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Sample records for confirm obstructive sleep

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ...

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A.; Stegenga, B.; Wijkstra, P. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Meinesz, A. F.; de Bont, L. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    In clinical practice, oral appliances are used primarily for obstructive sleep apnea patients who do not respond to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We hypothesized that an oral appliance is not inferior to CPAP in treating obstructive sleep apnea effectively. We randomly assigned

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    and is seen in both central sleep apnea (CSA) and obstructive sleep apnea .... weight.[1]. Perioperative and postoperative. Patients with OSAHS may have an increased perioperative risks. ... deprivation, and adjustment of sleeping positions.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Brass, Steven D.; Ho, Matthew L.

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because o...

  6. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    Snoring and excessive sleepiness are the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome but other clinical manifestations are present and a precise assessment of the disease involves clear definitions of the various kinds of apnea. Several pathogenetic factors (functional, anatomical, neurological, genetical) are still being discussed. However new insights of the pathophysiology of apneas allow more reliable treatments. Central nervous and cardiovascular complications as well as the traumatic morbidity, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, make it a major public health problem.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Matthew L; Brass, Steven D

    2011-11-29

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D. Brass

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual’s risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  9. Childhood Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dayal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common condition in childhood and can result insevere complications if left untreated. It is showing a rising trend in India. A significantassociation with obesity has been observed; however, some children with enlargedtonsils and/or adenoids may even be underweight. The patient usually presents withsnoring and other respiratory problems like mouth breathing, choking and gaspingepisodes in night. Poor school performance and neurocognitive deficits have beenreported. Pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale are seen in severe cases. Besidesthe history and clinical examination, for definitive diagnosis an overnightpolysomnographic evaluation is the gold standard. In all cases, the specific treatmentranges from simple lifestyle modifications and medications to surgeries likeadenotonsillectomy. Early diagnosis is vital.Key words: Childhood OSA, Obesity, adenotonsillar hypertrophy

  10. Hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips CL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Craig L Phillips,1–3 Denise M O'Driscoll4,51Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia; 2National Health and Medical Research Council Center for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3Discipline of Sleep Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 4Monash Lung and Sleep, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; 5Department of Medicine, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is increasingly being recognized as a major health burden with strong focus on the associated cardiovascular risk. Studies from the last two decades have provided strong evidence for a causal role of OSA in the development of systemic hypertension. The acute physiological changes that occur during apnea promote nocturnal hypertension and may lead to the development of sustained daytime hypertension via the pathways of sympathetic activation, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. This review will focus on the acute hemodynamic disturbances and associated intermittent hypoxia that characterize OSA and the potential pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of hypertension in OSA. In addition the epidemiology of OSA and hypertension, as well as the role of treatment of OSA, in improving blood pressure control will be examined.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, intermittent hypoxia, ambulatory blood pressure, sympathetic activation

  11. Role of sleep endoscopy in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Salama

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: Sleep endoscopy is a useful tool for the assessment of level, degree and shape of the upper airway obstruction during sleep in OSAS and this could be helpful in preoperative evaluation. Presence of obstruction at hypopharyngeal level or tongue base obstruction is an indicator of OSAS severity.

  12. Coagulability in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Liak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common disorder that affects both quality of life and cardiovascular health. The causal link between OSA and cardiovascular morbidity/mortality remains elusive. One possible explanation is that repeated episodes of nocturnal hypoxia lead to a hypercoagulable state that predisposes patients to thrombotic events. There is evidence supporting a wide array of hematological changes that affect hemostasis (eg, increased hematocrit, blood viscosity, platelet activation, clotting factors and decreased fibrinolytic activity.

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea: Awakening the hidden truth

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-16

    Jan 16, 2014 ... to OSA include reduced upper-airway dilator muscle activity during sleep, ..... three‑dimensionally analyzed with an advanced analysis technique ... Padma A, Ramakrishnan N, Narayanan V. Management of obstructive sleep.

  14. Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Due to Massive Cervical Lipohypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurlu, Alper Mete; Ersozlu, Tolga; Basat, Salih Onur; Ceran, Fatih

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a difficult problem to deal with. Many studies on the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea were performed in the past, and we present cervical lipohypertrophy causing severe obstructive sleep apnea in this article.

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in MPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Ricky Pal MBBChir, MA, MD, FRCS(ORL-HNS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs are a group of inherited, metabolic disorders characterized by progressive multisystem accumulation of partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. This manifests with multilevel airway obstruction, presenting with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine the severity and prevalence of OSA in MPS based on polysomnography analysis. Fifteen studies with 294 participants met the inclusion criteria for review. The pretreatment prevalence of OSA in MPS was 81% with a mean apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 10.4. Patients with MPS I are most significantly affected, with 75% suffering with moderate to severe OSA (mean AHI, 16.6. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT results in an almost significant reduction in OSA in MPS I ( P = .06, while adenotonsillar surgery significantly improves AHI ( P = .002. Obstructive sleep apnea least affects MPS III. There is a lack of long-term post-ERT and hematopoietic stem cell transplant data relating to OSA outcomes in this population, with further prospective studies required to determine the ongoing response to treatment.

  16. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in MPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Ricky Pal MBBChir, MA, MD, FRCS(ORL-HNS

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPSs are a group of inherited, metabolic disorders characterized by progressive multisystem accumulation of partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. This manifests with multilevel airway obstruction, presenting with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We systematically reviewed the literature to determine the severity and prevalence of OSA in MPS based on polysomnography analysis. Fifteen studies with 294 participants met the inclusion criteria for review. The pretreatment prevalence of OSA in MPS was 81% with a mean apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 10.4. Patients with MPS I are most significantly affected, with 75% suffering with moderate to severe OSA (mean AHI, 16.6. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT results in an almost significant reduction in OSA in MPS I (P = .06, while adenotonsillar surgery significantly improves AHI (P = .002. Obstructive sleep apnea least affects MPS III. There is a lack of long-term post-ERT and hematopoietic stem cell transplant data relating to OSA outcomes in this population, with further prospective studies required to determine the ongoing response to treatment.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea in ischemic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Tosun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ischemic stroke and to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment. METHODS: Overnight polysomnography was performed by a computerized system in 19 subjects with ischemic stroke. Patients with an apnea-hypopnea index > 5 were considered to have obstructive sleep apnea. The appropriate level of continuous positive airway pressure for each patient was determined during an all-night continuous positive airway pressure determination study. Attended continuous positive airway pressure titration was performed with a continuous positive airway pressure auto-titrating device. RESULTS: Obstructive sleep apnea prevalence among patients with ischemic stroke was 73.7%. The minimum SaO2 was significantly lower, and the percent of total sleep time in the wake stage and stage 1 sleep was significantly longer in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. In two patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea, we observed a decrease in the apnea-hypopnea index, an increase in mean wake time, mean SaO2, and minimum SaO2, and alterations in sleep structures with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. CONCLUSION: As the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is of particular importance in secondary stroke prevention, we suggest that the clinical assessment of obstructive sleep apnea be part of the evaluation of stroke patients in rehabilitation units, and early treatment should be started.

  18. Road traffic accidents in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liam, C K; How, L G; Tan, C T

    1996-03-01

    Three patients involved in road traffic accidents were suspected to have obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Two of them fell asleep while riding motorcycles and one patient fell asleep behind the wheel of a truck causing it to overturn. The diagnosis of OSA in each case was suspected based on a history of loud snoring, restless sleep, and excessive daytime somnolence and was confirmed by sleep studies.

  19. Cough in obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Ing, Alvin; Birring, Surinder S

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) has recently been reported to be a cause of chronic cough. It should be considered when cough remains unexplained following investigations and treatments for common causes. The presence of nocturnal cough, snoring and gastro-oesophageal reflux may be helpful in identifying patients who require further investigation. Daytime somnolence is often absent. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy has been reported to be effective in alleviating cough. Therapy for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, if present, should be optimised. The mechanism of the association between OSA and cough is not clear, but airway inflammation, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, increased cough reflex sensitivity and tracheobronchomalacia are possible explanations. Further studies should identify clinical predictors of OSA-cough, establish mechanisms and the optimal therapy.

  20. Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is an important public health problem and is associatedwith considerable morbidity and mortality. Therefore, treatment of this condition is ofparamount importance. The treatment of OSA includes general and behaviouralmeasures, mechanical measures including continuous positive airway pressure(CPAP, Bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP and Oral Appliances (OA,pharmacological treatment and surgical procedures. Continuous positive airwaypressure (CPAP treatment reverses the repetitive upper airway obstruction of sleepapnea and associated daytime sleepiness and is the most effective treatment for OSA.However maintaining patient adherence to CPAP therapy is a challenge. Weight lossshould be recommended to overweight patients with OSA, as it has been shown thatweight reduction has additional health benefits. Treatment of underlying medicalconditions such as hypothyroidism or acromegaly has profound effect onapnea/hypopnea index. A subset of patients with OSA may benefit from supplementaloxygen and positional therapy. Presently, there are no effective pharmacotherapeuticagents for treatment of patients with OSA and the role of surgical treatment in OSA iscontroversial. However, pharmacological treatment of persisting residual sleepiness,despite adequate positive airway pressure therapy delivery and adherence, is indicatedand may improve daytime sleepiness.Key words : CPAP, Oral appliances, Modafinil, CPAP complianceUvulopalatopharyngoplasty, positional therapy

  1. Sleep Endoscopy in the Evaluation of Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is not always resolved or improved with adenotonsillectomy. Persistent or complex cases of pediatric OSA may be due to sites of obstruction in the airway other than the tonsils and adenoids. Identifying these areas in the past has been problematic, and therefore, therapy for OSA in children who have failed adenotonsillectomy has often been unsatisfactory. Sleep endoscopy is a technique that can enable the surgeon to determine the level of obstruction in a sleeping child with OSA. With this knowledge, site-specific surgical therapy for persistent and complex pediatric OSA may be possible.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome:a proinflammatory disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Fang

    2007-01-01

    @@ Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a rather frequent disorder affecting 2%-4% of the general population. Large cohort studies have confirmed that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including myocardial infarction, hypertension, stroke and so on. For example, Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS) demonstrated that the prevalence of CVD (including myocardial infarction, angina, coronary revascularization, heart failure, stroke) was 1.42 times greater in patients with OSA (apnea/hypopnea index (AHI)>11 events/hour) than in those without OSA.1 However, the exact mechanisms linking sleep apnea to cardiovascular morbidity remain unclear. Two studies2,3 published in this issue of the Journal measured a series of subclinical inflammatory factors in patients with OSA, and added new evidence linking sleep apnea to cardiovascular morbidity.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is not fully understood but is likely multifactorial in origin. Inflammatory processes play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and circulating levels of several markers of inflammation have been associated with future cardiovascular risk. These include cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and selectins, cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6, chemokines such as interleukin 8, and C-reactive protein. There is also increasing evidence that inflammatory processes play an important role in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of OSAS and many of the inflammatory markers associated with cardiovascular risk have been reported as elevated in patients with OSAS. Furthermore, animal and cell culture studies have demonstrated preferential activation of inflammatory pathways by intermittent hypoxia, which is an integral feature of OSAS. The precise role of inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease in OSAS requires further study, particularly the relationship with oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, and obesity.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome.

  5. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Xian Qiao; Yi Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology,pathophysiology,and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment.Data Sources:Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and “asthma'" as the main keywords.Highly regarded older publications were also included.Study Selection:Information about the features of the two diseases in common,the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified,retrieved,and summarized.Results:Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions.The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years.Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea,and OSA often combines with asthma,as well.They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common.Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects,intermittent hypoxia,nerve reflex,inflammation,leptin,etc.Indirect mechanistic links include medication,nose diseases,smoking,obesity,and gastroesophageal reflux disease.Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma,some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome "alternative overlap syndrome,"and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure.Conclusions:OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis,symptoms,and therapies.With the growing awareness of the relationship between them,we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients.Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea alters sleep stage transition dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt T Bianchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Enhanced characterization of sleep architecture, compared with routine polysomnographic metrics such as stage percentages and sleep efficiency, may improve the predictive phenotyping of fragmented sleep. One approach involves using stage transition analysis to characterize sleep continuity. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed hypnograms from Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS participants using the following stage designations: wake after sleep onset (WASO, non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep, and REM sleep. We show that individual patient hypnograms contain insufficient number of bouts to adequately describe the transition kinetics, necessitating pooling of data. We compared a control group of individuals free of medications, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, medical co-morbidities, or sleepiness (n = 374 with mild (n = 496 or severe OSA (n = 338. WASO, REM sleep, and NREM sleep bout durations exhibited multi-exponential temporal dynamics. The presence of OSA accelerated the "decay" rate of NREM and REM sleep bouts, resulting in instability manifesting as shorter bouts and increased number of stage transitions. For WASO bouts, previously attributed to a power law process, a multi-exponential decay described the data well. Simulations demonstrated that a multi-exponential process can mimic a power law distribution. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: OSA alters sleep architecture dynamics by decreasing the temporal stability of NREM and REM sleep bouts. Multi-exponential fitting is superior to routine mono-exponential fitting, and may thus provide improved predictive metrics of sleep continuity. However, because a single night of sleep contains insufficient transitions to characterize these dynamics, extended monitoring of sleep, probably at home, would be necessary for individualized clinical application.

  7. Acoustical flow estimation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Azarbarzin, Ali; Montazeri, Aman; Moussavi, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    Tracheal respiratory sound analysis is a simple and non-invasive way to study the pathophysiology of the upper airways; it has recently been used for acoustical flow estimation and sleep apnea diagnosis. However in none of the previous studies, the accuracy of acoustical flow estimation was investigated neither during sleep nor in people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In this study, we recorded tracheal sound, flow rate and head position from 11 individuals with OSA during sleep and wakefulness. We investigated two approaches for calibrating the parameters of acoustical flow estimation model based on the known data recorded during wakefulness and sleep. The results show that the acoustical flow estimation parameters change from wakefulness to sleep. Therefore, if the model is calibrated based on the data recorded during wakefulness, although the estimated flow follows the relative variations of the recorded flow, the quantitative flow estimation error would be high during sleep. On the other hand, when the calibration parameters are extracted from tracheal sound and flow recordings during sleep, the flow estimation error is less than 5%. These results confirm the reliability of acoustical methods for estimating breathing flow during sleep and detecting the partial or complete obstructions of the upper airways during sleep.

  8. [The sleep obstructive apnea and hypopnea syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambron, L; Roelants, F; Deflandre, E; Raskin, S; Poirrier, R

    2004-01-01

    Since two decades, sleep breathing disorders are more wisely recognized by the Belgian medical community. Among these, the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is the best known but its frontiers with others syndromes such as the Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), the Central Sleep Apnea Syndrome (CSAS) or the Overlap Syndrome are still matter of discussion. Its causes are plurifactorial, and many recent publications draw the attention to its long term effects in the cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric fields. This article summarizes the present definitions and features associated with OSA, from clinical and neurophysiological perspectives, and the different consequences to which untreated or underdiagnosed patients are exposed.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cardiovascular problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhal Arıtürk Atılgan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is defined as repeated episodes of upper airway occlusion during sleep with consequent excessive daytime sleepiness. Recently, relationship has been found between cardiovascular disease and OSAS. Therefore OSAS has become more popular today. OSAS is associated with the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. A large number of studies have demonstrated that OSAS is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Sleep apnea was shown to be associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, stroke, pulmonary hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, and cardiovascular mortality

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders and cardiovascular diseases are major co-morbidities in both. Co-existence of both disorders (overlap syndrome) occurs in 1% of adults and overlap patients have worse nocturnal hypoxemia and hypercapnia than COPD and OSA patients alone. The present review discusses recent data concerning the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the overlap syndrome. RECENT FINDINGS: The severity of obstructive ventilatory impairment and hyperinflation, especially the inspiratory capacity to total lung capacity (TLC) ratio, correlates with the severity of sleep-related breathing disturbances. Early treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves survival, reduces hospitalization and pulmonary hypertension, and also reduces hypoxemia. Evidence of systemic inflammation and oxidative stress in COPD and sleep apnea provides insight into potential interactions between both disorders that may predispose to cardiovascular disease. Long-term outcome studies of overlap patients currently underway should provide further evidence of the clinical significance of the overlap syndrome. SUMMARY: Studies of overlap syndrome patients at a clinical, physiological and molecular level should provide insight into disease mechanisms and consequences of COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to identifying potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  11. [Obstructive sleep apnea features and occupational fitness of railway workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatyan, M S; Belozerova, N V; At'kov, O Yu

    2016-01-01

    The article covers prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, its role in health disorders of workers engaged into railway safety. The authors analyzed present standards of occupational fitness in workers performing critically important operating activities and methods of occupational selection with possible obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. I stage recommendations are suggested in diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in workers engaged into railway safety. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome appeared to threaten operators' activity, to cause accidents, to early disablement due to life-threatening complications, to unsuitability for the occupation due to diseases connected with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, cardiac rhythm and conductivity disorders, obesity).

  12. Health Promotion in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: “Health Promotion,” “Sleep Disorders,” “Primary Prevention,” “Health Education,” and “Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes.” Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices. PMID:25992174

  13. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fietze, I; Penzel, T; Alonderis, A;

    2011-01-01

    In Europe, the services provided for the investigation and management of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) varies from country to country. The aim of this questionnaire-based study was to investigate the current status of diagnostic pathways and therapeutic approaches applied in the treatment of OSA...... in Europe, qualification requirements of physicians involved in diagnosis and treatment of OSA, and reimbursement of these services....

  14. Mandibular advancement appliance for obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Niels; Svanholt, Palle; Solow, Beni

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of a mandibular advancement appliance (MAA) for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Ninety-three patients with OSA and a mean apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 34.7 were centrally randomised into three, parallel groups: (a) MAA; (b) mandibular non...

  15. Cognitive complaints in obstructive sleep apnea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, T.J.A.; Overeem, S.; Sitskoorn, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with impairments in cognitive functioning. Although cognitive complaints are related to quality of life, work productivity and health care expenditures, most research and all reviews have focused exclusively on objective cognitive functioning so far. In

  16. Severe upper airway obstruction during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonekat, H William; Hardin, Kimberly A

    2003-10-01

    Few disorders may manifest with predominantly sleep-related obstructive breathing. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder, varies in severity and is associated with significant cardiovascular and neurocognitive morbidity. It is estimated that between 8 and 18 million people in the United States have at least mild OSA. Although the exact mechanism of OSA is not well-delineated, multiple factors contribute to the development of upper airway obstruction and include anatomic, mechanical, neurologic, and inflammatory changes in the pharynx. OSA may occur concomitantly with asthma. Approximately 74% of asthmatics experience nocturnal symptoms of airflow obstruction secondary to reactive airways disease. Similar cytokine, chemokine, and histologic changes are seen in both disorders. Sleep deprivation, chronic upper airway edema, and inflammation associated with OSA may further exacerbate nocturnal asthma symptoms. Allergic rhinitis may contribute to both OSA and asthma. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard treatment for OSA. Treatment with CPAP therapy has also been shown to improve both daytime and nighttime peak expiratory flow rates in patients with concomitant OSA and asthma. It is important for allergists to be aware of how OSA may complicate diagnosis and treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. A thorough sleep history and high clinical suspicion for OSA is indicated, particularly in asthma patients who are refractory to standard medication treatments.

  17. Management of obstructive sleep apnea in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fietze, I; Penzel, T; Alonderis, A

    2011-01-01

    In Europe, the services provided for the investigation and management of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) varies from country to country. The aim of this questionnaire-based study was to investigate the current status of diagnostic pathways and therapeutic approaches applied in the treatment of OSA...

  18. Pierre Robin sequence and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Reimão

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 12-year-old female patient with Pierre Robin sequence is reported, in which reduction of the pharyngeal airway leads to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and excessive daytime sleepiness. Radiological evaluation, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance image showed bilateral temporomandibular ankylosis. Cephalometric data evidenced marked reduction of the posterior airway space. Three all-night polysomnographic evaluations detected severe OSAS with decrease in oxygen saturation. The Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT perfomed on two separate days objectively quantified the excessive daytime sleepiness with short sleep latencies; stage REM was not present. Polysomnography, MSLT and thorough radiologic studies, in this case, made it possible to determine the severity of OSAS, the site of obstruction, and the associated malformations.

  19. Influence of smoking on sleep and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleanu, Oana-Claudia; Pocora, Diana; Mihălcuţă, Stefan; Ulmeanu, Ruxandra; Zaharie, Ana-Maria; Mihălţan, Florin Dumitru

    2016-01-01

    The various ill effects that tobacco smoking has on health have been largely studied, particularly on vascular, neoplastic, and respiratory diseases. Lately, the discussion about the negative impact of cigarette smoking moved towards sleep medicine. Tobacco consumption has been associated with sleep disordered architecture, both during regular intake and after withdrawal. Its effects on sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) still remain a matter of debate. It is unclear whether smoking represents a risk factor for OSAS or whether smoking cessation has any beneficial effects on OSAS and its therapy. There seems to be a synergistic effect between smoking and OSAS, both causing an increase in cardiovascular morbidity. Future studies are needed in order to establish the strength of this association. We aim to review the literature regarding the consequences of smoking on sleep architecture and SDB, adding emphasis on OSAS clinical implications and treatment.

  20. Sleep board review question: insomnia in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budhiraja R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. What is the estimated prevalence of insomnia symptoms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea? 1. Less than 1% 2. 5%-10% 3. 20-30% 4. 40%-60% 5. Greater than 80%

  1. Reduced evoked motor and sensory potential amplitudes in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalj, Mario; Lušić, Linda; Đogaš, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown to what extent chronic intermittent hypoxaemia in obstructive sleep apnea causes damage to the motor and sensory peripheral nerves. It was hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have bilaterally significantly impaired amplitudes of both motor and sensory peripheral nerve-evoked potentials of both lower and upper limbs. An observational study was conducted on 43 patients with obstructive sleep apnea confirmed by the whole-night polysomnography, and 40 controls to assess the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and peripheral neuropathy. All obstructive sleep apnea subjects underwent standardized electroneurographic testing, with full assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials, sensory neural action potentials, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and distal motor and sensory latencies of the median, ulnar, peroneal and sural nerves, bilaterally. All nerve measurements were compared with reference values, as well as between the untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects. Averaged compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes were significantly reduced in the nerves of both upper and lower limbs in patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared with controls (P motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Clinical/subclinical axonal damage exists in patients with obstructive sleep apnea to a greater extent than previously thought.

  2. Mild obstructive sleep apnea: beyond the AHI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Iannotti J

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A common conundrum faced by sleep medicine practitioners is how to manage the large group of patients with mild sleep apnea. Many patients are referred for sleep evaluation, with symptoms thought to be due to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Often polysomnography demonstrates only mild sleep apnea, and the clinician and patient are faced with the dilemma of whether to use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy or an oral appliance. In making this important decision the clinician incorporates the commonly used definition of mild sleep apnea as an apnea-hypopnea index of between 5 and 14 apneas or hypopneas per hour of sleep. Moderate sleep apnea is defined as 15-29 events per hour, and severe is 30 and above events per hour. These arbitrary thresholds originated in the early 1980s when knowledge of this condition was in its infancy and little was known about the long term health effects. The definition ...

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodday, R H; Percious, D S; Morrison, A D; Robertson, C G

    2001-12-01

    Increased awareness that changes in sleeping habits and daytime behaviour may be attributable to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has led many patients to seek both information and definitive treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide information to dentists that will enable them to identify patients who may have OSAS and to assist these patients in making informed decisions regarding treatment options. In patients who have identifiable anatomic abnormalities of the maxilla and mandible resulting in a narrow pharyngeal airway, orthognathic surgery appears to be an excellent treatment option.

  4. Atrial fibrillation in obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with rising incidence. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among patients with AF. This observation has prompted significant research in understanding the relationship between OSA and AF. Multiple studies support a role of OSA in the initiation and progression of AF. This association has been independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. Instability of autonomic tone and wide swings in intrathoracic pressure are seen in OSA. T...

  5. Childhood Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Indra Narang; Mathew, Joseph L

    2012-01-01

    The global epidemic of childhood and adolescent obesity and its immediate as well as long-term consequences for obese individuals and society as a whole cannot be overemphasized. Obesity in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity and clinically significant consequences affecting the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, obesity is additionally complicated by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), occurring in up to 60% of obese children. OSA, which...

  6. High prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in Marfan's syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mo Li; He Quanying; Wang Yinna; Dong Birong; He Jinhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the current evidence about the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with Marfan's syndrome,and discuss some proposed potential mechanisms for this relationship.Data sources The data in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed articles published in English from 1990 to 2013.The search term was "Marfan's syndrome and sleep apnea".Study selection Clinical evidence about the epidemiology of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with Marfan's syndrome; the mechanism that causes obstructive sleep apnea; interventional therapy for patients with Marfan's syndrome,and coexisting obstructive sleep apnea.Results A high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea exists in patients with Marfan's syndrome.The potential reasons are craniofacial abnormalities and lax upper airway muscles,which lead to high nasal airway resistance and upper airway collapse.Obstructive sleep apnea mechanically deteriorates aortic dilatation and accelerates progression of aortic aneurysms.The condition is reversible and rapid maxillary expansion and adequate continuous positive airway pressure therapy are possible effective therapies to delay the expansion of aortic diameter in patients with Marfan's syndrome.Conclusions Obstructive sleep apnea is strongly associated with Marfan's syndrome.Craniofacial abnormalities and lax upper airway are the main mechanisms.Untreated obstructive sleep apnea accelerates progression of aortic dissection and rupture.Effective therapies for obstructive sleep apnea could postpone the aortic dilatation in patients with Marfan's syndrome.

  7. Sexual function in female patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria G.E.; Petersen, Marian; Kristensen, Ellids

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Obstructive sleep apnea is defined as repetitive (=5/hour) partial or complete cessation of breathing during sleep. Whereas obstructive sleep apnea is often considered to be associated with sexual problems in men, studies concerning effects of obstructive sleep apnea on female sexual...... function and distress are sparse. Aim. To investigate sexual dysfunction and sexual distress in female patients with obstructive sleep apnea and to determine which factors are of importance for their sexual function. Methods. We investigated 80 female patients (ages 28–64) admitted to a sleep laboratory...... and who after investigation received a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea. All subjects answered questions drawn from three self-administered questionnaires on sexuality. The results were compared with a population sample (N = 240). Main Outcome Measure. Data from nocturnal respiratory recordings...

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akre, Harriet; Øverland, Britt; Åsten, Pamela; Skogedal, Nina; Heimdal, Ketil

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among the Norwegian population with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). A secondary aim was to establish whether TCS phenotype severity is associated with OSAS severity. A prospective case study design was used. Individuals who were 5 years old and above with a known diagnosis of TCS in Norway were invited to participate in a study. The study included genetic testing, medical and dental examinations and polysomnography. All participants demonstrated disturbed respiration during sleep; 18/19 met the diagnostic criteria for OSAS. Subjectively evaluated snoring was not a reliable predictor of OSAS. We found no significant association between TCS phenotype severity and the severity of OSAS. OSAS is common in TCS, but there is no association with the phenotype severity. Individuals diagnosed with TCS must undergo sleep studies to identify the presence of OSAS.

  9. Childhood Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The global epidemic of childhood and adolescent obesity and its immediate as well as long-term consequences for obese individuals and society as a whole cannot be overemphasized. Obesity in childhood and adolescence is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity and clinically significant consequences affecting the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, obesity is additionally complicated by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, occurring in up to 60% of obese children. OSA, which is diagnosed using the gold standard polysomnogram (PSG, is characterised by snoring, recurrent partial (hypopneas or complete (apneas obstruction of the upper airway. OSA is frequently associated with intermittent oxyhemoglobin desaturations, sleep disruption, and sleep fragmentation. There is emerging data that OSA is associated with cardiovascular burden including systemic hypertension, changes in ventricular structure and function, arterial stiffness, and metabolic syndromes. Thus, OSA in the context of obesity may independently or synergistically magnify the underlying cardiovascular and metabolic burden. This is of importance as early recognition and treatment of OSA in obese children are likely to result in the reduction of cardiometabolic burden in obese children. This paper summarizes the current state of understanding of obesity-related OSA. Specifically, this paper will discuss epidemiology, pathophysiology, cardiometabolic burden, and management of obese children and adolescents with OSA.

  10. Epidemiology, risk factors, and consequences of obstructive sleep apnea and short sleep duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lawati, Nabil M; Patel, Sanjay R; Ayas, Najib T

    2009-01-01

    We will review the epidemiology, risk factors, and consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short/long sleep duration. Obstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is common, with moderate to severe disease present in approximately 9% of middle aged men and 4% of women. The prevalence of OSA in certain patient populations (such as elderly patients, hypertensive patients, patients with coronary disease, and prebariatric surgery patients) is even greater. There are a number or risk factors for disease including obesity, male sex, and family history. Obstructive sleep apnea negatively impacts quality of life and is also associated with a number of adverse safety and health consequences including cardiovascular disease and motor vehicle crashes. Short habitual sleep duration can result in excessive daytime sleepiness and reduced neurocognitive function. Sleep loss may have long-term health consequences and may lead to premature death, cardiovascular disease, and the development of diabetes.

  11. Consequences of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechner, Michael; Williamson, Ariel A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has various negative health and behavioral consequences in the pediatric population. As shown in adults, there are metabolic derangements such as obesity, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, as well as cardiovascular derangements like hypertension, chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, ventricular size/function abnormalities, and even elevated pulmonary arterial pressures, that can be seen in children with OSAS. The first two sections will discuss the metabolic and cardiovascular consequences on OSAS in children. The last section summarizes selected studies and reviews on the behavioral, neurocognitive and academic consequences of OSAS in children.

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea treatment with dental appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimão, R; De Gouveia, M M; Pestana, M C; Lopes, S R; Papaiz, E G; Papaiz, L F

    1994-12-01

    The case of a 40-year-old male patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is reported, with emphasis on treatment with a dental appliance. This therapeutic approach, which has been focused on recent research, has as its objective, the posturing of the mandibule and, consequently, the tongue more anteriorly, thus in turn leading to an increase in the posterior oropharyngeal airway space (PAS). Cephalometry contributed determining in this case whereby enlargement limits were observed in the PAS with mandibular displacement. Clinical and polysomnographic controls showed subjective reduction of the excessive daytime sleepiness and objective decrease in apneas intensity to normal limits. Eight months follow-up evidenced the steady improvement.

  13. Morbidity and mortality in children with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Ibsen, Rikke Falkner; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the diagnostic patterns of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children. A study was undertaken to evaluate morbidity and mortality in childhood OSA.......Little is known about the diagnostic patterns of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in children. A study was undertaken to evaluate morbidity and mortality in childhood OSA....

  14. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslava Hybášková

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA. A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%. The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n=17, 33.3%, followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n=12, 23.5%. Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis was observed in 16 patients (31.4%. The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3% patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%. The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA.

  15. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybášková, Jaroslava; Jor, Ondřej; Novák, Vilém; Zeleník, Karol; Matoušek, Petr; Komínek, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%). The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n = 17, 33.3%), followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n = 12, 23.5%). Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis) was observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3%) patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%). The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA.

  16. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy Changes the Treatment Concept in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jor, Ondřej; Novák, Vilém; Matoušek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated whether drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) helps identify the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). A total of 51 consecutive patients with polysomnography-confirmed OSA were enrolled in this prospective study. The presumed site of obstruction was determined according to history, otorhinolaryngologic examination, and polysomnography and a therapeutic plan designed before DISE. In 11 patients with severe OSA and/or previously failed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, DISE with simultaneous CPAP was performed. Multilevel collapse was noted in 49 patients (96.1%). The most frequent multilevel collapse was palatal, oropharyngeal, and tongue base collapse (n = 17, 33.3%), followed by palatal and oropharyngeal collapse (n = 12, 23.5%). Pathology of the larynx (epiglottis) was observed in 16 patients (31.4%). The laryngeal obstruction as a reason for intolerance of CPAP was observed in 3/11 (27.3%) patients. After DISE, the surgical plan was changed in 31 patients (60.8%). The results indicate that DISE helps identify the site of obstruction in the upper airways in patients with OSA more accurately and that the larynx plays an important role in OSA. PMID:28070516

  17. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Zamarrón; Luis Valdés Cuadrado; Rodolfo Álvarez-Sala

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent sleep disorder, characterized by repeated disruptions of breathing during sleep. This disease has many potential consequences including excessive daytime sleepiness, neurocognitive deterioration, endocrinologic and metabolic effects, and decreased quality of life. Patients with OSAS experience repetitive episodes of hypoxia and reoxygenation during transient cessation of breathing that provoke systemic effects. Furthermore, there m...

  18. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNOEA HYPOPNEA SYNDROME – AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISMAIL T

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS is a common cause of breathing-related sleep disorder, causing excessive daytime sleepiness. Common clinical features of OSAHS include snoring, fragmented sleep, daytime somnolence and fatigue. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of the condition, including its management.

  19. Metabolic disturbances in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Harsch

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic disturbances in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS include insulin resistance and elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules, as well as an elevation of hormones derived from the adipose tissue as leptin. These phenomena might, in part, be an explanation for the excess morbidity and mortality of OSAS patients concerning cardiovascular disease. Several of these factors have been described as being independently associated with OSAS and not only related to its comorbidities, including obesity. A promising approach to studying the metabolic phenomena in these OSAS patients would be to monitor patients before and during the course of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, as nocturnal sleep disturbances are treatable and may revert the impact of OSAS on the metabolic phenomena; however, patients do frequently (and unfortunately maintain their body weight. Although not confirmed by all investigations, a tendency towards an improvement in some of the above-mentioned metabolic parameters has been reported in several studies in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients and may be reflected by the decreased occurrence of new cardiovascular events, the reduction of systolic blood pressure and the improvement of left ventricular systolic function.

  20. Sexual function in male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marian; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate general and functional aspects of sexuality in male patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compare the results with normative data. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated 308 male patients (age 30-69) admitted to a sleep...... laboratory and receiving a diagnosis of OSA, using questions drawn from two self-administered questionnaires on sexuality [Fugl-Meyer Life satisfaction checklist (LiSat) and Brief Sexual Function Inventory (BSFI)]. RESULTS: We found that both general (Fugl-Meyer LiSat) and functional (BSFI) aspects...... of sexuality were worse in patients with (untreated) OSA when compared with normative data. Both aspects were dependent on age, obesity, social factors and concomitant medication but not on the severity of OSA as reflected by the apnoea-hypopnoea index or subjective sleepiness. CONCLUSION: We conclude...

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Roar in the Snore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinadh Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleeping is an important physiological role in our day to day life. A good laugh and a long sleep are the best cures in the doctor′s book. Sleep disorders of the upper airway result from any condition or disease that causes its partial or complete obstruction when a patient assumes a supine position and goes to sleep. Sleep disorders, particularly untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA can be associated with motor vehicle accidents, poor work performance in the office or workplace, and also makes a person prone to occupational accidents and reduced quality of life. Comprehensive management of upper airway sleep disorders requires an interdisciplinary approach. A prosthodontist can play a significant role as the team member in the interdisciplinary approach for the management of upper airway sleep disorders. The present article focuses on the history, clinical examination, investigations, and management of OSA.

  2. Diagnosis, treatment planning, and surgical correction of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodday, Reginald

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is to present the scientific rationale for considering maxillomandibular advancement as the surgical treatment of choice in selected patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; review the treatment planning that will identify those patients who would benefit from this procedure; review the surgical techniques; and review the patient outcomes after maxillomandibular advancement surgery. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome who have demonstrable retropositioning of the maxilla and mandible should be informed of maxillomandibular advancement as the primary surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  3. Partial upper airway obstruction in sleep after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, O; Brissaud, L; Fraga, J; Déjean, Y; Billiard, M

    1989-11-01

    Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty is the treatment of choice for selected patients with obstructive sleep apnea, although the response to surgery is variable. We measured, in addition to obstructive apnea, the frequency of sleep-related partial upper airway obstruction in 11 patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome both before and after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. Partial obstruction was detected indirectly by recording the secondary hemodynamic changes and respiratory stimulation with the static charge sensitive bed. The frequency of obstructive apnea episodes was reduced from 56.3% to 18.4% by the operation, while the episodes of increased respiratory resistance rose from 3.6% to 20.4%. The various breathing anomalies decreased significantly, although they were still present during 75.6% of the recording time. The results suggest that uvulopalatopharyngoplasty substantially reduces the frequency of obstructive apnea, some of which persists as partial obstruction. The persistent partial obstruction may be the key factor contributing to further pharyngeal narrowing and a recurrence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  4. Managing obstructive sleep apnoea in children: the role of craniofacial morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Rabelo Bozzini

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is a type of sleep-disordered breathing that affects 1 to 5% of all children. Pharyngeal and palatine tonsil hypertrophy is the main predisposing factor. Various abnormalities are predisposing factors for obstructive sleep apnoea, such as decreased mandibular and maxillary lengths, skeletal retrusion, increased lower facial height and, consequently, increased total anterior facial height, a larger cranio-cervical angle, small posterior airway space and an inferiorly positioned hyoid bone. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, a physical examination and tests confirming the presence and severity of upper airway obstruction. The gold standard test for diagnosis is overnight polysomnography. Attention must be paid to identify the craniofacial characteristics. When necessary, children should be referred to orthodontists and/or sleep medicine specialists for adequate treatment in addition to undergoing an adenotonsillectomy.

  5. [Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    The detection, correction or withdrawal of any cause or associated factor including obesity, drugs or alcohol is essential in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Treatment is mainly mechanical or surgical, but not medical. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has now largely replaced tracheostomy and successful long-term domestic use of this method has been reported on many occasions. Oropharyngeal surgery can solve a large part of social snoring problems. However criteria for procedure selection and evaluation of results are still needed to clarify the indication of this operation in patients with full clinical expression of the syndrome. In this regard, a comprehensive preoperative evaluation and a logical approach to the reconstruction of the upper-airway has recently led to the association of palatopharyngoplasty and maxillo-mandibular surgery, with an excellent long-term success rate.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea treatment with dental appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Reimão

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available The case of a 40-year-old male patient with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is reported, with emphasis on treatment with a dental appliance. This therapeutic approach, which has been focused on recent research, has as its objective, the posturing of the mandibule and, consequently, the tongue more anteriorly, thus in turn leading to an increase in the posterior oropharyngeal airway space (PAS. Cephalometry contributed determining in this case whereby enlargement limits were observed in the PAS with mandibular displacement. Clinical and polysomnographic controls showed subjective reduction of the excessive daytime sleepiness and objective decrease in apneas intensity to normal limits. Eight months follow-up evidenced the steady improvement.

  7. The genetics of obstructive sleep apnoea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a highly prevalent disorder associated with reduced quality of life and adverse cardiovascular and metabolic sequelae. Recent years have seen an intensification of the research effort to establish the genetic contribution to the development of OSAS and its sequelae. This review explores emerging evidence in this field. RECENT FINDINGS: A genetic basis for sleep-disordered breathing has been demonstrated for discrete disorders such as Treacher-Collins and Down syndromes, but the picture is less clear in so-called idiopathic OSAS. A degree of heritability appears likely in some of the intermediate phenotypes that lead to OSAS, particularly craniofacial morphology. However, only sparse and often contradictory evidence exists regarding the role of specific polymorphisms in causing OSAS in the general population. Similarly, investigations of the cardiovascular sequelae of OSAS have in general failed to consistently find single causative genetic mutations. Nonetheless, evidence suggests a role for tumour necrosis factor-alpha polymorphisms in particular, and large-scale family studies have suggested shared pathogenetic pathways for the development of obesity and OSAS. SUMMARY: As with other common disorders, OSAS is likely to result from multiple gene-gene interactions occurring in a suitable environment. The application of modern genetic investigative techniques, such as genome-wide association studies, may facilitate new discoveries in this field.

  8. Metabolic aspects of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Bonsignore

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is often associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS and could contribute to cardiovascular risk in OSAS. Sleep loss and intermittent hypoxia could contribute to the pathogenesis of the metabolic alterations associated with obesity, a common feature of OSAS. The biology of the adipocyte is being increasingly studied, and it has been found that hypoxia negatively affects adipocyte function. In November 2007, the European Respiratory Society and two EU COST Actions (Cardiovascular risk in OSAS (B26 and Adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome (BM0602, held a Research Seminar in Düsseldorf, Germany, to discuss the following: 1 the effects of hypoxia on glucose metabolism and adipocyte function; 2 the role of inflammatory activation in OSAS and obesity; 3 the alarming rates of obesity and OSAS in children; 4 the harmful effects of the metabolic syndrome in OSAS; 5 the effects of OSAS treatment on metabolic variables; and 6 the relationship between daytime sleepiness and hormonal and inflammatory responses. Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, the role of the endocannabinoid system and novel pharmacological approaches to treat insulin resistance were also discussed. As obesity and hypoxia could be the basic links between OSAS and adipocyte dysfunction, further research is needed to translate these new data into clinical practice.

  9. Depression and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara Ruth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For over two decades clinical studies have been conducted which suggest the existence of a relationship between depression and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA. Recently, Ohayon underscored the evidence for a link between these two disorders in the general population, showing that 800 out of 100,000 individuals had both, a breathing-related sleep disorder and a major depressive disorder, with up to 20% of the subjects presenting with one of these disorders also having the other. In some populations, depending on age, gender and other demographic and health characteristics, the prevalence of both disorders may be even higher: OSA may affect more than 50% of individuals over the age of 65, and significant depressive symptoms may be present in as many as 26% of a community-dwelling population of older adults. In clinical practice, the presence of depressive symptomatology is often considered in patients with OSA, and may be accounted for and followed-up when considering treatment approaches and response to treatment. On the other hand, sleep problems and specifically OSA are rarely assessed on a regular basis in patients with a depressive disorder. However, OSA might not only be associated with a depressive syndrome, but its presence may also be responsible for failure to respond to appropriate pharmacological treatment. Furthermore, an undiagnosed OSA might be exacerbated by adjunct treatments to antidepressant medications, such as benzodiazepines. Increased awareness of the relationship between depression and OSA might significantly improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcome for both disorders. In this review, we will summarize important findings in the current literature regarding the association between depression and OSA, and the possible mechanisms by which both disorders interact. Implications for clinical practice will be discussed.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea in severe mental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szaulińska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is estimated to be 3–7.5% in men and 2–3% in women. In mentally ill population it is even higher, as these patients are a high risk OSA group. The aim of the paper was a review of literature about the prevalence of sleep apnoea in patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and recurrent depressive disorder.The available data show that OSA is present in 15–48% of patients with schizophrenia, 21–43% of patients with bipolar disorder and 11–18% of patients with recurrent depressive disorder. The lack of diagnosis of OSA in people with mental illnesses has multiple negative consequences. The symptoms of sleep apnoea might imitate the symptoms of mental illnesses such as negative symptoms of schizophrenia and symptoms of depression, they might as well aggravate the cognitive impairment. A number of the drugs used in mental disorders may aggravate the symptoms of OSA. OSA is as well the risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases which are a serious clinical problem in mentally ill people and contribute to shortening of their expected lifespan. From the point of view of the physicians treating OSA it is important to pay attention to the fact that co-existing depression is the most common reason for resistant daytime sleepiness in OSA patients treated effectively with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP. CPAP therapy leads to significant improvement of mood. However, in schizophrenia and bipolar patients it may rarely lead to acute worsening of mental state, exacerbation of psychotic symptoms or phase shift from depression to mania.

  11. Does obstructive sleep apnea associate with atrial fibrillation?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Hai-long; LONG De-yong; DONG Jian-zeng; MA Chang-sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Obstructive sleep apnea(OSA)is a disorder in which transient obstruction fcomplete or partiall of the airway during sleep causes loud snoring,oxyhemoglobin desaturation and frequent arousal.1-4 OSA has been identified to relate to many cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension,coronary heart disease,heart failure,and cardiac arrhythmia.In this article,we attempt to discuss the association between OSA and atrial fibrillation (AF) while reviewing the recent data on OSA and AF.

  12. CPAP Treats Muscle Cramps in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Westwood, Andrew J.; Spector, Andrew R.; Auerbach, Sanford H.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case series of 4 patients with varying degrees of obstructive sleep apnea who incidentally had a history of nocturnal leg cramps. None of the patients had periodic limb movements during the study and denied symptoms consistent with restless legs syndrome. In 3 of the 4 patients, nocturnal leg cramps resolved with CPAP treatment for OSA, while the fourth patient noted near-resolution of cramping after starting CPAP. In patients presenting with muscle cramps, obstructive sleep apn...

  13. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Cluster Analysis at Time of Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillet, Yves; Richard, Philippe; Stach, Bruno; Vivodtzev, Isabelle; Timsit, Jean-Francois; Lévy, Patrick; Tamisier, Renaud; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background The classification of obstructive sleep apnea is on the basis of sleep study criteria that may not adequately capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping may improve prognosis prediction and help select therapeutic strategies. Objectives: This study used cluster analysis to investigate the clinical clusters of obstructive sleep apnea. Methods An ascending hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on baseline symptoms, physical examination, risk factor exposure and co-morbidities from 18,263 participants in the OSFP (French national registry of sleep apnea). The probability for criteria to be associated with a given cluster was assessed using odds ratios, determined by univariate logistic regression. Results: Six clusters were identified, in which patients varied considerably in age, sex, symptoms, obesity, co-morbidities and environmental risk factors. The main significant differences between clusters were minimally symptomatic versus sleepy obstructive sleep apnea patients, lean versus obese, and among obese patients different combinations of co-morbidities and environmental risk factors. Conclusions Our cluster analysis identified six distinct clusters of obstructive sleep apnea. Our findings underscore the high degree of heterogeneity that exists within obstructive sleep apnea patients regarding clinical presentation, risk factors and consequences. This may help in both research and clinical practice for validating new prevention programs, in diagnosis and in decisions regarding therapeutic strategies. PMID:27314230

  14. Sleep and upper airway obstruction in children with achondroplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zucconi, M; Weber, G; Castronovo, [No Value; FeriniStrambi, L; Russo, F; Chiumello, G; Smirne, S

    1996-01-01

    Objective: The features of achondroplasia, the most common form of dwarfism, includes short cranial base and midface hypoplasia; both abnormalities increased the risk of upper airway obstruction during sleep, The aim of our study was to evaluate sleep and respiratory function of children with achond

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Lipid Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkinski, Dimitar; Georgievski, Oliver; Dzekova-Vidimliski, Pavlina; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Dokic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a great interest in the interaction between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic dysfunction, but there is no consistent data suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for dyslipidemia. AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of lipid abnormalities in patients suspected of OSA, referred to our sleep laboratory for polysomnography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred patients referred to our hospital with suspected OSA, and all of them underwent for standard polysomnography. All patients with respiratory disturbance index (RDI) above 15 were diagnosed with OSA. In the morning after 12 hours fasting, the blood sample was collected from all patients. Blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), were determined in all study patients. In the study, both OSA positive and OSA negative patients were divided according to the body mass index (BMI) in two groups. The first group with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 and the second group with BMI > 30 kg/m^2. RESULTS: OSA positive patients with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 had statistically significant higher levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, and statistically significant lower level of HDL compared to OSA negative patients with BMI ≤ 30. There were no statistically significant differences in age and LDL levels between these groups. OSA positive patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2 had higher levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL and lower levels of HDL versus OSA negative patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2, but without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSION: OSA and obesity are potent risk factors for dyslipidemias. OSA could play a significant role in worsening of lipid metabolism in non-obese patients. But in obese patients, the extra weight makes the metabolic changes of lipid metabolism, and the role of OSA is not that very important like in non-obese patients. PMID

  16. Radiological findings in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello Junior, Carlos Fernando de; Guimaraes Filho, Helio Antonio; Gomes, Camila Albuquerque de Brito; Paiva, Camila Caroline de Amorim, E-mail: carlosfmello@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba UFPB, Joao Pessoa (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction occurring at the level of the pharynx during sleep. Although cephalometric analysis is an important method in the diagnosis of craniofacial deformities, CT and magnetic resonance imaging have been highlighted as the major imaging methods to investigate the possible causes of OSA, which, in most cases, is multifactorial. Magnetic resonance and CT both allow an excellent evaluation of the various anatomical planes of the site of obstruction, which enables better clinical assessment and surgical approach. This pictorial essay aims to describe the aspects that must be evaluated in the diagnostic imaging of patients presenting with the major predisposing factors for OSA. (author)

  17. Portable obstructive sleep apnea detection and mobile monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkol ćakmak, Duygu; Eyüboǧlu, B. Murat

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is becoming a prevalent disease for both adults and children. It is described as the cessation of breath for at least 10 seconds during sleep. Detecting sleep apnea is considered as a troublesome and timeconsuming method, which requires the patients to stay one or more nights in dedicated sleep disorder rooms with sensors physically attached to their body. Undiagnosed thereby untreated sleep apnea patients are under high risk of hypertension, heart attack, traffic accident through fatigue and sleeplessness. In this project, nasal and oral respiratory information is obtained with utilizing thermocouple and oxygen saturation in the blood is obtained with utilizing pulse oximeter. An analog hardware circuit is designed to readout thermocouple and pulse oximeter signals. According to this respiratory and pulse oximetry signals, obstructive sleep apnea is detected in real time with using a software implemented into an ARM based processor. An Android mobile application is developed to record and display the oxygen saturation, heart rate and respiratory signal data during sleep. ARM based processor and mobile application communication is established via Bluetooth interface to reduce cabling on the patient. In summary, a portable, low cost and user friendly device to detect obstructive sleep apnea which is able to share the necessary information to the patients and doctors for the duration of the whole sleep cycle is developed.

  18. Genioglossus fatigue in obstructive sleep apnea.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McSharry, David

    2012-08-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder that may cause cardiovascular disease and fatal traffic accidents but the pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Increased fatigability of the genioglossus (the principal upper airway dilator muscle) might be important in OSA pathophysiology but the existing literature is uncertain. We hypothesized that the genioglossus in OSA subjects would fatigue more than in controls. In 9 OSA subjects and 9 controls during wakefulness we measured maximum voluntary tongue protrusion force (Tpmax). Using surface electromyography arrays we measured the rate of decline in muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) during an isometric fatiguing contraction at 30% Tpmax. The rate of decline in MFCV provides an objective means of quantifying localized muscle fatigue. Linear regression analysis of individual subject data demonstrated a significantly greater decrease in MFCV in OSA subjects compared to control subjects (29.2 ± 20.8% [mean ± SD] versus 11.2 ± 20.8%; p=0.04). These data support increased fatigability of the genioglossus muscle in OSA subjects which may be important in the pathophysiology of OSA.

  19. BMI in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrowolska-Zarzycka Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a disease of multicasual etiology. The risk factors include obesity, among other issues. Hence, it is extremely important to determine the effect of body weight on the severity of OSA. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of the body weight expressed as body mass index (BMI, on the value of upper airways diameter and on the AHI (Apnea-Hypopnea Index value. The study was comprised of 41 patients diagnosed with OSA by way of polysomnography. Each patient was first examine via a lateral cephalometric image of the skull, which served to measure the upper and lower diameter of the upper airways. BMI was also calculated for each patient. Statistical analysis was carried out in accordance with Pearson’s correlation coefficient test. Our work demonstrated a negative correlation between BMI and the diameter of the upper airways, and a positive correlation between BMI and AHI value. We thus put forward that the increase in body weight in patients with OSA can contribute to the severity of the disease, regardless of the fact that it may not lead to a reduction of the lumen of the upper airways.

  20. Resistant Hypertension and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension (HTN is a modifiable, highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and renal dysfunction worldwide. In the United States, HTN affects one in three adults, contributes to one out of every seven deaths and to nearly half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. HTN is considered resistant when the blood pressure remains above goal despite lifestyle modification and administration of three antihypertensive agents of different classes including a diuretic. Large population-based studies have suggested that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a risk factor for resistant HTN. The mechanism proposed is a pattern of intermittent hypoxia associated with hyperaldosteronism, increased sympathetic tone, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation. In this review we discuss the association between OSA and resistant HTN, the physiologic mechanisms linking OSA with resistant HTN, and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP on blood pressure in patients with resistant HTN. While the reduction in blood pressure with CPAP is usually modest in patients with OSA, a decrease of only a few mmHg in blood pressure can significantly reduce cardiovascular risk. Patients presenting to a center specializing in management of hypertension should be screened and treated for OSA as a potentially modifiable risk factor.

  1. The Danish National Database for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Larsen, Preben; Cerqueira, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    National Patient Registry. STUDY POPULATION: All patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea or obesity hypoventilation syndrome at public and private in- and out-hospital departments in Denmark were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The NDOSA contains information about baseline characteristics, comorbidity......AIM: The aim of the Danish National Database for Obstructive Sleep Apnea (NDOSA) was to evaluate the clinical quality (diagnostic, treatment, and management) for obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome in Denmark using a real-time national database reporting to the Danish...... departments was involved in the management of sleep apnea in Denmark for the purpose of quality improvement. CONCLUSION: The NDOSA has proven to be a real-time national database using diagnostic and treatment procedures reported to the Danish National Patient Registry....

  2. Effect of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntire, Dan M; Kirkpatrick, Daniel R; Kerfeld, Mitchell J; Hambsch, Zakary J; Reisbig, Mark D; Agrawal, Devendra K; Youngblood, Charles F

    2014-11-01

    The perioperative care of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients is currently receiving much attention due to an increased risk for complications. It is established that postoperative changes in sleep architecture occur and this may have pathophysiological implications for OSA patients. Upper airway muscle activity decreases during rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). Severe OSA patients exhibit exaggerated chemoreceptor-driven ventilation during non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), which leads to central and obstructive apnea. This article critically reviewed the literature relevant to preoperative screening for OSA, prevalence of OSA in surgical populations and changes in postoperative sleep architecture relevant to OSA patients. In particular, we addressed three questions in regard to the effects of sedative-hypnotics, anesthetics and analgesics on sleep architecture, the underlying mechanisms and the relevance to OSA. Indeed, these classes of drugs alter sleep architecture, which likely significantly contributes to abnormal postoperative sleep architecture, exacerbation of OSA and postoperative complications.

  3. Dynamic Drug-Induced Sleep Computed Tomography in Adults With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lo, Yu-Lun; Wang, Chao-Jan; Hsin, Li-Jen; Lin, Wan-Ni; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Lee, Li-Ang

    2016-01-01

    Surgical success for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) depends on identifying sites of obstruction in the upper airway. In this study, we investigated sites of obstruction by evaluating dynamic changes in the upper airway using drug-induced sleep computed tomography (DI-SCT) in patients with OSA. Thirty-five adult patients with OSA were prospectively enrolled. Sleep was induced with propofol under light sedation (bispectral index 70–75), and low-dose 320-detector row CT was performed for 10 seconds over a span of 2–3 respiratory cycles with supporting a continuous positive airway pressure model. Most (89%) of the patients had multi-level obstructions. Total obstruction most commonly occurred in the velum (86%), followed by the tongue (57%), oropharyngeal lateral wall (49%), and epiglottis (26%). There were two types of anterior-posterior obstruction of the soft palate, uvular (94%) and velar (6%), and three types of tongue obstruction, upper (30%), lower (37%), and upper plus lower obstruction (33%). DI-SCT is a fast and safe tool to identify simulated sleep airway obstruction in patients with OSA. It provides data on dynamic airway movement in the sagittal view which can be used to differentiate palate and tongue obstructions, and this can be helpful when planning surgery for patients with OSA. PMID:27762308

  4. Sleep-related disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crinion, Sophie J

    2014-02-01

    Sleep may have several negative consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Sleep is typically fragmented with diminished slow wave and rapid-eye-movement sleep, which likely represents an important contributing factor to daytime symptoms such as fatigue and lethargy. Furthermore, normal physiological adaptations during sleep, which result in mild hypoventilation in normal subjects, are more pronounced in COPD, which can result in clinically important nocturnal oxygen desaturation. The co-existence of obstructive sleep apnea and COPD is also common, principally because of the high prevalence of each disorder, and there is little convincing evidence that one disorder predisposes to the other. Nonetheless, this co-existence, termed the overlap syndrome, typically results in more pronounced nocturnal oxygen desaturation and there is a high prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in such patients. Management of sleep disorders in patients with COPD should address both sleep quality and disordered gas exchange. Non-invasive pressure support is beneficial in selected cases, particularly during acute exacerbations associated with respiratory failure, and is particularly helpful in patients with the overlap syndrome. There is limited evidence of benefit from pressure support in the chronic setting in COPD patients without obstructive sleep apnea.

  5. Impact of short sleep on metabolic variables in obese children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Ayub, Bushra; Thompson, Dana M; Abdullah, Fizan; Billings, Kathleen R

    2017-09-01

    To analyze the association between sleep duration, metabolic variables, and insulin resistance in obese children with and without obstructive sleep apnea. The decline in sleep duration has paralleled a dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, suggesting a mechanistic relationship. Retrospective, case series. Consecutive obese patients 3 to 12 years of age who underwent polysomnography (PSG) and a metabolic panel and who completed a 14-item sleep questionnaire were analyzed. All laboratory testing was conducted within 3 months of PSG. Total sleep times were obtained from the PSG and confirmed by the questionnaire. A total of 171 patients (55.0% male) were studied. All patients were obese (body mass index [BMI] z score > 95th percentile). Patients were categorized into three groups: short sleepers, borderline sleepers, and optimal sleepers. Eighty-six (50.3%) patients were short sleepers, 71 (41.5%) were borderline sleepers, and 14 (8.2%) were optimal sleepers. The mean BMI z score was 3.13 ± 1.3 in short sleepers, 3.3 ± 1.1 in borderline sleepers, and 3.5 ± 1.5 in optimal sleepers (P = .39). There was no statistical difference in high- and low-density lipoprotein levels (P = .21 and P = .76, respectively) and total cholesterol (P = .43) among subgroups. Triglycerides, blood glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance were significantly higher in short sleepers when compared to borderline or normal sleepers (P = .008, P sleep duration was correlated with alterations in metabolic variables and insulin resistance in obese patients. This raises concern for development of comorbid conditions that can persist into adulthood. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:2176-2181, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zamarrón

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Zamarrón1, Vanesa García Paz1, Emilio Morete1, Felix del Campo Matías21Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago, Spain; 2Servicio de Neumologia, Hospital Universitario Rio Ortega de Vallaclolid, Vallaclolid, SpainAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are two diseases that often coexist within an individual. This coexistence is known as overlap syndrome and is the result of chance rather than a pathophysiological link. Although there are claims of a very high incidence of OSAS in COPD patients, recent studies report that it is similar to the general population. Overlap patients present sleep-disordered breathing associated to upper and lower airway obstruction and a reduction in respiratory drive. These patients present unique characteristics, which set them apart from either COPD or OSAS patients. COPD and OSAS are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events and their coexistence in overlap syndrome probably increases this risk. The mechanisms underlying cardiovascular risk are still unclear, but may involve systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and tonic elevation of sympathetic neural activity. The treatment of choice for overlap syndrome in stable patients is CPAP with supplemental oxygen for correction of upper airway obstructive episodes and hypoxemia during sleep.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, overlap syndrome, sleep, cardiovascular disease

  7. Genetic associations with obstructive sleep apnea traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and premature mortality. Although there is strong clinical and epidemiologic evidence supporting the importance of genetic factors in influencing obstructive sleep apnea, its genetic bas...

  8. Neurocognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Chitra; Strange, Charlie; Bachman, David

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder with far-reaching health implications. One of the major consequences of OSAS is an impact on neurocognitive functioning. Several studies have shown that OSAS has an adverse effect on inductive and deductive reasoning, attention, vigilance, learning, and memory. Neurocognitive impairment can be measured objectively with tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, the Steer Clear Performance Test, and tests of repetitive finger tapping. In children, OSAS may cause attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in addition to behavioral problems and learning disabilities. Risk factors for cognitive impairment include increasing age, male sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele positivity, current cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Down syndrome, hypothyroidism, significant alcohol consumption, stroke, and the use of psychoactive medications. At a cellular level, OSAS likely causes cognitive impairment through intermittent hypoxia, hormonal imbalance, and/or systemic inflammation, either independently or via the resultant endothelial dysfunction that occurs. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be measured and minimized in all studies of neurocognitive impairment. Recent studies have used functional and structural neuroimaging to delineate the brain areas affected in patients with OSAS with neurocognitive dysfunction. A common finding in several of these studies is decreased hippocampal volume. Other affected brain areas include the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain, which show focal reductions in gray matter. These changes can be reversed at least partially with the use of CPAP, which highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of OSAS. The currently available data in this field are quite limited, and more research is needed.

  9. Maxillary morphology in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, B H; Gotsopoulos, H; Sims, M R; Cistulli, P A

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to test the hypothesis that maxillary morphology differs between obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients and non-snoring, non-apnoeic subjects. Forty randomly selected patients [36 M, 4 F; mean age 49 +/- 2 (SEM) years] with varying degrees of OSA (mean Apnoea/Hypopnoea Index 32 +/- 4/hour) were compared with 21 non-snoring, non-apnoeic control subjects (18 M, 3 F; mean age 40 +/- 2 years). An intra-oral assessment of the occlusion was carried out, particularly for the presence or absence of posterior transverse discrepancies. Maxillary dental arch width was assessed by standardized lateral inter-tooth measurements (inter-canine, inter-premolar, and inter-molar) from dental models. Palatal height and maxillary depth were also measured. The maxillary dental arch was described by a 4th order polynomial equation. The ratios of maxillary to mandibular width (max/mand) and maxillary to facial width (max/facial) were determined from standardized postero-anterior cephalometric radiographs in a subgroup of patients (n = 29) and all controls. Twenty patients (50 per cent) had evidence of posterior transverse discrepancies compared with one control subject (5 per cent; P polynomial equation was greater in the patients than in the controls (P < 0.05), indicative of greater arch tapering. Patients had smaller maxillary to mandibular and maxillary to facial width ratios (P < 0.01). These results suggest that OSA patients have narrower, more tapered, and shorter maxillary arches than non-snoring, non-apnoeic controls. Further work is required to determine the relevance of these findings in the pathophysiology of OSA.

  10. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingöl, Züleyha; Kıyan, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Background: As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. Aims: To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study. Methods: Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity) and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Results: Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001), oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001) and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001) were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001) and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001) were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Conclusion: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high. PMID:28251022

  11. Does medically induced weight loss improve obstructive sleep apnoea in the obese: review of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsson, E

    2011-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is characterized by repeated periods of breathing cessation during sleep. Obstructive sleep apnoea is both common and underdiagnosed in the obese. A recent study found that as many as 86% of older obese type 2 diabetics had obstructive sleep apnoea. Obesity is independently associated with developing obstructive sleep apnoea, and the reverse may also occur. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea is therefore expected to rise in the wake of the obesity epidemic. The number of partial (hypopnoea) or complete (apnoea) airway obstructions per hour (apnoea-hypopnoea index) is used to classify obstructive sleep apnoea as mild (5-14 events per hour), moderate (15-30) or severe (>30). Severe obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with a two to sixfold increase in all-cause mortality; the impact of mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnoea is less clear. Until recently, the evidence supporting a beneficial effect of weight loss on obstructive sleep apnoea has been limited by a lack of randomized trials. In 2009, at least three randomized controlled trials evaluated whether medically induced weight loss improves obstructive sleep apnoea. The treatment effect ranged from 42% to 62% improvement, although the highest estimate was seen in a very short duration study (9 weeks). Patients who either lost 10-15 kg or more, or had severe obstructive sleep apnoea at baseline, benefited most from treatment.

  12. Case report: obstructive sleep apnea--an air safety risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panton, S; Norup, P W; Videbaek, R

    1997-12-01

    Aviation safety reports indicate that many incidents are related to fatigue. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by irregular snoring with repeated apnea episodes during sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. Deprived of sleep, patients suffer from daytime sleepiness and involuntary sleep attacks. The prevalence of OSA among adult men is more than one percent, 0.5% in women. Predisposed are men aged 40-65 yr. Many patients, including pilots, are unaware of their sleeping disturbance and the symptoms are not easily recognized. Therefore, this condition may not be discovered during a regular health examination. However, this condition can be effectively treated. In our opinion, pilots suffering from OSA do not necessarily have to lose their certificate. Diagnosis and treatment can be conducted, followed by regular check-ups. We suggest that questions about sleep be included in pilots' health examinations.

  13. CT demonstration of pharyngeal narrowing in adult obstructive sleep apnea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlman, M.E. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD); Haponik, E.F.; Smith, P.L.; Allen, R.P.; Bleecker, E.R.; Goldman, S.M.

    1983-03-01

    Sleep apnea is a major cause of daytime hypersomnolence. Among the proposed etiologies, focal obstruction of the airways at the level of the pharynx has been suggested but not proven. Using computed tomography, the cross-sectional area of the airway can be readily assessed. Thirty-three adults with clinically proven sleep apnea and 12 normal adults underwent systematic computed tomography of the neck. Significant airway narrowing was demonstrated in all the patients with obstructive sleep apnea, whereas no such narrowing was seen in the controls. In 11, the narrowing was at a single level, whereas in 22 patients two or more levels were affected. This study has shown that a structurally abnormal airway may serve as an anatomic substrate for the development of sleep apnea. On the basis of this evidence, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty has been performed in two patients with relief of symptoms in one.

  14. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Atkeson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy Atkeson, Sanja JelicDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NYAbstract: Endothelial activation and inflammation are important mediators of accelerated atherogenesis and consequent increased cardiovascular morbidity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Repetitive episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation associated with transient cessation of breathing during sleep in OSA resemble ischemia/reperfusion injury and may be the main culprit underlying endothelial dysfunction in OSA. Additional factors such as repetitive arousals resulting in sleep fragmentation and deprivation and individual genetic suseptibility to vascular manifestations of OSA contribute to impaired endothelial function in OSA. The present review focuses on possible mechanisms that underlie endothelial activation and inflammation in OSA.Keywords: endothelial, obstructive sleep apnea, inflammation, dysfunction

  15. Evaluation of Autonomic Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Turan Evlice

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system, which controls the body's internal organs is called Autonomic Nervous System. Parkinson's disease, vascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and Guilllain-Barre syndrome cause to disotonomia. Recent studies has been shown, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome cause to disotonomia too. To investigate disotonomia in in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome , should be preferred the methods like analysis of heart rate variability and sympathetic skin response which have low cost and easy applicability. Thus, it will be possible to prevent morbidity and mortality due to autonomic dysfuncion. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(2.000: 109-121

  16. Hyperinflation is associated with lower sleep efficiency in COPD with co-existent obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeff S; Wolfe, Lisa F; Lu, Brandon S; Kalhan, Ravi

    2009-12-01

    Prior research has shown that individuals with obstructive lung disease are at risk for sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality. We postulated that patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (known as overlap syndrome) who have more severe lung disease, as measured by lung hyperinflation (inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity), would have greater sleep disturbances independent of traditional measures of sleep apnea. We performed a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients evaluated and treated in an academic pulmonary clinic for overlap syndrome. Pulmonary function tests and polysomnogram data were collected. Thirty patients with overlap syndrome were included in the analysis. We found significant univariable associations between sleep efficiency and apnea/hypopnea index (beta = -0.285, p = 0.01) and between sleep efficiency and lung hyperinflation (beta = 0.654, p = 0.03). Using multivariable linear regression, the relationship between sleep efficiency and lung hyperinflation remained significant (beta = 1.13, p = 0.02) after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, apnea/hypopnea index, FEV(1)% predicted, oxygen saturation nadir, medications, and cardiac disease. We conclude that increased severity of hyperinflation is associated with worse sleep efficiency, independent of apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia. The mechanisms underlying this observation are uncertain. We speculate that therapies aimed at reducing lung hyperinflation may improve sleep quality in patients with overlap syndrome.

  17. Inflammatory cytokines in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Guilleminault, Christian; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Cheng, Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lee, Li-Ang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with chronic systemic inflammation and with cognitive impairments. This study aimed to investigate the status of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 23 (IL-23) and cognition in pediatric OSA. Controls and OSA children participated in the study. Exclusion criteria were adenotonsillectomy, heart, neurological and severe psychiatric diseases, craniofacial syndromes, and obesity. Polysomnogram was followed by serum testing for inflammatory markers and neurocognitive tests such as continuous performance task (CPT) and Wisconsin card sorting test, questionnaires, analyses of plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-17, and IL-23. Seventy-nine, 4 to 12-year-old subjects in 2 groups ended the study: 47 nonobese OSA children (mean age = 7.84 ± 0.56 years, body mass index [BMI] = 16.95 ± 0.47 kg/m2, BMI z-score = 0.15 ± 0.21, and mean apnea–hypopnea index [AHI] = 9.13 ± 1.67 events/h) and 32 healthy control children (mean age = 7.02 ± 0.65 years, with BMI = 16.55 ± 0.58 kg/m2, BMI z-score = −0.12 ± 0.27, and mean AHI = 0.41 ± 0.07 event/h) were enrolled. Serum cytokine analyses showed significantly higher levels of HS-CRP, IL-17, and IL-23 in OSA children (P = 0.002, P = 0.024, and P = 0.047). Regression test showed significant influence of HS-CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, and specifically IL-23, with the continuous performance test and Wisconsin card sorting test. OSA children have abnormal levels of IL-17, an interleukin related to T helper 17 cells, a T helper cell involved in development of autoimmunity and inflammation. This high expression level may contribute to the complications of pediatric OSA; we also found a significant influence of inflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-23, on abnormal neurocognitive testing. PMID

  18. Sleep-related sweating in obstructive sleep apnoea: association with sleep stages and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Thorleifsdottir, Bjorg; Svanborg, Eva; Olafsson, Isleifur; Gislason, Thorarinn

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate sleep-related sweating as a symptom of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Fifteen otherwise healthy male non-smoking patients with untreated moderate-to-severe OSA underwent polysomnography, including measurements of skin and core body temperature and electrodermal activity (EDA) as an objective indicator of sweating. Evening and morning blood pressure was measured as well as catecholamines in nocturnal urine. All measurements were repeated after 3 months on successful continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. The untreated OSA subjects had a mean (+/-SD) apnoea-hypopnoea index of 45.3 +/- 3.9 and a mean EDA index during sleep of 131.9 +/- 22.4 events per hour. Patients with higher EDA indices had higher systolic blood pressure in the evening and morning (P = 0.001 and 0.006) and lower rapid eye movement (REM) sleep percentage (P = 0.003). The EDA index decreased significantly to 78.5 +/- 17.7 in the patients on CPAP treatment (P = 0.04). The decrease correlated with lower evening systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.05 and 0.006) and an increase in REM% (P = 0.02). No relationship was observed between EDA and skin or core body temperature, or to catecholamine levels in urine. OSA patients who experience sleep-related sweating may have increased blood pressure and decreased REM sleep compared with other OSA patients. CPAP treatment appears to lower blood pressure and increase REM sleep to a higher extent in these patients compared with other OSA patients.

  19. Survey of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in Hong Kong of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周建偉; 吳國强; 郭嘉莉; 张美盈

    2004-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea affects up to 2.9% of children. This study was to determine demographic and clinical characteristics of a group of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as defined by sleep polysomnography (PSG).Methods A prospective study was conducted in a public-funded general hospital in Hong Kong of China. Children confirmed to have OSAS by PSG were followed up between January 1997 and December 1998. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) was offered to those with moderate to severe OSAS, and medication was offered to those with mild OSAS. All children were followed up regularly in the sleep clinic and sleep PSG was repeated for those with marked relapse in symptoms.Results Eighty-nine children (64 boys and 25 girls, mean age 7 years) were confirmed to have OSAS out of 352 children who underwent PSG during the study period. The most common symptoms of OSAS were snoring (100%) and sweating (81%) during sleep and nasal blockage (61%) and sleepiness (34%) during daytime. Severe OSAS occurred in 15 children. Moderate OSAS occurred in 33 children. Forty-one children had mild OSAS. Forty-nine children underwent T&A, 5 (boys, <5 years) out of whom were found to have recurrent OSAS within 1 year. Conclusion A male predominance has been found in a group of Hong Kong children with OSAS. Boys undergoing T&A at an early age (<5 years) will be more likely to develop repeated OSAS.

  20. Sleep structure in patients with periodic limb movements and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Jorge; Murie-Fernandez, Manuel; Toledo, Estefania; Urrestarazu, Elena; Alegre, Manuel; Viteri, Cesar; Salvador, Javier; Baptista, Peter; Alcaide, Belen; Artieda, Julio

    2009-08-01

    Periodic limb movements (PLM) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are two frequent sleep disorders which often occur in the same patient. The goal of this study was to know the influence of the presence of PLM in the sleep architecture in patients with and without OSAS. Two hundred twenty consecutive patients (69 women and 151 men) participated in this transversal study. They were patients with clinical suspicion of dysomnia, including snoring, OSAS, and PLM. All of them underwent a full polysomnography and were interviewed using questionnaires about the sleep quality. The sleep parameters (percentage of sleep stages, rapid eye movement latency, sleep efficiency, awakenings, PLM presence, apnea-hypopnea index) were calculated and compared between groups. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric distribution techniques were used for the analysis. Patients with PLM when compared with patients with OSAS had lower sleep efficiency and less rapid eye movement percentage. The presence of PLM in patients with sleep apnea was less relevant being responsible only for an increase in the rapid eye movement latency and a decrease in the duration of the three to four sleep stages. However, the presence of OSAS was related to a better sleep efficiency (patients with PLM plus OSAS had a better sleep efficiency than patients with only PLM). PLM alters the structure of sleep. In patients with sleep apnea, the presence of PLM is less relevant.

  1. Automatic Video Analysis for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad, Jorge; Muñoz-Ferrer, Aida; Cervantes, Miguel Ángel; Esquinas, Cristina; Marin, Alicia; Martínez, Carlos; Morera, Josep; Ruiz, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated the diagnostic accuracy for the identification of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and its severity of a noninvasive technology based on image processing (SleepWise). Methods: This is an observational, prospective study to evaluate the degree of agreement between polysomnography (PSG) and SleepWise. We recruited 56 consecutive subjects with suspected OSA who were referred as outpatients to the Sleep Unit of the Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol (HUGTiP) from January 2013 to January 2014. All patients underwent laboratory PSG and image processing with SleepWise simultaneously the same night. Both PSG and SleepWise analyses were carried independently and blindly. Results: We analyzed 50 of the 56 patients recruited. OSA was diagnosed through PSG in a total of 44 patients (88%) with a median apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 25.35 (24.9). According to SleepWise, 45 patients (90%) met the criteria for a diagnosis of OSA, with a median AHI of 22.8 (22.03). An analysis of the ability of PSG and SleepWise to classify patients by severity on the basis of their AHI shows that the two diagnostic systems distribute the different groups similarly. According to PSG, 23 patients (46%) had a diagnosis of severe OSA, 11 patients (22%) moderate OSA, and 10 patients (20%) mild OSA. According to SleepWise, 20, 13, and 12 patients (40%, 26%, and 24%, respectively) had a diagnosis of severe, moderate, and mild OSA respectively. For OSA diagnosis, SleepWise was found to have sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 83% in relation to PSG. The positive predictive value was 97% and the negative predictive value was 100%. The Bland-Altman plot comparing the mean AHI values obtained through PSG and SleepWise shows very good agreement between the two diagnostic techniques, with a bias of −3.85, a standard error of 12.18, and a confidence interval of −0.39 to −7.31. Conclusions: SleepWise was reasonably accurate for noninvasive and automatic diagnosis

  2. 77 FR 25226 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... withdrawing its proposed regulatory guidance for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and request for comment as published on April 20, 2012. The Agency is still in the process of carefully reviewing the...

  3. Predictors of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A.; Doff, M. H. J.; de Bont, L. G. M.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Wijkstra, P. J.; Pasma, H. R.; Stegenga, B.

    2007-01-01

    Oral appliance therapy is an alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for treating the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. However, the ability to pre-select suitable candidates for either treatment is limited. The aim of this study was to assess the value of relevant variabl

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with increased arterial stiffness in severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetho, Ian W; Parker, Robert J; Craig, Sonya; Duffy, Nick; Hardy, Kevin J; Wilding, John P H

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, leading to greater cardiovascular risk. Severely obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea may still be at risk of adverse health outcomes, even without previous cardiovascular disease. Pulse wave analysis non-invasively measures peripheral pulse waveforms and derives measures of haemodynamic status, including arterial stiffness, augmentation pressure and subendocardial viability ratio. We hypothesized that the presence of obstructive sleep apnea in severe obesity, even in the absence of an antecedent history of cardiovascular disease, would affect measurements derived from pulse wave analysis. Seventy-two severely obese adult subjects [obstructive sleep apnea 47 (body mass index 42 ± 7 kg m(-2) ), without obstructive sleep apnea (non-OSA) 25 (body mass index 40 ± 5 kg m(-2) )] were characterised using anthropometric, respiratory and cardio-metabolic parameters. Groups were similar in age, body mass index and gender. More subjects with obstructive sleep apnea had metabolic syndrome [obstructive sleep apnea 60%, without obstructive sleep apnea (non-OSA) 12%]. Those with obstructive sleep apnea had greater arterial stiffness, augmentation pressure and decreased subendocardial viability ratio (all P cardiovascular risk independently of metabolic abnormalities. The presence of obstructive sleep apnea in severe obesity identifies a group at high cardiovascular risk; clinicians should ensure that risk factors are managed appropriately in this group whether or not treatment of obstructive sleep apnea is offered or accepted by patients.

  5. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy in the obstructive sleep apnea: comparison between NOHL and VOTE classifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Viana, Alonço; Mendes, Daniella Leitão; de Andrade Lemes, Lucas Neves; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos; Neves, Denise Duprat; de Araújo-Melo, Maria Helena

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial or complete collapse of the pharynx that result in a decrease in oxyhemoglobin saturation. Nasofibrolaryngoscopy under induced sleep is a promising alternative for identifying sites of upper airway obstruction in patients with OSA. This study aimed to compare the obstruction sites screened by drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) using the Nose oropharynx hypopharynx and larynx (NOHL) and Velum oropharynx tongue base epiglottis (VOTE) classifications. We also determined the relationship between OSA severity and the number of obstruction sites and compared the minimum SaO2 levels between DISE and polysomnography (PSG). This was a prospective study in 45 patients with moderate and severe OSA using DISE with target-controlled infusion of propofol bispectral index (BIS) monitoring. The retropalatal region was the most frequent obstruction site, followed by the retrolingual region. Forty-two percent of patients had obstruction in the epiglottis. Concentrically shaped obstructions were more prevalent in both ratings. The relationship between OSA severity and number of obstruction sites was significant for the VOTE classification. Similar minimum SaO2 values were observed in DISE and PSG. The VOTE classification was more comprehensive in the analysis of the epiglottis and pharynx by DISE and the relationship between OSA severity and number of affected sites was also established by VOTE. The use of BIS associated with DISE is a reliable tool for the assessment of OSA patients.

  6. Role of Sensory Stimulation in Amelioration of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mak Adam Daulatzai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, characterized by recurrent upper airway (UA collapse during sleep, is associated with significant morbidity and disorders. Polysomnogram is employed in the evaluation of OSA and apnea-hypopnea number per hour reflects severity. For normal breathing, it is essential that the collapsible UA is patent. However, obstruction of the UA is quite common in adults and infants. Normally, important reflex mechanisms defend against the UA collapse. The muscle activity of UA dilators, including the genioglossus, tensor palatini (TP, and pharyngeal constrictors, is due to the integrated mechanism of afferent sensory input → to motor function. Snoring is harsh breathing to prevent UA obstruction. Unfortunately, snoring vibrations, pharyngeal suction collapse, negative pressure, and hypoxia cause pathological perturbations including dysfunctional UA afferent sensory activity. The current paper posits that peripheral sensory stimulation paradigm, which has been shown to be efficacious in improving several neurological conditions, could be an important therapeutic strategy in OSA also.

  7. Sleep in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Evidence Gaps and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Jen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD prevalence is rising to epidemic proportions due to historical smoking trends, the aging of the population, and air pollution. Although blaming the victims has been common in COPD, the majority of COPD worldwide is now thought to be nonsmoking related, that is, caused by air pollution and cookstove exposure. It is increasingly appreciated that subjective and objective sleep disturbances are common in COPD, although strong epidemiological data are lacking. People with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA plus COPD (the so-called overlap syndrome have a high risk of cardiovascular death, although again mechanisms are unknown and untested. This review aims to draw attention to the problem of sleep in COPD, to encourage clinicians to ask their patients about symptoms, and to stimulate further research in this area given the large burden of the disease.

  8. Quality of sexual life in men with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Mehmet; Balikci, Adem; Haciomeroglu, Bikem; Zincir, Serkan; Cinar, Alper; Congologlu, Emel; Bozkurt, Ali; Ozgen, Fuat; Ozsahin, Aytekin

    2013-02-01

    The study investigated the quality of sexual life of male obstructive sleep apnoea patients. Apnoea and non-apnoea participants were assessed with Golombok Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS) and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) before the sleep test. Folicule Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinising Hormone (LH), prolactin, testosterone and oestrogen levels were also evaluated. The apnoea group had a higher BMI and lower LH and testosterone levels than the non-apnoea group. There were no differences between the apnoea, non-apnoea groups and within the apnoea groups (mild, moderate and high apnoea) in terms of sexual satisfaction. Although there was a change in the hormonal levels of obstructive sleep apnoea patients, the sexual life of apnoea patients was not affected at the clinical level.

  9. Association of naso-Oro-pharyngeal structures with the sleep architecture in suspected obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Pawan; Gupta, Ravi; Sharma, Rajanish; Mishra, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to find out the association of various naso-oro-pharyngeal structures with sleep macro-architecture in suspected obstructive sleep apnea subjects. Study included 51 subjects with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Subjects with possible central apnea and those consuming any substance that can affect sleep architecture were excluded. Level I polysomnography was performed after thorough physical examination. Overnight study was scored in 30 s epochs to find out the polysomnographic variables. Surgical treatment was offered wherever indicated. Subjects with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were manually titrated on CPAP with the polysomnogram. SPSS v 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. We did not find any difference in the sleep architecture between genders. Sleep Efficiency was better in subjects with dental overjet, dental attrition, high tongue base, macroglossia, lesser oral cavity volume, edematous uvula, increased submental fat, hypertrophied facial muscles and Mallampatti grade III-IV. Shorter Sleep Latency was seen in subjects with tender TMJ and Mallampatti Gr III-IV. REM latency was shorter in subjects with high tongue base, macroglossia and hypertrophied muscles of mastication. Increased REM was observed in subjects with high tongue base, edematous uvula and tender TMJ. Enlarged tonsils had reversed effect with poor sleep efficiency, increased REM latency and decreased REM. CPAP therapy (N = 20) lessened awake time, decreased N2 and increased REM. Oro-pharyngeal structures affect the sleep architecture in suspected OSA subjects. Nasal structures do not affect the sleep architecture in these subjects and enlarged tonsils have opposite effect. Sleep architecture changes on the titration night with CPAP.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea: overlaps in pathophysiology, systemic inflammation, and cardiovascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Walter T

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome represent two of the most prevalent chronic respiratory disorders in clinical practice, and cardiovascular diseases represent a major comorbidity in each disorder. The two disorders coexist (overlap syndrome) in approximately 1% of adults but asymptomatic lower airway obstruction together with sleep-disordered breathing is more prevalent. Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has similar prevalence in COPD as the general population, and vice versa, factors such as body mass index and smoking influence relationships. Nocturnal oxygen desaturation develops in COPD, independent of apnea\\/hypopnea, and is more severe in the overlap syndrome, thus predisposing to pulmonary hypertension. Furthermore, upper airway flow limitation contributes to nocturnal desaturation in COPD without apnea\\/hypopnea. Evidence of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, involving C-reactive protein and IL-6, in addition to nuclear factor-kappaB-dependent pathways involving tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8, provides insight into potential basic interactions between both disorders. Furthermore, oxidative stress develops in each disorder, in addition to activation and\\/or dysfunction of circulating leukocytes. These findings are clinically relevant because systemic inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and the cell\\/molecular pathways involved are similar to those identified in COPD and sleep apnea. However, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea is not proven, and thus, studies of patients with the overlap syndrome should provide insight into the mechanisms of systemic inflammation in COPD and sleep apnea, in addition to potential relationships with cardiovascular disease.

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Peripheral Blood Neutrophils of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Guoda Pilkauskaite; Skaidrius Miliauskas; Raimundas Sakalauskas

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as obesity is associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Neutrophils produce great amounts of ROS. The aim was to evaluate peripheral blood neutrophils ROS production in men with OSA and to establish relations with disease severity and obesity. Methods. Forty-six men with OSA and 10 controls were investigated. OSA was confirmed by polysomnography (PSG), when apnea/hypopnea index was >5/h. Body mass index (BMI) was evaluated. Ne...

  12. Is there a place for teaching obstructive sleep apnea and snoring in the predoctoral dental curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Hottel, Timothy L; Pancratz, Frank

    2012-12-01

    The widespread prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and apneic snoring is both alarming and well documented. Sleep disorders affect one out of five Americans. Yet, during an attempt to study the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and snoring among patients at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, a search through the entire school's database for the terms "sleep apnea" and "snoring" found only ninety-two patients who admitted to snoring. Currently, the condition "sleep apnea" is not even on the school's list of health/medical questions. These figures not only are inconsistent with national statistics, but confirm that more needs to be done to make dental students aware of these disorders, include them in patient medical histories, and ultimately educate patients about therapies that can help. Considering the health concerns related to this sleep disorder, the economic impact of insomnia and daytime sleepiness, as well as the fact that the dentist is well poised to reduce symptoms and increase the quality of life among sufferers, mandibular advancement devices should become an educational standard in the predoctoral clinical curriculum of dental schools. Predoctoral clinical curricula need to reflect this current health trend and train dentists to care for these patients comprehensively.

  13. Acoustic-integrated dynamic MR imaging for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunn-Jy; Shih, Tiffany Ting-Fang; Chang, Yi-Chung; Hsu, Ying-Chieh; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Lo, Men-Tzung; Pham, Van-Truong; Lin, Chen; Wang, Pa-Chun

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by multi-level upper airway obstruction. Anatomic changes at the sites of obstruction may modify the physical or acoustic properties of snores. The surgical success of OSA depends upon precise localization of obstructed levels. We present a case of OSAS who received simultaneous dynamic MRI and snore acoustic recordings. The synchronized image and acoustic information successfully characterize the sites of temporal obstruction during sleep-disordered breathing events.

  14. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on sleep-wake stage ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrew Keong; Guan, Cuntai

    2012-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) experience fragmented sleep and exhibit different sleep architectures. While polysomnographic metrics for quantifying sleep architecture are studied, there is little information about the impact of OSA on the ratio of different sleep-wake stages (wake, W; rapid eye movement, REM; non-REM stages 1 to 3, N1 to N3). This study, therefore, aims to investigate the relationship between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI, a measure of OSA severity) and all possible ratios of sleep-wake stages. Sleep architectures of 24 adult subjects with suspected OSA were constructed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine scoring manual, and subsequently analyzed through various correlation (Pearson, Spearman, and Kendall) and regression (linear, logarithmic, exponential, and power-law) approaches. Results show a statistically significant positive, linear and monotonic correlation between AHI and REM/N3, as well as between AHI and N1/W (p-values sleep, and in light sleep than wake (or less time in deep sleep than REM, and in wake than light sleep). A power-law regression model may possibly explain the relationships of AHI-REM/N3 and AHI-N1/W, and predict the value of AHI using REM/N3 or N1/W.

  15. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS is a common medical disorder among adults, which is increasingly being recognized in children too. It is a breathing disorder characterized by upper airway obstruction with or without intermittent complete obstruction that disrupts normal breathing during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular disorders are mainly responsible for this disorder. This disorder leads to a state of chronic hypoxemia, which has significant cardiac, pulmonary and central nervous system implications. Diagnosis of OSAS is based on thorough history and clinical examination along with appropriate sleep studies including polysomnography. The mainstay of treatment of paediatric OSAS is adenotonsillectomy. Good anaesthetic practice in Paediatric patients with OSAS revolves around good and ideal airway management. Early detection of airway obstruction, intense monitoring to warn of impending airway problems and appropriate and early intervention of airway compromise are good anaesthetic practices. Coexisting medical problems should be adequately addressed and safe analgesic techniques in the perioperative period go towards improving outcomes in patients with paediatric OSAS.

  16. Assessing severity of obstructive sleep apnea by fractal dimension sequence analysis of sleep EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Yang, X. C.; Luo, L.; Shao, J.; Zhang, C.; Ma, J.; Wang, G. F.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.-K.; Fang, J.

    2009-10-01

    Different sleep stages are associated with distinct dynamical patterns in EEG signals. In this article, we explored the relationship between the sleep architecture and fractal dimension (FD) of sleep EEG. In particular, we applied the FD analysis to the sleep EEG of patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), which is characterized by recurrent oxyhemoglobin desaturation and arousals from sleep, a disease which received increasing public attention due to its significant potential impact on health. We showed that the variation of FD reflects the macrostructure of sleep. Furthermore, the fast fluctuation of FD, as measured by the zero-crossing rate of detrended FD (zDFD), is a useful indicator of sleep disturbance, and therefore, correlates with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and hourly number of blood oxygen saturation (SpO 2) decreases greater than 4%, as obstructive apnea/hypopnea disturbs sleep architecture. For practical purpose, a modified index combining zDFD of EEG and body mass index (BMI) may be useful for evaluating the severity of OSAHS symptoms.

  17. Studies on the mechanism of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwa, A; Gromysz, H; Jernajczyk, U; Karczewski, W A

    1989-01-01

    Several observations indicate that the mylohyoid nerve (NV) may play a crucial part in the mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The activity of this nerve normally counteracts the collapse of the upper airways during inspiration. Any reduction in this activity may thus facilitate the occurrence of apnoeic spells. We have studied the effects of ethanol and lung inflations on the activity of NV recorded along with the activities of phrenic and facial nerve in rabbits anaesthetised with chloralose-urethan, paralyzed with curare and artificially ventilated. Under the control conditions the NV exhibited phasic expiratory activity; after vagotomy and additional, inspiratory component was observed. Lung inflation strongly enhanced the expiratory activity of NV whereas both the phrenic and facial nerve activities (both phasic-inspiratory) were typically inhibited. An injection of 5 ml of 20% ethanol very strongly inhibited the NV activity. The results may confirm the importance of NV in the mechanism of OSA. The well-known fact that OSA patients are particularly sensitive to alcohol finds support in the response of NV activity to ethanol injection. The analysis of the patterns of discharges of the three outputs from the respiratory controller may additionally suggest that the Vth nerve nucleus is involved in the control of respiratory pattern.

  18. [Impact of sleep hygiene on patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes Bahia, Mariana; Soares, Vera; Carlos Winck, João

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a Sleep Hygiene brochure on a population of 36 patients recently diagnosed with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome and beginning treatment. One expects that: 1) the information about Sleep Hygiene offered in the brochure would change some of the patients' habits toward sleep; and that, 2) this intervention in the form of a free informative brochure would have an echo in terms of a better subjective evaluation of sleep complaints. The sleep habits and the sleep complaints were evaluated in the pre-test. Those variables were re-evaluated in the post-test and at that time the patients filled in a scale of satisfaction with the information about Sleep Hygiene, in terms of its contribution to improving their sleep complaints. There were no significant differences in the level of compliance to Sleep Hygiene between the two periods, although the majority of the patients considered that Sleep Hygiene did improve their sleep difficulties. The low level of compliance may be due to the fact that patients already had reasonable Sleep Hygiene habits, and also to the fact that the scale was not sufficiently discriminative. In addition, the self-discipline that Sleep Hygiene involves may have collided with other demands such as the adaptation to treatment with CPAP (Continuous Positive Air Pressure). In a following study, it would be interesting to find if the levels of sleep hygiene compliance would change if they were implemented after the initial adaptation to CPAP, which would imply a longitudinal study. It would be helpful to keep reminding the patients of Sleep Hygiene importance, offering new and update brochures to the patients during consultations.

  19. Using the Pathophysiology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea to Teach Cardiopulmonary Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitzky, Michael G.

    2008-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The effects of intermittent upper airway obstruction include alveolar hypoventilation, altered arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and stimulation of the arterial chemoreceptors, which leads to frequent arousals. These arousals disturb sleep…

  20. Tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy versus non-surgical management for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, Roderick P; Hearne, Benjamin J; Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Blackshaw, Helen; Lim, Jerome; Schilder, Anne G M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) is a condition that encompasses breathing problems when asleep, due to an obstruction of the upper airways, ranging in severity from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). It affects both children and adults. In children,

  1. Diagnosis and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Leon; Sweetman, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Insomnia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea. It reduces positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy acceptance and adherence. Comorbid patients show greater daytime impairments and poorer health outcomes. The insomnia often goes undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated. Pharmacotherapy is not recommended for long-term treatment. Although care should be taken administering behavioral therapies to patients with elevated sleepiness, cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an effective and durable nondrug therapy that reduces symptoms and may increase the effectiveness of PAP therapy. Sleep clinics should be alert to comorbid insomnia and provide adequate diagnostic tools and clinicians with CBTi expertise.

  2. Parasomnias: Common sleep disorders in children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Torres Molina

    2010-01-01

    The sleep disorders have a tendency to chronic evolution in approximately the 30% of children and adolescents, what constitute the main parasomnias clinical expressions of these phenomena. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome constitute a high prevailment ailment which affects the 2% of the childish population approximately it is considered an entity because of its cognitive and somatic resounding. Parasomnias are part of the complex symptomatic night cortege observed in OSAS, stablishing a d...

  3. Genetics of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dongmei; Xiao Yi; Luo Jinmei

    2014-01-01

    Objective To have a better understanding of genetic contributions to the development of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) by reviewing studies on its genetic basis.Data sources A comprehensive search of the PubMed literature without restriction on the publication date was carried out using terms "obstructive sleep apnea" and "candidate genes" or "genetics".Study selection Articles were selected if they were an original research paper or meta analysis of the genetic factors of OSAHS.Results Four intermediate phenotypes were described and several candidate genes that may determine the expression and severity of OSAHS were reviewed.Conclusion Multiple gene-gene interactions occurring in genes that affect obesity,craniofacial structure,ventilator control and asleep-awake pattern may influence the expression of OSAHS in a suitable environment.

  4. Oxygen desaturation during night sleep affects decision-making in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delazer, Margarete; Zamarian, Laura; Frauscher, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Stefani, Ambra; Heidbreder, Anna; Högl, Birgit

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed decision-making and its associations with executive functions and sleep-related factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Thirty patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea and 20 healthy age- and education-matched controls performed the Iowa Gambling Task, a decision-making task under initial ambiguity, as well as an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Patients, but not controls, also underwent a detailed polysomnographic assessment. Results of group analyses showed that patients performed at the same level of controls on the Iowa Gambling Task. However, the proportion of risky performers was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. Decision-making did not correlate with executive functions and subjective ratings of sleepiness, whereas there was a significant positive correlation between advantageous performance on the Iowa Gambling Task and percentage of N2 sleep, minimal oxygen saturation, average oxygen saturation and time spent below 90% oxygen saturation level. Also, the minimal oxygen saturation accounted for 27% of variance in decision-making. In conclusion, this study shows that a subgroup of patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be at risk of disadvantageous decision-making under ambiguity. Among the sleep-related factors, oxygen saturation is a significant predictor of advantageous decision-making.

  5. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Francesco Damiani; Annapaola Zito; Pierluigi Carratù; Vito Antonio Falcone; Elioda Bega; Pietro Scicchitano; Marco Matteo Ciccone; Onofrio Resta

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN) is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and on inflammatory...

  6. Facial appearance following surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodday, Reginald; Gregoire, Curtis

    2008-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a serious medical condition that is associated with numerous negative health side effects. The general dentist plays an invaluable role in identifying patients with this condition. Certain OSAS patients receive significant medical and social benefits from orthognathic surgery to advance the maxilla, mandible, and chin. Anterior positioning of the maxilla and mandible is not only highly successful for curing OSAS but also results in favorable facial esthetic changes.

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit,Gary; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Newman, Anne B.; Thomas A. Wadden; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi Sunyer, F. Xavier; Darcey, Valerie; Kuna, Samuel T.; ,

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk factors for the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Unattended polysomnography was performed in 306 participants. RESULTS Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. The mean AHI was 20.5 ± 16.8 events/h. A total of 30.5% of the participants had moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI

  8. Cognitive profile and brain morphological changes in obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Torelli, Federico; Moscufo, Nicola; Garreffa, Girolamo; Placidi, Fabio; Romigi, Andrea; Zannino, Silvana; Bozzali, Marco; Fasano, Fabrizio; Giulietti, Giovanni; Djonlagic, Ina; Malhotra, Atul; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Guttmann, Charles RG

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is accompanied by neurocognitive impairment, likely mediated by injury to various brain regions. We evaluated brain morphological changes in patients with OSA and their relationship to neuropsychological and oximetric data. Sixteen patients affected by moderate-severe OSA (age: 55.8±6.7 years, 13 males) and fourteen control subjects (age: 57.6±5.1 years, 9 males) underwent 3.0 Tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing evaluating ...

  9. Cardiac autonomic control in the obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouha Gammoudi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sympathetic activation is considered to be the main mechanism involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. The heart rate variability (HRV analysis represents a non-invasive tool allowing the study of the autonomic nervous system. The impairment of HRV parameters in OSA has been documented. However, only a few studies tackled the dynamics of the autonomic nervous system during sleep in patients having OSA. Aims: To analyze the HRV over sleep stages and across sleep periods in order to clarify the impact of OSA on cardiac autonomic modulation. The second objective is to examine the nocturnal HRV of OSA patients to find out which HRV parameter is the best to reflect the symptoms severity. Methods: The study was retrospective. We have included 30 patients undergoing overnight polysomnography. Subjects were categorized into two groups according to apnea–hypopnea index (AHI: mild-to-moderate OSAS group (AHI: 5–30 and severe OSAS group (AHI>30. The HRV measures for participants with low apnea–hypopnea indices were compared to those of patients with high rates of apnea–hypopnea across the sleep period and sleep stages. Results: HRV measures during sleep stages for the group with low rates of apnea–hypopnea have indicated a parasympathetic activation during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. However, no significant difference has been observed in the high AHI group except for the mean of RR intervals (mean RR. The parasympathetic activity tended to increase across the night but without a statistical difference. After control of age and body mass index, the most significant correlation found was for the mean RR (p=0.0001, r=−0.248. Conclusion: OSA affects sympathovagal modulation during sleep, and this impact has been correlated to the severity of the disease. The mean RR seemed to be a better index allowing the sympathovagal balance appreciation during the night in OSA.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Driving: A Canadian Thoracic Society and Canadian Sleep Society Position Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najib Ayas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA experience sleep fragmentation and poor sleep quality that results in daytime sleepiness, which impairs performance during driving and leads to an increased risk for collisions. Not surprisingly, observational studies have shown that patients with OSA experience a two- to 10-fold higher risk for collision compared with healthy controls. Although treatment would clearly mitigate these risks, there is no current Canadian position on driving and OSA. This article, the first Canadian position statement addressing the issue, provides an overview of provincial regulations and proposes recommendations with regard to driving in patients with OSA.

  11. Parasomnias: Common sleep disorders in children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Torres Molina

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The sleep disorders have a tendency to chronic evolution in approximately the 30% of children and adolescents, what constitute the main parasomnias clinical expressions of these phenomena. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome constitute a high prevailment ailment which affects the 2% of the childish population approximately it is considered an entity because of its cognitive and somatic resounding. Parasomnias are part of the complex symptomatic night cortege observed in OSAS, stablishing a direct physiopathology relationship between both of them. The reduction of the apnea episodes after the adenotonsillar hyperplasia surgical treatment is accompanied by diminishing of the sleep disorders modification in this patient.

  12. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present.

  13. Snoring Sounds Predict Obstruction Sites and Surgical Response in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Lo, Yu-Lun; Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Gui-She; Ni, Yung-Lun; Chen, Ning-Hung; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Huang, Chung-Guei; Cheng, Wen-Nuan; Li, Hsueh-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Snoring sounds generated by different vibrators of the upper airway may be useful indicators of obstruction sites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study aimed to investigate associations between snoring sounds, obstruction sites, and surgical responses (≥50% reduction in the apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and DISE), and relocation pharyngoplasty. All patients received follow-up polysomnography after 6 months. Fifteen (42%) patients with at least two complete obstruction sites defined by DISE were significantly, positively associated with maximal snoring sound intensity (40–300 Hz; odds ratio [OR], 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05–1.49) and body mass index (OR, 1.48, 95% CI 1.02–2.15) after logistic regression analysis. Tonsil obstruction was significantly, inversely correlated with mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz; OR, 0.84, 95% CI 0.74–0.96). Moreover, baseline tonsil obstruction detected by either DISE or mean snoring sound intensity (301–850 Hz), and AHI could significantly predict the surgical response. Our findings suggest that snoring sound detection may be helpful in determining obstruction sites and predict surgical responses. PMID:27471038

  14. The consolidation of implicit sequence memory in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Csabi

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA Syndrome is a relatively frequent sleep disorder characterized by disrupted sleep patterns. It is a well-established fact that sleep has beneficial effect on memory consolidation by enhancing neural plasticity. Implicit sequence learning is a prominent component of skill learning. However, the formation and consolidation of this fundamental learning mechanism remains poorly understood in OSA. In the present study we examined the consolidation of different aspects of implicit sequence learning in patients with OSA. We used the Alternating Serial Reaction Time task to measure general skill learning and sequence-specific learning. There were two sessions: a learning phase and a testing phase, separated by a 10-hour offline period with sleep. Our data showed differences in offline changes of general skill learning between the OSA and control group. The control group demonstrated offline improvement from evening to morning, while the OSA group did not. In contrast, we did not observe differences between the groups in offline changes in sequence-specific learning. Our findings suggest that disrupted sleep in OSA differently affects neural circuits involved in the consolidation of sequence learning.

  15. [Sleep disorders in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böing, Sebastian; Randerath, Winfried J

    2014-05-01

    Sleep disturbances (SD) are a frequent finding in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and have a negative impact on quality of life and the clinical course of the disease. The causes of SD are multiple and include for example respiratory symptoms and comorbidities. On the other hand sleep goes along with multiple physiological changes in respiration, so that sleep itself interacts with asthma and COPD. This interaction favors respiratory symptoms and may lead to hypoxemia and hypercapnia. A further complication of the respiratory situation and the clinical course can be found in asthma and COPD patients with coexisting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Due to the heterogeneity of SD in asthma and COPD, a detailed patient survey is the most important diagnostical tool. Based on the survey further technical examinations should be considered. Treatment strategies for the reduction of SD in asthma and COPD include an optimized medication and treatment of comorbidities. If indicated oxygen therapy, positive pressure breathing and pulmonary rehabilitation can contribute.

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and cognitive impairment: effects of CPAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Giordano

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS is a sleep disorder characterised by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction (apnea or reduced airflow (hypopnoea despite persistent respiratory effort. Apnea is defined as the cessation of breathing for at least 10 seconds during sleep, while hypopnoea is defined as at least 30% reduction in airflow for 10 seconds associated with oxygen desaturation and sleep fragmentation. The presence in the general population is about 4%. The principal symptoms are: excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS, snoring, dry throat, morning headache, night sweats, gastro-esophageal reflux, and increased blood pressure.Long term complications can be: increased cardio-cerebrovascular risk and cognitive impairment such as deficiency in attention, vigilance, visual abilities, thought, speech, perception and short term memory.Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP is currently the best non-invasive therapy for OSAS.CPAP guarantees the opening of upper airways using pulmonary reflexive mechanisms increasing lung volume during exhalation and resistance reduction, decreasing electromyografical muscular activity around airways.The causes of cognitive impairments and their possible reversibility after CPAP treatment have been analysed in numerous studies. The findings, albeit controversial, show that memory, attention and executive functions are the most compromised cognitive functions.The necessity of increasing the patient compliance with ventilotherapy is evident, in order to prevent cognitive deterioration and, when possible, rehabilitate the compromised functions, a difficult task for executive functions.

  17. Lingua-epiglottis position predicts glossopharyngeal obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuhua; Wu, Dahai; Jie, Qin; Bao, Jimin; Shi, Hongjin

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between lingua-epiglottis position and glossopharyngeal obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). One hundred and four patients with OSAHS diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG) were enrolled. Lingua-epiglottis position was visualized using endoscopy and classified into three types. Spiral CT imaging of the upper respiratory tract was performed to measure the cross-sectional area and inner diameter of the glossopharyngeal airway. The PSG was repeated after nasopharyngeal tube insertion (NPT-PSG). The NPT-PSG results, CT-measured data and incidence of stenosis were compared among the different lingua-epiglottis position groups. Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome patients with different lingua-epiglottis positions had similar demographics. As lingua-epiglottis position type varied from type I to type III, cross-sectional area and inner diameter of the glossopharyngeal area decreased, glossopharyngeal airway stenosis rate increased, and apnea hypopnea index measured by NPT-PSG increased. The lowest oxygen saturation decreased. Lingua-epiglottis position was significantly related to glossopharyngeal obstruction. Lingua-epiglottis position should be used in clinical practice for the preliminary assessment of glossopharyngeal obstruction.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome accompanied by diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takashi; Imamura, Makoto; Iwasaki, Yasuki; Mori, Masatomo

    2003-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was hospitalized with sleeping and dyspnea. Polysomnography determined an apnea hypopneas index (AHI) of 56/hr and that the events occurred in association with continued diaphragm electromyogram activity and thoraco-abdominal wall movement. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was then diagnosed and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) (11cmH2O) was set. AHI subsequently became 21/hr. Six months' later, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) for the narrowing middle pharynx was performed and the AHI became 7/hr. After starting nCPAP and UPPP, body weight and insulin resistance had decreased. Treatment for sleep apnea may improve insulin resistance in diabetes mellitus.

  19. Correlation between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in a general population in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Amra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate epidemiological relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sleep apnea syndrome in a sample of Persian population. Methods: As a part of a population-based cross-sectional study, 3900 randomly selected individuals aged 15 years or older were invited to take part in the survey; 3770 individuals (96.6% agreed to fill out the respiratory and sleep questionnaire. Those subjects suspected to have either chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and/or obstructive sleep apnea underwent spirometry and polysomnography test if indicated. Spirometric measurements were performed on 420 invited responders. Polysomnography measurements were performed on 25 of the responders. Results: Prevalence rates for sleep apnea, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and current asthma were 4.98%, 5.7% and 3.1%, respectively. Logistic regression showed independent associations between sleep apnea and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There was no significant independent association between sleep apnea symptoms and current asthma and wheeze ever. Conclusions: These observations indicated relationship between chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and obstructive sleep apnea. These observations indicated the necessity of further studies to explain the possible common pathogenic mechanisms involved in two disease entities.

  20. Sleep position trainer versus tennis ball technique in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogel, Michiel M.; Ubbink, Rinse; Dekker, Janita; Oppersma, Eline; Jongh, de Frans H.; Palen, van der Job; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective Positional therapy (PT) is an effective therapy in positional obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (POSAS) when used, but the compliance of PT is low. The objective of this study was to investigate whether a new kind of PT is effective and can improve compliance. Methods 29 patients wer

  1. Comparison of Polysomnographic and Portable Home Monitoring Assessments of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Saskatchewan Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Gjevre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare a commercially available, level III in-home diagnostic sleep test (Embletta, Embletta USA and in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG in women with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA.

  2. Treatment effect of uvulopalatopharyngoplasty on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋光峰; 孙炜; 李娜; 孙彦; 张念凯

    2004-01-01

    @@ Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. The prevalence of OSAS in middle-aged population is about 2%-4%.1 Many OSAS patients can be accompanied by serious cardiovascular complications, such as hypertension.2 The aim of this study was to find the changes of autonomic nervous system (ANS) during sleep, and the impact of surgical treatment on heart rate variability (HRV) in OSAS patients.

  3. The bidirectional interactions between psoriasis and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotsu, Camila; Nogueira, Heloisa; Albuquerque, Rachel G; Tomimori, Jane; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder which can impair general routine activities and has been closely related to poor quality of life. Pruritus and scratching are frequently observed, occurring mainly during sleep and precipitating nighttime arousals. Indeed, sleep quality has been shown to be negatively affected in psoriatic patients, in a close relationship with stress exposure and immune response. Although psoriasis is known to impair sleep, leading to insomnia, its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is controversial. Similarly, OSA is considered a multifactorial inflammatory disease, characterized by intermittent hypoxia, sleep fragmentation and autonomic dysfunction, with important outcomes on the cardiovascular and metabolic systems. Importantly, immunological activities and pro-inflammatory cytokines play a prominent role in both OSA and psoriasis. Currently it is not clear whether OSA is a risk factor for psoriasis development or if psoriasis is a possible predictor of OSA. Thus, our main purpose is to provide an overview of this intriguing relationship and show the current link between psoriasis and OSA in a bidirectional relationship.

  4. Predictors of obstructive sleep apnea in males with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Papanas

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Papanas1, Paschalis Steiropoulos2, Evangelia Nena2, Argyris Tzouvelekis2, Athanasios Skarlatos2, Maria Konsta2, Vasileios Vasdekis3, Efstratios Maltezos1, Demosthenes Bouros21Outpatient Clinic of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 2Sleep Laboratory, Department of Pneumonology, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, Greece; 3Department of Statistics, Athens University of Economic and Business, Athens, GreeceAbstract: The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS and its components among obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients vs controls, as well as to investigate which of these components are strongly associated with the presence of OSA in subjects reporting symptoms indicating sleep-disordered breathing. Included were 83 consecutive male subjects, without known concomitant diseases, who visited an outpatient clinic of obesity, diabetes and metabolism. Based on polysomnography, these were divided into two groups: OSA patients (n = 53 and controls (n = 30. Parameters indicating MS, according to the NCEP ATP III criteria (blood pressure, waist circumference, glucose, triglycerides, and HDL-cholesterol levels were evaluated in both groups. The criteria for MS were fulfilled in 49 participants. Presence of MS was significantly correlated with the presence of OSA. However, after adjustment for BMI, only serum glucose was significantly associated with the presence of OSA (P = 0.002. Conversely, the presence of MS was associated with a significant reduction in percentage of slow-wave sleep (P = 0.030. In conclusion, these results provide further evidence for the association between OSA and MS. Between subjects with MS, elevated serum glucose levels indicate a higher probability for the presence of OSA. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, glucose, metabolic syndrome

  5. Coblation endoscopic lingual lightening (CELL) for obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lee, Li-Ang; Kezirian, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of Coblation endoscopic lingual lightening (CELL) surgery for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This study was a retrospective case series in a tertiary referral sleep center. Twenty-five adults with moderate to severe OSA and determined to have retropalatal and tongue base obstruction based on Friedman tongue position III and fiberoptic endoscopy underwent CELL in combination with modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, known as relocation pharyngoplasty. CELL involves transoral resection of tongue base muscle tissue and lingual tonsil using Coblation under endoscopic guidance. The mean operation time for CELL was 42.6 ± 13.7 min. Total blood loss for CELL plus relocation pharyngoplasty was <50 ml in all patients. Mean postoperative pain score (sum of total pain scores/sum of total hospitalization day, visual analog scale, 0-10) was 2.6 ± 0.6. Postoperative bleeding and taste disturbance extending beyond 3 months occurred in one patient (4 %) individually. No patients reported tongue weakness or speech dysfunction. Epworth sleepiness scale improved from 9.6 ± 4.9 to 7.5 ± 4.3 (p = 0.023). Apnea-hypopnea index decreased from 45.7 ± 21.7 to 12.8 ± 8.2 events/hour (p < 0.001) 6 months after surgery. The overall response rate was 80 %. CELL is feasible, safe and effective in treating tongue base obstruction in OSA patients who underwent simultaneous relocation pharyngoplasty.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnoea among professional taxi drivers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firestone, Ridvan Tua; Mihaere, Kara; Gander, Philippa H

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the distribution of risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) among taxi drivers, and to investigate differences by ethnicity in OSAS symptoms among drivers. A two-page postal questionnaire was completed by 241 professional taxi drivers from Wellington, New Zealand. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome was defined as having an estimated 15 or more respiratory disturbances, per hour of sleep (Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI)> or =15) and self-reported daytime sleepiness. Pacific and Māori taxi drivers were more likely to have symptoms and risk factors for OSAS, compared to non-Māori non-Pacific drivers. In particular, Pacific drivers had a significantly increased pre-test probability of having moderate-severe OSA (RDI> or =15). Some professional taxi drivers are at increased risk for moderate-severe OSAS, especially Pacific and Māori taxi drivers. Untreated OSAS increases motor vehicle crash risk, so these findings have implications for the health and safety of drivers and their passengers. They suggest a need for more comprehensive research to guide policy on medical examinations required for licensing professional drivers as fit to drive.

  7. Screening for Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea before Ambulatory Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishman, Stacey L.; Tawfik, Kareem O.; Smith, David F.; Cheung, Kristin; Pringle, Lauren M.; Stephen, Matthew J.; Everett, Tiffany L.; Stierer, Tracey L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The American Society of Anesthesia practice guidelines recommend that pediatric and adult patients who undergo ambulatory surgery be screened for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). With this in mind, our objective was to assess the frequency of screening by anesthesia providers for the signs and symptoms of OSA in children undergoing surgery in an ambulatory setting. Methods: Prospective single-blinded observational study of anesthesia providers' preoperative interview of caregivers of consecutive patients younger than age 18 who were scheduled for ambulatory surgery. Results: One hundred one children (30 females) were identified, with a mean age of 6.9 ± 5.0 years; 54 were classified as white, 33 as black, and 14 as other. Total OSA-18 scores ranged from 18 to 97, with a mean of 33.1 ± 14.8. The mean score for adenotonsillectomy patients was higher than that for children who underwent procedures other than adenotonsillectomy. Thirty-one percent of children were screened for OSA, and snoring was the most common symptom recorded (28%). Patients who were screened for OSA were more likely to have snoring (p Tawfik KO, Smith DF, Cheung K, Pringle LM, Stephen MJ, Everett TL, Stierer TL. Screening for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea before ambulatory surgery. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):751–755. PMID:25902820

  8. Effects of sildenafil on autonomic nervous function during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Neves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of sildenafil on the autonomic nervous system in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea. METHODS: Thirteen male patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (mean age 43±10 years with a mean body mass index of 26.7±1.9 kg/m² received a single 50-mg dose of sildenafil or a placebo at bedtime. All-night polysomnography and heart rate variability were recorded. Frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability was performed for the central five-minute sample of the longest uninterrupted interval of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep, as well as for one-minute samples during apnea and during slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep after resumption of respiration. RESULTS: Compared to the placebo, sildenafil was associated with an increase in the normalized high-frequency (HFnu components and a decrease in the low/high-frequency components of the heart rate variability ratio (LF/HF in slow wave sleep (p<0.01 for both. Differences in heart rate variability parameters between one-minute post-apnea and apnea samples (Δ= difference between resumption of respiration and apnea were assessed. A trend toward a decreasing magnitude of ΔLF activity was observed during rapid eye movement sleep with sildenafil in comparison to placebo (p=0.046. Additionally, Δ LF/HF in SWS and rapid eye movement sleep was correlated with mean desaturation (sR= -0.72 and -0.51, respectively, p= 0.01 for both, and Δ HFnu in rapid eye movement sleep was correlated with mean desaturation (sR= 0.66, p= 0.02 and the desaturation index (sR= 0.58, p = 0.047. CONCLUSIONS: The decrease in arousal response to apnea/hypopnea events along with the increase in HFnu components and decrease in LH/HF components of the heart rate variability ratio during slow wave sleep suggest that, in addition to worsening sleep apnea, sildenafil has potentially immediate cardiac effects in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea.

  9. The role of drug-induced sleep endoscopy in surgical planning for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Ozturk; Erdur, Omer; Cirik, Ahmet Adnan; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the role of drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) in the surgical treatment planning of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This study was conducted using patients diagnosed with OSAS between January 2007 and March 2009, who were scheduled for surgical treatment. DISE was performed using propofol in patients considered to have upper respiratory tract obstruction as indicated by Muller's maneuver. After completing the sleep endoscopy, the patient was intubated and surgery was performed (tonsillectomy and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty). A successful operation was defined as a decrease in the respiratory disturbance index to below 5 or a decrease of ≥50 % following the operation. The study included 20 patients (4 female and 16 male) aged 19-57 years. No statistically significant correlation between modified Mallampati class and operation success or between the polysomnographic stage of disease and operation success was identified. A significantly high operation success rate was found in the group with obstruction of the upper airway according to DISE (p DISE (p DISE may be used to identify the localization of obstruction for diagnostic purposes, and it can be helpful in selecting the treatment method.

  10. Cumulative association of obstructive sleep apnea severity and short sleep duration with the risk for hypertension.

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    Pascaline Priou

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN. The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3% previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR (95% confidence intervals for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35-4.68 in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18-8.78 in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend. The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30 (OR, 4.29 [2.03-9.07]. In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA.

  11. Obstructive sleep apnea-related symptoms in Japanese people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Junji; Chishaki, Akiko; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Sawatari, Hiroyuki; Nishizaka, Mari; Ando, Shin-ichi

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-related symptoms and assessed the relationship with obesity or unusual sleep postures in Down syndrome patients in Japan. We obtained the demographic characteristics, sleep postures, and obstructive sleep apnea-related symptoms experienced by 90 people as reported by their caregivers. Although 71% reported snoring and 59% arousals, obstructive sleep apnea-related symptoms were not significantly different between obese and non-obese participants. The youngest age group had the fewest obstructive sleep apnea-related symptoms, especially symptoms of snoring. The odds for arousal, nocturia, and apnea tended to be higher in the unusual sleep-postures group. Unusual sleep postures were most frequent in the group 6-15 years of age. People with Down syndrome might sleep in unusual postures to avoid upper airway obstruction caused by other anatomical factors. For nurses and other health professionals working in mainstream service, it is important to screen all persons with Down syndrome for symptoms suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly those six years of age and older, and to refer them for further evaluation for sleep disorders.

  12. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

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    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  13. Cognition and biomarkers of oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea

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    Leticia Viana Sales

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate neuropsychological performance and biomarkers of oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and the relationships between these factors. METHODS: This was an observational, cross-sectional study of 14 patients (36.0±6.5 years old with obstructive sleep apnea and 13 controls (37.3±6.9 years old. All of the participants were clinically evaluated and underwent full-night polysomnography as well as neuropsychological tests. Blood samples were used to assay superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione and homocysteine, as well as vitamins E, C, B11 and B12. RESULTS: The patients performed poorly relative to the controls on several neuropsychological tests, such as the attention test and tests of long-term memory and working memory/executive function. They also had lower levels of vitamin E (p<0.006, superoxide dismutase (p<0.001 and vitamin B11 (p<0.001, as well as higher concentrations of homocysteine (p<0.02. Serum concentrations of vitamin C, catalase, glutathione and vitamin B12 were unaltered. Vitamin E levels were related to performance in the backward digit span task (F = 15.9; p = 0.002 and this correlation remained after controlling for age and body mass index (F = 6.3, p = 0.01. A relationship between superoxide dismutase concentrations and executive non-perseveration errors in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (F = 7.9; p = 0.01 was also observed. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased levels of antioxidants and lower performance on the neuropsychological tasks were observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. This study suggests that an imbalance between antioxidants and pro-oxidants may contribute to neuropsychological alterations in this patient population.

  14. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

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    Pinto, José Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years. The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%, obesity (34%, depression (19%, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD (18%, diabetes mellitus (15%, hypercholesterolemia (10%, asthma (4%, and no comorbidities (33%. Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations.

  15. Management of obstructive sleep apnea: A dental perspective

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    Padma Ariga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disordered breathing is a term which includes simple snoring, upper airway resistance syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Simple snoring is a common complaint affecting 45% of adults occasionally and 25% of adults habitually and is a sign of upper airway obstruction. Snoring has also been identified as a possible risk factor for hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and stroke. The role of dentistry in sleep disorders is becoming more significant, especially in co-managing patients with simple snoring and mild to moderate OSA. The practicing dental professional has the opportunity to assist patients at a variety of levels, starting with the recognition of a sleep-related disorder, referring patients to a physician for evaluation, and assisting in the management of sleep disorders. Obesity is the main predisposing factor for OSA. In nonobese patients, craniofacial anomalies like micrognathia and retrognathia may also predispose to OSA. Diagnosis of OSA is made on the basis of the history and physical examination and investigations such as polysomnography, limited channel testing, split-night testing, and oximetry. Nocturnal attended polysomnography, which requires an overnight stay in a sleep facility, is the standard diagnostic modality in determining if a patient has OSA. As far as treatment is concerned, the less invasive procedures are to be preferred to the more invasive options. The first and simplest option would be behavior modification, followed by insertion of oral devices suited to the patient, especially in those with mild to moderate OSA. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP and surgical options are chosen for patients with moderate to severe OSA. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AAOSM has recommended oral appliances for use in patients with primary snoring and mild to moderate OSA. It can also be used in patients with a lesser degree of oxygen saturation, relatively less day time sleepiness, lower frequency

  16. Review of and Updates on Hypertension in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Masood Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a prevalent sleep disorder as is hypertension (HTN in the 21st century with the rising incidence of obesity. Numerous studies have shown a strong association of OSA with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. There is overwhelming evidence supporting the relationship between OSA and hypertension (HTN. The pathophysiology of HTN in OSA is complex and dependent on various factors such as sympathetic tone, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, endothelial dysfunction, and altered baroreceptor reflexes. The treatment of OSA is multifactorial ranging from CPAP to oral appliances to lifestyle modifications to antihypertensive drugs. OSA and HTN both need prompt diagnosis and treatment to help address the growing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to these two entities.

  17. Prediagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea via Multiclass MTS

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    Chao-Ton Su

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has become an important public health concern. Polysomnography (PSG is traditionally considered an established and effective diagnostic tool providing information on the severity of OSA and the degree of sleep fragmentation. However, the numerous steps in the PSG test to diagnose OSA are costly and time consuming. This study aimed to apply the multiclass Mahalanobis-Taguchi system (MMTS based on anthropometric information and questionnaire data to predict OSA. Implementation results showed that MMTS had an accuracy of 84.38% on the OSA prediction and achieved better performance compared to other approaches such as logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machine, C4.5 decision tree, and rough set. Therefore, MMTS can assist doctors in prediagnosis of OSA before running the PSG test, thereby enabling the more effective use of medical resources.

  18. Heart rate recovery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    KARAŞEN, Rıza Murat; ÇİFTÇİ, Bülent; Baran ACAR; YALÇIN, Ahmet Arif; GÜVEN, Selma FIRAT

    2012-01-01

    To demonstrate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on baroregulatory function by using heart rate recovery (HRR) parameters. Materials and methods: Fifty-four moderate and severe OSAS patients were included in the study. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1 min later; a value of 18 beats/min was considered abnormal. OSAS patients were enrolled in the study as group 1 (normal HRR; n = 12) and group 2 (abnormal HRR, n = 42). Left ventr...

  19. Decision making is affected in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurat, Agnès; Ricarrère, Matthieu; Tiberge, Michel

    2013-03-01

    We assessed decision making in 20 patients newly diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and 20 healthy controls with the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which evaluates the ability to learn to sacrifice immediate rewards in favour of long-term gains. A standard neuropsychological battery was administered. Switching scores tended to be lower in patients. Patients persisted in selecting risky decks throughout the IGT, whereas controls behaved normally. Performance was correlated with hypoxaemia. Brain regions underlying decision making may be affected by OSA-related hypoxaemia.

  20. Heart rate recovery in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    KARAŞEN, Rıza Murat; ÇİFTÇİ, Bülent; Acar,Baran; YALÇIN, Ahmet Arif; GÜVEN, Selma FIRAT

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the effects of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) on baroregulatory function by using heart rate recovery (HRR) parameters. Materials and methods: Fifty-four moderate and severe OSAS patients were included in the study. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate between peak exercise and 1 min later; a value of 18 beats/min was considered abnormal. OSAS patients were enrolled in the study as group 1 (normal HRR; n = 12) and group 2 (abnormal HRR, n = 42). Left ventr...

  1. CPAP for Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, R Doug; Antic, Nick A; Heeley, Emma; Luo, Yuanming; Ou, Qiong; Zhang, Xilong; Mediano, Olga; Chen, Rui; Drager, Luciano F; Liu, Zhihong; Chen, Guofang; Du, Baoliang; McArdle, Nigel; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Tripathi, Manjari; Billot, Laurent; Li, Qiang; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Barbe, Ferran; Redline, Susan; Wang, Jiguang; Arima, Hisatomi; Neal, Bruce; White, David P; Grunstein, Ron R; Zhong, Nanshan; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-09-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events; whether treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) prevents major cardiovascular events is uncertain. Methods After a 1-week run-in period during which the participants used sham CPAP, we randomly assigned 2717 eligible adults between 45 and 75 years of age who had moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and coronary or cerebrovascular disease to receive CPAP treatment plus usual care (CPAP group) or usual care alone (usual-care group). The primary composite end point was death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina, heart failure, or transient ischemic attack. Secondary end points included other cardiovascular outcomes, health-related quality of life, snoring symptoms, daytime sleepiness, and mood. Results Most of the participants were men who had moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and minimal sleepiness. In the CPAP group, the mean duration of adherence to CPAP therapy was 3.3 hours per night, and the mean apnea-hypopnea index (the number of apnea or hypopnea events per hour of recording) decreased from 29.0 events per hour at baseline to 3.7 events per hour during follow-up. After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, a primary end-point event had occurred in 229 participants in the CPAP group (17.0%) and in 207 participants in the usual-care group (15.4%) (hazard ratio with CPAP, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.32; P=0.34). No significant effect on any individual or other composite cardiovascular end point was observed. CPAP significantly reduced snoring and daytime sleepiness and improved health-related quality of life and mood. Conclusions Therapy with CPAP plus usual care, as compared with usual care alone, did not prevent cardiovascular events in patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and established cardiovascular disease. (Funded by the National Health and

  2. Oral-appliance therapy obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome : a clinical study on therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud

    2007-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by disruptive snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Its neurobehavioral consequences include excessive sleepiness, an increased risk of accidents, and an impaired quality of l

  3. Undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.; Poels, P.J.P.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Hoog, M. de; Berg, S.W. van den; Hoeve, H.J.; Joosten, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis have a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms and morbidity. Little is known about the development and natural history of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome through life. The aim of this study

  4. Undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.; Poels, P.J.P.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Hoog, M. de; Berg, S.W. van den; Hoeve, H.J.; Joosten, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis have a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms and morbidity. Little is known about the development and natural history of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome through life. The aim of this study w

  5. Oral-appliance therapy obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome : a clinical study on therapeutic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud

    2007-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by disruptive snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Its neurobehavioral consequences include excessive sleepiness, an increased risk of accidents, and an impaired quality of

  6. Effects of surgical correction of nasal obstruction in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sériès, F; St Pierre, S; Carrier, G

    1992-11-01

    Negative upper airway pressure is thought to play a key role in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea. Because nasal resistance contributes to the increase of the transpharyngeal pressure gradient, we evaluated the effects of nasal surgery on sleep-related breathing abnormalities in 20 adults with obstructive sleep apnea. Polysomnographic studies were done before (baseline), and 2 to 3 mo after surgery (septoplasty, turbinectomy, and/or polypectomy). Nasal resistances were measured at these visits in 14 patients. Cephalometric measurements were obtained before surgery. Cephalometric abnormalities consisted in an increase in the distance from the mandibular plane to the hyoid bone (MP-H), a decrease in the space between the base of the tongue and the posterior soft tissues (PAS), a retroposition of the mandibule, and an increase in the length of the soft palate. Body weight did not change between the two studies. Nasal resistance decreased significantly after nasal surgery. The composition of the total sleep time spent in the rapid eye movement stage increased from 11.5 +/- 1.3% (mean +/- SEM) to 14 +/- 1.2% after surgery. For the group as the whole, there was no difference between baseline and postsurgical values in the frequency of respiratory disturbances (39.8 +/- 6.1, 36.8 +/- 5.9 n/h), the total apnea time (17.8 +/- 4.2, 15.4 +/- 2.8), the distribution of the apnea time within the different apnea types (obstructive and nonobstructive), and the severity of the nocturnal desaturations. Interestingly, apnea and apnea plus hypopnea indices returned to normal values (< 5 and 10, respectively) in four subjects with normal posterior soft tissues and mandibular plane to the hyoid bone distances.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Evaluation of Anthropometric and Metabolic Parameters in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Yaşar Yildirim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Sleep disorders have recently become a significant public health problem worldwide and have deleterious health consequences. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is the most common type of sleep-related breathing disorders. We aimed to evaluate anthropometric measurements, glucose metabolism, and cortisol levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Materials and Methods. A total of 50 patients with a body mass index ≥30 and major OSA symptoms were included in this study. Anthropometric measurements of the patients were recorded and blood samples were drawn for laboratory analysis. A 24-hour urine sample was also collected from each subject for measurement of 24-hour cortisol excretion. Patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to polysomnography results: control group with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI <5 (n=25 and OSA group with an AHI ≥5 (n=25. Results. Neck and waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, late-night serum cortisol, morning serum cortisol after 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test, and 24-hour urinary cortisol levels were significantly higher in OSA patients compared to control subjects. Newly diagnosed DM was more frequent in patients with OSA than control subjects (32% versus 8%, p=0.034. There was a significant positive correlation between AHI and neck circumference, glucose, and late-night serum cortisol. Conclusions. Our study indicates that increased waist and neck circumferences constitute a risk for OSA regardless of obesity status. In addition, OSA has adverse effects on endocrine function and glucose metabolism.

  8. Cardiac function and hypertension in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

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    Bertolami A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Adriana Bertolami, Carolina Gonzaga, Celso AmodeoSleep Laboratory of Dante Pazzanese Institute of Cardiology, Sao Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Cardiovascular disease is one of the major causes of death worldwide. Among its risk factors, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common but still underestimated condition. OSA often coexists and interacts with obesity, sharing multiple pathophysiological mechanisms and subsequent cardiovascular risk factors, such as type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, systemic inflammation, and in particular hypertension. There is also evidence suggesting an increased risk of arrhythmia, heart failure, renal failure, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. OSA is characterized by recurrent episodes of partial (hypopnea or complete interruption (apnea of breathing during sleep due to airway collapse in the pharyngeal region. The main mechanisms linking OSA to impaired cardiovascular function are secondary to hypoxemia and reoxygenation, arousals, and negative intrathoracic pressure. Consequently, the sympathetic nervous and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems may be overestimulated, and blood pressure increased. Resistance to treatment for hypertension represents a growing issue, and given that OSA has been recognized as the major secondary cause of resistant hypertension, clinical investigation for apnea is mandatory in this population. Standard diagnosis includes polysomnography, and treatment for OSA should include control of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including obesity. So far, continuous positive airway pressure is the treatment of choice for OSA, impacting positively on blood pressure goals; however, the impact on long-term follow-up and on cardiovascular disease should be better assessed.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, cardiac function

  9. Pathophysiologic Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Disease in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

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    Carlos Zamarrón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a highly prevalent sleep disorder, characterized by repeated disruptions of breathing during sleep. This disease has many potential consequences including excessive daytime sleepiness, neurocognitive deterioration, endocrinologic and metabolic effects, and decreased quality of life. Patients with OSAS experience repetitive episodes of hypoxia and reoxygenation during transient cessation of breathing that provoke systemic effects. Furthermore, there may be increased levels of biomarkers linked to endocrine-metabolic and cardiovascular alterations. Epidemiological studies have identified OSAS as an independent comorbid factor in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and physiopathological links may exist with onset and progression of heart failure. In addition, OSAS is associated with other disorders and comorbidities which worsen cardiovascular consequences, such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is an emerging public health problem that represents a constellation of cardiovascular risk factors. Both OSAS and metabolic syndrome may exert negative synergistic effects on the cardiovascular system through multiple mechanisms (e.g., hypoxemia, sleep disruption, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, and inflammatory activation. It has been found that CPAP therapy for OSAS provides an objective improvement in symptoms and cardiac function, decreases cardiovascular risk, improves insulin sensitivity, and normalises biomarkers. OSAS contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease independently and by interaction with comorbidities. The present review focuses on indirect and direct evidence regarding mechanisms implicated in cardiovascular disease among OSAS patients.

  10. What can anthropometric measurements tell us about obstructive sleep apnoea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, A; Akcaalan, M

    2017-01-01

    Clinical detection of anatomic narrowing of the upper airway may facilitate early recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether anthropometric measurement can be used to predict OSA. One hundred forty-seven subject were included from those patients who were referred to our sleep laboratory with suspected sleep apnoea. All patients were divided two groups with respect to the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI). The first group was diagnosed as OSA, AHI greater than 5. The second group was not diagnosed with OSA, AHI less than 5 (non-OSA control). Anthropometric measurements such as lower face height (LFH), interincisial distance, nose height, anterior neck height (ANH), lateral neck height, posterior neck height (PNH), ramus mandible height, corpus mandible height (CML), bigonial distance (BGD), neck width, and neck depth were assessed. Patients with OSA had higher body mass index (BMI) and larger LFH, ANH, thyromental distance, CML, BGD, and neck circumference than those without OSA (p height, neck height, mandible length, bigonial width, thyromental distance and neck circumference are in significant relationship with sleep disordered breathing. Thus, these measurements may be used in clinical practice for prediction of OSA.

  11. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

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    Luciana Balester Mello de Godoy

    Full Text Available To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS, mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA and normal individuals.UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale-ESS-≥ 10 and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale-MFIS-≥ 38 associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10 and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38 associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. "Control group" criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in "control group", adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT was performed five times (each two hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire-FOSQ-and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index-PSQI: p < 0.05 and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003 and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than "control group" (p < 0.02. UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1 compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5 than mild OSA (p = 0.02. Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to "control group" (p = 0.04.UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls.

  12. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

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    Weaver TE

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Terri E Weaver,1,2 Michael W Calik,1,2 Sarah S Farabi,1,2 Anne M Fink,1,2 Maria T Galang-Boquiren,2,3 Mary C Kapella,1,2 Bharati Prasad,2,4 David W Carley1,21Biobehavioral Health Science Department, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago; 2Center for Narcolepsy, Sleep and Health, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, 3Department of Orthodontics, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry, 4Sleep Center, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical

  13. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study

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    Gholam Hosein Kazemzadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI and respiratory tdisurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5 was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10 was 5% (2/40. There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively. In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = −0.48. We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80% and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease.

  14. Lack of reliable clinical predictors to identify obstructive sleep apnea in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

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    Nerbass, Flávia B.; Pedrosa, Rodrigo P.; Genta, Pedro R.; Antunes, Murillo O.; Arteaga-Fernández, Edmundo; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea is common among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and may contribute to poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, obstructive sleep apnea is largely unrecognized in this population. We sought to identify the clinical predictors of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were recruited from a tertiary University Hospital and were evaluated using validated sleep questionnaires (Berlin and Epworth) and overnight portable monitoring. Ninety patients (males, 51%; age, 46±15 years; body mass index, 26.6±4.9 kg/m2) were included, and obstructive sleep apnea (respiratory disturbance index ≥15 events/h) was present in 37 patients (41%). RESULTS: Compared with the patients without obstructive sleep apnea, patients with obstructive sleep apnea were older and had higher body mass index, larger waist circumference, larger neck circumference, and higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation. Excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth scale) was low and similar in the patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. The only predictors of obstructive sleep apnea (using a logistic regression analysis) were age ≥45 years (odds ratio [OR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 1.47–13.54; p = 0.008) and the presence of atrial fibrillation [OR, 5.37; CI 95%, 1.43–20.12; p = 0.013]. CONCLUSION: Consistent clinical predictors of obstructive sleep apnea are lacking for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which suggests that objective sleep evaluations should be considered in this population, particularly among elderly patients with atrial fibrillation. PMID:23917665

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea: management considerations in psychiatric patients

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    Heck T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Taryn Heck,1 Monica Zolezzi21Pharmacy Department, University of Alberta Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Clinical Pharmacy and Practice, College of Pharmacy, Qatar University, Doha, QatarAbstract: Psychiatric disorders and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are often comorbid. However, there is limited information on the impact of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms, on how to manage psychiatric pharmacotherapy in patients presenting with OSA, or on the effectiveness and challenges of OSA treatments in patients with comorbid mental illness. As such, the objective of this article is to provide an overview of some epidemiological aspects of OSA and treatment considerations in the management of OSA in individuals with comorbid psychiatric disorders. Predefined keywords were used to search for relevant literature in electronic databases. Data show that OSA is particularly prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. The medical care that patients with these comorbidities require can be challenging, as some of the psychiatric medications used by these patients may exacerbate OSA symptoms. As such, continuous positive airway pressure continues to be the first-line treatment, even in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. However, more controlled studies are required, particularly to determine continuous positive airway pressure compliance in patients with mental illness, the impact of treating OSA on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of the use of psychotropic medications on OSA symptoms.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, psychiatric disorders, comorbidity, psychotropic medications

  16. Association of allergy/immunology and obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Calais, Charles J; Robertson, Brian D; Beakes, Douglas E

    2016-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive upper airway collapse that results in nonrefreshing sleep, excessive daytime sleepiness, and, ultimately, adverse consequences on quality of life, the cardiovascular system, and neurocognitive performance. OSA has traditionally been linked to body habitus (obesity and increased neck circumference), racial demographics, alcohol, tobacco, and sedative use. Numerous other conditions are linked to OSA, which may have clinical relevance. Specifically, asthma and nasal obstructive syndromes, e.g., rhinitis, have been shown to be risk factors. This review used the anatomic homogeneity of the upper and lower airways as an explanation for the inflammatory conditions that underlie and interrelate rhinitis, asthma, and OSA. There is strong evidence that both immunoglobulin Emediated and irritant-induced inflammation in either airway location play a significant role in all three (OSA, rhinitis, and asthma). We highlighted pathophysiologic, chemical, and cellular factors that explain the distinct relationship among OSA, asthma, and rhinitis, with emphasis for increased provider vigilance of the other syndromes when a patient is diagnosed with either entity.

  17. The Influence of a Mandibular Advancement Plate on Polysomnography in Different Grades of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Antti Raunio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a mandibular advancement device on different grades of obstructive sleep apnea using a relatively simple test for the apnea-hypopnea index to determine if a mandibular device will be effective. Material and Methods: A total of 68 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS including, 31 with mild, 23 with moderate and 14 with severe OSAS were treated with a mandibular advancement device (MAD and monitored with polysomnography. Results: 25 of the 31 mild, 15 of the 23 moderate and 2 of the 14 severe OSAS patients were cured of their OSAS if a post treatment apnea-hypopnea index of less than 5 is regarded as cured. The odds ratios for success with MAD therapy are 3 for women over men, 14.9 for mild obstructive sleep apnea, 5.42 for moderate obstructive sleep apnea if severe obstructive sleep apnea is assigned an odds ratio of 1. Conclusions: The use of the apnea-hypopnea index alone is useful in mild and moderate disease to predict the effectiveness of mandibular advancement device. Treatment with a mandibular advancement device is very effective in treating mild and moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Conservative treatment with a mandibular advancement device can be successful in less severe grades of sleep apnea and may be an alternative for non-surgical patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea intolerant of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure management.

  18. Topography-specific spindle frequency changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    V Suzana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep spindles, as detected on scalp electroencephalography (EEG, are considered to be markers of thalamo-cortical network integrity. Since obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a known cause of brain dysfunction, the aim of this study was to investigate sleep spindle frequency distribution in OSA. Seven non-OSA subjects and 21 patients with OSA (11 mild and 10 moderate were studied. A matching pursuit procedure was used for automatic detection of fast (≥13Hz and slow (Hz spindles obtained from 30min samples of NREM sleep stage 2 taken from initial, middle and final night thirds (sections I, II and III of frontal, central and parietal scalp regions. Results Compared to non-OSA subjects, Moderate OSA patients had higher central and parietal slow spindle percentage (SSP in all night sections studied, and higher frontal SSP in sections II and III. As the night progressed, there was a reduction in central and parietal SSP, while frontal SSP remained high. Frontal slow spindle percentage in night section III predicted OSA with good accuracy, with OSA likelihood increased by 12.1%for every SSP unit increase (OR 1.121, 95% CI 1.013 - 1.239, p=0.027. Conclusions These results are consistent with diffuse, predominantly frontal thalamo-cortical dysfunction during sleep in OSA, as more posterior brain regions appear to maintain some physiological spindle frequency modulation across the night. Displaying changes in an opposite direction to what is expected from the aging process itself, spindle frequency appears to be informative in OSA even with small sample sizes, and to represent a sensitive electrophysiological marker of brain dysfunction in OSA.

  19. [Effect of obstructive sleep apnea on sleep architecture of acute ischemic stroke patients].

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    Xu, Y N; Li, J; Huang, J Y; Zhu, C; Mao, C J; Shen, Y; Liu, C F

    2017-03-28

    Objective: To investigate the effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on sleep architecture in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. Methods: Seventy AIS patients with polysomnography examination from June 2014 to April 2016 were included in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University. Twenty-seven healthy controls during the same period were chosen as control group. According to apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), AIS patients were divided into AIS group (AHIsleep time (TST) was significantly shorter and sleep efficiency (SE) was lower in AIS group than the control group (P=0.007, 0.008, respectively). AIS+ OSA group had longer non-rapid eye movement (NREM)1 than control group [24.9(21.3) vs 14.3(10.6), P=0.044]. Compared with AIS group, AIS+ OSA group had shorter NREM3 [13.0(13.2) vs 19.6(12.8), P=0.039]. There was no significant difference between the infarct location of AIS group and AIS+ OSA group. However, AIS+ OSA group had higher mRS score observed at 3 months through follow-up visit than AIS group (P=0.027). Spearman correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between unfavorable prognosis of stroke at 3 months and atrial fibrillation, the oxygen desaturation index (ODI), percentage of oxygen saturation Sleep architecture of cerebral infarction patients are disturbed with its characteristic of shorter total sleep time and lower sleep efficiency. Cerebral infarction patients with OSA have longer NREM1 and shorter NREM3.

  20. CPAP Treatment Partly Normalizes Sleep Spindle Features in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Saunamäki, Tiia; Huupponen, Eero; Loponen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) decreases sleep spindle density and frequency. We evaluated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on different features of sleep spindles. Methods. Twenty OSA patients underwent two night polysomnographies in a diagnostic phase and one night polysomnography after 6 months of CPAP treatment. The control group comprised 20 healthy controls. Sleep spindles were analyzed by a previously developed automated method. Unilateral and bilateral spindles were identified in central and frontopolar brain locations. Spindle density and frequency were determined for the first and last half of the NREM time. Results. The density of bilateral central spindles, which did not change in the untreated OSA patients, increased towards the morning hours during CPAP treatment and in the controls. Central spindles did not become faster with sleep in OSA patients and the central spindles remained slow in the left hemisphere even with CPAP. Conclusion. CPAP treatment normalized spindle features only partially. The changes may be associated with deficits in thalamocortical spindle generating loops. Significance. This study shows that some sleep spindle changes persist after CPAP treatment in OSA patients. The association of these changes to daytime symptoms in OSA patients needs to be further evaluated. PMID:28261503

  1. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA: THE STATE OF CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMIC RESERVE

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    N. L. Kunelskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Individuals with obstructive  sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS have an increased risk of disabling disorders of the cardiovascular system, including  stroke.  The  mechanisms   of OSAS effects on cerebral blood flow and cerebral vascular autoregulation have not been clear enough. Aim: To study characteristics of cerebral blood flow in patients  with OSAS and the effect of CPAP therapy on cerebral hemodynamic reserve. Materials and  methods: One  hundred and  two  patients with various OSAS severity (61 male  and  41 female and  20 healthy  volunteers  participated in the study. We performed  ultrasound assessment of cerebral  blood  flow with functional  tests  and calculated  reactivity indices. Results: With more severe OSAS, no significant differences in cerebral vascular reactivity compared to the control group were  registered. However, there  was a trend  to some  decrease  in the  index of constriction  and dilation  in the  vertebral  arteries  and  the  basilar artery, as well as to its increase in the middle cerebral artery in severe and moderate OSAS. The index of vasomotor  reactivity of cerebral  arteries was significantly (р < 0.05 lower in patients with  severe  OSAS:  for vertebral  arteries,  up  to 38.9 ± 8.5 and for basilar artery, up to 36.8 ± 15.7, compared to  the  control  group  (52.1 ± 9.8 and 50.1 ± 11.2, respectively. In patients who initiated CPAP therapy, there were no changes  in velosity, resistance  and  reactivity parameters of cerebral vessels after 2 months. Conclusion: We were able to  confirm a significant  impairment  of cerebral vascular autoregulation  in patients  with severe OSAS, predominantly in the posterior circulatory region. CPAP-therapy of 2 months'  duration  did not lead to restoration  of cerebral hemodynamic reserve.

  2. Mini Tracheostomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Evidence Based Proposal

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    Macario Camacho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To search for articles evaluating the use of tracheostomies (either permanent stomas or tracheostomy tubes in adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA patients and to evaluate the potential for the use of mini tracheostomies as treatment for OSA. Study Design. Systematic review. Methods. Nine databases were searched from inception through July 21, 2015. Results. The overall tracheostomy search yielded 516 articles, of which eighteen studies provided polysomnographic data. No study was identified (empty review for the use of mini tracheostomies for treating OSA. The mini tracheostomy search yielded ninety-five articles which describe findings for either mini tracheostomy kits (inner cannula diameter of 4 mm or the performance of mini tracheotomies. Six articles described the use of mini tracheostomies as a temporary procedure to relieve acute upper airway obstruction and none described the use for OSA. For tracheostomy stomal sites, suturing the skin directly to the tracheal rings with defatting can minimize stomal site collapse. The smallest tracheostomy stomal size that can successfully treat OSA has not been described. Conclusion. Mini tracheostomies as small as 4 mm have been successfully used in the short term to relieve upper airway obstruction. Given that polysomnography data are lacking, additional research is needed.

  3. Mini Tracheostomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Evidence Based Proposal

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    Camacho, Macario; Zaghi, Soroush; Chang, Edward T.; Song, Sungjin A.; Szelestey, Blake; Certal, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To search for articles evaluating the use of tracheostomies (either permanent stomas or tracheostomy tubes) in adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients and to evaluate the potential for the use of mini tracheostomies as treatment for OSA. Study Design. Systematic review. Methods. Nine databases were searched from inception through July 21, 2015. Results. The overall tracheostomy search yielded 516 articles, of which eighteen studies provided polysomnographic data. No study was identified (empty review) for the use of mini tracheostomies for treating OSA. The mini tracheostomy search yielded ninety-five articles which describe findings for either mini tracheostomy kits (inner cannula diameter of 4 mm) or the performance of mini tracheotomies. Six articles described the use of mini tracheostomies as a temporary procedure to relieve acute upper airway obstruction and none described the use for OSA. For tracheostomy stomal sites, suturing the skin directly to the tracheal rings with defatting can minimize stomal site collapse. The smallest tracheostomy stomal size that can successfully treat OSA has not been described. Conclusion. Mini tracheostomies as small as 4 mm have been successfully used in the short term to relieve upper airway obstruction. Given that polysomnography data are lacking, additional research is needed. PMID:26925105

  4. EVALUATION OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNOEA - OVERLAP SYNDROME

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    Vaddadi Sailendra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The drop in oxygen saturation during sleep is more than during exercise and patients of COPD who spend more time in sleeping. Significant sleep desaturation and the sleep disturbances are greater in overlap syndrome than in OSA alone. The present study is conducted in Gayathri Vidya Parishad Institute of Healthcare and Medical Technology, Visakhapatnam, AP, India, to find the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea in the patients with COPD. AIMS The present study was a cross-sectional study prospectively carried out with an aim to evaluate the breathing disorders during sleep in patients with COPD and to correlate these disorders with the stage of the disease. SETTINGS AND DESIGN The study Cohort was constituted by patients of COPD registered into Chest OPD or admitted in Indoor units of Gayathri Vidya Parishad Institute of Healthcare and Medical Technology, Visakhapatnam, AP, India, from July 2014 to May 2016. A total of thirty six consecutive COPD patients who consented to be enrolled into the study were classified into Mild, Moderate and Severe stages based on the Indian Guidelines for the management of COPD. METHODS AND MATERIAL Spirometric evaluation and bronchial reversibility testing was conducted in all the patients. Arterial Blood Gas Analysis was done using ABL3 arterial blood gas analyser (Radiometer, Copenhagen. POLYSOMNOGRAPHY Patients were hooked to Compumedics ProFusion Polysomnographic Machine (Compumedics Private Limited 2001, USA, by standard gold cups/electrodes. Thereafter, the patients were subjected to a full night sleep study (Overnight polysomnography. The electrode and sensor connection system utilises E-series EEG/PSG system in order to record the PSG study. The impedance of electrodes was checked and set to <10. A total of 20 leads were utilised for the study. The various parameters monitored included Electroencephalogram (EEG, Electro-oculogram (EOG, Electrocardiogram (ECG, chin and leg Electromyogram (EMG

  5. Analysis of sleep parameters in patients with obstructive sleep apnea studied in a hospital vs. a hotel-based sleep center.

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    Hutchison, Kimberly N; Song, Yanna; Wang, Lily; Malow, Beth A

    2008-04-15

    Polysomnography is associated with changes in sleep architecture called the first-night effect. This effect is believed to result from sleeping in an unusual environment and the technical equipment used to study sleep. Sleep experts hope to decrease this variable by providing a more familiar, comfortable atmosphere for sleep testing through hotel-based sleep centers. In this study, we compared the sleep parameters of patients studied in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories. We retrospectively reviewed polysomnograms completed in our hotel-based and hospital-based sleep laboratories from August 2003 to July 2005. All patients were undergoing evaluation for obstructive sleep apnea. Hospital-based patients were matched for age and apnea-hypopnea index with hotel-based patients. We compared the sleep architecture changes associated with the first-night effect in the two groups. The associated conditions and symptoms listed on the polysomnography referral forms are also compared. No significant differences were detected between the two groups in sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, REM sleep latency, total amount of slow wave sleep (NREM stages 3 and 4), arousal index, and total stage 1 sleep. This pilot study failed to show a difference in sleep parameters associated with the first-night effect in patients undergoing sleep studies in our hotel and hospital-based sleep laboratories. Future studies need to compare the first-night effect in different sleep disorders, preferably in multi-night recordings.

  6. A Survey of Sleep Medicine Physician Perceptions on the Surgical Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

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    Swope, Jonathan J; Couey, Marcus A; Wilson, James W; Jundt, Jonathon S

    2017-05-01

    Surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) varies by specialty. Our survey sought to answer 3 principal questions: 1) To which surgical specialists are sleep physicians referring patients for upper airway surgery? 2) Which surgical treatment do sleep specialists find to be most effective in treating OSA? 3) Do sleep medicine physicians believe that maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) is worthwhile to patients who are surgical candidates? We formulated a cross-sectional survey. The study sample was obtained by identifying all practices that advertised as sleep medicine specialists in Houston, Texas, by using Internet searches. Physicians who treated children were excluded. Seventy-nine surveys were hand delivered to offices in the greater Houston area; the survey included 6 questions to determine referral and surgical preferences for OSA. Variable responses included years in practice, specialty, and a comments section. A 10-point Likert scale was used to assess sleep medicine physicians' referral patterns and perceptions regarding surgical treatment of OSA. Numerical data were analyzed by calculating mean values and by dividing responses into "disagree" (5). Twenty-six surveys were returned. More sleep medicine physicians referred patients to ear, nose, and throat surgeons (52%) than to oral and maxillofacial surgeons (20%). MMA was viewed as the most effective surgery (72%), followed by "none" (16%), "other" (8%), and uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (4%). More respondents viewed the benefits versus risks as favorable for MMA (44%) than for uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (29%). The results of this survey show that sleep medicine physicians in the greater Houston area view MMA as the most favorable and effective surgical option for treating OSA. Although MMA was most often referred for, more respondents refer patients to ear, nose, and throat surgeons than to oral and maxillofacial surgeons for surgical management of OSA. Years in practice displayed no correlation in

  7. Obstructive sleep apnoea in adult indigenous populations in high-income countries: an integrative review.

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    Woods, Cindy E; Usher, Kim; Maguire, Graeme Paul

    2015-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is recognised as a common but under-diagnosed health issue. Currently, there is very little published data relating to the burden and impact of obstructive sleep apnoea among indigenous populations. The purpose of this review was to investigate the prevalence, impact, risk factors and treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea in indigenous populations in high-income countries. An integrative review was conducted on 25 English language studies and reports that investigated obstructive sleep apnoea among indigenous populations in high-income countries. Studies that did not focus on indigenous populations in the results or discussion were excluded. Eligible studies were identified by searching PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases and reference lists of eligible studies. Publication dates range from 1998 to 2012. Synthesis of studies indicates the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea is higher and severity is greater in indigenous populations compared with non-indigenous populations. Comparable risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea were identified in indigenous and non-indigenous populations, with only three studies identifying ethnicity as an independent risk factor. Indigenous populations in high-income countries are subject to an overall greater prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea that is also more severe. A higher prevalence of obesity, alcohol and tobacco use and comorbid medical conditions associated with low socioeconomic status rather than indigenous status per se appears to explain this disparity.

  8. Evaluation of neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea using chin surface electromyography of polysomnography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Guo-ping; YE Jing-ying; HAN De-min; WANG Xiao-yi; ZHANG Yu-huan; LI Yan-ru

    2013-01-01

    Background It is believed that defects in upper airway neuromuscular control play a role in sleep apnea pathogenesis.Currently,there is no simple and non-invasive method for evaluating neuromuscular activity for the purpose of screening in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.This study was designed to assess the validity of chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography in evaluating the neuromuscular activity of obstructive sleep apnea subjects and probe the neuromuscular contribution in the pathogenesis of the condition.Methods The chin surface electromyography of routine polysomnography during normal breathing and obstructive apnea were quantified in 36 male patients with obstructive sleep apnea.The change of chin surface electromyography from normal breathing to obstructive apnea was expressed as the percent compensated electromyography value,where the percent compensated electromyography value =(normal breath surface electromyography-apnea surface electromyography)/normal breath surface electromyography,and the percent compensated electromyography values among subjects were compared.The relationship between sleep apnea related parameters and the percent compensated electromyography value was examined.Results The percent compensated electromyography value of the subjects varied from 1% to 90% and had a significant positive correlation with apnea hypopnea index (R2=0.382,P <0.001).Conclusions Recording and analyzing chin surface electromyography by routine polysomnography is a valid way of screening the neuromuscular activity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.The neuromuscular contribution is different among subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

  9. Immediate postarousal sleep dynamics: an important determinant of sleep stability in obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Younes, Magdy; Hanly, Patrick J

    2016-04-01

    Arousability from sleep is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of the clinical spectrum of sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Patients with SDB display a wide range of arousability. The reason for these differences is not known. We hypothesized that differences in the speed with which sleep deepens following arousals/awakenings (postarousal sleep dynamics) is a major determinant of these differences in arousability in patients with SDB. We analyzed 40 preexisting clinical polysomnography records from patients with a range of SDB severity (apnea-hypopnea index 5-135/h). Sleep depth was determined every 3 s using the odds ratio product (ORP) method, a continuous index of sleep depth (0 = deep sleep, 2.5 = full wakefulness) that correlates strongly (r = 0.98) with arousability (Younes M, Ostrowski M, Soiferman M, Younes H, Younes M, Raneri J, and Hanly P. Sleep 38: 641-654, 2015). Time course of ORP was determined from end of arousal until the next arousal. All arousals were analyzed (142 ± 65/polysomnogram). ORP increased from 0.58 ± 0.32 during sleep to 1.67 ± 0.35 during arousals. ORP immediately (first 9 s) following arousals/awakenings (ORP-9) ranged from 0.21(very deep sleep) to 1.71 (highly arousable state) in different patients. In patients with high ORP-9, sleep deepened slowly (over minutes) beyond 9 s but only if no arousals/awakenings recurred. ORP-9 correlated strongly with average non-rapid eye movement sleep depth (r = 0.87, P sleep architecture. We conclude that postarousal sleep dynamics are highly variable among patients with sleep-disordered breathing and largely determine average sleep depth and continuity.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Overnight Body Fluid Shift before and after Hemodialysis.

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    Ogna, Adam; Forni Ogna, Valentina; Mihalache, Alexandra; Pruijm, Menno; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Cornette, Françoise; Bassi, Isabelle; Haba Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-06-05

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with significantly increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fluid overload may promote obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ESRD through an overnight fluid shift from the legs to the neck soft tissues. Body fluid shift and severity of obstructive sleep apnea before and after hemodialysis were compared in patients with ESRD. Seventeen patients with hemodialysis and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were included. Polysomnographies were performed the night before and after hemodialysis to assess obstructive sleep apnea, and bioimpedance was used to measure fluid overload and leg fluid volume. The mean overnight rostral fluid shift was 1.27±0.41 L prehemodialysis; it correlated positively with fluid overload volume (r=0.39; P=0.02) and was significantly lower posthemodialysis (0.78±0.38 L; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the mean obstructive apnea-hypopnea index before and after hemodialysis (46.8±22.0 versus 42.1±18.6 per hour; P=0.21), but obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly lower posthemodialysis (-10.1±10.8 per hour) in the group of 12 patients, with a concomitant reduction of fluid overload compared with participants without change in fluid overload (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index +8.2±16.1 per hour; P<0.01). A lower fluid overload after hemodialysis was significantly correlated (r=0.49; P=0.04) with a lower obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Fluid overload-assessed by bioimpedance-was the best predictor of the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index observed after hemodialysis (standardized r=-0.68; P=0.01) in multivariate regression analysis. Fluid overload influences overnight rostral fluid shift and obstructive sleep apnea severity in patients with ESRD undergoing intermittent hemodialysis. Although no benefit of hemodialysis on obstructive sleep apnea severity was observed in the whole group, the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Overnight Body Fluid Shift before and after Hemodialysis

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    Forni Ogna, Valentina; Mihalache, Alexandra; Pruijm, Menno; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Cornette, Françoise; Bassi, Isabelle; Haba Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with significantly increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fluid overload may promote obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ESRD through an overnight fluid shift from the legs to the neck soft tissues. Body fluid shift and severity of obstructive sleep apnea before and after hemodialysis were compared in patients with ESRD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Seventeen patients with hemodialysis and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were included. Polysomnographies were performed the night before and after hemodialysis to assess obstructive sleep apnea, and bioimpedance was used to measure fluid overload and leg fluid volume. Results The mean overnight rostral fluid shift was 1.27±0.41 L prehemodialysis; it correlated positively with fluid overload volume (r=0.39; P=0.02) and was significantly lower posthemodialysis (0.78±0.38 L; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the mean obstructive apnea-hypopnea index before and after hemodialysis (46.8±22.0 versus 42.1±18.6 per hour; P=0.21), but obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly lower posthemodialysis (−10.1±10.8 per hour) in the group of 12 patients, with a concomitant reduction of fluid overload compared with participants without change in fluid overload (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index +8.2±16.1 per hour; P<0.01). A lower fluid overload after hemodialysis was significantly correlated (r=0.49; P=0.04) with a lower obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Fluid overload—assessed by bioimpedance—was the best predictor of the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index observed after hemodialysis (standardized r=−0.68; P=0.01) in multivariate regression analysis. Conclusions Fluid overload influences overnight rostral fluid shift and obstructive sleep apnea severity in patients with ESRD undergoing intermittent hemodialysis. Although no benefit of hemodialysis on obstructive sleep apnea severity

  12. The role of physical exercise in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Maciel Dias de Andrade

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common clinical condition, with a variable and underestimated prevalence. OSA is the main condition associated with secondary systemic arterial hypertension, as well as with atrial fibrillation, stroke, and coronary artery disease, greatly increasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is not tolerated by all OSA patients and is often not suitable in cases of mild OSA. Hence, alternative methods to treat OSA and its cardiovascular consequences are needed. In OSA patients, regular physical exercise has beneficial effects other than weight loss, although the mechanisms of those effects remain unclear. In this population, physiological adaptations due to physical exercise include increases in upper airway dilator muscle tone and in slow-wave sleep time; and decreases in fluid accumulation in the neck, systemic inflammatory response, and body weight. The major benefits of exercise programs for OSA patients include reducing the severity of the condition and daytime sleepiness, as well as increasing sleep efficiency and maximum oxygen consumption. There are few studies that evaluated the role of physical exercise alone for OSA treatment, and their protocols are quite diverse. However, aerobic exercise, alone or combined with resistance training, is a common point among the studies. In this review, the major studies and mechanisms involved in OSA treatment by means of physical exercise are presented. In addition to systemic clinical benefits provided by physical exercise, OSA patients involved in a regular, predominantly aerobic, exercise program have shown a reduction in disease severity and in daytime sleepiness, as well as an increase in sleep efficiency and in peak oxygen consumption, regardless of weight loss.

  13. Screening for obstructive sleep apnea in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sandi C; Davey, Margot J; Horne, Rosemary S C; Nixon, Gillian M

    2014-07-01

    To compare symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and polysomnography (PSG) results in children with Down syndrome and typically developing children. A total of 49 children with Down syndrome referred for PSG between 2008 and 2012 were matched with typically developing children of the same sex, age, and OSA severity who had undergone PSG in the same year. A parent completed a sleep symptom questionnaire for each child. Sleep quality and measures of gas exchange were compared between the matched groups. The 98 children (46 females, 52 males) had mean age of 6.2 years (range, 0.3-16.9 years). Fourteen children had primary snoring, and 34 had OSA (9 mild, 7 moderate, and 19 severe). Children with Down syndrome had more severe OSA compared with 278 typically developing children referred in 2012. Symptom scores were not different between the matched groups. Those with Down syndrome had a higher average pCO2 during sleep (P = .03) and worse McGill oximetry scores. Compared with closely matched typically developing children with OSA of comparable severity, children with Down syndrome had a similar symptom profile and slightly worse gas exchange. Referred children with Down syndrome had more severe OSA than referred typically developing children, suggesting a relative reluctance by parents or doctors to investigate symptoms of OSA in children with Down syndrome. These findings highlight the need for formal screening tools for OSA in children with Down syndrome to improve detection of the condition in this high-risk group. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Obstructive Sleep Syndrom in Patient with Plonjon Guatr: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haldun sevketbeyoglu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A large number of predisposing factors (obesity, nasal obstruction, adenoid hypertrophy, macroglossia, etc. are reported to be associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OUAS. In addition to these factors, the large goiter and hypothyroidism were reported to be associated with OSAS as well. However, this relationship could not yet be fully demonstrated. In our case related to plonjon goiter, we wanted to show the effect of hyroidectomy to OSAS and #8211;if there is- and the relationship between pressure and OSAS. Two years ago, a 72-year-old female with BMI: 26.8 kg/m2 patient was admitted to our clinic with complaints of respiratory standstill during sleep, snoring, morning headaches and drowsiness during daylight. In the chest X-ray, chest computed tomography and ultrasonography applied to the patient, it was detected that the trachea was deviated to the left due to euthyroid plonjon goiter and severe OSAS and polisomnografisi (PSG was diagnosed for the patient. The patients apnea-hypopnea index (AHI was measured 63.1/h. With the aim of treatment, in 7cm H2O pressure, nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP was applied to the patient and AHI decreased to the level of 11.4/h. Thyroidectomy was performed one month after the diagnosis. AHI was found 34.8 /h on the PSG applied for the purpose of 8 week-postoperative control. There were recovery on the levels of total sleep time, AHI, obstructive apnea index, hypopnea index, average desaturation index, stage 3 and REM as 16%, 44.8%, 84.7%, 19%, 38.3%, 52.4% and 28% respectively when compared the preoperative term with and postoperative term. It was demonstrated that there was no change of the in the degree of OSAS after thyroidectomy but only some partial improvement in the OSAS. The conclusion that there may be some improvements in nCPAP pressures after thyroidectomy and nCPAP treatment should not be stopped was reached. Also, it should be kept in mind that patients who apply to

  15. Impact of nasal obstruction on sleep quality: a community-based study of women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Caroline; Jonsson, Lars; Holmström, Mats; Svensson, Malin; Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny; Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the impact of self-reported nasal obstruction on sleep quality in women. A community-based sample of 400 women underwent a full night of polysomnography. Airway diseases, allergies and sleep-related symptoms were assessed by questionnaires. Women with subjective nasal obstruction were subdivided into three groups: persistent nasal obstruction (PNO, n = 46), hay fever (n = 88) and nasal obstruction at night (NON, n = 30). Sleep problems and related daytime symptoms were most prevalent among women with NON. After adjusting for age, BMI, smoking and asthma, NON was an independent predictor of 'Difficulties inducing sleep due to nasal obstruction' [adjusted odds ratio (95 % CI): 89.5 (27.0-296.7)], 'Snoring' [4.2 (1.7-10.2)], 'Sweating at night' [2.6 (1.1-6.1)], 'Difficulties maintaining sleep' [2.7 (1.2-6.2)], and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath' [32.2 (8.7-119.1)]. 'Dry mouth on awakening' [7.7 (3.2-18.4)], 'Waking up unrefreshed' [2.7 (1.2-6.0)], 'Excessive daytime sleepiness' [2.6 (1.1-6.0)], and 'Daytime nasal obstruction' [12.2 (4.8-31.2)] were also associated with NON. Persistent nasal obstruction and hay fever were both associated with some reported sleep problems due to an overlap with NON. When women with NON were excluded, only 'Daytime nasal obstruction' was still significantly associated with PNO, while hay fever was associated with 'Daytime nasal obstruction' and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath'. There were no significant differences in objectively measured sleep variables between any of the three subgroups and the study cohort. Self-reported nasal obstruction at night in women has a significant effect on several subjective day- and nighttime symptoms, but it does not appear to affect objectively measured sleep quality.

  16. Sleep bruxism associated with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A pilot study using a new portable device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winck, M; Drummond, M; Viana, P; Pinho, J C; Winck, J C

    Sleep bruxism (SB) and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) share common pathophysiologic pathways. We aimed to study the presence and relationship of SB in a OSAS population. Patients referred with OSAS suspicion and concomitant SB complains were evaluated using a specific questionnaire, orofacial evaluation and cardio-respiratory polygraphy that could also monitor audio and EMG of the masseter muscles. From 11 patients studied 9 had OSAS. 55.6% were male, mean age was 46.3±11.3 years, and apnea hypopnea index of 11.1±5.7/h. Through specific questionnaire 55.6% had SB criteria. Orofacial examination (only feasible in 3) confirmed tooth wear in all. 77.8% had polygraphic SB criteria (SB index>2/h). Mean SB index was 5.12±3.6/h, phasic events predominated (72.7%). Concerning tooth grinding episodes, we found a mean of 10.7±9.2 per night. All OSAS patients except two (77.8%) had more than two audible tooth-grinding episodes. These two patients were the ones with the lowest SB index (1.0 and 1.4 per hour). Only in one patient could we not detect tooth grinding episodes. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between tooth grinding episodes and SB index and phasic event index (R=0.755, p=0.019 and R=0.737, p=0.023 respectively, Pearson correlation). Mean apnoea to bruxism index was 0.4/h, meaning that only a minority of SB events were not secondary to OSAS. We could not find any significant correlation between AHI and bruxism index or phasic bruxism index (R=-0.632 and R=-0.611, p>0.05, Pearson correlation). This pilot study shows that SB is a very common phenomenon in a group of mild OSAS patients, probably being secondary to it in the majority of cases. The new portable device used may add diagnostic accuracy and help to tailor therapy in this setting.

  17. Independent Association between Sleep Fragmentation and Dyslipidemia in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yingjun; Yi, Hongliang; Zou, Jianyin; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Guan, Jian; Yin, Shankai

    2016-05-17

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with dyslipidemia. Previous studies have demonstrated that sleep fragmentation can impair lipid metabolism. The present study aimed to identify whether sleep fragmentation is independently associated with dyslipidemia, in a large-scale, clinic-based consecutive OSA sample. This cross-sectional study was conducted among 2,686 patients who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspicion of OSA from January 2008 to January 2013 at the sleep laboratory. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to evaluate the independent associations between the microarousal index (MAI) and lipid profiles adjusting for potential confounders, including metabolic syndrome components and nocturnal intermittent hypoxia. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for various types of dyslipidemia according to MAI quartiles, as determined by logistic regression were also evaluated. MAI was found positively associated with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) but not with total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c). Furthermore, the adjusted ORs (95% confidence interval) for hyper-LDL cholesterolemia increased across MAI quartiles, as follows: 1 (reference), 1.3 (1.1-1.7), 1.6 (1.2-2.0), and 1.6 (1.2-2.1) (p = 0.001, linear trend). Sleep fragmentation in OSA is independently associated with hyper-LDL cholesterolemia, which may predispose patients with OSA to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

  18. Relationship between Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Sleep, Depression and Anxiety Symptoms in Newly-Diagnosed Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Macey, Paul M.; Woo, Mary A; Rajesh Kumar; Cross, Rebecca L.; Ronald M Harper

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients wi...

  19. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cunha Bawden

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA on cognition. METHOD: We compared the performance of 17 patients with polysomnographic diagnosis of OSA in brief cognitive tests to that of 20 healthy controls, matched for age and education. The testing battery included the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Brief Cognitive Screening Battery (BCSB, Digit-Symbol (DS and Phonemic Verbal Fluency (FAS. Anthropometric measures and scores from the Epworth Sleepiness Scale were also recorded. RESULTS: OSA patients performed significantly worse than controls in the MMSE, in memory items from the BCSB, in DS and also in FAS. OSA patients also exhibited higher body mass index, increased neck circumference and higher scores in Epworth Sleepiness Scale than controls. CONCLUSION: OSA significantly impairs cognitive performance, especially within the domains of attention, memory and executive functioning. These deficits may be detected by brief and easy-to-administer cognitive tests.

  20. Obstructive sleep apnoea, motor vehicle accidents, and work performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    The obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) shows a very high prevalence in the middle-age work force population and, between all diseases and medical conditions, is the major risk factor for motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). OSA can be diagnosed and treated, with resultant reduction in MVAs to those seen in the healthy population. It is increasing evidence that it is a major risk factor for occupational accidents also in fields different from the professional transport and for work disability. It is likely that the treatment of OSA results in the reduction of occupational accidents and work performance improvement with expected benefits in work processes and business in general. It is therefore advisable to develop strategies for screening and treatment of OSA in workers. The risk assessment of OSA in workers may also help to reduce the burden on national health care systems.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  2. Can you die from obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS)?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Carroll, G

    2015-02-01

    Studies suggest an independent association between Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome (OSAS) and cardiovascular death. The purpose of our study is to examine doctors\\' awareness of this association and to determine whether this correlates with recording of OSAS on death certificates. We contacted the Central Statistics Office (CSO) and obtained relevant mention of OSAS on death certificates. We surveyed doctors on their view of OSAS-related deaths, CSO data from 2008-2011 reveal two deaths with OSAS documented as a direct cause and 52 deaths with OSAS as a contributory cause. Seventy-five doctors\\' surveyed (41%) believe OSAS can be a direct cause of death and 177 (96%) believe OSAS can be an indirect cause of death. Only 22 (12%) had putdown OSAS as a cause of death. OSAS is seldom recorded on death certificates. This is at odds with epidemiological forecasts and contrary to an opinion poll from a selection of doctors.

  3. Does experimental paradoxical sleep deprivation (EPSD) is an appropriate model for evaluation of cardiovascular complications of obstructive sleep apnea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukar, Siyavash; Ghorbani-Shahrbabaki, Soodabe

    2016-05-01

    Some of the previous studies have used animal model of paradoxical sleep deprivation for investigation of sleep loss complications. The present study is designed to examine the effectiveness and reliability of this model for investigation and assessment of some cardiovascular complications of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The Wistar rat groups were divided into the control group, the Test48 and Test72 groups, who experienced paradoxical sleep deprivation for 48 and 72 h, and the Sham48 and Sham72 groups, who were exposed to environmental conditions same to test groups but without sleep deprivation, respectively. At the end of the experiment, blood pressure and heart rate variability were assessed. The results showed that 72 h rapid eye movements sleep deprivation significantly increased the systolic blood pressure compared to the control (p sleep deprivation may be a suitable model for induction and investigation of hemodynamic alterations which occurs in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; however, it cannot be an alternative model to induce heart rate variability alterations similar to those reported in patient with obstructive sleep apnea.

  4. Craniocervical Posture in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccin, Chaiane Facco

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is characterized by repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Objective The objective of this study is to verify the craniofacial characteristics and craniocervical posture of OSA and healthy subjects, determining possible relationships with the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI. Methods This case-control study evaluated 21 subjects with OSA, who comprised the OSA group (OSAG, and 21 healthy subjects, who constituted the control group (CG. Cephalometry analyzed head posture measurements, craniofacial measurements, and air space. Head posture was also assessed by means of photogrammetry. Results The groups were homogeneous regarding gender (12 men and 9 women in each group, age (OSAG = 41.86 ± 11.26 years; GC = 41.19 ± 11.20 years, and body mass index (OSAG = 25.65 ± 2.46 kg/m2; CG = 24.72 ± 3.01 kg/m2. We found significant differences between the groups, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance between the hyoid bone and the mandibular plane in OSAG, when compared with CG. A positive correlation was found between higher head hyperextension and head anteriorization, with greater severity of OSA as assessed by AHI. Conclusion OSAG subjects showed changes in craniofacial morphology, with lower average pharyngeal space and greater distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular plane, as compared with healthy subjects. Moreover, in OSA subjects, the greater the severity of OSA, the greater the head hyperextension and anteriorization.

  5. Bimaxillary Advancement as the Initial Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Five Years Follow-Up of the Pori Experience

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    Antti Raunio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Bimaxillary advancement surgery has proven to be effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. According to the Stanford protocol upper airway soft tissue surgery or advancement of tongue by chin plastic surgery is first carried out and if obstructive sleep apnea persists, then bimaxillary advancement is done. This study describes the 5 year outcome of 13 obstructive sleep apnea patients in whom the Stanford protocol was omitted and bimaxillary advancement was carried out as initial surgical treatment. Material and Methods: Patients were divided in two groups. Group A comprised patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS confirmed by polysomnography in whom ODI-4 (oxygen desaturation index was 5 or more. Group B consisted of patients with occlusal problems needing orthognathic surgery and with OSAS symptoms but no clear disease on polysomnography, where the ODI-4 index was less than 5. Both groups were treated with bimaxillary advancement surgery (BAS as initial therapy. Results: In the group A mean ODI-4 was 17.8 (SD 12 before treatment and 3.5 (SD 3.4 at 5-year follow-up (P = 0.018 in paired differences t-test. In group B the ODI-4 remained below 5. In group A mean saturation improved from 94.3% (SD 1.6 to 96.3% (SD 2, P = 0.115 and in group B from 96.3% (SD 1.2 to 97.8% (SD 1.7, P = 0.056 (in paired differences t-test. The static charge sensitive bed evaluation showed improvement in all patients except one. Conclusions: Bimaxillary advancement surgery is safe and reliable as an initial surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  6. Bimaxillary advancement as the initial treatment of obstructive sleep apnea: five years follow-up of the pori experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raunio, Antti; Rauhala, Esa; Kiviharju, Minna; Lehmijoki, Ossi; Sándor, George K B; Oikarinen, Kyösti

    2012-01-01

    Bimaxillary advancement surgery has proven to be effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. According to the Stanford protocol upper airway soft tissue surgery or advancement of tongue by chin plastic surgery is first carried out and if obstructive sleep apnea persists, then bimaxillary advancement is done. This study describes the 5 year outcome of 13 obstructive sleep apnea patients in whom the Stanford protocol was omitted and bimaxillary advancement was carried out as initial surgical treatment. Patients were divided in two groups. Group A comprised patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) confirmed by polysomnography in whom ODI-4 (oxygen desaturation index) was 5 or more. Group B consisted of patients with occlusal problems needing orthognathic surgery and with OSAS symptoms but no clear disease on polysomnography, where the ODI-4 index was less than 5. Both groups were treated with bimaxillary advancement surgery (BAS) as initial therapy. In the group A mean ODI-4 was 17.8 (SD 12) before treatment and 3.5 (SD 3.4) at 5-year follow-up (P = 0.018 in paired differences t-test). In group B the ODI-4 remained below 5. In group A mean saturation improved from 94.3% (SD 1.6) to 96.3% (SD 2), P = 0.115 and in group B from 96.3% (SD 1.2) to 97.8% (SD 1.7), P = 0.056 (in paired differences t-test). The static charge sensitive bed evaluation showed improvement in all patients except one. Bimaxillary advancement surgery is safe and reliable as an initial surgical treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  7. Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome Patients Have Worse Sleep Quality Compared to Mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Godoy, Luciana Balester Mello; Luz, Gabriela Pontes; Palombini, Luciana Oliveira; e Silva, Luciana Oliveira; Hoshino, Wilson; Guimarães, Thaís Moura; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia; Togeiro, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare sleep quality and sustained attention of patients with Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), mild Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and normal individuals. Methods UARS criteria were presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale—ESS—≥ 10) and/or fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale—MFIS—≥ 38) associated to Apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) ≤ 5 and Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) > 5 events/hour of sleep or more than 30% of total sleep time with flow limitation. Mild OSA was considered if the presence of excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS ≥ 10) and/or fatigue (MFIS ≥ 38) associated to AHI ≥ 5 and ≤ 15 events/hour. “Control group” criteria were AHI < 5 events/hour and RDI ≤ 5 events/hour and ESS ≤ 9, without any sleep, clinical, neurological or psychiatric disorder. 115 individuals (34 UARS and 47 mild OSA patients and 34 individuals in “control group”), adjusted for age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and schooling years, performed sleep questionnaires and sustained attention evaluation. Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT) was performed five times (each two hours) from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Results UARS patients had worse sleep quality (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire—FOSQ—and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index—PSQI: p < 0.05) and more fatigue than mild OSA patients (p = 0.003) and scored significantly higher in both Beck inventories than “control group” (p < 0.02). UARS patients had more lapses early in the morning (in time 1) compared to the results in the afternoon (time 5) than mild OSA (p = 0.02). Mild OSA patients had more lapses in times 2 than in time 5 compared to “control group” (p = 0.04). Conclusions UARS patients have a worse sleep quality, more fatigue and a worse early morning sustained attention compared to mild OSA. These last had a worse sustained attention than controls. PMID:27228081

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome, Periodic Limb Movements and Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Özgür Yalın

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by nocturnal repetitive apnea episodes. Periodic limb movements (PLMs is nocturnal, stereotypic, repetitive movements of the lower extremities. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of periodic limb movements in OSAS patients and correlation of PLM with OSAS severity. METHODS: One hundred and forty one OSAS suspected patients was enrolled into the study. All subjects’ blood pressure, heart rate measurements and neurologic examinations were made by the same neurologist. Sociodemographic characteristics were recorded. One night polysomnography (PSG was performed to all patients and results were analyzed. Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI ≥ 5 subjects were accepted as OSAS, and PLM Index (PLMI ≥ 5 subjects were accepted as having PLM. RESULTS: One hundred and two patients were diagnosed as OSAS. The control group consisted of 39 patients who had normal polysomnographic findings. OSAS patients’ were older and body mass index (BMI were higher than the control group. Systolic blood pressure was higher in OSAS group. Alcohol use was determined as a risk factor for OSAS. PLM were more common in OSAS group than the control group (% 30,3 - % 10,2. PLM frequency was associated with the severity of OSAS. CONCLUSION: In OSAS patients presence of PLM was related with OSAS severity, higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure and REM sleep depletion. PLM in OSAS patients could be regarded as an indicator of disease severity and also could aware clinician for increased complication rates.

  9. [Epworth drowsiness scale value in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe Echevarría, E M; Alvarez, D; Giobellina, R; Uribe Echevarría, A M

    2000-01-01

    Hypersomnia is one of the most consulted symptoms among patients evaluated at sleep disorder centers and it is frequently related to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Our hypothesis is that Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) is the parameter with the greatest predictive value in the OSAS diagnosis. We compared patients with OSAS diagnosis to a control group. In both groups we compared ESS with body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist perimeter (WP). Anthropometric index (BMI, NC and WC), were similar in both groups (p < 0.10). When we analyzed ESS, a score greater than 10 was observed in the OSAS group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.001). Epworth sleepiness scale yielded 60% of sensibility, 82% of specificity and a positive predictive value of 85%. The negative predictive value was 52%. Confidence index was 70%. The relationship between OSAS and ESS scale was significant (Pearson Chi-Square value 7.5). Odds Ratio for apneas was 15 and its confidence interval was lower than 1.5 and upper than 141. We conclude that with ESS score exceeding 10 points OSAS should be suspected.

  10. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome and Weight Loss: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C. Cowan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA syndrome is common, and obesity is a major risk factor. Increased peripharyngeal and central adiposity result in increased pharyngeal collapsibility, through increased mechanical loading around the upper airway, reduced tracheal traction on the pharynx, and reduced neuromuscular activity, particularly during sleep. Significant and sustained weight loss, if achieved, is likely to be a useful therapeutic option in the management of OSA and may be attempted by behavioural, pharmacological, and surgical approaches. Behavioural therapy programs that focus on aspects such as dietary intervention, exercise prescription patients and general lifestyle counselling have been tested. Bariatric surgery is an option in the severely obese when nonsurgical measures have failed, and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are the most commonly employed techniques in the United Kingdom. Most evidence for efficacy of surgery comes from cohort studies. The role of sibutramine in OSA in the obese patients has been investigated, however, there are concerns regarding associated cardiovascular risk. In this paper the links between obesity and OSA are discussed, and the recent studies evaluating the behavioural, pharmacological and surgical approaches to weight loss in OSA are reviewed.

  11. Pure Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Erectile Dysfunction

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    Cenk Gürbüz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the existence of erectile dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in which the other possible causes of erectile dysfunction were eliminated.Material and Methods: The study group consisted of 24 patients diagnosed as OSAS with polysomnographic evaluation, and 15 non-apneic controls (mean age; 41.0±8.8 and 42.3±7.9 year respectively whose comorbidities which might be associated with erectile dysfunction were excluded. Daytime sleepiness was evaluated by Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and measurement of erectile function was performed by International Index of Erectile Function.Results: The rate of erectile dysfunction in OSAS and control groups were 54.2% and 33.3% respectively (p=0.204. The difference between mean erectile function scores of patient and control groups was non-significant (26.1±4.5 and 26.3±4.3 respectively, p=0.900. There was no correlation between erectile function scores and apnea hypnoea index (r=-0.140; p=0.395.Conclusion: Findings obtained from this study suggest that the high incidence of erectile dysfunction reported in OSAS patients seems to be related with concomitant comorbidities such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and neuroendocrine disorders rather than sleep apnea.

  12. Cerebral Microbleeds on MRI in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Dae Lim; Kim, Jun Yup; Lim, Jae-Sung; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Nam, Hyunwoo

    2017-01-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to increase the risk of stroke. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are considered one of the precursors to symptomatic stroke. We aimed to clarify the relationship between OSA and CMBs. We recruited patients who visited our clinic for the evaluation of sleep-disordered breathing. All patients underwent both overnight polysomnography and brain magnetic resonance imaging, which included T2*-weighted gradient-recalled echo images. We applied multivariate logistic regression and partial correlation analysis to estimate the relationship between OSA and CMBs. A total of 75 (45 male, 30 female) patients were enrolled. Their mean age was 60.5 years. Patients with CMBs had a significantly higher apneahypopnea index (AHI) compared with those without CMBs. AHI equal to or greater than 15 was a significant independent predictor of CMBs (adjusted odds ratio, 4.51; 95% CI, 1.40-14.58; p = 0.012) in the multivariate regression analysis. In addition, a partial correlation analysis adjusted for age, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease revealed a positive relationship between AHI and the number of CMBs (r = 0.585, p = 0.028). Moderate-to-severe OSA can be one of the independent predictors of CMBs which are considered a surrogate marker of overt stroke.

  13. Quantitative Effects of Trunk and Head Position on the Apnea Hypopnea Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Ellen R.; van Maanen, J. Peter; Hilgevoord, Anthony A.J.; Laman, D. Martin; de Vries, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that head position, separately from trunk position, is an additionally important factor for the occurrence of apnea in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Patients and Participants: Three hundred patients referred to our department because of clinically suspected OSA. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Patients underwent overnight polysomnography with 2 position sensors: one on the trunk, and one in the mid-forehead. Of the 300 subjects, 241 were diagnosed with OSA, based on an AHI > 5. Of these patients, 199 could be analyzed for position-dependent OSA based on head and trunk position sensors (AHI in supine position twice as high as AHI in non-supine positions): 41.2% of the cases were not position dependent, 52.3% were supine position dependent based on the trunk sensor, 6.5% were supine position dependent based on the head sensor alone. In 46.2% of the trunk supine position-dependent group, head position was of considerable influence on the AHI (AHI was > 5 higher when the head was also in supine position compared to when the head was turned to the side). Conclusions: The results of this study confirm our hypothesis that the occurrence of OSA may also be dependent on the position of the head. Therefore in patients with a suspicion of position-dependent OSA, sleep recording with dual position sensors placed on both trunk and head should be considered. Citation: van Kesteren ER; van Maanen JP; Hilgevoord AAJ; Laman DM; de Vries N. Quantitative effects of trunk and head position on the apnea hypopnea index in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2011;34(8):1075-1081. PMID:21804669

  14. Drug induced sleep endoscopy in the decision-making process of children with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Francesca; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Gaini, Renato Maria; Garavello, Werner

    2015-03-01

    Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) is currently recommended in children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). However, the condition persists after surgery in about one third of cases. It has been suggested that Drug Induced Sleep Endoscopy (DISE) may be of help for planning a more targeted and effective surgical treatment but evidence is yet weak. The aim of this review is to draw recommendation on the use of DISE in children with OSA. More specifically, we aimed at determine the proportion of cases whose treatment may be influenced by DISE findings. A comprehensive search of articles published from February 1983 to January 2014 listed in the PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed. The search terms used were: "endoscopy" or "nasoendoscopy" or "DISE" and "obstructive sleep apnea" and "children" or "child" or "pediatric." The main outcome was the rate of naive children with hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids. The assumptions are that clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids is reliable and does not require DISE, and that exclusive T&A may solve OSA in the vast majority of cases even in the presence of other concomitant sites of obstruction. Five studies were ultimately selected and all were case series. The median (range) number of studied children was 39 (15-82). Mean age varied from 3.2 to 7.8 years. The combined estimate rate of OSA consequent to hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids was 71% (95%CI: 64-77%). In children with Down Syndrome, the combined estimated rate of hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids was 62% (95%CI: 44-79%). Our findings show that DISE may be of benefit in a minority of children with OSA since up to two thirds of naive cases presents with hypertrophic tonsils and/or adenoids. Its use should be limited to those whose clinical evaluation is unremarkable or when OSA persists after T&A.

  15. Cervical column morphology in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Petri, Niels; Kjaer, Inger; Svanholt, Palle

    2008-10-01

    Cervical column morphology was examined in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and compared with the cervical morphology of an adult control group with neutral occlusion, normal craniofacial morphology, and no history of sleep apnoea. The sleep apnoea group consisted of 91 patients, 16 females aged 29-59 years (mean 49.4 years) and 75 males aged 27-65 years (mean 49.0 years). All patients were diagnosed with OSA by overnight polysomnography. The control group consisted of 21 subjects, 15 females aged 23-40 years (mean 29.2 years) and 6 males aged 25-44 years (mean 32.8 years). From each individual, a visual assessment of the cervical column was performed on the radiograph. Differences in the cervical column morphology, between the genders and the groups were assessed by Fisher's exact test and the effect of age by logistic regression analysis. In the OSA group, 46.2 per cent had fusion anomalies of the cervical column and 5.5 per cent a posterior arch deficiency. Fusion anomalies occurred in 26.4 per cent as fusions between two cervical vertebrae. Block fusions occurred in 12.1 per cent and occipitalization in 14.3 per cent. A posterior arch deficiency occurred in 2.2 per cent as a partial cleft of C1 and in 3.3 per cent as dehiscence of C3 and C4. No statistical gender differences were found in the occurrence of morphological characteristics of the cervical column. The fusion anomalies of the cervical column occurred significantly more often in the OSA group. The results indicate that the morphological deviations of the upper cervical vertebrae play a role in the phenotypical subdivision and diagnosis of OSA.

  16. Study of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA in asthmatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany Shaker

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It is recorded that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is widespread in asthmatic patients and is related to severity of the condition. OSA is thought to be among the pathophysiological mechanisms which cause asthma symptoms worsening. Treatment of OSA contributes to improvement of symptoms of asthma and also peak expiratory flow rates and life quality. So the aim of this study is to estimate the frequency of OSA in asthmatics with various degrees of severity and to study the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP on asthma symptoms and control. Subjects and methods: This study included 50 patients ≥18 years, diagnosed with asthma with various degrees of severity and suspected to have OSA. All studied patients were subjected to the following: History, examination, BMI, chest X-ray, pulmonary function tests, reversibility test, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS, polysomno graphy and CPAP therapy for patients who had OSA after polysomnography. Results: The frequency of OSA in the studied asthmatic patients was 24%, 9.5% in moderate persistent degree and 55.6% in severe persistent degree with a statistically very highly significant difference. A statistically very highly positive correlation between OSA severity and various degrees of asthma severity was found and there were statistically very highly significant differences between asthmatic patients with and without OSA regarding night time symptoms, GERD symptoms, difficult to control asthma and sleep quality. Also there were statistically very highly significant differences between asthmatic patients who had OSA before and after CPAP therapy regarding asthma and GERD symptoms, difficult to control asthma, pulmonary function tests, ESS score and sleep quality parameters. Conclusions: 1 There is a high risk of developing OSA in asthmatic patients. 2 There is a bidirectional relationship between OSA and asthma with increasing frequency of OSA with the increasing of asthma severity. 3

  17. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone.

  18. Prevalence and incidence of hypertension in obstructive sleep apnea patients and the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and its confounders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Jing; CHEN Bao-yuan

    2009-01-01

    @@ Based on available population-based studies, Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) associated with accompanying daytime sleepiness affects 3% to 7% of adult men and 2% to 5% of adult women in the general population. In some population subsets, like obese or older people, this prevalence is even higher. The health risk in OSA patients shows a strong association with acute cardiovascular events such as stroke, myocardial infarction and nocturnal sudden death.1,2 And with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, and especially, systemic hypertension.3,4 In this review, prevalence and incidence of hypertension in OSA patients and the relationships between OSA and its confounders are considered, and of course, these confounders are also generally taken as risk factors for hypertension.

  19. Effects of Tiagabine on Slow Wave Sleep and Arousal Threshold in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranto-Montemurro, Luigi; Sands, Scott A; Edwards, Bradley A; Azarbarzin, Ali; Marques, Melania; de Melo, Camila; Eckert, Danny J; White, David P; Wellman, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) severity is markedly reduced during slow-wave sleep (SWS) even in patients with a severe disease. The reason for this improvement is uncertain but likely relates to non-anatomical factors (i.e. reduced arousability, chemosensitivity, and increased dilator muscle activity). The anticonvulsant tiagabine produces a dose-dependent increase in SWS in subjects without OSA. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that tiagabine would reduce OSA severity by raising the overall arousal threshold during sleep. After a baseline physiology night to assess patients' OSA phenotypic traits, a placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial of tiagabine 12 mg administered before sleep was performed in 14 OSA patients. Under each condition, we assessed the effects on sleep and OSA severity using standard clinical polysomnography. Tiagabine increased slow-wave activity (SWA) of the electroencephalogram (1-4 Hz) compared to placebo (1.8 [0.4] vs. 2.0 [0.5] LogμV2, p = .04) but did not reduce OSA severity (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] 41.5 [20.3] vs. 39.1 [16.5], p > .5). SWS duration (25 [20] vs. 26 [43] mins, p > .5) and arousal threshold (-26.5 [5.0] vs. -27.6 [5.1] cmH2O, p = .26) were also unchanged between nights. Tiagabine modified sleep microstructure (increase in SWA) but did not change the duration of SWS, OSA severity, or arousal threshold in this group of OSA patients. Based on these findings, tiagabine should not be considered as a therapeutic option for OSA treatment.

  20. Use of Electronic Data and Existing Screening Tools to Identify Clinically Significant Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A Severson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the ability of electronic health data and existing screening tools to identify clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, as defined by symptomatic or severe OSA.

  1. Do Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients Underestimate Their Daytime Symptoms before Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Leclerc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Daytime somnolence is an important feature of the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA hypopnea syndrome and is usually subjectively assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS.

  2. Low-frequency oscillations and vasoreactivity of cortical vessels in obstructive sleep apnea during wakefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik Winther; Jensen, Benedicte Ersted; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Effective nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy reduces the cardiovascular outcomes associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but the mechanism behind this effect is unclear. We investigated if OSA patients during wakefulness showed signs of increased sympathetic activity...

  3. Dynamics of Snoring Sounds and Its Connection with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    CERN Document Server

    Alencar, Adriano M; Oliveira, Carolina Beatriz; Vieira, Andre P; Moriya, Henrique T; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2012-01-01

    Snoring is extremely common in the general population and when irregular may indicate the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. We analyze the overnight sequence of wave packets --- the snore sound --- recorded during full polysomnography in patients referred to the sleep laboratory due to suspected obstructive sleep apnea. We hypothesize that irregular snore, with duration in the range between 10 and 100 seconds, correlates with respiratory obstructive events. We find that the number of irregular snores --- easily accessible, and quantified by what we call the snore time interval index (STII) --- is in good agreement with the well-known apnea-hypopnea index, which expresses the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and is extracted only from polysomnography. In addition, the Hurst analysis of the snore sound itself, which calculates the fluctuations in the signal as a function of time interval, is used to build a classifier that is able to distinguish between patients with no or mild apnea and patients with mod...

  4. Risk of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome among in-patients at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with this high risk. Keywords: obstructive sleep apnoea; severe mental illness; Nigeria, in-patients ... drug-induced weight gain and a sedentary life style due to psychomotor .... teria of insomnia: Distinguishing insomnia related to.

  5. Clinical observation of glucose metabolism disorders in elderly patients with obstructive sleep apnea disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蔷

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between obstructive sleep apnea hypoventilation syndrome (OSAHS) and glucose metabolism disorders in patients without diabetes mellitus.Methods A total of 88 patients with OSAHS but without diabetes mellitus from 2009 to 2011 in

  6. Speckle tracking echocardiography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and overlapping obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizarro C

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Pizarro,* Fabian van Essen,* Fabian Linnhoff, Robert Schueler, Christoph Hammerstingl, Georg Nickenig, Dirk Skowasch, Marcel Weber Department of Internal Medicine II, Cardiology, Pneumology and Angiology, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: COPD and congestive heart failure represent two disease entities of growing global burden that share common etiological features. Therefore, we aimed to identify the degree of left ventricular (LV dysfunction in COPD as a function of COPD severity stages and concurrently placed particular emphasis on the presence of overlapping obstructive sleep apnea (OSA.Methods: A total of 85 COPD outpatients (64.1±10.4 years, 54.1% males and 20 controls, matched for age, sex, and smoking habits, underwent speckle tracking echocardiography for LV longitudinal strain imaging. Complementary 12-lead electrocardiography, laboratory testing, and overnight screening for sleep-disordered breathing using the SOMNOcheck micro® device were performed.Results: Contrary to conventional echocardiographic parameters, speckle tracking echocardiography revealed significant impairment in global LV strain among COPD patients compared to control smokers (-13.3%±5.4% vs -17.1%±1.8%, P=0.04. On a regional level, the apical septal LV strain was reduced in COPD (P=0.003 and associated with the degree of COPD severity (P=0.02. With regard to electrocardiographic findings, COPD patients exhibited a significantly higher mean heart rate than controls (71.4±13.0 beats per minute vs 60.3±7.7 beats per minute, P=0.001 that additionally increased over Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stages (P=0.01. Albeit not statistically significant, COPD led to elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels (453.2±909.0 pg/mL vs 96.8±70.0 pg/mL, P=0.08. As to somnological testing, the portion of COPD patients exhibiting overlapping OSA accounted for 5.9% and

  7. Tonsil volume, tonsil grade and obstructive sleep apnea: is there any meaningful correlation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Burihan Cahali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to evaluate the correlation between oropharyngeal examination and objective palatine tonsil volume in snoring adults and verify the influence of the oropharyngeal anatomy, body mass index, age, and severity of obstructive sleep apnea on actual tonsil volume. In addition, we aimed to assess the influence of tonsil size on obstructive sleep apnea in adults. INTRODUCTION: Pharyngeal wall geometry is often altered in adults who have obstructive sleep apnea, and this might influence the findings of the oropharyngeal examination that, in turn, are the key factors when considering surgical management for this condition. Furthermore, the correlation between the actual tonsil volume and the severity of obstructive sleep apnea in adults is currently unknown. METHODS: We prospectively studied 130 patients with obstructive sleep apnea or primary snoring who underwent pharyngeal surgery with intraoperative measurement of tonsil volume. We compared tonsil volume with preoperative polysomnography, oropharyngeal examination, and anthropometric data. RESULTS: We found a significant correlation between actual tonsil volume and subjective tonsil grade. We also found a significant correlation between tonsil volume and the apnea-hypopnea index. Using a multivariate linear regression model, tonsil volume was found to be significantly correlated with age, body mass index, and oropharyngeal examination, but not with polysomnography. Clinically, only the rare tonsil grade IV was indicative of more severe obstructive sleep apnea. CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong correlation between clinical tonsil grade and objective tonsil volume in snoring adults, and this correlation exists regardless of the presence or severity of obstructive sleep apnea. Pharyngeal tissue volume likely reflects the body mass index rather than obstructive sleep apnea severity.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and fatty liver: Association or causal link?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed; H; Ahmed; Christopher; D; Byrne

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a complex disorder that consists of upper airway obstruction, chronic intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. OSA is well known to be associated with hypoxia, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, and these factors can occur in the presence or absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Although it is well established that insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and obesity occur frequently with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), it is now becoming apparen...

  9. Positional abnormalities during sleep in children affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: the putative role of kinetic muscular chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenuto, Marco; Gimigliano, Francesca; Fiordelisi, Giovanni; Ruberto, Maria; Esposito, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD) are disorders of breathing during sleep characterized by prolonged partial upper airway obstruction, intermittent complete or partial obstruction (obstructive apnea or hypopnea), or both prolonged and intermittent obstruction that disrupts normal ventilation during sleep, normal sleep patterns, or both. Children with OSAS may sleep in unusual positions, such as seated or with neck hyperextended, even if the neck position is not the only unusual posture or the special sleeping positions that is possible to detect in children with SRBD. We have hypothesized that the assumption of unusual posture during sleep, in particular legs retracting or crossing during sleep, could be a way to enlarge the diaphragmatic excursion and promoting the alveolar gas exchanges avoiding the stress of the antero-lumbar and prevertebral muscular chains in SRBD subjects. We have hypothesized that the assumption of unusual posture during sleep, in particular legs retracting or crossing during sleep, could be a way to enlarge the diaphragmatic excursion and promoting the alveolar gas exchanges avoiding the stress of the antero-lumbar and prevertebral muscular chains in SRBD subjects. We can postulate that the prevertebral and antero-lumbar muscular chains could be oversolicited during the apnoic events, and the assumption of abnormal posture could be interpreted as a way to relax or diminish the strain or muscular stress caused by the apneas. The consequence of this hypothesis could be summarized in the concept that a specific rehabilitation or muscular program to improve the tone of this kinetic chain, could be useful to limit the effect nocturnal or diurnal of this so impacting syndrome.

  10. Comparison of full-night and ambulatory polysomnography with ApneaGraph in the subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaloğlu, Furkan; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf K; Yilmaz, Metin; Ulukavak Çiftçi, Tansu; Çiftçi, Bülent; Bakkal, Faruk K

    2017-01-01

    The localization of the obstruction is crucial in determining the appropriate surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS); ApneaGraph has been introduced for diagnosis of OSAS and localization of airway obstruction level. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of ApneaGraph for both clinical staging and site of obstruction. Thirty male OSAS patients were prospectively enrolled in this clinical trial. The following parameter were included to the study: Body mass indexes and neck circumferences of the subjects, Epworth sleepiness scale, site of obstruction detected by flexible endoscopy and ApneaGraph, apnea hypopnea index (AHI), apnea index, hypopnea index, maximal oxygen desaturation and average oxygen saturation which were detected by both polysomnography (PSG) and ApneaGraph devices. Our data presented that, although AHI measured by ApneaGraph and PSG were significantly correlated; severity stages of the subjects were different in 44 % of the subjects when based on AHI of ApneaGraph, compared to PSG. Majority of the changes were from severe OSAS to mild or moderate levels. Similar dominant collapse levels were detected in 64 % of the subjects by both devices. It was seen that transpalatal obstruction was better correlated between ApneaGraph and flexible endoscopy. As a conclusion, we might assume that ApneaGraph can be used as a screener for OSAS and it appears to be a more reliable device to confirm dominancy of palatal level obstruction.

  11. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis presenting with orthopnea in a patient with COPD and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.L.N. Swamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as motor neuron disease (MND is a relentlessly progressive neurological disorder causing peripheral muscular weakness and resultant respiratory failure. In this article, we report a case of ALS with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA with orthopnea as initial symptoms.

  12. Towards a clinical classification system for position-dependent obstructive sleep apnea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravesloot, M.; Frank, M.H.; van Maanen, J.P.; Verhagen, E.A.; de Lange, J.; de Vries, N.; de Vries, N.; Ravesloot, M.; van Maanen, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss the various definitions of position-dependent obstructive apnea. The first was introduced in 1984 by Cartwright, who suggested that physicians should differentiate between patients with either positional (POSA) or non-positional obstructive sleep apnea. Treatment of POSA

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Giulio; Vicini, Claudio; De Benedetto, Michele; Salamanca, Fabrizio; Sorrenti, Giovanni; Romandini, Mario; Bosi, Marcello; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Foresta, Enrico; Laforì, Andreina; Meccariello, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Alessandro; Toraldo, Domenico Maurizio; Campanini, Aldo; Montevecchi, Filippo; Rizzotto, Grazia; Cervelli, Daniele; Moro, Alessandro; Arigliani, Michele; Gobbi, Riccardo; Pelo, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT) compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5) and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p < 0.01). The area under the ROC curve (95% CI) was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00) for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5), 0.90 (0.82–0.98) for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15), and 0.84 (0.76–0.92) for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed. PMID:26636102

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Obstructive Airway Adult Test for Diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Gasparini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rationale. The gold standard for the diagnosis of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is polysomnography, whose access is however reduced by costs and limited availability, so that additional diagnostic tests are needed. Objectives. To analyze the diagnostic accuracy of the Obstructive Airway Adult Test (OAAT compared to polysomnography for the diagnosis of OSA in adult patients. Methods. Ninety patients affected by OSA verified with polysomnography (AHI ≥ 5 and ten healthy patients, randomly selected, were included and all were interviewed by one blind examiner with OAAT questions. Measurements and Main Results. The Spearman rho, evaluated to measure the correlation between OAAT and polysomnography, was 0.72 (p<0.01. The area under the ROC curve (95% CI was the parameter to evaluate the accuracy of the OAAT: it was 0.91 (0.81–1.00 for the diagnosis of OSA (AHI ≥ 5, 0.90 (0.82–0.98 for moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15, and 0.84 (0.76–0.92 for severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30. Conclusions. The OAAT has shown a high correlation with polysomnography and also a high diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of OSA. It has also been shown to be able to discriminate among the different degrees of severity of OSA. Additional large studies aiming to validate this questionnaire as a screening or diagnostic test are needed.

  15. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea following head and neck cancer treatment : A cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, W; Hoekema, A; Stegenga, B; van der Hoeven, JH; de Bont, LGM; Roodenburg, JLN

    The obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder characterised by repetitive pharyngeal collapse. OSAHS is associated with a reduced quality of life. A high OSAHS prevalence has been reported in patients treated for head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of

  16. Severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in an adult patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagan, Y; Abadi, J; Lifschitz, A; Laron, Z

    2001-08-01

    A 68 year old patient with Laron syndrome (primary growth hormone (GH) resistance-insensitivity due to a molecular defect of the GH receptor) and severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome is described. Treatment with continuous positive air pressure therapy resulted in improved nocturnal sleep, daytime alertness and cognitive functions.

  17. The role of nasal CPAP in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome due to mandibular hypoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Miller, Stanley D W

    2012-02-01

    Melnick Needles syndrome (MNS), Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) and Pierre Robin syndrome (PRS) are congenital abnormalities with characteristic facial appearances that include micrognathia. A 20-year-old girl with MNS, a 16-year-old boy with TCS and a 12-year-old girl with PRS attended the sleep apnoea clinic at our institution at different times. Diagnostic sleep studies were initially performed on all three patients to confirm the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). They subsequently commenced nasal CPAP (nCPAP) treatment and their progress was followed. A limited sleep study on the patient with MNS demonstrated moderate\\/severe OSAS with an AHI of 33 events\\/h. Commencement of nCPAP resulted in symptomatic improvement. Overnight oximetry in the patient with TCS showed repeated desaturation to SpO2<90%. Subsequent treatment by nCPAP almost completely abolished the desaturation events. Overnight polysomnography in the patient with PRS demonstrated severe OSAS with an AHI of 49 events\\/h. After 3 years of nCPAP therapy, this patient requested discontinuation of treatment. Subsequent polysomnography without nCPAP revealed an AHI of <5 events\\/h. The use of nCPAP in the patients with MNS and TCS resulted in effective control of their sleep abnormalities. Mandibular growth and enlargement of the posterior airway space led to resolution of OSAS in the patient with PRS. There is a definite role for nCPAP therapy in patients with congenital micrognathia and OSAS. The use of nCPAP may obviate the need for more invasive corrective surgery for OSAS and is not necessarily a life-long requirement.

  18. Treatment of Insomnia, Insomnia Symptoms, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea During and After Menopause: Therapeutic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Tal, Joshua Z.; Suh, Sooyeon A.; Dowdle, Claire L.; Nowakowski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Understanding sleep complaints among menopausal women is an emerging area of clinical and research interest. Several recent reviews have focused on mechanisms of menopausal insomnia and symptoms. In this review, we present a discussion on the most relevant and recent publications on the treatment of sleep disorders for menopausal women, with a focus on menopause-related insomnia, insomnia symptoms, and obstructive sleep apnea. We discuss both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments,...

  19. Melatonin secretion and excretion in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, J; Svanborg, E; Wetterberg, L; Röjdmark, S

    1997-11-01

    Melatonin (MT) secretion and excretion were investigated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Nine men, mean age 55.1 years, mean body mass index 31.2, with a previously confirmed diagnosis of moderate to severe OSAS, were tested on two occasions: immediately before initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and again after at least 4 weeks of continuous nocturnal use of CPAP. Serum MT concentrations were determined every second hour between 2000 and 0800 hours. Urine was collected between 2200 and 0700 hours for determination of urinary MT excretion. Sleep apnea recordings included ear oximetry, respiration and body movements, body position, and breathing sounds. Nine healthy male controls were tested on one occasion. We found that the MT secretion, as reflected by the area under the curve (AUC), among the OSAS patients did not differ from that found in healthy controls (MT AUC 1.68 vs. 1.92 nmol/l x h). Sleep apnea recordings were normalized during CPAP treatment. Moreover, the excessive daytime sleepiness disappeared in all patients. Neither MT secretion (MT AUC 1.68 vs. 1.56 nmol/l x h) nor urinary excretion of MT (0.122 vs. 0.108 nmol/9 h) changed significantly as a result of the CPAP treatment.

  20. Effects of Adenotonsillectomy on Neurocognitive Function in Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumie Horiuchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in children does not only present with symptoms of sleep disturbances but also with associated symptoms such as growth failure, enuresis, academic learning difficulties, and behavioral problems, including attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder- (ADHD- like symptoms. We evaluated neurocognitive functions before and after adenotonsillectomy in a patient with OSAS. An 11-year-old boy suspected of having ADHD with nocturnal enuresis was referred for evaluation. He was found to have adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Presence of snoring was evident only after detailed medical interview. Polysomnography confirmed the diagnosis of OSAS, which was subsequently treated by adenotonsillectomy. The apnea/hypopnea index decreased from 21.9 at baseline to 1.8 after surgery, and the frequency of enuresis fell from almost nightly to 2-3 times per month. Neurocognitive and behavioral assessment after the treatment of OSAS showed significant improvement in cognitive functions, especially attention capacity and considerable amelioration of behavioral problems including ADHD-like symptoms. As the most common cause of pediatric OSAS is adenotonsillar hypertrophy, medical interview and oropharyngeal examination should always be performed in children suspected of having ADHD. The necessity of sleep evaluation for children with ADHD-like symptoms was also emphasized.

  1. Respiratory events and obstructive sleep apnea in children with achondroplasia: investigation and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpaiman, Shahla; Sillence, David O; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Ault, Jenny E; Waters, Karen

    2011-12-01

    We report aspects of sleep-disordered breathing in a cohort of achondroplastic children who attended our hospital. A retrospective chart review was conducted for a 15-year period to further evaluate the diagnosis and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in children with achondroplasia. A review of the medical records was undertaken for 46 children (63%, mean age 3.9 years) with achondroplasia that had overnight polysomnography. Among them, 25 (54.3%) had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). For 19 out of 46 patients (follow-up rate, 41.3%) with a mean follow-up of 31.3 months (range, 3 month to 11 years), 13 had undergone adenotonsillectomy, while nine were treated with continuous positive airway pressure. Prospective evaluation of our clinic population confirms a high incidence of SDB in achondroplastic children. OSA has been linked to raise intracranial pressure as well as neurocognitive deficits in children and we hypothesize that associations between neurological and respiratory abnormalities in this disorder are a consequence of the early onset of associated respiratory, rather than the neurological complications.

  2. The validity of the static charge sensitive bed in detecting obstructive sleep apnoeas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, O; Brissaud, L; Sales, B; Besset, A; Billiard, M

    1988-04-01

    The demand for polysomnographic recordings associated with respiratory control exceeds the capacity of the few existing sleep disorder centres and therefore a simple and inexpensive method is needed for screening and diagnosing sleep-related breathing disorders. The static charge sensitive bed (SCSB) permits long-term recordings of body movements, respiratory movements and the ballistocardiogram (BCG) without electrodes or cables being attached to the subject. The aim of the present study was to test the validity of this particular method in detecting obstructive sleep apnoeas without airflow measurements. Simultaneous SCSB and spirometer recordings were compared in fourteen sleep apnoea patients and six controls. The mean sensitivity of the SCSB method to detect the obstructive apnoeas was 0.92-0.98. The specificity to detect 2 min apnoea epochs was 0.61-0.68 in the apnoea group, while in the control group it was 0.99-1.00. According to this study, the SCSB detects the obstructive events without always distinguishing between severe periodic hypopnoeas and obstructive apnoeas. The sensitivity of the SCSB makes it valuable for screening subjects suspected of having obstructive sleep apnoeas. Further studies will concentrate on a more detailed analysis of the various respiratory, BCG and body movement patterns, which may lead to additional information on the severity of the upper airway obstruction.

  3. Prevalence and Characteristics of Central Compared to Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Analyses from the Sleep Heart Health Study Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Lucas M.; Kapur, Vishesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Determine the prevalence of central sleep apnea (CSA) in a large community-based cohort using current definitions and contrast the clinical characteristics of subjects with CSA to those with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and no sleep apnea. Methods: A cross sectional analysis of baseline data from 5,804 participants of the Sleep Heart Health study was performed. Subjects meeting contemporary diagnostic criteria for CSA and Cheyne Stokes respiration (CSR) were compared to those without sleep apnea and those with OSA. Demographic data, medical comorbidities, medication use, and sleep related symptoms were compared between the groups Results: The prevalences of CSA and Cheyne Stokes respiration (CSR) in this sample were 0.9 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.7–1.2)% and 0.4 (95% CI: 0.3–0.6)%, respectively. Individuals with CSA were older, had lower body mass indexes (BMI), lower Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores, and were more likely to be male than individuals with obstructive sleep apnea OSA. Among those with self-reported heart failure (HF), OSA was much more common at 55.1% (95% CI: 45.6–64.6) than CSA 4.1% (95% CI: 0.3–7.9). Conclusions: This is the largest community-based study of the prevalence and characteristics of CSA to date and demonstrates a prevalence of CSA that is intermediate to those previously noted. Contrary to prior data from clinic based samples, individuals with heart failure were much more likely to have OSA than CSA. Citation: Donovan LM, Kapur VK. Prevalence and characteristics of central compared to obstructive sleep apnea: analyses from the sleep heart health study cohort. SLEEP 2016;39(7):1353–1359. PMID:27166235

  4. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53±11 yrs; body mass index (BMI=45±9 kg/m2 with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI 33±30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P=0.006, income level (P<0.001, and employment status (P=0.03 between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P=0.03, P=0.004, and P=0.001, resp., as well as in Hispanics (P=0.02, P=0.02, P=0.03, resp.. Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence.

  5. Compensatory Head Posture Changes in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Maorong; XIA Xirong; Hiroki SAKAKIBARA; Susumu SUETSUGU

    2000-01-01

    The upper airway narrowing and changes in head posture and their relationship with apnea severity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were investigated. In 86 male OSA patients and 37 healthy men, one-night polysomnographic examination was performed and a lateral cephalogram by digital image processing system was taken in each subject. Fifteen variables concerning the upper airway dimensions, area and head postures were measured by using a computer software (NIH Image). The results showed that upper airway dimensions in the OSA group at all levels were significantly smaller than those in the control group and the results hold true when the age and body mass index were well controlled in these two groups. Significant forward inclination of the cervical column was found in the patients with an apnea index (AI) greater than 35episodes/h. And changes in the head posture variables in the whole study group were significantly correlated with AI and airway dimensions at various levels. It was suggested that there exist significant and extensive upper airway narrowing in OSA patients even in upright position and awake state; And as the apnea severity progresses, patients may assume certain compensatory head postures in an attempt to maintain an adequate airway patency.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

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    Mario Francesco Damiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis (such as interleukin- [IL-] 6 and pentraxin- [PTX-] 3. Methods. The study design allowed us to define 4 groups: (1 controls (n=30; (2 OSA patients without HTN (n=30; (3 HTN patients without OSA (n=30; (4 patients with OSA and HTN (n=30. In the morning after portable monitoring (between 7 am and 8 am, blood samples were collected, and carotid IMT was measured. Results. Carotid IMT, IL-6, and PTX-3 in OSA normotensive patients and in non-OSA HTN subjects were significantly higher compared to control subjects; in addition, in OSA hypertensive patients they were significantly increased compared to OSA normotensive, non-OSA HTN, or control subjects. Conclusions. OSA and HTN have an additive role in the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and in blood levels of inflammatory markers for atherosclerosis, such as interleukin-6 and pentraxin-3.

  7. CLINICAL ANALYSIS OF OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEASYNDROME WITH ACUTE RESPIRATORY FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the clinical characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) induced acute respiratory failure. Methods The clinical and laboratory characteristics of 9 patients were reviewed. Results 9 patients (8 females, 1 male) presented with obesity and mental disturbance, with a BMI being 44.97 kg /m2, (45.25 kg/m2 in the fe male). The mean age of the group was 67.89 years (61~74 years). All had respiratory acidosis (mean pH 7.17), hypercapni a (mean PaCO2 94.10mmHg) (63.97~143.18mmHg), and hypoxemia (mean PaO2 39mmHg) (29.03~44.03mmHg). During periods of clinical stability all but 2 had awaken hypercapnia (mean PaCO2 46.73mmHg) (38.25~54.68mmHg). Four of the 9 patients had pulmonary function test showing FEV1>70%. Conclusion OSAS induced acute respiratory fail ure has a sudden onset and various presentations and can be reversed with early and proper treatment. The severity of abnormal pulmonary function was less than what would be expected to cause respiratory failure.

  8. Circulating adhesion molecules in obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Victoria M; Grandner, Michael A; Pack, Allan I

    2014-02-01

    Over 20 years of evidence indicates a strong association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and cardiovascular disease. Although inflammatory processes have been heavily implicated as an important link between the two, the mechanism for this has not been conclusively established. Atherosclerosis may be one of the mechanisms linking OSA to cardiovascular morbidity. This review addresses the role of circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA, and how these may be part of the link between cardiovascular disease and OSA. There is evidence for the role of adhesion molecules in cardiovascular disease risk. Some studies, albeit with small sample sizes, also show higher levels of adhesion molecules in patients with OSA compared to controls. There are also studies that show that levels of adhesion molecules diminish with continuous positive airway pressure therapy. Limitations of these studies include small sample sizes, cross-sectional sampling, and inconsistent control for confounding variables known to influence adhesion molecule levels. There are potential novel therapies to reduce circulating adhesion molecules in patients with OSA to diminish cardiovascular disease. Understanding the role of cell adhesion molecules generated in OSA will help elucidate one mechanistic link to cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA.

  9. Small B cell lymphocytic lymphoma presenting as obstructive sleep apnea

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    Chang Weng-Cheng

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most lymphomas that involve the tonsil are large B cell lymphomas. Large B-cell lymphoma is a high grade malignancy which progresses rapidly. Tonsillar lymphoma usually presents as either a unilaterally enlarged palatine tonsil or as an ulcerative and fungating lesion over the tonsillar area. Small lymphocytic lymphomas (SLL of the Waldeyer's ring are uncommon. Case presentation We report a 41-year-old male who presented with a ten-year history of snoring. Physical examination revealed smooth bilateral symmetrically enlarged tonsils without abnormal surface change or cervical lymphadenopathy. Palatal redundancy and a narrowed oropharyngeal airway were also noted. The respiratory disturbance index (RDI was 66 per hour, and severe obstruction sleep apnea (OSA was suspected. No B symptoms, sore throat, odynophagia or dysphagia was found. We performed uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP and pathological examination revealed incidental small B-cell lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL. Conclusion It is uncommon for lymphoma to initially present as OSA. SLL is an indolent malignancy and is not easy to detect in the early stage. We conclude that SLL may be a contributing factor of OSA in the present case.

  10. Information processing speed in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpinen, R; Saunamäki, T; Jehkonen, M

    2014-04-01

    To provide a comprehensive review of studies on information processing speed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as compared to healthy controls and normative data, and to determine whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment improves information processing speed. A systematic review was performed on studies drawn from Medline and PsycINFO (January 1990-December 2011) and identified from lists of references in these studies. After inclusion criteria, 159 articles were left for abstract review, and after exclusion criteria 44 articles were fully reviewed. The number of patients in the studies reviewed ranged from 10 to 157 and the study samples consisted mainly of men. Half of the studies reported that patients with OSAS showed reduced information processing speed when compared to healthy controls. Reduced information processing speed was seen more often (75%) when compared to norm-referenced data. Psychomotor speed seemed to be particularly liable to change. CPAP treatment improved processing speed, but the improvement was marginal when compared to placebo or conservative treatment. Patients with OSAS are affected by reduced information processing speed, which may persist despite CPAP treatment. Information processing is usually assessed as part of other cognitive functioning, not as a cognitive domain per se. However, it is important to take account of information processing speed when assessing other aspects of cognitive functioning. This will make it possible to determine whether cognitive decline in patients with OSAS is based on lower-level or higher-level cognitive processes or both.

  11. Sympathoexcitation and arterial hypertension associated with obstructive sleep apnea and cyclic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J Woodrow; Tamisier, Renaud; Liu, Yuzhen

    2015-12-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. These obstructive episodes are characterized by cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), by sleep fragmentation, and by hemodynamic instability, and they result in sustained sympathoexcitation and elevated arterial pressure that persist during waking, after restoration of normoxia. Early studies established that 1) CIH, rather than sleep disruption, accounts for the increase in arterial pressure; 2) the increase in arterial pressure is a consequence of the sympathoactivation; and 3) arterial hypertension after CIH exposure requires an intact peripheral chemoreflex. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated that sympathoactivation and hypertension after CIH are also dependent on altered central sympathoregulation. Furthermore, although many molecular pathways are activated in both the carotid chemoreceptor and in the central nervous system by CIH exposure, two specific neuromodulators-endothelin-1 and angiotensin II-appear to play crucial roles in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic response to intermittent hypoxia.

  12. Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. Results : In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Conclusion : Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups. PMID:25352924

  13. Sexual function in male patients with obstructive sleep apnoea after 1 year of CPAP treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marian Christin; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate what impact 1 year of effective nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment had on general and functional aspects of sexuality in male patients with a confirmed diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). METHODS: Before and after 1...... year of CPAP treatment, a total of 207 CPAP-compliant male patients (age 26-77) received a survey with questions drawn from two self-administered questionnaires on sexuality - Life Satisfaction 11 (LiSat-11) and brief sexual function inventory (BSFI). For assessment of daytime sleepiness, we used...... the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). RESULTS: Response rate was 76%. We found no significant changes in satisfaction with relation to partner or life as a whole, but satisfaction with sexual life (LiSat-11) and both general and functional aspects of sexuality (BSFI) were significantly improved after 1 year...

  14. Oral Appliance Treatment Response and Polysomnographic Phenotypes of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Takaya, Hisashi; Qian, Jin; Petocz, Peter; Ng, Andrew T.; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Mandibular advancement splints (MAS) are an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA); however, therapeutic response is variable. Younger age, female gender, less obesity, and milder and supine-dependent OSA have variably been associated with treatment success in relatively small samples. Our objective was to utilize a large cohort of MAS treated patients (1) to compare efficacy across patients with different phenotypes of OSA and (2) to assess demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnography variables as treatment response predictors. Methods: Retrospective analysis of MAS-treated patients participating in clinical trials in sleep centers in Sydney, Australia between years 2000–2013. All studies used equivalent customized two-piece MAS devices and treatment protocols. Treatment response was defined as (1) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 5/h, (2) AHI < 10/h and ≥ 50% reduction, and (3) ≥ 50% AHI reduction. Results: A total of 425 patients (109 female) were included (age 51.2 ± 10.9 years, BMI 29.2 ± 5.0 kg/m2). MAS reduced AHI by 50.3% ± 50.7% across the group. Supine-predominant OSA patients had lower treatment response rates than non-positional OSA (e.g., 36% vs. 59% for AHI < 10/h). REM-predominant OSA showed a lower response rate than either NREM or non-stage dependent OSA. In prediction modelling, age, baseline AHI, and anthropometric variables were predictive of MAS treatment outcome but not OSA phenotype. Gender was not associated with treatment outcome. Conclusions: Lower MAS treatment response rates were observed in supine and REM sleep. In a large sample, we confirm that demographic, anthropometric, and polysomnographic data only weakly inform about MAS efficacy, supporting the need for alternative objective prediction methods to reliably select patients for MAS treatment. Citation: Sutherland K, Takaya H, Qian J, Petocz P, Ng AT, Cistulli PA. Oral appliance treatment response and polysomnographic phenotypes of

  15. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy (DISE) with Target Controlled Infusion (TCI) and Bispectral Analysis in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxdorf, Maximilian; Tschaikowsky, Klaus; Scherl, Claudia; Bauer, Judith; Iro, Heinrich; Angerer, Florian

    2016-12-06

    The aim of this study was to establish a standardized protocol for drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) to differentiate obstruction patterns in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Target-controlled infusion (TCI) of the sedative propofol was combined with real-time monitoring of the depth of sedation using bispectral analysis. In an observational study 57 patients (mean age 44.8 years, ± SD 10.5; mean apnea hypopnea Index (AHI) 30.8/hr, ± SD 21.6, mean BMI 28.2 kg/m(2), ± SD 5.3) underwent cardiorespiratory polysomnography followed by DISE with TCI and bispectral analysis. Sleep was induced solely by the intravenous infusion of propofol with a TCI-pump, with an initial target plasma level of 2.0 µg/ml. Under continuous monitoring of the patient's respiration, state of consciousness and value of the bispectral analysis, the target plasma propofol level was raised in steps of 0.2 µg/ml/2 min until the desired depth of sedation was reached. The mean value of the bispectral analysis at the target depth of sedation was determined and the obstruction patterns during DISE-TCI-bispectral analysis then classified according to the VOTE-system. Subsequently the results were analyzed according to polysomnographic and anthropometric data. The occurrence of multilevel obstruction sites across all degrees of severity of OSA clarifies the need for sleep endoscopy prior to upper airway surgery. The advantage of this technique is the reproducibility of the protocol even for heterogeneous groups of patients. In addition, the gradual controlled and standardized increase of the plasma level of propofol with real-time control of the bispectral index leads to a precisely controllable depth of sedation. The DISE-TCI-bispectral analysis procedure is a step towards a required reproducible protocol of sleep endoscopy - capable of standardization. However it is not yet known whether these observed obstruction patterns also correspond to findings in natural sleep.

  16. Consensus and evidence-based Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea guidelines 2014 (first edition

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    Surendra K Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS are subsets of sleep-disordered breathing. Awareness about OSA and its consequences among the general public as well as the majority of primary care physicians across India is poor. This necessitated the development of the Indian initiative on obstructive sleep apnea (INOSA guidelines under the auspices of Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. OSA is the occurrence of an average five or more episodes of obstructive respiratory events per hour of sleep with either sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities or ≥15 such episodes without any sleep-related symptoms or co-morbidities. OSAS is defined as OSA associated with daytime symptoms, most often excessive sleepiness. Patients undergoing routine health check-up with snoring, daytime sleepiness, obesity, hypertension, motor vehicular accidents, and high-risk cases should undergo a comprehensive sleep evaluation. Medical examiners evaluating drivers, air pilots, railway drivers, and heavy machinery workers should be educated about OSA and should comprehensively evaluate applicants for OSA. Those suspected to have OSA on comprehensive sleep evaluation should be referred for a sleep study. Supervised overnight polysomnography is the "gold standard" for evaluation of OSA. Positive airway pressure (PAP therapy is the mainstay of treatment of OSA. Oral appliances (OA are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer OA to PAP, or who do not respond to PAP or who fail treatment attempts with PAP or behavioral measures. Surgical treatment is recommended in patients who have failed or are intolerant to PAP therapy.

  17. The role of polysomnography in diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Gwynne D

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea in children is associated with serious neurocognitive and cardiovascular morbidity, systemic inflammation, and increased health care use, yet remains underdiagnosed. Although the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea is 1-3% in the pediatric population, the prevalence of primary snoring (PS) is estimated to be 3-12%. The challenge for pediatricians is to differentiate PS from obstructive sleep apnea in a cost-effective, reliable, and accurate manner before recommending invasive or intrusive therapies, such as surgery or continuous positive airway pressure. The validity of polysomnography as the gold standard for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea has been challenged, primarily related to concerns that abnormalities on polysomnography do not correlate well with adverse outcomes, that those abnormalities have statistical more than clinical significance, and that performing polysomnograms on all children who snore is a practical impossibility. The aim of this article is to review the clinical utility of diagnostic tests other than polysomnography to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea, to highlight the limitations and strengths of polysomnography, to underscore the threshold levels of abnormalities detected on polysomnography that correlate with morbidity, and to discuss what the practical implications are for treatment.

  18. COGNITIVE AND EMOTIONAL IMPAIRMENT IN OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA SYNDROME

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Peng; Shun-wei Li; Hong Kang; Xi-zhen Huang

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the emotional and cognitive status in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS),using neuropsychological tests and evoked-related potential (P3).Methods Sixteen patients diagnosed of OSAS were tested by Hamilton rating scale for anxiety (HRSA) and Hamilton rating scale for depression (HRSD). Other three groups, OSAS patient group (n = 21), snoring group (n = 21), and control group (n = 21), were administered polysomnography (PSG), auditory evoked event-related potential (P3), and clinic memory test. The results were analyzed using general linear model (GLM) analysis and Post Hoc test.Results Twelve OSAS patients' scores of HRSA and HRSD were beyond the normal range, 26.42 ± 4.48 and 22.08 ±3.97 respectively. The auditory P3 latency in OSAS group was 363.1 ± 22.9 ms (Fz), 368.57 ± 28.03 ms (Cz), in snoring group 336.57 ± 31.08 ms (Fz), 339.81 ± 31.76 ms (Cz), in control group 340.8 ± 28.7 ms (Fz), 338.29 ± 29.21 ms (Cz).There were significant differences between OSAS group and snoring group, as well as control group (P < 0.05). No significant difference was seen between snoring group and control group. No significant difference was noted in P3 amplitude among three groups. Memory quotient (MQ) reduced in snoring group compared with control group.Conclusions Emotional disturbances are common clinical features in OSAS patients. Abnormal auditory P3 latency indicates the cognitive dysfunction in OSAS patients. Nocturnal hypoxaemia may play an important role on it. Snorers should be monitored because of the tendency to develop cognitive impairment.

  19. Obstructive sleep apnea and bone mineral density in obese patients

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    Mariani S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefania Mariani,1 Daniela Fiore,1 Laura Varone,2 Sabrina Basciani,1 Agnese Persichetti,1 Mikiko Watanabe,1 Maurizio Saponara,3 Giovanni Spera,1 Costanzo Moretti,4 Lucio Gnessi11Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Medical Physiopathology and Endocrinology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2Department of Environmental Biology, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 3Department of Otolaryngology, Audiology and Phonation, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 4Division of Endocrinology, Department of System Medicine, Section of Reproductive Endocrinology University of TorVergata, Fatebenefratelli Hospital "San Giovanni Calibita" Rome, ItalyContext: Obesity and its co-morbidities may adversely affect bone mineral density (BMD. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a major complication of obesity. To date, the effects of OSA on BMD in obese patients have been poorly studied.Objective: To examine whether the severity of OSA independently correlates with BMD in obese patients.Methods: One hundred and fifteen obese subjects with OSA (Apnea/Hypopnea Index [AHI] ≥5 events per hour were included in the study. BMD was measured at lumbar spine, total hip, and femoral neck by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Body mass index, lean mass, and representative measures of metabolic syndrome (waist circumference, fasting plasma glucose, blood pressure, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides and inflammation (ESR, CRP, fibrinogen were also evaluated.Results: BMD did not differ among obese individuals regardless of OSA severity. Correlation coefficient analysis for all the covariates showed a lack of association between AHI and BMD that was strongly influenced by age and weight.Conclusion: Our study does not support an independent association between AHI and BMD in obese patients. Controlled studies involving a greater number of patients are warranted.Keywords: obesity, polysomnography, metabolic syndrome

  20. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Antonio; Mozzanica, Francesco; Sonzini, Giulia; Plebani, Daniela; Urbani, Emanuele; Pecis, Marica; Montano, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Although previous studies demonstrated that patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may present subclinical manifestations of dysphagia, in not one were different textures and volumes systematically studied. The aim of this study was to analyze the signs and symptoms of oropharyngeal dysphagia using fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) with boluses of different textures and volumes in a large cohort of patients with OSAS. A total of 72 OSAS patients without symptoms of dysphagia were enrolled. The cohort was divided in two groups: 30 patients with moderate OSAS and 42 patients with severe OSAS. Each patient underwent a FEES examination using 5, 10 and 20 ml of liquids and semisolids, and solids. Spillage, penetration, aspiration, retention, and piecemeal deglutition were considered. The penetration-aspiration scale (PAS), pooling score (PS), and dysphagia outcome and severity scale (DOSS) were used for quantitative analysis. Each patient completed the SWAL-QOL questionnaire. Forty-six patients (64 %) presented spillage, 20 (28 %) piecemeal deglutition, 26 (36 %) penetration, and 30 (44 %) retention. No differences were found in the PAS, PS, and DOSS scores between patients with moderate and severe OSAS. Patients with severe OSAS scored higher General Burden and Food selection subscales of the SWAL-QOL. Depending on the DOSS score, the cohort of patients was divided into those with and those without signs of dysphagia. Patients with signs of dysphagia scored lower in the General Burden and Symptoms subscales of the SWAL-QOL. OSAS patients show signs of swallowing impairment in about half of the population; clinicians involved in the management of these patients should include questions on swallowing when taking the medical history.

  1. Cervical vertebral anomalies in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saugat Ray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to find an association between the patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and with cervical vertebral anomalies and any further correlation between various anomalies with varying severities of OSA. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted lateral cephalograms of 70 subjects who were diagnosed with OSA and 70 other orthodontic patients who were selected as a control group. The lateral radiographs of both cases and controls were traced and findings were recorded. Results: In total, 21.42% of subjects in the OSA group and 8.57% in the control group were affected with cervical vertebrae anomalies. The statistical analysis reveals that the number of subjects affected with cervical vertebrae anomalies in OSA group is highly significant. A number of cases of fusion were higher than posterior arch deficiency in OSA group and equal in the control group. However, in both the groups, the number of cases with two vertebrae fusion was higher. Further, the higher number of two vertebrae fusion cases in OSA group was found to be statistically significant. The findings of one-way ANOVA for OSA cases reveals the number of cases affected with cervical vertebrae anomalies were statistically highly significant (P < 0.01 in severe cases of OSA. Conclusion: Patients of cervical vertebral anomalies may be at higher risk of developing OSA, and the possibility of the presence of cervical vertebral anomalies may increase with the increase in the severity of OSA. The most common vertebral anomaly was found to be two vertebral fusions.

  2. Inflammatory cardiovascular risk markers in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) represents a highly prevalent disease and is recognized as a major public health burden. Large-scale epidemiological studies have demonstrated an independent relationship between OSAS and various cardiovascular disorders. The pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in OSAS is not completely understood, but given the complexity of the disorder, a multifactorial etiology is likely. Inflammatory processes have emerged as critical in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in general and they mediate many of the stages of atheroma formation. Circulating levels of several markers of inflammation have been associated with future cardiovascular risk. These markers include cell adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and selectins, cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6), chemokines such as IL-8, and C-reactive protein (CRP). There is increasing evidence that inflammatory processes also play a central role in the cardiovascular pathophysiology of OSAS. This is supported by cell culture and animal studies identifying a preferential activation of inflammatory pathways by intermittent hypoxia (IH), the hallmark of OSAS. A number of studies have selectively examined the expression of inflammatory factors in OSAS patients with different conclusions. These different findings may have been contributed to by a number of methodological factors such as small subject numbers, inadequately matched study populations, particularly in terms of body mass index (BMI), and inclusion of patients with pre-existing cardiovascular or metabolic diseases. This review will focus on the potential role of various inflammatory markers in OSAS with a critical analysis of the current literature.

  3. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and sleep bruxism: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokubauskas, L; Baltrušaitytė, A

    2017-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a clinical risk factor for sleep bruxism (SB). Both OSAS and SB are reported to be associated with sleep-related arousal reactions, although no clear causative link has been established. An electronic literature search was conducted of the MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, SAGE Journals and EBSCOhost databases covering the period January 2006 and September 2016. Sequential screenings at the title, abstract and full-text levels were performed. The review included observational studies in the English language with a clearly established aim to assess the relationship between OSAS and SB using full-night PSG. The seven-item quality-assessment tool for experimental bruxism studies was used to assess the methodology across the studies. After a comprehensive screening of titles, abstracts and full texts, only three studies that met the pre-defined criteria were finally included in this systematic review. Two studies gave evidence that OSAS is associated with the occurrence of SB events: (i) SB events frequently occur during micro-arousal events consequent on apnoea-hypopnoea (AH) events and (ii) most SB events occur in temporal conjunction with AH events termination. However, one study did not report a strong association between AH and SB events. It can be concluded that there are not enough scientific data to define a clear causative link between OSAS and SB. However, they appear to share common clinical features. Further studies should focus on the intermediate mechanisms between respiratory and SB events. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Sexual behaviors during sleep associated with polysomnographically confirmed parasomnia overlap disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Giordano, Alessandra; Chiarot, Elisabetta; Peila, Elena; Terreni, Anna; Bucca, Caterina; Mutani, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Parasomnia overlap disorder (POD) refers to a sleep disorder characterized by the association of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) with NREM sleep parasomnia in the same patient. Sexual behaviors during sleep (SBS) can include most wakeful sexual activities and are classified in the ICSD-2 as a variant of confusional arousals and sleepwalking, both NREM parasomnias. A case of SBS associated with sleepwalking and possible RBD has been previously described, but it was not confirmed by polysomnography (PSG). We report two patients with SBS associated with POD documented by PSG. In one patient (60-year-old female) SBS was video-polysomnographically demonstrated: a few minute episode of masturbation occurring during slow-wave sleep (SWS) and preceded by hypersynchronous delta pattern. During the episode, the EEG pattern showed the persistence of delta rhythms with increasing alpha activity. When awoken by technicians, the patient was not aware of her sexual behavior and did not report any dream. The other patient, a 41-year-old male with a history of sleepwalking and RBD, was legally charged with repeatedly sexually fondling a young girl during the night. The POD was documented by PSG. The parasomnia defense, including sleepsex, was accepted by the Court and the patient was acquitted. This is an unprecedented report of SBS in patients with PSG-confirmed POD and of SBS documented during video-PSG.

  5. Update for nurse anesthetists. The Starling resistor: a model for explaining and treating obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalford, Catherine B

    2004-04-01

    Recent epidemiological research places the incidence of obstructive sleep apnea as high as 16% in the general population. Serious postoperative respiratory complications and death have been reported in this population. Anesthetic drugs contribute to these complications secondary to acute and residual influences on the complex orchestration of airway muscles and reflexes involved in airway patency. The Starling resistor model is a theoretical model that has application in explaining upper airway dynamics and the treatment and management of obstructive sleep apnea. The model postulates the oropharynx as a collapsible tube. The oropharynx remains open or partially or completely closed as a result of pressure upstream at the nose and mouth, pressure downstream at the trachea and below, or tissue pressure surrounding the oropharynx. This AANA Journal course provides an overview of the Starling resistor model, its application to obstructive sleep apnea, and preoperative and postoperative anesthetic considerations.

  6. 21 CFR 872.5570 - Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. 872.5570 Section 872.5570 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Devices § 872.5570 Intraoral devices for snoring and intraoral devices for snoring and obstructive sleep...

  7. Maxillomandibular Advancement Surgery as Alternative to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Morbidly Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea : A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, Michiel H. J.; Jansma, Johan; Schepers, Rutger H.; Hoekema, Aamoud

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep-related breathing disorder, characterized by disrupted snoring and repetitive upper airway obstructions. Oral appliance therapy is an effective alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and is especially effective in mild and moderat

  8. Apnea–hypopnea index decreased significantly after nasal surgery for obstructive sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Zhao, Guoqiang; Li, Yunchuan; Zang, Hongrui; Wang, Tong; Wang, Dongbo; Han, Demin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Nasal surgeries have been applied to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients with nasal obstruction for decades. However, the efficiency of nasal surgery in improving OSA remains controversial. The aim of this study was to identify whether isolated nasal surgery can improve apnea–hypopnea index (AHI). Methods: Computerized searches were performed in MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus from January 1, 2000 to April 30, 2016. A total of 18 articles and 587 participants were included. There were 1 randomized controlled trials, 2 nonrandomized trials, 11 prospective studies, and 4 retrospective studies. Data regarding study design (prospective/retrospective clinical trial, randomized, and controlled), population size, participant characteristics (age, gender, and body mass index), surgical intervention, and outcomes (AHI, Epworth sleep scale [ESS]) was collected. Results: Statistically significant improvement in AHI (subgroup 1: weighted mean difference [WMD] [95%confidence interval (CI)], −4.17 [−7.62, −0.73]; subgroup 2: WMD [95%CI], −4.19 [−7.51, −0.88]; overall: WMD [95%CI], −4.15 [−6.48, −1.82]) and ESS (subgroup 1: WMD [95%CI], −2.14 [−3.08, −1.19]; subgroup 2: WMD [95%CI], −4.70 [−5.95, −3.44]; overall: WMD [95%CI], −4.08 [−5.27, −2.88]) was revealed. Conclusion: Both AHI and ESS improved significantly after isolated nasal surgery, but the improvement of AHI is slightly significant. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the long-term benefits of nasal surgery on OSA. PMID:28151900

  9. HbA1c is associated with severity of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in nondiabetic men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Papanas

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Papanas1, Paschalis Steiropoulos2, Evangelia Nena2, Argyris Tzouvelekis2, Efstratios Maltezos1, Georgia Trakada2, Demosthenes Bouros21Outpatient Clinic of Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolism at the 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Pneumonology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis, GreeceAbstract: The aim of this study was to examine the potential correlation of sleep characteristics with glucose metabolism in nondiabetic men with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Included were 31 male patients (mean age 46.7 ± 11 years, recently diagnosed with OSAS by full polysomnography. There was a significant correlation of fasting glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels with arousal index (P = 0.047 and P = 0.014, respectively. Moreover, HbA1c levels were correlated with apnea hypopnea index (P = 0.009, a widely accepted marker of the severity of OSAS, and with percentage of sleep time with saturation of hemoglobin with oxygen as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 <90% (t < 90% (P = 0.010. Finally, glucose and HbA1c levels showed a significant negative correlation with average SpO2 (P = 0.013 and P = 0.012, respectively and, additionally, glucose levels with minimum SpO2 (P = 0.027 during sleep. In conclusion, severity of OSAS among nondiabetic men is associated with increased HbA1c levels and increased fasting glucose. Thus, severity of OSAS may be an additional marker of cardiovascular risk, as well as of future diabetes, in these subjects. However, further work is needed to confirm the clinical significance of these observations.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, glucose metabolism, glycated hemoglobin, sleep disordered breathing

  10. Adverse respiratory events after general anesthesia in patients at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Mendonça, Júlia; Pereira, Helder; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2015-01-01

    Patients with STOP-BANG score >3 have a high risk of Obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate early postoperative respiratory complications in adults with STOP-BANG score >3 after general anesthesia. This is a prospective double cohort study matching 59 pairs of adult patients with STOP-BANG score >3 (high risk of obstructive sleep apnea) and patients with STOP-BANG score <3 (low risk of obstructive sleep apnea), similar with respect to gender, age and type of surgery, admitted after elective surgery in the Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit in May 2011. Primary outcome was the development of adverse respiratory events. Demographics data, perioperative variables, and postoperative length of stay in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit and in hospital were recorded. The Mann-Whitney test, the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test were used for comparisons. Subjects in both pairs of study subjects had a median age of 56 years, including 25% males, and 59% were submitted to intra-abdominal surgery. High risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had a higher median body mass index (31 versus 24kg/m(2), p<0.001) and had more frequently co-morbidities, including hypertension (58% versus 24%, p<0.001), dyslipidemia (46% versus 17%, p<0.001) and insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (17% versus 2%, p=0.004). These patients were submitted more frequently to bariatric surgery (20% versus 2%, p=0.002). Patients with high risk of obstructive sleep apnea had more frequently adverse respiratory events (39% versus 10%, p<0.001), mild to moderate desaturation (15% versus 0%, p=0.001) and inability to breathe deeply (34% versus 9%, p=0.001). After general anesthesia high risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had an increased incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. [Adverse respiratory events after general anesthesia in patients at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Mendonça, Júlia; Pereira, Helder; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2015-01-01

    Patients with STOP-BANG score >3 have a high risk of Obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate early postoperative respiratory complications in adults with STOP-BANG score >3 after general anesthesia. This is a prospective double cohort study matching 59 pairs of adult patients with STOP-BANG score >3 (high risk of obstructive sleep apnea) and patients with STOP-BANG score <3 (low risk of obstructive sleep apnea), similar with respect to gender, age and type of surgery, admitted after elective surgery in the Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit in May 2011. Primary outcome was the development of adverse respiratory events. Demographics data, perioperative variables, and postoperative length of stay in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit and in hospital were recorded. The Mann-Whitney test, the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test were used for comparisons. Subjects in both pairs of study subjects had a median age of 56 years, including 25% males, and 59% were submitted to intra-abdominal surgery. High risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had a higher median body mass index (31 versus 24kg/m(2), p<0.001) and had more frequently co-morbidities, including hypertension (58% versus 24%, p<0.001), dyslipidemia (46% versus 17%, p<0.001) and insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (17% versus 2%, p=0.004). These patients were submitted more frequently to bariatric surgery (20% versus 2%, p=0.002). Patients with high risk of obstructive sleep apnea had more frequently adverse respiratory events (39% versus 10%, p<0.001), mild to moderate desaturation (15% versus 0%, p=0.001) and inability to breathe deeply (34% versus 9%, p=0.001). After general anesthesia high risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had an increased incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Upper airway finding on CT scan with and without nasal CPAP in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akashiba, Tsuneto; Sasaki, Iwao; Kurashina, Keiji; Yoshizawa, Takayuki; Otsuka, Kenzo; Horie, Takashi (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-04-01

    The area of upper airway (from the nasopharynx to the hypopharynx) was measured by means of computed tomography (CT) scan in 15 confirmed cases of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and in 4 normal controls while they were awake. The minimum cross-sectional area (MA) of the upper airway was 14.7+-20.0 mm{sup 2} in OSA patients and 80.0+-33.1 mm{sup 2} in normal controls and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.01). In OSA patients, MA did not correlate with age, body weight, apnea index, desaturation index, mean nadir-SO{sub 2} and lowest SO{sub 2}. MA was also measured with OSA patients while nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) of 10 cmH{sub 2}O was applied and it was found that MA was significantly widened when NCPAP therapy was performed. We conclude that upper airway narrowing is consistent finding in OSA patients but the degree of narrowing does not correlate with parameters of apnea and gas exchange during sleep, and NCPAP is effective to widen the area of upper airway in OSA patients. (author).

  13. Effect of CPAP on Endothelial Function in Subjects With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huajun; Wang, Yuyu; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is related to endothelial dysfunction. CPAP is the first-line treatment for OSA. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of CPAP on endothelial function in subjects with OSA. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched. The overall effects were measured by the weighted mean difference with a 95% CI. Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity. Eleven studies were eligible for the meta-analysis. A random-effects model revealed that CPAP significantly improved endothelial function as assessed by flow-mediated dilation (weighted mean difference of 2.92, 95% CI 2.21-3.63, P CPAP compliance and duration, and sleep-related variables had no effect on reduction in arterial stiffness after CPAP. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the protective effect of CPAP on endothelial function was robust. CPAP significantly improved flow-mediated dilation in subjects with OSA. Long-term randomized controlled trials with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm the positive effect of CPAP on endothelial function in subjects with OSA.

  14. [Effect of positive pressure respiration on diurnal catecholamine excretion by patients with obstructive sleep apnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślicki, J; Wocial, B; Koziej, M; Pałasiewicz, G; Zieliński, J

    1996-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate effects of CPAP treatment on diurnal catecholamine excretion in urine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). 12 males with severe OSA (mean AHI = 63) were measured in 3 separate 8 hour samples by fluorimetric method. NA levels were higher in OSA patients in all urine samples than in obese, mildly hypertensive males (control group = C). In C group patients NA levels were significantly lower at night than during the day contrary to OSA patients in whom NA levels dropped insignificantly during sleep. In OSA patients NA levels during sleep correlated with severity of apneas (r = 0.42) and night hypoxaemia (r = -0.46). CPAP treatment resulted in significant fall in NA levels during sleep (p sleep in OSA patients may be related to sleep fragmentation and hypoxia. CPAP treatment restores normal circadian rhythm of NA excretion.

  15. Genetic Associations with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Brian E; Chen, Han; Stilp, Adrienne M; Gleason, Kevin J; Sofer, Tamar; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Arens, Raanan; Bell, Graeme I; Below, Jennifer E; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Chun, Sung; Conomos, Matthew P; Evans, Daniel S; Johnson, W Craig; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Lane, Jacqueline M; Larkin, Emma K; Loredo, Jose S; Post, Wendy S; Ramos, Alberto R; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I; Shah, Neomi A; Stone, Katie L; Taylor, Kent D; Thornton, Timothy A; Tranah, Gregory J; Wang, Chaolong; Zee, Phyllis C; Hanis, Craig L; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Patel, Sanjay R; Laurie, Cathy C; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Saxena, Richa; Lin, Xihong; Redline, Susan

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and premature mortality. Although there is strong clinical and epidemiologic evidence supporting the importance of genetic factors in influencing obstructive sleep apnea, its genetic basis is still largely unknown. Prior genetic studies focused on traits defined using the apnea-hypopnea index, which contains limited information on potentially important genetically determined physiologic factors, such as propensity for hypoxemia and respiratory arousability. To define novel obstructive sleep apnea genetic risk loci for obstructive sleep apnea, we conducted genome-wide association studies of quantitative traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans from three cohorts. Genome-wide data from as many as 12,558 participants in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis, and Starr County Health Studies population-based cohorts were metaanalyzed for association with the apnea-hypopnea index, average oxygen saturation during sleep, and average respiratory event duration. Two novel loci were identified at genome-level significance (rs11691765, GPR83, P = 1.90 × 10(-8) for the apnea-hypopnea index, and rs35424364; C6ORF183/CCDC162P, P = 4.88 × 10(-8) for respiratory event duration) and seven additional loci were identified with suggestive significance (P < 5 × 10(-7)). Secondary sex-stratified analyses also identified one significant and several suggestive associations. Multiple loci overlapped genes with biologic plausibility. These are the first genome-level significant findings reported for obstructive sleep apnea-related physiologic traits in any population. These findings identify novel associations in inflammatory, hypoxia signaling, and sleep pathways.

  16. Life-Threatening Obstructive Sleep Apnea Caused by Adenoid Hypertrophy in an Infant with Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Khirani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoidectomy is a commonly performed surgery in children, even though its effectiveness is still under investigation. However, in children with risk factors such as age under 3 years old, associated comorbidities, or severe obstructive sleep apneas, a high postoperative respiratory morbidity is possible. We report the case of a 15-month-old boy with Noonan syndrome and a complex clinical history, who presented with a life-threatening obstructive sleep apnea due to hypertrophy of the adenoids which resolved completely after adenoidectomy.

  17. Mean platelet volume is associated with disease severity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selahattin Akyol

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with cardiovascular diseases and thromboembolic events. The mean platelet volume (MPV is a predictor of cardiovascular thromboembolic events. The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between the MPV and disease severity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. METHODS: We prospectively included 194 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular disease (mean age 56.5±12.5 years who were undergoing sleep tests. An overnight full laboratory polisomnography examination was conducted on each patient. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI: (1 AHIlow group: 5≤AHI30. RESULTS: The highest MPV values were found in the AHIhigh group compared with other groups (p<0.05 for all. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the MPV was associated with the AHI (β=0.500, p<0.001 and the high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP level (β=0.194, p=0.010. CONCLUSION: The MPV is independently associated with both disease severity and inflammation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  18. Clinical consequences and economic costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melissa Knauert; Sreelatha Naik; M.Boyd Gillespie; Meir Kryger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of the healthcare and societal consequences and costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.Data sources: PubMed database for English-language studies with no start date restrictions and with an end date of September 2014.Methods: A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify all studies that discussed the physiologic, clinical and societal consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as well as the costs associated with these consequences.There were 106 studies that formed the basis of this analysis.Conclusions: Undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can lead to abnormal physiology that can have serious implications including increased cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic disease, excessive daytime sleepiness, work-place errors, traffic accidents and death.These consequences result in significant economic burden.Both, the health and societal consequences and their costs can be decreased with identification and treatment of sleep apnea.Implications for practice: Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, despite its consequences, is limited by lack of diagnosis, poor patient acceptance, lack of access to effective therapies, and lack of a variety of effective therapies.Newer modes of therapy that are effective, cost efficient and more accepted by patients need to be developed.

  19. Accuracy of peripheral arterial tonometry in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The use of handheld devices that assess peripheral arterial tonometry has emerged as an auxiliary method for assessment and diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the accuracy of peripheral arterial tonometry in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea. METHODS: Contemporary cohort cross-sectional study. Thirty patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea underwent peripheral arterial tonometry and assisted nocturnal polysomnography concomitantly. RESULTS: The mean apnea/hypopnea index by peripheral arterial tonometry was significantly higher than that by polysomnography (p < 0.001, but the values of both sleep studies were significantly correlated (r = 0.762. There was a high correlation between variables: minimum oxygen saturation (r = 0.842,p < 0.001, oxygen saturation < 90% (r = 0.799, p < 0.001, and mean heart rate (r = 0.951, p < 0.001. Sensitivity and specificity were 60% and 96.2% (AUC: 0.727;p = 0.113, respectively, when at a threshold value of 5 events/h. In severe cases (≥30 events/h, the result was a sensitivity of 77.8% and a specificity of 86.4% (AUC: 0.846, p = 0.003. CONCLUSION: Peripheral arterial tonometry is a useful portable device for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea; its accuracy is higher in moderate and severe cases.

  20. [The role of maxillofacial surgery in obstructive sleep hypopnea and apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilon, Yves; Raskin, Sylviane; Heymans, Olivier; Poirrier, Robert

    2002-01-01

    One of the most common symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is daytime drowsiness. It is associated with a high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and an elevated incidence of car crashes. In general, young patients don't want conservative treatment because symptomatic and to prevent secondary effects. In this article, we briefly define sleep disorders and the interest of cephalometric examination. We describe the different treatment possibilities and stress the important role of orthognathic surgery in this syndrome.

  1. High Mallampati score, obesity and obstructive sleep apnea: triple insult to lung function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Uzma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper assesses the combined effect of high Mallampati score, obesity and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA on lung function as measured by spirometry. Our results showed that the combination of sleep apnea, obesity and high Mallampati score resulted in a degree of restriction that was significantly greater than that produced by each factor alone. These observations underscore the importance of factoring in the Mallampati score in the assessment of respiratory disease.

  2. Maxillomandibular Advancement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients: a Restrospective Study on the Sagittal Cephalometric Variables

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The present retrospective study analyzes sagittal cephalometric changes in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to maxillomandubular advancement. Material and Methods 15 adult sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG) and treated with maxillomandubular advancement (MMA) were included in this study. Pre- (T1) and postsurgical (T2) PSG studies assessing the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and the lowest oxygen saturation (L...

  3. Effects of experimental nasal obstruction on human masseter and suprahyoid muscle activities during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Shigetoshi; Ono, Takashi; Ishiwata, Yasuo; Kuroda, Takayuki; Ohyama, Kimie

    2003-04-01

    The effect of nasal obstruction on nocturnal masseter and suprahyoid muscle activities using a newly developed portable electromygram (EMG)-recording unit was examined. Ten healthy Japanese males participated in this study. EMG activities of both the right masseter and bilateral suprahyoid muscles were recorded with a portable EMG-recording unit. At midnight, the subject was asked to lie on a bed after complete preparation with surface electrodes. After maximal clenching and jaw-opening effort (100% maximum voluntary contribution), the subject was allowed to fall asleep. In the first half of the night, EMG activities were recorded for about three hours of sleep without nasal obstruction. In the second half of the night, EMG activities were recorded for about three hours of sleep with nasal obstruction. In both muscles, there were no significant changes in either the maximal EMG activities or the number of events beyond 40% MVC with nasal obstruction. But in an evaluation based on the distribution of muscle activities, the EMG activity of the masseter muscle tended to decrease (P = .07) and that of the suprahyoid muscles increased significantly (P = .02) with nasal obstruction. These results suggest that nasal obstruction could modulate the activities of the masseter and suprahyoid muscles during sleep.

  4. Sleep stage and obstructive apneaic epoch classification using single-lead ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz Bülent

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polysomnography (PSG is used to define physiological sleep and different physiological sleep stages, to assess sleep quality and diagnose many types of sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea. However, PSG requires not only the connection of various sensors and electrodes to the subject but also spending the night in a bed that is different from the subject's own bed. This study is designed to investigate the feasibility of automatic classification of sleep stages and obstructive apneaic epochs using only the features derived from a single-lead electrocardiography (ECG signal. Methods For this purpose, PSG recordings (ECG included were obtained during the night's sleep (mean duration 7 hours of 17 subjects (5 men with ages between 26 and 67. Based on these recordings, sleep experts performed sleep scoring for each subject. This study consisted of the following steps: (1 Visual inspection of ECG data corresponding to each 30-second epoch, and selection of epochs with relatively clean signals, (2 beat-to-beat interval (RR interval computation using an R-peak detection algorithm, (3 feature extraction from RR interval values, and (4 classification of sleep stages (or obstructive apneaic periods using one-versus-rest approach. The features used in the study were the median value, the difference between the 75 and 25 percentile values, and mean absolute deviations of the RR intervals computed for each epoch. The k-nearest-neighbor (kNN, quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA, and support vector machines (SVM methods were used as the classification tools. In the testing procedure 10-fold cross-validation was employed. Results QDA and SVM performed similarly well and significantly better than kNN for both sleep stage and apneaic epoch classification studies. The classification accuracy rates were between 80 and 90% for the stages other than non-rapid-eye-movement stage 2. The accuracies were 60 or 70% for that specific stage

  5. Comparison of a novel non-contact biomotion sensor with wrist actigraphy in estimating sleep quality in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallin, Michael; O'Hare, Emer; Zaffaroni, Alberto; Boyle, Patricia; Fagan, Ciara; Kent, Brian; Heneghan, Conor; de Chazal, Philip; McNicholas, Walter T

    2014-08-01

    Ambulatory monitoring is of major clinical interest in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. We compared a novel non-contact biomotion sensor, which provides an estimate of both sleep time and sleep-disordered breathing, with wrist actigraphy in the assessment of total sleep time in adult humans suspected of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. Both systems were simultaneously evaluated against polysomnography in 103 patients undergoing assessment for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in a hospital-based sleep laboratory (84 male, aged 55 ± 14 years and apnoea-hypopnoea index 21 ± 23). The biomotion sensor demonstrated similar accuracy to wrist actigraphy for sleep/wake determination (77.3%: biomotion; 76.5%: actigraphy), and the biomotion sensor demonstrated higher specificity (52%: biomotion; 34%: actigraphy) and lower sensitivity (86%: biomotion; 94%: actigraphy). Notably, total sleep time estimation by the biomotion sensor was superior to actigraphy (average overestimate of 10 versus 57 min), especially at a higher apnoea-hypopnoea index. In post hoc analyses, we assessed the improved apnoea-hypopnoea index accuracy gained by combining respiratory measurements from polysomnography for total recording time (equivalent to respiratory polygraphy) with total sleep time derived from actigraphy or the biomotion sensor. Here, the number of misclassifications of obstructive sleep apnoea severity compared with full polysomnography was reduced from 10/103 (for total respiratory recording time alone) to 7/103 and 4/103 (for actigraphy and biomotion sensor total sleep time estimate, respectively). We conclude that the biomotion sensor provides a viable alternative to actigraphy for sleep estimation in the assessment of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. As a non-contact device, it is suited to longitudinal assessment of sleep, which could also be combined with polygraphy in ambulatory studies.

  6. Distraction osteogenesis as a treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Wai Kin; Yang, Yanqi; Cheung, Lim Kwong; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: To conduct a systematic review to answer the clinical question “What are the effectiveness of mandibular distraction osteogenesis (MDO) and its complications to treat patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS)?”. Methods: A systematic search including a computer search with specific keywords, reference list search, and manual search were done. Relevant articles on MDO were assessed and selected in 3 rounds for final review based on 5 predefined inclusion criteria and followed by a round of critical appraisal. Different types of distraction and their treatment outcomes of OSAS were recorded with standardized form and analyzed. Results: Twelve articles were included in the final review. A total of 256 patients aged 7 days to 60 years were treated with either external or internal MDO, with a mean follow-up period of 6 to 37 months. The average distraction distance of 12 to 29 mm was achieved with various distraction protocols. The success rate for adult patients was 100%, and cure rates were ranged from 82% to 100%. The definition of success or cure for OSAS in children or infants was not defined. Therefore, there were no clearly reported success or cure rates for children/infants in the included studies. However, all studies reported that these patients showed significant improvement in OSAS, with many of them who avoided tracheostomy or had the tracheostomy decannulated. The complication rates were ranged from 0% to 21.4%, with most being from local wound infections or neurosensory disturbances. Conclusion: This systematic review showed that MDO was effective in resolving OSAS in adults with retrognathic mandible. MDO also showed promising results in infants or children with OSAS. From the results of this systematic review, we recommend to define the criteria of success or cure for OSAS surgery in children and infants. We also recommend setting up randomized controlled trials to compare MDO with traditional maxillomandibular

  7. Heart rate responses to autonomic challenges in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is accompanied by structural alterations and dysfunction in central autonomic regulatory regions, which may impair dynamic and static cardiovascular regulation, and contribute to other syndrome pathologies. Characterizing cardiovascular responses to autonomic challenges may provide insights into central nervous system impairments, including contributions by sex, since structural alterations are enhanced in OSA females over males. The objective was to assess heart rate responses in OSA versus healthy control subjects to autonomic challenges, and, separately, characterize female and male patterns. We studied 94 subjects, including 37 newly-diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (6 female, age mean ± std: 52.1 ± 8.1 years; 31 male aged 54.3 ± 8.4 years, and 57 healthy control subjects (20 female, 50.5 ± 8.1 years; 37 male, 45.6 ± 9.2 years. We measured instantaneous heart rate with pulse oximetry during cold pressor, hand grip, and Valsalva maneuver challenges. All challenges elicited significant heart rate differences between OSA and control groups during and after challenges (repeated measures ANOVA, p<0.05. In post-hoc analyses, OSA females showed greater impairments than OSA males, which included: for cold pressor, lower initial increase (OSA vs. control: 9.5 vs. 7.3 bpm in females, 7.6 vs. 3.7 bpm in males, OSA delay to initial peak (2.5 s females/0.9 s males, slower mid-challenge rate-of-increase (OSA vs. control: -0.11 vs. 0.09 bpm/s in females, 0.03 vs. 0.06 bpm/s in males; for hand grip, lower initial peak (OSA vs. control: 2.6 vs. 4.6 bpm in females, 5.3 vs. 6.0 bpm in males; for Valsalva maneuver, lower Valsalva ratio (OSA vs. control: 1.14 vs. 1.30 in females, 1.29 vs. 1.34 in males, and OSA delay during phase II (0.68 s females/1.31 s males. Heart rate responses showed lower amplitude, delayed onset, and slower rate changes in OSA patients over healthy controls, and impairments may be more pronounced in

  8. The role of physical exercise in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Flávio Maciel Dias de; Pedrosa, Rodrigo Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common clinical condition, with a variable and underestimated prevalence. OSA is the main condition associated with secondary systemic arterial hypertension, as well as with atrial fibrillation, stroke, and coronary artery disease, greatly increasing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Treatment with continuous positive airway pressure is not tolerated by all OSA patients and is often not suitable in cases of mild OSA. Hence, alternative methods to treat OSA and its cardiovascular consequences are needed. In OSA patients, regular physical exercise has beneficial effects other than weight loss, although the mechanisms of those effects remain unclear. In this population, physiological adaptations due to physical exercise include increases in upper airway dilator muscle tone and in slow-wave sleep time; and decreases in fluid accumulation in the neck, systemic inflammatory response, and body weight. The major benefits of exercise programs for OSA patients include reducing the severity of the condition and daytime sleepiness, as well as increasing sleep efficiency and maximum oxygen consumption. There are few studies that evaluated the role of physical exercise alone for OSA treatment, and their protocols are quite diverse. However, aerobic exercise, alone or combined with resistance training, is a common point among the studies. In this review, the major studies and mechanisms involved in OSA treatment by means of physical exercise are presented. In addition to systemic clinical benefits provided by physical exercise, OSA patients involved in a regular, predominantly aerobic, exercise program have shown a reduction in disease severity and in daytime sleepiness, as well as an increase in sleep efficiency and in peak oxygen consumption, regardless of weight loss. RESUMO A apneia obstrutiva do sono (AOS) é uma condição clínica comum, possuindo prevalência variável e subestimada. Principal condição associada à hipertens

  9. Branchio-oto-renal syndrome with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Arjun; Shastri, Aravind R T; Ross-Russell, Robert I

    2012-08-13

    Branchio-oto-renal (BOR) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterised by branchial arch anomalies, otological and renal abnormalities. To the best of our knowledge, upper airway obstruction has not been hitherto reported in BOR. The authors report a 19-month-old girl with BOR syndrome with features of severe airway obstruction needing tracheostomy.

  10. Function and modulation of premotor brainstem parasympathetic cardiac neurons that control heart rate by hypoxia-, sleep-, and sleep-related diseases including obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Weigand, Letitia A; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Mares, Jacquelyn; Wang, Xin; Mendelowitz, David

    2014-01-01

    Parasympathetic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) in the brainstem dominate the control of heart rate. Previous work has determined that these neurons are inherently silent, and their activity is largely determined by synaptic inputs to CVNs that include four major types of synapses that release glutamate, GABA, glycine, or serotonin. Whereas prior reviews have focused on glutamatergic, GABAergic and glycinergic pathways, and the receptors in CVNs activated by these neurotransmitters, this review focuses on the alterations in CVN activity with hypoxia-, sleep-, and sleep-related cardiovascular diseases including obstructive sleep apnea.

  11. Evaluation of coblation lingual tonsil removal technique for obstructive sleep apnea in Asians: preliminary results of surgical morbidity and prognosticators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Jee Hye; Tan, Kenglu; Lee, Woo-Hyun; Rhee, Chae-Seo; Kim, Jeong-Whun

    2015-09-01

    Retroglossal obstruction is one of the etiologies causing obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and can be addressed by removing some tissues of the tongue base. However, because of its deep-seated location, its surgical removal is still challenging. Although coblation technique has been introduced, its efficacy and morbidity need further evaluation, particularly in Asians. This study aimed to assess its safety and effectiveness and to identify outcome prognosticators. Forty-seven OSA patients who underwent coblation lingual tonsil removal were included. Retroglossal obstruction was confirmed by drug-induced sleep videofluoroscopy. Attended full-night polysomnography was performed twice; before and 6 months after surgery in 27 patients. The tongue base was fully exposed with three deep-seated traction sutures, visualized with a 30° or 70° endoscope, and ablated using a coblator. Surgical success was defined with postoperative apnea hypopnea index (AHI) 50 %. Postoperative morbidities were evaluated. Demographic and polysomnographic parameters between success and failure groups were compared. None of the patients had immediate postoperative hemorrhage. Postoperatively, one patient had delayed hemorrhage and one patient severe respiratory difficulty. Taste loss, tongue dysmotility, dental injury or severe oropharyngeal stricture were absent. A mean AHI decreased from 37.7 ± 18.6 to 18.7 ± 14.8/h (P Coblation lingual tonsil removal technique showed minimal morbidity and favorable outcome in Koreans. The surgical outcome might be associated with the severity of single respiratory events.

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Pathogenetic Aspects and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Boot (Hendrik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAlmost twenty years ago obstmctive sleep apnea was considered to be a medical curiosity that was of little importance, and snoring was merely the subject of humor than one of serious investigation. Although the clinical manifestations of sleep apnea syndrome have been described as early

  13. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Pathogenetic Aspects and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Boot (Hendrik)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAlmost twenty years ago obstmctive sleep apnea was considered to be a medical curiosity that was of little importance, and snoring was merely the subject of humor than one of serious investigation. Although the clinical manifestations of sleep apnea syndrome have been described as early

  14. Effects of edentulism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-11-29

    Nov 29, 2014 ... may entail oro‑nasal and maxilla‑mandibular disorders.[4,5]. According to the soft ... of the upper airway causes a postural change, resulting in .... Table 1: Descriptive statistics of study groups. Number of subjects (n). Sex .... treatment in sleep apnea syndrome. ... A Guide to Understanding Your Sleep Study.

  15. The rheological properties of blood and the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Władysław Pierzchała

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is an important public health concern, which affects around 2–4% of the population. Left untreated, it causes a decrease not only in quality of life, but also of life expectancy. Despite the fact that knowledge about the mechanisms of development of cardiovascular disease in patients with OSA is still incomplete, observations confirm a relationship between sleep disordered breathing and the rheological properties of blood. One possible consequence of an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease may be a rise in mortality in OSA patients. Continuously improved research methods are allowing for an increasingly more accurate understanding of the significance of observed changes. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 2, 206–210

  16. Comparison of pulse rate variability with heart rate variability during obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Karmakar, Chandan K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2011-03-01

    We investigate whether pulse rate variability (PRV) extracted from finger photo-plethysmography (Pleth) waveforms can be the substitute of heart rate variability (HRV) from RR intervals of ECG signals during obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Simultaneous measurements (ECG and Pleth) were taken from 29 healthy subjects during normal (undisturbed sleep) breathing and 22 patients with OSA during OSA events. Highly significant (pr>0.95) were found between heart rate (HR) and pulse rate (PR). Bland-Altman plot of HR and PR shows good agreement (sleep. However, several variability measures (SDNN, RMSSD, HF power, LF/HF and sample entropy) of PR and HR were found to be significantly (pheart rate variability under normal breathing in sleep but does not precisely reflect HRV in sleep disordered breathing.

  17. Recommendations for the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Hedner, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article is aimed at addressing the current state-of-the-art in epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures and treatment options for appropriate management of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in cardiovascular (in particular hypertensive) patients, as well as for the management of car...

  18. Position paper on the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Hedner, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This article is aimed at addressing the current state of the art in epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures and treatment options for appropriate management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in cardiovascular (particularly hypertensive) patients, as well as for the management of cardi...

  19. An Empirical Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Trial for Suspected Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Skomro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Standard practice in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA management requires that a positive diagnostic, overnight polysomnography (PSG test be obtained before initiating treatment. However, long waiting times due to lack of access to PSG testing facilities may delay the initiation of definitive treatment for OSA.

  20. Detection of cognitive impairment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome using mismatch negativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Wen; Ningyu Wang; Jinfeng Liu; Zhanfeng Yan; Zhonghai Xin

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment, 97 patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome were divided into three groups (mild, moderate, severe) according to minimum oxygen saturation, and 35 healthy subjects were examined as controls. Cognitive function was determined using the mismatch negativity paradigm and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment. The results revealed that as the disease worsened, the mismatch negativity latency was gradually extended, and the amplitude gradually declined in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome. Importantly, mismatch negativity latency in severe patients with a persistent time of minimum oxygen saturation 60 seconds. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between minimum oxygen saturation latency and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores. These findings indicate that intermittent night-time hypoxemia affects mismatch negativity waveforms and Montreal Cognitive Assessment scores. As indicators for detecting the cognitive functional status of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome patients, the sensitivity of mismatch negativity is 82.93%, the specificity is 73.33%, the accuracy rate is 81.52%, the positive predictive value is 85.00%, the negative predictive value is 70.21%, the positive likelihood ratio is 3, and the negative likelihood ratio is 0.23. These results indicate that mismatch negativity can be used as an effective tool for diagnosis of cognitive dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome patients.

  1. Obstructive sleep apnoea is frequent in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banghoej, Anne Margareta; Nerild, Henriette Holst; Kristensen, Peter Lommer;

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA) is frequent in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study is to evaluate prevalence of OSA in patients with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, all patients with type 1 diabetes attending the outpatient clinic were offered screening...

  2. Anterior mandibular positioning device for treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Christian; Grymer, Luisa; Hjorth, Tine

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the severity of side effects and the influence on snoring and the AHI (apnoea-hypopnoea index = number of apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour recording) of an anterior mandibular positioning device (AMP device) for treatment of snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea...

  3. Executive functions and cognitive subprocesses in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lis (Stefanie); S. Krieger (Stephan); D. Hennig (Dorothee); C.H. Röder (Christian); P. Kirsch (Peter); W. Seeger (Werner); B. Gallhofer (Bernd); R. Schulz (Richard)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn recent years, special interest has been focused on impairments of executive functions in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). However, the majority of studies have not clearly separated deficits in executive functions from impairments in other cognitive processes in

  4. Craniosynostosis: Obstructive sleep apnea in a unifying theory for intracranial hypertension.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Spruijt (Bart)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractCraniosynostosis is a rare congenital disorder, characterized by the premature fusion of skull suture(s) resulting in an abnormal skull shape. These children are at risk for obstructive sleep apnea, but also for cranio-cerebral disproportion, hydrocephalus, venous hypertension and ab

  5. Dynamics of snoring sounds and its connection with obstructive sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Adriano M.; da Silva, Diego Greatti Vaz; Oliveira, Carolina Beatriz; Vieira, André P.; Moriya, Henrique T.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    Snoring is extremely common in the general population and when irregular may indicate the presence of obstructive sleep apnea. We analyze the overnight sequence of wave packets - the snore sound - recorded during full polysomnography in patients referred to the Sleep Laboratory due to suspected obstructive sleep apnea. We hypothesize that irregular snore, with duration in the range between 10 and 100 s, correlates with respiratory obstructive events. We find that the number of irregular snores - easily accessible, and quantified by what we call the snore time interval index (STII) - is in good agreement with the well-known apnea-hypopnea index, which expresses the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and is extracted only from polysomnography. In addition, the Hurst analysis of the snore sound itself, which calculates the fluctuations in the signal as a function of time interval, is used to build a classifier that is able to distinguish between patients with no or mild apnea and patients with moderate or severe apnea.

  6. Correlation among obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, coronary atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Gan; XU Zhuo-wen; ZHANG Yu-lin; YANG Zhi-jian; ZHANG Xi-long; YIN Kai-sheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Epidemiologic investigations have shown that the morbidity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among adults is 2%-4%, among the population aged 30 years and over is 4.63%, and among patients with hypertension or coronary atherosclerostic disease (CAD) is as high as 30%-50%.

  7. Neuropsychological functioning after CPAP treatment in obstructive sleep apnea: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Kylstra; J.A. Aaronson; W.F. Hofman; B.A. Schmand

    2012-01-01

    The generally held clinical view is that treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves cognition in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the cognitive domains in which recovery is found differ between studies. A meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the effect

  8. Neuropsychological functioning after CPAP treatment in obstructive sleep apnea: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Kylstra; J.A. Aaronson; W.F. Hofman; B.A. Schmand

    2013-01-01

    The generally held clinical view is that treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves cognition in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the cognitive domains in which recovery is found differ between studies. A meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the effect

  9. Validity and reliability of a protocol of orofacial myofunctional evaluation for patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folha, Gislaine A; Valera, Fabiana C P; de Felício, Cláudia M

    2015-06-01

    There is no standardized protocol for the clinical evaluation of orofacial components and functions in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to examine the validity, reliability, and psychometric properties of the Expanded Protocol of Orofacial Myofunctional Evaluation with Scores (OMES-expanded) in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects were evaluated, and the validity of OMES-expanded was tested by construct validity (i.e. the ability to discriminate orofacial status between apneic and control subjects) and criterion validity (i.e. correlation between OMES-expanded and a reference instrument). Construct validity was adequate; the apneic group showed significantly worse orofacial status than did control subjects. Criterion validity of OMES-expanded was good, as was its reliability. The OMES-expanded is valid and reliable for evaluating orofacial myofunctional disorders of patients with obstructive sleep apnea, with adequate psychometric properties. It may be useful to plan a therapeutic strategy and to determine whether the effects of therapy are related to improved muscle and orofacial functions.

  10. Craniofacial, craniocervical, and pharyngeal morphology in bilateral cleft lip and palate and obstructive sleep apnea patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, B.C.M.; Remmelink, H.J.; Pruim, G.J.; Hoekema, A.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze craniofacial, craniocervical, and pharyngeal morphology in surgically treated bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) men, untreated men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and a reference group of men. Subjects and methods: Lateral cephalograms were obt

  11. Effect of melatonin administration on subjective sleep quality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Nunes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Disturbed sleep is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Conventional hypnotics worsen nocturnal hypoxemia and, in severe cases, can lead to respiratory failure. Exogenous melatonin has somnogenic properties in normal subjects and can improve sleep in several clinical conditions. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was carried out to determine the effects of melatonin on sleep in COPD. Thirty consecutive patients with moderate to very severe COPD were initially recruited for the study. None of the participants had a history of disease exacerbation 4 weeks prior to the study, obstructive sleep apnea, mental disorders, current use of oral steroids, methylxanthines or hypnotic-sedative medication, nocturnal oxygen therapy, and shift work. Patients received 3 mg melatonin (N = 12 or placebo (N = 13, orally in a single dose, 1 h before bedtime for 21 consecutive days. Sleep quality was assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and daytime sleepiness was measured by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Pulmonary function and functional exercise level were assessed by spirometry and the 6-min walk test, respectively. Twenty-five patients completed the study protocol and were included in the final analysis. Melatonin treatment significantly improved global PSQI scores (P = 0.012, particularly sleep latency (P = 0.008 and sleep duration (P = 0.046. No differences in daytime sleepiness, lung function and functional exercise level were observed. We conclude that melatonin can improve sleep in COPD. Further long-term studies involving larger number of patients are needed before melatonin can be safely recommended for the management of sleep disturbances in these patients.

  12. Increased Ventricular Premature Contraction Frequency During REM Sleep in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari A. Watanabe

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients with obstructive sleep apnea are reported to have a peak of sudden cardiac death at night, in contrast to patients without apnea whose peak is in the morning. We hypothesized that ventricular premature contraction (VPC frequency would correlate with measures of apnea and sympathetic activity.Methods Electrocardiograms from a sleep study of 125 patients with coronary artery disease were evaluated. Patients were categorized by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI into Moderate (AHI 15 apnea groups. Sleep stages studied were Wake, S1, S2, S34, and rapid eye movement (REM. Parameters of a potent autonomically-based risk predictor for sudden cardiac death called heart rate turbulence were calculated.Results There were 74 Moderate and 51 Severe obstructive sleep apnea patients. VPC frequency was affected significantly by sleep stage (Wake, S2 and REM, F=5.8, p<.005 and by AHI (F=8.7, p<.005. In Severe apnea patients, VPC frequency was higher in REM than in Wake (p=.011. In contrast, patients with Moderate apnea had fewer VPCs and exhibited no sleep stage dependence (p=.19. Oxygen desaturation duration per apnea episode correlated positively with AHI (r2=.71, p<.0001, and was longer in REM than in non-REM (p<.0001. The heart rate turbulence parameter TS correlated negatively with oxygen desaturation duration in REM (r2=.06, p=.014.Conclusions Higher VPC frequency coupled with higher sympathetic activity caused by longer apnea episodes in REM sleep may be one reason for increased nocturnal death in apneic patients.

  13. Radiologic evaluation of adenoids and tonsils in children with obstructive sleep apnea: Plain films and fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreplick Fernbach, S.; Brouillette, T.; Riggs, T.W.; Hunt, C.E.

    1983-07-01

    Twenty-six children with obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated by lateral neck radiographs during wakefulness, and by polygraphic monitoring and upper airway fluoreoscopy during natural sleep. Children with craniofacial abnormalities, palatal surgery, and central nervous system disease were excluded from the study. Moderate or marked enlargement of tonsils and adenoids was noted on lateral neck radiographs of 18 of 26 patients. An objective measure of adenoidal enlargement, the adenoidal-nasopharyngeal ratio, correlated well with subjective judgment of adenoidal size but was not generally more useful than subjective estimation. Upper airway fluroescopy demonstrated the site and mechanism of obstruction in all patients. Because all children with moderate to marked adenotonsillar enlargement demonstrated obstruction at the adenoidal or tonsillar level on fluoroscopy, we now screen children with suspected sleep apnea with lateral airway radiographs and polysomnography. Fluoroscopy is reserved for children with mild adenotosillar enlargement, craniofacial dysplasia, prior cleft palate repair, or neuromuscular disorders. These results suggest that the pathogenesis of obstuctive sleep apnea in children involve anatomic factors which narrow the upper airway, sleep-related hypotonia of pharyngeal dilator musculature, and compensatory mechanisms to prevent or alleviate asphyxia.

  14. The Tongue Muscle Training (ZMT® in nCPAP Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessmann H.-W.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome is treated not only with the help of nCPAP but by other means which help to support the sufficient level of pharyngeal airways. In course of our experiment we investigated changes in parameters of breath during night sleep in patients with high indices of obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome after the tongue muscle training. 40 patients with OSAS treated only with the help of nCPAP underwent a 5-week course of electrical stimulation of upper pharyngeal muscles. This type of treatment was supposed to result in dilatation of pharyngeal airways and cure of occlusion and obstruction. Parameters of breath during the night sleep before- and after the treatment were detected with the help of somno-poligraphic investigations and compared. Indices of apnea and hypopnea decreased in 26 of 40 patients, which is more than half of the probands. We recommended the patients with a diagnosed OSAS without a risk of recurrence to add tongue muscle training to nCPAP. In case the course of nCPAP therapy is launched it helped achieve sufficient improvement of parameters affecting breath during the night sleep and in many cases decrease respiratory pressure of nCPAP therapy or its complete cessation.

  15. Flextube reflectometry for level diagnosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and snoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Hilberg, O; Grymer, L

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use sound reflections in a flexible tube (flextube reflectometry) for identifying the predominant obstructive level of the upper airway in a series of patients referred to a sleep clinic. We also wished to study the relationship between the number of flextube narrowings...... per hour recording and the RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopneas per hour recording) by ResMed AutoSet (AS), which is a device based on nasal pressure variations. We performed sleep studies on 54 patients referred for snoring or OSA; 1) at home with AS; 2) in hospital using...... correlation between the number of flextube narrowings per hour recording and the RDIs by the AS (Spearman's correlation coefficient r = 0.62, p useful information regarding the level of obstructive predominance during obstructive events. The method also...

  16. Videoradiography at submental electrical stimulation during apnea in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillarp, B.; Rosen, I.; Wickstroem, O. (Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology Malmoe Allmaenna Sjukhus (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology)

    1991-05-01

    Percutaneous submental electrical stimulation during sleep may be a new therapeutic method for patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Electrical stimulation to the submental region during obstructive apnea is reported to break the apnea without arousal and to diminish apneic index, time spent in apnea, and oxygen desaturation. The mode of breaking the apnea by electrical stimulation has not yet been shown. However, genioglossus is supposed to be the muscle responsible for breaking the apnea by forward movement of the tongue. To visualize the effect of submental electrical stimulation, one patient with severe OSAS has been examined with videoradiography. Submental electrical stimulation evoked an immediate complex muscle activity in the tongue, palate, and hyoid bone. This was followed by a forward movement of the tongue which consistently broke obstructive apnea without apparent arousal. Time spent in apnea was diminished but intervals between apnea were not affected. (orig.).

  17. [Could mouth breathing lead to obstructive sleep apnea syndromes. A preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raskin, S; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary work is to determine an easy method to diagnose "buccal breather" children and "nasal breather" children. Then, to establish a possible connection with the syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea. 22 children agreed to participate. Clinical, orthophonic, orthodontic, postural and polysomnographical exams have been carried out. The proposed clinical exam turns out to be a good means of diagnosing between buccal breathers and nasal breathers. The aerophonoscope reveals velar inadequacies in buccal breathers. The latter also present osseous discrepancies mainly in the mandible. The polysomnography reveals a higher apnea/hypopnea index and more agitated sleep in buccal breathers. Mandibular lowering movements are more frequent and similar to those of adults suffering from apnea. These elements similar to those encountered in adults suffering from apnea make us think that buccal breathing could be the origin of obstructive sleep apnea, several decades later.

  18. Screening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Empirical Mode Decomposition of Pulse Oximetry

    CERN Document Server

    Schlotthauer, Gastón; Larrateguy, Luis D; Milone, Diego H

    2014-01-01

    Detection of desaturations on the pulse oximetry signal is of great importance for the diagnosis of sleep apneas. Using the counting of desaturations, an index can be built to help in the diagnosis of severe cases of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. It is important to have automatic detection methods that allows the screening for this syndrome, reducing the need of the expensive polysomnography based studies. In this paper a novel recognition method based on the empirical mode decomposition of the pulse oximetry signal is proposed. The desaturations produce a very specific wave pattern that is extracted in the modes of the decomposition. Using this information, a detector based on properly selected thresholds and a set of simple rules is built. The oxygen desaturation index constructed from these detections produces a detector for obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome with high sensitivity ($0.838$) and specificity ($0.855$) and yields better results than standard desaturation detection approach...

  19. Added value of a mandible movement automated analysis in the screening of obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Gisele; Cambron, Laurent; Jamart, Jacques; Marchand, Eric; Senny, Frédéric; Poirrier, Robert

    2013-02-01

    In-laboratory polysomnography is the 'gold standard' for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but is time consuming and costly, with long waiting lists in many sleep laboratories. Therefore, the search for alternative methods to detect respiratory events is growing. In this prospective study, we compared attended polysomnography with two other methods, with or without mandible movement automated analysis provided by a distance-meter and added to airflow and oxygen saturation analysis for the detection of respiratory events. The mandible movement automated analysis allows for the detection of salient mandible movement, which is a surrogate for arousal. All parameters were recorded simultaneously in 570 consecutive patients (M/F: 381/189; age: 50±14 years; body mass index: 29±7 kg m(-2) ) visiting a sleep laboratory. The most frequent main diagnoses were: obstructive sleep apnea (344; 60%); insomnia/anxiety/depression (75; 13%); and upper airway resistance syndrome (25; 4%). The correlation between polysomnography and the method with mandible movement automated analysis was excellent (r: 0.95; P<0.001). Accuracy characteristics of the methods showed a statistical improvement in sensitivity and negative predictive value with the addition of mandible movement automated analysis. This was true for different diagnostic thresholds of obstructive sleep severity, with an excellent efficiency for moderate to severe index (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15h(-1) ). A Bland & Altman plot corroborated the analysis. The addition of mandible movement automated analysis significantly improves the respiratory index calculation accuracy compared with an airflow and oxygen saturation analysis. This is an attractive method for the screening of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, increasing the ability to detect hypopnea thanks to the salient mandible movement as a marker of arousals.

  20. Waist-to-height ratio distinguish obstructive sleep apnea from primary snoring in obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa Caixêta, Juliana Alves; Saramago, Alex Martins; de Cácia Pradella-Hallinan, Marcia Lourdes; Moreira, Gustavo Antônio; Tufik, Sergio; Fujita, Reginaldo Raimundo

    2015-03-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing is caused by the interaction of multiple factors, including tonsillar hypertrophy, retrognathia, maxillary atresia, neuromuscular abnormalities, activation of inflammatory mediator cascades, and obesity. The prevalence and severity of obesity among children and adolescents increased worldwide during recent decades and has thus become a public health concern. The aim of this study is to assess the metabolic and anthropometric changes associated with sleep-disordered breathing in obese children. Prospective assessment of prepubertal obese children followed at a pediatric endocrinology outpatient clinic that had history of frequent snoring. Children were submitted to polysomnography, measurements of body weight, height, blood pressure, neck circumference, and waist circumference. BMI, neck-to-height, and waist-to-height ratios were calculated. Laboratory tests included a complete blood count, liver function tests, lipid profile, and glucose metabolism assessment. Additionally, the presence of metabolic syndrome was assessed. Differences between obstructive sleep apnea and primary snoring groups were calculated using unpaired t-test, Fisher's exact test or Mann-Whitney test (p < 0.05). The sample included 20 children with primary snoring and nine with obstructive sleep apnea. The two groups did not differ with regard to age, gender, BMI, or BMI z-score, serum lipids, glucose metabolism, cell count, liver function, or arterial blood pressure. Anthropometric data did not differ between groups. The waist-to-height ratio was greater among children with obstructive sleep apnea, compared to those with primary snoring. In the present study, the waist-to-height ratio was greater in children with obstructive sleep apnea and, thus, could distinguish these children from those with primary snoring.

  1. Modified Uvulopalatopharyngoplasty and Coblation Channeling of the Tongue for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Multi-Centre Australian Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Stuart G.; Carney, A. Simon; Woods, Charmaine; Antic, Nick; McEvoy, R. Doug; Chia, Michael; Sands, Terry; Jones, Andrew; Hobson, Jonathan; Robinson, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the surgical outcomes and efficacy of modified uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (mod UPPP) and Coblation channelling of the tongue (CCT) as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Adult patients with simple snoring or obstructive sleep apnea were treated with combined modified UPPP, bilateral tonsillectomy, and CCT (N = 48). Full polysomnography was performed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Postoperative clinical assessment, sleep questionnaires, and patient demographics including body mass index were compared to preoperative data. All polysomnograms were re-scored to AASM recommended criteria by 2 sleep professionals. Results: The preoperative AHI (median and interquartile range) of 23.1 (10.4 to 36.6) was lowered to a postoperative AHI of 5.6 (1.9 to 10.4) (p coblation channeling of the tongue for obstructive sleep apnea: a multi-centre australian trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(2):117–124. PMID:23372463

  2. Effects of maternal obstructive sleep apnoea on fetal growth: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Fung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with reduced fetal growth, and whether nocturnal oxygen desaturation precipitates acute fetal heart rate changes. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a prospective observational study, screening 371 women in the second trimester for OSA symptoms. 41 subsequently underwent overnight sleep studies to diagnose OSA. Third trimester fetal growth was assessed using ultrasound. Fetal heart rate monitoring accompanied the sleep study. Cord blood was taken at delivery, to measure key regulators of fetal growth. RESULTS: Of 371 women screened, 108 (29% were high risk for OSA. 26 high risk and 15 low risk women completed the longitudinal study; 14 had confirmed OSA (cases, and 27 were controls. The median (interquartile range respiratory disturbance index (number of apnoeas, hypopnoeas or respiratory related arousals/hour of sleep was 7.9 (6.1-13.8 for cases and 2.2 (1.3-3.5 for controls (p<0.001. Impaired fetal growth was observed in 43% (6/14 of cases, vs 11% (3/27 of controls (RR 2.67; 1.25-5.7; p = 0.04. Using logistic regression, only OSA (OR 6; 1.2-29.7, p = 0.03 and body mass index (OR 2.52; 1.09-5.80, p = 0.03 were significantly associated with impaired fetal growth. After adjusting for body mass index on multivariate analysis, the association between OSA and impaired fetal growth was not appreciably altered (OR 5.3; 0.93-30.34, p = 0.06, although just failed to achieve statistical significance. Prolonged fetal heart rate decelerations accompanied nocturnal oxygen desaturation in one fetus, subsequently found to be severely growth restricted. Fetal growth regulators showed changes in the expected direction- with IGF-1 lower, and IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 higher- in the cord blood of infants of cases vs controls, although were not significantly different. CONCLUSION: OSA may be associated with reduced fetal growth in late pregnancy. Further

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea in Prader-Willi syndrome: risks and advantages of adenotonsillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leone Giordano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is a well-known clinical manifestation of Prader-Willi syndrome. The aim of our study is to evaluate the efficacy of adenotonsillectomy for the treatment of the disorder as well as the improvement of their post-operative quality of life. Five patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apneas and adenotonsillar hypertrophy of grade III-IV underwent adenotonsillectomy. Pre- and postoperative apneas and Quality of Life were assessed respectively with a polysomnography with multi-sleep latency test and with the pediatric Quality of Life questionnaire, performed before and 6 months after surgery. A decrease of apnea/hypopnea index values has been detected between pre- and post-surgery (t=2.64, P=0.005, as well as oxygen desaturation index values (t=5.51, P=0.005, multi-sleep latency test (t=4.54, P=0.01, and of the values of pediatric Quality of Life questionnaire. No correlation has been detected between body mass index and apnea/hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation index and multi-sleep latency test values pre- and post-adenotonsillectomy. A correlation has been found between multi-sleep latency test and oxygen desaturation index values post-surgery (P=0.04. No post-operative complications were observed. Our data underline the efficacy of surgery in Prader-Willi patients with adenotonsillar hypertrophy in order to improve their quality of life.

  4. Body composition in obstructive sleep apneahypopnea syndrome bio-impedance reflects the severity of sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovin Sînziana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is characterized by repeated breathing pauses during sleep and is closely associated with obesity. Body fat is known to be a predictive factor for OSAHS and its severity. Aim To study the correlation between the severity of OSAHS and body composition measurements. Methods 30 patients with OSAHS (21 men, 9 women, mean age 45.1 years, mean apnea-hypopnea index = 29.6/hour were included in the study after full polysomnography. They were divided into 3 groups according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI: mild OSAHS (mean AHI 10.9/h, moderate OSAHS (mean AHI 23.9/h and severe OSAHS (mean AHI 53.9/h. Body composition (body fat, body water and dry lean mass was assessed using bioelectric impedance assay (BIA. Other measurements included neck and abdominal circumferences and body mass index (BMI. Pearson's coefficient (r was used to express correlations between AHI and the following parameters: BMI, neck and abdominal circumferences, body fat, dry lean mass, and body water. Wilcoxon Sum-of-Ranks (Mann-Whitney test for comparing unmatched samples was used to compare anthropometric and body composition measurements between groups. Results The correlation between AHI and BMI was weak (r = 0.38. AHI correlated moderately with neck circumference (r = 0.54, with neck circumference corrected by height (r = 0.60, and more strongly with body fat (r = 0.67, with body water (r = 0.69 and with abdominal circumference (r = 0.75. There was a strong negative correlation between AHI and dry lean mass (r = - 0.92. There were significant differences in body fat, body water, neck circumference corrected by height and abdominal circumference (Wilcoxon Sum-of-Ranks, p Conclusions In our study, the severity of OSAHS correlated with body fat and with body water more strongly than with general and cervical obesity. Abdominal adiposity may predict OSAHS severity better than neck circumference.

  5. Nocturnal mouthpiece ventilation and medical hypnosis to treat severe obstructive sleep apnea in a child with cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirani, Sonia; Kadlub, Natacha; Delord, Vincent; Picard, Arnaud; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2013-09-01

    A 4-year old boy presented severe obstructive sleep apnoea due to complete nasal obstruction secondary to cherubism. Because of anticipatory anxiety due to numerous surgical interventions, medical hypnosis was proposed to facilitate non-invasive continuous positive pressure ventilation (CPAP) acceptance. CPAP by means of an oral interface was completely accepted after three hypnosis sessions and resulted in the correction of his obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome. This report highlights the benefit of medical hypnosis in facilitating CPAP acceptance as well as the efficacy of mouthpiece ventilation in a severe form of cherubism with complete nasal obstruction.

  6. The Role of Daytime Sleepiness in Psychosocial Outcomes after Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Yuet Ying Lau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of daytime sleepiness and sleep quality in psychosocial outcomes of patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Thirty-seven individuals with moderate to severe OSA and compliant with CPAP treatment for at least 3 months were compared to 27 age- and education-matched healthy controls. The OSA group and the control group were studied with overnight polysomnography (PSG and compared on measures of daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index, mood (Beck Depression Inventory, Profile of Mood States, and functional outcomes (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire. After CPAP treatment, the OSA group improved on sleep quality and sleepiness. As a group, they did not differ from controls on sleep architecture after CPAP. The OSA group also showed significant improvements in functional outcomes and was comparable to controls on mood and functional outcomes. Persistent difficulties included lowered activity level and residual sleepiness in some individuals. Sleepiness was found to be a significant predictor of mood and affective states, while both sleepiness and sleep quality predicted functional outcomes. These results highlight the importance of assessment and intervention targeting psychosocial functioning and sleepiness in individuals with OSA after treatment.

  7. Making Sense of Oxidative Stress in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Mediator or Distracter in Brain Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eZhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to cognitive impairment, metabolic derangements and cardiovascular disease and mortality. Identifying the mechanisms by which this prevalent disorder influences health outcomes is now of utmost importance. As the prevalence of this disorder steadily increases, therapies are needed to prevent or reverse sleep apnea morbidities now more than ever before. Oxidative stress is implicated in cardiovascular morbidities of sleep apnea. What role oxidative stress plays in neural injury and cognitive impairments has been difficult to understand without readily accessible tissue to biopsy in persons with and without sleep apnea. An improved understanding of the role oxidative stress plays in neural injury in sleep apnea may be developed by integrating information gained examining neural tissue in animal models of sleep apnea with key features of redox biochemistry and clinical sleep apnea studies where extra-neuronal oxidative stress characterizations have been performed. Collectively, this information sets the stage for developing and testing novel therapeutic approaches to treat and prevent, not only central nervous system injury and dysfunction in sleep apnea, but also the cardiovascular and potentially metabolic conditions associated with this prevalent, disabling disorder.

  8. Sleep-related breathing disorders. 5. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunstein, R R

    1995-10-01

    CPAP should be considered the first line of treatment in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea. In our centre in Sydney this generally means patients with more than 20 apnoea/hypopnoeas per hour with repeated dips in oxyhaemoglobin saturation and usually some symptomatology. Despite this first line role of nasal CPAP, recent objective studies question whether earlier enthusiastic reports on adherence to CPAP are correct. The role of technical innovations in new CPAP machines in improving usage remains to be tested. The "drop out" rate from physician selection for a CPAP trial to highly compliant user is certainly more than 50% of patients. What happens to these patients? Data from some studies suggest that surgical treatments are used, at least in the USA, but in all probability many of these patients remain untreated. The challenge in the next decade is either to improve CPAP devices to increase usage in this group or to develop other treatment options. The role of intensive inhospital "acclimatisation" to CPAP also has yet to be objectively tested. It is unclear whether "intelligent" CPAP will make huge inroads in increasing the number of patients who accept CPAP trials, prescriptions, or compliance. It will have minimal impact on patients with mask problems or claustrophobia or those who feel that CPAP is inconvenient. There is a high likelihood that it will reduce technologist workload during CPAP titration studies. "Intelligent" CPAP may help to reduce total overnight mouth leakage and therefore reduce nasal side effects. The current expense of developing such devices will mean that they are unlikely to supersede much cheaper standard "one pressure" CPAP machines in the next few years.

  9. The effect of adding gender item to Berlin Questionnaire in determining obstructive sleep apnea in sleep clinics

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    Melike Yuceege

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: We aimed to validate the Turkish version of Berlin Questionnaire (BQ and developped a BQ-gender (BQ-G form by adding gender component. We aimed to compare the two forms in defining patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA in sleep clinics. Methods: Four hundred and eighty five consecutive patients, refered to our sleep clinic for snoring, witnessed apnea and/or excessive daytime sleepiness were enrolled to the study. All patients underwent in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG. Patients with sleep efficiency less than 40% and total sleep time less than 4 hours, chronic anxiolitic/sedative drug usage, respiratory tract infection within past two weeks were excluded from the study. All the patients fulfilled BQ. The test and retest for BQ were applied in 15-day interval in 30 patients. Results: Totally 433 patients were enrolled to the study (285 male, 148 female.The mean age of the patients was 47,5 ± 10.5 (21-79. 180 patients (41.6% had apnea-hypopnea index (AHI ≤ 15, while 253 patients (58,4% had AHI > 15. The κ value was 48–94 and the the truth value was 69-94% for the test-retest procedure. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV, positive predictive value (PPV, and area under the curve AUC were 84.2%, 31.7%, 48.7%, 63.4%, and 0.579 in order for BQ and 79.9 %, 51.7%, 63.2% , 69.6%, and 0.652 for BQ-G. Conclusion: The results showed that BQ-G is relatively better than BQ in determining moderate to severe OSA in sleep clinics where most of the patients are sleep apneic but both of the tests were found to have insufficient validities in defining moderate to severe OSA in sleep clinics.

  10. Sleep disorders in US military personnel: a high rate of comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mysliwiec, Vincent; Gill, Jessica; Lee, Hyunhwa; Baxter, Tristin; Pierce, Roslyn; Barr, Taura L; Krakow, Barry; Roth, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    .... The objective of our study was to determine the presence of sleep disorders in US military personnel referred for evaluation of sleep disturbances after deployment and examine associations between...

  11. Parasomnia Overlap Disorder with Sexual Behaviors during Sleep in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Soca, Rodolfo; Keenan, Joseph C; Schenck, Carlos H

    2016-01-01

    .... We present the case of a 42-year-old male patient with video-polysomnography (vPSG) documented POD. The patient had sleepwalking, sleep-related eating, confusional arousals, sexsomnia, sleeptalking, and REM sleep behavior disorder...

  12. Effect of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea on seizure outcomes in children with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Eric; Vendrame, Martina; Gregas, Matthew; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2012-06-01

    A retrospective review of children with epilepsy and obstructive sleep apnea, treated surgically for their obstructive sleep apnea from January 2008-October 2010, was performed for age, sex, type of epilepsy, antiseizure medications, sleep-study data, and changes in seizure frequency. Twenty-seven subjects (median age, 5 years) with no adjustment to their medications around their time of surgery were identified. Three months after surgery, 10 (37%) patients became seizure-free, three (11%) demonstrated >50% seizure-reduction, and six (22%) exhibited an amelioration of seizure frequency. Two (7%) demonstrated unchanged seizure-frequency, and six (22%) manifested a worsening of seizure frequency. Median seizure frequency before surgery was 8.5 (interquartile range, 2-90), and after surgery, three (interquartile range, 0-75), with a 53% median seizure reduction. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a trend toward seizure freedom with each percentile increase in body mass index and early age of surgery. We conclude that obstructive sleep apnea surgery may decrease seizure frequency, especially in children with elevated body mass index scores and younger age at time of surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Paediatric sleep-disordered breathing due to upper airway obstruction in the orthodontic setting: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Vandana; Kennedy, Declan; Martin, James; Dreyer, Craig; Sampson, Wayne

    2013-11-01

    The essential feature of paediatric sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is increased upper airway resistance during sleep presenting clinically as snoring. Paediatric SDB is a continuum ranging from primary snoring (PS), which is not associated with gas exchange abnormalities or significant sleep fragmentation, to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) with complete upper airway obstruction, hypoxaemia, and obstructive hypoventilation. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity and craniofacial disharmonies are important predisposing factors in the development and progression of paediatric SDB. Clinical symptoms are significant and domains affected include behaviour, neurocognition, cardiovascular morbidity and quality of life. Overnight polysomnography is the current diagnostic gold standard method to assess SDB severity while adenotonsillectomy is the recommended first line of treatment. Other treatments for managing paediatric SDB include nasal continuous airway pressure, the administration of nasal steroids, dentofacial orthopaedic treatment and surgery. However, there are insufficient long-term efficacy data using dentofacial orthopaedics to treat paediatric SDB. Further studies are warranted to define the characteristics of patients who may benefit most from orthodontic treatment.

  14. [Upper airway's 3D analysis of patients with obstructive sleep apnea using tomographic cone beam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruwier, A; Poirrier, A L; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2014-12-01

    The progress of medical imaging over the last decades has led to a better understanding of the upper airway structure in sleep-disordered patients. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is attributed to a functional narrowing of the upper airway, particularly of the oropharynx, during sleep. This narrowing is multifactorial. We have shown that in 60% cases, the maxilla (nasal pyramid) seems too narrow. A mandible retroposition may also play a dominant role in 30% of the cases. Both scenarios can be combined. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) is a new medical imaging technique that permits to visualize the upper airway with less ionizing radiation than the conventional scanner. To date, only five authors have performed an upper airway's 3D analysis of sleep apnea patients with cone beam. A better understanding of the affected segment of the upper airway should help refine treatment options.

  15. Incremental shuttle walk test in the assessment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Catherine G; Aung, Thida; Renshaw, Stephen A; Bianchi, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome is associated independently with an increase in cardiovascular risk factors and is associated with self-reported lack of exercise. We aimed to investigate the utility of the incremental shuttle walk test in routine clinical practice to monitor physical capacity of patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and explore whether continuous positive airway pressure therapy alters exercise capacity. Participants with symptomatic moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome attending for a trial of continuous positive airway pressure therapy completed questionnaires assessing sleepiness and physical activity and underwent an incremental shuttle walk test. Subjects compliant or partially compliant with continuous positive airway pressure therapy underwent reassessment at 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post-initiation of therapy. Participants unable to tolerate continuous positive airway pressure therapy completed a single reassessment 6 months after their initial visit. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy resulted in an increased distance walked during the incremental shuttle walk test. Improvements in cardiovascular responses to exercise were identified. Compliant patients reported increased daily activity. The incremental shuttle walk test is a simple, reproducible and safe test that is responsive to continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Our findings support the use of the incremental shuttle walk test for monitoring the effects of continuous positive airway pressure treatment and may suggest its use in rehabilitation programmes designed to reduce obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  16. The predictive value of Muller maneuver in REM-dependent obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Kursat Murat; Ozcan, Muge; Ozdogan, Fatih; Hizli, Omer; Dere, Huseyin; Unal, Adnan

    2013-09-01

    To our knowledge, no studies up to date have investigated the correlation of rapid eye movement (REM) dependent obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and Muller maneuver. The aim of this study is to investigate whether REM-dependent OSAS is predicted by the findings of the Muller maneuver. The study was conducted on 149 patients with witnessed apnea and daytime sleepiness. Muller maneuver was performed to all patients and the obstruction site was determined using a five-point scale. Then, polysomnography of the patient was obtained and the apnea-hypopnea indexes were determined in total sleep time, REM-dependent sleep and non-REM-dependent sleep. The correlations between the Muller maneuver findings and polysomnographic data were analyzed. The ages of the patients included in the study ranged between 25 and 73 years with a mean age of 49.3 ± 10.1 years. Their mean body mass index was 30.8 ± 5.1 kg/m(2) (range 21.9-55.4 kg/m(2)). The patients' mean apnea-hypopnea indexes in total sleep time was 28.1 and ranged between 5.4 and 124.3. REM-dependent OSAS was determined in 49 patients. When the data were analyzed, it was determined that there were no statistically significant correlations between tongue base or lateral pharyngeal band obstruction at the level of hypopharynx and the REM-dependent OSAS. At the level of the soft palate, the obstruction caused by the lateral pharyngeal bands or soft palate and REM dependency did not show any statistically significant correlation (p > 0.05). In conclusion, Muller maneuver does not provide useful data to predict REM dependency of OSAS.

  17. Empiric Auto-Titrating CPAP in People with Suspected Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Fitzgerald; Doelken, Peter; Ahmed, Qanta A.; Gilbert, Gregory E.; Strange, Charlie; Herpel, Laura; Frye, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Efficient diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be difficult because of time delays imposed by clinic visits and serial overnight polysomnography. In some cases, it may be desirable to initiate treatment for suspected OSA prior to polysomnography. Our objective was to compare the improvement of daytime sleepiness and sleep-related quality of life of patients with high clinical likelihood of having OSA who were randomly assigned to receive empiric auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) while awaiting polysomnogram versus current usual care. Methods: Serial patients referred for overnight polysomnography who had high clinical likelihood of having OSA were randomly assigned to usual care or immediate initiation of auto-titrating CPAP. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) scores and the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) scores were obtained at baseline, 1 month after randomization, and again after initiation of fixed CPAP in control subjects and after the sleep study in auto-CPAP patients. Results: One hundred nine patients were randomized. Baseline demographics, daytime sleepiness, and sleep-related quality of life scores were similar between groups. One-month ESS and FOSQ scores were improved in the group empirically treated with auto-titrating CPAP. ESS scores improved in the first month by a mean of −3.2 (confidence interval −1.6 to −4.8, p auto-CPAP resulted in symptomatic improvement of daytime sleepiness and sleep-related quality of life in a cohort of patients awaiting polysomnography who had a high pretest probability of having OSA. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the applicability of empiric treatment to other populations. Citation: Drummond F; Doelken P; Ahmed QA; Gilbert GE; Strange C; Herpel L; Frye MD. Empiric auto-titrating CPAP in people with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(2):140-145. PMID:20411690

  18. Interaction between smoking and obstructive sleep apnea:not just participants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Ying-ni; LI Qing-yun; ZHANG Xiu-juan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the current evidence that links smoking to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and to discuss some potential mechanisms proposed for these links.Data sources We searched PubMed and Medline to identify studies investigating the interaction between smoking and OSA.Study selection Articles regarding the relationship between smoking and OSA were selected.Studies considered smoking as a confounding factor were excluded.Results The association of smoking and OSA has been confirmed in several studies.The effects of smoking on the pathophysiology of OSA may include smoking-induced upper airway inflammation,stimulant effects of nicotine on upper airway muscles,and a "rebound effect" due to nightly short-term nicotine withdrawal,or all of the above.In addition,the coexistence of OSA and smoking may have more widespread implications for cardiovascular dysfunction in patients with OSA.Finally,OSA might be responsible for the addiction to nicotine.Conclusions Smoking may act as a risk factor for OSA and join with OSA in a common pathway to increase the risk of systematic injury.OSA,in turn,may be a predisposing factor for smoking.Thus,smoking cessation is recommended when considering treatment for OSA,and treating OSA may be a necessary precondition for successful smoking cessation.

  19. Sleep apnea syndrome. Examination of pharyngeal obstruction with high-speed MR and polysomnography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suto, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan); Inoue, Y. [Dept. of Neuropsychiatry, Tottori Univ. School of Medicine, Yonago (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    We attempted to determine the usefulness of high-speed MR imaging for evaluating the severity of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) by comparing findings of pharyngeal obstruction obtained with high-speed MR with those of all-night polysomnography (PSG). A total of 33 patients with SAS underwent turbo-FLASH MR examination, while awake and after i.v. injection of hydroxyzine hydrochloride. Serial images were examined by cinemode. Pharyngeal findings on MR were divided into single-site obstruction (SO) at the velopharynx, multiple-site obstruction (MO), and no obstruction (NO). PSG findings were analyzed to determine the predominant type of apnea, severity as evaluated by an apnea index (AI), and the lowest SaO{sub 2} value during sleep. Seventy-five percent of the central apnea group had SO, and 70% of the mixed apneas had MO, while only 15% of the obstructed apneas had MO. The percentage of patients with severe SAS (AI of 20% or higher) was 48% for the SO, and 70% for the MO. The lowest SaO{sub 2} value tended to be low in the mixed apnea in the case of PSG, and tended to be low in the MO at MR examination. Analysis of pharyngeal dynamics using high-speed MR may provide some useful information for evaluating the severity of SAS. (orig.).

  20. Obstructive sleep apnoea in Treacher Collins syndrome: prevalence, severity and cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomp, R G; Bredero-Boelhouwer, H H; Joosten, K F M; Wolvius, E B; Hoeve, H L J; Poublon, R M L; Mathijssen, I M J

    2012-06-01

    This cohort study in 35 patients (13 children) evaluates the prevalence, severity and anatomical cause of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) in patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. Ambulatory polysomnography was performed cross-sectionally to determine OSAS prevalence and severity. All upper airway related surgical interventions were evaluated retrospectively. In 11 patients, sleep endoscopy, and flexible and rigid endoscopy were applied to determine the level of anatomical obstruction of the upper airway. The overall prevalence of OSAS in Treacher Collins patients was 46% (54% in children; 41% in adults). Thirty-eight upper airway related surgical interventions were performed in 17 patients. Examination of the upper airway revealed various anatomical levels of obstruction, from the nasal septum to the trachea. Most significant obstruction was found at the level of the oro/hypopharynx. OSAS in Treacher Collins patients is an important problem so all patients should be screened for OSAS by polysomnography. Endoscopy of the upper airways was helpful in determining the level of obstruction. Surgical treatment at one level will not resolve OSAS in most patients because OSAS in Treacher Collins has a multilevel origin. Non-invasive ventilation (continuous positive airway pressure or bilevel positive airway pressure) or tracheotomy should be considered as a treatment modality.

  1. Validation of the MediByte® Type 3 Portable Monitor Compared with Polysomnography for Screening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S Driver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Portable monitors are increasingly being used as a diagnostic screening tool for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, and in-laboratory validation of these devices with polysomnography (PSG is required.

  2. A study on correlation of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and perihematoma edema of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高晓刚

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyse the correlation of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and perihematoma edema of hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage.Methods One hundred and forty-four patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage were collected and 78 of

  3. Long-term oral-appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea : A cephalometric study of craniofacial changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, M. H. J.; Hoekema, A.; Pruim, G. J.; Slater, J. J. R. Huddleston; Stegenga, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this randomized controlled study was to cephalometrically assess possible changes in craniofacial morphology associated with long term use of an adjustable oral appliance compared with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with the obstructive sleep

  4. Is Perioperative Fluid and Salt Balance a Contributing Factor in Postoperative Worsening of Obstructive Sleep Apnea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Thach; Singh, Mandeep; Yadollahi, Azadeh; Chung, Frances

    2016-05-01

    An understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying recurrent upper airway collapse may help anesthesiologists better manage patients in the postoperative period. There is convincing evidence in the sleep medicine literature to suggest that a positive fluid and salt balance can worsen upper airway collapse in patients with obstructive sleep apnea through the redistribution of fluid from the legs into the neck and upper airway while supine, in a process known as "rostral fluid shift." According to this theory, during the day the volume from a fluid bolus or from fluid overload states (i.e., heart failure and chronic kidney disease) accumulates in the legs due to gravity, and when a person lies supine at night, the fluid shifts rostrally to the neck, also owing to gravity. The fluid in the neck can increase the extraluminal pressure around the upper airways, causing the upper airways to narrow and predisposing to upper airway collapse. Similarly, surgical patients also incur large fluid and salt balance shifts, and when recovered supine, this may promote fluid redistribution to the neck and upper airways. In this commentary, we summarize the sleep medicine literature on the impact of fluid and salt balance on obstructive sleep apnea severity and discuss the potential anesthetic implications of excessive fluid and salt volume on worsening sleep apnea.

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea in a Danish population of men and women aged 60-80 years with nocturia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bing, Mette Hornum; Jennum, Poul; Moller, Lars Alling

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was in a case-control design to evaluate the association between nocturia and obstructive sleep apnea, in men and women who had nocturia ≥ 2 per night (nocturics) compared to those without nocturia (controls).......The aim of the present study was in a case-control design to evaluate the association between nocturia and obstructive sleep apnea, in men and women who had nocturia ≥ 2 per night (nocturics) compared to those without nocturia (controls)....

  6. Efficacy and comorbidity of oral appliances in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea : a systematic review and preliminary results of a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, Aarnoud

    2006-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by repetitive obstructions of the upper airway during sleep. The modification of pharyngeal patency by oral appliance therapy has been suggested as an alternative to various treatment mod

  7. Progress in study on central nervous system injuries caused by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Xiang-xiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and repetitive intermittent hypoxia and dysfunction of sleep architecture mainly contribute to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. More and more evidences demonstrate it is a systemic disease, which is common encountered in clinic and strongly related to the systemic lesion of central nervous system. The central nervous system complications comprise cognitive impairment, brain atrophy and the growing risk of stroke and so on. Early treatment for OSAS has a positive significance on complications of central nervous system, and even the damage can be completely reversed.

  8. Flextube reflectometry for level diagnosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and snoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Hilberg, O; Grymer, L

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use sound reflections in a flexible tube (flextube reflectometry) for identifying the predominant obstructive level of the upper airway in a series of patients referred to a sleep clinic. We also wished to study the relationship between the number of flextube narrowings...... per hour recording and the RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopneas per hour recording) by ResMed AutoSet (AS), which is a device based on nasal pressure variations. We performed sleep studies on 54 patients referred for snoring or OSA; 1) at home with AS; 2) in hospital using...

  9. Electrophysiological Assessment of the Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Ethem Gelir; Cenk Başaran; Sibel Bayrak; Süha Yağcıoğlu; Murat Timur Budak; Hikmet Fırat; Pekcan Ungan

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiological Assessment of the Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognition Ethem Gelir1*, Cenk Bas¸aran1, Sibel Bayrak1, Su¨ ha Yag˘ cıog˘ lu2, Murat Timur Budak1, Hikmet Fırat3, Pekcan Ungan4 1 Department of Physiology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey, 2 Department of Biophysics, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey, 3 Sleep Laboratory, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, SGK Ankara Education Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, 4 Department o...

  10. Effects of salmeterol on sleeping oxygen saturation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Silke

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep is associated with important adverse effects in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), such as disturbed sleep quality and gas exchange, including hypoxemia and hypercapnia. The effects of inhaled long-acting beta(2)-agonist therapy (LABA) on these disturbances are unclear. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of inhaled salmeterol on nocturnal sleeping arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) and sleep quality. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of moderate\\/severe stable COPD patients, we compared the effects of 4 weeks of treatment with salmeterol 50 microg b.d. and matching placebo on sleeping SaO(2) and sleep quality. Overnight polysomnography (PSG) was performed at baseline, and after 4 and 8 weeks in addition to detailed pulmonary function testing. Of 15 patients included, 12 completed the trial (median age 69 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, FEV(1): 39%). RESULTS: Both mean SaO(2) [salmeterol vs. placebo: 92.9% (91.2, 94.7) vs. 91.0% (88.9, 94.8); p = 0.016] and the percentage of sleep spent below 90% of SaO(2) [1.8% (0.0, 10.8) vs. 25.6% (0.5, 53.5); p = 0.005] improved significantly with salmeterol. Sleep quality was similar with both salmeterol and placebo on PSG. Static lung volumes, particularly trapped gas volume, tended to improve with salmeterol. CONCLUSION: We conclude that inhaled LABA therapy improves sleeping SaO(2) without significant change in sleep quality.

  11. Effects of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Cognitive Functions: Evidence for a Common Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Andreou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS show similar neurocognitive impairments. Effects are more apparent in severe cases, whereas in moderate and mild cases the effects are equivocal. The exact mechanism that causes cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases is still unknown and only suggestions have been made for each disease separately. The primary objective of this review is to present COPD and OSAS impact on cognitive functions. Secondly, it aims to examine the potential mechanisms by which COPD and OSAS can be linked and provide evidence for a common nature that affects cognitive functions in both diseases. Patients with COPD and OSAS compared to normal distribution show significant deficits in the cognitive abilities of attention, psychomotor speed, memory and learning, visuospatial and constructional abilities, executive skills, and language. The severity of these deficits in OSAS seems to correlate with the physiological events such as sleep defragmentation, apnea/hypopnea index, and hypoxemia, whereas cognitive impairments in COPD are associated with hypoventilation, hypoxemia, and hypercapnia. These factors as well as vascocerebral diseases and changes in systemic hemodynamic seem to act in an intermingling and synergistic way on the cause of cognitive dysfunctions in both diseases. However, low blood oxygen pressure seems to be the dominant factor that contributes to the presence of cognitive deficits in both COPD and OSAS.

  12. The effect of sleep apnea severity on cardiac autonomic activity during night time in obstructive sleep apnea patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulay Ozkececi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Impaired autonomic cardiac function is an important consequence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. This impairment is mainly due to intermittent hypoxia episodes following apneas. However, the impact of apnea severity on autonomic cardiac function remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the severity of sleep apnea and heart rate turbulence (HRT and heart rate variability (HRV in OSA. DESIGN AND SETTING: Observational cross-sectional study conducted in the Departments of Cardiology and Pulmonary Diseases, Afyon Kocatepe University, Turkey. METHODS: 106 patients with OSA and 27 healthy volunteers were enrolled. Based on apnea hypopnea index (AHI values, obstructive sleep apnea severity was classified as follows: mild OSA (AHI ≥ 5 and 30. HRV and HRT parameters were assessed via 24-hour digital Holter electrocardiogram recordings for all subjects. RESULTS: HRV and HRT results were significantly lower among OSA patients than among control subjects (P < 0.05. However, there were no significant differences in HRT and HRV between the three patient subgroups. Correlations did emerge between AHI and the NN-interval parameter RMSSD and between oxygen desaturation and turbulence slope (respectively: r = -0.22, P = 0.037; and r = -0.28, P = 0.025. CONCLUSION: HRT and HRV results deteriorate in OSA. Correlations between apnea severity and these parameters seem to be present.

  13. CT findings in adults with obstructive sleep apnea; Measurement of pharyngeal spaces with an image analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Fumiaki; Asakura, Kohji; Nakano, Yuji; Shintani, Tomoko; Akita, Nobuto; Kataura, Akikatsu (Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed CT scans in 20 adult OSAS patients and 6 control subjects, and measured the airspaces in the nasopharynx, mesopharynx and hypopharynx, using an image analyzer. The airspaces were significantly smaller at all sites of the pharynx in OSAS patients than in the control subjects, but they did not show a positive correlation with the apnea index or the body mass index. In good responders whose apnea indexes improved more than 50% after uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty (UPPP), the nasopharyngeal and mesopharyngeal airspaces were significantly smaller, and the hypopharyngeal space tended to be larger than in poor responders. Our results suggest that CT scan is a helpful method for analyzing the area of the upper airway, especially in relation to the response to UPPP in adults with OSAS. (author).

  14. Flextube reflectometry and pressure recordings for level diagnosis in obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Grymer, L; Hilberg, O

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sound reflections in a flexible tube (flextube reflectometry) with pressure-catheter recordings (ApneaGraph) for identifying the predominant obstructive level of the upper airway during sleep. Seventeen males with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea...... syndrome (OSAS) were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation = SD) number of flextube narrowings per hour recording was 50.2 (20.4) and the mean (SD) RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour recording) determined by the ApneaGraph was 45.7 (20.2). The mean difference...... (SD) between the number of flextube narrowings per hour recording and the RDIs determined by the ApneaGraph was not statistically significantly different from 0. There was no statistically significant correlation between the percentage of retropalatal narrowing of the total narrowing (retropalatal...

  15. Flextube reflectometry and pressure-recordings for level diagnosis in obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, C E; Grymer, L; Hilberg, O

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sound reflections in a flexible tube (flextube reflectometry) with pressure-catheter recordings (ApneaGraph) for identifying the predominant obstructive level of the upper airway during sleep. Seventeen males with suspected obstructive sleep apnoea...... syndrome (OSAS) were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation = SD) number of flextube narrowings per hour recording was 50.2 (20.4) and the mean (SD) RDI (respiratory disturbance index = apnoeas and hypopnoeas per hour recording) determined by the ApneaGraph was 45.7 (20.2). The mean difference...... (SD) between the number of flextube narrowings per hour recording and the RDIs determined by the ApneaGraph was not statistically significantly different from 0. There was no statistically significant correlation between the percentage of retropalatal narrowing of the total narrowing (retropalatal...

  16. [Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children: beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteller, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in the general childhood population is 1-2% and the most common cause is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. However, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy, there are other highly prevalent causes of this syndrome in children. The causes are often multifactorial and include muscular hypotonia, dentofacial abnormalities, soft tissue hypertrophy of the airway, and neurological disorders). Collaboration between different specialties involved in the care of these children is essential, given the wide variability of conditions and how frequently different factors are involved in their genesis, as well as the different treatments to be applied. We carried out a wide literature review of other causes of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children, beyond adenotonsillar hypertrophy. We organised the prevalence of this syndrome in each pathology and the reasons that cause it, as well as their interactions and management, in a consistent manner.

  17. The Effect of Body Position on Physiological Factors that Contribute to Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, Simon A.; Edwards, Bradley A.; Wellman, Andrew; Turton, Anthony; Skuza, Elizabeth M.; Berger, Philip J.; Hamilton, Garun S.

    2015-01-01

    Study objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) resolves in lateral sleep in 20% of patients. However, the effect of lateral positioning on factors contributing to OSA has not been studied. We aimed to measure the effect of lateral positioning on the key pathophysiological contributors to OSA including lung volume, passive airway anatomy/collapsibility, the ability of the airway to stiffen and dilate, ventilatory control instability (loop gain), and arousal threshold. Design: Non-randomized single arm observational study. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients/participants: 20 (15M, 5F) continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated severe OSA patients. Interventions: Supine vs. lateral position. Measurements: CPAP dial-downs performed during sleep to measure: (i) Veupnea: asleep ventilatory requirement, (ii) passive V0: ventilation off CPAP when airway dilator muscles are quiescent, (iii) Varousal: ventilation at which respiratory arousals occur, (iv) active V0: ventilation off CPAP when airway dilator muscles are activated during sleep, (v) loop gain: the ratio of the ventilatory drive response to a disturbance in ventilation, (vi) arousal threshold: level of ventilatory drive which leads to arousal, (vii) upper airway gain (UAG): ability of airway muscles to restore ventilation in response to increases in ventilatory drive, and (viii) pharyngeal critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Awake functional residual capacity (FRC) was also recorded. Results: Lateral positioning significantly increased passive V0 (0.33 ± 0.76L/min vs. 3.56 ± 2.94L/min, P Turton A, Skuza EM, Berger PJ, Hamilton GS. The effect of body position on physiological factors that contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2015;38(9):1469–1478. PMID:25761982

  18. Relationship between the quality of life and the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lopes

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of sleep disorders on the quality of life (QOL have been documented in the literature. Excessive sleepiness and altered circadian rhythms may negatively affect ability to learn, employment, and interpersonal relations, and directly degrade QOL. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome of varying severity on QOL. The study was conducted on 1892 patients aged 18 years or older referred by a physician to the Sleep Institute, São Paulo, with complaints related to apnea (snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness, hyperarousal, and fatigue. They were submitted to overnight polysomnography for the diagnosis of sleep disorders from August 2005 through April 2006. The patients completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and QOL SF-36 sleep questionnaires. They were classified as non-physically active and physically active and not-sleepy and sleepy and the results of polysomnography were analyzed on the basis of the apnea hypopnea index (AHI. The apneic subjects showed a reduction in QOL which was proportional to severity. There was a significant decrease in all domains (physical functioning, role physical problems, bodily pain, general health perceptions, vitality, social functioning, emotional problems, general mental health for apneics with AHI >30, who generally were sleepy and did not participate in physical activities (P < 0.05. The present study provides evidence that the impact of sleep disorders on QOL in apneics is not limited to excessive daytime sleepiness and that physical activity can contribute to reducing the symptoms. Thus, exercise should be considered as an adjunct interventional strategy in the management of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Subsequent Risk of Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Ting Kao; Shih-Han Hung; Herng-Ching Lin; Chih-Kuang Liu; Hung-Meng Huang; Chuan-Song Wu

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) still remains unclear. This retrospective cohort study aimed to investigate the relationship between OSA and subsequent CRS using a population-based dataset. The study used data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We selected 971 patients with OSA for the study cohort and 4855 patients without OSA for the comparison cohort. Each patient was tracked for 5 years to determine those wh...

  20. Accelerated Echo Planer J-resolved Spectroscopic Imaging of Putamen and Thalamus in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj K. Sarma; Macey, Paul M.; Rajakumar Nagarajan; Ravi Aysola; Ronald M Harper; M. Albert Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) leads to neurocognitive and autonomic deficits that are partially mediated by thalamic and putamen pathology. We examined the underlying neurochemistry of those structures using compressed sensing-based 4D echo-planar J-resolved spectroscopic imaging (JRESI), and quantified values with prior knowledge fitting. Bilaterally increased thalamic mI/Cr, putamen Glx/Cr, and Glu/Cr, and bilaterally decreased thalamic and putamen tCho/Cr and GABA/Cr occurred in ...

  1. Correlation between the oropharyngo-laryngoscopic findings and the severity of obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Priscila Sequeira Dias; Maria Helena Araujo-Melo; Denise Duprat Neves; Lucas Neves de Andrade Lemes; Manuela Salvador Mosciaro; Sandro Bedoya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To correlate anatomical and functional changes of the oral cavity, pharynx and larynx to the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Methods : We conducted a cross-sectional study of 66 patients of both genders, aged between 21 and 59 years old with complaints of snoring and / or apnea. All underwent full clinical evaluation, including physical examination, nasolarybgoscopy and polisonography. We classified individuals into groups by the value of the apnea-hypopnea i...

  2. Caffeine intake is independently associated with neuropsychological performance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Daniel; Bardwell, Wayne A; Loredo, Jose S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Heaton, Robert K; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    In healthy individuals, caffeine intake may improve performance on cognitive tests. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder that has been associated with impaired cognitive function. In this study, we investigated whether increased caffeine intake in untreated patients with OSA is linked to better cognitive performance. Forty-five untreated OSA patients underwent baseline polysomnography after completing a survey of 24-h caffeine intake. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychologi...

  3. Length of Individual Apnea Events Is Increased by Supine Position and Modulated by Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Timo Leppänen; Juha Töyräs; Anu Muraja-Murro; Salla Kupari; Pekka Tiihonen; Esa Mervaala; Antti Kulkas

    2016-01-01

    Positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among OSA patients. In severe OSA, the obstruction events are longer in supine compared to nonsupine positions. Corresponding scientific information on mild and moderate OSA is lacking. We studied whether individual obstruction and desaturation event severity is increased in supine position in all OSA severity categories and whether the severity of individual events is linked to OSA severity categories. Polygraphic recordings of 2026 patients...

  4. Association between obesity and cognition impairment in patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王婧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the association between obesity and cognition impairment in patients with moderate-tosevere obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS).Methods A total of 425 eligible patients with moderate-to-severe OSAHS were screened for this retrospective study at Sleep Center,Second Affiliated H

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MCY Tan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea (OSAH is a common disorder characterized by recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Patients experience a reduced quality of life and an increased risk of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, which is the first-line therapy for OSAH, improves sleepiness, vigilance and quality of life.

  6. Isolated sleep paralysis linked to impaired nocturnal sleep quality and health-related quality of life in Chinese-Taiwanese patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sun-Wung; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Lan, Sheng-Hsing; Hsu, Chung-Yao

    2010-11-01

    Isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) is a rapid eye movement (REM) sleep parasomnia and has a special meaning in Chinese population. Worsening of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs especially during REM sleep. The relationship between ISP and OSA is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of ISP on sleep and life quality in Chinese-Taiwanese OSA patients. We recruited 107 OSA patients diagnosed by polysomnography (PSG) in Southern Taiwan. ISP was evaluated by self-reported sleep questionnaire. We used Chinese version of Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and Short-Form 36 (SF36) to evaluate daytime sleepiness, nocturnal sleep quality, and health-related quality of life, respectively for OSA patients. Student's t-test was used to compare PSG parameters, ESS, PSQI, physical and mental component of SF-36 (P-SF36 and M-SF36) between OSA patients with and without ISP. Stepwise multiple regression was used to find out the factors independently associated with ESS, PSQI, P-SF36, and M-SF36. Forty-one of 107 patients (38.3%) had ISP. It showed no significant difference in PSG parameters between OSA patients with and without ISP. OSA patients with ISP had significantly higher ESS (P = 0.010), higher PSQI (P = 0.007), lower P-SF36 (P = 0.020), and lower M-SF36 (P = 0.001) than those without ISP. ISP was an independent factor associated with ESS (P = 0.017), PSQI (P = 0.001), and M-SF36 (P = 0.030) after adjusting for other confounding variables. ISP was independently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, worse sleep quality, and impaired mental health-related quality of life in Chinese-Taiwanese OSA patients.

  7. The effect of nasal tramazoline with dexamethasone in obstructive sleep apnoea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; Minaritzoglou, Aliki; Zakynthinos, Georgios; Vagiakis, Emmanouil; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2013-10-01

    Although there is a strong correlation between oral/oro-nasal breathing and apnoea/hypopnoea index in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and normal nasal resistance at wakefulness, it remains unknown whether the pharmacological prevention of potential nasal obstruction during sleep could decrease oral/oro-nasal breathing and increase nasal breathing and subsequently decrease the apnoea/hypopnoea index. This study evaluated the effect of a combination of a nasal decongestant with corticosteroid on breathing route pattern and apnoea/hypopnoea index. 21 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (mean apnoea/hypopnoea index 31.1 events per hour) and normal nasal resistance at wakefulness were enrolled in a randomised crossover trial of 1 weeks' treatment with nasal tramazoline and dexamethasone compared with 1 weeks' treatment with nasal placebo. At the start and end of each treatment period, patients underwent nasal resistance measurement and overnight polysomnography with attendant measurement of breathing route pattern. Nasal tramazoline with dexamethasone was associated with decrease in oral/oro-nasal breathing epochs and concomitant increase in nasal breathing epochs, and mean decrease of apnoea/hypopnoea index by 21%. The change in nasal breathing epochs was inversely related to the change in apnoea/hypopnoea index (Rs=0.78; pnasal tramazoline with dexamethasone in OSA patients with normal nasal resistance at wakefulness can restore the preponderance of nasal breathing epochs and modestly improve apnoea/hypopnoea index.

  8. Distinguishing obstructive from central sleep apneas and hypopneas using linear SVM and acoustic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Richard; Bradley, T Douglas; Packer, Devin; Alshaer, Hisham

    2016-08-01

    Sleep Apnea (SA) is a very common but underdiagnosed respiratory disorder. SA has 2 main types, obstructive and central sleep apnea (OSA and CSA, respectively). The distinction between the 2 types is important for proper clinical management. Our aim in this study was to deploy acoustic analysis of breath sounds to distinguish central from obstructive events. We recorded breath sounds from 29 patients from which 45 segments with obstructive only and 40 segments with central only respiratory events were isolated. Subsequently, 10 acoustic features were extracted and used to identify basic breath sounds: inspiration, expiration, and snoring. A 2nd set of 6 sound-specific features were extracted from the basic sounds, designed based on SA pathophysiology. These 6 features were used to train and test a linear SVM classifier using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme. We achieved an excellent accuracy of 91.8%. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the ability to distinguish CSA from OSA with high reliability from breath sound recordings during sleep.

  9. High risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Renata Silva Andrechuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to stratify the risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated at a public, tertiary, teaching hospital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify related sociodemographic and clinical factors.Method: cross-sectional analytical study with 113 patients (mean age 59.57 years, 70.8% male. A specific questionnaire was used for the sociodemographic and clinical characterization and the Berlin Questionnaire for the stratification of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.Results: the prevalence of high risk was 60.2% and the outcome of clinical worsening during hospitalization was more frequent among these patients. The factors related to high risk were body mass index over 30 kg/m2, arterial hypertension and waist circumference indicative of cardiovascular risk, while older age (60 years and over constituted a protective factor.Conclusion: considering the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to clinical worsening, it is suggested that nurses should monitor, in their clinical practice, people at high risk for this syndrome, guiding control measures of modifiable factors and aiming to prevent the associated complications, including worsening of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Obesity on Exercise Function in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carla A.; Selvadurai, Hiran; Baur, Louise A.; Waters, Karen A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Evaluate the relative contributions of weight status and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to cardiopulmonary exercise responses in children. Design: Prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants underwent anthropometric measurements, overnight polysomnography, spirometry, cardiopulmonary exercise function testing on a cycle ergometer, and cardiac doppler imaging. OSA was defined as ≥ 1 obstructive apnea or hypopnea per hour of sleep (OAHI). The effect of OSA on exercise function was evaluated after the parameters were corrected for body mass index (BMI) z-scores. Similarly, the effect of obesity on exercise function was examined when the variables were adjusted for OAHI. Setting: Tertiary pediatric hospital. Participants: Healthy weight and obese children, aged 7–12 y. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Seventy-one children were studied. In comparison with weight-matched children without OSA, children with OSA had a lower cardiac output, stroke volume index, heart rate, and oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) at peak exercise capacity. After adjusting for BMI z-score, children with OSA had 1.5 L/min (95% confidence interval -2.3 to -0.6 L/min; P = 0.001) lower cardiac output at peak exercise capacity, but minute ventilation and ventilatory responses to exercise were not affected. Obesity was only associated with physical deconditioning. Cardiac dysfunction was associated with the frequency of respiratory-related arousals, the severity of hypoxia, and heart rate during sleep. Conclusions: Children with OSA are exercise limited due to a reduced cardiac output and VO2 peak at peak exercise capacity, independent of their weight status. Comorbid OSA can further decrease exercise performance in obese children. Citation: Evans CA, Selvadurai H, Baur LA, Waters KA. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity on exercise function in children. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1103-1110. PMID:24882905

  11. Simulated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Increases P-Wave Duration and P-Wave Dispersion

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    Wons, Annette M.; Rossi, Valentina; Bratton, Daniel J.; Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I.; Camen, Giovanni; Kohler, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Background A high P-wave duration and dispersion (Pd) have been reported to be a prognostic factor for the occurrence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), a condition linked to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis of whether a short-term increase of P-wave duration and Pd can be induced by respiratory manoeuvres simulating OSA in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Methods 12-lead-electrocardiography (ECG) was recorded continuously in 24 healthy subjects and 33 patients with PAF, while simulating obstructive apnea (Mueller manoeuvre, MM), obstructive hypopnea (inspiration through a threshold load, ITH), central apnea (AP), and during normal breathing (BL) in randomized order. The P-wave duration and Pd was calculated by using dedicated software for ECG-analysis. Results P-wave duration and Pd significantly increased during MM and ITH compared to BL in all subjects (+13.1ms and +13.8ms during MM; +11.7ms and +12.9ms during ITH; p<0.001 for all comparisons). In MM, the increase was larger in healthy subjects when compared to patients with PAF (p<0.05). Conclusion Intrathoracic pressure swings through simulated obstructive sleep apnea increase P-wave duration and Pd in healthy subjects and in patients with PAF. Our findings imply that intrathoracic pressure swings prolong the intra-atrial and inter-atrial conduction time and therefore may represent an independent trigger factor for the development for PAF. PMID:27071039

  12. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

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    Macey, Paul M; Woo, Mary A; Kumar, Rajesh; Cross, Rebecca L; Harper, Ronald M

    2010-04-16

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI), and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI), as well as sex and body mass index (BMI). AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  13. Relationship between obstructive sleep apnea severity and sleep, depression and anxiety symptoms in newly-diagnosed patients.

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    Paul M Macey

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in at least 10% of the population, and leads to higher morbidity and mortality; however, relationships between OSA severity and sleep or psychological symptoms are unclear. Existing studies include samples with wide-ranging comorbidities, so we assessed relationships between severity of OSA and common sleep and psychological disturbances in recently diagnosed OSA patients with minimal co-morbidities. We studied 49 newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients without major co-morbidities such as mental illness, cardiovascular disease, or stroke; subjects were not using psychoactive medications or tobacco (mean +/- std age: 46.8+/-9.1 years; apnea/hyponea index [AHI]: 32.1+/-20.5 events/hour; female/male: 12/37; weight <125 kg. We evaluated relationships between the AHI and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale; ESS, sleep quality (Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index; PSQI, depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II; BDI, and anxiety symptoms (Beck Anxiety Inventory; BAI, as well as sex and body mass index (BMI. AHI was similar in females and males. Mean levels of all symptoms were above normal thresholds, but AHI was not correlated with age, ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI; only BMI was correlated with OSA severity. No differences in mean AHI appeared when subjects were grouped by normal versus elevated values of ESS, PSQI, BDI, or BAI. Consistent with other studies, a strong link between OSA severity and psychological symptoms did not appear in these newly diagnosed patients, suggesting that mechanisms additional to the number and frequency of hypoxic events and arousals occurring with apneas contribute to adverse health effects in OSA. OSA patients presenting with mild or moderate severity, and no major co-morbidities will not necessarily have low levels of sleep or psychological disturbances.

  14. Distinct severity stages of obstructive sleep apnoea are correlated with unique dyslipidaemia: large-scale observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Jian; YI, HONGLIANG; Zou, Jianyin; Meng, Lili; Tang, Xulan; Zhu, Huaming; Yu, Dongzhen; Zhou, Huiqun; Su, Kaiming; Yang, Mingpo; Chen, Haoyan; Shi, Yongyong; Wang, Yue; WANG Jian; YIN, SHANKAI

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyslipidaemia is an intermediary exacerbation factor for various diseases but the impact of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) on dyslipidaemia remains unclear. Methods A total of 3582 subjects with suspected OSA consecutively admitted to our hospital sleep centre were screened and 2983 (2422 with OSA) were included in the Shanghai Sleep Health Study. OSA severity was quantified using the apnoea–hypopnea index (AHI), the oxygen desaturation index and the arousal index. Biochemical indi...

  15. The Prioritization of Clinical Risk Factors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity Using Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process

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    Thaya Maranate

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a problem of shortage of sleep laboratories that can accommodate the patients in a timely manner. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to worse outcomes particularly in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. For this reason, the prioritization in polysomnography (PSG queueing should be endorsed based on disease severity. To date, there have been conflicting data whether clinical information can predict OSA severity. The 1,042 suspected OSA patients underwent diagnostic PSG study at Siriraj Sleep Center during 2010-2011. A total of 113 variables were obtained from sleep questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The 19 groups of clinical risk factors consisting of 42 variables were categorized into each OSA severity. This study aimed to array these factors by employing Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process approach based on normalized weight vector. The results revealed that the first rank of clinical risk factors in Severe, Moderate, Mild, and No OSA was nighttime symptoms. The overall sensitivity/specificity of the approach to these groups was 92.32%/91.76%, 89.52%/88.18%, 91.08%/84.58%, and 96.49%/81.23%, respectively. We propose that the urgent PSG appointment should include clinical risk factors of Severe OSA group. In addition, the screening for Mild from No OSA patients in sleep center setting using symptoms during sleep is also recommended (sensitivity = 87.12% and specificity = 72.22%.

  16. “Myxedema Madness” Associated with Newly Diagnosed Hypothyroidism and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Neal, J. Matthew; Yuhico, Rodney Joe O.

    2012-01-01

    This is the case report of a 32-year-old obese male with a history of agitation, hallucinations, and delirium, recently diagnosed with primary hypothyroidism; he gave a several month history of fatigue with nocturnal snoring and frequent awakening. Polysomnogram revealed severe OSA; initiation of CPAP and levothyroxine resulted in immediate improvement. The lack of a previous psychiatric history and acuteness of presentation was consistent with hypothyroid psychosis complicated by sleep deprivation cause by untreated OSA. Primary hypothyroidism is a common disorder often associated with depression. It is rarely associated with psychosis and was first described as “myxoedematous madness” in 1949. It has not been previously reported to cause psychosis when associated with obstructive sleep apnea. This case illustrates the need for examination of potential multiple organic causes in a patient who presents with psychosis in the critical care setting. Citation: Neal JM; Yuhico RJO. “Myxedema madness” associated with newly diagnosed hypothyroidism and obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(6):717-718. PMID:23243407

  17. Toward numerical simulations of fluid-structure interactions for investigation of obstructive sleep apnea

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    Huang, Chien-Jung; Huang, Shao-Ching; White, Susan M.; Mallya, Sanjay M.; Eldredge, Jeff D.

    2016-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a medical condition characterized by repetitive partial or complete occlusion of the airway during sleep. The soft tissues in the airway of OSA patients are prone to collapse under the low-pressure loads incurred during breathing. This paper describes efforts toward the development of a numerical tool for simulation of air-tissue interactions in the upper airway of patients with sleep apnea. A procedure by which patient-specific airway geometries are segmented and processed from dental cone-beam CT scans into signed distance fields is presented. A sharp-interface embedded boundary method based on the signed distance field is used on Cartesian grids for resolving the airflow in the airway geometries. For simulation of structure mechanics with large expected displacements, a cut-cell finite element method with nonlinear Green strains is used. The fluid and structure solvers are strongly coupled with a partitioned iterative algorithm. Preliminary results are shown for flow simulation inside the three-dimensional rigid upper airway of patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Two validation cases for the fluid-structure coupling problem are also presented.

  18. Biomarkers to Improve Diagnosis and Monitoring of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Current Status and Future Perspectives

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    Konstantinos Archontogeorgis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway collapse associated with oxygen desaturation and sleep disruption. It is proposed that these periodic changes lead to molecular variations that can be detected by assessing serum biomarkers. Studies have identified inflammatory, oxidative, and metabolic perturbations attributable to sleep-disordered breathing. Given that OSAS is associated with increased cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity, the ideal biomarker should enable timely recognition with the possibility of intervention. There is accumulating data on the utility of serum biomarkers for the evaluation of disease severity, prognosis, and response to treatment. However, current knowledge is limited by data collection techniques, disease complexity, and potential confounding factors. The current paper reviews the literature on the use of serum biomarkers in OSAS. It is concluded that the ideal serum biomarker still needs to be discovered, while caution is needed in the interpretation of hitherto available results.

  19. Changes in breathing and the pharynx after weight loss in obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Suratt, P M; McTier, R F; Findley, L J; Pohl, S L; Wilhoit, S C

    1987-10-01

    The effect of weight loss following dietary restriction on disordered breathing on the pharyngeal airway is controversial in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We therefore prospectively studied eight patients before and after dietary-induced weight loss. Mean weight loss was 20.6 kg +/- 12.8 SD. After weight loss there were significant improvements in PO2 and PCO2 measured during wakefulness, and in the number of desaturation episodes per hour of sleep, average desaturation per episode, and number of movement arousals. The number of apneas and hypopneas significantly decreased in six of eight patients. There was a significant correlation between body mass index and number of disordered breathing events. Nasopharyngeal collapsibility and pulse flow resistance decreased in awake patients after weight loss. We conclude that moderate weight loss in obese patients with OSA improves oxygenation during both sleep and wakefulness, decreases the number of disordered breathing events in many patients, decreases the collapsibility of the nasopharyngeal airway.

  20. Does the energy expenditure status in obstructive sleep apnea favour a positive energy balance?

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    Major, Geneviève C; Sériès, Frédéric; Tremblay, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on energy expenditure is controversial. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between 24-hr energy expenditure or sleeping metabolic rate and features of the obstructive sleep apnea. Twenty-four apneic men took part in this cross-sectional study and were classified in quartiles of nocturnal desaturation severity, i.e. of percentage total sleep time with SaO2 hydrodensitometry. During the stay in the respiratory chamber, urine was collected to assess catecholamine concentration and percentage recording time with SaO2 < 90% (%TRT SaO2 < 90%) was measured with nocturnal oximetry. Mean fat free mass and fat mass were greater in quartile 4 than in quartile 1 (P < 0.05). %TRT SaO2 < 90% was higher in quartile 4 than in other quartiles (P < 0.0001). 24-hr energy expenditure and sleeping metabolic rate were similar among quartiles. However, when expressed on a per kg body weight basis (kcal/kg), these variables were negatively correlated with the %TRT SaO2 < 90% in the whole group (r = -0.46 and -0.48, respectively, P < 0.05). %TRT SaO2 < 90% was found to be a predictor of sleeping metabolic rate which explained, together with fat mass and fat free mass, 86% of this variance (P < 0.05). In apneic men energy expenditure relative to body weight decreases with increasing severity of oxygen desaturation which could favour a positive energy balance.

  1. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on blood pressure in patients with hypertension

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    Gurubhagavatula I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Barry Fields1, Indira Gurubhagavatula1–31Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 2Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Hypertension is the most significant risk factor for death worldwide. Approximately 30%–40% of affected individuals have coexisting obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, a disorder resulting from the upper airway’s inability to remain patent during sleep. A causal relationship between OSA and hypertension has been demonstrated. Blunting or elimination of normal blood pressure (BP dipping during sleep is commonly seen in OSA patients, with corresponding increases in daytime BP. This dipping is clinically salient, because it is associated with the end-organ damage seen with chronic hypertension, such as cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular disease. African-Americans are at greatest risk for non-dipping and end-organ damage. Rapidly fluctuating changes in sympathetic tone, intrathoracic pressure, oxyhemoglobin saturation, and carbon dioxide levels are all thought to play a role in acute and chronic BP elevation. Individuals with preexisting hypertension are most susceptible to OSA’s BP-raising effects. First-line therapy for OSA includes continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP delivered via a mask interface. Patients who show the greatest BP declines while using CPAP are more likely to be those who have at least moderate OSA, adhere to therapy, have preexisting hypertension, and whose blood vessels retain reversibility in disease-related remodeling. Given the heavy burden OSA-related hypertension places on the healthcare system, prevention, early detection, and prompt intervention should be the goals for all affected individuals.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, hypertension, nocturnal dipping, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP

  2. Selective indication for positive airway pressure (PAP in sleep-related breathing disorders with obstruction

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    Stasche, Norbert

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Positive airway pressure (PAP is the therapy of choice for most sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBD. A variety of PAP devices using positive airway pressure (CPAP, BiPAP, APAP, ASV must be carefully considered before application. This overview aims to provide criteria for choosing the optimal PAP device according to severity and type of sleep-related breathing disorder. In addition, the range of therapeutic applications, constraints and side effects as well as alternative methods to PAP will be discussed. This review is based on an analysis of current literature and clinical experience. The data is presented from an ENT-sleep-laboratory perspective and is designed to help the ENT practitioner initiate treatment and provide support. Different titration methods, current devices and possible applications will be described. In addition to constant pressure devices (CPAP, most commonly used for symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA without complicating conditions, BiPAP models will be introduced. These allow two different positive pressure settings and are thus especially suitable for patients with cardiopulmonary diseases or patients with pressure intolerance, increasing compliance in this subgroup considerably. Compliance can also be increased in patients during first night of therapy, patients with highly variable pressure demands or position-dependent OSA, by using self-regulating Auto-adjust PAP devices (Automatic positive airway pressure, APAP. Patients with Cheyne-Stokes breathing, a subtype of central sleep apnoea, benefit from adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV, which analyzes breathing patterns continually and adjusts the actual ventilation pressure accordingly. This not only reduces daytime sleepiness, but can also influence heart disease positively. Therapy with positive airway pressure is very effective in eliminating obstruction-related sleep diseases and symptoms. However, because therapy is generally applied for life, the optimal

  3. Velopharyngeal mucosal surface topography in healthy subjects and subjects with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambeth, Christopher; Amatoury, Jason; Wang, Ziyu; Foster, Sheryl; Amis, Terence; Kairaitis, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Macroscopic pharyngeal anatomical abnormalities are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of upper airway (UA) obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Microscopic changes in the UA mucosal lining of OSA subjects are reported; however, the impact of these changes on UA mucosal surface topography is unknown. This study aimed to 1) develop methodology to measure UA mucosal surface topography, and 2) compare findings from healthy and OSA subjects. Ten healthy and eleven OSA subjects were studied. Awake, gated (end expiration), head and neck position controlled magnetic resonance images (MRIs) of the velopharynx (VP) were obtained. VP mucosal surfaces were segmented from axial images, and three-dimensional VP mucosal surface models were constructed. Curvature analysis of the models was used to study the VP mucosal surface topography. Principal, mean, and Gaussian curvatures were used to define surface shape composition and surface roughness of the VP mucosal surface models. Significant differences were found in the surface shape composition, with more saddle/spherical and less flat/cylindrical shapes in OSA than healthy VP mucosal surface models (P surface models were also found to have more mucosal surface roughness (P surface models. Our novel methodology was utilized to model the VP mucosal surface of OSA and healthy subjects. OSA subjects were found to have different VP mucosal surface topography, composed of increased irregular shapes and increased roughness. We speculate increased irregularity in VP mucosal surface may increase pharyngeal collapsibility as a consequence of friction-related pressure loss.NEW & NOTEWORTHY A new methodology was used to model the upper airway mucosal surface topography from magnetic resonance images of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy adults. Curvature analysis was used to analyze the topography of the models, and a new metric was derived to describe the mucosal surface roughness. Increased roughness was

  4. Compliance with noninvasive home ventilation in children with obstructive sleep apnoea.

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    Nathan, Anna Maria; Tang, Jenny Poh Lin; Goh, Anne; Teoh, Oon Hoe; Chay, Oh Moh

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to determine compliance with noninvasive home ventilation in children with obstructive sleep apnoea and the factors affecting this compliance. We retrospectively reviewed 51 children who were prescribed noninvasive home ventilation for the management of obstructive sleep apnoea from 1 January 2000 until 31 May 2008. Noninvasive ventilation was started based on positive polysomnogram, i.e. obstructive apnoea hypopnea index ≥ 1/hr. Compliance was defined as the use of noninvasive ventilation ≥ 4 days/week. Noninvasive home ventilation was started at a median age of 11.5 years. In all, 21 (41.2 %) children were reported to be compliant with treatment. Univariate analysis revealed that the female gender (p = 0.017), presence of asthma (p = 0.023), presence of genetic syndromes (p = 0.023), use of bi-level ventilation versus continuous positive airway pressure (p = 0.027), and funding from the social work department (p = 0.049) were associated with compliance with noninvasive home ventilation. Logistic regression revealed the presence of asthma (p = 0.008) and female gender (p = 0.047) to be significantly associated with compliance with treatment. However, factors such as counselling prior to initiation of treatment, severity of obstructive sleep apnoea before initiation of treatment, obesity, use of humidification, and polysomnogram indices were not found to be associated with treatment compliance. Only 41.2% of the children in this study were reported to be compliant with noninvasive home ventilation. The female gender and the presence of asthma were associated with treatment compliance. Future research focusing on effective methods to improve compliance with noninvasive home ventilation in children should be undertaken.

  5. Numerical analysis for the efficacy of nasal surgery in obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

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    Yu, Shen; Liu, Ying-Xi; Sun, Xiu-Zhen; Su, Ying-Feng; Wang, Ying; Gai, Yin-Zhe

    2014-04-01

    In the present study, we reconstructed upper airway and soft palate models of 3 obstructive sleep apnea—hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients with nasal obstruction. The airflow distribution and movement of the soft palate before and after surgery were described by a numerical simulation method. The curative effect of nasal surgery was evaluated for the three patients with OSAHS. The degree of nasal obstruction in the 3 patients was improved after surgery. For 2 patients with mild OSAHS, the upper airway resistance and soft palate displacement were reduced after surgery. These changes contributed to the mitigation of respiratory airflow limitation. For the patient with severe OSAHS, the upper airway resistance and soft palate displacement increased after surgery, which aggravated the airway obstruction. The efficacy of nasal surgery for patients with OSAHS is determined by the degree of improvement in nasal obstruction and whether the effects on the pharynx are beneficial. Numerical simulation results are consistent with the polysomnogram (PSG) test results, chief complaints, and clinical findings, and can indirectly reflect the degree of nasal patency and improvement of snoring symptoms, and further, provide a theoretical basis to solve relevant clinical problems. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Neck Circumference Is a Predictor of Metabolic Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Short-Sleeping Obese Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Lilian; Piaggi, Paolo; Mattingly, Megan; Zhao, Xiongce; Lucassen, Eliane; Rother, Kristina I.; Sumner, Anne E.; Csako, Gyorgy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The constellation of metabolic syndrome, although controversial with regard to its clinical usefulness, is epidemiologically related to increased diabetes risk and cardiovascular mortality. Our goal was to investigate the associations among neck circumference (NC), obstructive sleep apnea syndromes (OSAS), and metabolic syndrome in obese men and women sleeping less than 6.5 hr per night. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of obese men and premenopausal obese women sleeping less than 6.5 hr per night. We enrolled 120 individuals (92 women), age 40.5±6.9 years and body mass index (BMI) 38.6±6.5 kg/m2. Metabolic syndrome severity was assessed by a score and OSAS was defined as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) ≥5. Metabolic end endocrine parameters were measured, and sleep duration was determined by actigraphy and validated questionnaires. Results: Metabolic syndrome was found in 41% and OSAS in 58% (28% had both). Subjects with metabolic syndrome were 3 years older and more often Caucasian; they had higher RDI scores, larger NC, more visceral fat, lower serum adiponectin, higher 24-hr urinary norepinephrine (NE) excretion, and lower growth hormone concentrations. A NC of ≥38 cm had a sensitivity of 54% and 58% and a specificity of 70% and 79% in predicting the presence of metabolic syndrome and OSAS, respectively. RDI, adiponectin, and NC accounted for approximately 30% of the variability in the metabolic syndrome score, as estimated by an age-, gender-, and race-corrected multivariate model (R2=0.376, Pmetabolic syndrome in short-sleeping obese men and premenopausal obese women. Addition of NC to the definition of metabolic syndrome should be considered and needs to be validated in future studies. PMID:24571423

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as an accident risk factor in professional drivers in Yekaterinburg. Dangerous Sleep (DS-1 study

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    A. A. Belkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available About 20% of all road traffic accidents may be associated with falling asleep while driving. This may be caused by sleep disorders leading to daytime sleepiness, the most common of which is obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. Objective: to study somatic and mental health, sleep disorders, OSAS in particular, in the population of Russian drivers (Sverdlovsk Region. Patients and methods. The descriptive cohort «Dangerous Sleep» (DS-1 study of 20 professional drivers having more than 5-year driving experience was conducted at the Clinical Institute of the Brain. The mean age of the drivers was 45.8 years. They underwent somatic evaluation for cardiovascular risk factors and a psychological examination involving a risk readiness diagnostic procedure, the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and an electroencephalographic examination. A somnological examination assumed testing using the Epworth sleepiness scale, polysomnography, or overnight pulse metry. Results and discussion. 30% of the drivers were found to have marked attention disorders and an inability to adapt to extreme conditions, which create a risk for professional duties. The predisposing factors were noted to be alcohol addiction, overweight, and OSAS, the rate of the latter proved to be higher than that in the general population of able-bodied men. It was shown that a somnological examination should be obligatorily performed while hiring professional drivers, particularly to long hauliers. The drivers having a long length of experience, in whom a periodic examination detects sleep disorders, should be treated for somatic diseases and should also have individual working schedules to rule out their long night-time driving. 

  8. Examination of Pulse Oximetry Tracings to Detect Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Patients with Advanced Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Adrienne S Scott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nocturnal hypoxemia and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA are common comorbidities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The authors sought to develop a strategy to interpret nocturnal pulse oximetry and assess its capacity for detection of OSA in patients with stage 3 to stage 4 COPD. A review of consecutive patients with COPD who were clinically prescribed oximetry and polysomnography was conducted. OSA was diagnosed if the polysomnographic apnea-hypopnea index was >15 events/h. Comprehensive criteria were developed for interpretation of pulse oximetry tracings through iterative validation and interscorer concordance of ≥80%. Criteria consisted of visually identified desaturation ‘events’ (sustained desaturation ≥4%, 1 h time scale, ‘patterns’ (≥3 similar desaturation/saturation cycles, 15 min time scale and the automated oxygen desaturation index. The area under the curve (AUC, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated. Of 59 patients (27 male, 31 had OSA (53%. The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 46% of predicted (range 21% to 74% of predicted and 52% of patients were on long-term oxygen therapy. Among 59 patients, 35 were correctly identified as having OSA or not having OSA, corresponding to an accuracy of 59%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 59% and 60%, respectively. The AUC was 0.57 (95% CI 0.55 to 0.59. Using software-computed desaturation events (hypoxemia ≥4% for ≥10 s indexed at ≥15 events/h of sleep as diagnostic criteria, sensitivity was 60%, specificity was 63% and the AUC was 0.64 (95%CI 0.62 to 0.66. No single criterion demonstrated important diagnostic utility. Pulse oximetry tracing interpretation had a modest diagnostic value in identifying OSA in patients with moderate to severe COPD.

  9. Comparison of Sugammadex versus Neostigmine Costs and Respiratory Complications in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek Yazıcıoğlu; Baran, İlkay; Mutlu, Murad; Ural, Gülçin; Akkaya, Taylan; Özlü, Onur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare sugammadex and neostigmine regarding the efficacy in reversing rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block, the incidence of post-operative respiratory complications and costs in patients undergoing surgery for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Methods After obtaining ethical approval and patient consent, 74 patients in ASA physical status I or II were randomised into two groups to receive 2-mg kg−1 sugammadex (Group S) or 0.04-mg kg−1 neostigmine+0.5-mg atropine (Group N). Groups were compared regarding time to TOF (train-of-four) 0.9, operating room time, post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) stay, post-operative respiratory complications, costs related to neuromuscular block reversal, anaesthesia care and complication treatment. Results Patient demographics, anaesthesia, surgical data and total rocuronium doses were similar between groups. Time to TOF 0.9 was shorter for group S [Group N: 8 (5–18) min; Group S: 2 (1.5–6) min (psugammadex group (vial cost 98.14 TL) than that in the neostigmine group (ampoule cost 0.27 TL; total 6147.88 TL vs. 3569.5 TL); however, complication treatment cost and total cost were lower in group S than those in group N (199.5 TL vs. 3944.6 TL) (staff anaesthesia doctor cost was 0.392 TL per min and the cost of nurse anaesthetist was 0.244 TL per min). Conclusion This study confirmed the efficacy of sugammadex over neostigmine for the reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block. Sugammadex decreases the incidence of post-operative respiratory complications and related costs in patients with OSA. PMID:27366535

  10. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea reduces the risk of atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Adam S; Shvilkin, Alexei; Shah, Dhaval; Haffajee, Charles I; Das, Saumya; Kumar, Kapil; Kramer, Daniel B; Zimetbaum, Peter J; Buxton, Alfred E; Josephson, Mark E; Anter, Elad

    2013-07-23

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) undergoing pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). OSA is a predictor of AF recurrence following PVI. However, the impact of CPAP therapy on PVI outcome in patients with OSA is poorly known. Among 426 patients who underwent PVI between 2007 and 2010, 62 patients had a polysomnography-confirmed diagnosis of OSA. While 32 patients were "CPAP users" the remaining 30 patients were "CPAP nonusers." The recurrence of any atrial tachyarrhythmia, use of antiarrhythmic drugs, and need for repeat ablations were compared between the groups during a follow-up period of 12 months. Additionally, the outcome of patients with OSA was compared to a group of patients from the same PVI cohort without OSA. CPAP therapy resulted in higher AF-free survival rate (71.9% vs. 36.7%; p = 0.01) and AF-free survival off antiarrhythmic drugs or repeat ablation following PVI (65.6% vs. 33.3%; p = 0.02). AF recurrence rate of CPAP-treated patients was similar to a group of patients without OSA (HR: 0.7, p = 0.46). AF recurrence following PVI in CPAP nonuser patients was significantly higher (HR: 2.4, p PVI that improves arrhythmia free survival. PVI offers limited value to OSA patients not treated with CPAP. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Posture-dependent change of tracheal sounds at standardized flows in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Pasterkamp, H; Schäfer, J; Wodicka, G R

    1996-12-01

    The ability of awake subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to dilate their pharynx during inspiration may be defective. Airflow through a relatively more narrow pharyngeal passage should lead to increased flow turbulence and hence to louder respiratory sounds. We therefore studied the increase of tracheal sound intensity (TSI) in the supine position as an indicator of abnormal pharyngeal dynamics in patients with documented OSA. Sound was recorded with a contact sensor at the suprasternal notch in 7 patients with OSA (age, 52 +/- 8 years; body mass index, 29.0 +/- 3; apnea-hypopnea index, 58 +/- 17; means +/- SD), and in 8 control subjects, including obese subjects and snorers (age, 39 +/- 8 years; body mass index, 28.6 +/- 4). Subjects breathed through a pneumotachograph and aimed at target flows of 1.5 to 2 L/s, first sitting, then supine. Flow and sound signals were digitized at a 10-KHz rate. Fourier analysis was applied to sounds within the target flow range and average power spectra were obtained. Spectral power was calculated for frequency bands 0.2 to 1, 1 to 2, and 2 to 3 KHz. In the supine position, OSA patients had a significantly greater increase of inspiratory TSI than control subjects: 7.5 +/- 1.2 dB vs 1.7 +/- 3.4 dB (p TSI also increased in supine subjects, but the change was significantly greater in OSA subjects only at high frequencies. These findings confirm our earlier observations that did not include obese subjects or snorers among control subjects. Measuring posture effects on tracheal sounds is noninvasive and requires little time and effort. The greater increase of inspiratory TSI in supine OSA patients compared to subjects without OSA suggests a potential value for daytime acoustic screening.

  12. História clínica e exame físico em SAOS: clinical history and physical examination Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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    Gleison Marinho Guimarães

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Embora SAOS seja uma patologia comum, é frequentemente subdiagnosticada. Seus sinais e sintomas são, na sua maioria, subjetivos e, portanto, deve haver suspeição diagnóstica quando existir roncos, sonolência diurna, cansaço, desânimo e alteração de humor. Escalas e tabelas com boa sensibilidade, que incluem os sintomas clínicos mais relevantes e dados do exame físico, podem indicar o diagnóstico de SAOS. A confirmação diagnóstica é realizada através de polissonografia, considerada o método padrão ouro.Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common disease, it often goes undiagnosed. The signs and symptoms of the syndrome are mostly subjective. Therefore, snoring, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, dejection and mood changes should raise the suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Scales and tables that have good sensitivity and include the most relevant clinical symptoms and physical examination results can suggest a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The diagnosis is confirmed by polysomnography, which is considered the gold standard method.

  13. The effect of the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on telomere length

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    Tempaku, Priscila Farias; Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Hirotsu, Camila; Andersen, Monica Levy; Xavier, Gabriela; Maurya, Pawan Kumar; Rizzo, Lucas Bortolotto; Brietzke, Elisa; Belangero, Sintia Iole; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) as well as the shortening of telomeres. It is known that OSAS-related factors are stimuli that can contribute to the acceleration of cellular senescence. Thus, the present study aimed to compare the leukocyte telomere length (LTL) between OSAS patients and controls, as well as to verify the correlation between LTL and sleep parameters. We used DNA extracted of 928 individuals from EPISONO to measure the LTL by the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. All individuals were subjected to one full-night polysomnography. LTL was significantly shorter in OSAS patients compared to controls. The results showed negative correlations between LTL and the following variables: apnea-hypopnea index, respiratory disturbance index, desaturation index and wake after sleep onset. LTL was positively correlated with sleep efficiency, total sleep time, basal, minimum and maximum oxygen saturation. Lastly, it was observed that OSAS severity was associated with shorter LTL even after adjusting for sex, age, years of schooling, body mass index, diabetes, stroke and heart attack. In conclusion, our study indicates the presence of an association between LTL and OSAS and a significant impact of severity of OSAS in telomeres shortening. PMID:27690344

  14. Impact of acetazolamide and CPAP on cortical activity in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

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    Katrin Stadelmann

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVES: 1 To investigate the impact of acetazolamide, a drug commonly prescribed for altitude sickness, on cortical oscillations in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. 2 To examine alterations in the sleep EEG after short-term discontinuation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy. DESIGN: Data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized cross-over design studies were analyzed. SETTING: Polysomnographic recordings in sleep laboratory at 490 m and at moderate altitudes in the Swiss Alps: 1630 or 1860 m and 2590 m. PATIENTS: Study 1: 39 OSAS patients. Study 2: 41 OSAS patients. INTERVENTIONS: Study 1: OSAS patients withdrawn from treatment with CPAP. Study 2: OSAS patients treated with autoCPAP. Treatment with acetazolamide (500-750 mg or placebo at moderate altitudes. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: An evening dose of 500 mg acetazolamide reduced slow-wave activity (SWA; approximately 10% and increased spindle activity (approximately 10% during non-REM sleep. In addition, alpha activity during wake after lights out was increased. An evening dose of 250 mg did not affect these cortical oscillations. Discontinuation of CPAP therapy revealed a reduction in SWA (5-10% and increase in beta activity (approximately 25%. CONCLUSIONS: The higher evening dose of 500 mg acetazolamide showed the "spectral fingerprint" of Benzodiazepines, while 250 mg acetazolamide had no impact on cortical oscillations. However, both doses had beneficial effects on oxygen saturation and sleep quality.

  15. Prevalence of risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in interstate bus drivers.

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    Viegas, Carlos Alberto de Assis; de Oliveira, Haroldo Willuweit

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in interstate bus drivers. This study involved 262 professional interstate bus drivers employed by a Brazilian company headquartered in the Federal District. The drivers were evaluated using a questionnaire designed to assess respiratory sleep disorders, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, test of sustained attention, test of divided attention and anthropometric measurements. Body weight was found to be above the ideal in 68% of the drivers evaluated, 34% of which had a neck circumference = 42 cm. During the study period, the drivers reported using tobacco (27%), cola-based soft drinks (55%), alcohol (65%) and coffee (88%). The Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was = 10 points in 28%. Snoring was reported by 36%, sleep apnea by 5%, a sensation of suffocation during sleep by 12%, restless sleep by 29% and drowsiness while driving by 48%. There were 42% who had been involved in transit accidents, 7.6% of which were attributed to hypersomnolence. Those scoring higher than 10 of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale presented lower levels of sustained attention. In addition, a reduction in divided attention was found to correlate with greater daytime sleepiness and larger neck circumference. The rate of stimulant use found in the group of drivers evaluated is alarming. The high prevalence of daytime sleepiness indicates that attentiveness is reduced in this population.

  16. Utility of portable monitoring in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea

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    U Krishnaswamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common but underdiagnosed sleep disorder, which is associated with systemic consequences such as hypertension, stroke, metabolic syndrome, and ischemic heart disease. Nocturnal laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG is the gold standard test for diagnosis of OSA. PSG consists of a simultaneous recording of multiple physiologic parameters related to sleep and wakefulness including electroencephalography (EEG, electrooculography (EOG, surface electromyography (EMG, airflow measurement using thermistor and nasal pressure transducer, pulse oximetry and respiratory effort (thoracic and abdominal. Multiple alternative and simpler methods that record respiratory parameters alone for diagnosing OSA have been developed in the past two decades. These devices are called portable monitors (PMs and enable performing sleep studies at a lower cost with shorter waiting times. It has been observed and reported that comprehensive sleep evaluation coupled with the use of PMs can fulfill the unmet need for diagnostic testing in various out-of-hospital settings in patients with suspected OSA. This article reviews the available medical literature on PMs in order to justify the utility of PMs in the diagnosis of OSA, especially in resource-poor, high-disease burden settings. The published practice parameters for the use of these devices have also been reviewed with respect to their relevance in the Indian setting.

  17. Microarray studies of genomic oxidative stress and cell cycle responses in obstructive sleep apnea.

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    Hoffmann, Michal S; Singh, Prachi; Wolk, Robert; Romero-Corral, Abel; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Somers, Virend K

    2007-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the commonest form of sleep-disordered breathing, is characterized by recurrent episodes of intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. This study evaluated microarray measures of gene transcript levels in OSA subjects compared to age and BMI matched healthy controls. Measurements were obtained before and after: (a) a night of normal sleep in controls; and (b) a night of untreated apnea in OSA patients. All subjects underwent full polysomnography. mRNA from the whole blood samples was analyzed by HG-U133A and B Affymetrix GeneChip arrays using Spotfire 7.2 data analysis platform. After sleep in OSA patients, changes were noted in several genes involved in modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including heme oxygenase 1, superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, and catalase. Changes were also observed in genes involved in cell growth, proliferation, and the cell cycle such as cell division cycle 25B, signaling lymphocyte activating molecule (SLAM), calgizzarin S100A11, B-cell translocation gene, Src-like adapter protein (SLAP), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 2. These overnight changes in OSA patients are suggestive of activation of several mechanisms to modulate, and adapt to, increased ROS developing in response to the frequent episodes of intermittent hypoxia.

  18. Markers of Myocardial Ischemia in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Coronary Artery Disease

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    Misa Valo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by intermittent hypoxia during sleep. We tested the hypothesis that nocturnal myocardial ischemia is detectable by ST segment depression and elevation of high sensitive troponin T (hsTrop T and B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP in patients with OSA and coexisting coronary artery disease (CAD. Twenty-one patients with OSA and CAD and 20 patients with OSA alone underwent in-hospital polysomnography. Blood samples for hsTrop T and NT-proBNP measurements were drawn before and after sleep. ST segment depression was measured at the time of maximum oxygen desaturation during sleep. The apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI, oxygen saturation nadir, and time in bed with oxygen saturation of ≤80% were similar in both groups. Levels of hsTrop T and NT-proBNP did not differ significantly before and after sleep but NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in patients suffering from OSA and CAD compared to patients with OSA alone. No significant ST depression was found at the time of oxygen saturation nadir in either group. Despite the fact that patients with untreated OSA and coexisting CAD experienced severe nocturnal hypoxemia, we were unable to detect myocardial ischemia or myocyte necrosis based on significant ST segment depression or elevation of hsTrop T and NT-proBNP, respectively.

  19. Sleep quality predicts quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Tzahit Simon-Tuval

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Scharf1*, Nimrod Maimon2*, Tzahit Simon-Tuval3, Barbara J Bernhard-Scharf4, Haim Reuveni2, Ariel Tarasiuk21Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Beersheba, Israel; 3Guilford Glazer School of Business and Management, Ben Gurion University, Beersheba, Israel; 4Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; The study was performed at the Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheva, Israel*Drs Scharf and Maimon contributed equally to this manuscript.Purpose: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients may suffer from poor sleep and health-related quality of life. We hypothesized that disturbed sleep in COPD is correlated with quality of life.Methods: In 180 patients with COPD (forced expired volume in 1 second [FEV1] 47.6 ± 15.2% predicted, 77.8% male, aged 65.9 ± 11.7 years, we administered general (Health Utilities Index 3 and disease-specific (St George’s Respiratory questionnaires and an index of disturbed sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.Results: Overall scores indicated poor general (Health Utilities Index 3: 0.52 ± 0.38, disease-specific (St George’s: 57.0 ± 21.3 quality of life and poor sleep quality (Pittsburgh 11.0 ± 5.4. Sleep time correlated with the number of respiratory and anxiety symptoms reported at night. Seventy-seven percent of the patients had Pittsburg scores >5, and the median Pittsburgh score was 12. On multivariate regression, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was an independent predictor of both the Health Utilities Index 3 and the St George’s scores, accounting for 3% and 5%, respectively, of the scores. Only approximately 25% of the patients demonstrated excessive sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale >9.Conclusions: Most patients with COPD suffer disturbed sleep. Sleep quality was correlated with general and disease-specific quality of life. Only a minority of COPD patients

  20. Modeling the autonomic and metabolic effects of obstructive sleep apnea: A simulation study.

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    Limei eCheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term exposure to intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation introduced by recurring obstructive sleep apnea has been linked to subsequent cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear, but impairment of the normal interactions among the systems that regulate autonomic and metabolic function is likely involved. We have extended an existing integrative model of respiratory, cardiovascular and sleep-wake state control, to incorporate a sub-model of glucose-insulin-fatty acid regulation. This computational model is capable of simulating the complex dynamics of cardiorespiratory control, chemoreflex and state-related control of breath-to-breath ventilation, state-related and chemoreflex control of upper airway potency, respiratory and circulatory mechanics, as well as the metabolic control of glucose insulin dynamics and its interactions with the autonomic control. The interactions between autonomic and metabolic control include the circadian regulation of epinephrine secretion, epinephrine regulation on dynamic fluctuations in glucose and free-fatty acid in plasma, metabolic coupling among tissues and organs provided by insulin and epinephrine, as well as the effect of insulin on peripheral vascular sympathetic activity. These model simulations provide insight into the relative importance of the various mechanisms that determine the acute and chronic physiological effects of sleep-disordered breathing. The model can also be used to investigate the effects of a variety of interventions, such as different glucose clamps, the intravenous glucose tolerance test and the application of continuous positive airway pressure on obstructive sleep apnea subjects. As such, this model provides the foundation on which future efforts to simulate disease progression and the long-term effects of pharmacological intervention can be based.

  1. Self-reported sleep quality and acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Geiger-Brown J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jeanne Geiger-Brown,1 Sarah Lindberg,2 Samuel Krachman,3 Charlene E McEvoy,4 Gerard J Criner,3 John E Connett,2 Richard K Albert,5 Steven M Scharf6 1Center for Health Outcomes Research, University of Maryland School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, 2University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Division of Biostatistics, Minneapolis, MN, 3Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, 4Health Partners Institute of Education and Research, St Paul, MN, 5The Medicine Service, Denver Health and Department of Medicine, the University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO, 6Department of Medicine, Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD suffer from poor sleep quality. We hypothesized that poor sleep quality in otherwise stable patients predicted exacerbations in these patients. Methods: This is a secondary analysis of the results of a previously published randomized trial of azithromycin in 1,117 patients with moderate to severe COPD who were clinically stable on enrollment. Sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Other quality of life indices included the Medical Outcome Study 36-item Short Form Health Survey and the St Georges Respiratory Questionnaire. Outcomes included time to first exacerbation and exacerbation rate. Results: Sleep quality was “poor” (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index >5 in 53% of participants but was not related to age or severity of airflow obstruction. Quality of life scores were worse in “poor” sleepers than in “good” sleepers. Major classes of comorbid conditions, including psychiatric, neurologic, and musculoskeletal disease, were more prevalent in the “poor” sleepers. Unadjusted time to first exacerbation was shorter (190 versus 239 days and exacerbation rate (1

  2. A longitudinal assessment of sleep variables during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    Vanaparthy, R; Mota, P; Khan, R; Ehsan, M; Qureshi, A; ZuWallack, R; Leidy, N

    2015-11-01

    Although sleep disturbance is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), relatively little is known on the effect of the exacerbation on sleep quality. Accordingly, we longitudinally assessed sleep variables during exacerbations and clinical stability. This is a sub-study of a larger observational analysis. Inclusion criteria were clinically stable COPD and two or more clinical exacerbations in the preceding 12 months. Patients were followed for approximately 6 months and during this time the following were recorded daily: (1) COPD exacerbations, which were determined in two ways, clinically and symptom defined using the exacerbations of chronic pulmonary disease tool (EXACT); (2) daytime sleepiness, which was measured using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale; (3) subjective awakenings, which was measured from a sleep diary; and (4) sleep duration, efficiency, and objective awakenings, which was measured from actigraphy. These variables for exacerbation and non-exacerbation days were compared. Seventeen patients (9 male, age 63 ± 12 years, forced expiratory volume in 1 second 52 ± 20%) entered data over 135 ± 18 days. During this time, 15 patients had 27 symptom-defined exacerbations and 8 had 9 clinically reported exacerbations. Symptom-defined exacerbation days were 26% of the total study days. More daytime sleepiness, decreased total sleep time (TST), and decreased sleep efficiency (SE) were present during exacerbations compared with clinical stability (p < 0.001). These disturbances tended to be greater during clinically reported exacerbations than during unreported events (p < 0.05). Increased daytime sleepiness, less TST, and poorer SE are present during COPD exacerbations.

  3. Clinical symptoms and related factors of obstructive sleep apnea among overweight and obese taxi drivers

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    Agus D. Susanto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is common condition in commercial drivers while overweight and obesity as the most important risk factors. This study aimed to know the clinical symptoms and risk factors of OSA in overweight and obese taxi drivers in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was done in 103 taxi drivers in Jakarta from November 2011–September 2013, by systematic random sampling from 10 taxi stations. Inclusion criteria were taxi drivers with body mass index (BMI which 23–29.9 and mild or moderate OSA. Portable polysomnography (PSG test was used to diagnose OSA. Parametric and nonparametric test were used in bivariate analysis. Logistic regression multivariable was used to final evaluate risk factors of OSA.Results: There were 54 (52.4% of 103 drivers with OSA and 49 (47.6% without OSA. Clinical symptoms found significantly (p<0.05 were snoring, unrefreshing sleep, occasional sleep while driving, and headache or nausea on waking up in the morning. Risk factors for OSA were increased BMI (OR=0.60, 95% CI=0.45–0.79, p=0.001, snoring history in the family (OR=4.92, 95% CI=1.82–13.31, p=0.002 and sleep duration <7 hours within 24 hours (OR=5.14, 95% CI=1.37–19.23, p=0.015.Conclusion: Clinical symptoms of OSA were snoring, unrefreshing sleep, occasional sleep while driving and headache or nausea on waking up in the morning. Risk factors of OSA were increased BMI, snoring history in the family and sleep duration <7 hours within 24 hours.

  4. Zolpidem Induced Sleep-related Eating and Complex Behaviors in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Restless Legs Syndrome

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    Park, Young-Min; Shin, Hyun-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Zolpidem-induced sleep-related complex behaviors (SRCB) with anterograde amnesia have been reported. We describe herein a case in which the development of zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) and SRCB was strongly suspected. A 71-year-old Korean male was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry due to his repetitive SRED and SRCB with anterograde amnesia, which he reported as having occurred since taking zolpidem. The patient also had restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). His baseline serum iron level was low at admission. Zolpidem discontinuation resulted in the immediate disappearance of his SRED, but did not affect his RLS symptoms. These symptoms rapidly improved after adding a single i.v. iron injection once daily, and so he was discharged to day-clinic treatment. These findings indicate that zolpidem can induce SRCB. Although the pathophysiology of zolpidem-induced SRED and other SRCB remains unclear, clinicians should carefully monitor for the potential induction of complex behaviors associated with zolpidem in patients with comorbid RLS or OSA. PMID:27489385

  5. Zolpidem Induced Sleep-related Eating and Complex Behaviors in a Patient with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Min; Shin, Hyun-Woo

    2016-08-31

    Zolpidem-induced sleep-related complex behaviors (SRCB) with anterograde amnesia have been reported. We describe herein a case in which the development of zolpidem-induced sleep-related eating disorder (SRED) and SRCB was strongly suspected. A 71-year-old Korean male was admitted to the Department of Psychiatry due to his repetitive SRED and SRCB with anterograde amnesia, which he reported as having occurred since taking zolpidem. The patient also had restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). His baseline serum iron level was low at admission. Zolpidem discontinuation resulted in the immediate disappearance of his SRED, but did not affect his RLS symptoms. These symptoms rapidly improved after adding a single i.v. iron injection once daily, and so he was discharged to day-clinic treatment. These findings indicate that zolpidem can induce SRCB. Although the pathophysiology of zolpidem-induced SRED and other SRCB remains unclear, clinicians should carefully monitor for the potential induction of complex behaviors associated with zolpidem in patients with comorbid RLS or OSA.

  6. Value of STOP-Bang questionnaire in screening patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome in sleep disordered breathing clinic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Jinmei; Huang Rong; Zhong Xu; Xiao Yi; Zhou Jiong

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is the most common sleep-disordered breathing and is still underdiagnosed.This study was designed to evaluate the value of the STOP-Bang questionnaire (SBQ) in screening OSAHS in sleep-disordered breathing clinics in order to extend it into the general Chinese population.Methods Two hundred and twelve patients undergoing overnight polysomnography (PSG) in the sleep-disordered breathing clinic of Pecking Union Medical College Hospital between May 2011 and January 2012 were prospectively included and were asked to fill in the SBQ.A score of 3 or more of the SBQ indicated a high risk of OSAHS.We analyzed the sensitivities and specificities of SBQ in screening OSAHS.Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the probabilities of the severity of OSAHS based upon the apnea hypopnea index (AHI).Results The patients at high risk of OSAHS had higher AHI,higher oxygen desaturation index (ODI),lower pulse oxygen saturation (LSpO2) during sleep time and less sleep time in stage N3.SBQ scores were positively correlated with AHI,ODI and the ratio of SpO2 lower than 90%,and negatively correlated with LSpO2 during sleep.The sensitivities of the SBQ with AHI ≥5/h,AHI ≥15/h,AHI ≥30/h as cut-offs were 94.9%,96.5%,and 97.7%,respectively,and the specificities were 50.0%,28.6%,and 17.9%,respectively.The Logistic regression analysis showed the probability of severe OSAHS increased and the probability of normal subjects decreased with increasing SBQ score.Conclusions The STOP-Bang questionnaire has excellent sensitivity in screening OSAHS patients and can predict the severity of OSAHS.More studies will be required to determine the value of SBQ in the general Chinese population.

  7. Refractory Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Patient with Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis

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    Ara Darakjian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH can cause ossification of ligaments and may affect the spine. We report a case of obstructive sleep apnea in a patient with significant upper airway narrowing secondary to cervical DISH. This patient had an initial apnea-hypopnea index (AHI of 145 events/hour and was treated with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, genial tubercle advancement, hyoid suspension, septoplasty, inferior turbinoplasties, and radiofrequency ablations to the tongue base which reduced his AHI to 40 events/hour. He redeveloped symptoms, was started on positive airway pressure (PAP therapy, and later underwent a maxillomandibular advancement which improved his AHI to 16.3 events/hour. A few years later his AHI was 100.4 events/hour. His disease has gradually progressed over time and he was restarted on PAP therapy. Despite PAP titration, years of using PAP therapy, and being 100 percent compliant for the past three months (average daily use of 7.6 hours/night, he has an AHI of 5.1 events/hour and has persistent hypersomnia with an Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire score of 18/24. At this time he is pending further hypersomnia work-up. DISH patients require prolonged follow-up to monitor the progression of disease, and they may require unconventional measures for adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  8. Inflammatory Markers and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Children: The NANOS Study

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    Alex Gileles-Hillel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Obesity and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA are common coexisting conditions associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state underlying some of the cognitive, metabolic, and cardiovascular morbidities. Aim. To examine the levels of inflammatory markers in obese community-dwelling children with OSA, as compared to no-OSA, and their association with clinical and polysomnographic (PSG variables. Methods. In this cross-sectional, prospective multicenter study, healthy obese Spanish children (ages 4–15 years were randomly selected and underwent nocturnal PSG followed by a morning fasting blood draw. Plasma samples were assayed for multiple inflammatory markers. Results. 204 children were enrolled in the study; 75 had OSA, defined by an obstructive respiratory disturbance index (RDI of 3 events/hour total sleep time (TST. BMI, gender, and age were similar in OSA and no-OSA children. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 levels were significantly higher in OSA children, with interleukin-6 concentrations being higher in moderate-severe OSA (i.e., AHI > 5/hrTST; P<0.01, while MCP-1 levels were associated with more prolonged nocturnal hypercapnia (P<0.001. Conclusion. IL-6, MCP-1, and PAI-1 are altered in the context of OSA among community-based obese children further reinforcing the proinflammatory effects of sleep disorders such as OSA. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01322763.

  9. A comparative study on oxidative stress role in nasal breathing impairment and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passali, D; Corallo, G; Petti, A; Longini, M; Passali, F M; Buonocore, G; Bellussi, L M

    2016-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a sleep disorder that leads to metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to define the expression and clinical significance of biomarkers involved in oxidative stress in patients with OSAS. A prospective study was designed to compare outcomes of oxidative stress laboratory tests in three groups of subjects. The study involved the recruitment of three groups of subjects, 10 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome with AHI > 30; 10 patients suffering from snoring at night with AHI oxidative and antioxidant (plasma thiol groups) biomarkers in blood and urine samples. No statistical differences in age, sex distribution or body mass index were present between the three groups (p > 0.05). There were significant differences in AHI among the three groups of patients (p 0.05) between the levels of biomarkers of oxidative stress in the three populations studied. The results of our study show that the nose can play a role in the pathogenesis of OSAS through the production of biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea: a cardiometabolic risk in obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

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    Drager, Luciano F; Togeiro, Sônia M; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2013-08-13

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed condition characterized by recurrent episodes of obstruction of the upper airway leading to sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia during sleep. Obesity predisposes to OSA, and the prevalence of OSA is increasing worldwide because of the ongoing epidemic of obesity. Recent evidence has shown that surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk, including sympathetic activation, systemic inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction, are significantly increased in obese patients with OSA versus those without OSA, suggesting that OSA is not simply an epiphenomenon of obesity. Moreover, findings from animal models and patients with OSA show that intermittent hypoxia exacerbates the metabolic dysfunction of obesity, augmenting insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In patients with the metabolic syndrome, the prevalence of moderate to severe OSA is very high (∼60%). In this population, OSA is independently associated with increased glucose and triglyceride levels as well as markers of inflammation, arterial stiffness, and atherosclerosis. A recent randomized, controlled, crossover study showed that effective treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure for 3 months significantly reduced several components of the metabolic syndrome, including blood pressure, triglyceride levels, and visceral fat. Finally, several cohort studies have consistently shown that OSA is associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, independent of obesity. Taken together, these results support the concept that OSA exacerbates the cardiometabolic risk attributed to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. Recognition and treatment of OSA may decrease the cardiovascular risk in obese patients. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated recognition of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using support vector machine classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Angari, Haitham M; Sahakian, Alan V

    2012-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder that causes pauses of breathing due to repetitive obstruction of the upper airways of the respiratory system. The effect of this phenomenon can be observed in other physiological signals like the heart rate variability, oxygen saturation, and the respiratory effort signals. In this study, features from these signals were extracted from 50 control and 50 OSA patients from the Sleep Heart Health Study database and implemented for minute and subject classifications. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used with linear and second-order polynomial kernels. For the minute classification, the respiratory features had the highest sensitivity while the oxygen saturation gave the highest specificity. The polynomial kernel always had better performance and the highest accuracy of 82.4% (Sen: 69.9%, Spec: 91.4%) was achieved using the combined-feature classifier. For subject classification, the polynomial kernel had a clear improvement in the oxygen saturation accuracy as the highest accuracy of 95% was achieved by both the oxygen saturation (Sen: 100%, Spec: 90.2%) and the combined-feature (Sen: 91.8%, Spec: 98.0%). Further analysis of the SVM with other kernel types might be useful for optimizing the classifier with the appropriate features for an OSA automated detection algorithm.

  12. Predictors and prevalence of obstructive sleep apnoea and snoring in 1001 middle aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradling, J R; Crosby, J H

    1991-02-01

    One thousand and one men, aged 35-65 years, were identified from the age-sex register of one group general practice. Over four years 900 men were visited at home and asked questions about symptoms potentially related to sleep apnoea and snoring. Height, weight, neck circumference, resting arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and spirometric values were also determined. All night oximetry was then performed at home and the tracing analysed for the number of dips in SaO2 of more than 4%. Subjects with more than five dips of 4% SaO2 or more per hour were invited for sleep laboratory polysomnography. Seventeen per cent of the men admitted to snoring "often." Multiple linear regression techniques identified and ranked neck circumference (r2 = 7.2%), cigarette consumption (r2 = 3.4%), and nasal stuffiness (r2 = 2%) as the only significant independent predictors of snoring. Together these account for at least a sixfold variation in the likelihood of being an "often" snorer. Forty six subjects (5%) had greater than 4% SaO2 dip rates of over five an hour and 31 of these had full sleep studies. Three subjects had clinically obvious and severe symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea, giving a prevalence of three per 1001 men (0.3%; 95% confidence interval 0.07-0.9%). Eighteen men had obstructive sleep apnoea only when supine and in 10 the cause of the SaO2 dipping on the original home tracing was not elucidated. The greater than 4% SaO2 dip rates correlated with the history of snoring. Multiple linear regression techniques identified and ranked neck circumference (r2 = 7.9%), alcohol consumption (r2 = 3.7%), age (r2 = 1%) and obesity (r2 = 1%) as the only significant independent predictors of the rate of overnight hypoxic dipping. This study shows that snoring in this randomly selected population correlates best with neck size, smoking, and nasal stuffiness. Obstructive sleep apnoea, defined by nocturnal hypoxaemia, correlates best with neck size and alcohol, and less so with age

  13. Improvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Diagnosis and Management Wait Times: A Retrospective Analysis of a Home Management Pathway for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Alan Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea is a common condition within the Canadian population. The current gold standard for diagnosis and management of patients is in-laboratory (in-lab polysomnography; however, the limited availability of testing options for patients has led to long wait times and increased disease burden within the population. The Sleep Research Laboratory in Saskatoon (Saskatchewan implemented a home management program to run in parallel with the in-lab system several years ago in an effort to increase their capacity and reduce wait times. The present study was a retrospective analysis of all patients referred to the program between 2009 and 2012. The home management system has improved wait times by diagnosing and managing up to one-half of the referred patient population, reducing the wait for in-lab treatment from a median of 152 days in 2009 to 92 days in 2012 (P<0.0001. Moving forward, home management can provide a viable alternative to in-lab testing for patients who meet strict entry criteria, reducing the in-lab workload and, ultimately, reducing wait times.

  14. Association between obstructive sleep apnea and health-related quality of life in individuals affected with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østertun Geirdal, Amy; Øverland, Britt; Heimdal, Ketil; Storhaug, Kari; Asten, Pamela; Akre, Harriet

    2013-11-01

    Although the relationship between Quality of Life (QoL) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been reported in several studies, little is known about this relationship among individuals affected with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). The aim of this study was to examine the associations between obstructive sleep and QoL in TCS patients. Thirty-six individuals with TCS (8-75 years) were invited to participate in expanded medical examinations, including a sleep study, polysomnography, as well as to respond to questionnaires about health related Health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Twenty-three (64 %) responded to the invitation, but four were later excluded due to additional diagnoses or unconfirmed TCS, and four were below 12 years and excluded due to different scoring rules for sleep and respiratory disturbances in young children and adults. The remaining group comprised 15 adults and adolescents with TCS, 5 male (33 %) and 10 female (66 %). The participants were between 12 and 75 years of age (mean 38.6, SD 18.5). Obstructive sleep was found in 87 % of the patients and several sleep apnea parameters, among these wake time after sleep, subjective snoring and mean saturation, were associated with poorer HRQoL. OSA appears to account for reduced HRQoL in adolescents and adults with TCS.

  15. Determinants of Wake Pco2 and Increases in Wake Pco2 over Time in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittivoravitkul, Prapun; Kaw, Roop; Hatipoğlu, Umur; Wang, Lu; Aboussouan, Loutfi S

    2016-02-01

    The progression from obesity and obstructive sleep apnea to obesity with hypoventilation and daytime hypercapnia may relate to features of sleep-disordered breathing events that affect loading and unloading of carbon dioxide. To determine whether the wake Pco2 increases over time in untreated obstructive sleep apnea, and whether that increase is explained by changes in sleep-disordered breathing event duration, interevent duration, or postevent ventilation amplitude. We selected 14 adults who had two polysomnographic studies more than 1 year apart because of untreated or suboptimally treated moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea. Demographic and polysomnographic data were reviewed for both sets of studies, including the evening wake end-tidal CO2, the ratio of mean event to mean interevent duration (subsuming apneas and hypopneas), and the ratio of mean post- to preevent breath amplitude. The mean (SD) wake end-tidal Pco2 increased between studies from 35.9 (4.2) to 39.5 (3.9) mm Hg (P level between studies (median, 24.0-26.5 mmol/L; P = 0.01). In our study cohort, wake end-tidal CO2 correlated with body mass index and features of sleep apnea that influence the balance of loading and unloading of CO2. However, those features remained fixed over time, even as the wake Pco2 and bicarbonate levels increased with untreated sleep apnea.

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: An important piece in the puzzle of cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Cátia; Santos, Beatriz; Severino, Davide; Cabanelas, Nuno; Peres, Marisa; Monteiro, Isabel; Leal, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) is a clinical entity characterized by recurring episodes of apnea and/or hypopnea during sleep, due to a total or partial collapse, respectively, of the upper airway. This collapse originates a set of pathophysiological changes that determine the appearance of several cardiovascular complications. OSA contributes for the development of hypertension, heart failure, arrhythmias and coronary heart disease. Nowadays it is recognized to be an important public health problem, taking into account not just its repercussions but also its prevalence, since the main risk factor for the disease is obesity, a growing problem worldwide, both in developed and developing countries. The present review summarizes the current knowledge about OSA, as regards its definition, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, cardiovascular effects and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. [Relationship between adult craniofacial structures and development of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuqin; Liu, Lizhong

    2010-06-01

    To explore the influence of adult craniofacial structures on obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). This study compared the measurements of the height, body weight,neck circumference, the mallampati oropharyngeal score grading, thyromental distance, thyromental angle, lobule-mental distance, mental-lower lip distance of 50 patients with OSAHS with those of 50 controls. Statistical findings showed that OSAHS patients were different from controls in the following ways: (1) higher neck circumference; (2) larger thyromental angle; (3) higher Mallampati scores; (4) higher body mass index; (5) shorter mental-lower lip distance. A crowded posterior oropharynx and a steep thyromental plane are associated with OSAHS. The adult craniofacial structures of bony and soft tissue determine the dimension of upper airway during sleep andpaly an important role in the development of OSAHS.

  18. Atrial Arrhythmias in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Underlying Mechanisms and Implications in the Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Filgueiras-Rama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common disorder characterized by repetitive interruption of ventilation during sleep caused by recurrent upper airway collapse, which leads to intermittent hypoxia. The disorder is commonly undiagnosed despite its relationship with substantial cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the effects of the disorder appear to be particularly dangerous in young subjects. In the last decade, substantial clinical evidence has identified OSA as independent risk factor for both bradyarrhythmias and tachyarrhythmias. To date the mechanisms leading to such arrhythmias have not been completely understood. However, recent data from animal models and new molecular analyses have increased our knowledge of the field, which might lead to future improvement in current therapeutic strategies mainly based on continuous positive airway pressure. This paper aims at providing readers a brief and specific revision of current knowledge about the mechanisms underlying atrial arrhythmias in OSA and their clinical and therapeutic implications.

  19. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with mandibular advancement appliance over prostheses: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Thais Moura; Colen, Sâmia; Cunali, Paulo Afonso; Rossi, Rowdley; Dal-Fabbro, Cibele; Ferraz, Otávio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia

    2015-01-01

    Treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) is recommended for mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), primary snoring and as a secondary option for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, because it has better adherence and acceptance. However, edentulous patients do not have supports to hold the MAD. This study aimed to present a possible to OSA treatment with MAD in over complete upper and partial lower dentures. The patient, a 38-year-old female with mild OSA, was treated with a MAD. The respiratory parameter, such as apnea–hypopnea index, arousal index and oxyhemoglobin saturation was improved after treatment. PMID:26483952

  20. Sexsomnia and REM- predominant obstructive sleep apnea effectively treated with a mandibular advancement device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Meira e Cruz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasomnias with sexual behavior or sexsomnias are considered a subtype of NREM parasomnias. Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea (OSAH has been described as a known triggering factor for parasomnias including sexsomnia. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP has been the standard of treatment for OSAH but mandibular advancement devices (MAD are becoming an important treatment alternative. We present the case of a patient with mild OSAH and sexsomnia who had resolution of both conditions with a MAD. This patient had the added uniqueness of having REM-predominant OSAH

  1. The Specific Characteristics in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cor Pulmonale

    OpenAIRE

    Pi-Chang Lee; Betau Hwang; Wen-Jue Soong; C. C. Laura Meng

    2012-01-01

    Background. The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the pediatric population is currently estimated at 1-2% of all children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical and hemodynamic characteristics in pediatric patients with cor pulmonale and OSA. Methods. Thirty children with the diagnosis of OSA were included. These patients consisted of 26 male and 4 female children with a mean age of 7 ± 4 years old. Five of those children were found to be associated with cor p...

  2. Residual Daytime Sleepiness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea After Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Optimization: Causes and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Julia L; Serinel, Yasmina; Marshall, Nathaniel S; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2016-09-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but it is also common in the general population. When sleepiness remains after continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA, comorbid conditions or permanent brain injury before CPAP therapy may be the cause of the residual sleepiness. There is currently no broad approach to treating residual EDS in patients with OSA. Individual assessment must be made of comorbid conditions and medications, and of lifestyle factors that may be contributing to the sleepiness. Modafinil and armodafinil are the only pharmacologic agents indicated for residual sleepiness in these patients.

  3. Lower grade chronic inflammation is associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宏霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the existence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome(OSAS)in patients with type 2 diabetes(T2DM) is associated with low grade chronic inflammation.Methods Fifty-four patients hospitalized for poor glycemic control from 12/2008 to 12/2009 were divided into 2 groups,OSAS group(T2DM with OSAS,27 cases)and NOSAS group(T2DM without OSAS,27 cases).The control group consisted of 26people from a health check-up program without diabetes

  4. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome in adults with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Elizabeth A

    2016-12-01

    Adults with Down syndrome are predisposed to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors.The prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome is estimated at 35-42%. This is up to ten-times higher than in the general adult population.Symptoms of OSAHS, including behavioural and emotional disturbances as well as standard symptoms such as sleepiness, should be monitored as part of regular health surveillance in adults with Down syndrome.There is evidence that the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in adults with Down syndrome and comorbid OSAHS can lead to significant improvements in subjective sleepiness, behaviour and cognitive function, though further large-scale trials are required. To discuss the relationship between the phenotypic features of Down syndrome and the risk factors for obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS).To examine the prevalence of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome.To review recent research into the effectiveness of treatment of OSAHS in adults with Down syndrome using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS) is characterised by repeated cycles of upper airway obstruction during sleep, leading to diurnal symptoms. Individuals with Down syndrome are predisposed to OSAHS due to overlap between the Down syndrome phenotype and OSAHS risk factors. Recent large studies using subjective and objective measures estimate that OSAHS affects around 40% of adults with Down syndrome, in contrast to 2-4% of the general adult population. The "double-hit" of comorbid Down syndrome and OSAHS may accelerate cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome. However, with the appropriate care and support, OSAHS can be treated effectively in this group using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, improving daytime function and behaviour. Symptoms of OSAHS should be routinely

  5. Genetic aspects of hypertension and metabolic disease in the obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riha, R.L.; Diefenbach, K.; Jennum, P.;

    2008-01-01

    phenotyping, which has hampered genetic dissection of these diseases; in addition, sleep-disordered breathing has not been factored into most studies dealing with essential hypertension or metabolic syndrome. Genome-wide scans have yielded inconsistent results in all three disorders under discussion......Though it has long been recognised that there is a hereditary component to the obstructive steep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), identifying its genetic basis remains elusive. Hypertension and metabolic syndrome, Like OSAHS, are polygenic disorders, physiologically complex and the product...

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease: back and forward in time over the last 25 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan SF

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 25 years, there have been significant advances made in understanding the pathophysiology and cardiovascular consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Substantial evidence now implicates OSA as an independent risk factor for the development of hypertension, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure and stroke, as well as increased risk of death. Pathophysiologic mechanisms include release of inflammatory mediators, oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction, hypercoagulability and endothelial dysfunction. Although non-randomized intervention studies suggest that treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure may mitigate its impact of the development of cardiovascular disease, randomized clinical trials are lacking.

  7. Upper airway surgery of obstructive sleep apnea in pycnodysostosis: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testani, Elisa; Scarano, Emanuele; Leoni, Chiara; Dittoni, Serena; Losurdo, Anna; Colicchio, Salvatore; Gnoni, Valentina; Vollono, Catello; Zampino, Giuseppe; Paludetti, Gaetano; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-08-01

    Pycnodysostosis is an autosomal recessive disorder due to a mutation in the cathepsin K gene, which causes a decrease of the bone turnover; a review of the literature suggests that pycnodysostosis is frequently associated with severe respiratory obstruction, which needs surgical treatment. The aim of this paper is to describe the surgical treatment of a 3½-year-old girl affected by Pycnodysostosis complicated by a severe sleep-related respiratory disorder. The surgical treatment, consisting of adenotonsillectomy and palatoplasty, resulted in a striking amelioration of respiratory parameters and increased posterior airway space, and allowed the patient to avoid tracheotomy while awaiting for maxillo-mandibular surgery.

  8. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Redhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea decreases central nervous system-derived proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yo-El S; Finn, Mary Beth; Sutphen, Courtney L; Herries, Elizabeth M; Jerome, Gina M; Ladenson, Jack H; Crimmins, Daniel L; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M

    2016-07-01

    We hypothesized that one mechanism underlying the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Alzheimer's disease is OSA leading to decreased slow wave activity (SWA), increased synaptic activity, decreased glymphatic clearance, and increased amyloid-β. Polysomnography and lumbar puncture were performed in OSA and control groups. SWA negatively correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β-40 among controls and was decreased in the OSA group. Unexpectedly, amyloid-β-40 was decreased in the OSA group. Other neuronally derived proteins, but not total protein, were also decreased in the OSA group, suggesting that OSA may affect the interaction between interstitial and cerebrospinal fluid. Ann Neurol 2016;80:154-159.

  10. Effect of Positive Airway Pressure on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Non-Sleepy Obstructive Sleep Apnea : The RICCADSA Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peker, Yüksel; Glantz, Helena; Eulenburg, Christine; Wegscheider, Karl; Herlitz, Johan; Thunström, Erik

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE: Obstructive sleep apnea is common in patients with coronary artery disease, many of whom do not report daytime sleepiness. First-line treatment for symptomatic obstructive sleep apnea is continuous positive airway pressure, but its value in patients without daytime sleepiness is uncertain

  11. Lack of effect of sleep apnea on oxidative stress in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Simiakakis

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate markers of systemic oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity in subjects with and without OSAS in order to investigate the most important factors that determine the oxidant-antioxidant status. METHODS: A total of 66 subjects referred to our Sleep laboratory were examined by full polysomnography. Oxidative stress and antioxidant activity were assessed by measurement of the derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs and the biological antioxidant capacity (BAP in blood samples taken in the morning after the sleep study. Known risk factors for oxidative stress, such as age, sex, obesity, smoking, hypelipidemia, and hypertension, were investigated as possible confounding factors. RESULTS: 42 patients with OSAS (Apnea-Hypopnea index >15 events/hour were compared with 24 controls (AHI<5. The levels of d-ROMS were significantly higher (p = 0.005 in the control group but the levels of antioxidant capacity were significantly lower (p = 0.004 in OSAS patients. The most important factors predicting the variance of oxidative stress were obesity, smoking habit, and sex. Parameters of sleep apnea severity were not associated with oxidative stress. Minimal oxygen desaturation and smoking habit were the most important predicting factors of BAP levels. CONCLUSION: Obesity, smoking, and sex are the most important determinants of oxidative stress in OSAS subjects. Sleep apnea might enhance oxidative stress by the reduction of antioxidant capacity of blood due to nocturnal hypoxia.

  12. Prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea in Asian adults: a systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirrakhimov Aibek E

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common disease, affecting approximately 2% of women and 4% of men residing in Western communities. No systematically reviewed data are available about the prevalence of this disease in Asia, the most heavily populated continent. Methods PubMed/Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar were searched for articles published from 1993 to May 2012 that reported the prevalence of OSA diagnosed via sleep monitoring and the prevalence of patients at risk for OSA as assessed by symptomatology and/or sleep questionnaires. We have also searched abstract database of major pulmonary and sleep scientific societies for relevant abstracts presented from 2010 to 2012. The following inclusion criteria were used: articles published in English, age ≥ 18 years, ≥ 100 participants in studies using sleep monitoring for the diagnosis of OSA, ≥ 300 participants in studies using questionnaires to detect patients at high risk for OSA. Exclusion criteria: duplicate publications, studies reporting the prevalence of central sleep apnea only, hospital based studies as well as studies assessing OSA prevalence among patients with resistant arterial hypertension, chronic kidney disease, heart failure and in patients with concomitant neurological disease. Results Twenty four articles were found to meet the inclusion criteria, covering 47,957 subjects (26,042 men and 21,915 women and four relevant abstracts were noted. OSA prevalence ranged from 3.7% to 97.3%. Male gender, older age, a higher BMI and waist to hip ratio, greater neck circumference, arterial hypertension, smoking, snoring and daytime sleepiness were associated with OSA. Sample size, difference between the populations studied and the fact that some works included patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA explain the difference in prevalence rates. Conclusion This systematic review highlights the lack of data regarding the prevalence of OSA in Asians

  13. The influence of upper airways diameter on the intensity of obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Szymańska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is characterized by at least 5 ten-second-long episodes of apnea or hypopnea, per hour of sleep. This disease may lead to severe, life-threatening complications. Therefore, risk analysis and its influence on disease intensity is crucial for proper implementation of preventive treatments. Objective. To determine the relation between the intensity of OSA expressed in Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI, and the anterior-posterior diameter of upper airways at the levels of soft palate and tongue base. Material and Method. Medical records of 41 patients with sleep apnea (AHI>4 diagnosed through polysomnographic examination obstructive were used for the study. The data consisted of: age and gender, polysomnographic examination results (AHI, lateral cephalogram with cephalomertic analysis, together with measurements of the upper and lower pharyngeal depth according to McNamara. Statistical analysis was carried out in accordance with Pearson’s r correlation coefficient test (Statistica 8.0 software package. Results. Analysis of the influence of upper airways diameter on the intensity of OSA showed that the value of upper Airways diameter at the tongue base level had no statistically significant impact on the value of AHI (p=0.795. However, a statistically significant impact of the value of upper airways diameter on the AHI value (p=0.008 at the soft palate level was observed. Patients with OSA have narrowed upper airways diameter. The value of AHI increases with the decrease of upper diameter and is not dependent on a lower diameter value. Patients with a decreased upper airways diameter should be informed about potential breathing disorders during sleep.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and snoring in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiolek, Maciej; Namyslowski, Grzegorz; Karpe, Jacek; Ziora, Dariusz; Misiolek, Hanna; Czecior, Eugeniusz; Scierski, Wojciech

    2003-04-01

    The analysis of the correlation between bilateral vocal cord paralysis and the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and snoring is presented. The aim of the study was to establish whether the decrease of the air flow in the upper airway in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis involves OSAS and/or snoring occurrence and whether arytenoidectomy affects an improvement of breathing parameters measured during sleep. Fourteen patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis underwent Poly-MESAM examination before and 3 months after arytenoidectomy. They had never complained of snoring before. The Epworth sleepiness scale was used to quantify excessive daytime somnolence. The RDI, DI, mean saturation and percentage of snoring, loud snoring and sleep without snoring were estimated and compared pre- and postoperatively. The results were compared by the Student's t-test for dependent values. No significant differences were shown between the Epworth scores before and after the treatment. The RDI, DI and mean saturation were normal before and after the operation. The percentage of loud snoring decreased and the percentage of sleep without snoring increased significantly after arytenoidectomy in both cases. The mechanism of snoring in patients with vocal cord paralysis seems to be similar to OSAS. The difference consists in the level of flow limitation. On the basis of the results there is no reason to diagnose OSAS and UARS in patients with bilateral vocal cord paralysis. On the other hand, the intensive snoring that occurs after paralysis was significantly reduced as a result of arytenoidectomy.

  15. Wireless Wearable Multisensory Suite and Real-Time Prediction of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Trung Q; Cheng, Changqing; Sangasoongsong, Akkarapol; Wongdhamma, Woranat; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2013-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep disorder found in 24% of adult men and 9% of adult women. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has emerged as a standard therapy for OSA, a majority of patients are not tolerant to this treatment, largely because of the uncomfortable nasal air delivery during their sleep. Recent advances in wireless communication and advanced ("bigdata") preditive analytics technologies offer radically new point-of-care treatment approaches for OSA episodes with unprecedented comfort and afforadability. We introduce a Dirichlet process-based mixture Gaussian process (DPMG) model to predict the onset of sleep apnea episodes based on analyzing complex cardiorespiratory signals gathered from a custom-designed wireless wearable multisensory suite. Extensive testing with signals from the multisensory suite as well as PhysioNet's OSA database suggests that the accuracy of offline OSA classification is 88%, and accuracy for predicting an OSA episode 1-min ahead is 83% and 3-min ahead is 77%. Such accurate prediction of an impending OSA episode can be used to adaptively adjust CPAP airflow (toward improving the patient's adherence) or the torso posture (e.g., minor chin adjustments to maintain steady levels of the airflow).

  16. Outcome of CPAP treatment on intimate and sexual relationships in men with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reishtein, Judith L; Maislin, Greg; Weaver, Terri E

    2010-06-15

    To examine intimate and sexual relationships in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the association with daytime sleepiness, and the change in these outcomes with continuous positive airway pressure treatment (CPAP). Pre-post test, quasi-experimental study. Seven sleep disorders centers in the U.S. and Canada. 123 males with OSA (AHI > or =20), aged 21 to 60 years. Nasal CPAP for > or =3 months. Compared to normal values, at baseline patients were significantly sleepier, as measured by the Multiple Sleep Latency Test and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. They were also more impaired in intimate and sexual relationships, as measured by the Intimate and Sexual Relationships subscale of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire. Neither race nor marital status was significantly associated with impaired intimate and sexual relationships. Following treatment, patients were significantly more alert and had reported improved intimate and sexual relationships, with the greatest change occurring in those with the most disease severity. OSA has an adverse impact on intimate and sexual relationships that is related to subjective sleepiness and improved with CPAP treatment.

  17. Speech Signal and Facial Image Processing for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Espinoza-Cuadros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common sleep disorder characterized by recurring breathing pauses during sleep caused by a blockage of the upper airway (UA. OSA is generally diagnosed through a costly procedure requiring an overnight stay of the patient at the hospital. This has led to proposing less costly procedures based on the analysis of patients’ facial images and voice recordings to help in OSA detection and severity assessment. In this paper we investigate the use of both image and speech processing to estimate the apnea-hypopnea index, AHI (which describes the severity of the condition, over a population of 285 male Spanish subjects suspected to suffer from OSA and referred to a Sleep Disorders Unit. Photographs and voice recordings were collected in a supervised but not highly controlled way trying to test a scenario close to an OSA assessment application running on a mobile device (i.e., smartphones or tablets. Spectral information in speech utterances is modeled by a state-of-the-art low-dimensional acoustic representation, called i-vector. A set of local craniofacial features related to OSA are extracted from images after detecting facial landmarks using Active Appearance Models (AAMs. Support vector regression (SVR is applied on facial features and i-vectors to estimate the AHI.

  18. Cardiorespiratory phase-coupling is reduced in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammar M Kabir

    Full Text Available Cardiac and respiratory rhythms reveal transient phases of phase-locking which were proposed to be an important aspect of cardiorespiratory interaction. The aim of this study was to quantify cardio-respiratory phase-locking in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We investigated overnight polysomnography data of 248 subjects with suspected OSA. Cardiorespiratory phase-coupling was computed from the R-R intervals of body surface ECG and respiratory rate, calculated from abdominal and thoracic sensors, using Hilbert transform. A significant reduction in phase-coupling was observed in patients with severe OSA compared to patients with no or mild OSA. Cardiorespiratory phase-coupling was also associated with sleep stages and was significantly reduced during rapid-eye-movement (REM sleep compared to slow-wave (SW sleep. There was, however, no effect of age and BMI on phase coupling. Our study suggests that the assessment of cardiorespiratory phase coupling may be used as an ECG based screening tool for determining the severity of OSA.

  19. Subjective and Objective Appraisal of Activity in Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen R. Chasens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study examined the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, daytime sleepiness, functional activity, and objective physical activity. Setting. Subjects (N=37 being evaluated for OSA were recruited from a sleep clinic. Participants. The sample was balanced by gender (53% male, middle-aged, primarily White, and overweight or obese with a mean BMI of 33.98 (SD=7.35; median BMI=32.30. Over 40% reported subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS ≥10 and had OSA (78% with apnea + hypopnea index (AHI ≥5/hr. Measurements. Evaluation included questionnaires to evaluate subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and functional outcomes (Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ, an activity monitor, and an overnight sleep study to determine OSA severity. Results. Increased subjective sleepiness was significantly associated with lower scores on the FOSQ but not with average number of steps walked per day. A multiple regression analysis showed that higher AHI values were significantly associated with lower average number of steps walked per day after controlling patient's age, sex, and ESS. Conclusion. Subjective sleepiness was associated with perceived difficulty in activity but not with objectively measured activity. However, OSA severity was associated with decreased objective physical activity in aging adults.

  20. Myofunctional Therapy to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Certal, Victor; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Ruoff, Chad M.; Capasso, Robson; Kushida, Clete A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To systematically review the literature for articles evaluating myofunctional therapy (MT) as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children and adults and to perform a meta-analysis on the polysomnographic, snoring, and sleepiness data. Data Sources: Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, and The Cochrane Library. Review Methods: The searches were performed through June 18, 2014. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement was followed. Results: Nine adult studies (120 patients) reported polysomnography, snoring, and/or sleepiness outcomes. The pre- and post-MT apneahypopnea indices (AHI) decreased from a mean ± standard deviation (M ± SD) of 24.5 ± 14.3/h to 12.3 ± 11.8/h, mean difference (MD) −14.26 [95% confidence interval (CI) −20.98, −7.54], P < 0.0001. Lowest oxygen saturations improved from 83.9 ± 6.0% to 86.6 ± 7.3%, MD 4.19 (95% CI 1.85, 6.54), P = 0.0005. Polysomnography snoring decreased from 14.05 ± 4.89% to 3.87 ± 4.12% of total sleep time, P < 0.001, and snoring decreased in all three studies reporting subjective outcomes. Epworth Sleepiness Scale decreased from 14.8 ± 3.5 to 8.2 ± 4.1. Two pediatric studies (25 patients) reported outcomes. In the first study of 14 children, the AHI decreased from 4.87 ± 3.0/h to 1.84 ± 3.2/h, P = 0.004. The second study evaluated children who were cured of OSA after adenotonsillectomy and palatal expansion, and found that 11 patients who continued MT remained cured (AHI 0.5 ± 0.4/h), whereas 13 controls had recurrent OSA (AHI 5.3 ± 1.5/h) after 4 y. Conclusion: Current literature demonstrates that myofunctional therapy decreases apnea-hypopnea index by approximately 50% in adults and 62% in children. Lowest oxygen saturations, snoring, and sleepiness outcomes improve in adults. Myofunctional therapy could serve as an adjunct to other obstructive sleep apnea treatments. Citation: Camacho M, Certal V, Abdullatif J, Zaghi S, Ruoff CM

  1. Sleep architecture following a weight loss intervention in overweight and obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes: relationship to apnea-hypopnea index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechter, Ari; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Kuna, Samuel T; Zammit, Gary; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Newman, Anne B; Millman, Richard P; Reboussin, David M; Wadden, Thomas A; Jakicic, John M; Pi-Sunyer, F Xavier; Wing, Rena R; Foster, Gary D

    2014-11-15

    To determine if weight loss and/ or changes in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) improve sleep architecture in overweight/ obese adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This was a randomized controlled trial including 264 overweight/ obese adults with T2D and OSA. Participants were randomized to an intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) or a diabetes and support education (DSE) control group. Measures included anthropometry, AHI, and sleep at baseline and year-1, year-2, and year-4 follow-ups. Changes in sleep duration (total sleep time [TST]), continuity [wake after sleep onset (WASO)], and architecture stage 1, stage 2, slow wave sleep, and REM sleep) from baseline to year 1, 2, and 4 did not differ between ILI and DSE. Repeated-measure mixed-model analyses including data from baseline through year-4 for all participants demonstrated a significant positive association between AHI and stage 1 sleep (p architecture changes are more strongly related to reductions in AHI than body weight, whereas WASO may be more influenced by weight than AHI. NCT00194259. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  2. Sleep hypoventilation and daytime hypercapnia in stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmedahl NH

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nils Henrik Holmedahl,1 Britt Øverland,2 Ove Fondenes,3 Ivar Ellingsen,1 Jon Andrew Hardie4 1Glittreklinikken LHL Helse as, Hakadal, Norway; 2Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, ENT Department, Oslo, Norway; 3Norwegian National Centre of Excellence in Home Mechanical Ventilation, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; 4Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway Purpose: To explore the associations between sleep hypoventilation (SH and daytime arterial pressures of carbon dioxide (PaCO2, sleep stages, and sleep apneas/hypopneas (AHI in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. SH has previously been found in COPD-subjects with chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF using supplementary oxygen (LTOT, and has been proposed as a possible predictor for CHRF. Patients and methods: A prospectively designed observational study in a pulmonary rehabilitation hospital of 100 (39 male stable COPD inpatients with a mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 1.1 L (42% of predicted and a mean age of 64 years, using polysomnography with transcutaneous measurement of carbon dioxide pressure increase (ΔPtcCO2. Results: SH as defined by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM was found in 15 of the subjects, seven of whom used LTOT. However, six had SH despite being normocapnic during the daytime (only one on LTOT. Subjects with SH had a greater ΔPtcCO2 increase from nonrapid eye movement (NREM to rapid eye movement (REM sleep stages compared to non-SH subjects (mean [standard deviation] between-groups difference =0.23(0.20 kPa, P<0.0005. Subjects with apnea/hypopnea index ≥15 (overlap, N=27 did not differ from those with COPD alone (AHI <5, N=25 in sleep ΔPtcCO2 or daytime PaCO2. A regression model with the variables FEV1, LTOT, and sleep maximum ΔPtcCO2 explained 56% of the variance in daytime PaCO2 (F(3, 94 =40.37, P<0.001. Conclusion: In stable COPD, SH as defined by the AASM was found both in

  3. At least one in three people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus referred to a diabetes centre has symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Mortensen, B; Almdal, T

    2014-01-01

    %. Patients with symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea had significantly higher BMI, poorer glycaemic control and lower plasma HDL cholesterol levels as compared with patients unlikely to have obstructive sleep apnoea. The groups were not different with respect to sex, age, diabetes duration, blood pressure......, diabetic complications or medication use. In multiple regression analyses, age, BMI and HDL cholesterol levels were all significant, independent predictors of obstructive sleep apnoea. CONCLUSIONS: At least one third of people with Type 2 diabetes referred to a diabetes clinic in Denmark has symptomatic......AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of symptomatic obstructive sleep apnoea in unselected patients with Type 2 diabetes referred to a tertiary diabetes clinic. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, all newly referred patients were offered a stepwise screening for obstructive sleep apnoea with: (1...

  4. [Distribution of electroencephalograph power density in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea during different sleep stages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y; Tian, X; Chen, B Y; Zhou, N; Xia, M; Bai, W W; Dou, M M; Liu, X Y

    2017-04-12

    Objective: To investigate the variation of electroencephalograph(EEG) power density during different sleep stages in OSA for understanding of the mechanisms underlying the brain dysfunction in OSA as well as its earlier diagnosis and treatment. Methods: Sixteen-channel EEGs from OSA patients and normal controls in stage wake, sleep stage 1, sleep stage 2, sleep stage 3 and rapid eye movement stage were analyzed by time-frequency analysis method. The EEG power density in different frequency bands (including δ, θ, α, σ, β and γ) was respectively compared between the 2 groups. The correlation between the variation in the EEG power and primary indices of polysomnography was further analyzed. Results: The EEG power density in δ band in stage wake [OSA: (0.82±0.13) μV(2)/Hz, Control: (0.66±0.02) μV(2)/Hz, t=4.309, Pdensity was significantly higher in frontal and central regions in stage wake [frontal: OSA: (0.90±0.02) μV(2)/Hz, Control: (0.66±0.02) μV(2)/Hz, t=8.539, Pdensity in central region in stage 1 and stage 3 was positively correlated with arousal index (r=0.877 in stage 1, 0.656 in stage 3), implying that sleep fragmentation was closely related to the variation of EEG power density during nocturnal sleep in OSA. Conclusions: The feature stages for OSA are stage wake, stage 1 and stage 3. The EEG power density in OSA (δ band) was significantly higher than that in the control. The EEG power density in OSA and the control shows differences in frontal and central regions in stage wake and stage 1, as well as in central region in stage 3. The results indicate that low-frequency EEG power density giving priority to frontal area and central area has improved in severe OSA, which may be related to the neurologic deficits in corresponding brain areas.

  5. The Management of Iatrogenic Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome Following Bimaxillary Surgery in a Patient with Cleft Lip and Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbino, Giovanni; Gervasio, Fernando Carmine; Blythe, John; Bianchi, Francesca Antonella

    2016-07-01

    A 26-year-old man presented with a 6-year history of severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome followed a bimaxillary osteotomy procedure for a class III skeletal pattern. The patient was born with a unilateral cleft lip and palate and underwent primary lip and palate repair and later a pharyngeal flap for severe velopharyngeal insufficiency. Surgical management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome with conventional osteotomy, in cleft lip and palate patients, is a difficult problem. Distraction osteogenesis may provide a safer alternative. The authors describe and discuss the indications and the technical challenge of a multistage treatment protocol with distraction osteogenesis.

  6. Increased neck soft tissue mass and worsening of obstructive sleep apnea after growth hormone treatment in men with abdominal obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimi, Mahssa; Koranyi, Josef; Franco, Celina

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion.......Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion....

  7. Increased neck soft tissue mass and worsening of obstructive sleep apnea after growth hormone treatment in men with abdominal obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karimi, Mahssa; Koranyi, Josef; Franco, Celina

    2010-01-01

    Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion.......Risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are male gender, obesity and abnormalities in neck soft tissue mass. OSA is associated with both growth hormone (GH) excess and severe GH deficiency in adults. Adults with abdominal obesity have markedly suppressed GH secretion....

  8. Orthodontics treatments for managing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Nelly T; Desplats, Eve; Almeida, Fernanda R

    2016-02-01

    A small maxilla and/or mandible may predispose children to sleep-disordered breathing, which is a continuum of severity from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea. Preliminary studies have suggested that orthodontic treatments, such as orthopedic mandibular advancement or rapid maxillary expansion, may be effective treatments. The aim is to investigate the efficacy of orthopedic mandibular advancement and/or rapid maxillary expansion in the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and Internet were searched for eligible studies published until April 2014. Articles with adequate data were selected for the meta-analysis; other articles were reported in the qualitative assessment. Data extraction was conducted by two independent authors. A total of 58 studies were identified. Only eight studies were included in the review; of these, six were included in the meta-analysis. The research yielded only a small number of studies. Consequently, any conclusions from the pooled diagnostic parameters and their interpretation should be treated carefully. Although the included studies were limited, these orthodontic treatments may be effective in managing pediatric snoring and obstructive sleep apnea. Other related health outcomes, such as neurocognitive and cardiovascular functions have not yet been systematically addressed. More studies are needed with larger sample size, specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and standardized data reporting to help establish guidelines for the orthodontic treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The correlation of anxiety and depression with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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    Fariborz Rezaeitalab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is a common sleep disorder characterized by repeated upper airway obstruction during sleep. While respiratory pauses followed by loud snoring and daytime sleepiness are the main symptoms of OSAS, the patients may complain from sleep disruption, headache, mood disturbance, irritability, and memory impairment. However, the association of sleep apnea with anxiety and depression is not completely understood. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, the treatment of choice for OSAS, may be influenced by psychological conditions, especially claustrophobia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of OSAS with anxiety and depression symptoms. This study also investigated the association of anxiety with body mass index (BMI and the severity of OSAS. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study on 178 adult individuals diagnosed with OSAS at the sleep laboratory between September 2008 and May 2012. The participants were interviewed according to a checklist regarding both their chief complaints and other associated symptoms. The psychological status was assessed according to Beck anxiety inventory (BAI and Beck depression inventory (BDI scoring. The severity of breathing disorder was classified as mild, moderate, and severe based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI which was ascertained by overnight polysomnography. Daytime sleepiness was assessed by Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS. Results: The mean (SD age of participants was 50.33 years. In terms of sex, 85.5% of the study population were males and14.4% were females. We found no relation between sex and the symptoms of OSAS. Regarding the frequency of anxiety and depression symptoms, 53.9% of the individuals had some degree of anxiety, while 46.1% demonstrated depressive symptoms. In terms of OSAS severity, this study showed that OSAS severity was associated with the frequency of anxiety, chocking, and sleepiness (P

  10. Quality of life impairment in patients of obstructive sleep apnea and its relation with the severity of disease

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen Dutt; Ashok Kumar Janmeja; Prasanta Raghab Mohapatra; Anup Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Several studies have demonstrated considerable impairment of quality of life (QOL) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, but its relation with severity of OSA is yet unclear. Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of OSA on the QOL and its association with the disease severity. Design and Setting: Observational, prospective case-control study. Materials and Methods: QOL of 69 OSA patients and 41 healthy controls were assessed using the Calgary sleep apnea quality of lif...

  11. Cochrane Corner: Extracts from The Cochrane Library: Tonsillectomy or Adenotonsillectomy versus Non-Surgical Management for Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Martin J; Goldstein, Nira A; Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    The "Cochrane Corner" is a section in the journal that highlights systematic reviews relevant to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, with invited commentary to aid clinical decision making. This installment features a Cochrane Review on tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) in children, which finds moderate-quality evidence that surgery improves symptoms, behavior, and quality of life compared to nonsurgical management. The results apply to nonsyndromic children with SDB confirmed by polysomnography and must be balanced against a favorable natural history in many cases.

  12. [Chronic snoring and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carlos Villafranca, F; Cobo Plana, J; Díaz-Esnal, B; Fernández-Mondragón, P; Macías Escalada, E; Puente Rodríguez, M

    2003-09-01

    The problems children have in sleeping are manifold; the gamut of disorders that have been described ranges from simple, occasional snoring with no accompanying complications, through the syndrome of increased blockage of the upper airways to the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) where respiratory difficulties accompanied by hypoxemia, hypercapnia and structural sleep difficulties. Mouth breathing and chronic snoring occur frequently in children, with the incidence of snoring, identical for both sexes, varying between 3.2 and 27%. Difficulties in sleeping begin between the ages of the 3 and 9, peaking between 3 and 6. These results demonstrate, in a general way, the disparity between growth of the adenoids and tonsils, and upper airway growth. A differential diagnosis between the various pathological possibilities is based on the observed clinical signs and symptoms, analysis of cephalometric radiographs, polysomnography, a nocturnal cardio-respiratory polygraph and a video film taken during sleep. Snoring is the most characteristic sign of OSAHS in children. We do not yet have available any synthetic study that would sum up results of studies of sleep disorders in children. Nevertheless, we can define obstructive sleep apnea in children as the partial or total cessation of nose and mouth breathing for a period double that of the normal respiratory cycle. Classical treatment of children who suffer from severe respiratory difficulties during sleep, after identification of the etiology of the problem, consists of surgical removal of the adenoids or tonsils and, in certain, continuous positive pressure to assist breathing. The authors of this article have worked with 137 patients between the ages of 6 and 9, 77 of whom were chronic snorers with an average age of 7 years 6 months. The average age of the control group of 60 children was 7 years 2 months. We collected clinical data, medical histories, and distributed a questionnaire to determine

  13. A clinical approach to obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease

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    Maeder MT

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micha T Maeder,1 Otto D Schoch,2 Hans Rickli1 1Department of Cardiology, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Kantonsspital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland Abstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is associated with cardiovascular risk factors, cardiovascular diseases, and increased mortality. Epidemiological studies have established these associations, and there are now numerous experimental and clinical studies which have provided information on the possible underlying mechanisms. Mechanistic proof-of-concept studies with surrogate endpoints have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP has the potential to reverse or at least to attenuate not only OSA but also the adverse cardiovascular effects associated with OSA. However, no randomized studies have been performed to demonstrate that treatment of OSA by CPAP improves clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular risk factors and/or established cardiovascular disease and concomitant OSA. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of OSA as a potential cardiovascular risk factor, the impact of OSA on cardiac function, the role of OSA as a modifier of the course of cardiovascular diseases such as coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure, and the insights from studies evaluating the impact of CPAP therapy on the cardiovascular features associated with OSA. Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular, risk, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, hypertension

  14. Ambulatory monitoring in the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome

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    Jaime Corral-Peñafiel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA is a highly prevalent disorder associated with complications such as arterial hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and traffic accidents. The resources allocated for OSA are insufficient and OSA is a significant public health problem. Portable recording devices have been developed for the detection of OSA syndrome and have proved capable of providing an equivalent diagnosis to in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG, at least in patients with a high pre-test probability of OSA syndrome. PSG becomes important in patients who have symptoms and certain comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or stroke, as well as in patients with a clinical history suggesting a different sleep disorder. Continuous positive airway pressure is the most effective treatment in OSA. Ambulatory monitoring of the therapeutic modalities has been evaluated to enhance the care process and reduce costs compared to the conventional approach, without sacrificing efficiency. This review evaluates the role of portable monitoring devices in the diagnostic process of OSA and the search for alternative strategies based on ambulatory management protocols.

  15. Association of adiponectin genotype polymorphisms at positions 45 and 276 with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Su; Xilong Zhang; Shicheng Su

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between adiponectin genotype polymorphisms and obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Methods: Using the TaqMan polymerase chain reaction(PCR) method, the single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNP)at positions 45 and 276 in the adiponectin gene were determined in Chinese of the Han nationality in the Nanjing district. The OSAHS group consisted of 78 patients, and the control group contained 40 subjects. The association of adiponectin genotype polymorphisms at positions 45 and 276 with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome was analyzed. Results: No evidence of a direct association was found between OSAHS and adiponectin genotype SNP at positions 45 and 276(P> 0.05). However, compared with those OSAHS patients having G/T+T/T genotype at position 276, the OSAHS patients with the G/G genotype showed a greater neck circumference(NC), a prolonged duration of the longest apnea event, and elevated levels of blood cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol(P < 0.05). Conclusion: No direct association was detected between OSAHS and adiponectin genotype distribution at positions 45 and 276 in Chinese of Han nationality in the Nanjing district. However, OSAHS patients with the adiponectin GIG genotype at position 276 had a larger NC and the longest apnea event compared to those having the adiponectin SNP276 G/T +T/T genotype. This may have an indirect influence on the development of OSAHS.

  16. Effects of simulated obstructive sleep apnoea on the human carotid baroreceptor-vascular resistance reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, V L; Bowker, C M; Pearson, S B; Elliott, M W; Hainsworth, R

    2004-06-15

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), which is characterized by periodic inspiratory obstruction, is associated with hypertension and possibly with changes in the baroreceptor reflex. In this investigation we induced changes in inspiratory resistance and in inspiratory oxygen and carbon dioxide content, which simulate some of the changes in OSA, to determine whether this caused changes in the gain or setting of the carotid baroreflex. In eight healthy subjects (aged 21-62 years) we changed the stimulus to carotid baroreceptors, using neck chambers and graded pressures of -40 to +60 mmHg, and assessed vascular resistance responses in the brachial artery from changes in blood pressure (Finapres) divided by brachial artery blood flow velocity (Doppler ultrasound). Stimulus-response curves were defined during (a) sham (no additional stimulus), (b) addition of an inspiratory resistance (inspiratory pressure -10 mmHg), (c) breathing asphyxic gas (12% O(2), 5% CO(2)), and (d) combined resistance and asphyxia. Sigmoid or polynomial functions were applied to the curves and maximum differentials (equivalent to peak gain) and the corresponding carotid pressures (equivalent to 'set point') were determined. The sham test had no effect on either gain or 'set point'. Inspiratory resistance alone had no effect on blood pressure and did not displace the curve. However, it reduced gain from -3.0 +/- 0.6 to -2.1 +/- 0.4 units (P sleep apnoea.

  17. Piecing Together Phenotypes of Brain Injury and DysfunctionIn Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid eVeasey

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a highly prevalent condition that is associated with significant neurobehavioral impairments. Cognitive abnormalities identified in individuals with OSA include impaired verbal memory, planning, reasoning, vigilance and mood. Therapy for OSA improves some but not all neurobehavioral outcomes, supporting a direct role for OSA in brain dysfunction and raising the question of irreversible injury form OSA. Recent clinical studies have refined the neurobehavioral, brain imaging and electrophysiological characteristics of obstructive sleep apnea, highlighting findings shared with aging and some unique to OSA. This review summarizes the cognitive, brain metabolic and structural, and peripheral nerve conduction changes observed in OSA that collectively provide a distinct phenotype of OSA brain injury and dysfunction. Findings in animal models of OSA provide insight into molecular mechanisms underlying OSA neuronal injury that can be related back to human neural injury and dysfunction. A comprehensive phenotype of brain function and injury in OSA is essential for advancing diagnosis, prevention and treatment of this common disorder.

  18. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using radiofrequency-assisted uvulopalatoplasty with tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dae Jun; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kim, Bo-Hyeng; Hong, Seok-Chan; Yu, Myeong Sang; Kim, Young-Hyun; Choi, Jeong-Seok; Jin, Kwang Ho

    2013-02-01

    Radiofrequency surgery was introduced to minimize thermal damage to the tissue. A radiofrequency electrode can be used to make cuts in the free edge of the soft palate like those done in laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty [radiofrequency-assisted uvulopalatoplasty (RAUP)]. Tonsillectomy can enlarge the lateral diameter of the pharynx. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of RAUP with tonsillectomy in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Ninety-two patients with obstructive sleep apnea were included in this study. Patients were categorized according to disease severity and Friedman's staging system. Patients were assessed with the preoperative visual analog scale (VAS) for snoring, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) at baseline and repeated at 6 months postoperatively. The intensity of postoperative pain, speech deficits and dysphagia were also recorded. There was a significant improvement in the VAS score for snoring, ESS and AHI before and after surgery. Overall, the results of the present study indicated a surgery success rate (a 50 % decrease in AHI and AHI tonsillectomy is an effective treatment for patients with OSAS.

  19. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Myocardial Infarction: A Systematic Review

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    Fernanda Porto

    Full Text Available Abstract Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has been associated to cardiovascular risk factors. However, the association between OSA and cardiovascular disease is still controversial. The objective of the present study was to verify the association between OSA and myocardial infarction (MI. This is a systematic review of the literature performed through electronic data sources MEDLINE/PubMed, PubMed Central, Web of Science and BVS -Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (Virtual Health Library. The descriptors used were: 'obstructive sleep apnea' AND 'polysomnography' AND 'myocardial infarction' AND 'adults NOT 'treatment.' The present work analysed three prospective studies, selected from 142 articles. The studies followed a total sample of 5,067 OSA patients, mostly composed by male participants. All patients underwent night polysomnography, and all studies found an association between OSA and fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular outcomes. Thus, we were able to observe that 644 (12.7% of the 5,067 patients suffered MI or stroke, or required a revascularization procedure, and 25.6% of these cardiovascular events were fatal. MI was responsible for 29.5% of all 644 analysed outcomes. There is an association between OSA and MI, in male patients, and apnea and hypopnea index (AHI are the most reliable markers.

  20. Serum Level of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jing; XU Yongjian; ZHANG Zhenxiang; LIU Huiguo; XIONG Weining; XU Shuyun

    2007-01-01

    To explore the relationship between the serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)level and the severity of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), the concentrations of serum VEGF in 40 OSAHS patients and 9 healthy controls were measured by using ELISA method.Meanwhile the correlation between the concentration of VEGF and parameters of polysomnography (PSG) was examined. Our results showed that the concentrations of VEGF were significantly higher in OSAHS patients with severe hypoxia (536.8±334.7 pg/mL) than in those with mild hypoxia (329.2±174.7 pg/mL) and healthy controls (272. 8±211.0 pg/mL) (P<0.05 for both). The concentrations of VEGF were also significantly higher in OSAHS patients with hypertension (484.5±261.4 pg/mL) than in those without hypertension (311.0±158.4 pg/mL) and healthy controls (272. 8±211.0 pg/mL) (P<0.05 for both). There was a positive correlation between the concentration of VEGF and the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) (γ=0.34, P<0.05). It is concluded that the concentration of the serum VEGF is positively related to the severity of OSAHS. The elevated serum VEGF level may be involved in the pathogenesis of the complications of obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome.

  1. Sleep hygiene and its association with daytime sleepiness, depressive symptoms, and quality of life in patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Ahm; Paek, Joon-Hyun; Han, Su-Hyun

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the direct and indirect associations of sleep hygiene with daytime sleepiness, depressive symptoms, and quality of life (QoL), in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Data were collected from adults with mild OSA. The Sleep Hygiene Index (SHI), Sleep Problems Index-1 (SPI-1) of the Medical Outcomes Study-Sleep Scale, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health survey (SF-36) were used to evaluate patients. To determine the indirect and direct associations between SHI and disease outcomes, the Sobel test and multiple linear regression analyses were used, respectively. When we evaluated the direct associations, we excluded 3 items of the original SHI which were more reflective of general health rather than sleep-specific habits and environments. In total, 260 patients with mild OSA participated in this study. The average age, AHI, and SHI scores were 49.1 years (SD 12.5), 9.3/h (SD 2.9), and 24.7 (SD 6.0), respectively. Here, ≥ 10% of participants indicated poor sleep hygiene behaviors on 7 of 13 items. Young age and men were associated with higher SHI scores (both phygiene is indirectly related to daytime sleepiness, depressive symptoms, QoL via sleep quality and also related to daytime sleepiness and QoL independent of sleep quality in mild OSA patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Position Paper by Canadian Dental Sleep Medicine Professionals Regarding the Role of Different Health Care Professionals in Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Snoring with Oral Appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Gauthier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present Canadian position paper contains recommendations for the management by dentists of sleep-disordered breathing in adults with the use of oral appliances (OAs as a treatment option for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. The recommendations are based on literature reviews and expert panel consensus. OAs offer an effective, first-line treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer an OA to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy, or for severe OSA patients who cannot tolerate CPAP, are inappropriate candidates for CPAP or who have failed CPAP treatment attempts. The purpose of the present position paper is to guide interdisciplinary teamwork (sleep physicians and sleep dentists and to clarify the role of each professional in the management of OA therapy. The diagnosis of OSA should always be made by a physician, and OAs should be fitted by a qualified dentist who is trained and experienced in dental sleep medicine. Follow-up assessment by the referring physician and polysomnography or sleep studies are required to verify treatment efficacy. The present article emphasizes the need for a team approach to OA therapy and provides treatment guidelines for dentists trained in dental sleep medicine. Many of the dentists and sleep physicians who contributed to the preparation of the present article are members of the Canadian Sleep Society and the authors reached a consensus based on the current literature.

  3. Evaluation of a Decision Support System for Obstructive Sleep Apnea with Nonlinear Analysis of Respiratory Signals.

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    Evangelos Kaimakamis

    Full Text Available Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA is a common sleep disorder requiring the time/money consuming polysomnography for diagnosis. Alternative methods for initial evaluation are sought. Our aim was the prediction of Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI in patients potentially suffering from OSA based on nonlinear analysis of respiratory biosignals during sleep, a method that is related to the pathophysiology of the disorder.Patients referred to a Sleep Unit (135 underwent full polysomnography. Three nonlinear indices (Largest Lyapunov Exponent, Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Approximate Entropy extracted from two biosignals (airflow from a nasal cannula, thoracic movement and one linear derived from Oxygen saturation provided input to a data mining application with contemporary classification algorithms for the creation of predictive models for AHI.A linear regression model presented a correlation coefficient of 0.77 in predicting AHI. With a cutoff value of AHI = 8, the sensitivity and specificity were 93% and 71.4% in discrimination between patients and normal subjects. The decision tree for the discrimination between patients and normal had sensitivity and specificity of 91% and 60%, respectively. Certain obtained nonlinear values correlated significantly with commonly accepted physiological parameters of people suffering from OSA.We developed a predictive model for the presence/severity of OSA using a simple linear equation and additional decision trees with nonlinear features extracted from 3 respiratory recordings. The accuracy of the methodology is high and the findings provide insight to the underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome.Reliable predictions of OSA are possible using linear and nonlinear indices from only 3 respiratory signals during sleep. The proposed models could lead to a better study of the pathophysiology of OSA and facilitate initial evaluation/follow up of suspected patients OSA utilizing a practical low cost methodology

  4. Impact of Restless Legs Syndrome on the Sleep Quality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Erdal İn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is well known that various sleep disorders are common in cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, restless legs syndrome (RLS has not been extensively studied in these patients. The aim of the current study was to investigate the prevalence of RLS and its impact on sleep quality in patients with COPD. Methods: The study included a total of 50 patients with COPD with a mean age of 67.2±7.7 years; 39 (78% were male. The RLS diagnosis was made based on the questionnaire items standardized by the International RLS study group. Dyspnea severity (mMRC, quality of life (CAT, sleep quality [Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI], and daytime sleepiness [Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS] were evaluated using certain specific questionnaires. The subjects were studied in two groups: RLS-positive and RLS-negative groups. Results: In the study population, RLS was detected in 17 (34% patients. It was found that the RLS-positive subjects had a longer disease duration (p=0.006, a higher hospital admission rate (p=0.008, and lower spirometric values (p=0.023 for FVC; p=0.001 for FEV1. The CAT score was significantly higher in the RLS-positive group (p=0.019. The RLS-positive group had higher PSQI and ESS scores (p<0.001 for both. There were negative correlations between PSQI, ESS scores, and spirometric measures (FVC and FEV1, whereas PSQI and ESS scores had positive correlations with disease duration, mMRC, and CAT scores. Conclusion: In our study, it was observed that RLS is a common condition in patients with COPD. As the duration and severity of COPD increases, RLS becomes more prevalent and sleep quality deteriorates.

  5. The effect of exercise on obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized and controlled trial.

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    Sengul, Yesim Salik; Ozalevli, Sevgi; Oztura, Ibrahim; Itil, Oya; Baklan, Baris

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of breathing and physical exercise on pulmonary functions, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Twenty patients with mild to moderate OSAS were included in the study either as exercise or control group. The control group did not receive any treatment, whereas the exercise group received exercise training. Exercise program consisting of breathing and aerobic exercises was applied for 1.5 h 3 days weekly for 12 weeks. Two groups were assessed through clinical and laboratory measurements after 12 weeks. In the evaluations, bicycle ergometer test was used for exercise capacity, pulmonary function test, maximal inspiratory-expiratory pressure for pulmonary functions, polysomnography for AHI, sleep parameters, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), Short Form-36 (SF-36) for quality of sleep and health-related quality of health, Epworth Sleepiness Scale for daytime sleepiness, and anthropometric measurements for anthropometric characteristics. In the control group, the outcomes prior to and following 12-weeks follow-up period were found to be similar. In the exercise group, no change was found in the anthropometric and respiratory measurements (P > 0.05), whereas significant improvements were found in exercise capacity, AHI, and FOSQ and SF-36 (P  0.05). Exercise appears not to change anthropometric characteristics and respiratory functions while it improves AHI, health-related quality of life, quality of sleep, and exercise capacity in the patients with mild to moderate OSAS.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome as a cause of road traffic accidents.

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    Aguiar, M; Valença, J; Felizardo, M; Caeiro, F; Moreira, S; Staats, R; Bugalho de Almeida, A A

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) patients have a higher rate of road traffic accidents. Our study aimed to analyse any differences in OSAS patients between those who reported having had road traffic accidents and/or near misses and those who did not. We studied 163 patients with OSAS (apnoea- hypopnoea index (AHI)>10/h) diagnosed using nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG), all drivers, 18.4% of whom drove for a living. Patients were asked at their first clinical interview to self-report road traffic accidents and/or near misses over the past 3 years which had been caused by abnormal daytime drowsiness. This allowed patients to be divided into two groups, those who had had road traffic accidents and/or near misses and those who had not. Both were compared as to age, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), daytime PaO2 and PaCO2, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) test and NPSG data. This latter was total sleep time (TTS), sleep efficiency, sleep stages, arousal index (ARI), AHI, minimal and average SaO2, % of time with SaO2 TDAH) (T test). Group I (no road traffic accidents) No=89 patients; group II (road traffic accidents) No=74 patients. Age (years) was 57.6+/-11.8 vs. 54.7+/-10.9 (ns); male gender, 75% vs. 78.4%; ESS, 12.3+/-5.4 vs. 17.6+/-4.3 (pTDAH (minutes), 98.5+/-63.7 vs. 133.3+/-83.2 (p=0,005). In our experience patients who had road traffic accidents and/or near misses had a more severe OSAS, with higher AHI, excessive daytime sleepiness and lower quality of life.

  7. Oscillating Positive Airway Pressure Versus CPAP for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

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    Haba-Rubio, José; Petitpierre, Nicolas Julien; Cornette, Françoise; Tobback, Nadia; Vat, Sopharat; Giallourou, Theresia; Al-Jumaily, Ahmed; Heinzer, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), it is not always well tolerated by the patients. Previous physiological studies showed that pressure oscillations applied to the pharynx could activate upper airway muscles, but it is not clear whether these pressure oscillations could be tolerated during sleep in OSA patients. The aim of this study was to assess the tolerance of oscillating positive airway pressure (O-PAP) (a CPAP device delivering high-frequency pressure oscillations to the upper airway) compared to CPAP. Fourteen OSA patients currently on CPAP [age 59.9 ± 10.1 years old, BMI 34.8 ± 7.2 kg/m2, initial apnea–hypopnea index (AHI): 58.7 ± 25.2 events/h] used O-PAP or CPAP on two consecutive nights under polysomnography, in a single-blind randomized crossover design to assess sleep quality. A subtherapeutic pressure (70% of the optimal titrated pressure) was applied in both conditions and the residual AHI with each technique was also compared. There was no difference in measured or perceived sleep quality between the two treatment modalities (sleep efficiency 90.0% versus 88.1%, p = 0.54). Despite the small sample, we also found a trend toward a decrease in residual respiratory events with O-PAP compared to CPAP (median AHI 14.3 versus 20.5/h, p = 0.194). The good tolerance of O-PAP and the positive trend toward a reduction in residual AHI should stimulate further research on the effects of O-PAP in OSA patients. PMID:26029694

  8. Cognitive and Emotional Impairments in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-wei Li; Bin Peng; Hong Kong

    2000-01-01

    mechanism of cognitive impairment in OSAS was not clear. The results of our study showed that there was significant negative correlation between the P3 latency and mean SO2 value. All of these data indicated that hypoxemia might be related to cognitive dysfunction. Emotional disturbances were common clinical features in OSAS. Major depression and psychosis were presented in a higher percentage. In our study, 75% patients had higher neuropsychological scores that were beyond the normal range. Among them, depression was more evident With regard to the therapy of CPAP ,we confirmed its effectiveness. The neuropsychological sores were significantly decreased after treatment Conclusion: The principal conclusion of the present study were that the P3 latency were prolonged in OSAS patients and snorers might had a tendency developing cognitive dysfunction It was also demonstrated that emotional disturbances in OSAS might be reversed ,and CPAP therapy might play on important role in treating these disturbances.

  9. Cognitive and Emotional Impairments in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-wei Li; Bin Peng; Hong Kong

    2000-01-01

    mechanism of cognitive impairment in OSAS was not clear. The results of our study showed that there was significant negative correlation between the P3 latency and mean SO2 value. All of these data indicated that hypoxemia might be related to cognitive dysfunction. Emotional disturbances were common clinical features in OSAS. Major depression and psychosis were presented in a higher percentage. In our study, 75% patients had higher neuropsychological scores that were beyond the normal range. Among them, depression was more evident With regard to the therapy of CPAP ,we confirmed its effectiveness. The neuropsychological sores were significantly decreased after treatment Conclusion: The principal conclusion of the present study were that the P3 latency were prolonged in OSAS patients and snorers might had a tendency developing cognitive dysfunction It was also demonstrated that emotional disturbances in OSAS might be reversed ,and CPAP therapy might play on important role in treating these disturbances.

  10. Complications of adenotonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea in school-aged children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinopoulou, Sofia; Gallagher, Paul; Elden, Lisa; Garetz, Susan L.; Mitchell, Ron B.; Redline, Susan; Rosen, Carol L.; Katz, Eliot S.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Amin, Raouf; Arens, Raanan; Paruthi, Shalini; Marcus, Carole L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenotonsillectomy is the treatment of choice for most children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but can lead to complications. Current guidelines recommend that high-risk children be hospitalized after adenotonsillectomy, but it is unclear which otherwise-healthy children will develop post-operative complications. We hypothesized that polysomnographic parameters would predict post-operative complications in children who participated in the Childhood AdenoTonsillectomy (CHAT) study. Methods Children in the CHAT study aged 5–9 years with apnea hypopnea index 2–30/hr or obstructive apnea index 1–20/hr without comorbidities other than obesity/asthma underwent adenotonsillectomy. Associations between demographic variables and surgical complications were examined with Chi square and Fisher’s exact tests. Polysomnographic parameters between subjects with/without complications were compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Results Of the 221 children (median apnea hypopnea index 4.7/hr, range 1.2–27.7/hr; 31% obese), 16 (7%) children experienced complications. 3 (1.4%) children had respiratory complications including pulmonary edema, hypoxemia and bronchospasm. Thirteen (5.9%) had non-respiratory complications, including dehydration (4.5%), hemorrhage (2.3%) and fever (0.5%). There were no statistically significant associations between demographic parameters (gender, race, and obesity) or polysomnographic parameters (apnea hypopnea index, % total sleep time with SpO250 Torr) and complications. Conclusions This study showed a low risk of post-adenotonsillectomy complications in school-aged healthy children with obstructive apnea although many children met published criteria for admission due to obesity, or polysomnographic severity. In this specific population, none of the polysomnographic or demographic parameters predicted post-operative complications. Further research could identify the patients at greatest risk of post-operative complications

  11. Neuropsychological Functioning after Adenotonsillectomy in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying YU; Yu-xue CHEN; Lu LIU; Zhi-yuan YU; Xiang LUO

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of adenotonsillectomy (AT) for children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and the improvement of their cognitive function.Studies on cognitive performance of OSAS children treated with or without AT were identified by searching the Pubmed,EMBASE and Cochrane library.A meta-analysis was conducted to analyze the literature.The random-effects model was used to evaluate 11 eligible studies using an inverse-variance method.The neuropsychological test results of 4 cognitive domains (general intelligence,memory,attention-executive function and verbal ability) were obtained and analyzed.By comparison of cognitive function between OSAS children and healthy controls,the effect sizes of each domain were achieved as follows:general intelligence,-0.5 (P<0.0001);memory,-0.18 (P=0.02);attention-executive function,-0.21 (P=0.002);and verbal ability,-0.48 (P=0.0006).The effect sizes of general intelligence,memory,attention-executive function,and verbal ability after AT compared to baseline level were-0.37 (P=0.008),-0.36 (P=0.0005),-0.02 (P=0.88),and-0.45 (P=0.009),respectively.Comparing the cognitive ability between OSAS children after AT and healthy controls showed that the effect sizes were-0.54 (P=0.0009),-0.24 (P=0.12),-0.17 (P=0.35),and-0.45 (P=0.009) in general intelligence,memory,attention-executive function,and verbal ability,respectively.Our results confirmed that OSAS children performed worse than healthy children in terms of the 4 cognitive domains investigated.After 6-12 months of observation,significant improvement in attention-executive function and verbal ability were found in OSAS children treated with AT compared to their baseline level;restoration of attention-executive function and memory were observed in OSAS children after AT in comparison to healthy controls.Further rigorous randomized controlled trials should be conducted to obtain definitive conclusions.

  12. The Diagnosis Value and Its Implication of Impulse Oscillometry in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The change of measurements of impulse oscillometry (IOS) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients and its mechanism were observed. The respiratory impedance was measured by using IOS technique and polysomnography (PSG) was monitored synchronously in 36 OSAS patients,14 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and 12 normal controls. Results showed that R20 in OSAS group was significantly higher than in COPD group and control group (P<0. 01). R5-R20 in OSAS group was lower than that in COPD group, but significantly higher than that in control group(P<0. 01). The levels of R20 and R5-R20 were positively correlated with severity degree of the disease. In addition, apnea-hyponea index (AHI) was positively correlated with R5 and R20 with the correlation index (r)being 0.66 and 0. 86 respectively. The lowest SO2 was negatively correlated with R5 and R5-R20, with r being -0.66 and -0. 79 respectively. The mean SO2 was negatively correlated with R5 and R5-R20 with r being -0.81 and -0. 69 respectively, IOS technique could be used as a valuable tool for assessing the degree of upper airway obstruction in the patients with OSAS, and could help to explore its pathological mechanism.

  13. Palatal sensory threshold reflects nocturnal hypoxemia and airway occlusion in snorers and obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Park, Hyun Woo; Won, Sung Jun; Jeon, Sea-Yuong; Jin, Hong Ryul; Lee, So-Jin; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Kim, Dae Woo

    2013-11-15

    Upper airway sensory deficit has been reported to be associated with snoring or obstructive sleep apnea. There are limited data on the correlation between disease severity and upper airway sensation. In this study, we investigated the relationship between clinical parameters and standardized palatal sensory threshold (SPST) using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments. We recruited 40 snorers and 19 control subjects. Palatal sensory threshold was measured in all study subjects, using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments. Standardized palatal sensory threshold was determined by subtraction of hard palate sensation from uvular sensation. All subjects with snoring underwent a modified Muller maneuver during wakefulness before polysomnography. SPST was higher in snorers than in control subjects, but did not differ according to the severity of obstructive sleep apnea. Patients with higher SPST (≥ 0.45 g/mm(2)) were older and had more severe hypoxemia indices: lower nadir oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2) and higher percentage of sleep time at < 90% SpO2. Adjusted for age, sex, neck circumference, and body mass index, SPST was correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index and hypoxemia indices. With a cutoff value ≥ 0.45 g/mm(2), the sensitivity of SPST for nocturnal hypoxemia (nadir SpO2, < 80%) was 81.3%. Patients with higher SPST (≥ 0.45 g/mm(2)) showed more airway occlusion in modified Muller maneuver, than those with lower values. The SPST measured using Semmes Weinstein monofilaments reflects nocturnal hypoxemia and airway occlusion. This test provides a potential tissue marker of the severity of hypoxemia in patients who snore.

  14. Effects of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity on exercise function in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Carla A; Selvadurai, Hiran; Baur, Louise A; Waters, Karen A

    2014-06-01

    Evaluate the relative contributions of weight status and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to cardiopulmonary exercise responses in children. Prospective, cross-sectional study. Participants underwent anthropometric measurements, overnight polysomnography, spirometry, cardiopulmonary exercise function testing on a cycle ergometer, and cardiac doppler imaging. OSA was defined as ≥ 1 obstructive apnea or hypopnea per hour of sleep (OAHI). The effect of OSA on exercise function was evaluated after the parameters were corrected for body mass index (BMI) z-scores. Similarly, the effect of obesity on exercise function was examined when the variables were adjusted for OAHI. Tertiary pediatric hospital. Healthy weight and obese children, aged 7-12 y. N/A. Seventy-one children were studied. In comparison with weight-matched children without OSA, children with OSA had a lower cardiac output, stroke volume index, heart rate, and oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) at peak exercise capacity. After adjusting for BMI z-score, children with OSA had 1.5 L/min (95% confidence interval -2.3 to -0.6 L/min; P = 0.001) lower cardiac output at peak exercise capacity, but minute ventilation and ventilatory responses to exercise were not affected. Obesity was only associated with physical deconditioning. Cardiac dysfunction was associated with the frequency of respiratory-related arousals, the severity of hypoxia, and heart rate during sleep. Children with OSA are exercise limited due to a reduced cardiac output and VO2 peak at peak exercise capacity, independent of their weight status. Comorbid OSA can further decrease exercise performance in obese children.

  15. Long-term results of tracheostomy for severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapaniemi, J J; Laurikainen, E A; Halme, P; Antila, J

    2001-01-01

    Severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) is most often accompanied by metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes and coronary disease. In its most severe form, it is a life-threatening condition, requiring active and immediate help. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most efficient nonsurgical treatment for patients with OSAS. However, for anatomical, disease-related and subjective reasons, many patients cannot accept this treatment. A permanent tracheostomy may be one alternative in such patients who, in addition, often suffer from extreme obesity and severe heart disease. In this paper, we describe the long-term follow-up results of 7 patients suffering from OSAS and treated with permanent tracheostomy. All the patients (5 men, 2 women) were diagnosed using the static charge sensitive bed method and night-time oximetry for sleep analysis. The mean body mass index (BMI) of the patients ranged from 34 to 60 and the age from 41 to 64 years. All the patients had severe OSAS and long periods of low oxygen saturation (SaO2) levels. Six patients had a CPAP trial before tracheostomy. Only 2 patients tolerated the trial but, despite the continuous use of CPAP, they were nonresponders. Permanent tracheostomy was done according to normal routine in each patient. After primary healing of 2 days, they used silver cannulae, which also allowed them to speak. The patients were evaluated every year after the tracheostomy. After some practical difficulties including proper maintenance of the cannula, all the patients quickly learned the correct management. In postoperative sleep studies, nadir SaO2 levels had improved significantly, obstructive apneas had disappeared and the subjective quality of life had improved. No marked changes in BMI were found.

  16. Investigation of the relationship between mean platelet volume and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Şükrü Erden

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS is characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction and intermittent hypoxia during sleep. Intermittent hypoxia and increased inflammatory activity plays a role in increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the OSAS. OSAS is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and cardiovascular disorders are the most important complications of OSAS. Mean platelet volume (MPV is a marker of platelet activation and function, and increased platelet volume is associated with increased platelet activity. Different diseases related with inflammation, hypoxia, vascular injury, thrombosis and atherosclerosis were found to be associated with MPV. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between OSAS and MPV. Methods: In this retrospective study, data of sex and age matched 33 patients with moderate OSAS, 34 patients with severe OSAS and 30 healthy subjects were evaluated. Results: The mean MPV was found in control, moderate OSAS and severe OSAS groups as 7.83±1.00, 8.26±1.40 and 8.94±1.20 (fL respectively. The mean MPV value was significantly higher in severe OSAS group than control subjects (p=0.001. In correlation analysis, there were positive correlation between MPV with apnea-hypopnea index and total sleep time, and negative correlation between MPV with platelet count and minimum oxygen saturation (Respectively, p=0.003 / R=0.295, p=0.030 / R=0.221, p=0.011 / R= -0.257, p=0.019 / R= -0.238. Conclusion: In this study, the increased MPV was associated with severe OSAS and the results of this study suggest that the platelet activation is increased in OSAS. Hypoxia caused by OSAS, due to the activated platelets, may play a role in the development of cardiovascular diseases which is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in OSAS. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (4: 492-496

  17. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  18. Oral pressure therapy for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea: clinical feasibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid-Moayer M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mehran Farid-Moayer,1 Lawrence C Siegel,2,3 Jed Black41Peninsula Sleep Center, Burlingame, CA, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; 3Department of Clinical Affairs, ApniCure, Inc, Redwood City, CA, USA; 4Stanford Center for Sleep Research and Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USAPurpose: This feasibility study examined the initial-use safety and effectiveness of a new noninvasive oral pressure therapy (OPT system developed to treat obstructive sleep apnea (OSA.Methods: The OPT system consists of a console that connects with flexible tubing to a premanufactured polymer mouthpiece. Through the mouthpiece, a pump in the console creates oral vacuum intended to move the soft palate anteriorly to decrease obstruction of the airway during sleep. The mouthpiece was produced in ten different sizes to accommodate a range of oral dimensions. Subjects with OSA in this single-center, single-night study underwent a polysomnography (PSG study at baseline, followed by PSG during use of OPT.Results: Fifty-six men and 20 women, aged 50.8 ± 12.0 years (mean ± standard deviation [SD], had OSA with apnea–hypopnea indices (AHI greater than five events per hour at baseline. Body weight averaged 98.0 ± 18.2 kg (mean ± SD, body mass index ranged from 22.6 kg/m2 to 57.9 kg/m2 and averaged 32.5 ± 5.8 kg/m2 (mean ± SD. OPT was generally well tolerated without any serious adverse events. Baseline AHI was 38.7 ± 27.5 events/hour (mean ± SD and was reduced with treatment to 24.6 ± 25.7 events/hour (P < 0.001, Cohen's d 0.53. Treatment produced AHI less than or equal to ten events/hour in 38% of the subjects. Oxygen desaturation index was 30.1 ± 23.7 events/hour at baseline versus 15.8 ± 19.1 events/hour with treatment (P < 0.001, Cohen's d 0.66. The minimum oxygen saturation increased with treatment from 77.9 ± 8.3 to 82.2 ± 7.9 (P < 0.001, Cohen's d 0.53. Stage-N1 sleep shifts

  19. Neurobehavioral functioning in adolescents with and without obesity and obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Gallagher, Paul R; Berkowitz, Robert I; Radcliffe, Jerilynn; Bradford, Ruth; Marcus, Carole L

    2015-03-01

    Children and adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibit neurobehavioral abnormalities, but few studies have evaluated the transitional stage of adolescence. Obesity is also associated with neurobehavioral abnormalities, and many patients with OSAS are obese. However, the confounding effect of obesity on neurobehavioral abnormalities in adolescents with OSAS has not been evaluated. We hypothesized that obese adolescents with OSAS would exhibit more neurobehavioral abnormalities than obese and lean adolescents without OSAS. Cross-sectional, case control. Sleep Center and community. Obese adolescents with OSAS compared to (1) nonsnoring, obese controls without OSAS, and (2) nonobese, nonsnoring controls. Neurobehavioral evaluation. Obese adolescents with OSAS had significantly worse executive function and attention compared to both obese (P Obese adolescents with OSAS show impaired executive and behavioral function compared to obese and lean controls, and are more likely to score in the clinically abnormal range on measures of neurobehavioral functioning. These results are especially concerning given that the frontal lobe is still developing during this critical age period. We speculate that untreated OSAS during adolescence may lead to significant neurobehavioral deficits in adulthood. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Accurate method for home-based diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosna Ghandeharioun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overnight polysomnography is the gold standard for the detection of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAS. However, it is expensive and needs attending personnel. The study of simplified sleep apnea monitoring is one of the recent trends for sleep medicine research. The proposed clinical prediction rules employ the vital and social statistics, symptoms, craniofacial traits, and obesity-related measures for initial screening of OSAS in an ambulatory setting. However, most of them are partially or completely clinical and not home-based. One disadvantage of this sort of screening methods is their inability to asses OSAS severity. Another approach of initial OSAS screening is a usage of just one or two physiological signals such as electrocardiography (ECG, pulse oximetry, snoring, nasal airflow, or even speech sound. In this study, we aimed to review the different strategies and to compare their performances, reported by means of their sensitivity–specificity and accuracy for OSAS incidence and severity. OSAS severity is determined by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI value. Based on the data obtained from the related articles, the most accurate methods of AHI estimation exploit ECG and pulse oximetry signals.

  1. Ictal central apnea and bradycardia in temporal lobe epilepsy complicated by obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

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    Yoko Nishimura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 12-year-old boy who developed temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE with daily complex partial seizures (CPS and monthly generalized seizures. Moreover, he frequently snored while asleep since early childhood. Polysomnography (PSG revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea with apnea–hypopnea index (AHI of 37.8/h. Video-PSG with simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG recording captured two ictal apneic episodes during sleep, without any motor manifestations. The onset of rhythmic theta activity in the midtemporal area on EEG was preceded by the onset of apnea by several seconds and disappeared soon after cessation of central apnea. One episode was accompanied by ictal bradycardia of <48 beats/min which persisted for 50 s beyond the end of epileptic activity. After treatment with carbamazepine and tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, the seizures were well controlled and AHI decreased to 2.5/h. Paroxysmal discharges also disappeared during this time. Uncontrolled TLE complicated by sleep apnea should be evaluated for the presence of ictal central apnea/bradycardia.

  2. Emerging drugs for common conditions of sleepiness: obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy.

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    Sullivan, Shannon S; Guilleminault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and narcolepsy are sleep disorders associated with high prevalence and high symptomatic burden including prominent sleepiness, daytime dysfunction and poor nocturnal sleep. Both have elevated risk of poor health outcomes. Current therapies are often underutilized, cumbersome, costly or associated with residual symptoms. This review covers current available therapies for OSA and narcolepsy as well as discusses areas for potential drug development, and agents in the therapeutic pipeline, including the cannabinoid dronabinol (OSA), the histamine inverse agonist/ antagonist pitolisant (narcolepsy), and stimulants with uncertain and/or multiple activities such as JZP-110 and JZP-386 (narcolepsy, possibly OSA). Finally it addresses new approaches and uses for therapies currently on the market such as the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide (OSA). Both OSA and narcolepsy are conditions of sleepiness for which lifelong treatments are likely to be required. In OSA, while continuous positive airway pressure will likely remain the gold standard therapy for the foreseeable future, there is plenty of room for integrating phenotypes and variants of OSA into therapeutic strategies to lead to better, more personalized disease modification. In narcolepsy, unlike OSA, drug therapy is the current mainstay of treatment. Advances using novel mechanisms to treat targeted symptoms such as sleepiness and/or novel agents that can treat more than one symptom of narcolepsy, hold promise. However, cost, convenience and side effects remain challenges.

  3. Asthma Control and Its Relationship with Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA in Older Adults

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    Mihaela Teodorescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objectives. Asthma in older individuals is poorly understood. We aimed to characterize the older asthma phenotype and test its association with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Pulmonary and Asthma/Allergy clinics. Participants. 659 asthma subjects aged 18–59 years (younger and 154 aged 60–75 (older. Measurements. Sleep Apnea scale of Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SA-SDQ, asthma severity step (1–4, severe if step 3 or 4, established OSA diagnosis, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP use, and comorbidities. Results. Older versus younger had worse control, as assessed by asthma step, lung function, and inhaled corticosteroid use. Among older subjects, after controlling for known asthma aggravators, OSA diagnosis was the only factor robustly associated with severe asthma: on average, OSA was associated with nearly 7 times greater likelihood of severe asthma in an older individual (OR=6.67. This relationship was of greater magnitude than in younger subjects (OR=2.16. CPAP use attenuated the likelihood of severe asthma in older subjects by 91% (P=0.005, much more than in the younger asthmatics. Conclusion. Diagnosed OSA increases the risk for worse asthma control in older patients, while CPAP therapy may have greater impact on asthma outcomes. Unrecognized OSA may be a reason for poor asthma control, particularly among older patients.

  4. Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and cognitive impairments in the elderly

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    Song Shuling

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS is a common sleep-related breathing disorder that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It has received inc