Z.; Tang, B.; Strohmaier, H.; Lochmuller, H.; Schlotter-Weigel, B.; Senderek, J.; Krebs, A.; Dick, K.J.; Petty, R.; Longman, C.; Anderson, N.E.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Pieber, T.R.; Crosby, A.H.; Guelly, C.

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMA, also known as hereditary motor neuropathies) and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Here we report that mutations in the TRPV4 gene cause congenital distal SMA, scap

  10. Alterations in the ankyrin domain of TRPV4 cause congenital distal SMA, scapuloperoneal SMA and HMSN2C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Olschewski, Andrea; Papic, Lea; Kremer, Hannie; McEntagart, Meriel E.; Uhrig, Sabine; Fischer, Carina; Froehlich, Eleonore; Balint, Zoltan; Tang, Bi; Strohmaier, Heimo; Lochmueller, Hanns; Schlotter-Weigel, Beate; Senderek, Jan; Krebs, Angelika; Dick, Katherine J.; Petty, Richard; Longman, Cheryl; Anderson, Neil E.; Padberg, George W.; Schelhaas, Helenius J.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Pieber, Thomas R.; Crosby, Andrew H.; Guelly, Christian

    Spinal muscular atrophies (SMA, also known as hereditary motor neuropathies) and hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Here we report that mutations in the TRPV4 gene cause congenital distal SMA,

  11. Defining the phenotype in an autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome with a combined congenital defect of glycosylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Lefeber, D.J.; Urban, Z.; Meirleir, L. de; Meinecke, P.; Kaesbach, G. Gillessen; Sykut-Cegielska, J.; Adamowicz, M.; Salafsky, I.; Ranells, J.; Lemyre, E.; Reeuwijk, J. van; Brunner, H.G.; Wevers, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa is a genetically heterogeneous condition. Its molecular basis is largely unknown. Recently, a combined disorder of N- and O-linked glycosylation was described in children with congenital cutis laxa in association with severe central nervous system involvement, brain

  12. Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome : from clinical and genetic diagnosis to the molecular mechanisms involved in intestinal elongation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Christine S.; Halim, Danny; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Alves, Maria M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital Short Bowel Syndrome (CSBS) is a rare gastrointestinal disorder in which the mean length of the small intestine is substantially reduced when compared to its normal counterpart. Families with several affected members have been described and CSBS has been suggested to have a genetic basis.

  13. Heterozygous mutations of the kinesin KIF21A in congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamada, K; Andrews, C; Chan, WM; McKeown, CA; Magli, A; de Berardinis, T; Loewenstein, A; Lazar, M; O'Keefe, M; Letson, R; London, A; Ruttum, M; Matsumoto, N; Saito, N; Morris, L; Del Monte, M; Johnson, RH; Uyama, E; Houtman, WA; de Vries, B; Carlow, TJ; Hart, BL; Krawiecki, N; Shoffner, J; Vogel, MC; Katowitz, J; Goldstein, SM; Levin, AV; Sener, EC; Ozturk, BT; Akarsu, AN; Brodsky, MC; Hanisch, F; Cruse, RP; Zubcov, AA; Robb, RM; Roggenkaemper, P; Gottlob, [No Value; Kowal, L; Battu, R; Traboulsi, EI; Franceschini, P; Newlin, A; Demer, JL; Engle, EC

    2003-01-01

    Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1 (CFEOM1; OMIM #135700) is an autosomal dominant strabismus disorder associated with defects of the oculomotor nerve. We show that individuals with CFEOM1 harbor heterozygous missense mutations in a kinesin motor protein encoded by KIF21A. We iden

  14. Memory for pitch in congenital amusia: beyond a fine-grained pitch discrimination problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Victoria Jane; Stewart, Lauren

    2010-08-01

    Congenital amusia is a disorder that affects the perception and production of music. While amusia has been associated with deficits in pitch discrimination, several reports suggest that memory deficits also play a role. The present study investigated short-term memory span for pitch-based and verbal information in 14 individuals with amusia and matched controls. Analogous adaptive-tracking procedures were used to generate tone and digit spans using stimuli that exceeded psychophysically measured pitch perception thresholds. Individuals with amusia had significantly smaller tone spans, whereas their digits spans were a similar size to those of controls. An automated operation span task was used to determine working memory capacity. Working memory deficits were seen in only a small subgroup of individuals with amusia. These findings support the existence of a pitch-specific component within short-term memory and suggest that congenital amusia is more than a disorder of fine-grained pitch discrimination.

  15. Case series: Congenital left ventricular diverticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Dharita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital left ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac malformation characterized by a localized outpouching from the cardiac chamber. The patient is usually asymptomatic. However, complications like embolism, infective endocarditis, arrhythmia and, rarely, rupture can be the initial presentation. Diagnosis can be established by USG, echocardiography, CT angiography, and MRI. We report here two neonates with congenital left ventricular apical diverticulum associated with epigastric hernia.

  16. Congenital oesophageal hiatal hernia in a pug

    OpenAIRE

    Keeley B; Puggioni A; Pratschke K

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Congenital sliding, oesophageal or type I hiatal hernia was diagnosed in a five-month-old pug puppy presented for evaluation of dyspnoea post feeding. The diagnosis was confirmed using plain film radiography. Surgical reduction of the hernia followed by plication of the oesophageal hiatus, oesophagopexy and left flank gastropexy permitted restoration of normal function. At 12 months of age, the dog was asymptomatic. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of a congenital t...

  17. Congenital malalignment of the big toe nail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gunnar; Sachse, Michael Max

    2012-05-01

    Congenital malalignment of the big toe nail is based on a lateral deviation of the nail plate. This longitudinal axis shift is due to a deviation of the nail matrix, possibly caused by increased traction of the hypertrophic extensor tendon of the hallux. Congenital malalignment of the big toe nail is typically present at birth. Ingrown toenails and onychogryphosis are among the most common complications. Depending on the degree of deviation, conservative or surgical treatment may be recommended.

  18. Development and Congenital Anomalies of the Pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroyuki Tadokoro; Masaru Takase; Bunsei Nobukawa

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how the pancreas develops is essential to understand the pathogenesis of congenital pancreatic anomalies. Recent studies have shown the advantages of investigating the development of frogs, mice, and chickens for understanding early embryonic development of the pancreas and congenital anomalies, such as choledochal cysts, anomalous pancreaticobiliary junction, annular pancreas, and pancreas divisum. These anomalies arise from failure of complete rotation and fusion during embryo...

  19. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  20. Congenital Scaphoid Megalourethra: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Obara

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A congenital megalourethra is an enlargement of the pendulous urethra without evidence of distal obstruction. A 1-month-old boy presented to us with complaint of weak stream, ballooning of the penis before and during voiding and post voiding dribbling, since birth. Physical examination and cystourethroscope confirmed the diagnosis of congenital scaphoid megalourethra. He underwent reduction urethroplasty. During postoperative follow up, he had normal looking penis with good urinary stream.

  1. CONGENITAL RADIAL DYSPLASIA: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatram Reddy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital radial dysplasia, also referred to as radial club hand , means deficiency along the preaxial or radial side of the extremity. It ranges from hypoplasia of the thumb to variou s degrees of radial hypoplasia. We present one such rare case of type 4 congenital unilateral isolated radial dysplasia with carpel anomaly , reported to our department in SVS medical C ollege, Mahabubanagar, Telangana state

  2. Solitary ulcerated congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yuen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient with a giant ulcerated nodule over the back since birth was diagnosed as congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG based on clinical and histopathological examination. Congenital giant JXG with ulceration at birth is a rare presentation of JXG and commonly misdiagnosed. This case emphasizes the importance of being aware of the myriad presentations of JXG in order to make a correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary investigations or treatment.

  3. ABNORMALITIES OF ERG IN CONGENITAL ANIRIDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is generally associated with nystagmus, corneal pannus, cataract, ectopia lentis, glaucoma, macular hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia and compromised visual function. Many theories have been proposed, including a failure in the development of the neural ectoderm and/or an aberrant development of mesoderm. We observed the ERG from 19 patients with congenital aniridia. Fourteen patients had abnormal ERG, including the reduced a wave trough under dark adapted red stimuli with dark adap...

  4. Radiographic observation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Women' s University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-12-15

    Five cases of congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 1: A female infant, birth weight 2.25 kg, Apgar score 10, normal delivery at 11:33 P.M. on Feb.8, 1972. Lt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 2: A female infant, birth weight 1.48 kg, Apgar score 5, normal delivery at 11:20 A.M. on Oct.14, 1972. Lt. side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. This infant was twin. this infant's mother was toxemia. Case 3; A 33 years old women was admitted to the our hospital because of Lt.hip joint pain without other symptoms. Date of admission: Jan. 8, 1973. Rt side congenital diaphragmentic hernia. Case 4: A 4 month infant male was admitted to the our hospital because of vomiting, dyspnea and abdominal pain. He had cyanosis intermittently after one month ago. This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: This infant was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: Aug. 30, 1971. Rt side congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Case 5: A 13 years old girl was admitted to our hospital because of general weakness without other symptoms. This patient was normal delivered. The family history was not contributory. Date of admission: March. 15, 1973. Lt. side congenital diaphragmentic hernia.

  5. [Aftereffects of congenital infections in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdzenidze, E; Zhvania, M

    2006-12-01

    Congenital infections are among the most pressing health care problems. Congenital infections are not reason of congenital malformation and perinatal mortality only, but also pathologies that can be revealed during first year of life. Frequency for congenital viral infection displayed from birth varies between 23% and 92%. The aim of the study was the investigation of inherent infection consequences (citomegaloviral infection, herpes infection and chlamidia) in children in different age groups. Under our observation were 81 children with congenital infections. Among them 29 were with citomegaloviral infection, 17 with herpes infection; 15 chlamidia infection and 22 infections mix (citomegalovirus + herpes, citomegalovirus + chlamidia and chlamidia + herpes). In all observed children neurological simptomatic such as neuro-reflectory hyperexcitability syndrom, hypertension-hydrocephalic syndrom, musculary dystonia syndrom, hydrocephaly, retardation of psychomotor development etc. were present. After birth the worst prevalent are pathologies of cardiovascular system: functional cardiopathy, carditis, congenital heart disease (among them multivalvular disease), affection of hepatobilliar system, organs of vision and hearing etc are present also.

  6. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merke, Deborah P; Poppas, Dix P

    2014-01-01

    The management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involves suppression of adrenal androgen production, in addition to treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia is especially challenging because changes in the hormonal milieu during puberty can lead to inadequate suppression of adrenal androgens, psychosocial issues often affect adherence to medical therapy, and sexual function plays a major part in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, treatment regimen reassessment is indicated during adolescence. Patients with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia require reassessment regarding the need for glucocorticoid drug treatment. No clinical trials have compared various regimens for classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia in adults, thus therapy is individualised and based on the prevention of adverse outcomes. Extensive patient education is key during transition from paediatric care to adult care and should include education of females with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia regarding their genital anatomy and surgical history. Common issues for these patients include urinary incontinence, vaginal stenosis, clitoral pain, and cosmetic concerns; for males with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, common issues include testicular adrenal rest tumours. Transition from paediatric to adult care is most successful when phased over many years. Education of health-care providers on how to successfully transition patients is greatly needed. PMID:24622419

  7. Face Perception and Test Reliabilities in Congenital Prosopagnosia in Seven Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Janina Esins; Johannes Schultz; Claudia Stemper; Ingo Kennerknecht; Isabelle Bülthoff

    2016-01-01

    Congenital prosopagnosia, the innate impairment in recognizing faces, is a very heterogeneous disorder with different phenotypical manifestations. To investigate the nature of prosopagnosia in more detail, we tested 16 prosopagnosics and 21 controls with an extended test battery addressing various aspects of face recognition. Our results show that prosopagnosics exhibited significant impairments in several face recognition tasks: impaired holistic processing (they were tested amongst others w...

  8. Reduced sensitivity to emotional prosody in congenital amusia rekindles the musical protolanguage hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, William Forde; Marin, Manuela M.; Stewart, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    A number of evolutionary theories assume that music and language have a common origin as an emotional protolanguage that remains evident in overlapping functions and shared neural circuitry. The most basic prediction of this hypothesis is that sensitivity to emotion in speech prosody derives from the capacity to process music. We examined sensitivity to emotion in speech prosody in a sample of individuals with congenital amusia, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in proce...

  9. Acute liver failure in a pediatric patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I treated with deferasirox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Ling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDA represent a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by morphological abnormalities of erythroid precursor cells and various degrees of hemolysis. Iron overload is a result of continuous hemolysis and recurrent transfusions. It is treated with iron chelators, including deferasirox. We present here a case of acute liver failure in a 12 years old girl with CDA type I treated with deferasirox and discuss the approach to treatment.

  10. Mutations in the Translated Region of the Lactase Gene (LCT) Underlie Congenital Lactase Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen, Mikko; Kokkonen, Jorma; Enattah, Nabil Sabri; Ylisaukko-oja, Tero; Komu, Hanna; Varilo, Teppo; Peltonen, Leena; Savilahti, Erkki; Järvelä, Irma

    2005-01-01

    Congenital lactase deficiency (CLD) is a severe gastrointestinal disorder characterized by watery diarrhea in infants fed with breast milk or other lactose-containing formulas. We initially assigned the CLD locus by linkage and linkage disequilibrium on 2q21 in 19 Finnish families. Here we report the molecular background of CLD via characterization of five distinct mutations in the coding region of the lactase (LCT) gene. Twenty-seven patients out of 32 (84%) were homozygous for a nonsense mu...

  11. Congenital generalized lipodystrophy of Berardinelli-Seip type: A rare case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujay Khandpur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital generalized lipodystrophy of Berardinelli-Seip type is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by nearly complete absence of adipose tissue and a consequent generalized muscular appearance, which is recognized easily at birth. The condition is associated with various dermatological and systemic manifestations. We report a case of this form of lipodystrophy. The patient had several cutaneous manifestations, including severe acanthosis nigricans, generalized hyperpigmentation, curly scalp hair, prominent subcutaneous veins, and enlarged clitoris. She also had associated celiac disease.

  12. Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face with enlargement of the ipsilateral cerebellar hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Gous

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CILF is a rare disorder in which overgrowth of fatty tissue with infiltration of underlying structures leads to craniofacial deformities and asymmetry. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, surgical planning and evaluation of underlying structures. To our knowledge, our case is the first to describe CILF associated with isolated enlargement of a cerebellar hemisphere in the absence of an enlarged ipsilateral cerebral hemisphere (hemimegalencephaly.

  13. Infrequent SCN9A mutations in congenital insensitivity to pain and erythromelalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Christopher J.; Wu, Yanhong; Kilfoyle, Dean H; Sandroni, Paola; Davis, Mark D; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Low, Phillip A.; Dyck, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Mutations in SCN9A have been reported in (1) congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP); (2) primary erythromelalgia; (3) paroxysmal extreme pain disorder; (4) febrile seizures and recently (5) small fibre sensory neuropathy. We sought to investigate for SCN9A mutations in a clinically well-characterised cohort of patients with CIP and erythromelalgia. Methods We sequenced all exons of SCN9A in 19 clinically well-studied cases including 6 CIP and 13 erythromelalgia (9 with family histor...

  14. Modeling congenital disease and inborn errors of development in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Fly models that faithfully recapitulate various aspects of human disease and human health-related biology are being used for research into disease diagnosis and prevention. Established and new genetic strategies in Drosophila have yielded numerous substantial successes in modeling congenital disorders or inborn errors of human development, as well as neurodegenerative disease and cancer. Moreover, although our ability to generate sequence datasets continues to outpace our ability to analyze t...

  15. Modeling congenital disease and inborn errors of development in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fly models that faithfully recapitulate various aspects of human disease and human health-related biology are being used for research into disease diagnosis and prevention. Established and new genetic strategies in Drosophila have yielded numerous substantial successes in modeling congenital disorders or inborn errors of human development, as well as neurodegenerative disease and cancer. Moreover, although our ability to generate sequence datasets continues to outpace our ability to ...

  16. Severe congenital nemaline myopathy with primary pulmonary lymphangiectasia: unusual clinical presentation and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Waisayarat, Jariya; Suriyonplengsaeng, Chinnawut; Khongkhatithum, Chaiyos; Rochanawutanon, Mana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Nemaline myopathy is a rare genetic muscle disorder defined by the presence of nemaline rods in the muscle fibre sarcoplasm. Congenital nemaline myopathy is the most serious form of the disease’s spectrum. Case presentation The affected newborn has no spontaneous movement, fractures at birth and respiratory insufficiency. The present case was a Thai male, floppy at birth with fractures of both humeri and femurs and ventilator-dependent respiration. The patient developed bilateral...

  17. Congenital varicella syndrome: cranial MRI in a long-term survivor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, N.P.; Jarosz, J.M.; Cox, T.C.S. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Ruskin Wing, King`s Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, E. [Dept. of Paediatric Neurology, King`s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-03-01

    Congenital varicella syndrome is a rare disorder which follows maternal infection in the first or early second trimester. The syndrome comprises a number of malformations including microcephaly, cortical destruction and limb hypoplasia. We describe a case where there has been long-term survival following second trimester maternal infection. The clinical findings, including the characteristic lower limb hypoplasia, are documented, as are the appearances on cranial MRI indicating an encephaloclastic porencephaly. (orig.) (orig.) With 4 figs., 28 refs.

  18. Affective evaluation of simultaneous tone combinations in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Manuela M; Thompson, William Forde; Gingras, Bruno; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Congenital amusia is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired pitch processing. Although pitch simultaneities are among the fundamental building blocks of Western tonal music, affective responses to simultaneities such as isolated dyads varying in consonance/dissonance or chords varying in major/minor quality have rarely been studied in amusic individuals. Thirteen amusics and thirteen matched controls enculturated to Western tonal music provided pleasantness ratings of sine-tone dyads and complex-tone dyads in piano timbre as well as perceived happiness/sadness ratings of sine-tone triads and complex-tone triads in piano timbre. Acoustical analyses of roughness and harmonicity were conducted to determine whether similar acoustic information contributed to these evaluations in amusics and controls. Amusic individuals' pleasantness ratings indicated sensitivity to consonance and dissonance for complex-tone (piano timbre) dyads and, to a lesser degree, sine-tone dyads, whereas controls showed sensitivity when listening to both tone types. Furthermore, amusic individuals showed some sensitivity to the happiness-major association in the complex-tone condition, but not in the sine-tone condition. Controls rated major chords as happier than minor chords in both tone types. Linear regression analyses revealed that affective ratings of dyads and triads by amusic individuals were predicted by roughness but not harmonicity, whereas affective ratings by controls were predicted by both roughness and harmonicity. We discuss affective sensitivity in congenital amusia in view of theories of affective responses to isolated chords in Western listeners.

  19. Neuroblastoma in a Case with Congenital Horner’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Mayalı

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Miosis, ptosis, and ipsilateral facial anhidrosis are normally present in Horner’s syndrome. Pathologies which show central, preganglionic and postganglionic residence in sympathetic chain are present in its etiology. A 3-month-old girl baby was admitted to our clinic for ptosis in the left eye. Heterochromia, ptosis in the left eye, myosis and, ipsilateral anhidrosis were detected in her examination. In view of these findings, it seemed possible that her disease could be congenital Horner’s syndrome. Brachial plexus injury due to birth trauma plays a major role in the etiology of congenital Horner’s syndrome. There was not any birth trauma history in our patient. The patient was diagnosed to have neuroblastoma as a result of etiologic tests. In conclusion, Horner’s syndrome can be the presenting sign of childhood neuroblastoma. Therefore, it is advisable to examine the oculosympathetic system in detail in order to leave out any underlying serious disorder. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 325-6

  20. Impaired short-term memory for pitch in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, Barbara; Lévêque, Yohana; Fornoni, Lesly; Albouy, Philippe; Caclin, Anne

    2016-06-01

    Congenital amusia is a neuro-developmental disorder of music perception and production. The hypothesis is that the musical deficits arise from altered pitch processing, with impairments in pitch discrimination (i.e., pitch change detection, pitch direction discrimination and identification) and short-term memory. The present review article focuses on the deficit of short-term memory for pitch. Overall, the data discussed here suggest impairments at each level of processing in short-term memory tasks; starting with the encoding of the pitch information and the creation of the adequate memory trace, the retention of the pitch traces over time as well as the recollection and comparison of the stored information with newly incoming information. These impairments have been related to altered brain responses in a distributed fronto-temporal network, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures, as well as in abnormalities in the connectivity between the two auditory cortices. In contrast, amusic participants׳ short-term memory abilities for verbal material are preserved. These findings show that short-term memory deficits in congenital amusia are specific to pitch, suggesting a pitch-memory system that is, at least partly, separated from verbal memory. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.