WorldWideScience

Sample records for confined complex morphologies

  1. Block copolymer morphologies confined by square-shaped particle: Hard and soft confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qiyi; Yang Wenyan; Hu Kaiyan

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of diblock copolymers confined around one square-shaped particle is studied systematically within two-dimensional self-consistent field theory (SCFT). In this model, we assume that the thin block copolymer film is confined in the vicinity of a square-shaped particle by a homopolymer melt, which is equivalent to the poor solvents. Multiple sequences of square-shaped particle-induced copolymer aggregates with different shapes and self-assembled internal morphologies are predicted as functions of the particle size, the structural portion of the copolymer, and the volume fraction of the copolymer. A rich variety of aggregates are found with complex internal self-assembled morphologies including complex structures of the vesicle, with one or several inverted micelle surrounded by the outer monolayer with the particle confined in the core. These results demonstrate that the assemblies of diblock copolymers formed around the square-shaped particle in poor solvents are of immediate interest to the assembly of copolymer and the morphology of biomembrane in the confined environment, as well as to the transitions of vesicles to micelles. (paper)

  2. Counterion effects on nano-confined metal–drug–DNA complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have explored morphology of DNA molecules bound with Cu complexes of piroxicam (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug molecules under one-dimensional confinement of thin films and have studied the effect of counterions present in a buffer. X-ray reflectivity at and away from the Cu K absorption edge and atomic force microscopy studies reveal that confinement segregates the drug molecules preferentially in a top layer of the DNA film, and counterions enhance this segregation.

  3. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  4. Morphological inversion of complex diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V. A. T.; Vural, D. C.

    2017-09-01

    Epidemics, neural cascades, power failures, and many other phenomena can be described by a diffusion process on a network. To identify the causal origins of a spread, it is often necessary to identify the triggering initial node. Here, we define a new morphological operator and use it to detect the origin of a diffusive front, given the final state of a complex network. Our method performs better than algorithms based on distance (closeness) and Jordan centrality. More importantly, our method is applicable regardless of the specifics of the forward model, and therefore can be applied to a wide range of systems such as identifying the patient zero in an epidemic, pinpointing the neuron that triggers a cascade, identifying the original malfunction that causes a catastrophic infrastructure failure, and inferring the ancestral species from which a heterogeneous population evolves.

  5. Induced Chirality in Confined Space on Halogen Gold Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longo, Alessandro; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Portale, Giuseppe; Calandra, Pietro; Liveri, Vincenzo Turco

    2015-01-01

    The solubilization of HAuCl4 toluene within optically active reverse micelles and lamellar structures formed by (1R,25)-Dodecy1(2-hydroxy-1-methyl-2-phenylethyl)dimethylammonium bromide (DMEB) has allowed us to evidence the complex phenomenology accompanying the confinement of Au salt -within these

  6. Spatial confinement effects on spectroscopic and morphological studies of nanosecond laser-ablated Zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-12-01

    Spatial confinement effects on plasma parameters and surface morphology of laser ablated Zr (Zirconium) are studied by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd:YAG laser at various fluencies ranging from 8 J cm-2 to 32 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from LIBS analysis that both plasma parameters i.e. excitation temperature and electron number density increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Zr plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 12,600 K and 14 × 1017 cm-3 respectively whereas, these values are enhanced to 15,000 K and 21 × 1017 cm-3 in the presence of blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Zr plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser ablated Zr. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters for surface structuring.

  7. Morphology and composition of pyrotechnic residues formed at different levels of confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeij, Erwin; Duvalois, Willem; Webb, Rutger; Koeberg, Mattijs

    2009-04-15

    Post explosion residues (PER) are residues from pyrotechnic compositions or explosives that are generated during an explosion. In the recent past SEM/EDX was used several times to analyze PER from pyrotechnic compositions. The results from these studies suggest that there might be a difference in morphology and composition of pyrotechnic residues formed at different levels of confinement. Also because of general thermodynamic principles it is believed that at higher levels of confinement the final pressure and temperature during the explosion is probably (but not necessarily) higher, eventually resulting in smaller and more spherical particles and a more homogeneous elemental composition. If there is a relation between morphology and composition of pyrotechnic residues and the level of confinement at which these are formed, it would be possible to draw conclusions about the conditions at which pyrotechnic residues were formed and the kind and construction of the device used. This may aid forensic scientists not only in the determination of the original explosive composition, but also of the explosive device. To perform controlled experiments with pyrotechnic charges at, at least, two pre-set levels of confinement a test vessel was built by TNO Defence, Security and Safety. For this study, three different flash powder compositions and black powder were selected. The generated residues were sampled on collecting plates and Nucleopore filters connected to a pump system in the immediate vicinity of the venting area for further analyses by SEM/EDX and XRD. From the results it follows that in the pressure range studied, the level of confinement seems to have a minor effect on the features of the generated residue particles. Because passive sampling by means of collector plates seemed doubtful and because the number of experiments had to be limited it is impossible to draw definitive conclusions. In addition to the level of confinement several other variables may affect

  8. Inorganic Nanoparticle Induced Morphological Transition for Confined Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers within Emulsion Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; He, Yun; Yan, Nan; Zhu, Yutian; Hu, Yuexin

    2017-09-07

    Recently, it has been reported that the incorporation of functional inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) into the three-dimensional (3D) confined self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) creates the unique nanostructured hybrid composites, which can not only introduce new functions to BCPs but also induce some interesting morphological transitions of BCPs. In the current study, we systematically investigate the cooperative self-assembly of a series of size-controlled and surface chemistry-tunable gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) diblock copolymer within the emulsion droplets. The influences of the size, content, and surface chemistry of the AuNPs on the coassembled nanostructures as well as the spatial distribution of AuNPs in the hybrid particles are examined. It is found that the size and content of the AuNPs are related to the entropic interaction, while the surface chemistry of AuNPs is related to the enthalpic interaction, which can be utilized to tailor the self-assembled morphologies of block copolymer confined in the emulsion droplets. As the content of PS-coated AuNPs increases, the morphology of the resulting AuNPs/PS-b-P2VP hybrid particles changes from the pupa-like particles to the bud-like particles and then to the onion-like particles. However, a unique morphological transition from the pupa-like particles to the mushroom-like particles is observed as the content of P4VP-coated AuNPs increases. More interestingly, it is observed that the large AuNPs are expelled to the surface of the BCP particles to reduce the loss in the conformational entropy of the block segment, which can arrange into the strings of necklaces on the surfaces of the hybrid particles.

  9. Structure and morphology of magnetron sputter deposited ultrathin ZnO films on confined polymeric template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajaib; Schipmann, Susanne; Mathur, Aakash; Pal, Dipayan; Sengupta, Amartya; Klemradt, Uwe; Chattopadhyay, Sudeshna

    2017-08-01

    The structure and morphology of ultra-thin zinc oxide (ZnO) films with different film thicknesses on confined polymer template were studied through X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Using magnetron sputter deposition technique ZnO thin films with different film thicknesses (weight of polystyrene). The detailed internal structure, along the surface/interfaces and the growth direction of the system were explored in this study, which provides insight into the growth procedure of ZnO on confined polymer and reveals that a thin layer of ZnO, with very low surface and interface roughness, can be grown by DC magnetron sputtering technique, with approximately full coverage (with bulk like electron density) even in nm order of thickness, in 2-7 nm range on confined polymer template, without disturbing the structure of the underneath template. The resulting ZnO-polystyrene hybrid systems show strong ZnO near band edge (NBE) and deep-level (DLE) emissions in their room temperature photoluminescence spectra, where the contribution of DLE gets relatively stronger with decreasing ZnO film thickness, indicating a significant enhancement of surface defects because of the greater surface to volume ratio in thinner films.

  10. Structure and morphology of magnetron sputter deposited ultrathin ZnO films on confined polymeric template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ajaib [Discipline of Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552 (India); Schipmann, Susanne [II. Insatitute of Physics and JARA-FIT, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Mathur, Aakash; Pal, Dipayan [Discipline of Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552 (India); Sengupta, Amartya [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Delhi 110016 (India); Klemradt, Uwe [II. Insatitute of Physics and JARA-FIT, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Chattopadhyay, Sudeshna, E-mail: sudeshna@iiti.ac.in [Discipline of Metallurgy Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552 (India); Discipline of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552 (India); Centre for Biosciences and Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Indore 453552 (India)

    2017-08-31

    Highlights: • Ultra-thin ZnO films grown on confined polymeric (polystyrene, PS) template. • XRR and GISAXS explore the surface/interfaces structure and morphology of ZnO/PS. • Insights into the growth mechanism of magnetron sputtered ZnO thin film on PS template. • Nucleated disk-like cylindrical particles are the basis of the formation of ZnO layers. • Effect of ZnO film thickness on room temperature PL spectra in ZnO/PS systems. - Abstract: The structure and morphology of ultra-thin zinc oxide (ZnO) films with different film thicknesses on confined polymer template were studied through X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Using magnetron sputter deposition technique ZnO thin films with different film thicknesses (<10 nm) were grown on confined polystyrene with ∼2R{sub g} film thickness, where R{sub g} ∼ 20 nm (R{sub g} is the unperturbed radius of gyration of polystyrene, defined by R{sub g} = 0.272 √M{sub 0}, and M{sub 0} is the molecular weight of polystyrene). The detailed internal structure, along the surface/interfaces and the growth direction of the system were explored in this study, which provides insight into the growth procedure of ZnO on confined polymer and reveals that a thin layer of ZnO, with very low surface and interface roughness, can be grown by DC magnetron sputtering technique, with approximately full coverage (with bulk like electron density) even in nm order of thickness, in 2–7 nm range on confined polymer template, without disturbing the structure of the underneath template. The resulting ZnO-polystyrene hybrid systems show strong ZnO near band edge (NBE) and deep-level (DLE) emissions in their room temperature photoluminescence spectra, where the contribution of DLE gets relatively stronger with decreasing ZnO film thickness, indicating a significant enhancement of surface defects because of the greater surface to volume ratio in thinner films.

  11. The Contribution of Morphological Awareness to the Spelling of Morphemes and Morphologically Complex Words in French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejzo, Anila

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore the relationship between morphological awareness and the spelling of morphemes and morphologically complex words among 75 third- and fourth-grade Francophone students of low socio-economic status. To reach this objective, we administered a dictation comprised of morphologically complex words with prefixes,…

  12. Probability and Surprisal in Auditory Comprehension of Morphologically Complex Words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Laura Winther; Baayen, R. Harald

    2012-01-01

    Two auditory lexical decision experiments document for morphologically complex words two points at which the probability of a target word given the evidence shifts dramatically. The first point is reached when morphologically unrelated competitors are no longer compatible with the evidence. Adapt...

  13. Crystallinity and order of poly(ethylene oxide)/lithium triflate complex confined in nanoporous membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, Christina; Teeters, Dale

    2009-01-01

    The confinement of poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, electrolyte in pores of 13, 35, 55 and 100 nm in diameter in nanoporous alumina membranes was seen to have effects on the ionic conduction properties. Specific conductivity values for the PEO/lithium triflate complex in the 13 and 35 nm pores, for temperatures below the melt temperatures, were increased by a factor of four compared to the non-confined polymer and the 55 and 100 nm pore systems. Thermal analysis data indicate the melting temperature for the PEO electrolyte in the pores is directly proportional to the pore size such that as the pore size of confinement is decreased, the T m decreases as well. The same behavior is seen for the amount of crystallinity, with less crystallinity being observed as the pores become smaller. Perhaps the observed conduction behavior could be attributed to less crystallinity. However, it is known that confinement of polyethers in pores results in stretching and ordering of the backbone and that such ordering can increase ion conduction. This ordering would seem to be the major factor involved in these results. The enhanced conduction only being seen in the 13 and 35 nm pores and not the 55 and 100 nm pores is attributed to the larger size for the latter which allows a more bulk-like behavior with less ordering.

  14. Morphological evaluation of the Pinus kesiya complex (Pinaceae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Businský, R.; Frantík, Tomáš; Vít, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 300, č. 2 (2014), s. 273-285 ISSN 0378-2697 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : morphological var iation * Pinus densata ssp. tibetica * Pinus kesiya complex Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.422, year: 2014

  15. X-ray and neutron scattering studies of complex confined fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    We review recent X-ray and neutron scattering studies of the structure and dynamics of confined complex fluids. This includes the study of polymer conformations and binary fluid phase transitions in porous media using Small Angle Neutron scattering, and the use of synchrotrons radiation to study ordering and fluctuation phenomena at solid/liquid and liquid/air interfaces. Ordering of liquids near a solid surface or in confinement will be discussed, and the study, via specular and off-specular X-ray reflectivity, of capillary wave fluctuations on liquid polymer films. Finally, we shall discuss the use of high-brilliance beams from X-ray synchrotrons to study via photon correlation spectroscopy the slow dynamics of soft condensed matter systems

  16. Individual Neurons Confined to Distinct Antennal-Lobe Tracts in the Heliothine Moth: Morphological Characteristics and Global Projection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Elena; Zhao, Xin C.; Lande, Andreas; Berg, Bente G.

    2016-01-01

    To explore fundamental principles characterizing chemosensory information processing, we have identified antennal-lobe projection neurons in the heliothine moth, including several neuron types not previously described. Generally, odor information is conveyed from the primary olfactory center of the moth brain, the antennal lobe, to higher brain centers via projection neuron axons passing along several parallel pathways, of which the medial, mediolateral, and lateral antennal-lobe tract are considered the classical ones. Recent data have revealed the projections of the individual tracts more in detail demonstrating three main target regions in the protocerebrum; the calyces are innervated mainly by the medial tract, the superior intermediate protocerebrum by the lateral tract exclusively, and the lateral horn by all tracts. In the present study, we have identified, via iontophoretic intracellular staining combined with confocal microscopy, individual projection neurons confined to the tracts mentioned above, plus two additional ones. Further, using the visualization software AMIRA, we reconstructed the stained neurons and registered the models into a standard brain atlas, which allowed us to compare the termination areas of individual projection neurons both across and within distinct tracts. The data demonstrate a morphological diversity of the projection neurons within distinct tracts. Comparison of the output areas of the neurons confined to the three main tracts in the lateral horn showed overlapping terminal regions for the medial and mediolateral tracts; the lateral tract neurons, on the contrary, targeted mostly other output areas in the protocerebrum. PMID:27822181

  17. Sharp Morphological Transitions from Nanoscale Mixed-Anchoring Patterns in Confined Nematic Liquid Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C. [Institute; División; Li, Xiao [Institute; Martínez-González, José A. [Institute; Smith, Coleman [Institute; Hernández-Ortiz, J. P. [Departamento; Nealey, Paul F. [Institute; Materials; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute; Materials

    2017-08-17

    Liquid crystals are known to be particularly sensitive to orientational cues provided at surfaces or interfaces. In this work, we explore theoretically, computationally, and experimentally the behavior of liquid crystals on isolated nanoscale patterns with controlled anchoring characteristics at small length scales. The orientation of the liquid crystal is controlled through the use of chemically patterned polymer brushes that are tethered to a surface. This system can be engineered with remarkable precision, and the central question addressed here is whether a characteristic length scale exists at which information encoded on a surface is no longer registered by a liquid crystal. To do so, we adopt a tensorial description of the free energy of the hybrid liquidcrystal surface system, and we investigate its morphology in a systematic manner. For long and narrow surface stripes, it is found that the liquid crystal follows the instructions provided by the pattern down to 100 nm widths. This is accomplished through the creation of line defects that travel along the sides of the stripes. We show that a "sharp" morphological transition occurs from a uniform undistorted alignment to a dual uniform/splay-bend morphology. The theoretical and numerical predictions advanced here are confirmed by experimental observations. Our combined analysis suggests that nanoscale patterns can be used to manipulate the orientation of liquid crystals at a fraction of the energetic cost that is involved in traditional liquid crystal-based devices. The insights presented in this work have the potential to provide a new fabrication platform to assemble low power bistable devices, which could be reconfigured upon application of small external fields.

  18. Self-assembling morphologies of symmetrical PS-b-PMMA in different sized confining grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wenhui; Luo, Jun; Shi, Peixiong

    2014-01-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA), an emerging lithographic technique, has attracted increasing attention as a result of its advantages of low cost, high throughput and convenient processing. However, DSA still presents some challenges, such as the control of defects, the fabrication of complex patterns...

  19. Review of tritium confinement and atmosphere detritiation system in hot cells complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzello, Claudio; Borgognoni, Fabio; Pinna, Tonio; Tosti, Silvano

    2010-01-01

    The tritium confinement strategy adopted during the past years in the ITER hot cell building is compared to the safety requirements given by the standard ISO-17873 'Nuclear facilities - criteria for the design and operation of ventilation systems for nuclear installations other than nuclear reactors'. In fact, this is the reference safety guideline recommended by French licensing authorities. Several features of the considered design of the hot cell building are not in agreement with these guidelines. Main discrepancies concern the zoning of the hot cell complex, the flow rates of ventilation, and the possibility to recycle the room atmosphere and to detritiate the effluent air. These aspects are discussed together with some proposed modifications of the design.

  20. Complex confining layers : a physical and geochemical characterization of heterogeneous unconsolidated fluvial deposits using a facies-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoort, Pieter-Jan van

    2003-01-01

    A proper characterization of physical and chemical heterogeneities in the subsoil is an important condition for successful modeling of groundwater flow and solute transport. This study focuses on the physical and chemical characterization of a complex confining layer in the Rhine–Meuse deltaic plain

  1. Nanoscale Confinement and Fluorescence Effects of Bacterial Light Harvesting Complex LH2 in Mesoporous Silicas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Tubasum, Sumera; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    Many key chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly in living cells, take place in confined space at the mesoscopic scale. Towards understanding of physicochemical nature of biomacromolecules confined in nanoscale space, in this work we have elucidated fluorescent effects of a light harvest...

  2. Where and how morphologically complex words interplay with naming pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitserlood, Pienie; Bölte, Jens; Dohmes, Petra

    2002-01-01

    Two picture-word experiments are reported in which a delay of 7 to 10 was introduced between distractor and picture. Distractor words were either derived words (Experiment 1) or compounds (Experiment 2), morphologically related to the picture name. In both experiments, the position of morphological overlap between distractor (e.g., rosebud vs tea-rose) and picture name (rose) was manipulated. Clear facilitation of picture naming latencies was obtained when pictures were paired with morphological distractors, and effects were independent of distractor type and position of overlap. The results are evaluated against "full listing" and "decomposition" approaches of morphological representation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  3. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Are Complex Magnetic Field Structures Responsible for the Confined X-class Flares in Super Active Region 12192?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Ting; Chen, Huadong, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: hdchen@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-08-10

    From 2014 October 19 to 27, six X-class flares occurred in super active region (AR) 12192. They were all confined flares and were not followed by coronal mass ejections. To examine the structures of the four flares close to the solar disk center from October 22 to 26, we firstly employ composite triple-time images in each flare process to display the stratified structure of these flare loops. The loop structures of each flare in both the lower (171 Å) and higher (131 Å) temperature channels are complex, e.g., the flare loops rooting at flare ribbons are sheared or twisted (enwound) together, and the complex structures were not destroyed during the flares. For the first flare, although the flare loop system appears as a spindle shape, we can estimate its structures from observations, with lengths ranging from 130 to 300 Mm, heights from 65 to 150 Mm, widths at the middle part of the spindle from 40 to 100 Mm, and shear angles from 16° to 90°. Moreover, the flare ribbons display irregular movements, such as the left ribbon fragments of the flare on October 22 sweeping a small region repeatedly, and both ribbons of the flare on October 26 moved along the same direction instead of separating from each other. These irregular movements also imply that the corresponding flare loops are complex, e.g., several sets of flare loops are twisted together. Although previous studies have suggested that the background magnetic fields prevent confined flares from erupting,based on these observations, we suggest that complex flare loop structures may be responsible for these confined flares.

  5. Complex flow morphologies in shock-accelerated gaseous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Vorobieff, P.; Orlicz, G.; Palekar, A.; Tomkins, C.; Goodenough, C.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Prestridge, K. P.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2007-11-01

    A Mach 1.2 planar shock wave impulsively and simultaneously accelerates a row of three heavy gas (SF 6) cylinders surrounded by a lighter gas (air), producing pairs of vortex columns. The heavy gas cylinders (nozzle diameter D) are initially equidistant in the spanwise direction (center to center spacing S), with S/D=1.5. The interaction of the vortex columns is investigated with planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in the plane normal to the axes of the cylinders. Several distinct post-shock morphologies are observed, apparently due to rather small variations of the initial conditions. We report the variation of the streamwise and spanwise growth rates of the integral scales for these flow morphologies.

  6. Complexation-tailored morphology of asymmetric block copolymer membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2013-08-14

    Hydrogen-bond formation between polystyrene-b-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer (BCP) and -OH/-COOH functionalized organic molecules was used to tune morphology of asymmetric nanoporous membranes prepared by simultaneous self-assembly and nonsolvent induced phase separation. The morphologies were characterized by field emmision scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Hydrogen bonds were confirmed by infrared (IR), and the results were correlated to rheology characterization. The OH-functionalized organic molecules direct the morphology into hexagonal order. COOH-functionalized molecules led to both lamellar and hexagonal structures. Micelle formation in solutions and their sizes were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements and water fluxes of 600-3200 L/m 2·h·bar were obtained. The pore size of the plain BCP membrane was smaller than with additives. The following series of additives led to pores with hexagonal order with increasing pore size: terephthalic acid (COOH-bifunctionalized) < rutin (OH-multifunctionalized) < 9-anthracenemethanol (OH-monofunctionalized) < 3,5-dihydroxybenzyl alcohol (OH-trifunctionalized). © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. Complexation-tailored morphology of asymmetric block copolymer membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Nunes, Suzana Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen-bond formation between polystyrene-b-poly (4-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P4VP) block copolymer (BCP) and -OH/-COOH functionalized organic molecules was used to tune morphology of asymmetric nanoporous membranes prepared by simultaneous self-assembly and nonsolvent induced phase separation. The morphologies were characterized by field emmision scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Hydrogen bonds were confirmed by infrared (IR), and the results were correlated to rheology characterization. The OH-functionalized organic molecules direct the morphology into hexagonal order. COOH-functionalized molecules led to both lamellar and hexagonal structures. Micelle formation in solutions and their sizes were determined using dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements and water fluxes of 600-3200 L/m 2·h·bar were obtained. The pore size of the plain BCP membrane was smaller than with additives. The following series of additives led to pores with hexagonal order with increasing pore size: terephthalic acid (COOH-bifunctionalized) < rutin (OH-multifunctionalized) < 9-anthracenemethanol (OH-monofunctionalized) < 3,5-dihydroxybenzyl alcohol (OH-trifunctionalized). © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Control of exciton confinement in quantum dot-organic complexes through energetic alignment of interfacial orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Matthew T; Amin, Victor A; Swenson, Nathaniel K; Ho, Andrew Y; Weiss, Emily A

    2013-01-09

    This paper describes a method to control the quantum confinement, and therefore the energy, of excitonic holes in CdSe QDs through adsorption of the hole-delocalizing ligand phenyldithiocarbamate, PTC, and para substitutions of the phenyl ring of this ligand with electron-donating or -withdrawing groups. These substitutions control hole delocalization in the QDs through the energetic alignment of the highest occupied orbitals of PTC with the highest density-of-states region of the CdSe valence band, to which PTC couples selectively.

  9. Morphological and ecological complexity in early eukaryotic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaux, E J; Knoll, A H; Walter, M R

    2001-07-05

    Molecular phylogeny and biogeochemistry indicate that eukaryotes differentiated early in Earth history. Sequence comparisons of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes suggest a deep evolutionary divergence of Eukarya and Archaea; C27-C29 steranes (derived from sterols synthesized by eukaryotes) and strong depletion of 13C (a biogeochemical signature of methanogenic Archaea) in 2,700 Myr old kerogens independently place a minimum age on this split. Steranes, large spheroidal microfossils, and rare macrofossils of possible eukaryotic origin occur in Palaeoproterozoic rocks. Until now, however, evidence for morphological and taxonomic diversification within the domain has generally been restricted to very late Mesoproterozoic and Neoproterozoic successions. Here we show that the cytoskeletal and ecological prerequisites for eukaryotic diversification were already established in eukaryotic microorganisms fossilized nearly 1,500 Myr ago in shales of the early Mesoproterozoic Roper Group in northern Australia.

  10. A Multiscale Model of Morphological Complexity in Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Mary Katherine; Ayres, Phil; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2017-01-01

    Approaches from complex systems science can support design decision-making by extracting important information about key dependencies from large, unstructured data sources. This paper presents an initial case study applying such approaches to city structure, by characterising low-level features a...

  11. Computational modeling and statistical analyses on individual contact rate and exposure to disease in complex and confined transportation hubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. L.; Tsui, K. L.; Lo, S. M.; Liu, S. B.

    2018-01-01

    Crowded transportation hubs such as metro stations are thought as ideal places for the development and spread of epidemics. However, for the special features of complex spatial layout, confined environment with a large number of highly mobile individuals, it is difficult to quantify human contacts in such environments, wherein disease spreading dynamics were less explored in the previous studies. Due to the heterogeneity and dynamic nature of human interactions, increasing studies proved the importance of contact distance and length of contact in transmission probabilities. In this study, we show how detailed information on contact and exposure patterns can be obtained by statistical analyses on microscopic crowd simulation data. To be specific, a pedestrian simulation model-CityFlow was employed to reproduce individuals' movements in a metro station based on site survey data, values and distributions of individual contact rate and exposure in different simulation cases were obtained and analyzed. It is interesting that Weibull distribution fitted the histogram values of individual-based exposure in each case very well. Moreover, we found both individual contact rate and exposure had linear relationship with the average crowd densities of the environments. The results obtained in this paper can provide reference to epidemic study in complex and confined transportation hubs and refine the existing disease spreading models.

  12. Morphological evaluation of complex congenital heart disease by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Osahiro

    1993-01-01

    Ninety infants and children with complex congenital heart disease were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and the accuracy of morphological diagnoses by MRI was tested by comparison to the final diagnoses primarily based on angiocardiography. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI diagnoses were generally excellent in evaluating vena caval and atrial morphology, type of AV connection, ventricular morphology, type of VA connection and great vessel morphology. Although some difficulty with evaluating the detailed anatomy of the AV valve and its suspension system and fine vascular structures, MRI could demonstrate the entire cardiac structures clearly and provide the 3-dimensional information regarding the intracardiac structures, and it was extremely valuable in morphological assessment of complex congenital heart disease. (author)

  13. Morphological variation in leaf dissection of Rheum palmatum complex (Polygonaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Mei Wang

    Full Text Available AIMS: Rheum palmatum complex comprises all taxa within section Palmata in the genus Rheum, including R. officinale, R. palmatum, R. tanguticum, R. tanguticum var. liupanshanense and R. laciniatum. The identification of the taxa in section Palmata is based primarily on the degree of leaf blade dissection and the shape of the lobes; however, difficulties in species identification may arise from their significant variation. The aim of this study is to analyze the patterns of variation in leaf blade characteristics within and among populations through population-based sampling covering the entire distribution range of R. palmatum complex. METHODS: Samples were taken from 2340 leaves from 780 individuals and 44 populations representing the four species, and the degree of leaf blade dissection and the shape of the lobe were measured to yield a set of quantitative data. Furthermore, those data were statistically analyzed. IMPORTANT FINDINGS: The statistical analysis showed that the degree of leaf blade dissection is continuous from lobed to parted, and the shape of the lobe is also continuous from broadly triangular to lanceolate both within and between populations. We suggested that taxa in section Palmata should be considered as one species. Based on the research on the R. palmatum complex, we considered that the quantitative characteristics were greatly influenced by the environment. Therefore, it is not reliable to delimitate the species according to the continuously quantitative vegetative characteristics.

  14. Kirigami artificial muscles with complex biologically inspired morphologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sareh, Sina; Rossiter, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present bio-inspired smart structures which exploit the actuation of flexible ionic polymer composites and the kirigami design principle. Kirigami design is used to convert planar actuators into active 3D structures capable of large out-of-plane displacement and that replicate biological mechanisms. Here we present the burstbot, a fluid control and propulsion mechanism based on the atrioventricular cuspid valve, and the vortibot, a spiral actuator based on Vorticella campanula, a ciliate protozoa. Models derived from biological counterparts are used as a platform for design optimization and actuator performance measurement. The symmetric and asymmetric fluid interactions of the burstbot are investigated and the effectiveness in fluid transport applications is demonstrated. The vortibot actuator is geometrically optimized as a camera positioner capable of 360° scanning. Experimental results for a one-turn spiral actuator show complex actuation derived from a single degree of freedom control signal. (paper)

  15. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ossola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size.

  16. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael A.; Christie, Fiona J.; Hahs, Amy K.; Livesley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i) ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii) ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii) ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size. PMID:26528416

  17. Delimitating cryptic species in the Gracilaria domingensis complex (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) using molecular and morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Goia de M; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Costa, Emmanuelle da S; de Jesus, Priscila B; Oliveira, Mariana C; Oliveira, Eurico C; Davis, Charles C; Nunes, José Marcos de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Species in the genus Gracilaria that display conspicuously flattened vegetative morphologies are a taxonomically challenging group of marine benthic red algae. This is a result of their species richness, morphological similarity, and broad phenotypic plasticity. Within this group, the Gracilaria domingensis complex is one of the most common, conspicuous, and morphologically variable species along the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. Previous research has identified that members of this complex belong to two distantly related clades. However, despite this increased phylogentic resolution, species delimitations within each of these clades remain unclear. Our study assessed the species diversity within this difficult complex using morphological and molecular data from three genetic markers (cox1, UPA, and rbcL). We additionally applied six single-marker species delimitation methods (SDM: ABGD, GMYCs, GMYCm, SPN, bPTP, and PTP) to rbcL, which were largely in agreement regarding species delimitation. These results, combined with our analysis of morphology, indicate that the G. domingensis complex includes seven distinct species, each of which are not all most closely related: G. cervicornis; a ressurected G. ferox; G. apiculata subsp. apiculata; a new species, Gracilaria baiana sp. nov.; G. intermedia subsp. intermedia; G. venezuelensis; and G. domingensis sensu stricto, which includes the later heterotypic synonym, G. yoneshigueana. Our study demonstrates the value of multipronged strategies, including the use of both molecular and morphological approaches, to decipher cryptic species of red algae. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  18. Investigation of Plasmas Having Complex, Dynamic Evolving Morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellan, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    Three different types of plasmas have been investigated using both experimental and theoretical methods. The first type of plasma is dense, highly ionized, governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and highly dynamic. This plasma is relevant to solar coronal loops, astrophysical jets, and other situations where strong magnetic forces act on the plasma. A well-diagnosed laboratory experiment creates a magnetohydrodynamically driven highly collimated plasma jet. This jet undergoes a kink instability such that it rapidly develops a corkscrew shape. The kink causes lateral acceleration of the jet, and this lateral acceleration drives a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that in turn chokes the current flowing in the jet and causes a magnetic reconnection. The magnetic reconnection causes electron and ion heating as well as emission of whistler waves. This entire sequence of events has been observed, measured in detail, and related to theoretical models. The second type of plasma is a transient rf-produced plasma used as a seed plasma for the magnetohydrodynamic experiments described above. Detailed atomic physics ionization processes have been investigated and modeled. The third type of plasma that has been studied is a dusty plasma where the dust particles are spontaneously growing ice grains. The rapid growth of the ice grains to large size and their highly ordered alignment has been investigated as well as collective motion of the ice grains, including well-defined flows on the surface of nested toroids. In addition to the experimental work described above, several related theoretical models have been developed, most notably a model showing how a complex interaction between gravity and magnetic fields on extremely weakly ionized plasma in an accretion disk provides an electric power source that can drive astrophysical jets associated with the accretion disk. Eighteen papers reporting this work have been published in a wide variety of journals.

  19. Investigation of Plasmas Having Complex, Dynamic Evolving Morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellan, Paul M. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-01-03

    Three different types of plasmas have been investigated using both experimental and theoretical methods. The first type of plasma is dense, highly ionized, governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and highly dynamic. This plasma is relevant to solar coronal loops, astrophysical jets, and other situations where strong magnetic forces act on the plasma. A well-diagnosed laboratory experiment creates a magnetohydrodynamically driven highly collimated plasma jet. This jet undergoes a kink instability such that it rapidly develops a corkscrew shape. The kink causes lateral acceleration of the jet, and this lateral acceleration drives a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that in turn chokes the current flowing in the jet and causes a magnetic reconnection. The magnetic reconnection causes electron and ion heating as well as emission of whistler waves. This entire sequence of events has been observed, measured in detail, and related to theoretical models. The second type of plasma is a transient rf-produced plasma used as a seed plasma for the magnetohydrodynamic experiments described above. Detailed atomic physics ionization processes have been investigated and modeled. The third type of plasma that has been studied is a dusty plasma where the dust particles are spontaneously growing ice grains. The rapid growth of the ice grains to large size and their highly ordered alignment has been investigated as well as collective motion of the ice grains, including well-defined flows on the surface of nested toroids. In addition to the experimental work described above, several related theoretical models have been developed, most notably a model showing how a complex interaction between gravity and magnetic fields on extremely weakly ionized plasma in an accretion disk provides an electric power source that can drive astrophysical jets associated with the accretion disk. Eighteen papers reporting this work have been published in a wide variety of journals.

  20. Confined Li ion migration in the silicon-graphene complex system: An ab initio investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Xu, Bo; Shi, Jing; Lei, Xueling; Ouyang, Chuying

    2018-04-01

    Silicon-Carbon complex systems play an important role in enhancing the performance of Si-based anode materials for Li ion batteries. In this work, the Li migration property of the Silicon-Graphene (Si-Gr) complex systems are investigated by using first-principles calculations. Especially, the effects of graphene coating on the migration of Li ions are discussed in detail. The distance between Si surface and graphene in the Si-Gr system significantly affects the lateral migration of Li ions. With the decrease of the distance from 4.715 to 3.844 Å, the energy barrier of Li ion migration also decreases from 0.115 to 0.067 eV, which are all lower than that of the case without graphene d(0.135 eV). However, smaller distance (3.586 Å) brings the high energy barrier (0.237 eV). Through AIMD calculations, it is found that the graphene coating in the Si-Gr complex system would result in the larger intercalation depths, more uniform distributions, and higher migration coefficients of Li ions. Further calculations of migration coefficients of Li ions at different temperature are used to obtained the activation energy for Li ions migration in the Si-Gr system, which is as low as 0.028 eV. This low activation energy shows that it is easy for Li ions migrating in the Si-Gr system. Our study provided the basically information to understand the migration mechanism of Li ions in Si-C system.

  1. Comparative Visual Analysis of Structure-Performance Relations in Complex Bulk-Heterojunction Morphologies

    KAUST Repository

    Aboulhassan, A.

    2017-07-04

    The structure of Bulk-Heterojunction (BHJ) materials, the main component of organic photovoltaic solar cells, is very complex, and the relationship between structure and performance is still largely an open question. Overall, there is a wide spectrum of fabrication configurations resulting in different BHJ morphologies and correspondingly different performances. Current state-of-the-art methods for assessing the performance of BHJ morphologies are either based on global quantification of morphological features or simply on visual inspection of the morphology based on experimental imaging. This makes finding optimal BHJ structures very challenging. Moreover, finding the optimal fabrication parameters to get an optimal structure is still an open question. In this paper, we propose a visual analysis framework to help answer these questions through comparative visualization and parameter space exploration for local morphology features. With our approach, we enable scientists to explore multivariate correlations between local features and performance indicators of BHJ morphologies. Our framework is built on shape-based clustering of local cubical regions of the morphology that we call patches. This enables correlating the features of clusters with intuition-based performance indicators computed from geometrical and topological features of charge paths.

  2. Comparative Visual Analysis of Structure-Performance Relations in Complex Bulk-Heterojunction Morphologies

    KAUST Repository

    Aboulhassan, A.; Sicat, R.; Baum, D.; Wodo, O.; Hadwiger, Markus

    2017-01-01

    The structure of Bulk-Heterojunction (BHJ) materials, the main component of organic photovoltaic solar cells, is very complex, and the relationship between structure and performance is still largely an open question. Overall, there is a wide spectrum of fabrication configurations resulting in different BHJ morphologies and correspondingly different performances. Current state-of-the-art methods for assessing the performance of BHJ morphologies are either based on global quantification of morphological features or simply on visual inspection of the morphology based on experimental imaging. This makes finding optimal BHJ structures very challenging. Moreover, finding the optimal fabrication parameters to get an optimal structure is still an open question. In this paper, we propose a visual analysis framework to help answer these questions through comparative visualization and parameter space exploration for local morphology features. With our approach, we enable scientists to explore multivariate correlations between local features and performance indicators of BHJ morphologies. Our framework is built on shape-based clustering of local cubical regions of the morphology that we call patches. This enables correlating the features of clusters with intuition-based performance indicators computed from geometrical and topological features of charge paths.

  3. L2 Grammatical Gender in a Complex Morphological System: The Case of German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Patti; Juffs, Alan

    2008-01-01

    In order to determine the nature of naturalistic learners' difficulty with grammatical gender in a complex morphological system, the longitudinal production data of an early naturalistic L1-Italian and L1-Turkish learner who are acquiring German are examined in light of current theories of gender within Chomsky's (1995) Minimalist Program. After…

  4. Examination of High Resolution Channel Topography to Determine Suitable Metrics to Characterize Morphological Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, R. L.; Gaeuman, D.

    2015-12-01

    Complex bed morphology is deemed necessary to restore salmonid habitats, yet quantifiable metrics that capture channel complexity have remained elusive. This work utilizes high resolution topographic data from the 40 miles of the Trinity River of northern California to determine a suitable metric for characterizing morphological complexity at the reach scale. The study area is segregated into reaches defined by individual riffle pool units or aggregates of several consecutive units. Potential measures of complexity include rugosity and depth statistics such as standard deviation and interquartile range, yet previous research has shown these metrics are scale dependent and subject to sampling density-based bias. The effect of sampling density on the present analysis has been reduced by underrepresenting the high resolution topographic data as a 3'x 3' raster so that all areas are equally sampled. Standard rugosity, defined as the three-dimensional surface area divided by projected area, has been shown to be dependent on average depth. We therefore define R*, a empirically depth-corrected rugosity metric in which rugosity is corrected using an empirical relationship based on linear regression between the standard rugosity metric and average depth. By removing the dependence on depth using a regression based on the study reach, R* provides a measure reach scale complexity relative to the entire study area. The interquartile range of depths is also depth-dependent, so we defined a non-dimensional metric (IQR*) as the interquartile range dividing by median depth. These are calculated to develop rankings of channel complexity which, are found to closely agree with perceived channel complexity observed in the field. Current efforts combine these measures of morphological complexity with salmonid habitat suitability to evaluate the effects of channel complexity on the various life stages of salmonids. Future work will investigate the downstream sequencing of channel

  5. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon [Mahidol University, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Rachathewi, Bangkok (Thailand); Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  6. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  7. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Won C; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Chang, Eric Y; Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques.

  8. Micromechanical Characterization of Complex Polypropylene Morphologies by HarmoniX AFM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liparoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the capability of the HarmoniX Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM technique to draw accurate and reliable micromechanical characterization of complex polymer morphologies generally found in conventional thermoplastic polymers. To that purpose, injection molded polypropylene samples, containing representative morphologies, have been characterized by HarmoniX AFM. Mapping and distributions of mechanical properties of the samples surface are determined and analyzed. Effects of sample preparation and test conditions are also analyzed. Finally, the AFM determination of surface elastic moduli has been compared with that obtained by indentation tests, finding good agreement among the results.

  9. Morphological and molecular characterization of Cladosporium cladosporioides species complex causing pecan tree leaf spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C; Muniz, M F B; Rolim, J M; Martins, R R O; Rosenthal, V C; Maciel, C G; Mezzomo, R; Reiniger, L R S

    2016-09-16

    The objective of this study was to characterize species of the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex isolated from pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis) with symptoms of leaf spot, based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological attributes were assessed using monosporic cultures on potato dextrose agar medium, which were examined for mycelial growth, sporulation, color, and conidia and ramoconidia size. Molecular characterization comprised isolation of DNA and subsequent amplification of the translation elongation factor 1α (TEF-1α) region. Three species of the C. cladosporioides complex were identified: C. cladosporioides, Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides, and Cladosporium subuliforme. Sporulation was the most important characteristic differentiating species of this genus. However, morphological features must be considered together with molecular analysis, as certain characters are indistinguishable between species. TEF-1αcan be effectively used to identify and group isolates belonging to the C. cladosporioides complex. The present study provides an important example of a methodology to ascertain similarity between isolates of this complex causing leaf spot in pecan trees, which should facilitate future pathogenicity studies.

  10. Colour interceptions, thermal stability and surface morphology of polyester metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohdy, M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Chelating copolymers via grafting of acrylic acid (AAc) and acrylamide (AAm/AAc) comonomer mixture onto polyester micro fiber fabrics (PETMF) using gamma-radiation technique were prepared. The prepared graft chains (PETMF-g-AAc) and (PETMF-g-PAAc/PAAm) acted as chelating sites for some selected transition metal ions. The prepared graft copolymers and their metal complexes were characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), colour parameters and surface morphology measurements. The colour interception and strength measurements showed that the metal complexation is homogeneously distributed. The results showed that the thermal stability of PETMF was improved after graft copolymerization and metal complexes. Moreover, the degree of grafting enhanced the thermal stability values of the grafted and complexed copolymers up to 25% of magnitude, on the other hand the activation energy of the grafted-copolymer with acrylic acid increased up to 80%. The SEM observation gives further supports to the homogenous distribution of grafting and metal complexation

  11. Developmental changes of morphology in the basolateral complex of the rabbit amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagalska-Majewska, Hanna; Luczyńska, Anna; Wójcik, Sławomir; Dziewiatkowski, Jerzy; Kurlapska, Renata; Moryś, Janusz

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to follow topographical and morphological changes in the development of the amygdaloid basolateral complex (BLC) in the rabbit. The material consists of 35 brains of New Zealand rabbits of both sexes, divided into 7 age groups (P2-P90). In cresyl violet preparations BLC is already well visible on P2 and is composed of the lateral (divided into dorsolateral and ventromedial divisions), basolateral and homogenous basomedial nuclei. On about the 7th postnatal day it is possible to divide the basomedial nucleus (BM) into dorsal (Bmd) and ventral (BMv) divisions. The topography and subdivisions set on P7 are maintained in further periods of life. The morphology of neurons (shape, dendrites, staining) changes significantly until P21 in all BLC nuclei. Our results indicate that BLC achieves morphological maturity relatively late, which is probably connected with a long creation of emotional memory and regulation of emotional behaviour.

  12. A Complex Interaction Between Reduced Reelin Expression and Prenatal Organophosphate Exposure Alters Neuronal Cell Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Mullen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are both likely to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders, and major depressive disorders. Prior studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that the combinatorial effect of two factors—reduced expression of reelin protein and prenatal exposure to the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos oxon—gives rise to acute biochemical effects and to morphological and behavioral phenotypes in adolescent and young adult mice. In the current study, we examine the consequences of these factors on reelin protein expression and neuronal cell morphology in adult mice. While the cell populations that express reelin in the adult brain appear unchanged in location and distribution, the levels of full length and cleaved reelin protein show persistent reductions following prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon. Cell positioning and organization in the hippocampus and cerebellum are largely normal in animals with either reduced reelin expression or prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos oxon, but cellular complexity and dendritic spine organization is altered, with a skewed distribution of immature dendritic spines in adult animals. Paradoxically, combinatorial exposure to both factors appears to generate a rescue of the dendritic spine phenotypes, similar to the mitigation of behavioral and morphological changes observed in our prior study. Together, our observations support an interaction between reelin expression and chlorpyrifos oxon exposure that is not simply additive, suggesting a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors in regulating brain morphology.

  13. Generation of Complex Verbal Morphology in First and Second Language Acquisition: Evidence from Russian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Gor

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the structure of the mental lexicon and the processing of Russian verbal morphology by two groups of speakers, adult American learners of Russian and Russian children aged 4-6, and reports the results of two matching experiments conducted at the University of Maryland, USA and St. Petersburg State University, Russia. The theoretical framework for this study comes from research on the structure of the mental lexicon and modularity in morphological processing. So far, there are very few studies investigating the processing of complex verbal morphology, with most of the work done on Icelandic, Norwegian, Italian, and Russian. The current views are shaped predominantly by research on English regular and irregular past-tense inflection, which has been conducted within two competing approaches. This study investigates the processing of verbal morphology in Russian, a language with numerous verb classes differing in size and the number and complexity of conjugation rules. It assumes that instead of a sharp opposition of regular and irregular verb processing, a gradual parameter of regularity may be more appropriate for Russian. Therefore, the issue of symbolic rule application versus associative patterning can take on a new meaning for Russian, possibly, with the distinction between default and non-default processing replacing the regular-irregular distinction.

  14. Morphology and distribution of chandelier cell axon terminals in the mouse cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M C; DeFelipe, J; Muñoz, A

    2009-01-01

    Chandelier cells represent a unique type of cortical gamma-aminobutityric acidergic interneuron whose axon terminals (Ch-terminals) only form synapses with the axon initial segments of some pyramidal cells. Here, we have used immunocytochemistry for the high-affinity plasma membrane transporter GAT-1 and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin to analyze the morphology and distribution of Ch-terminals in the mouse cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex. In general, 2 types of Ch-terminals were distinguished on the basis of their size and the density of the axonal boutons that made up the terminal. Simple Ch-terminals were made up of 1 or 2 rows of labeled boutons, each row consisting of only 3-5 boutons. In contrast, complex Ch-terminals were tight cylinder-like structures made up of multiple rows of boutons. Simple Ch-terminals were detected throughout the cerebral cortex and claustroamygdaloid complex, the complex type was only occasionally found in certain regions, whereas in others they were very abundant. These results indicate that there are substantial differences in the morphology and distribution of Ch-terminals between different areas and layers of the mouse cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we suggest that the distribution of complex Ch-terminals may be related to the developmental origin of the different brain regions analyzed.

  15. Global diversity of the Ganoderma lucidum complex (Ganodermataceae, Polyporales) inferred from morphology and multilocus phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Wei; Cao, Yun; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Vlasák, Josef; Li, De-Wei; Li, Meng-Jie; Dai, Yu-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Species of the Ganoderma lucidum complex are used in many types of health products. However, the taxonomy of this complex has long been chaotic, thus limiting its uses. In the present study, 32 collections of the complex from Asia, Europe and North America were analyzed from both morphological and molecular phylogenetic perspectives. The combined dataset, including an outgroup, comprised 33 ITS, 24 tef1α, 24 rpb1 and 21 rpb2 sequences, of which 19 ITS, 20 tef1α, 20 rpb1 and 17 rpb2 sequences were newly generated. A total of 13 species of the complex were recovered in the multilocus phylogeny. These 13 species were not strongly supported as a single monophyletic lineage, and were further grouped into three lineages that cannot be defined by their geographic distributions. Clade A comprised Ganoderma curtisii, Ganoderma flexipes, Ganoderma lingzhi, Ganoderma multipileum, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma sessile, Ganoderma sichuanense and Ganoderma tropicum, Clade B comprised G. lucidum, Ganoderma oregonense and Ganoderma tsugae, and Clade C comprised Ganoderma boninense and Ganoderma zonatum. A dichotomous key to the 13 species is provided, and their key morphological characters from context, pores, cuticle cells and basidiospores are presented in a table. The taxonomic positions of these species are briefly discussed. Noteworthy, the epitypification of G. sichuanense is rejected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Morphological assessment of the stylohyoid complex variations with cone beam computed tomography in a Turkish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, C; Gunduz, K; Avsever, H

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the length, thickness, sagittal and transverse angulations and the morphological variations of the stylohyoid complex (SHC), to assess their probable associations with age and gender, and to investigate the prevalence of it in a wide range of a Turkish sub-population by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCT images of the 1000 patients were evaluated retrospectively. The length, thickness, sagittal and transverse angulations, morphological variations and ossification degrees of SHC were evaluated on multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) adnd three-dimensional (3D) volume rendering (3DVR) images. The data were analysed statistically by using nonparametric tests, Pearson's correlation coefficient, Student's t test, c2 test and one-way ANOVA. Statistical significance was considered at p 35 mm). The mean sagittal angle value was measured to be 72.24° and the mean transverse angle value was 70.81°. Scalariform shape, elongated type and nodular calcification pattern have the highest mean age values between the morphological groups, respectively. Calcified outline was the most prevalent calcification pattern in males. There was no correlation between length and the calcification pattern groups while scalariform shape and pseudoarticular type were the longest variations. We observed that as the anterior sagittal angle gets wider, SHC tends to get longer. The most observed morphological variations were linear shape, elongated type and calcified outline pattern. Detailed studies on the classification will contribute to the literature. (Folia Morphol 2018; 77, 1: 79-89).

  17. Does structural complexity determine the morphology of assemblages? An experimental test on three continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Heloise; Parr, Catherine L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how species will respond to global change depends on our ability to distinguish generalities from idiosyncrasies. For diverse, but poorly known taxa, such as insects, species traits may provide a short-cut to predicting species turnover. We tested whether ant traits respond consistently to habitat complexity across geographically independent ant assemblages, using an experimental approach and baits. We repeated our study in six paired simple and complex habitats on three continents with distinct ant faunas. We also compared traits amongst ants with different foraging strategies. We hypothesised that ants would be larger, broader, have longer legs and more dorsally positioned eyes in simpler habitats. In agreement with predictions, ants had longer femurs and dorsally positioned eyes in simple habitats. This pattern was most pronounced for ants that discovered resources. Body size and pronotum width responded as predicted for experimental treatments, but were inconsistent across continents. Monopolising ants were smaller, with shorter femurs than those that occupied or discovered resources. Consistent responses for several traits suggest that many, but not all, aspects of morphology respond predictably to habitat complexity, and that foraging strategy is linked with morphology. Some traits thus have the potential to be used to predict the direction of species turnover, changes in foraging strategy and, potentially, evolution in response to changes in habitat structure.

  18. Does structural complexity determine the morphology of assemblages? An experimental test on three continents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloise Gibb

    Full Text Available Understanding how species will respond to global change depends on our ability to distinguish generalities from idiosyncrasies. For diverse, but poorly known taxa, such as insects, species traits may provide a short-cut to predicting species turnover. We tested whether ant traits respond consistently to habitat complexity across geographically independent ant assemblages, using an experimental approach and baits. We repeated our study in six paired simple and complex habitats on three continents with distinct ant faunas. We also compared traits amongst ants with different foraging strategies. We hypothesised that ants would be larger, broader, have longer legs and more dorsally positioned eyes in simpler habitats. In agreement with predictions, ants had longer femurs and dorsally positioned eyes in simple habitats. This pattern was most pronounced for ants that discovered resources. Body size and pronotum width responded as predicted for experimental treatments, but were inconsistent across continents. Monopolising ants were smaller, with shorter femurs than those that occupied or discovered resources. Consistent responses for several traits suggest that many, but not all, aspects of morphology respond predictably to habitat complexity, and that foraging strategy is linked with morphology. Some traits thus have the potential to be used to predict the direction of species turnover, changes in foraging strategy and, potentially, evolution in response to changes in habitat structure.

  19. Functional morphology of the cranio-mandibular complex of the Guira cuckoo (Aves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestoni, Sofía; Degrange, Federico Javier; Tambussi, Claudia Patricia; Demmel Ferreira, María Manuela; Tirao, Germán Alfredo

    2018-06-01

    The cranio-mandibular complex is an important structure involved in food capture and processing. Its morphology is related to the nature of the food item. Jaw muscles enable the motion of this complex and their study is essential for functional and evolutionary analysis. The present study compares available behavioral and dietary data obtained from the literature with novel results from functional morphological analyses of the cranio-mandibular complex of the Guira cuckoo (Guira guira) to understand its relationship with the zoophagous trophic habit of this species. The bite force was estimated based on muscle dissections, measurements of the physiological cross-sectional area, and biomechanical modeling of the skull. The results were compared with the available functional morphological data for other birds. The standardized bite force of G. guira is higher than predicted for exclusively zoophagous birds, but lower than for granivorous and/or omnivorous birds. Guira guira possesses the generalized jaw muscular system of neognathous birds, but some features can be related to its trophic habit. The external adductor muscles act mainly during food item processing and multiple aspects of this muscle group are interpreted to increase bite force, that is, their high values of muscle mass, their mechanical advantage (MA), and their perpendicular orientation when the beak is closed. The m. depressor mandibulae and the m. pterygoideus dorsalis et ventralis are interpreted to prioritize speed of action (low MA values), being most important during prey capture. The supposed ecological significance of these traits is the potential to widen the range of prey size that can be processed and the possibility of rapidly capturing agile prey through changes in the leverage of the muscles involved in opening and closing of the bill. This contributes to the trophic versatility of the species and its ability to thrive in different habitats, including urban areas. © 2018 Wiley

  20. Complex dynamics induced by strong confinement - From tracer diffusion in strongly heterogeneous media to glassy relaxation of dense fluids in narrow slits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Suvendu; Spanner-Denzer, Markus; Leitmann, Sebastian; Franosch, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We provide an overview of recent advances of the complex dynamics of particles in strong confinements. The first paradigm is the Lorentz model where tracers explore a quenched disordered host structure. Such systems naturally occur as limiting cases of binary glass-forming systems if the dynamics of one component is much faster than the other. For a certain critical density of the host structure the tracers undergo a localization transition which constitutes a critical phenomenon. A series of predictions in the vicinity of the transition have been elaborated and tested versus computer simulations. Analytical progress is achieved for small obstacle densities. The second paradigm is a dense strongly interacting liquid confined to a narrow slab. Then the glass transition depends nonmonotonically on the separation of the plates due to an interplay of local packing and layering. Very small slab widths allow to address certain features of the statics and dynamics analytically.

  1. Information properties of morphologically complex words modulate brain activity during word reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakala, Tero; Hultén, Annika; Lehtonen, Minna; Lagus, Krista; Salmelin, Riitta

    2018-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies of the reading process point to functionally distinct stages in word recognition. Yet, current understanding of the operations linked to those various stages is mainly descriptive in nature. Approaches developed in the field of computational linguistics may offer a more quantitative approach for understanding brain dynamics. Our aim was to evaluate whether a statistical model of morphology, with well-defined computational principles, can capture the neural dynamics of reading, using the concept of surprisal from information theory as the common measure. The Morfessor model, created for unsupervised discovery of morphemes, is based on the minimum description length principle and attempts to find optimal units of representation for complex words. In a word recognition task, we correlated brain responses to word surprisal values derived from Morfessor and from other psycholinguistic variables that have been linked with various levels of linguistic abstraction. The magnetoencephalography data analysis focused on spatially, temporally and functionally distinct components of cortical activation observed in reading tasks. The early occipital and occipito-temporal responses were correlated with parameters relating to visual complexity and orthographic properties, whereas the later bilateral superior temporal activation was correlated with whole-word based and morphological models. The results show that the word processing costs estimated by the statistical Morfessor model are relevant for brain dynamics of reading during late processing stages. © 2018 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chemical and morphological gradient scaffolds to mimic hierarchically complex tissues: From theoretical modeling to their fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrella, Alessandra; Aiello, Maurizio; Quarto, Rodolfo; Scaglione, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    Porous multiphase scaffolds have been proposed in different tissue engineering applications because of their potential to artificially recreate the heterogeneous structure of hierarchically complex tissues. Recently, graded scaffolds have been also realized, offering a continuum at the interface among different phases for an enhanced structural stability of the scaffold. However, their internal architecture is often obtained empirically and the architectural parameters rarely predetermined. The aim of this work is to offer a theoretical model as tool for the design and fabrication of functional and structural complex graded scaffolds with predicted morphological and chemical features, to overcome the time-consuming trial and error experimental method. This developed mathematical model uses laws of motions, Stokes equations, and viscosity laws to describe the dependence between centrifugation speed and fiber/particles sedimentation velocity over time, which finally affects the fiber packing, and thus the total porosity of the 3D scaffolds. The efficacy of the theoretical model was tested by realizing engineered graded grafts for osteochondral tissue engineering applications. The procedure, based on combined centrifugation and freeze-drying technique, was applied on both polycaprolactone (PCL) and collagen-type-I (COL) to test the versatility of the entire process. A functional gradient was combined to the morphological one by adding hydroxyapatite (HA) powders, to mimic the bone mineral phase. Results show that 3D bioactive morphologically and chemically graded grafts can be properly designed and realized in agreement with the theoretical model. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2286-2297. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Plasticity first: molecular signatures of a complex morphological trait in filamentous cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Robin; Kupczok, Anne; Stucken, Karina; Ilhan, Judith; Hammerschmidt, Katrin; Dagan, Tal

    2017-08-31

    Filamentous cyanobacteria that differentiate multiple cell types are considered the peak of prokaryotic complexity and their evolution has been studied in the context of multicellularity origins. Species that form true-branching filaments exemplify the most complex cyanobacteria. However, the mechanisms underlying the true-branching morphology remain poorly understood despite of several investigations that focused on the identification of novel genes or pathways. An alternative route for the evolution of novel traits is based on existing phenotypic plasticity. According to that scenario - termed genetic assimilation - the fixation of a novel phenotype precedes the fixation of the genotype. Here we show that the evolution of transcriptional regulatory elements constitutes a major mechanism for the evolution of new traits. We found that supplementation with sucrose reconstitutes the ancestral branchless phenotype of two true-branching Fischerella species and compared the transcription start sites (TSSs) between the two phenotypic states. Our analysis uncovers several orthologous TSSs whose transcription level is correlated with the true-branching phenotype. These TSSs are found in genes that encode components of the septosome and elongasome (e.g., fraC and mreB). The concept of genetic assimilation supplies a tenable explanation for the evolution of novel traits but testing its feasibility is hindered by the inability to recreate and study the evolution of present-day traits. We present a novel approach to examine transcription data for the plasticity first route and provide evidence for its occurrence during the evolution of complex colony morphology in true-branching cyanobacteria. Our results reveal a route for evolution of the true-branching phenotype in cyanobacteria via modification of the transcription level of pre-existing genes. Our study supplies evidence for the 'plasticity-first' hypothesis and highlights the importance of transcriptional regulation in

  4. Quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joos, H.

    1976-07-01

    The main topics of these lectures are: phenomenological approach to quark confinement, standard Lagrangian of hadrondynamics, Lagrangian field theory and quark confinement, classical soliton solutions in a simple model, quantization of extended systems, colour charge screening and quantization on a lattice and remarks on applications. A survey of the scientific publications listed according to the topics until 26 March 1976 is supplemented. (BJ) [de

  5. Gluon confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.; Lorenci, V.A. de; Elbaz, E.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we present a new model for a gauge field theory such that self-interacting spin-one particles can be confined in a compact domain. The necessary conditions to produce the confining potential appear already in the properties of the eikonal structure generated by the particular choice of the dynamics. (author)

  6. The Effect of Trail Pheromone and Path Confinement on Learning of Complex Routes in the Ant Lasius niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaczkes, Tomer J; Weichselgartner, Tobias; Bernadou, Abel; Heinze, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Route learning is key to the survival of many central place foragers, such as bees and many ants. For ants which lay pheromone trails, the presence of a trail may act as an important source of information about whether an error has been made. The presence of trail pheromone has been demonstrated to support route learning, and the effect of pheromones on route choice have been reported to persist even after the pheromones have been removed. This could be explained in two ways: the pheromone may constrain the ants onto the correct route, thus preventing errors and aiding learning. Alternatively, the pheromones may act as a 'reassurance', signalling that the learner is on the right path and that learning the path is worthwhile. Here, we disentangle pheromone presence from route confinement in order to test these hypotheses, using the ant Lasius niger as a model. Unexpectedly, we did not find any evidence that pheromones support route learning. Indeed, there was no evidence that ants confined to the correct route learned at all. Thus, while we cannot support the 'reassurance' hypothesis, we can rule out the 'confinement' hypothesis. Other findings, such as a reduction in pheromone deposition in the presence of trail pheromones, are remarkably consistent with previous experiments. As previously reported, ants which make errors on their outward journey upregulate pheromone deposition on their return. Surprisingly, ants which would go on to make an error down-regulate pheromone deposition on their outward journey, hinting at a capacity for ants to gauge the quality of their own memories.

  7. The Effect of Trail Pheromone and Path Confinement on Learning of Complex Routes in the Ant Lasius niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer J Czaczkes

    Full Text Available Route learning is key to the survival of many central place foragers, such as bees and many ants. For ants which lay pheromone trails, the presence of a trail may act as an important source of information about whether an error has been made. The presence of trail pheromone has been demonstrated to support route learning, and the effect of pheromones on route choice have been reported to persist even after the pheromones have been removed. This could be explained in two ways: the pheromone may constrain the ants onto the correct route, thus preventing errors and aiding learning. Alternatively, the pheromones may act as a 'reassurance', signalling that the learner is on the right path and that learning the path is worthwhile. Here, we disentangle pheromone presence from route confinement in order to test these hypotheses, using the ant Lasius niger as a model. Unexpectedly, we did not find any evidence that pheromones support route learning. Indeed, there was no evidence that ants confined to the correct route learned at all. Thus, while we cannot support the 'reassurance' hypothesis, we can rule out the 'confinement' hypothesis. Other findings, such as a reduction in pheromone deposition in the presence of trail pheromones, are remarkably consistent with previous experiments. As previously reported, ants which make errors on their outward journey upregulate pheromone deposition on their return. Surprisingly, ants which would go on to make an error down-regulate pheromone deposition on their outward journey, hinting at a capacity for ants to gauge the quality of their own memories.

  8. T-matrix modeling of linear depolarization by morphologically complex soot and soot-containing aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    We use state-of-the-art public-domain Fortran codes based on the T-matrix method to calculate orientation and ensemble averaged scattering matrix elements for a variety of morphologically complex black carbon (BC) and BC-containing aerosol particles, with a special emphasis on the linear depolarization ratio (LDR). We explain theoretically the quasi-Rayleigh LDR peak at side-scattering angles typical of low-density soot fractals and conclude that the measurement of this feature enables one to evaluate the compactness state of BC clusters and trace the evolution of low-density fluffy fractals into densely packed aggregates. We show that small backscattering LDRs measured with ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne lidars for fresh smoke generally agree with the values predicted theoretically for fluffy BC fractals and densely packed near-spheroidal BC aggregates. To reproduce higher lidar LDRs observed for aged smoke, one needs alternative particle models such as shape mixtures of BC spheroids or cylinders. -- Highlights: ► New superposition T-matrix code is applied to soot aerosols. ► Quasi-Rayleigh side-scattering peak in linear depolarization (LD) is explained. ► LD measurements can be used for morphological characterization of soot aerosols

  9. Electromagnetic Scattering by a Morphologically Complex Object: Fundamental Concepts and Common Misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischenko, Michael I.; Travis, Larry D.; Cairns, Brian; Tishkovets, Victor P.; Dlugach, Janna M.; Rosenbush, Vera K.; Kiselev, Nikolai N.

    2011-01-01

    Following Keller(Proc Symp Appl Math 1962;13:227:46), we classify all theoretical treatments of electromagnetic scattering by a morphologically complex object into first- principle (or "honest" in Keller s terminology) and phenomenological (or "dishonest") categories. This helps us identify, analyze, and dispel several profound misconceptions widespread in the discipline of electromagnetic scattering by solitary particles and discrete random media. Our goal is not to call for a complete renunciation of phenomenological approaches but rather to encourage a critical and careful evaluation of their actual origin, virtues, and limitations. In other words, we do not intend to deter creative thinking in terms of phenomenological short-cuts, but we do want to raise awareness when we stray (often for practical reasons) from the fundamentals. The main results and conclusions are illustrated by numerically-exact data based on direct numerical solutions of the macroscopic Maxwell equations.

  10. Plasma confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, R D

    2003-01-01

    Detailed and authoritative, this volume examines the essential physics underlying international research in magnetic confinement fusion. It offers readable, thorough accounts of the fundamental concepts behind methods of confining plasma at or near thermonuclear conditions. Designed for a one- or two-semester graduate-level course in plasma physics, it also represents a valuable reference for professional physicists in controlled fusion and related disciplines.

  11. Ovipositor morphology and host relations of the Bactrocera tau complex (Diptera: Tephritidae in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalao Sumrandee

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The taxon, Bactrocera tau, is a complex of fruit flies that infest fruits of many species in the family Cucurbitaceaeas well as fruits from very different plant families in southeast Asia. Past mitotic karyotype studies of B. tau flies from differentgeographic location- and/or host-associated populations indicate there are nine forms present within the taxon in Thailand,which have been designated as B. tau forms A to I. In this study, ovipositor morphology was compared among sevenmembers of the B. tau complex using scanning electron microscopy. The flies could be placed into two main groups based onthe shape of the aculeus apex. The first group comprised B. tau forms C and I which have trilobed aculeus apices. The secondgroup included B. tau forms A, D, E, F and G, all of which have single-pointed apices. The latter five forms were furtherdivided on the basis of the sharpness of the aculeus apex into “medium” (A and E, “sharp” (D and G and “blunt” (F apices.Host fruit associations, fly aculeus apex shape and geographical region were overlain onto a molecular phylogeny previouslypublished for the B. tau group in Thailand. Cucurbitaceae fruits appear to be ancestral hosts for the B. tau complex whereasthe use of fruits of other plant families appeared late in the evolutionary history of this group. Forms with trilobed and singlepointedaculeus apices separated early in B. tau evolutionary history, but the split does not seem host related. Flies withmedium, sharp and blunt, simple-pointed aculeus apices showed no evident associations, being randomly distributed acrossthe phylogenetic tree. Bactrocera tau form A which infested fruits of nine Cucurbitaceae species was found in all fivesurveyed regions, whereas each of the other forms, which were restricted to 1-3 fruit species, were found in 1-2 regions.

  12. Computation of complexity measures of morphologically significant zones decomposed from binary fractal sets via multiscale convexity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sin Liang; Koo, Voon Chet; Daya Sagar, B.S.

    2009-01-01

    Multiscale convexity analysis of certain fractal binary objects-like 8-segment Koch quadric, Koch triadic, and random Koch quadric and triadic islands-is performed via (i) morphologic openings with respect to recursively changing the size of a template, and (ii) construction of convex hulls through half-plane closings. Based on scale vs convexity measure relationship, transition levels between the morphologic regimes are determined as crossover scales. These crossover scales are taken as the basis to segment binary fractal objects into various morphologically prominent zones. Each segmented zone is characterized through normalized morphologic complexity measures. Despite the fact that there is no notably significant relationship between the zone-wise complexity measures and fractal dimensions computed by conventional box counting method, fractal objects-whether they are generated deterministically or by introducing randomness-possess morphologically significant sub-zones with varied degrees of spatial complexities. Classification of realistic fractal sets and/or fields according to sub-zones possessing varied degrees of spatial complexities provides insight to explore links with the physical processes involved in the formation of fractal-like phenomena.

  13. Capturing variations in inundation with satellite remote sensing in a morphologically complex, large lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guiping; Liu, Yuanbo

    2015-04-01

    Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China, with high morphological complexity from south to north. In recent years, the lake has experienced expansion and shrinkage processes over both short- and long-term scales, resulting in significant hydrological, ecological and economic problems. Exactly how and how rapidly the processes of spatial change have occurred in the lake during the expansion and shrinkage periods is unknown. Such knowledge is of great importance for policymakers as it may help with flood/drought prevention, land use planning and lake ecological conservation. In this study, we investigated the spatial-temporal distribution and changing processes of inundation in Poyang Lake based on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Level-1B data from 2000 to 2011. A defined water variation rate (WVR) and inundation frequency (IF) indicator revealed the water surface submersion and exposure processes of lake expansion and shrinkage in different zones which were divided according to the lake's hydrological and topographic features. Regional differences and significant seasonality variability were found in the annual and monthly mean IF. The monthly mean IF increased slowly from north to south during January-August but decreased quickly from south to north during September-December. During the lake expansion period, the lake-type water body zone (Zone II) had the fastest expansion rate, with a mean monthly WVR value of 34.47% in February-March, and was followed by the channel-type water body zone (Zone I) in March-May (22.47%). However, during the lake shrinkage period, rapid shrinkage first appeared around the alluvial delta zones in August-October. The sequence of lake surface shrinkage from August to December is exactly opposite to that of lake expansion from February to July. These complex inundation characteristics and changing process were driven by the high temporal variability of the river flows, the morphological diversity of the

  14. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FETOPLACENTAL COMPLEX IN PREGNANT PATIENTS WITH DIFFUSE TOXIC GOITER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Petrukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The course of pregnancy and delivery in patients with diffuse toxic goiter (DTG is often complicated by preeclampsia, fetoplacental insufficiency, placental abruption and associated with higher maternal and perinatal mortality. Aim: To study particulars of fetoplacental complex functioning in DTG. Materials and methods: We assessed pregnant patients with DTG (n = 92 and their newborns (n = 94. By the time of delivery, 86 of patients were clinically and biochemically euthyroid. Functions of fetoplacental complex (by levels of placental lactogen, α-fetoprotein, estriol, progesterone and cortisol were assessed by radioimmune and immunoenzyme assays. Fetometrical parameters of fetuses were studied by ultrasound method. Complex assessment of placentas was done by light and electronic microscopy. Results: Eighty seven (94,6% patients with DTG had combined complications of pregnancy. The most frequent were: the threat of termination of pregnancy, in 68 (73.9% of cases, low placenta placement, in 23 (25%, anemia, in 56 (60.9%, pre-eclampsia, in 56 (60.9%. In 59 of patients (64.1%, fetoplacental insufficiency was diagnosed, with predominance of strain or exhaustion reactions. Critical status of fetoplacental complex was found in pregnant patients with uncontrolled DTG and duration of control of less than 20 weeks, as well as in pregnant patients with DTG relapses. The values of main hormones (placental lactogen, α-fetoprotein and progesterone were below 10th percentile.According to the results of the ultrasound assessments, fetuses from mothers with DTG during gestation demonstrated decrease of the majority or percentile parameters, such as biparietal cranial size, fetal femoral length, abdomen diameter, that was especially prominent in the groups with relapsing DTG.Eighty eight of 94 newborns (93.6% were born full-term. In total, every third baby (29.3% had some degree of intrauterine developmental delay at birth. Among the cases with

  15. A novel method of complex evaluation of meibomian glands morphological and functional state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Trubilin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel method that provides complex assessment of meibomian glands morphological and functional state — biometry of meibomian glands — was developed. The results of complex examination (including meibomian glands biometry, correlation analysis data and clinical findings demonstrate direct association between the objective (i.e., meibomian glands dysfunction by biomicroscopy, tear film break-up time / TBUT, symptomatic TBUT, compression testing and subjective signs of meibomian glands dysfunction (patient’s complaints and the parameters of meibomian glands biometry. High direct correlation between biometrical index and compression test result was revealed (p = 0.002, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient = 0.6644. Meibomian glands dysfunction is characterized by biometric parameters abnormalities, i.e., dilatation of meibomian glands orifices, decrease of distance between meibomian glands orifices, partial or total atrophy of meibomian glands (even up to gland collapse with its visual reduction and increase of distance between the glands. The suppression of inflammatory process and the recovery of meibomian glands secretion improve biometric parameters and result in the opening of meibomian glands orifices, liquefaction of clogs, evacuation of meibomian glands secretion, narrowing of meibomian glands orifices and increase of distance between them. The proposed method expands the armamentarium of meibomian glands dysfunction and lipid-deficient dry eye diagnosing. Meibomian glands biometry can be applied in specialized ophthalmological hospitals and outpatient departments. It is a simple procedure of short duration that does not require any special equipment or professional skills. Meibomian glands biometry enables to prescribe pathogenically targeted therapy and to improve quality of life. 

  16. Morphology, Stability, and Application of Lycopene Microcapsules Produced by Complex Coacervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia A. Rocha-Selmi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interest in lycopene has increased in recent years due to studies that associate it with the reduction in risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, due to its high degree of unsaturation, this carotenoid is inclined to isomerize and oxidize during processing and storage, making it difficult to use in the food industry. Microencapsulation can improve this situation, increasing its stability and making incorporation into food formulations possible. Thus, the aim of this study was to microencapsulate lycopene by complex coacervation using gelatin and gum Arabic as the encapsulating agents. The microcapsules were evaluated based on the encapsulation efficiency and their morphology and then submitted to a stability test and applied in cake making. Most of the systems studied presented spherical microcapsules with defined walls. The encapsulation efficiency values were above 90%, and the average diameter of the capsules ranged from 61 to 144 μm. The stability test showed that microencapsulation offered greater protection to the lycopene as compared to its free form. The application of nonfreeze dried coacervated microcapsules in cake making was satisfactory, but the color transference was low when freezedried coacervated microcapsules were used.

  17. T-matrix modeling of linear depolarization by morphologically complex soot and soot-containing aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2013-07-01

    We use state-of-the-art public-domain Fortran codes based on the T-matrix method to calculate orientation and ensemble averaged scattering matrix elements for a variety of morphologically complex black carbon (BC) and BC-containing aerosol particles, with a special emphasis on the linear depolarization ratio (LDR). We explain theoretically the quasi-Rayleigh LDR peak at side-scattering angles typical of low-density soot fractals and conclude that the measurement of this feature enables one to evaluate the compactness state of BC clusters and trace the evolution of low-density fluffy fractals into densely packed aggregates. We show that small backscattering LDRs measured with ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne lidars for fresh smoke generally agree with the values predicted theoretically for fluffy BC fractals and densely packed near-spheroidal BC aggregates. To reproduce higher lidar LDRs observed for aged smoke, one needs alternative particle models such as shape mixtures of BC spheroids or cylinders.

  18. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J., E-mail: fwilliams@qi.fcen.uba.ar [INQUIMAE-CONICET, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química-Física, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  19. Morphological Characteristics of Placental Complex in Pregnant Women without Complications in Pregnancy and in the Presence of Severe Preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbetov, Turakbai Zh.; Berdalinova, Akzhenis K.; Tusupkalieyv, Akylbek B.; Koishybayev, Arip K.; Zharilkasynov, Karaman Ye.

    2016-01-01

    According to the WHO data, preeclampsia develops during late pregnancy in 2-8% of women. Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, therefore, the study of the morphological features of placental complex, taking into account gestational complications in postpartum women with severe preeclampsia is an important…

  20. Morphological Control of Mesoporosity and Nanoparticles within Co3O4-CuO Electrospun Nanofibers: Quantum Confinement and Visible Light Photocatalysis Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Amaresh C; Uyar, Tamer

    2017-10-18

    The one-dimensional (1D) mesoporous and interconnected nanoparticles (NPs) enriched composite Co 3 O 4 -CuO nanofibers (NFs) in the ratio Co:Cu = 1/4 (Co 3 O 4 -CuO NFs) composite have been synthesized by electrospinning and calcination of mixed polymeric template. Not merely the mesoporous composite Co 3 O 4 -CuO NFs but also single mesoporous Co 3 O 4 NFs and CuO NFs have been produced for comparison. The choice of mixed polymer templates such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) for electrospinning is responsible for the formation of 1D mesoporous NFs. The HR-TEM result showed evolution of interconnected nanoparticles (NPs) and creation of mesoporosity in all electrospun NFs. The quantum confinement is due to NPs within NFs and has been proved by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study and the UV-vis-NRI diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The high intense photoluminescence (PL) spectra showing blue shift of all NFs also confirmed the quantum confinement phenomena. The lowering of PL spectrum after mixing of CuO in Co 3 O 4 nanofibers framework (Co 3 O 4 -CuO NFs) proved CuO as an efficient visible light response low cost cocatalyst/charge separator. The red shifting of the band gap in composite Co 3 O 4 -CuO NFs is due to the internal charge transfer between Co 2+ to Co 3+ and Cu 2+ , proved by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Creation of oxygen vacancies by mixing of CuO and Co 3 O 4 also prevents the electron-hole recombination and enhances the photocatalytic activity in composite Co 3 O 4 -CuO NFs. The photocurrent density, Mott-Schottky (MS), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies of all NFs favor the high photocatalytic performance. The mesoporous composite Co 3 O 4 -CuO NFs exhibits high photocatalytic activity toward phenolic compounds degradation as compared to the other two NFs (Co 3 O 4 NFs and CuO NFs). The kinetic study of phenolic compounds followed first order rate equation. The high photocatalytic

  1. Tuning the non-covalent confinement of Gd(III) complexes in silica nanoparticles for high T1-weighted MR imaging capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Grechkina, Svetlana L; Mustafina, Asiya R; Kholin, Kirill V; Stepanov, Alexey S; Nizameev, Irek R; Ismaev, Ildus E; Kadirov, Marsil K; Zairov, Rustem R; Fattakhova, Alfia N; Amirov, Rustem R; Soloveva, Svetlana E

    2017-01-01

    The present work introduces deliberate synthesis of Gd(III)-doped silica nanoparticles with high relaxivity at magnetic field strengths below 1.5T. Modified microemulsion water-in-oil procedure was used in order to achieve superficial localization of Gd(III) complexes within 40-55nm sized silica spheres. The relaxivities of the prepared nanoparticles were measured at 0.47, 1.41 and 1.5T with the use of both NMR analyzer and whole body NMR scanner. Longitudinal relaxivities of the obtained silica nanoparticles reveal significant dependence on the confinement mode, changing from 4.1 to 49.6mM -1 s -1 at 0.47T when the localization of Gd(III) complexes changes from core to superficial zones of the silica spheres. The results highlight predominant contribution of the complexes located close to silica/water interface to the relaxivity of the nanoparticles. Low effect of blood proteins on the relaxivity in the aqueous colloids of the nanoparticles was exemplified by serum bovine albumin. T 1 - weighted MRI data indicate that the nanoparticles provide strong positive contrast at 1.5T, which along with low cytotoxicity effect make a good basis for their application as contrast agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Paleoamerican diet, migration and morphology in Brazil: archaeological complexity of the earliest Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Sabine; Parks, Maria; Grupe, Gisela; Reinhard, Karl J

    2011-01-01

    During the early Holocene two main paleoamerican cultures thrived in Brazil: the Tradição Nordeste in the semi-desertic Sertão and the Tradição Itaparica in the high plains of the Planalto Central. Here we report on paleodietary singals of a Paleoamerican found in a third Brazilian ecological setting--a riverine shellmound, or sambaqui, located in the Atlantic forest. Most sambaquis are found along the coast. The peoples associated with them subsisted on marine resources. We are reporting a different situation from the oldest recorded riverine sambaqui, called Capelinha. Capelinha is a relatively small sambaqui established along a river 60 km from the Atlantic Ocean coast. It contained the well-preserved remains of a Paleoamerican known as Luzio dated to 9,945±235 years ago; the oldest sambaqui dweller so far. Luzio's bones were remarkably well preserved and allowed for stable isotopic analysis of diet. Although artifacts found at this riverine site show connections with the Atlantic coast, we show that he represents a population that was dependent on inland resources as opposed to marine coastal resources. After comparing Luzio's paleodietary data with that of other extant and prehistoric groups, we discuss where his group could have come from, if terrestrial diet persisted in riverine sambaquis and how Luzio fits within the discussion of the replacement of paleamerican by amerindian morphology. This study adds to the evidence that shows a greater complexity in the prehistory of the colonization of and the adaptations to the New World.

  3. Paleoamerican diet, migration and morphology in Brazil: archaeological complexity of the earliest Americans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Eggers

    Full Text Available During the early Holocene two main paleoamerican cultures thrived in Brazil: the Tradição Nordeste in the semi-desertic Sertão and the Tradição Itaparica in the high plains of the Planalto Central. Here we report on paleodietary singals of a Paleoamerican found in a third Brazilian ecological setting--a riverine shellmound, or sambaqui, located in the Atlantic forest. Most sambaquis are found along the coast. The peoples associated with them subsisted on marine resources. We are reporting a different situation from the oldest recorded riverine sambaqui, called Capelinha. Capelinha is a relatively small sambaqui established along a river 60 km from the Atlantic Ocean coast. It contained the well-preserved remains of a Paleoamerican known as Luzio dated to 9,945±235 years ago; the oldest sambaqui dweller so far. Luzio's bones were remarkably well preserved and allowed for stable isotopic analysis of diet. Although artifacts found at this riverine site show connections with the Atlantic coast, we show that he represents a population that was dependent on inland resources as opposed to marine coastal resources. After comparing Luzio's paleodietary data with that of other extant and prehistoric groups, we discuss where his group could have come from, if terrestrial diet persisted in riverine sambaquis and how Luzio fits within the discussion of the replacement of paleamerican by amerindian morphology. This study adds to the evidence that shows a greater complexity in the prehistory of the colonization of and the adaptations to the New World.

  4. The Influence of Semantic and Morphological Complexity of Verbs on Sentence Recall: Implications for the Nature of Conceptual Representation and Category-Specific Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobayyen, F.; de Almeida, R.G.

    2005-01-01

    One hundred and forty normal undergraduate students participated in a Proactive Interference (PI) experiment with sentences containing verbs from four different semantic and morphological classes (lexical causatives, morphological causatives, and morphologically complex and simplex perception verbs). Past research has shown significant PI build-up…

  5. Delimiting Species Boundaries within a Paraphyletic Species Complex: Insights from Morphological, Genetic, and Molecular Data on Paramecium sonneborni (Paramecium aurelia species complex, Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Sawka, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    The demarcation of boundaries between protist species is often problematic because of the absence of a uniform species definition, the abundance of cryptic diversity, and the occurrence of convergent morphology. The ciliates belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex, consisting of 15 species, are a good model for such systematic and evolutionary studies. One member of the complex is P. sonneborni, previously known only from one stand in Texas (USA), but recently found in two new sampling sites in Cyprus (creeks running to Salt Lake and Oroklini Lake near Larnaca). The studied Paramecium sonneborni strains (from the USA and Cyprus) reveal low viability in the F1 and F2 generations of interstrain hybrids and may be an example of ongoing allopatric speciation. Despite its molecular distinctiveness, we postulate that P. sonneborni should remain in the P. aurelia complex, making it a paraphyletic taxon. Morphological studies have revealed that some features of the nuclear apparatus of P. sonneborni correspond to the P. aurelia spp. complex, while others are similar to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi. The observed discordance indicates rapid splitting of the P. aurelia-P. jenningsi-P. schewiakoffi group, in which genetic, morphological, and molecular boundaries between species are not congruent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. From lizard body form to serpentiform morphology: The atlas-axis complex in African cordyliformes and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čerňanský, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    The comparative vertebral morphology of the atlas-axis complex in cordyliforms, xantusiid and several skinks is studied here. These lizards are particularly interesting because of their different ecological adaptations and anti-predation strategies, where conformation ranges from the lizard-like body to a snake-like body. This transition to serpentiform morphology shows several evolutionary patterns in the atlas-axis complex: 1) the zygapophyseal articulations are lost in the early stage of the transition. In contrast to mammals, the atlas is more or less locked to the axis in lepidosaurs, but the absence of zygapophyseal articulation releases this locking for rotation. However despite its serpentiform morphology, Chamaesaura is different, in possessing this articulation; 2) the first intercentrum of Chamaesaura and Tetradactylus africanus (serpentiform grass-swimmers) is fully curved anteriorly, underlying the occipital condyle. While this limits ventral skull rotation beyond a certain angle, it locks the skull, which is a crucial adaptation for a sit-and-wait position in grassland habitats that needs to keep the head stabilized; and 3) in Acontias, most of the atlas articular surface with the occipital condyle is formed by the lateral aspect of the articulation area relative to the area located in the dorsal region of the slightly reduced intercentrum. A similar state occurs in amphisbaenians, most likely reflecting a fossorial lifestyle of the limbless lizards. Although Chamaesaura and Tetradactylus live sympatrically in grasslands, Chamaesaura differs in several ways in atlas-axis complex: for example, aforementioned presence of the atlas-axis zygapophyseal articulation, and long posterodorsal processes. Its occipital condyle protrudes further posteriorly, placing the atlas-axis complex further from the endocranium than in Tetradactylus. Hence, adaptation in the same niche, even among sister clades, can lead to different atlas-axis morphology due to different

  7. Comparative morphology of the axial complex and interdependence of internal organ systems in sea urchins (Echinodermata: Echinoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Alexander; Faber, Cornelius; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2009-06-09

    The axial complex of echinoderms (Echinodermata) is composed of various primary and secondary body cavities that interact with each other. In sea urchins (Echinoidea), structural differences of the axial complex in "regular" and irregular species have been observed, but the reasons underlying these differences are not fully understood. In addition, a better knowledge of axial complex diversity could not only be useful for phylogenetic inferences, but improve also an understanding of the function of this enigmatic structure. We therefore analyzed numerous species of almost all sea urchin orders by magnetic resonance imaging, dissection, histology, and transmission electron microscopy and compared the results with findings from published studies spanning almost two centuries. These combined analyses demonstrate that the axial complex is present in all sea urchin orders and has remained structurally conserved for a long time, at least in the "regular" species. Within the Irregularia, a considerable morphological variation of the axial complex can be observed with gradual changes in topography, size, and internal architecture. These modifications are related to the growing size of the gastric caecum as well as to the rearrangement of the morphology of the digestive tract as a whole. The structurally most divergent axial complex can be observed in the highly derived Atelostomata in which the reorganization of the digestive tract is most pronounced. Our findings demonstrate a structural interdependence of various internal organs, including digestive tract, mesenteries, and the axial complex.

  8. Morphological characterization of Capsicum annuum L. accessions from southern Mexico and their response to the Bemisia tabaci-Begomovirus complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Ballina-Gomez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The high diversity of chili pepper (Capsicum annuum L. in Mexico offers an excellent alternative to search for wild and semi-domesticated genotypes as sources of resistance to the complex Bemisia tabaci (Genn. (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae-Begomovirus, which has caused enormous losses in commercial production of various horticultural crops. The goal of the present work was to characterize ex situ 18 genotypes of C. annuum from southern Mexico through 47 morphological descriptors, and to evaluate its response to the B. tabaci-Begomovirus complex. Morphological characterization showed the variables calyx annular constriction (CAC, number of branch bifurcation (NBB, and calyx pigmentation (CP had the highest variation. Principal components analysis (PCA of 47 morphological characteristics showed that 12 components were selected as meaningful factors. These components explained 94% of the variation. Cluster analysis showed three major clusters and seven sub-clusters. On the other hand, evaluation of the response to B. tabaci-Begomovirus showed that the genotypes have differential susceptibility to this vector-pathogen complex. Genotypes 'Chawa', 'Blanco', 'Maax' and 'X'catic' were into the low susceptibility to B. tabaci and low severity of viral symptoms. Surprisingly, the genotype 'Simojovel' showed high susceptibility to whitefly, but was grouped into genotypes with low symptom severity. This study shows the potential of native germplasm of pepper to explore sources of resistance to the B. tabaci-Begomovirus complex.

  9. Synthesis, spectral characterisation, morphology, biological activity and DNA cleavage studies of metal complexes with chromone Schiff base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kavitha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cu(II, Co(II, Ni(II and Zn(II complexes have been synthesized using 3-((pyridine-2-yliminomethyl-4H-chromen-4-one as a ligand derived from 3-formyl chromone and 2-amino pyridine. All the complexes were characterised by analytical, conductivity, IR, electronic, magnetic, ESR, thermal, powder XRD and SEM studies. The analytical data revealed that the metal to ligand molar ratio is 1:2 in all the complexes. Molar conductivity data indicates that all the complexes are neutral in nature. On the basis of magnetic and electronic spectral data, octahedral geometry is proposed for all the complexes. Thermal behaviour of the synthesized complexes indicates the coordinated and lattice water molecules are present in the complexes. The X-ray diffraction data suggest a triclinic system for all compounds. Different surface morphologies were identified from SEM micrographs. All metal complexes exhibit fluorescence. The antimicrobial and nematicidal activity data show that metal complexes are more potent than the parent ligand. The DNA cleavage activity of the ligand and its metal complexes were observed in the presence of H2O2.

  10. Fe-tannic acid complex dye as photo sensitizer for different morphological ZnO based DSSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakar, Soner; Özacar, Mahmut

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have synthesized different morphological ZnO nanostructures via microwave hydrothermal methods at low temperature within a short time. We described different morphologies of ZnO at different Zn(NO3)2/KOH mole ratio. The ZnO nanostructures were characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry. All ZnO structures have hexagonal wurtzite type structures. The FESEM images showed various morphologies of ZnO such as plate, rod and nanoparticles. Dye sensitized solar cells have been assembled by these different morphological structures photo electrode and tannic acid or Fe-tannic acid complex dye as sensitizer. We have achieved at maximum efficiencies of photovoltaic cells prepared with ZnO plate in all dye systems. The conversion efficiencies of dye sensitized solar cells are 0.37% and 1.00% with tannic acid and Fe-tannic acid complex dye, respectively.

  11. Modeling the Excess Cell Surface Stored in a Complex Morphology of Bleb-Like Protrusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryna Kapustina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells transition from spread to rounded morphologies in diverse physiological contexts including mitosis and mesenchymal-to-amoeboid transitions. When these drastic shape changes occur rapidly, cell volume and surface area are approximately conserved. Consequently, the rounded cells are suddenly presented with a several-fold excess of cell surface whose area far exceeds that of a smooth sphere enclosing the cell volume. This excess is stored in a population of bleb-like protrusions (BLiPs, whose size distribution is shown by electron micrographs to be skewed. We introduce three complementary models of rounded cell morphologies with a prescribed excess surface area. A 2D Hamiltonian model provides a mechanistic description of how discrete attachment points between the cell surface and cortex together with surface bending energy can generate a morphology that satisfies a prescribed excess area and BLiP number density. A 3D random seed-and-growth model simulates efficient packing of BLiPs over a primary rounded shape, demonstrating a pathway for skewed BLiP size distributions that recapitulate 3D morphologies. Finally, a phase field model (2D and 3D posits energy-based constitutive laws for the cell membrane, nematic F-actin cortex, interior cytosol, and external aqueous medium. The cell surface is equipped with a spontaneous curvature function, a proxy for the cell surface-cortex couple, that is a priori unknown, which the model "learns" from the thin section transmission electron micrograph image (2D or the "seed and growth" model image (3D. Converged phase field simulations predict self-consistent amplitudes and spatial localization of pressure and stress throughout the cell for any posited stationary morphology target and cell compartment constitutive properties. The models form a general framework for future studies of cell morphological dynamics in a variety of biological contexts.

  12. Confined flow of polymer blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tufano, C.; Peters, G.W.M.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of confinement on the steady-state morphology of two different emulsions is investigated. The blends, made from polybutene (PB) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polybutadiene (PBD) in PDMS, are sheared between two parallel plates, mostly with a standard gap spacing of 40 m, in the

  13. The Size and Morphological Study of Spherical Polyelectrolyte Complex Beads Using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Bučko, M.; Tihlaříková, Eva; Krajčovič, T.; Gemeiner, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, S3 (2015), s. 1697-1698 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : PEC * ESEM * polymers * morphology Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2015

  14. Pennisetum section Brevivalvula in West Africa : morphological and genetic variation in an agamic species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmelzer, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Section Brevivalvula is one of five sections in the large tropical grass genus Pennisetum . It belongs to the tertiary genepool of P. glaucum (L.) R. Br., pearl millet, and consists of six morphological species: P.

  15. Pre-maxillary complex morphology in bilateral cleft and hypothesis on laterality of deviated pre-maxilla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Murthy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pre-maxillary complex (pre-maxilla [PMX] + vomer morphology in bilateral complete cleft of primary and secondary palate (BCLCP is very complex and less reviewed in literature. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 200 consecutive BCLCP patients were selected. Their pre-operative clinical photographs and dental casts were evaluated by a single investigator at two different points of time, to study the morphology of PMX and vomer with special emphasis on deviation of vomer and rotation of PMX. Results: It is found that in above 70% of patients, PMX and vomer both displaced or deviated towards left side in horizontal plane and PMX rotated anticlockwise at PMX vomerine suture (PVS. In 10% of cases, both PMX and vomer are displaced towards the right side, PMX rotated clockwise at PVS. In 11% of cases, vomer is displaced towards the left side, but PMX rotated clockwise at PVS. In 5% of cases, vomer is displaced towards the right side, but PMX rotated anticlockwise at PVS. Both PMX and vomer are in midline in 4% of cases. Conclusion: Specific morphological deviation of vomer and PMX has been studied. We put forward the probable hypothesis to explain the deviation and rotation of PMX.

  16. Opaque for the Reader but Transparent for the Brain: Neural Signatures of Morphological Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinzer, Marcus; Lahiri, Aditi; Flaisch, Tobias; Hannemann, Ronny; Eulitz, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Within linguistics, words with a complex internal structure are commonly assumed to be decomposed into their constituent morphemes (e.g., un-help-ful). Nevertheless, an ongoing debate concerns the brain structures that subserve this process. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the present study varied the internal complexity of derived…

  17. Structural, thermal, morphological and biological studies of proton-transfer complexes formed from 4-aminoantipyrine with quinol and picric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Abdel Majid A.

    2013-03-01

    4-Aminoantipyrine (4AAP) is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, biochemical experiments and environmental monitoring. However, residual amounts of 4AAP in the environment may pose a threat to human health. To provide basic data that can be used to extract or eliminate 4AAP from the environment, the proton-transfer complexes of 4AAP with quinol (QL) and picric acid (PA) were synthesized and spectroscopically investigated. The interactions afforded two new proton-transfer salts named 1,5-dimethyl-3-oxo-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-aminium-4-hydroxyphenolate and 1,5-dimethyl-3-oxo-2-phenyl-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrazol-4-aminium-2,4,6-trinitrophenolate for QL and PA, respectively, via a 1:1 stoichiometry. Elemental analysis (CHN), electronic absorption, spectrophotometric titration, IR, Raman, 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the new products. The thermal stability of the synthesized CT complexes was investigated using thermogravimetric (TG) analyses, and the morphology and particle size of these complexes were obtained from scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that PA and 4AAP immediately formed a yellow precipitate with a remarkable sponge-like morphology and good thermal stability up to 180 °C. Finally, the biological activities of the newly synthesized CT complexes were tested for their antibacterial and antifungal activities. The results indicated that the [(4AAP)(QL)] complex exhibited strong antimicrobial activities against various bacterial and fungal strains compared with standard drugs.

  18. Application of Modern Experimental Technique to Solve Morphological Complexity in Plants Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURANTO

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern taxonomy has two approaches, i.e. classical and experimental taxonomy. Classical taxonomy uses morphological characters, while experimental taxonomy uses broader methods including chemistry, physics and mathematics, in the form of laboratory data that are revealed together with the progress of optical technique (microscope, chemistry methods (chromatography, electrophoresis, etc. Modern taxonomy tends to use series of interrelated data. More data used would result in more validity and give better clarification of taxonomic status. A lot of modern taxonomic data such as palynology, cytotaxonomy (cytology, chemical constituent (chemotaxonomy, isozyme and DNA sequencing were used recently.

  19. 3D reconstruction modeling of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells: Effect of the complexity of the boundary on the morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Jin; Jeong, Daun; Kim, SeongMin; Choi, Yeong Suk; Ihn, Soo-Ghang; Yun, Sungyoung; Lim, Younhee; Lee, Eunha; Park, Gyeong-Su

    2016-02-01

    Although the morphology of the active layer in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic (BHJ-OPV) cells is critical for determining the quantum efficiency (QE), predicting the real QE for a 3-dimensional (3D) morphology has long been difficult because structural information on the composition complexity of donor (D): acceptor (A) blends with small domain size is limited to 2D observations via various image-processing techniques. To overcome this, we reconstruct the 3D morphology by using an isotropic statistical approach based on 2D energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EF-TEM) images. This new reconstruction method is validated to obtain the internal QE by using a dynamic Monte Carlo simulation in the BHJ-OPV system with different additives such as 4 vol% 1-chloronaphthalene (CN) and 4 vol% 1,8-diiodooctane (DIO) (compared to the case of no additive); the resulting trend is compared with the experimental QE. Therefore, our developed method can be used to predict the real charge transport performance in the OPV system accurately.

  20. Magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n {approx}1.5X10{sup 20}m{sup -3}). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO{sub 2} interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 {mu}s) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong

  1. Magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    The Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) is a compact, high-magnetic-field tokamak capable of operating at density and magnetic field values similar to, or even encompassing, those of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and therefore provides a unique opportunity to explore physics issues that are directly relevant to ITER. During 2004 the experimental activities were focussed on fully exploiting the lower hybrid system (for generating and controlling the plasma current) and the electron cyclotron heating system (joint experiment with the Institute of Plasma Physics of the National Research Council, Milan). With all four gyrotrons in operation, full electron cyclotron power was achieved up to a record level of 1.5 MW. By simultaneously injecting lower hybrid waves, to tailor the plasma current radial profile, and electron cyclotron waves, to heat the plasma centre, good confinement regimes with internal transport barriers were obtained at the highest plasma density values ever achieved for this operation regime (n ∼1.5X10 20 m -3 ). Specific studies were devoted to optimising the coupling of lower hybrid waves to the plasma (by real-time control of the plasma position) and to generating current by electron cyclotron current drive. The new scanning CO 2 interferometer (developed by the Reversed Field Experiment Consortium) for high spatial and time resolution (1 cm/50 μs) density profile measurements was extensively used. The Thomson scattering diagnostic was upgraded and enabled observation of scattered signals associated with the Confinement background plasma dynamics. As for theoretical studies on the dynamics of turbulence in plasmas, the transition from Bohm-like scaling to gyro-Bohm scaling of the local plasma diffusivity was demonstrated on the basis of a generalised four wave model (joint collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the University of California at Irvine). The transition from weak to strong energetic particle

  2. A Multiscale Model of Morphological Complexity in Cities - Characterising Emergent Homogeneity and Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Mary Katherine; Ayres, Phil; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2017-01-01

    Approaches from complex systems science can support design decision-making by extracting important information about key dependencies from large, unstructured data sources. This paper presents an initial case study applying such approaches to city structure, by characterising low-level features a...

  3. Cryptic or pseudocryptic: can morphological methods inform copepod taxonomy? An analysis of publications and a case study of the Eurytemora affinis species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajus, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Natalia; Alekseev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Interest in cryptic species has increased significantly with current progress in genetic methods. The large number of cryptic species suggests that the resolution of traditional morphological techniques may be insufficient for taxonomical research. However, some species now considered to be cryptic may, in fact, be designated pseudocryptic after close morphological examination. Thus the “cryptic or pseudocryptic” dilemma speaks to the resolution of morphological analysis and its utility for identifying species. We address this dilemma first by systematically reviewing data published from 1980 to 2013 on cryptic species of Copepoda and then by performing an in-depth morphological study of the former Eurytemora affinis complex of cryptic species. Analyzing the published data showed that, in 5 of 24 revisions eligible for systematic review, cryptic species assignment was based solely on the genetic variation of forms without detailed morphological analysis to confirm the assignment. Therefore, some newly described cryptic species might be designated pseudocryptic under more detailed morphological analysis as happened with Eurytemora affinis complex. Recent genetic analyses of the complex found high levels of heterogeneity without morphological differences; it is argued to be cryptic. However, next detailed morphological analyses allowed to describe a number of valid species. Our study, using deep statistical analyses usually not applied for new species describing, of this species complex confirmed considerable differences between former cryptic species. In particular, fluctuating asymmetry (FA), the random variation of left and right structures, was significantly different between forms and provided independent information about their status. Our work showed that multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis, can be powerful techniques for the morphological discrimination of cryptic taxons. Despite increasing cryptic species

  4. Designing tough and fracture resistant polypropylene/multi wall carbon nanotubes nanocomposites by controlling stereo-complexity and dispersion morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Dibyendu; Satapathy, Bhabani K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • New pathway to improve dispersion and toughness by tacticity modification. • >330% toughness enhancement in PP/MWCNT nanocomposites with stereo-complex PP. • Prominent dispersion and distribution morphology due to matrix stereocomplexity. • Tacticity induced “Semi-ductile-to-tough-to-quasi-brittle” transitions in the PP/MWCNT. • Two-fold reduced steady state CTOD rate in i-PP+s-PP/ MWCNT nanocomposites. - Abstract: A remarkable toughness enhancement (>330%) of multi wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) filled stereo-complex polypropylene (PP) matrix i.e. blend of isotactic-PP and syndiotactic-PP (70:30) with differences in stereo-regularity has been observed. The enhancement has been correlated to quantifiable morphological parameters such as free-space lengths concerning dispersion and relatively greater reduction in crystallite size/lamellar thickness. Systematic analysis of glass transition data and estimation of multi wall carbon nanotubes induced reduction in interfacial polymer chain immobilization reiterates susceptibility of polymer segments to ready-mobility. The extent of toughening has quantitatively been analyzed by fracture-energy partitioning, essential work of fracture (EWF), approach enabling the detection of a “semi-ductile-to-tough-to-quasi-brittle” transition in the MWCNT filled stereo-complex polypropylene. Real-time fracture kinetics analysis revealed toughening mechanism to be primarily blunting-assisted; an aspect also corroborated by extensive plastic flow without much energy dissipation in the inner fracture process zone. Thus the study establishes a new pathway of tacticity-defined matrix modification to toughen nanocomposites

  5. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odenwald, Matthew A; Prosperi, Jenifer R; Goss, Kathleen H

    2013-01-01

    The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta control the migratory potential and

  6. APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at membrane protrusions regulate mammary tumor cell migration and mesenchymal morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The APC tumor suppressor is mutated or downregulated in many tumor types, and is prominently localized to punctate clusters at protrusion tips in migratory cells, such as in astrocytes where it has been implicated in directed cell motility. Although APC loss is considered an initiating event in colorectal cancer, for example, it is less clear what role APC plays in tumor cell motility and whether loss of APC might be an important promoter of tumor progression in addition to initiation. Methods The localization of APC and β-catenin was analyzed in multiple cell lines, including non-transformed epithelial lines treated with a proteasome inhibitor or TGFβ to induce an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as several breast cancer lines, by immunofluorescence. APC expression was knocked down in 4T07 mammary tumor cells using lentiviral-mediated delivery of APC-specific short-hairpin (sh) RNAs, and assessed using quantitative (q) reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blotting. Tumor cell motility was analyzed by performing wound-filling assays, and morphology via immunofluorescence (IF) and phase-contrast microscopy. Additionally, proliferation was measured using BrdU incorporation, and TCF reporter assays were performed to determine β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcriptional activity. Results APC/β-catenin-rich complexes were observed at protrusion ends of migratory epithelial cells treated with a proteasome inhibitor or when EMT has been induced and in tumor cells with a mesenchymal, spindle-like morphology. 4T07 tumor cells with reduced APC levels were significantly less motile and had a more rounded morphology; yet, they did not differ significantly in proliferation or β-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we found that APC/β-catenin-rich complexes at protrusion ends were dependent upon an intact microtubule cytoskeleton. Conclusions These findings indicate that membrane protrusions with APC/β-catenin-containing puncta

  7. Measures of Morphological Complexity of Gray Matter on Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Control Age Grouping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan D. Pham

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Current brain-age prediction methods using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI attempt to estimate the physiological brain age via some kind of machine learning of chronological brain age data to perform the classification task. Such a predictive approach imposes greater risk of either over-estimate or under-estimate, mainly due to limited training data. A new conceptual framework for more reliable MRI-based brain-age prediction is by systematic brain-age grouping via the implementation of the phylogenetic tree reconstruction and measures of information complexity. Experimental results carried out on a public MRI database suggest the feasibility of the proposed concept.

  8. Diversification in the South American Pampas: the genetic and morphological variation of the widespread Petunia axillaris complex (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetto, Caroline; Fagundes, Nelson J R; Segatto, Ana L A; Kuhlemeier, Cris; Solís Neffa, Viviana G; Speranza, Pablo R; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal distribution of genetic variation and the ways in which this distribution is connected to the ecological context of natural populations is fundamental for understanding the nature and mode of intraspecific and, ultimately, interspecific differentiation. The Petunia axillaris complex is endemic to the grasslands of southern South America and includes three subspecies: P. a. axillaris, P. a. parodii and P. a. subandina. These subspecies are traditionally delimited based on both geography and floral morphology, although the latter is highly variable. Here, we determined the patterns of genetic (nuclear and cpDNA), morphological and ecological (bioclimatic) variation of a large number of P. axillaris populations and found that they are mostly coincident with subspecies delimitation. The nuclear data suggest that the subspecies are likely independent evolutionary units, and their morphological differences may be associated with local adaptations to diverse climatic and/or edaphic conditions and population isolation. The demographic dynamics over time estimated by skyline plot analyses showed different patterns for each subspecies in the last 100 000 years, which is compatible with a divergence time between 35 000 and 107 000 years ago between P. a. axillaris and P. a. parodii, as estimated with the IMa program. Coalescent simulation tests using Approximate Bayesian Computation do not support previous suggestions of extensive gene flow between P. a. axillaris and P. a. parodii in their contact zone. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Conformation Control of a Conjugated Polymer through Complexation with Bile Acids Generates Its Novel Spectral and Morphological Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Youichi; Noguchi, Takao; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Roy, Bappaditya; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Shinkai, Seiji

    2016-11-29

    Control of higher-order polymer structures attracts a great deal of interest for many researchers when they lead to the development of materials having various advanced functions. Among them, conjugated polymers that are useful as starting materials in the design of molecular wires are particularly attractive. However, an equilibrium existing between isolated chains and bundled aggregates is inevitable and has made their physical properties very complicated. As an attempt to simplify this situation, we previously reported that a polymer chain of a water-soluble polythiophene could be isolated through complexation with a helix-forming polysaccharide. More recently, a covalently self-threading polythiophene was reported, the main chain of which was physically protected from self-folding and chain-chain π-stacking. In this report, we wish to report a new strategy to isolate a water-soluble polythiophene and to control its higher-order structure by a supramolecular approach: that is, among a few bile acids, lithocholate can form stoichiometric complexes with cationic polythiophene to isolate the polymer chain, and the higher-order structure is changeable by the molar ratio. The optical and morphological studies have been thoroughly performed, and the resultant complex has been applied to the selective recognition of two AMP structural isomers.

  10. Comments on confinement criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurak, V.; Schroer, B.; Swieca, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    For a QED 2 model with SU(n) flavour, the nature of the physical states space is more subtle than one expects on the basis of the loop criterion for confinement. One may have colour confinement without confinement of the fundamental flavour representation. Attempts to formulate confinement criteria in which the quark fields play a more fundamental role are discussed [pt

  11. Sleep spindle and K-complex detection using tunable Q-factor wavelet transform and morphological component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek eLajnef

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel framework for joint detection of sleep spindles and K-complex events, two hallmarks of sleep stage S2, is proposed. Sleep electroencephalography (EEG signals are split into oscillatory (spindles and transient (K-complex components. This decomposition is conveniently achieved by applying morphological component analysis (MCA to a sparse representation of EEG segments obtained by the recently introduced discrete tunable Q-factor wavelet transform (TQWT. Tuning the Q-factor provides a convenient and elegant tool to naturally decompose the signal into an oscillatory and a transient component. The actual detection step relies on thresholding (i the transient component to reveal K-complexes and (ii the time-frequency representation of the oscillatory component to identify sleep spindles. Optimal thresholds are derived from ROC-like curves (sensitivity versus FDR on training sets and the performance of the method is assessed on test data sets. We assessed the performance of our method using full-night sleep EEG data we collected from 14 participants. In comparison to visual scoring (Expert 1, the proposed method detected spindles with a sensitivity of 83.18% and false discovery rate (FDR of 39%, while K-complexes were detected with a sensitivity of 81.57% and an FDR of 29.54%. Similar performances were obtained when using a second expert as benchmark. In addition, when the TQWT and MCA steps were excluded from the pipeline the detection sensitivities dropped down to 70% for spindles and to 76.97% for K-complexes, while the FDR rose up to 43.62% and 49.09% respectively. Finally, we also evaluated the performance of the proposed method on a set of publicly available sleep EEG recordings. Overall, the results we obtained suggest that the TQWT-MCA method may be a valuable alternative to existing spindle and K-complex detection methods. Paths for improvements and further validations with large-scale standard open-access benchmarking data sets are

  12. Processing complex pseudo-words in mild cognitive impairment: The interaction of preserved morphological rule knowledge with compromised cognitive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouilidou, Christina; Dolenc, Barbara; Marvin, Tatjana; Pirtošek, Zvezdan

    2016-01-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) affects the cognitive performance of elderly adults. However, the level of severity is not high enough to be diagnosed with dementia. Previous research reports subtle language impairments in individuals with MCI specifically in domains related to lexical meaning. The present study used both off-line (grammaticality judgment) and on-line (lexical decision) tasks to examine aspects of lexical processing and how they are affected by MCI. 21 healthy older adults and 23 individuals with MCI saw complex pseudo-words that violated various principles of word formation in Slovenian and decided if each letter string was an actual word of their language. The pseudo-words ranged in their degree of violability. A task effect was found, with MCI performance to be similar to that of healthy controls in the off-line task but different in the on-line task. Overall, the MCI group responded slower than the elderly controls. No significant differences were observed in the off-line task, while the on-line task revealed a main effect of Violation type, a main effect of Group and a significant Violation × Group interaction reflecting a difficulty for the MCI group to process pseudo-words in real time. That is, while individuals with MCI seem to preserve morphological rule knowledge, they experience additional difficulties while processing complex pseudo-words. This was attributed to an executive dysfunction associated with MCI that delays the recognition of ungrammatical formations.

  13. How does ulnar shortening osteotomy influence morphologic changes in the triangular fibrocartilage complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Sato, Kazuki; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy often is indicated for treatment of injuries to the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). However, the effect of ulnar shortening osteotomy on the changes in shape of the TFCC is unclear. In our study, quantitative evaluations were performed using MRI to clarify the effect of ulnar shortening on triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) thickness attributable to disc regeneration of the TFC and TFC angle attributable to the suspension effect of ulnar shortening on the TFC. The purposes of this study were (1) to compare preoperative and postoperative TFC thickness and TFC angle on MR images to quantitatively evaluate the effect of ulnar shortening osteotomy on disc regeneration and the suspension effect on the TFC; and (2) to assess whether changes in TFC thickness and TFC angle correlated with the Mayo wrist score. Between 1995 and 2008, 256 patients underwent ulnar shortening osteotomy for TFCC injuries. The minimum followup was 24 months (mean, 51 months; range, 24-210 months). A total of 79 patients (31%) with complete followup including preoperative and postoperative MR images and the Mayo wrist score was included in this retrospective study. Evaluation of the postoperative MR images and the Mayo wrist score were performed at the final followup. The remaining 177 patients did not undergo postoperative MRI, or they had a previous fracture, large tears of the disc proper, or were lost to followup. Two orthopaedists, one of whom performed the surgeries, measured the TFC thickness and the TFC angle on coronal MR images before and after surgery for each patient. Correlations of the percent change in the TFC thickness and the magnitude of TFC angle change with age, sex, postoperative MR images, extent of ulnar shortening, preoperative ulnar variance, and postoperative Mayo wrist score were assessed. Stepwise regression analysis showed a correlation between the percent change in TFC thickness and preoperative ulnar variance (R2=0.21; β=-0.33; 95

  14. Building solids inside nano-space: from confined amorphous through confined solvate to confined 'metastable' polymorph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nartowski, K P; Tedder, J; Braun, D E; Fábián, L; Khimyak, Y Z

    2015-10-14

    The nanocrystallisation of complex molecules inside mesoporous hosts and control over the resulting structure is a significant challenge. To date the largest organic molecule crystallised inside the nano-pores is a known pharmaceutical intermediate - ROY (259.3 g mol(-1)). In this work we demonstrate smart manipulation of the phase of a larger confined pharmaceutical - indomethacin (IMC, 357.8 g mol(-1)), a substance with known conformational flexibility and complex polymorphic behaviour. We show the detailed structural analysis and the control of solid state transformations of encapsulated molecules inside the pores of mesoscopic cellular foam (MCF, pore size ca. 29 nm) and controlled pore glass (CPG, pore size ca. 55 nm). Starting from confined amorphous IMC we drive crystallisation into a confined methanol solvate, which upon vacuum drying leads to the stabilised rare form V of IMC inside the MCF host. In contrast to the pure form, encapsulated form V does not transform into a more stable polymorph upon heating. The size of the constraining pores and the drug concentration within the pores determine whether the amorphous state of the drug is stabilised or it recrystallises into confined nanocrystals. The work presents, in a critical manner, an application of complementary techniques (DSC, PXRD, solid-state NMR, N2 adsorption) to confirm unambiguously the phase transitions under confinement and offers a comprehensive strategy towards the formation and control of nano-crystalline encapsulated organic solids.

  15. Hermitian relativity, chromodynamics and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treder, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The extension of the Riemann metrics of General Relativity to the complex domain (substitution of the symmetry conditions for the fundamental tensor, the affinity and the Ricci curvature by the conditions of hermicity) leads to a 'Generalized Theory of Gravity' (Einstein) describing the Newton-Einstein gravodynamics combined with the chromodynamics of quarks. The interaction of gravodynamics and chromodynamics implied by the Einstein-Schroedinger field equations of the hermitian relativity theory enforces the 'confinement'. The 'confinement' prevents the gravitational potential from divergence which would result in the lack of a Riemann space-time metric

  16. Chernobyl new safe confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, L.

    2011-01-01

    The author presents the new safe confinement that will be commissioned at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl NPP in 2015. The confinement will ensure that Chernobyl Unit 4 will be placed in an environmentally safe condition for at least next 100 years. The article highlights the current work status, future perspectives and the feasibility of confinement concept [ru

  17. Genetic and Morphological Analyses Demonstrate That Schizolecis guntheri (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) Is Likely to Be a Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Camila S.; Costa-Silva, Guilherme J.; Roxo, Fábio F.; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Schizolecis is a monotypic genus of Siluriformes widely distributed throughout isolated coastal drainages of southeastern Brazil. Previous studies have shown that fish groups found in isolated river basins tend to differentiate over time in the absence of gene flow, resulting in allopatric speciation. In this study, we used partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI with the analysis of the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC) and the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) for single locus species delimitation, and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of external morphology to test the hypothesis that Schizolecis guntheri is a complex of species. We analyzed 94 samples of S. guntheri for GMYC and ABGD, and 82 samples for PCA from 22 coastal rivers draining to the Atlantic in southeastern Brazil from the Paraná State to the north of the Rio de Janeiro State. As a result, the GMYC model and the ABGD delimited five operational taxonomy units (OTUs – a nomenclature referred to in the present study of the possible new species delimited for the genetic analysis), a much higher number compared to the traditional alfa taxonomy that only recognizes S. guntheri across the isolated coastal rivers of Brazil. Furthermore, the PCA analysis suggests that S. guntheri is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including dorsal-fin spine length, pectoral-fin spine length, pelvic-fin spine length, lower caudal-fin spine length, caudal peduncle depth, anal width and mandibular ramus length. However, no exclusive character was found among the isolated populations that could be used to describe a new species of Schizolecis. Therefore, we can conclude, based on our results of PCA contrasting with the results of GMYC and ABGD, that S. guntheri represents a complex of species. PMID:29552028

  18. Genetic and Morphological Analyses Demonstrate That Schizolecis guntheri (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) Is Likely to Be a Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Camila S; Costa-Silva, Guilherme J; Roxo, Fábio F; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Schizolecis is a monotypic genus of Siluriformes widely distributed throughout isolated coastal drainages of southeastern Brazil. Previous studies have shown that fish groups found in isolated river basins tend to differentiate over time in the absence of gene flow, resulting in allopatric speciation. In this study, we used partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI with the analysis of the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC) and the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) for single locus species delimitation, and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of external morphology to test the hypothesis that Schizolecis guntheri is a complex of species. We analyzed 94 samples of S. guntheri for GMYC and ABGD, and 82 samples for PCA from 22 coastal rivers draining to the Atlantic in southeastern Brazil from the Paraná State to the north of the Rio de Janeiro State. As a result, the GMYC model and the ABGD delimited five operational taxonomy units (OTUs - a nomenclature referred to in the present study of the possible new species delimited for the genetic analysis), a much higher number compared to the traditional alfa taxonomy that only recognizes S. guntheri across the isolated coastal rivers of Brazil. Furthermore, the PCA analysis suggests that S. guntheri is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including dorsal-fin spine length, pectoral-fin spine length, pelvic-fin spine length, lower caudal-fin spine length, caudal peduncle depth, anal width and mandibular ramus length. However, no exclusive character was found among the isolated populations that could be used to describe a new species of Schizolecis . Therefore, we can conclude, based on our results of PCA contrasting with the results of GMYC and ABGD, that S. guntheri represents a complex of species.

  19. Genetic and Morphological Analyses Demonstrate That Schizolecis guntheri (Siluriformes: Loricariidae Is Likely to Be a Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila S. Souza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizolecis is a monotypic genus of Siluriformes widely distributed throughout isolated coastal drainages of southeastern Brazil. Previous studies have shown that fish groups found in isolated river basins tend to differentiate over time in the absence of gene flow, resulting in allopatric speciation. In this study, we used partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI with the analysis of the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC and the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD for single locus species delimitation, and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA of external morphology to test the hypothesis that Schizolecis guntheri is a complex of species. We analyzed 94 samples of S. guntheri for GMYC and ABGD, and 82 samples for PCA from 22 coastal rivers draining to the Atlantic in southeastern Brazil from the Paraná State to the north of the Rio de Janeiro State. As a result, the GMYC model and the ABGD delimited five operational taxonomy units (OTUs – a nomenclature referred to in the present study of the possible new species delimited for the genetic analysis, a much higher number compared to the traditional alfa taxonomy that only recognizes S. guntheri across the isolated coastal rivers of Brazil. Furthermore, the PCA analysis suggests that S. guntheri is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including dorsal-fin spine length, pectoral-fin spine length, pelvic-fin spine length, lower caudal-fin spine length, caudal peduncle depth, anal width and mandibular ramus length. However, no exclusive character was found among the isolated populations that could be used to describe a new species of Schizolecis. Therefore, we can conclude, based on our results of PCA contrasting with the results of GMYC and ABGD, that S. guntheri represents a complex of species.

  20. Structural and functional characterizations of SsgB, a conserved activator of developmental cell division in morphologically complex actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Traag, Bjørn A; Willemse, Joost; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K; Klock, Heath E; Knuth, Mark W; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Minor, Wladek; Mommaas, A Mieke; Morse, Andrew T; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J; Trame, Christine B; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Shuren; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A; van Wezel, Gilles P

    2009-09-11

    SsgA-like proteins (SALPs) are a family of homologous cell division-related proteins that occur exclusively in morphologically complex actinomycetes. We show that SsgB, a subfamily of SALPs, is the archetypal SALP that is functionally conserved in all sporulating actinomycetes. Sporulation-specific cell division of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgB mutants is restored by introduction of distant ssgB orthologues from other actinomycetes. Interestingly, the number of septa (and spores) of the complemented null mutants is dictated by the specific ssgB orthologue that is expressed. The crystal structure of the SsgB from Thermobifida fusca was determined at 2.6 A resolution and represents the first structure for this family. The structure revealed similarities to a class of eukaryotic "whirly" single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding proteins. However, the electro-negative surface of the SALPs suggests that neither SsgB nor any of the other SALPs are likely to interact with nucleotide substrates. Instead, we show that a conserved hydrophobic surface is likely to be important for SALP function and suggest that proteins are the likely binding partners.

  1. Structural and Functional Characterizations of SsgB, a Conserved Activator of Developmental Cell Division in Morphologically Complex Actinomycetes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingping; Traag, Bjørn A.; Willemse, Joost; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Clayton, Thomas; Das, Debanu; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; Minor, Wladek; Mommaas, A. Mieke; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; van den Bedem, Henry; Wang, Shuren; Weekes, Dana; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2009-01-01

    SsgA-like proteins (SALPs) are a family of homologous cell division-related proteins that occur exclusively in morphologically complex actinomycetes. We show that SsgB, a subfamily of SALPs, is the archetypal SALP that is functionally conserved in all sporulating actinomycetes. Sporulation-specific cell division of Streptomyces coelicolor ssgB mutants is restored by introduction of distant ssgB orthologues from other actinomycetes. Interestingly, the number of septa (and spores) of the complemented null mutants is dictated by the specific ssgB orthologue that is expressed. The crystal structure of the SsgB from Thermobifida fusca was determined at 2.6 Å resolution and represents the first structure for this family. The structure revealed similarities to a class of eukaryotic “whirly” single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding proteins. However, the electro-negative surface of the SALPs suggests that neither SsgB nor any of the other SALPs are likely to interact with nucleotide substrates. Instead, we show that a conserved hydrophobic surface is likely to be important for SALP function and suggest that proteins are the likely binding partners. PMID:19567872

  2. Confinement models for gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khadkikar, S.B.; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    1987-04-01

    Confinement model for gluons using a 'colour super current' is formulated. An attempt has been made to derive a suitable dielectric function corresponding to the current confinement model. A simple inhomogeneous dielectric confinement model for gluons is studied for comparison. The model Hamiltonians are second quantized and the glueball states are constructed. The spurious motion of the centre of confinement is accounted for. The results of the current confinement scheme are found to be in good agreement with the experimental candidates for glueballs. (author). 16 refs, 3 tabs

  3. Morphological and Molecular Data Reveal Three Distinct Populations of Indian Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwant; Singh, Nisha; Mishra, Shefali; Tripathi, Kabita; Singh, Bikram P; Rai, Vandna; Singh, Ashok K; Singh, Nagendra K

    2018-01-01

    Wild relatives of crops possess adaptive mutations for agronomically important traits, which could play significant role in crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. However, global climate change and human activities pose serious threats to the natural habitats leading to erosion of genetic diversity of wild rice populations. The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize India's huge untapped wild rice diversity in Oryza rufipogon Griff. species complex from a wide range of ecological niches. We made strategic expeditions around diversity hot spots in 64 districts of nine different agro-climatic zones of the country and collected 418 wild rice accessions. Significant variation was observed among the accessions for 46 morphological descriptors, allowing classification into O. nivara, O. rufipogon , and O. sativa f. spontanea morpho-taxonomic groups. Genome-specific pSINE1 markers confirmed all the accessions having AA genome, which were further classified using ecotype-specific pSINE1 markers into annual, perennial, intermediate, and an unknown type. Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation for the morphological traits in each ecotype group. Genetic diversity analysis based on multi-allelic SSR markers clustered these accessions into three major groups and analysis of molecular variance for nine agro-climatic zones showed that 68% of the genetic variation was inherent amongst individuals while only 11% of the variation separated the zones, though there was significant correlation between genetic and spatial distances of the accessions. Model based population structure analysis using genome wide bi-allelic SNP markers revealed three sub-populations designated 'Pro-Indica,' 'Pro-Aus,' and 'Mid-Gangetic,' which showed poor correspondence with the morpho - taxonomic classification or pSINE1 ecotypes. There was Pan-India distribution of the 'Pro-Indica' and 'Pro-Aus' sub-populations across agro-climatic zones, indicating a more

  4. Multilocus phylogeny of the avian family Alaudidae (larks) reveals complex morphological evolution, non-monophyletic genera and hidden species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alström, Per; Barnes, Keith N; Olsson, Urban; Barker, F Keith; Bloomer, Paulette; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Qureshi, Masood Ahmed; Guillaumet, Alban; Crochet, Pierre-André; Ryan, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    usually placed in Melanocorypha]; Ammomanopsis grayi and Ammomanes cinctura/deserti [former traditionally placed in Ammomanes]; Chersophilus duponti and Certhilauda spp.; Eremopterix hova [usually placed in Mirafra] and several Mirafra spp.), as well as both highly conserved plumages (e.g. within Mirafra) and strongly divergent lineages (e.g. Eremopterix hova vs. other Eremopterix spp.; Calandrella cinerea complex vs. Eremophila spp.; Eremalauda dunni vs. Chersophilus duponti; Melanocorypha mongolica and male M. yeltoniensis vs. other Melanocorypha spp. and female M. yeltoniensis). Sexual plumage dimorphism has evolved multiple times. Few groups of birds show the same level of disagreement between taxonomy based on morphology and phylogenetic relationships as inferred from DNA sequences. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Morphological and Molecular Data Reveal Three Distinct Populations of Indian Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwant; Singh, Nisha; Mishra, Shefali; Tripathi, Kabita; Singh, Bikram P.; Rai, Vandna; Singh, Ashok K.; Singh, Nagendra K.

    2018-01-01

    Wild relatives of crops possess adaptive mutations for agronomically important traits, which could play significant role in crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. However, global climate change and human activities pose serious threats to the natural habitats leading to erosion of genetic diversity of wild rice populations. The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize India’s huge untapped wild rice diversity in Oryza rufipogon Griff. species complex from a wide range of ecological niches. We made strategic expeditions around diversity hot spots in 64 districts of nine different agro-climatic zones of the country and collected 418 wild rice accessions. Significant variation was observed among the accessions for 46 morphological descriptors, allowing classification into O. nivara, O. rufipogon, and O. sativa f. spontanea morpho-taxonomic groups. Genome-specific pSINE1 markers confirmed all the accessions having AA genome, which were further classified using ecotype-specific pSINE1 markers into annual, perennial, intermediate, and an unknown type. Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation for the morphological traits in each ecotype group. Genetic diversity analysis based on multi-allelic SSR markers clustered these accessions into three major groups and analysis of molecular variance for nine agro-climatic zones showed that 68% of the genetic variation was inherent amongst individuals while only 11% of the variation separated the zones, though there was significant correlation between genetic and spatial distances of the accessions. Model based population structure analysis using genome wide bi-allelic SNP markers revealed three sub-populations designated ‘Pro-Indica,’ ‘Pro-Aus,’ and ‘Mid-Gangetic,’ which showed poor correspondence with the morpho-taxonomic classification or pSINE1 ecotypes. There was Pan-India distribution of the ‘Pro-Indica’ and ‘Pro-Aus’ sub-populations across agro-climatic zones

  6. Geological Mapping of Impact Melt Deposits at Lunar Complex Craters: New Insights into Morphological Diversity, Distribution and the Cratering Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, D.; Head, J. W., III; Pieters, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have completed high resolution geological mapping of impact melt deposits at the young lunar complex craters (wall and rim impact melt units and their relation to floor units have also been mapped. Among the distinctive features of these impact melt deposits are: 1) Impact Melt Wave Fronts: These are extensive (sometimes several kilometers in length) and we have documented their occurrence and distribution in different parts of the crater floor at Jackson and Tycho. These features emphasize melt mobility and style of emplacement during the modification stage of the craters. 2) Variations in Floor Elevations: Spatially extensive and coherent sections of crater floors have different elevations at all the three craters. The observed elevation differences could be caused by subsidence due to cooling of melt and/or structural failure, together with a contribution from regional slope. 3) Melt-Covered Megablocks: We also observe large blocks/rock-fragments (megablocks) covered in impact melt, which could be sections of collapsed wall or in some cases, subdued sections of central peaks. 4) Melt-Covered Central Peaks: Impact melt has also been mapped on the central peaks but varies in spatial extent among the craters. The presence of melt on peaks must be taken into account when interpreting peak mineralogy as exposures of deeper crust. 5) Boulder Distribution: Interesting trends are observed in the distribution of boulder units of various sizes; some impact melt units have spatially extensive boulders, while boulder distribution is very scarce in other units on the floor. We interpret these distributions to be influenced by a) the differential collapse of the crater walls during the modification stage, and b) the amount of relative melt volume retained in different parts of the crater floor. These observations provide important documentation of the morphological diversity and better understanding of the emplacement and final distribution of impact melt deposits.

  7. Assessment of multiple sources of anthropogenic and natural chemical inputs to a morphologically complex basin, Lake Mead, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Lakes with complex morphologies and with different geologic and land-use characteristics in their sub-watersheds could have large differences in natural and anthropogenic chemical inputs to sub-basins in the lake. Lake Mead in southern Nevada and northern Arizona, USA, is one such lake. To assess variations in chemical histories from 1935 to 1998 for major sub-basins of Lake Mead, four sediment cores were taken from three different parts of the reservoir (two from Las Vegas Bay and one from the Overton Arm and Virgin Basin) and analyzed for major and trace elements, radionuclides, and organic compounds. As expected, anthropogenic contaminant inputs are greatest to Las Vegas Bay reflecting inputs from the Las Vegas urban area, although concentrations are low compared to sediment quality guidelines and to other USA lakes. One exception to this pattern was higher Hg in the Virgin Basin core. The Virgin Basin core is located in the main body of the lake (Colorado River channel) and is influenced by the hydrology of the Colorado River, which changed greatly with completion of Glen Canyon Dam upstream in 1963. Major and trace elements in the core show pronounced shifts in the early 1960s and, in many cases, gradually return to concentrations more typical of pre-1960s by the 1980s and 1990s, after the filling of Lake Powell. The Overton Arm is the sub-basin least effected by anthropogenic contaminant inputs but has a complex 137Cs profile with a series of large peaks and valleys over the middle of the core, possibly reflecting fallout from nuclear tests in the 1950s at the Nevada Test Site. The 137Cs profile suggests a much greater sedimentation rate during testing which we hypothesize results from greatly increased dust fall on the lake and Virgin and Muddy River watersheds. The severe drought in the southwestern USA during the 1950s might also have played a role in variations in sedimentation rate in all of the cores. ?? 2009.

  8. Tokamak confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of energy confinement with engineering parameters, such as plasma current and major radius, is important for establishing the size of an ignited fusion device. Tokamaks exhibit a variety of modes of operation with different confinement properties. At present there is no adequate first principles theory to predict tokamak energy confinement and the empirical scaling method is the preferred approach to designing next step tokamaks. This paper reviews a number of robust theoretical concepts, such as dimensional analysis and stability boundaries, which provide a framework for characterising and understanding tokamak confinement and, therefore, generate more confidence in using empirical laws for extrapolation to future devices. (author)

  9. Dynamics in geometrical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Kremer, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the dynamics of low molecular weight and polymeric molecules when they are constrained under conditions of geometrical confinement. It covers geometrical confinement in different dimensionalities: (i) in nanometer thin layers or self supporting films (1-dimensional confinement) (ii) in pores or tubes with nanometric diameters (2-dimensional confinement) (iii) as micelles embedded in matrices (3-dimensional) or as nanodroplets.The dynamics under such conditions have been a much discussed and central topic in the focus of intense worldwide research activities within the last two decades. The present book discusses how the resulting molecular mobility is influenced by the subtle counterbalance between surface effects (typically slowing down molecular dynamics through attractive guest/host interactions) and confinement effects (typically increasing the mobility). It also explains how these influences can be modified and tuned, e.g. through appropriate surface coatings, film thicknesses or pore...

  10. Molecular Insights into the Complex Relationship between Capacitance and Pore Morphology in Nanoporous Carbon-based Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Alexander J; Hwang, Gyeong S

    2016-12-21

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors, or supercapacitors, are high-power energy storage devices that consist of large surface area electrodes (filled with electrolyte) to accommodate ion packing in accordance with classical electric double layer (EDL) theory. Nanoporous carbons (NPCs) have recently emerged as a class of electrode materials with the potential to dramatically improve the capacitance of these devices by leveraging ion confinement. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such enhancements are a clear departure from EDL theory and remain an open question. In this paper, we present the concept of ion reorganization kinetics during charge/discharge cycles, especially within highly confining subnanometer pores, which necessarily dictates the capacitance. Our molecular dynamics voltammetric simulations of ionic liquid immersed in NPC electrodes (of varying pore size distributions) demonstrate that the most efficient ion migration, and thereby largest capacitance, is facilitated by nonuniformity of shape (e.g., from cylindrical to slitlike) along nanopore channels. On the basis of this understanding, we propose that a new structural descriptor, coined as the pore shape factor, can provide a new avenue for materials optimization. These findings also present a framework to understand and evaluate ion migration kinetics within charged nanoporous materials.

  11. ABC triblock copolymer vesicles with mesh-like morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Dian; Hu, Yunxia; Grason, Gregory M; Russell, Thomas P

    2011-01-25

    Polymer vesicles made from poly(isoprene-b-styrene-b-2-vinyl pyridine) (PI-b-PS-b-P2VP) triblock copolymer confined within the nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane are studied. It was found that these vesicles have well-defined, nanoscopic size, and complex microphase-separated hydrophobic membranes, comprised of the PS and PI blocks, while the coronas are formed by the P2VP block. Vesicle formation was tracked using both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. A mesh-like morphology formed in the membrane at a well-defined composition of the three blocks that can be tuned by changing the copolymer composition. The nanoscale confinement, copolymer composition, and subtle molecular interactions contribute to the generation of these vesicles with such unusual morphologies.

  12. The confinement problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiler, E.

    1985-01-01

    Confinement of quarks is sometimes taken as some kind of dogma in the contemporary theory of strong interactions - quantum chromo-dynamics (QCD). Scientists should not be content with that. What is meant by ''permanent confinement'' should be formulated more precisely to see whether the theory has this property or not. The author looks at some possible interpretations of ''confinement'' and their shortcomings and then turns to the most widely used rather pragmatic definition based on the somewhat unphysical notion of infinitely heavy external sources. He describes what is known about the problem and tries to bring into focus some aspects that are insufficiently understood in his opinion

  13. The effect of spatial micro-CT image resolution and surface complexity on the morphological 3D analysis of open porous structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyka, Grzegorz, E-mail: gregory.pyka@mtm.kuleuven.be [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Kerckhofs, Greet [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Biomechanics Research Unit, Université de Liege, Chemin des Chevreuils 1 - BAT 52/3, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Schrooten, Jan; Wevers, Martine [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 – PB2450, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-01-15

    In material science microfocus X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) is one of the most popular non-destructive techniques to visualise and quantify the internal structure of materials in 3D. Despite constant system improvements, state-of-the-art micro-CT images can still hold several artefacts typical for X-ray CT imaging that hinder further image-based processing, structural and quantitative analysis. For example spatial resolution is crucial for an appropriate characterisation as the voxel size essentially influences the partial volume effect. However, defining the adequate image resolution is not a trivial aspect and understanding the correlation between scan parameters like voxel size and the structural properties is crucial for comprehensive material characterisation using micro-CT. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the spatial image resolution on the micro-CT based morphological analysis of three-dimensional (3D) open porous structures with a high surface complexity. In particular the correlation between the local surface properties and the accuracy of the micro-CT-based macro-morphology of 3D open porous Ti6Al4V structures produced by selective laser melting (SLM) was targeted and revealed for rough surfaces a strong dependence of the resulting structure characteristics on the scan resolution. Reducing the surface complexity by chemical etching decreased the sensitivity of the overall morphological analysis to the spatial image resolution and increased the detection limit. This study showed that scan settings and image processing parameters need to be customized to the material properties, morphological parameters under investigation and the desired final characteristics (in relation to the intended functional use). Customization of the scan resolution can increase the reliability of the micro-CT based analysis and at the same time reduce its operating costs. - Highlights: • We examine influence of the image resolution

  14. Genetic evidence for malaria vectors of the Anopheles sundaicus complex in Sri Lanka with morphological characteristics attributed to Anopheles subpictus species B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Pavillupillai J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles subpictus sensu lato, a widespread malaria vector in Asia, is reportedly composed of four sibling species A - D. Mosquitoes morphologically identified as belonging to the Subpictus complex were collected from different locations near the east coast of Sri Lanka, and specific ribosomal DNA sequences determined to validate their taxonomic status. Methods Anopheles subpictus s.l. larvae and blood-fed adults were collected from different locations in the Eastern province and their sibling species status was determined based on published morphological characteristics. DNA sequences of the D3 domain of 28 S ribosomal DNA (rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer -2 (ITS-2 of mosquitoes morphologically identified as An. subpictus sibling species A, B, C and D were determined. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on D3 domain of rDNA resulted in two clades: one clade with mosquitoes identified as An. subpictus species A, C, D and some mosquitoes identified as species B, and another clade with a majority of mosquitoes identified as species B with D3 sequences that were identical to Anopheles sundaicus cytotype D. Analysis of ITS-2 sequences confirmed a close relationship between a majority of mosquitoes identified as An. subpictus B with members of the An. sundaicus complex and others identified as An. subpictus B with An. subpictus s.l. Conclusions The study suggests that published morphological characteristics are not specific enough to identify some members of the Subpictus complex, particularly species B. The sequences of the ITS-2 and D3 domain of rDNA suggest that a majority that were identified morphologically as An. subpictus species B in the east coast of Sri Lanka, and some identified elsewhere in SE Asia as An. subpictus s.l., are in fact members of the Sundaicus complex based on genetic similarity to An. sundaicus s.l. In view of the well-known ability of An. sundaicus s.l. to breed in brackish and fresh water and

  15. The confining trailing string

    CERN Document Server

    Kiritsis, E; Nitti, F

    2014-01-01

    We extend the holographic trailing string picture of a heavy quark to the case of a bulk geometry dual to a confining gauge theory. We compute the classical trailing confining string solution for a static as well as a uniformly moving quark. The trailing string is infinitely extended and approaches a confining horizon, situated at a critical value of the radial coordinate, along one of the space-time directions, breaking boundary rotational invariance. We compute the equations for the fluctuations around the classical solutions, which are used to obtain boundary force correlators controlling the Langevin dynamics of the quark. The imaginary part of the correlators has a non-trivial low-frequency limit, which gives rise to a viscous friction coefficient induced by the confining vacuum. The vacuum correlators are used to define finite-temperature dressed Langevin correlators with an appropriate high-frequency behavior.

  16. Solitons and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swieca, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of two recent developments in quantum field theory are discussed. First, related with 'extended particles' such as soliton, kink and the 't Hooft monopole. Second, with confinement of particles which are realized in the Schwinger model [pt

  17. Confinement and the Pomeron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The importance of confinement for obtaining a unitary high-energy limit for QCD is discussed. ''Minijets'' are argued to build up non-unitary behavior endash when k T > Λ is imposed. For minijets to mix with low k T Pomeron Field Theory describing confinement, and give consistent asymptotic behavior, new ''quarks'' must enter the theory above the minijet transverse momentum scale. The Critical Pomeron is the resulting high-energy limit. 22 refs

  18. Space schemes of ecological zonation and morphology of the atolls lagoons and reef complex of an oceanic archipelago of the Caribbean: San Andres and Providence (Colombia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz M, Juan Manuel

    2005-01-01

    The oceanic atolls and reef-complexes of the Archipelago of San Andres and Providencia exhibit semi-enclosed to rather open lagoon basins, where various characteristic bottom habitats occur. Certain areas of the lagoon floor are covered by sediments, being in some settings vegetated by algae or sea grass, and other areas by coralline framework of different types according to the composition and dominance of coral species and to their morphology and level of reef development. This study seeks to determine the spatial distribution patterns of lagoon bottom habitats based on the analysis of gradients of most relevant physical factors. Patterns in the occurrence and abundance of most habitats became evident in relation with wave-energy level, water depth, and the occurrence of islands. Some morphological reef types are oriented in a preferential direction and show spatial arrangements of development that are presumably related to prevailing current speed and direction and wave exposure

  19. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or 3 He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied

  20. Morphological and genetic evolution in eastern populations of the Macrhybopsis aestivalis complex (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae), with the descriptions of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Carter R; Mayden, Richard L; Powers, Steven L

    2017-03-30

    For many years the North American cyprinid fish Macrhybopsis aestivalis (common name: Speckled Chub) was regarded as a single widespread and morphologically variable species, occurring in rivers throughout much of the Mississippi Valley and geographically adjacent eastern Gulf slope drainages, west to the Rio Grande basin in Texas, New Mexico, and Mexico. Eisenhour (1997) completed a morphological study of western populations of the Speckled Chub, the results of which appeared thereafter in published form (Eisenhour 1999, 2004). He demonstrated the existence of five valid species west of the Mississippi River (aestivalis, marconis, australis, tetranema, hyostoma), of which the name aestivalis was shown to be restricted to the population occurring in the Rio Grande and the geographically adjacent Rio San Fernando system, in northeastern Mexico. Eisenhour (2004) considered populations throughout the middle Mississippi Valley and its major tributaries to be a single morphologically variable species (hyostoma), and he also indicated that populations of Macrhybopsis from eastern Gulf slope drainages may represent a complex of species. Genetic confirmation of Eisenhour's conclusions regarding western species appeared in the publication by Underwood et al. (2003), who also showed that western populations of M. hyostoma, as presently recognized, are genetically much more complex than previously considered.     Meanwhile, the present authors were involved in a companion study of eastern populations of Macrhybopsis, for which a genetic summary of the eastern Gulf coast species was published by Mayden & Powers (2004). Based on their findings, four species were recognized from southeastern drainages (identified as species A-D), although no formal taxonomic descriptions were included. Their genetic data, in combination with meristic, morphometric and other morphological data presented herein, form the basis for a revised classification of eastern Macrhybopsis populations

  1. The morphology and distribution of submerged reefs in the Maui-Nui Complex, Hawaii: New insights into their evolution since the Early Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faichney, Iain D.E.; Webster, James M.; Clague, David A.; Kelley, Chris; Applegate, Bruce; Moore, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Reef drowning and backstepping have long been recognised as reef responses to sea-level rise on subsiding margins. During the Late Pleistocene (~500–14 ka) Hawaiian reefs grew in response to rapid subsidence and 120 m 100 kyr sea-level cycles, with recent work on the submerged drowned reefs around the big island of Hawaii, and in other locations from the last deglacial, providing insight into reef development under these conditions. In contrast, reefs of the Early Pleistocene (~1.8–0.8 Ma) remain largely unexplored despite developing in response to significantly different 60–70 m 41 kyr sea-level cycles. The Maui-Nui Complex (MNC — forming the islands of Maui, Molokai, Lanai and Kahoolawe), provides a natural laboratory to study reef evolution throughout this time period as recent data indicate the reefs grew from 1.1 to 0.5 Ma. We use new high resolution bathymetric and backscatter data as well as sub-bottom profiling seismic data and field observations from ROV and submersible dives to make a detailed analysis of reef morphology and structure around the MNC. We focus specifically on the south-central region of the complex that provides the best reef exposure and find that the morphology of the reefs varies both regionally and temporally within this region. Barrier and pinnacle features dominate the steeper margins in the north of the study area whilst broad backstepping of the reefs is observed in the south. Within the Au'au channel in the central region between the islands, closely spaced reef and karst morphology indicates repeated subaerial exposure. We propose that this variation in the morphology and structure of the reefs within the MNC has been controlled by three main factors; the subsidence rate of the complex, the amplitude and period of eustatic sea-level cycles, and the slope and continuity of the basement substrate. We provide a model of reef development within the MNC over the last 1.2 Ma highlighting the effect that the interaction

  2. Species delimitation in the Gehyra nana (Squamata: Gekkonidae) complex: cryptic and divergent morphological evolution in the Australian Monsoonal Tropics, with the description of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Paul; Bourke, Gayleen; Tedeschi, Leonardo G; Pratt, Renae C; Oliver, Paul M; Palmer, Russell A; Moritz, Craig

    2018-04-04

    Recent advances in molecular genetic techniques and increased fine scale sampling in the Australian Monsoonal Tropics (AMT) have provided new impetus to reassess species boundaries in the Gehyra nana species complex, a clade of small-bodied, saxicolous geckos which are widely distributed across northern Australia. A recent phylogenomic analysis revealed eight deeply divergent lineages that occur as a series of overlapping distributions across the AMT and which, as a whole, are paraphyletic with four previously described species. Several of these lineages currently included in G. nana are phenotypically distinct, while others are highly conservative morphologically. Here we use an integrated approach to explore species delimitation in this complex. We redefine G. nana as a widespread taxon with complex genetic structure across the Kimberley of Western Australia and Top End of the Northern Territory, including a lineage with mtDNA introgressed from the larger-bodied G. multiporosa. We describe four new species with more restricted distributions within the G. nana complex. The new species are phylogenetically divergent and morphologically diagnosable, and include the relatively cryptic G. paranana sp. nov. from the western Northern Territory, the large-bodied G. pseudopunctata sp. nov. from the southern Kimberley ranges, G. granulum sp. nov., a small-bodied form with granules on the proximal lamellae from the north-west and southern Kimberley ranges and the small-bodied G. pluraporosa sp. nov. restricted to the northern Kimberley. Our revision largely stabilises the taxonomy of the G. nana complex, although further analyses of species limits among the remaining mostly parapatric lineages of G. nana sensu stricto are warranted.

  3. The spider Harpactea sadistica: co-evolution of traumatic insemination and complex female genital morphology in spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezác, Milan

    2009-08-07

    The males of invertebrates from a few phyla, including arthropods, have been reported to practise traumatic insemination (TI; i.e. injecting sperm by using the copulatory organ to penetrate the female's body wall). As all previously reported arthropod examples have been insects, there is considerable interest in whether TI might have evolved independently in other arthropods. The research reported here demonstrates the first case of TI in the arthropod subphylum Chelicerata, in particular how the genital morphology and mating behaviour of Harpactea sadistica (Rezác 2008), a spider from Israel, has become adapted specifically for reproduction based on TI. Males have needle-like intromittent organs and females have atrophied spermathecae. In other spiders, eggs are fertilized simultaneously with oviposition, but the eggs of H. sadistica are fertilized in the ovaries (internal fertilization) and develop as embryos before being laid. Sperm-storage organs of phylogenetically basal groups to H. sadistica provide males with last male sperm priority and allow removal of sperm by males that mate later, suggesting that TI might have evolved as an adaptive strategy to circumvent an unfavourable structure of the sperm-storage organs, allowing the first male to mate with paternity advantage. Understanding the functional significance of TI gives us insight into factors underlying the evolution of the genital and sperm-storage morphology in spiders.

  4. Crystallization features of normal alkanes in confined geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yunlan; Liu, Guoming; Xie, Baoquan; Fu, Dongsheng; Wang, Dujin

    2014-01-21

    How polymers crystallize can greatly affect their thermal and mechanical properties, which influence the practical applications of these materials. Polymeric materials, such as block copolymers, graft polymers, and polymer blends, have complex molecular structures. Due to the multiple hierarchical structures and different size domains in polymer systems, confined hard environments for polymer crystallization exist widely in these materials. The confined geometry is closely related to both the phase metastability and lifetime of polymer. This affects the phase miscibility, microphase separation, and crystallization behaviors and determines both the performance of polymer materials and how easily these materials can be processed. Furthermore, the size effect of metastable states needs to be clarified in polymers. However, scientists find it difficult to propose a quantitative formula to describe the transition dynamics of metastable states in these complex systems. Normal alkanes [CnH2n+2, n-alkanes], especially linear saturated hydrocarbons, can provide a well-defined model system for studying the complex crystallization behaviors of polymer materials, surfactants, and lipids. Therefore, a deeper investigation of normal alkane phase behavior in confinement will help scientists to understand the crystalline phase transition and ultimate properties of many polymeric materials, especially polyolefins. In this Account, we provide an in-depth look at the research concerning the confined crystallization behavior of n-alkanes and binary mixtures in microcapsules by our laboratory and others. Since 2006, our group has developed a technique for synthesizing nearly monodispersed n-alkane containing microcapsules with controllable size and surface porous morphology. We applied an in situ polymerization method, using melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and nonionic surfactants as emulsifiers. The solid shell of microcapsules can provide a stable three-dimensional (3-D

  5. Cellular internalization and morphological analysis after intravenous injection of a highly hydrophilic octahedral rhenium cluster complex - a new promising X-ray contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikova, Anna A; Solovieva, Anastasiya O; Trifonova, Kristina E; Brylev, Konstantin A; Ivanov, Anton A; Kim, Sung-Jin; Shestopalov, Michael A; Fufaeva, Maria S; Shestopalov, Alexander M; Mironov, Yuri V; Poveshchenko, Alexander F; Shestopalova, Lidia V

    2016-11-01

    The octahedral cluster compound Na 2 H 8 [{Re 6 Se 8 }(P(C 2 H 4 CONH 2 )(C 2 H 4 COO) 2 ) 6 ] has been shown to be highly radio dense, thus becoming a promising X-ray contrast agent. It was also shown that this compound had low cytotoxic effect in vitro, low acute toxicity in vivo and was eliminated rapidly from the body through the urinary tract. The present contribution describes a more detailed cellular internalization assay and morphological analysis after intravenous injection of this hexarhenium cluster compound at different doses. The median lethal dose (LD 50 ) of intravenously administrated compound was calculated (4.67 ± 0.69 g/kg). Results of the study clearly indicated that the cluster complex H n [{Re 6 Se 8 }(P(C 2 H 4 CONH 2 )(C 2 H 4 COO) 2 ) 6 ] n-10 was not internalized into cells in vitro and induced only moderate morphological alterations of kidneys at high doses without any changes in morphology of liver, spleen, duodenum, or heart of mice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. ATR confinement leakage determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, P.; Buescher, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    The air leakage rate from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) confinement is an important parameter in estimating hypothesized accidental releases of radiation to the environment. The leakage rate must be determined periodically to assure that the confinement has not degraded with time and such determination is one of the technical safety requirements of ATR operation. This paper reviews the methods of confinement leakage determination and presents an analysis of leakage determination under windy conditions, which can complicate the interpretation of the determined leakage rates. The paper also presents results of analyses of building air exchange under windy conditions. High wind can enhance air exchange and this could increase the release rates of radioisotopes following an accident

  7. Morphological and Phylogenetic Characterization of New Gephyrocapsa Isolates Suggests Introgressive Hybridization in the Emiliania/Gephyrocapsa Complex (Haptophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendif, El Mahdi; Probert, Ian; Young, Jeremy R; von Dassow, Peter

    2015-07-01

    The coccolithophore genus Gephyrocapsa contains a cosmopolitan assemblage of pelagic species, including the bloom-forming Gephyrocapsa oceanica, and is closely related to the emblematic coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi within the Noëlaerhabdaceae. These two species have been extensively studied and are well represented in culture collections, whereas cultures of other species of this family are lacking. We report on three new strains of Gephyrocapsa isolated into culture from samples from the Chilean coastal upwelling zone using a novel flow cytometric single-cell sorting technique. The strains were characterized by morphological analysis using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetic analysis of 6 genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, plastidial 16S and tufA, and mitochondrial cox1 and cox3 genes). Morphometric features of the coccoliths indicate that these isolates are distinct from G. oceanica and best correspond to G. muellerae. Surprisingly, both plastidial and mitochondrial gene phylogenies placed these strains within the E. huxleyi clade and well separated from G. oceanica isolates, making Emiliania appear polyphyletic. The only nuclear sequence difference, 1bp in the 28S rDNA region, also grouped E. huxleyi with the new Gephyrocapsa isolates and apart from G. oceanica. Specifically, the G. muellerae morphotype strains clustered with the mitochondrial β clade of E. huxleyi, which, like G. muellerae, has been associated with cold (temperate and sub-polar) waters. Among putative evolutionary scenarios that could explain these results we discuss the possibility that E. huxleyi is not a valid taxonomic unit, or, alternatively the possibility of past hybridization and introgression between each E. huxleyi clade and older Gephyrocapsa clades. In either case, the results support the transfer of Emiliania to Gephyrocapsa. These results have important implications for relating morphological species concepts to ecological and evolutionary units of diversity

  8. Effect of complexing agent TEA: The structural, morphological, topographical and optical properties of FexSx nano thin films deposited by SILAR technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, K.; Mani, P.; Surendra Dilip, C.; Valli, S.; Fermi Hilbert Inbaraj, P.; Joseph Prince, J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron sulfide thin films (Fe x S x ) (x = 0.05 M, 0.10 M, 0.15 M, 0.20 M and 0.25 M) were deposited by SILAR method from equimolar and equivolume aqueous solutions of ferrous nitrate and sodium sulfide with the addition of complexing agent TEA. The structural, morphological and optical characteristics of the films were derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV–vis spectral techniques. The mixed characteristics (crystalline and amorphous) of the deposited films and the increasing crystalline qualities with the concentrations were understood from the XRD analysis. The grain sizes and roughness of the films were decreases with the increasing concentration and also at the higher concentration films are shown by the same images presence of hexagonal like crystallite structure. The influence of complexing agent TEA on the surface roughness and morphological properties are confirmed by the atomic force microscope (AFM) results. The effect of increasing substrate concentration on the absorption and transmission measurements and its impact on the optical band-gap energy were enumerated from the UV–vis analysis.

  9. Effect of complexing agent TEA: The structural, morphological, topographical and optical properties of Fe{sub x}S{sub x} nano thin films deposited by SILAR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikandan, K., E-mail: 1984manikandan@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Anna University BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India); Mani, P. [Department of Physics, Anna University BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India); Surendra Dilip, C. [Department of Chemistry, Anna University BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India); Valli, S. [Department of Physics, M.I.E.T. Arts and Science College, Tiruchirappalli 620 007, Tamilnadu (India); Fermi Hilbert Inbaraj, P.; Joseph Prince, J. [Department of Physics, Anna University BIT Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamilnadu (India)

    2014-01-01

    Iron sulfide thin films (Fe{sub x}S{sub x}) (x = 0.05 M, 0.10 M, 0.15 M, 0.20 M and 0.25 M) were deposited by SILAR method from equimolar and equivolume aqueous solutions of ferrous nitrate and sodium sulfide with the addition of complexing agent TEA. The structural, morphological and optical characteristics of the films were derived from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV–vis spectral techniques. The mixed characteristics (crystalline and amorphous) of the deposited films and the increasing crystalline qualities with the concentrations were understood from the XRD analysis. The grain sizes and roughness of the films were decreases with the increasing concentration and also at the higher concentration films are shown by the same images presence of hexagonal like crystallite structure. The influence of complexing agent TEA on the surface roughness and morphological properties are confirmed by the atomic force microscope (AFM) results. The effect of increasing substrate concentration on the absorption and transmission measurements and its impact on the optical band-gap energy were enumerated from the UV–vis analysis.

  10. A functional monomer is not enough: principal component analysis of the influence of template complexation in pre-polymerization mixtures on imprinted polymer recognition and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golker, Kerstin; Karlsson, Björn C G; Rosengren, Annika M; Nicholls, Ian A

    2014-11-10

    In this report, principal component analysis (PCA) has been used to explore the influence of template complexation in the pre-polymerization phase on template molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) recognition and polymer morphology. A series of 16 bupivacaine MIPs were studied. The ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA)-crosslinked polymers had either methacrylic acid (MAA) or methyl methacrylate (MMA) as the functional monomer, and the stoichiometry between template, functional monomer and crosslinker was varied. The polymers were characterized using radioligand equilibrium binding experiments, gas sorption measurements, swelling studies and data extracted from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of all-component pre-polymerization mixtures. The molar fraction of the functional monomer in the MAA-polymers contributed to describing both the binding, surface area and pore volume. Interestingly, weak positive correlations between the swelling behavior and the rebinding characteristics of the MAA-MIPs were exposed. Polymers prepared with MMA as a functional monomer and a polymer prepared with only EGDMA were found to share the same characteristics, such as poor rebinding capacities, as well as similar surface area and pore volume, independent of the molar fraction MMA used in synthesis. The use of PCA for interpreting relationships between MD-derived descriptions of events in the pre-polymerization mixture, recognition properties and morphologies of the corresponding polymers illustrates the potential of PCA as a tool for better understanding these complex materials and for their rational design.

  11. A Functional Monomer Is Not Enough: Principal Component Analysis of the Influence of Template Complexation in Pre-Polymerization Mixtures on Imprinted Polymer Recognition and Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Golker

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this report, principal component analysis (PCA has been used to explore the influence of template complexation in the pre-polymerization phase on template molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP recognition and polymer morphology. A series of 16 bupivacaine MIPs were studied. The ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA-crosslinked polymers had either methacrylic acid (MAA or methyl methacrylate (MMA as the functional monomer, and the stoichiometry between template, functional monomer and crosslinker was varied. The polymers were characterized using radioligand equilibrium binding experiments, gas sorption measurements, swelling studies and data extracted from molecular dynamics (MD simulations of all-component pre-polymerization mixtures. The molar fraction of the functional monomer in the MAA-polymers contributed to describing both the binding, surface area and pore volume. Interestingly, weak positive correlations between the swelling behavior and the rebinding characteristics of the MAA-MIPs were exposed. Polymers prepared with MMA as a functional monomer and a polymer prepared with only EGDMA were found to share the same characteristics, such as poor rebinding capacities, as well as similar surface area and pore volume, independent of the molar fraction MMA used in synthesis. The use of PCA for interpreting relationships between MD-derived descriptions of events in the pre-polymerization mixture, recognition properties and morphologies of the corresponding polymers illustrates the potential of PCA as a tool for better understanding these complex materials and for their rational design.

  12. Confinement of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, J.

    1978-01-01

    Three quark models of hadron structure, which suggest an explanation of quarks confinement mechanism in hadrons are considered. Quark classifications, quark flawors and colours, symmetry model of hadron structure based on the colour theory of strong interaction are discussed. Diagrams of colour combinations of quarks and antiquarks, exchange of gluons, binding quarks in hadron. Quark confinement models based on the field theory, string model rotating and bag model are discussed. Diagrams of the colour charge distribution explaining the phenomena of infrared ''slavery'' and ultraviolet ''freedom'' are given. The models considered explain but some quark properties, creating prerequisites for the development of the consequent theory of hadron structure

  13. Dimensional Control and Morphological Transformations of Supramolecular Polymeric Nanofibers Based on Cofacially-Stacked Planar Amphiphilic Platinum(II) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Matthew E; Nazemi, Ali; Lunn, David J; Hayward, Dominic W; Boott, Charlotte E; Hsiao, Ming-Siao; Harniman, Robert L; Davis, Sean A; Whittell, George R; Richardson, Robert M; De Cola, Luisa; Manners, Ian

    2017-09-26

    Square-planar platinum(II) complexes often stack cofacially to yield supramolecular fiber-like structures with interesting photophysical properties. However, control over fiber dimensions and the resulting colloidal stability is limited. We report the self-assembly of amphiphilic Pt(II) complexes with solubilizing ancillary ligands based on polyethylene glycol [PEG n , where n = 16, 12, 7]. The complex with the longest solubilizing PEG ligand, Pt-PEG 16 , self-assembled to form polydisperse one-dimensional (1D) nanofibers (diameters fibers of length up to ca. 400 nm. The fiber lengths were dependent on the Pt-PEG 16 complex to seed mass ratio in a manner analogous to a living covalent polymerization of molecular monomers. Moreover, the fiber lengths were unchanged in solution after 1 week and were therefore "static" with respect to interfiber exchange processes on this time scale. In contrast, similarly formed near-uniform fibers of Pt-PEG 12 exhibited dynamic behavior that led to broadening of the length distribution within 48 h. After aging for 4 weeks in solution, Pt-PEG 12 fibers partially evolved into 2D platelets. Furthermore, self-assembly of Pt-PEG 7 yielded only transient fibers which rapidly evolved into 2D platelets. On addition of further fiber-forming Pt complex (Pt-PEG 16 ), the platelets formed assemblies via the growth of fibers selectively from their short edges. Our studies demonstrate that when interfiber dynamic exchange is suppressed, dimensional control and hierarchical structure formation are possible for supramolecular polymers through the use of kinetically controlled seeded growth methods.

  14. Hohlraum manufacture for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, L.R.; Gobby, P.; Bartos, J.

    1994-01-01

    Hohlraums are an integral part of indirect drive targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. Hohlraums are made by an electroforming process that combines elements of micromachining and coating technology. The authors describe how these target element are made and extension of the method that allow fabrication of other, more complex target components

  15. L2 speakers decompose morphologically complex verbs: fMRI evidence from priming of transparent derived verbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eDe Grauwe

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this fMRI long-lag priming study, we investigated the processing of Dutch semantically transparent, derived prefix verbs. In such words, the meaning of the word as a whole can be deduced from the meanings of its parts, e.g. wegleggen ‘put aside’. Many behavioral and some fMRI studies suggest that native (L1 speakers decompose transparent derived words. The brain region usually implicated in morphological decomposition is the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG. In non-native (L2 speakers, the processing of transparent derived words has hardly been investigated, especially in fMRI studies, and results are contradictory: Some studies find more reliance on holistic (i.e. non-decompositional processing by L2 speakers; some find no difference between L1 and L2 speakers. In this study, we wanted to find out whether Dutch transparent derived prefix verbs are decomposed or processed holistically by German L2 speakers of Dutch. Half of the derived verbs (e.g. omvallen ‘fall down’ were preceded by their stem (e.g. vallen ‘fall’ with a lag of 4 to 6 words (‘primed’; the other half (e.g. inslapen ‘fall asleep’ were not (‘unprimed’. L1 and L2 speakers of Dutch made lexical decisions on these visually presented verbs. Both ROI analyses and whole-brain analyses showed that there was a significant repetition suppression effect for primed compared to unprimed derived verbs in the LIFG. This was true both for the analyses over L2 speakers only and for the analyses over the two language groups together. The latter did not reveal any interaction with language group (L1 vs. L2 in the LIFG. Thus, L2 speakers show a clear priming effect in the LIFG, an area that has been associated with morphological decomposition. Our findings are consistent with the idea that L2 speakers engage in decomposition of transparent derived verbs rather than processing them holistically.

  16. Confinement for More Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kipnusu, Wycliffe K.; Elsayed, Mohamed; Kossack, Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Broadband dielectric spectroscopy and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy are employed to study the molecular dynamics and effective free volume of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) in the bulk state and when confined in unidirectional nanopores with average diameters of 4, 6, and 8 nm. Enhanced α...

  17. Disorder parameter of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Ejiri, S.; Matsubara, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    1996-01-01

    The disorder parameter of confinement-deconfinement phase transition based on the monopole action determined previously in SU(2) QCD are investigated. We construct an operator which corresponds to the order parameter defined in the abelian Higgs model. The operator shows proper behaviors as the disorder parameter in the numerical simulations of finite temperature QCD. (orig.)

  18. On confinement and duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strassler, M J [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2002-05-15

    Confinement in four-dimensional gauge theories is considered from several points of view. General features are discussed, and the mechanism of confinement is investigated. Dualities between field theories, and duality between field theory and string theory, are both put to use. In these lectures I have given an overview of some of the key ideas underlying confinement as a property of field theory, and now, of string theory as well. This is a tiny fraction of what field theory (and now string theory) is capable of, and we are still uncovering new features on a monthly basis. In fact, most field theories do not have confinement, for reasons entirely different from those of QCD. Many become nontrivial conformal field theories at low energy. Others become composite, weakly-coupled gauge theories. Dualities of many stripes are found everywhere. Ordinary dimensional analysis in string theory is totally wrong in the regime where it looks like weakly-coupled field theory, and ordinary dimensional analysis in field theory is totally wrong in the regime where it looks like weakly-coupled supergravity.

  19. Assessing species boundaries using multilocus species delimitation in a morphologically conserved group of neotropical freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex (Poeciliidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin C Bagley

    Full Text Available Accurately delimiting species is fundamentally important for understanding species diversity and distributions and devising effective strategies to conserve biodiversity. However, species delimitation is problematic in many taxa, including 'non-adaptive radiations' containing morphologically cryptic lineages. Fortunately, coalescent-based species delimitation methods hold promise for objectively estimating species limits in such radiations, using multilocus genetic data. Using coalescent-based approaches, we delimit species and infer evolutionary relationships in a morphologically conserved group of Central American freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex. Phylogenetic analyses of multiple genetic markers (sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes and five nuclear loci from 10/15 species and genetic lineages recognized in the group support the P. sphenops species complex as monophyletic with respect to outgroups, with eight mitochondrial 'major-lineages' diverged by ≥2% pairwise genetic distances. From general mixed Yule-coalescent models, we discovered (conservatively 10 species within our concatenated mitochondrial DNA dataset, 9 of which were strongly supported by subsequent multilocus Bayesian species delimitation and species tree analyses. Results suggested species-level diversity is underestimated or overestimated by at least ~15% in different lineages in the complex. Nonparametric statistics and coalescent simulations indicate genealogical discordance among our gene tree results has mainly derived from interspecific hybridization in the nuclear genome. However, mitochondrial DNA show little evidence for introgression, and our species delimitation results appear robust to effects of this process. Overall, our findings support the utility of combining multiple lines of genetic evidence and broad phylogeographical sampling to discover and validate species using coalescent-based methods. Our study also highlights the

  20. Studies on fluctuating asymmetry (FA for certain morphological traits in four species of the Drosophila bipectinata complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Parul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA is defined as subtle deviations from perfect bilateral symmetry, evident in differences between the right and the left sides of any given trait. It is a pattern of variation between sides and measures developmental instability. Differences in the level of FA may be used for comparing developmental precision among closely related species and thus may give an idea whether developmental stability was affected during the divergence and separation of populations into distinct species. Keeping this in view, FA was studied in four species of the Drosophila bipectinata complex i.e. D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata, D. malerkotliana and D. pseudoananassae. In females of all the four species, FA values did not vary significantly for any of the traits considered. However, in case of males, they varied significantly for Wing length (WL and sex comb tooth number (SCTN. Also, while in females Composite fluctuating asymmetry (CFA did not exhibit significant variation, in males it was found to vary significantly across the four species. However, Bonferroni t-tests did not reveal any consistent difference in FA levels between any two species. The magnitude of FA was found to differ significantly among traits and CFA values were found to be higher for males than females in all the four species. Therefore, it may be concluded that the level of FA shows trait specific variations and males are more prone to developmental perturbations. However, the FA levels are more or less similar in all the four species of this complex. Thus, developmental precision remains nearly same in all the four species of this complex irrespective of the degree of evolutionary divergence reached.

  1. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J Scott; Edwards, Danielle L; Fisher, Robert N; Harlow, Peter S

    2008-10-27

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  2. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J.S.; Edwards, D.L.; Fisher, R.N.; Harlow, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  3. Topology of polymer chains under nanoscale confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satarifard, Vahid; Heidari, Maziar; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Tans, Sander J; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Mashaghi, Alireza

    2017-08-24

    Spatial confinement limits the conformational space accessible to biomolecules but the implications for bimolecular topology are not yet known. Folded linear biopolymers can be seen as molecular circuits formed by intramolecular contacts. The pairwise arrangement of intra-chain contacts can be categorized as parallel, series or cross, and has been identified as a topological property. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we determine the contact order distributions and topological circuits of short semi-flexible linear and ring polymer chains with a persistence length of l p under a spherical confinement of radius R c . At low values of l p /R c , the entropy of the linear chain leads to the formation of independent contacts along the chain and accordingly, increases the fraction of series topology with respect to other topologies. However, at high l p /R c , the fraction of cross and parallel topologies are enhanced in the chain topological circuits with cross becoming predominant. At an intermediate confining regime, we identify a critical value of l p /R c , at which all topological states have equal probability. Confinement thus equalizes the probability of more complex cross and parallel topologies to the level of the more simple, non-cooperative series topology. Moreover, our topology analysis reveals distinct behaviours for ring- and linear polymers under weak confinement; however, we find no difference between ring- and linear polymers under strong confinement. Under weak confinement, ring polymers adopt parallel and series topologies with equal likelihood, while linear polymers show a higher tendency for series arrangement. The radial distribution analysis of the topology reveals a non-uniform effect of confinement on the topology of polymer chains, thereby imposing more pronounced effects on the core region than on the confinement surface. Additionally, our results reveal that over a wide range of confining radii, loops arranged in parallel and cross

  4. Lack of FTSH4 Protease Affects Protein Carbonylation, Mitochondrial Morphology, and Phospholipid Content in Mitochondria of Arabidopsis: New Insights into a Complex Interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smakowska, Elwira; Skibior-Blaszczyk, Renata; Czarna, Malgorzata; Kolodziejczak, Marta; Kwasniak-Owczarek, Malgorzata; Parys, Katarzyna; Funk, Christiane; Janska, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    FTSH4 is one of the inner membrane-embedded ATP-dependent metalloproteases in mitochondria of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In mutants impaired to express FTSH4, carbonylated proteins accumulated and leaf morphology was altered when grown under a short-day photoperiod, at 22°C, and a long-day photoperiod, at 30°C. To provide better insight into the function of FTSH4, we compared the mitochondrial proteomes and oxyproteomes of two ftsh4 mutants and wild-type plants grown under conditions inducing the phenotypic alterations. Numerous proteins from various submitochondrial compartments were observed to be carbonylated in the ftsh4 mutants, indicating a widespread oxidative stress. One of the reasons for the accumulation of carbonylated proteins in ftsh4 was the limited ATP-dependent proteolytic capacity of ftsh4 mitochondria, arising from insufficient ATP amount, probably as a result of an impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), especially complex V. In ftsh4, we further observed giant, spherical mitochondria coexisting among normal ones. Both effects, the increased number of abnormal mitochondria and the decreased stability/activity of the OXPHOS complexes, were probably caused by the lower amount of the mitochondrial membrane phospholipid cardiolipin. We postulate that the reduced cardiolipin content in ftsh4 mitochondria leads to perturbations within the OXPHOS complexes, generating more reactive oxygen species and less ATP, and to the deregulation of mitochondrial dynamics, causing in consequence the accumulation of oxidative damage. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Mesoscale simulations of confined Nafion thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanya, P.; Sharman, J.; Elliott, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The morphology and transport properties of thin films of the ionomer Nafion, with thicknesses on the order of the bulk cluster size, have been investigated as a model system to explain the anomalous behaviour of catalyst/electrode-polymer interfaces in membrane electrode assemblies. We have employed dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to investigate the interaction of water and fluorocarbon chains, with carbon and quartz as confining materials, for a wide range of operational water contents and film thicknesses. We found confinement-induced clustering of water perpendicular to the thin film. Hydrophobic carbon forms a water depletion zone near the film interface, whereas hydrophilic quartz results in a zone with excess water. There are, on average, oscillating water-rich and fluorocarbon-rich regions, in agreement with experimental results from neutron reflectometry. Water diffusivity shows increasing directional anisotropy of up to 30% with decreasing film thickness, depending on the hydrophilicity of the confining material. A percolation analysis revealed significant differences in water clustering and connectivity with the confining material. These findings indicate the fundamentally different nature of ionomer thin films, compared to membranes, and suggest explanations for increased ionic resistances observed in the catalyst layer.

  6. DLGS97/SAP97 is developmentally upregulated and is required for complex adult behaviors and synapse morphology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Topaz, Carolina; Urra, Francisco; Barría, Romina; Albornoz, Valeria; Ugalde, Diego; Thomas, Ulrich; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; Delgado, Ricardo; Kukuljan, Manuel; Sanxaridis, Parthena D; Tsunoda, Susan; Ceriani, M Fernanda; Budnik, Vivian; Sierralta, Jimena

    2008-01-02

    The synaptic membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) scaffolding protein family is thought to play key roles in synapse assembly and synaptic plasticity. Evidence supporting these roles in vivo is scarce, as a consequence of gene redundancy in mammals. The genome of Drosophila contains only one MAGUK gene, discs large (dlg), from which two major proteins originate: DLGA [PSD95 (postsynaptic density 95)-like] and DLGS97 [SAP97 (synapse-associated protein)-like]. These differ only by the inclusion in DLGS97 of an L27 domain, important for the formation of supramolecular assemblies. Known dlg mutations affect both forms and are lethal at larval stages attributable to tumoral overgrowth of epithelia. We generated independent null mutations for each, dlgA and dlgS97. These allowed unveiling of a shift in expression during the development of the nervous system: predominant expression of DLGA in the embryo, balanced expression of both during larval stages, and almost exclusive DLGS97 expression in the adult brain. Loss of embryonic DLGS97 does not alter the development of the nervous system. At larval stages, DLGA and DLGS97 fulfill both unique and partially redundant functions in the neuromuscular junction. Contrary to dlg and dlgA mutants, dlgS97 mutants are viable to adulthood, but they exhibit marked alterations in complex behaviors such as phototaxis, circadian activity, and courtship, whereas simpler behaviors like locomotion and odor and light perception are spared. We propose that the increased repertoire of associations of a synaptic scaffold protein given by an additional domain of protein-protein interaction underlies its ability to integrate molecular networks required for complex functions in adult synapses.

  7. Novel and facile method, dynamic self-assemble, to prepare SnO₂/rGO droplet aerogel with complex morphologies and their application in supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingxi; Wang, Huan; Li, Lingzhi; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yu; Wang, Wei; Gao, Jianping

    2014-08-27

    A facile and novel method to prepare SnO2/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) droplet aerogels with complex morphologies had been developed. This method has been named dynamic self-assemble. Aerogels with both "egg-tart" and "mushroom" shapes were obtained by this method. The changes in the graphene oxide (GO) droplet morphologies during the dynamic process of a GO droplet falling into a SnCl2 target solution were monitored using a high speed camera. The formed SnO2/rGO aerogels were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The microstructures of the SnO2/rGO aerogels were observed with scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, the SnO2/rGO droplet aerogels were used as the electrode material in a symmetrical two-electrode supercapacitor and the electrochemical performance of the supercapacitor was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge methods. The SnO2/rGO electrodes demonstrated excellent electrochemical performance and stability. At a scan rate of 5 mV/s, their highest gravimetric and volumetric specific capacitances were 310 F/g and 180 F/cm(3), respectively, and their energy and power densities were as high as 30 Wh·kg(-1) and 8.3 kW·kg(-1), respectively.

  8. Phase transitions and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.M.; Gava, E.

    1978-02-01

    The publication collects six lectures on the following themes: quantum field theory and classical statistical mechanics, continuous symmetries, lattice gauge theories, the nature of confinement, a criterion for confinement and non-abelian Yang-Mills theories

  9. Formation of complex wedding-cake morphologies during homoepitaxial film growth of Ag on Ag(111): atomistic, step-dynamics, and continuum modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Maozhi; Han, Yong; Thiel, P A; Evans, J W

    2009-01-01

    An atomistic lattice-gas model is developed which successfully describes all key features of the complex mounded morphologies which develop during deposition of Ag films on Ag(111) surfaces. We focus on this homoepitaxial thin film growth process below 200 K. The unstable multilayer growth mode derives from the presence of a large Ehrlich-Schwoebel step-edge barrier, for which we characterize both the step-orientation dependence and the magnitude. Step-dynamics modeling is applied to further characterize and elucidate the evolution of the vertical profiles of these wedding-cake-like mounds. Suitable coarse-graining of these step-dynamics equations leads to instructive continuum formulations for mound evolution.

  10. Qualitative quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.L.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared limit in asymptotically free non-abelian gauge theories using recently developed non-perturbative methods which allow derivation of zero momentum theorems for Green's functions and vertices is described. These low-energy theorems are compared to the infrared behavior predicted from the renormalization group equation when the existence of an infrared fixed point is assumed. A set of objects is exhibited whose low energy theorems violate the scaling behavior predicted by the renormalization group. This shows that the assumed fixed point cannot exist and that in the Landau gauge the effective charge becomes infinite in the infrared. Qualitatively this implies that as an attempt is made to separate elementary quanta the interaction between the quanta becomes arbitrarily strong. This indicates at least that the theories studied are capable of color confinement. Results are true only for theories with large numbers of quarks. This opens the possibility that large numbers of quarks are actually necessary for confinement

  11. Topological confinement and superconductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-hassanieh, Dhaled A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Cristian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We derive a Kondo Lattice model with a correlated conduction band from a two-band Hubbard Hamiltonian. This mapping allows us to describe the emergence of a robust pairing mechanism in a model that only contains repulsive interactions. The mechanism is due to topological confinement and results from the interplay between antiferromagnetism and delocalization. By using Density-Matrix-Renormalization-Group (DMRG) we demonstrate that this mechanism leads to dominant superconducting correlations in aID-system.

  12. Innovative confinement concepts workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Innovative Confinement Concepts Workshop occurred in California during the week preceding the Second Symposium on Current Trends in International Fusion Research. An informal report was made to the Second Symposium. A summary of the Workshop concluded that some very promising ideas were presented, that innovative concept development is a central element of the restructured US DOE. Fusion Energy Sciences program, and that the Workshop should promote real scientific progress in fusion

  13. Confined exciton spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Clivia M.S.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In this work, the exciton is considered as a sensor of the electronic and optical properties of materials such as semiconductors, which have size compared to the exciton De Broglie wavelength, approximately 20 nm, depending on the semiconductor. Examples of electron-phonon, electron-electron, photon-electron, exciton-polariton, phonon-plasmon, are presented, under different confinement conditions such as quantum wells, superlattices

  14. Helical Confinement Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beidler, C; Brakel, R; Burhenn, R; Dinklage, A; Erckmann, V; Feng, Y; Geiger, J; Hartmann, D; Hirsch, M; Jaenicke, R; Koenig, R; Laqua, H P; Maassberg, H; Wagner, F; Weller, A; Wobig, H [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Stellarators, conceived 1951 by Lyman Spitzer in Princeton, are toroidal devices that confine a plasma in a magnetic field which originates from currents in coils outside the plasma. A plasma current driven by external means, for example by an ohmic transformer, is not required for confinement. Supplying the desired poloidal field component by external coils leads to a helically structured plasma topology. Thus stellarators - or helical confinement devices - are fully three-dimensional in contrast to the toroidal (rotational) symmetry of tokamaks. As stellarators can be free of an inductive current, whose radial distribution depends on the plasma parameters, their equilibrium must not be established via the evolving plasma itself, but to a first order already given by the vacuum magnetic field. They do not need an active control (like positional feedback) and therefore cannot suffer from its failure. The outstanding conceptual advantage of stellarators is the potential of steady state plasma operation without current drive. As there is no need for current drive, the recirculating power is expected to be smaller than in equivalent tokamaks. The lack of a net current avoids current driven instabilities; specifically, no disruptions, no resistive wall modes and no conventional or neoclassical tearing modes appear. Second order pressure-driven currents (Pfirsch-Schlueter, bootstrap) exist but they can be modified and even minimized by the magnetic design. The magnetic configuration of helical devices naturally possesses a separatrix, which allows the implementation of a helically structured divertor for exhaust and impurity control. (author)

  15. Complex Morphology of Subducted Lithosphere in the Mantle below the Molucca Collision Zone from Non-linear Seismic Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Widiyantoro

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Results of seismic studies presented in previous publications depict two opposing subducted oceanic lithospheric slabs under the Molucca region. This unique structure is related to the arc-arc collision between the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs. Recently, we have revisited the complex subduction zone structure by employing a non-linear tomographic imaging technique in which 3-D ray tracing has been implemented. We have used P- as well as S-wave arrival times from carefully reprocessed global data set. The results provide some improvements in the positioning of wave-speed anomalies. Consistent with earlier results, the new P-wave model depicts the two opposing subducted slabs of the Molucca Sea plate. The intriguing new observation is that the westward dipping slab appears to penetrate into the lower mantle by taking the form of folded slab. We envisage that the folding behavior may have been caused by the shift of the whole subduction system in the Molucca region toward the Eurasian continent due to the westward thrust of the Pacific plate combined with the large left-lateral movement of the Sorong fault. The inversion of travel-time residuals of direct S phases strongly confirms the new observation.

  16. Pattern replication by confined dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, S.; Schäffer, E.; Morariu, M.D.; Steiner, U

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of a polymer film in a confined geometry was employed in a pattern-replication process. The instability of dewetting films is pinned by a structured confining surface, thereby replicating its topographic pattern. Depending on the surface energy of the confining surface, two different

  17. Winter storm-induced hydrodynamics and morphological response of a shallow transgressive shoal complex: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siadatmousavi, S. Mostafa; Jose, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Using extended deployments during seasons of low and high discharge from the Atchafalaya River, meteorological, hydrodynamic and bottom boundary layer parameters were monitored from Tiger and Trinity Shoal complex, off Louisiana coast, USA. During winter storms, the surface current speed measured at both shoals exceeded 0.5 m/s and the entire water column followed the prevailing wind direction. The current speed close to the bottom exceeded 0.3 m/s during high energy northerly winds. The mean water level in the shoal complex increased during southerly winds and decreased during northerly winds, such that the difference between wind set-up and set-down exceeded 0.7 m in Tiger Shoal and 0.6 m in Trinity Shoal during high energy frontal passages. The swell height was inversely correlated with mean water level, and increased during pre-frontal phase and decreased during post-frontal phase of winter storms. The sea (short waves) height responded quickly to wind direction and speed; and within a few hours after the wind shifted and blowing from the north, the sea height increased during both deployments. Bimodal wave frequency spectrum was observed during wind veering from southerly to northerly, when both sea and swell intensities were significant. The Tiger Shoal bed sediment texture transformed drastically, from mud to shell and shell hash assemblage, within a period of two weeks during the December 2008 deployment. Backscatter signal intensity from a Pulse Coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (PCADP) and its velocity estimates were used to determine the vertical extend and timing of mud resuspension and their eventual flushing out from the shoal environment, when exposed to high energy winter storm passages. The computed time frame for a total transformation of bottom sediment texture (from muddy bottom to shell and shell hash assemblage) was supported by the combined wave and bottom current induced shear stress at shoal bed. The bed samples collected from Tiger Shoal

  18. Inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.

    1977-01-01

    The principal goal of the inertial confinement fusion program is the development of a practical fusion power plant in this century. Rapid progress has been made in the four major areas of ICF--targets, drivers, fusion experiments, and reactors. High gain targets have been designed. Laser, electron beam, and heavy ion accelerator drivers appear to be feasible. Record-breaking thermonuclear conditions have been experimentally achieved. Detailed diagnostics of laser implosions have confirmed predictions of the LASNEX computer program. Experimental facilities are being planned and constructed capable of igniting high gain fusion microexplosions in the mid 1980's. A low cost long lifetime reactor design has been developed

  19. Confinement and 4-manifolds

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    In this talk I will survey a connection between two very challenging problems, one in physics and one in math. The physics problem involves quantitative understanding of confinement in a system with least amount of supersymmetry that has been studied so far and that has a wide range of applications, from semi-realistic string models to qualitatively new examples of gauge-gravity duality. Surprisingly, the rich physics of this system translates into incredibly rich mathematics of the only remaining unsolved case of the Poincare conjecture.

  20. Hadrosynthesis and Quark Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satz Helmut

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Multihadron production in high energy collisions, from e+e− annihilation to heavy ion interactions, shows remarkable thermal behaviour, specified by a universal “Hagedorn” temperature. We argue that this hadronic radiation is formed by tunnelling through the event horizon of colour confinement, i.e., that it is the QCD counterpart of Hawking-Unruh radiation from black holes. It is shown to be emitted at a universal temperature TH ≃ (σ/2π1/2, where σ denotes the string tension. Since the event horizon does not allow information transfer, the radiation is thermal “at birth”.

  1. Minimal quantization and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, N.P.; Kalinowskij, Yu.L.; Nguyen Suan Han; Pervushin, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    A ''minimal'' version of the Hamiltonian quantization based on the explicit solution of the Gauss equation and on the gauge-invariance principle is considered. By the example of the one-particle Green function we show that the requirement for gauge invariance leads to relativistic covariance of the theory and to more proper definition of the Faddeev - Popov integral that does not depend on the gauge choice. The ''minimal'' quantization is applied to consider the gauge-ambiguity problem and a new topological mechanism of confinement

  2. Greater-confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevorrow, L.E.; Schubert, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Greater-confinement disposal (GCD) is a general term for low-level waste (LLW) disposal technologies that employ natural and/or engineered barriers and provide a degree of confinement greater than that of shallow-land burial (SLB) but possibly less than that of a geologic repository. Thus GCD is associated with lower risk/hazard ratios than SLB. Although any number of disposal technologies might satisfy the definition of GCD, eight have been selected for consideration in this discussion. These technologies include: (1) earth-covered tumuli, (2) concrete structures, both above and below grade, (3) deep trenches, (4) augered shafts, (5) rock cavities, (6) abandoned mines, (7) high-integrity containers, and (8) hydrofracture. Each of these technologies employ several operations that are mature,however, some are at more advanced stages of development and demonstration than others. Each is defined and further described by information on design, advantages and disadvantages, special equipment requirements, and characteristic operations such as construction, waste emplacement, and closure

  3. Self-Assembly of Diblock Molecular Polymer Brushes in the Spherical Confinement of Nanoemulsion Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Andrea; Pelras, Théophile; Chakroun, Ramzi; Gröschel, André H; Müllner, Markus

    2018-05-02

    Understanding the self-assembly behavior of polymers of various topologies is key to a reliable design of functional polymer materials. Self-assembly under confinement conditions emerges as a versatile avenue to design polymer particles with complex internal morphologies while simultaneously facilitating scale-up. However, only linear block copolymers have been studied to date, despite the increasing control over macromolecule composition and architecture available. This study extends the investigation of polymer self-assembly in confinement from regular diblock copolymers to diblock molecular polymer brushes (MPBs). Block-type MPBs with polystyrene (PS) and polylactide (PLA) compartments of different sizes are incorporated into surfactant-stabilized oil-in-water (chloroform/water) emulsions. The increasing confinement in the nanoemulsion droplets during solvent evaporation directs the MPBs to form solid nano/microparticles. Microscopy studies reveal an intricate internal particle structure, including interpenetrating networks and axially stacked lamellae of PS and PLA, depending on the PS/PLA ratio of the brushes. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Electrostatic-Dipole (ED) Fusion Confinement Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George H.; Shrestha, Prajakti J.; Yang, Yang; Thomas, Robert

    2004-11-01

    The Electrostatic-Dipole (ED) concept significantly differs from a "pure" dipole confinement device [1] in that the charged particles are preferentially confined to the high-pressure region interior of the dipole coil by the assistance of a surrounding spherical electrostatic grid. In present ED experiments, a current carrying coil is embedded inside the grid of an IEC such as to produce a magnetic dipole field. Charged particles are injected axisymmetrically from an ion gun (or duo-plasmatron) into the center of the ED confinement grid/dipole ring where they oscillate along the magnetic field lines and pass the peak field region at the center of the dipole region. As particles begin accelerating away from the center region towards the outer electrostatic grid region, they encounter a strong electrostatic potential (order of 10's of kilovolts) retarding force. The particles then decelerate, reverse direction and re-enter the dipole field region where again magnetic confinement dominates. This process continues, emulating a complex harmonic oscillator motion. The resulting pressure profile averaged over the field curvature offers good plasma stability in the ED configuration. The basic concept and results from preliminary experiments will be described. [1] M.E. Mauel, et al. "Dipole Equilibrium and Stability," 18th IAEA Conference of Plasma Phys. and Control. Nuclear Fusion, Varenna, Italy 2000, IAEA-F1-CN-70/TH

  5. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  6. Inertial confinement fusion target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourdier, A.

    2001-12-01

    A simple, zero-dimensional model describing the temporal behaviour of an imploding-shell, magnetized fuel inertial confinement fusion target is formulated. The addition of a magnetic field to the fuel reduces thermal conduction losses. As a consequence, it might lead to high gains and reduce the driver requirements. This beneficial effect of the magnetic field on thermonuclear gains is confirmed qualitatively by the zero-dimensional model results. Still, the extent of the initial-condition space for which significant gains can occur is not, by far, as large as previously reported. One-dimensional CEA code simulations which confirm this results are also presented. Finally, we suggest to study the approach proposed by Hasegawa. In this scheme, the laser target is not imploded, and the life-time of the plasma can be very much increased. (author)

  7. Femtochemistry of confined water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douhal, A.; Carranza, M. A.; Sanz, M.; Organero, J. A.; Santos, L.

    In this contribution, we applied ultrafast spectroscopy to study the H-bond network of water confined in nanostructures (Cyclodextrins and Micelles). We examine the effect of caging on ultrafast reaction dynamics and discuss the related processes under different experimental conditions. The results show an ultrafast dynamic giving birth to intermediates of the probe, which show femtosecond and picosecond dynamics leading to the final structure at the excited state. The results show the high sensitivity of the used technique in detecting small of water. This work was supported by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MCYT, Spain) and ``Conserjería de Ciencia y Tecnologia de la JCCM, Spain'' through projects MAT2002-01829 and PAI-02-004.

  8. Section 1. Confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Major experimental and theoretical results achieved by the Controlled Thermonuclear Research (CTR) program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory during FY 1975 gave the greatest encouragement to date that the ultimate goal of a deuterium-tritium-fueled mirror reactor can be reached. In the experimental program, the year was characterized by unusually important physics results from the 2XIIB experiment and by significant steps in the plan to change the Baseball II mode of operation. The stabilization of ion-cyclotron instabilities in the 2XIIB experiment by the introduction of an auxiliary warm plasma permitted the buildup of a high-temperature, high-density plasma with an n tau parameter an order of magnitude larger than the 2XII experiment.I In the Baseball II experiment, preliminary tests and computer predictions indicated that a dense, transient, target plasma can be created by laser irradiation of a pellet in midflight through the center of the Baseball confinement zone

  9. Effects of knee immobilization on morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex after hamstring harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Evaluation using three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamae, Atsuo; Adachi, Nobuo; Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Nishimori, Makoto; Ochi, Mitsuo; Deie, Masataka

    2012-01-01

    It is desirable to maintain the morphology of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex after tendon harvesting for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of knee immobilization on morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. In total, 39 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with autologous semitendinosus tendons were included in this study. After surgery, the knee was immobilized for 3 days in 1 group of patients (group 1; 24 patients; control group) and for a longer period (10-14 days) in the other group (group 2; 15 patients). Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D CT) examination was performed at 6 and/or 12 months after the surgery for all patients. Morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex (proximal shift of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon junction, width of the regenerated semitendinosus tendons, re-insertion sites of the regenerated tendons, and rate of semitendinosus tendon regeneration) were evaluated. Successful regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was confirmed in all patients in group 2. In group 1, 3D CT showed that regeneration of the semitendinosus tendon was unsuccessful in 1 of the 24 patients. The average length of the proximal shift of the semitendinosus muscle-tendon junction was 7.3±2.5 cm in group 1 and 7.2±1.9 cm in group 2. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with regard to the morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. This study showed that the structure of regenerated tendons could be clearly identified in 38 of 39 cases (97.4%) after ACL reconstruction. However, prolonged knee immobilization (10-14 days) could not prevent morphological changes in the semitendinosus muscle-tendon complex. (author)

  10. Confinement at large-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkhamer, F.R.

    1985-06-01

    Recent numerical results indicate that QCD in the limit of an infinite number (N) of colors also has confinement and moreover that it looks rather similar to normal QCD with N = 3 colors. This imposes severe restrictions on what the mechanism of confinement can be

  11. Gravitationally confined relativistic neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayenas, C. G.; Fokas, A. S.; Grigoriou, D.

    2017-09-01

    Combining special relativity, the equivalence principle, and Newton’s universal gravitational law with gravitational rather than rest masses, one finds that gravitational interactions between relativistic neutrinos with kinetic energies above 50 MeV are very strong and can lead to the formation of gravitationally confined composite structures with the mass and other properties of hadrons. One may model such structures by considering three neutrinos moving symmetrically on a circular orbit under the influence of their gravitational attraction, and by assuming quantization of their angular momentum, as in the Bohr model of the H atom. The model contains no adjustable parameters and its solution, using a neutrino rest mass of 0.05 eV/c2, leads to composite state radii close to 1 fm and composite state masses close to 1 GeV/c2. Similar models of relativistic rotating electron - neutrino pairs give a mass of 81 GeV/c2, close to that of W bosons. This novel mechanism of generating mass suggests that the Higgs mass generation mechanism can be modeled as a latent gravitational field which gets activated by relativistic neutrinos.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuckolls, J.H.; Wood, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Edward Teller has been a strong proponent of harnessing nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes. There are two approaches: Plowshare, which utilizes macro- explosions, and inertial confinement fusion, which utilizes microexplosions. The development of practical fusion power plants is a principal goal of the inertial program. It is remarkable that Teller's original thermonuclear problem, how to make super high yield nuclear explosions, and the opposite problem, how to make ultra low yield nuclear explosions, may both be solved by Teller's radiation implosion scheme. This paper reports on the essential physics of these two thermonuclear domains, which are separated by nine orders of magnitude in yield, provided by Teller's similarity theorem and its exceptions. Higher density makes possible thermonuclear burn of smaller masses of fuel. The leverage is high: the scale of the explosion diminishes with the square of the increase in density. The extraordinary compressibility of matter, first noticed by Teller during the Los Alamos atomic bomb program, provides an almost incredible opportunity to harness fusion. The energy density of thermonuclear fuels isentropically compressed to super high-- -densities---even to ten thousand times solid density---is small compared to the energy density at thermonuclear ignition temperatures. In small masses of fuel imploded to these super high matter densities, the energy required to achieve ignition may be greatly reduced by exploiting thermonuclear propagation from a relatively small hot spot

  13. Thermostating highly confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Stefano; Todd, B D; Searles, Debra J

    2010-06-28

    In this work we show how different use of thermostating devices and modeling of walls influence the mechanical and dynamical properties of confined nanofluids. We consider a two dimensional fluid undergoing Couette flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Because the system is highly inhomogeneous, the density shows strong fluctuations across the channel. We compare the dynamics produced by applying a thermostating device directly to the fluid with that obtained when the wall is thermostated, considering also the effects of using rigid walls. This comparison involves an analysis of the chaoticity of the fluid and evaluation of mechanical properties across the channel. We look at two thermostating devices with either rigid or vibrating atomic walls and compare them with a system only thermostated by conduction through vibrating atomic walls. Sensitive changes are observed in the xy component of the pressure tensor, streaming velocity, and density across the pore and the Lyapunov localization of the fluid. We also find that the fluid slip can be significantly reduced by rigid walls. Our results suggest caution in interpreting the results of systems in which fluid atoms are thermostated and/or wall atoms are constrained to be rigid, such as, for example, water inside carbon nanotubes.

  14. What happens to the triangular fibrocartilage complex during pronation and supination of the forearm? Analysis of its morphology and diagnostic assessment with MR arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Service de Radiologie, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Botte, M.J. [Div. of Orthopedic Surgery, Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2001-12-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dynamic morphologic changes of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) during pronation and supination of the forearm using high-resolution MR arthrography in cadavers and to evaluate the impact of these changes on the diagnostic assessment of the normal and abnormal TFCC. Design and specimens: High-resolution MR arthrography of 10 wrists of cadaveric specimens was obtained in maximum pronation, in the neutral position, and in maximum supination of the forearm. The structures of the TFCC were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and correlated with anatomic sections. The position of the forearm that allowed the best visualization of normal structures and lesions of the TFCC was determined. Results: The shape and extent of the articular disc as well as the radial portions of the radioulnar ligaments did not change with pronation and supination. The articular disc was horizontal in the neutral position and tilted more distally to align with the proximal carpal row in pronation and supination. The fibers of the ulnar part of the radioulnar ligaments (ulnar attachment of the articular disc) revealed the most significant changes: their orientation was coronal in the neutral position and sagittal in positions of pronation and supination. The ulnomeniscal homologue was largest in the neutral position and was reduced in size during pronation and supination. The extensor carpi ulnaris tendon was centered in its groove in the neutral position and pronation. In supination this tendon revealed subluxation from this groove. The dorsal capsule of the distal radioulnar joint was taut in pronation, and the palmar capsule was taut in supination. The preferred forearm position for analysis of most of the structures of the TFCC was the neutral position, followed by the pronated position. The neutral position was rated best for the detection of ulnar and radial detachments of the TFCC, followed by the pronated position, except for two central

  15. The role of particle jamming on the formation and stability of step-pool morphology: insight from a reduced-complexity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletti, M.; Molnar, P.; Hassan, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Granular processes have been recognized as key drivers in earth surface dynamics, especially in steep landscapes because of the large size of sediment found in channels. In this work we focus on step-pool morphologies, studying the effect of particle jamming on step formation. Starting from the jammed-state hypothesis, we assume that grains generate steps because of particle jamming and those steps are inherently more stable because of additional force chains in the transversal direction. We test this hypothesis with a particle-based reduced-complexity model, CAST2, where sediment is organized in patches and entrainment, transport and deposition of grains depend on flow stage and local topography through simplified phenomenological rules. The model operates with 2 grain sizes: fine grains, that can be mobilized both my large and moderate flows, and coarse grains, mobile only during large floods. First, we identify the minimum set of processes necessary to generate and maintain steps in a numerical channel: (a) occurrence of floods, (b) particle jamming, (c) low sediment supply, and (d) presence of sediment with different entrainment probabilities. Numerical results are compared with field observations collected in different step-pool channels in terms of step density, a variable that captures the proportion of the channel occupied by steps. Not only the longitudinal profiles of numerical channels display step sequences similar to those observed in real step-pool streams, but also the values of step density are very similar when all the processes mentioned before are considered. Moreover, with CAST2 it is possible to run long simulations with repeated flood events, to test the effect of flood frequency on step formation. Numerical results indicate that larger step densities belong to system more frequently perturbed by floods, compared to system having a lower flood frequency. Our results highlight the important interactions between external hydrological forcing and

  16. BY FRUSTUM CONFINING VESSEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Khazaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helical piles are environmentally friendly and economical deep foundations that, due to environmental considerations, are excellent additions to a variety of deep foundation alternatives available to the practitioner. Helical piles performance depends on soil properties, the pile geometry and soil-pile interaction. Helical piles can be a proper alternative in sensitive environmental sites if their bearing capacity is sufficient to support applied loads. The failure capacity of helical piles in this study was measured via an experimental research program that was carried out by Frustum Confining Vessel (FCV. FCV is a frustum chamber by approximately linear increase in vertical and lateral stresses along depth from top to bottom. Due to special geometry and applied bottom pressure, this apparatus is a proper choice to test small model piles which can simulate field stress conditions. Small scale helical piles are made with either single helix or more helixes and installed in fine grained sand with three various densities. Axial loading tests including compression and tension tests were performed to achieve pile ultimate capacity. The results indicate the helical piles behavior depends essentially on pile geometric characteristics, i.e. helix configuration and soil properties. According to the achievements, axial uplift capacity of helical model piles is about equal to usual steel model piles that have the helixes diameter. Helical pile compression bearing capacity is too sufficient to act as a medium pile, thus it can be substituted other piles in special geoenvironmental conditions. The bearing capacity also depends on spacing ratio, S/D, and helixes diameter.

  17. Unconfined versus confined speleogenetic settings: variations of solution porosity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimchouk Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Speleogenesis in confined settings generates cave morphologies that differ much from those formed in unconfined settings. Cavesdeveloped in unconfined settings are characterised by broadly dendritic patterns of channels due to highly competing development.In contrast, caves originated under confined conditions tend to form two- or three-dimensional mazes with densely packed conduits.This paper illustrates variations of solution (channel porosity resulted from speleogenesis in unconfined and confined settings by theanalysis of morphometric parameters of typical cave patterns. Two samples of typical cave systems formed in the respective settingsare compared. The sample that represents unconfined speleogenesis consists of solely limestone caves, whereas gypsum cavesof this type tend to be less dendritic and more linear. The sample that represents confined speleogenesis consists of both limestoneand gypsum maze caves. The comparison shows considerable differences in average values of some parameters between thesettings. Passage network density (the ratio of the cave length to the area of the cave field, km/km2 is one order of magnitudegreater in confined settings than in unconfined (average 167.3 km/km2 versus 16.6 km/km2. Similarly, an order of magnitudedifference is observed in cave porosity (a fraction of the volume of a cave block, occupied by mapped cavities; 5.0 % versus 0.4 %.This illustrates that storage in maturely karstified confined aquifers is generally much greater than in unconfined. The average areal coverage (a fraction of the area of the cave field occupied by passages in a plan view is about 5 times greater in confined settingsthan in unconfined (29.7 % versus 6.4 %. This indicates that conduit permeability in confined aquifers is appreciably easier to targetwith drilling than the widely spaced conduits in unconfined aquifers.

  18. Automated entry technologies for confined space work activities: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Lucia; Ferrari, Emilio; Mora, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Work in confined spaces poses a significant risk to workers and rescuers involved in the emergency response when an accident occurs. Despite several standards and regulations define the safety requirements for such activities, injuries, and fatalities still occur. Furthermore, the on-site inspections after accidents often reveal that both employers and employees fail to implement safe entry procedures. Removing the risk is possible by avoiding the worker entry, but many activities require the presence of the operator inside the confined space to perform manual tasks. The following study investigates the available technologies for hazardous confined space work activities, e.g., cleaning, inspecting, and maintenance tasks. The aim is to provide a systematic review of the automated solutions for high-risk activities in confined spaces, considering the non-man entry as the most effective confined space safety strategy. Second, this survey aims to provide suggestions for future research addressing the design of new technologies. The survey consists of about 60 papers concerning innovative technologies for confined space work activities. The document review shows that several solutions have been developed and automation can replace the workers for a limited number of hazardous tasks. Several activities still require the manual intervention due to the complex characteristics of confined spaces, e.g., to remove the remains of the automatic cleaning process from the bottom of a tank. The results show that available technologies require more flexibility to adapt to such occupational environments and further research is needed.

  19. The role of confined collagen geometry in decreasing nucleation energy barriers to intrafibrillar mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doyoon; Lee, Byeongdu; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Jun, Young-Shin

    2018-03-06

    Mineralization of collagen is critical for the mechanical functions of bones and teeth. Calcium phosphate nucleation in collagenous structures follows distinctly different patterns in highly confined gap regions (nanoscale confinement) than in less confined extrafibrillar spaces (microscale confinement). Although the mechanism(s) driving these differences are still largely unknown, differences in the free energy for nucleation may explain these two mineralization behaviors. Here, we report on experimentally obtained nucleation energy barriers to intra- and extrafibrillar mineralization, using in situ X-ray scattering observations and classical nucleation theory. Polyaspartic acid, an extrafibrillar nucleation inhibitor, increases interfacial energies between nuclei and mineralization fluids. In contrast, the confined gap spaces inside collagen fibrils lower the energy barrier by reducing the reactive surface area of nuclei, decreasing the surface energy penalty. The confined gap geometry, therefore, guides the two-dimensional morphology and structure of bioapatite and changes the nucleation pathway by reducing the total energy barrier.

  20. Simulating tumor growth in confined heterogeneous environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevertz, Jana L; Torquato, Salvatore; Gillies, George T

    2008-01-01

    The holy grail of computational tumor modeling is to develop a simulation tool that can be utilized in the clinic to predict neoplastic progression and propose individualized optimal treatment strategies. In order to develop such a predictive model, one must account for many of the complex processes involved in tumor growth. One interaction that has not been incorporated into computational models of neoplastic progression is the impact that organ-imposed physical confinement and heterogeneity have on tumor growth. For this reason, we have taken a cellular automaton algorithm that was originally designed to simulate spherically symmetric tumor growth and generalized the algorithm to incorporate the effects of tissue shape and structure. We show that models that do not account for organ/tissue geometry and topology lead to false conclusions about tumor spread, shape and size. The impact that confinement has on tumor growth is more pronounced when a neoplasm is growing close to, versus far from, the confining boundary. Thus, any clinical simulation tool of cancer progression must not only consider the shape and structure of the organ in which a tumor is growing, but must also consider the location of the tumor within the organ if it is to accurately predict neoplastic growth dynamics

  1. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus and method are described for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell

  2. Tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, T. Kenneth

    1978-11-14

    Apparatus and method for confining a plasma in a center mirror cell by use of two end mirror cells as positively charged end stoppers to minimize leakage of positive particles from the ends of the center mirror cell.

  3. Alternate fusion -- continuous inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, D.C.; Turner, L.; Nebel, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    The authors argue that alternate approaches to large tokamak confinement are appropriate for fusion applications if: (1) They do not require magnetic confinement of a much higher quality than demonstrated in tokamaks; (2) Their physics basis may be succinctly stated and experimentally tested; (3) They offer near-term applications to important technical problems; and (4) Their cost to proof-of-principle is low enough to be consistent with current budget realities. An approach satisfying all of these criteria is presented. Fusion systems based on continuous inertial confinement are described. In these approaches, the inertia of a nonequilibrium plasma is used to produce local concentrations of plasma density in space and/or time. One implementation (inertial electrostatic confinement) which has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically uses a system of electrostatic grids to accelerate plasma ions toward a spherical focus. This system produced a steady 2 x 10 10 D-T neutrons/second with an overall fusion gain of 10 -5 in a sphere of about 9 cm radius. Recent theoretical developments show how to raise the fusion gain to order unity or greater by replacing the internal grids by a combination of applied magnetic and electrostatic fields. In these approaches, useful thermonuclear conditions may be produced in a system as small as a few mm radius. Confinement is that of a nonneutralized plasma. A pure electron plasma with a radial beam velocity distribution is absolutely confined by an applied Penning trap field. Spherical convergence of the confined electrons forms a deep virtual cathode near r = 0, in which thermonuclear ions are absolutely confined at useful densities. The authors have examined the equilibrium, stability, and classical relaxation of such systems, and obtained many positive physics results. Equilibria exist for both pure electron and partially charge-neutralized systems with arbitrarily high core-plasma densities

  4. Physics of inertial confinement pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mead, W.C.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of inertial confinement fusion pellet physics is given. A discussion is presented of current estimated ICF driver requirements and a couple of pellet examples. The physics of driver/plasma coupling for two drivers which are being considered, namely a laser driver and a heavy ion accelerator driver, is described. Progress towards inertial confinement fusion that has been made using laser drivers in target experiments to date is discussed

  5. Infrared slavery and quark confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Alabiso, C

    1976-01-01

    The question is considered of whether the so-called infrared slavery mechanism as, e.g., being manifest in non-Abelian gauge theories, necessarily confines quarks. Making a specific ansatz for the long- range forces, the Schwinger-Dyson equation is solved for the quark Green function. Besides having a confining solution, it appears that quarks may by-pass the long-range forces and be produced. (20 refs).

  6. Infrared slavery and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabiso, C.; Schierholz, G.

    1976-01-01

    The question of whether the so-called infrared slavery mechanism as, e.g., being manifest in non-Abelian gauge theories, necessarily confines quarks is posed. Making a specific ansatz for the long-range forces, the Schwinger-Dyson equation is solved for the quark Green function. Besides having a confining solution, it appears that quarks may by-pass the long-range forces and be produced. (Auth.)

  7. Magnetic well for plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valfells, A.; Chiu, Y.C.

    1977-01-01

    A multipole magnetic well for plasma confinement includes a plurality of current-carrying coils placed on planes corresponding to the facets of a regular polyhedron that can be symmetrically circumscribed about a sphere. The direction of current in the coils is such as to minimize the flux density at the center of the polyhedron, thereby providing a confinement well with three-dimensional symmetry having an increasing flux density in all directions from the center. 16 claims, 18 figures

  8. Neutron spectroscopy for confinement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorn, R.

    2010-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is an important method for the study of microscopic dynamics because it captures the spatial as well as the temporal aspects of the atomic or molecular motion. In this article techniques will be presented which are of special importance for the study of confined systems. Many of these are based on the fact that neutron scattering is isotope-dependent. Possible sources of systematic errors in measurements of confined systems will be pointed out. (author)

  9. Structural variations in nanosized confined gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Kai [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Tien Cheng [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Micro/Nano Science of Technology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan, ROC (China); Charnaya, E.V., E-mail: charnaya@live.co [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Petrodvorets 198504 (Russian Federation); Sheu, Hwo-Shuenn [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China); Kumzerov, Yu.A. [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute RAS, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-29

    The complex crystalline structure of gallium under nanoconfinement was revealed by synchrotron radiation x-ray powder diffraction. Nanoconfinement was shown to stabilize delta-Ga which is metastable in bulk. Two new gallium phases named iota- and kappa-Ga were found upon cooling below room temperature. These crystalline modifications were stable and coexisted with known gallium phases. Correlations between confined gallium particle shapes and emergence of particular crystalline phases were observed. Melting and freezing temperatures for different gallium phases were obtained. Remarkable supercooling of liquid gallium was seen in 3.5 nm pores.

  10. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-01

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker [1]—henceforth cited as SW—in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell

  11. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-01-01

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker - henceforth cited as SW - in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell. The

  12. Morphology of the jaw, suspensorial, and opercle musculature of Beloniformes and related species (Teleostei: Acanthopterygii), with a special reference to the m. adductor mandibulae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneburg, Ingmar

    2015-01-01

    The taxon Beloniformes represents a heterogeneous group of teleost fishes that show an extraordinary diversity of jaw morphology. I present new anatomical descriptions of the jaw musculature in six selected beloniforms and four closely related species. A reduction of the external jaw adductor (A1) and a changed morphology of the intramandibular musculature were found in many Beloniformes. This might be correlated with the progressively reduced mobility of the upper and lower jaw bones. The needlefishes and sauries, which are characterised by extremely elongated and stiffened jaws, show several derived characters, which in combination enable the capture of fish at high velocity. The ricefishes are characterised by several derived and many plesiomorphic characters that make broad scale comparisons difficult. Soft tissue characters are highly diverse among hemiramphids and flying fishes reflecting the uncertainty about their phylogenetic position and interrelationship. The morphological findings presented herein may help to interpret future phylogenetic analyses using cranial musculature in Beloniformes.

  13. Morphology of the jaw, suspensorial, and opercle musculature of Beloniformes and related species (Teleostei: Acanthopterygii, with a special reference to the m. adductor mandibulae complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Werneburg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The taxon Beloniformes represents a heterogeneous group of teleost fishes that show an extraordinary diversity of jaw morphology. I present new anatomical descriptions of the jaw musculature in six selected beloniforms and four closely related species. A reduction of the external jaw adductor (A1 and a changed morphology of the intramandibular musculature were found in many Beloniformes. This might be correlated with the progressively reduced mobility of the upper and lower jaw bones. The needlefishes and sauries, which are characterised by extremely elongated and stiffened jaws, show several derived characters, which in combination enable the capture of fish at high velocity. The ricefishes are characterised by several derived and many plesiomorphic characters that make broad scale comparisons difficult. Soft tissue characters are highly diverse among hemiramphids and flying fishes reflecting the uncertainty about their phylogenetic position and interrelationship. The morphological findings presented herein may help to interpret future phylogenetic analyses using cranial musculature in Beloniformes.

  14. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  15. Momentum confinement at low torque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, W M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Burrell, K H [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); De Grassie, J S [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Budny, R [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Groebner, R J [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Kinsey, J E [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Kramer, G J [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Luce, T C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Makowski, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Mikkelsen, D [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Nazikian, R [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Petty, C C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Politzer, P A [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Scott, S D [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Zeeland, M A Van [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Zarnstorff, M C [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Momentum confinement was investigated on DIII-D as a function of applied neutral beam torque at constant normalized beta {beta}{sub N}, by varying the mix of co (parallel to the plasma current) and counter neutral beams. Under balanced neutral beam injection (i.e. zero total torque to the plasma), the plasma maintains a significant rotation in the co-direction. This 'intrinsic' rotation can be modeled as being due to an offset in the applied torque (i.e. an 'anomalous torque'). This anomalous torque appears to have a magnitude comparable to one co neutral beam source. The presence of such an anomalous torque source must be taken into account to obtain meaningful quantities describing momentum transport, such as the global momentum confinement time and local diffusivities. Studies of the mechanical angular momentum in ELMing H-mode plasmas with elevated q{sub min} show that the momentum confinement time improves as the torque is reduced. In hybrid plasmas, the opposite effect is observed, namely that momentum confinement improves at high torque/rotation. GLF23 modeling suggests that the role of E x B shearing is quite different between the two plasmas, which may help to explain the different dependence of the momentum confinement on torque.

  16. Phenomenology and theory of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pervushin, V.N.

    1987-01-01

    Phenomenological and theoretical arguments of the separation of the hadronization dynamics from confinement and the idea of the ''kinematic'' confinement are discussed. The recent theory contains results which point out that the Wilson criterion and the confinement potentials are not sufficient for explaining the phenomenological confinement in the sense of zero color amplitudes or Green functions. However, these potentials well explain the hadron spectrum and spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, i.e., the hadronization dynamics. The ''kinematic'' confinement can be explained by the topological degeneration of all color-particle physical states in QCD. This degeneration arises if the theory is quantized by explicitly solving the gauge and dynamic constraints: all color states are defined up to gauge(phase) factors describing the map of the three-dimensional space onto SU(3) c -group (π 3 (SU(3) c =Z). The total probability of the color particle generation is equal to zero due to the destructive interference of these phase factors. As a result, in QCD there remains only a hadron sector used in the phenomenology

  17. MRI interrReader and intra-reader reliabilities for assessing injury morphology and posterior ligamentous complex integrity of the spine according to the thoracolumbar injury classification system and severity score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Guen Young; Lee, Joon Woo; Choi, Seung Woo; Lim, Hyun Jin; Sun, Hye Young; Kang, Yu Suhn; Kang, Heung Sik; Chai, Jee Won; Kim, Su Jin

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inter-reader and intra-reader reliabilities using the thoracolumbar injury classification system and severity score (TLICS) and to analyze the effects of reader experience on reliability and the possible reasons for discordant interpretations. Six radiologists (two senior, two junior radiologists, and two residents) independently scored 100 MRI examinations of thoracolumbar spine injuries to assess injury morphology and posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) integrity according to the TLICS. Inter-reader and intra-reader agreements were determined and analyzed according to the number of years of radiologist experience. Inter-reader agreement between the six readers was moderate (k = 0.538 for the first and 0.537 for the second review) for injury morphology and fair to moderate (k = 0.440 for the first and 0.389 for the second review) for PLC integrity. No significant difference in inter-reader agreement was observed according to the number of years of radiologist experience. Intra-reader agreements showed a wide range (k = 0.538-0.822 for injury morphology and 0.423-0.616 for PLC integrity). Agreement was achieved in 44 for the first and 45 for the second review about injury morphology, as well as in 41 for the first and 38 for the second review of PLC integrity. A positive correlation was detected between injury morphology score and PLC integrity. The reliability of MRI for assessing thoracolumbar spinal injuries according to the TLICS was moderate for injury morphology and fair to moderate for PLC integrity, which may not be influenced by radiologist' experience

  18. Fluctuations and confinement in ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Harris, J.H.; Murakami, M.

    1993-01-01

    In the period immediately prior to the suspension of ATF operation in November, 1991, a great deal of emphasis was palced on investigations of the fundamental mechanisms controlling confinement in this device. At that time, measurements of the density fluctuations throughout the plasma volume indicated the existence of theoretically predicted dissipative trapped electron and resistive interchange instabilities. These identifications were supported by results of dynamic configuration scans of the magnetic fields during which the extent of the magnetic well, shear, and fraction of confined trapped particles were changed continuously. Interpretation of the data from these experiments has been an ongoing exercise. Most recently, analysis of discharges employing strong gas puffing to change density gradients and fluctuation levels have strengthened the view that dissipative trapped electron modes may be present but do not play a significant direct role in energy transport. The present paper summarizes the current understanding concerning the identification of instabilities and their relationship to confinement in ATF

  19. Correlations In Confined Quantum Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufty, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  20. Finite temperature approach to confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gave, E.; Jengo, R.; Omero, C.

    1980-06-01

    The finite temperature treatment of gauge theories, formulated in terms of a gauge invariant variable as in a Polyakov method, is used as a device for obtaining an effective theory where the confinement test takes the form of a correlation function. The formalism is discussed for the abelian CPsup(n-1) model in various dimensionalities and for the pure Yang-Mills theory in the limit of zero temperature. In the latter case a class of vortex like configurations of the effective theory which induce confinement correspond in particular to the instanton solutions. (author)

  1. Some aspects of geometrical confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novello, M.; De Lorenci, V.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Elbaz, E. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1998-04-01

    In this paper we present a toy model for the dynamics of a gauge field theory in such way that spin-one particles can be confined in a compact domain. We show that the property of confinement can be associated to the formation of a null surface identified to a horizon. This is due to the presence of an effective geometry generated by the self-interaction of the gauge field that guides the wave propagation of the field. This phenomenon has a striking analogy to the gravitational black hole in Einstein general theory of relativity, separating two domains of spacetime that can be trespassed only into one direction. (author) 4 refs.

  2. Pellet injection and toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The proceedings of a technical committee meeting on pellet injection and toroidal confinement, held in Gut Ising, Federal Republic of Germany, 24-26 October, 1988, are given in this report. Most of the major fusion experiments are using pellet injectors; these were reported at this meeting. Studies of confinement, which is favorably affected, impurity transport, radiative energy losses, and affects on the ion temperature gradient instability were given. Studies of pellet ablation and effects on plasma profiles were presented. Finally, several papers described present and proposed injection guns. Refs, figs and tabs

  3. CONFINEMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PLASMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, H.R.

    1963-05-01

    The confinement of a high temperature plasma in a stellarator in which the magnetic confinement has tended to shift the plasma from the center of the curved, U-shaped end loops is described. Magnetic means are provided for counteracting this tendency of the plasma to be shifted away from the center of the end loops, and in one embodiment this magnetic means is a longitudinally extending magnetic field such as is provided by two sets of parallel conductors bent to follow the U-shaped curvature of the end loops and energized oppositely on the inside and outside of this curvature. (AEC)

  4. On triply diffusive convection in completely confined fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Jyoti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper carries forward Prakash et al. [21] analysis for triple diffusive convection problem in completely confined fluids and derives upper bounds for the complex growth rate of an arbitrary oscillatory disturbance which may be neutral or unstable through the use of some non-trivial integral estimates obtained from the coupled system of governing equations of the problem.

  5. Dynamics and relaxation in confined medium. Application to 129Xe magnetic relaxation in Vycor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, Virginie

    1995-01-01

    Porous media morphology and topology drive the exploration of pore space by fluid. So, analysis of transport process, associated with relaxation mechanism, allows indirect study of pore geometry. The purpose of this work is to understand better the relation between geometry and transport. This study involves two parts: a modelization and prediction step is followed by an experimental application of magnetic relaxation. Numerical simulations and analytical models allow to quantify the influence on the solid interface of the dynamical behavior of confined gas in disordered porous media (granular structure and porous network) or in common geometry (cylindrical and lamellar interfaces). The formalism of diffusion propagator is a powerful tool to quantify the influence of the pore geometry on the diffusion of confined gas. The propagator holds all dynamical information on the system; it also predicts the temporal evolution of the autocorrelation functions of the Hamiltonian describing local coupling. In an intermediate time scale, magnetic relaxation shows complex diffusional regime: the autocorrelation functions decrease in a power law with a exponent smaller than d/2 (where d is the Euclidian dimension of the system). This behavior is analogous to dynamic in low-dimensional space, but here arises from surface correlations of the porous media. The long-time behavior of the autocorrelation functions retrieves the asymptotic decrease t -d/2 . Moreover, atypical behavior is observed for the Knudsen diffusion between infinite planes. It turns out that 129 Xe NMR is a appropriate technique to characterize organization and diffusion of gas confined in Vycor. Systematic studies of temperature and pressure effect on the 129 Xe chemical shift allow to specify the Xe/solid interaction. The analysis of the relaxation measurements, thanks to the numerical development, confirms conclusions arising from the study of diffusion propagator. (author) [fr

  6. Morphological demosaicking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Shuxue

    2009-02-01

    Bayer patterns, in which a single value of red, green or blue is available for each pixel, are widely used in digital color cameras. The reconstruction of the full color image is often referred to as demosaicking. This paper introduced a new approach - morphological demosaicking. The approach is based on strong edge directionality selection and interpolation, followed by morphological operations to refine edge directionality selection and reduce color aliasing. Finally performance evaluation and examples of color artifacts reduction are shown.

  7. GENETIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL VARIATION OF POPULATIONS BELONGING TO THE BULINUS TRUNCATUS/TROPICUS COMPLEX (GASTROPODA; PLANORBIDAE) IN SOUTH WESTERN ZIMBABWE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukaratirwa, S.; Kristensen, Thomas K.; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    1998-01-01

    , in respect of allozyme variation (5 polymorphic loci), shell morphology (9 variables), copulatory organ and chromosome number. Comparative data were obtained from snails from north western Zimbabwe identified definitely as B. tropicus. Analysis of the genetic structure revealed a high degree of polymorphism...... (P) ranging from 0.29-0.80 among populations from Plumtree and expected heterozygosity (He) from 0.02-0.22. No enzymatic diagnostic loci were found which could differentiate the different morphs or populations and discriminant function analysis on the morphological data showed an overlap of morphs...

  8. A new molecular phylogeny of the Laurencia complex (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae) and a review of key morphological characters result in a new genus, Coronaphycus, and a description of C. novus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metti, Yola; Millar, Alan J K; Steinberg, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Within the Laurencia complex (Rhodophyta, Rhodomelaceae), six genera have been recognized based on both molecular analyses and morphology: Laurencia, Osmundea, Chondrophycus, Palisada, Yuzurua, and Laurenciella. Recently, new material from Australia has been collected and included in the current molecular phylogeny, resulting in a new clade. This study examined the generic delineations using a combination of morphological comparisons and phylogenetic analysis of chloroplast (rbcL) nucleotide sequence. The molecular phylogeny recovered eight (rather than six) clades; Yuzurua, Laurenciella, Palisada, and Chondrophycus showed as monophyletic clades each with strong support. However, the genera Osmundea and Laurencia were polyphyletic. Consequently, the new genus Coronaphycus is proposed, resulting in the new combination Coronaphycus elatus and a description of the new species C. novus. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  9. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-05-01

    A plausible interpretation of the experimental evidence is that energy confinement in tokamaks is governed by two separate considerations: (1) the need for resistive MHD kink-stability, which limits the permissible range of current profiles - and therefore normally also the range of temperature profiles; and (2) the presence of strongly anomalous microscopic energy transport near the plasma edge, which calibrates the amplitude of the global temperature profile, thus determining the energy confinement time tau/sub E/. Correspondingly, there are two main paths towards the enhancement of tokamak confinement: (1) Configurational optimization, to increase the MHD-stable energy content of the plasma core, can evidently be pursued by varying the cross-sectional shape of the plasma and/or finding stable radial profiles with central q-values substantially below unity - but crossing from ''first'' to ''second'' stability within the peak-pressure region would have the greatest ultimate potential. (2) Suppression of edge turbulence, so as to improve the heat insulation in the outer plasma shell, can be pursued by various local stabilizing techniques, such as use of a poloidal divertor. The present confinement model and initial TFTR pellet-injection results suggest that the introduction of a super-high-density region within the plasma core should be particularly valuable for enhancing ntau/subE/. In D-T operation, a centrally peaked plasma pressure profile could possibly lend itself to alpha-particle-driven entry into the second-stability regime

  10. Frictional properties of confined polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N; Persson, Bo N J

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate, and b) polymer sliding on polymer. In the first setup the shear stresses are relatively i...

  11. String theory and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    This article is based on a talk given at the ''Strings '97'' conference. It discusses the search for the universality class of confining strings. The key ingredients include the loop equations, the zigzag symmetry, the non-linear renormalization group. Some new tests for the equivalence between gauge fields and strings are proposed. (orig.)

  12. Mirror Confinement Systems: project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This report contains descriptions of the projects supported by the Mirror Confinement Systems (MCS) Division of the Office of Fusion Energy. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators, in collaboration with MCS staff office, and include objectives and milestones for each project. In addition to project summaries, statements of Division objectives and budget summaries are also provided

  13. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  14. Is confinement the ultimate truth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirrring, W.

    1980-01-01

    This seminar discusses a field theory which leads to a r-potential and therefore to a confinement. By comparison to the instability due to a resonance phenomenon, the author concentrates on the theory's ghost problem and concludes that for some couplings this does not occur and the theory behaves reasonably

  15. Two flavor QCD and Confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elia, M.; Di Giacomo, A.; Pica, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    We argue that the order of the chiral transition for N_f=2 is a sensitive probe of the QCD vacuum, in particular of the mechanism of color confinement. A strategy is developed to investigate the order of the transition by use of finite size scaling analysis. An in-depth numerical investigation is...

  16. Turbulent jet in confined counterflow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mean flowfield of a turbulent jet issuing into a confined, uniform counterflow was investigated computationally. Based on dimensional analysis, the jet penetration length was shown to scale with jet-to-counterflow momentum flux ratio. This scaling and the computational results reproduce the well-known correct limit of ...

  17. Momentum Confinement at Low Torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, W.M.; Burrell, K.H.; deGrassie, J.S.; Budny, R.; Groebner, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Kinsey, J.E.; Kramer, G.J.; Makowski, M.A.; Mikkelsen, D.; Nazikian, R.; Petty, C.C.; Politzer, P.A.; Scott, S.D.; Van Zeeland, M.A.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Momentum confinement was investigated on DIII-D as a function of applied neutral beam torque at constant normalized β N , by varying the mix of co (parallel to the plasma current) and counter neutral beams. Under balanced neutral beam injection (i.e. zero total torque to the plasma), the plasma maintains a significant rotation in the co-direction. This 'intrinsic' rotation can be modeled as being due to an offset in the applied torque (i.e. an 'anomalous torque'). This anomalous torque appears to have a magnitude comparable to one co-neutral beam source. The presence of such an anomalous torque source must be taken into account to obtain meaningful quantities describing momentum transport, such as the global momentum confinement time and local diffusivities. Studies of the mechanical angular momentum in ELMing H-mode plasmas with elevated q min show that the momentum confinement time improves as the torque is reduced. In hybrid plasmas, the opposite effect is observed, namely that momentum confinement improves at high torque/rotation. The relative importance of E x B shearing between the two is modeled using GLF23 and may suggest a possible explanation.

  18. On the implications of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors consider some implications of confinement starting from the basic observation that cross-sections for the production of colored asymptotic states, such as free quarks and gluons, from color singlet initial states must be zero if QCD is to be confining. The authors discuss two pictures of confinement: the failure of the cluster decomposition property and the absence of a pole at timelike momenta in the propagator of a confined particle. The authors use QCD-based models as a framework to relate the failure of the cluster decomposition property to other ideas, such as the role of a nonzero gluon condensate. The authors' primary interest is to address the question of the absence of a mass pole through a study of model Schwinger-Dyson equations. These equations contain some of the dynamical information that is present in the study of the cluster decomposition property. The authors discuss the problems within this idea and its study using the Schwinger-Dyson equations

  19. Baryon observables and color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations of baryon observables within the framework of the chiral bag model are reviewed. The results of such calculations are found to be remarkably insensitive to the radius of color confinement and indicate the difficulty of finding unambiguous evidence for quarks in nuclei. 13 refs.; 5 figs

  20. Influence of Meander Confinement on Hydro-Morphodynamics of a Cohesive Meandering Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parna Parsapour-Moghaddam

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite several decades of intensive study of the morphological changes in meandering rivers, less attention has been paid to confined meanders. This paper studies the hydro-morphodynamics of two adjacent sub-reaches of a meandering creek, located in the City of Ottawa, Canada. Both of these sub-reaches are meandering channels with cohesive bed and banks, but one is confined by a railway embankment. Field reconnaissance revealed distinct differences in the morphological characteristics of the sub-reaches. To further study this, channel migration and morphological changes of the channel banks along each of these sub-reaches were analyzed by comparing the historical aerial photography (2004, 2014, light detection and ranging (LIDAR data (2006, bathymetric data obtained from a total station survey (2014, and field examination. Moreover, two different spatially intensive acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP surveys were conducted in the study area to find the linkage between the hydrodynamics and morphological changes in the two different sub-reaches. The unconfined sub-reach is shown to have a typical channel migration pattern with deposition on the inner bank and erosion on the outer bank of the meander bend. The confined sub-reach, on the other hand, experienced greater bank instabilities than the unconfined sub-reach. The average rate of bank retreat was 0.2 m/year in the confined sub-reach whereas it was lower (0.08 m/year in the unconfined sampling reach. In the confined sub-reach, an irregular meandering pattern occurred by the evolution of a concave-bank bench, which was caused by reverse flow eddies. The sinuosity of the confined sub-reach decreased from 1.55 to 1.49 in the 10-year study period. The results of the present study demonstrate the physical mechanisms by which meander confinement can change the meandering pattern and morphological characteristics of a cohesive clay bed creek.

  1. Highly Confined Electronic and Ionic Conduction in Oxide Heterostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2015-01-01

    The conductance confined at the interface of complex oxide heterostructures provides new opportunities to explore nanoelectronic as well as nanoionic devices. In this talk I will present our recent results both on ionic and electronic conductivity at different heterostructures systems. In the first...... unattainable for Bi2O3-based materials, is achieved[1]. These confined heterostructures provide a playground not only for new high ionic conductivity phenomena that are sufficiently stable but also uncover a large variety of possible technological perspectives. At the second part, I will discuss and show our...

  2. Surface motion and confinement potential for a microwave confined corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensley, D.L.

    1979-07-01

    Approximate time dependent solutions for surface velocities and potentials are given for a plane polarized microwave field confining a hot, over-dense plasma corona. Steady state solutions to Poissons' equation can be applied to the time dependent case, provided transit time effects are included. The product of ion pressure and potential wave (surface) velocity gives an average heating rate approx. 7/32 NKT 0 V/sub theta/ directly to the ions

  3. Brain morphology of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) varies inconsistently with respect to habitat complexity: A test of the Clever Foraging Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Newaz I; Thompson, Cole; Bolnick, Daniel I; Stuart, Yoel E

    2017-05-01

    The Clever Foraging Hypothesis asserts that organisms living in a more spatially complex environment will have a greater neurological capacity for cognitive processes related to spatial memory, navigation, and foraging. Because the telencephalon is often associated with spatial memory and navigation tasks, this hypothesis predicts a positive association between telencephalon size and environmental complexity. The association between habitat complexity and brain size has been supported by comparative studies across multiple species but has not been widely studied at the within-species level. We tested for covariation between environmental complexity and neuroanatomy of threespine stickleback ( Gasterosteus aculeatus ) collected from 15 pairs of lakes and their parapatric streams on Vancouver Island. In most pairs, neuroanatomy differed between the adjoining lake and stream populations. However, the magnitude and direction of this difference were inconsistent between watersheds and did not covary strongly with measures of within-site environmental heterogeneity. Overall, we find weak support for the Clever Foraging Hypothesis in our study.

  4. Sequential Indentation Tests to Investigate the Influence of Confining Stress on Rock Breakage by Tunnel Boring Machine Cutter in a Biaxial State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Cao, Ping; Han, Dongya

    2016-04-01

    The influence of confining stress on rock breakage by a tunnel boring machine cutter was investigated by conducting sequential indentation tests in a biaxial state. Combined with morphology measurements of breaking grooves and an analysis of surface and internal crack propagation between nicks, the effects of maximum confining stress and minimum stress on indentation efficiency, crack propagation and chip formation were investigated. Indentation tests and morphology measurements show that increasing a maximum confining stress will result in increased consumed energy in indentations, enlarged groove volumes and promoted indentation efficiency when the corresponding minimum confining stress is fixed. The energy consumed in indentations will increase with increase in minimum confining stress, however, because of the decreased groove volumes as the minimum confining stress increases, the efficiency will decrease. Observations of surface crack propagation show that more intensive fractures will be induced as the maximum confining stress increases, whereas the opposite occurs for an increase of minimum confining stress. An observation of the middle section, cracks and chips shows that as the maximum confining stress increases, chips tend to form in deeper parts when the minimum confining stress is fixed, whereas they tend to formed in shallower parts as the minimum confining stress increases when the maximum confining stress is fixed.

  5. Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebel, R.A.; Turner, L.; Tiouririne, T.N.; Barnes, D.C.; Nystrom, W.D.; Bussard, R.W.; Miley, G.H.; Javedani, J.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) is one of the earliest plasma confinement concepts, having first been suggested by P. T. Farnsworth in the 1950s. The concept involves a simple apparatus of concentric spherical electrostatic grids or a combination of grids and magnetic fields. An electrostatic structure is formed from the confluence of electron or ion beams. Gridded IEC systems have demonstrated neutron yields as high as 2 * 10 10 neutrons/sec. These systems have considerable potential as small, inexpensive, portable neutron sources for assaying applications. Neutron tomography is also a potential application. Atomic physics effects strongly influence the performance of all of these systems. Important atomic effects include elastic scattering, ionization, excitation, and charge exchange. This paper discusses how an IEC system is influenced by these effects and how to design around them. Theoretical modeling and experimental results are presented

  6. Extra dimensions and color confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pleitez, V

    1995-04-01

    An extension of the ordinary four dimensional Minkowski space by introducing additional dimensions which have their own Lorentz transformation is considered. Particles can transform in a different way under each Lorentz group. It is shown that only quark interactions are slightly modified and that color confinement automatic since these degrees of freedom run only in the extra dimensions. No compactification of the extra dimensions is needed. (author). 4 refs.

  7. Confinement facilities for handling plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maraman, W.J.; McNeese, W.D.; Stafford, R.G.

    1975-01-01

    Plutonium handling on a multigram scale began in 1944. Early criteria, equipment, and techniques for confining contamination have been superseded by more stringent criteria and vastly improved equipment and techniques for in-process contamination control, effluent air cleaning and treatment of liquid wastes. This paper describes the evolution of equipment and practices to minimize exposure of workers and escape of contamination into work areas and into the environment. Early and current contamination controls are compared. (author)

  8. Inertial-confinement-fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented

  9. Confinement and diffusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of electric field fluctuations on confinement and diffusion in tokamak is discussed. Based on the experimentally determined cross-field turbolent diffusion coefficient, D∼3.7*cT e /eB(δn i /n i ) rms which is also derived by a simple theory, the cross-field diffusion time, tp=a 2 /D, is calculated and compared to experimental results from 51 tokamak for standard Ohmic operation

  10. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis begins by identifying a hypothetical model of tokamak confinement that is designed to take into account the conflict between Tsub(e)(r)-profile shapes arising from microscopic transport and J(r)-profile shapes required for gross stability. On the basis of this model, a number of hypothetical lines of advance are developed. Some TFTR experiments that may point the way to a particularly attractive type of tokamak reactor regime are discussed. (author)

  11. Capillary Condensation in Confined Media

    OpenAIRE

    Charlaix, Elisabeth; Ciccotti, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    28 pages - To appear in 2010 in the Handbook of Nanophysics - Vol 1 - Edited by Klaus Sattler - CRC Press; We review here the physics of capillary condensation of liquids in confined media, with a special regard to the application in nanotechnologies. The thermodynamics of capillary condensation and thin film adsorption are first exposed along with all the relevant notions. The focus is then shifted to the modelling of capillary forces, to their measurements techniques (including SFA, AFM and...

  12. Metastability in Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, B.H.; Cowley, S.C.; Hurricane, O.A.

    1999-01-01

    The parameter space of magnetically confined plasmas near marginal instability for interchange-type modes is divided into three regions according to qualitative stability properties. Region I is linearly stable though nonlinearly unstable to large excitations. Region II is linearly unstable, nonlinearly stable to small excitations, and nonlinearly unstable to large excitations. Region III is linearly and nonlinearly unstable. For an equilibrium evolving through marginal stability, region III and therefore explosive instability are inevitably encountered. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  13. Confinement and strings in MQCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanany, A.; Strassler, M.J.; Zaffaroni, A.

    1998-01-01

    We study aspects of confinement in the M-theory fivebrane version of QCD (MQCD). We show heavy quarks are confined in hadrons (which take the form of membrane-fivebrane bound states) for N=1 and softly broken N=2 SU(N) MQCD. We explore and clarify the transition from the exotic physics of the latter to the standard physics of the former. In particular, the many strings and quark-antiquark mesons found in N=2 field theory by Douglas and Shenker are reproduced. It is seen that in the N=1 limit all but one such meson disappears while all of the strings survive. The strings of softly broken N=2, N=1, and even non-supersymmetric SU(N) MQCD have a common ratio for their tensions as a function of the amount of flux they carry. We also comment on the almost BPS properties of the Douglas-Shenker strings and discuss the brane picture for monopole confinement on N=2 QCD Higgs branches. (orig.)

  14. Soft-Body Muscles for Evolved Virtual Creatures: The Next Step on a Bio-Mimetic Path to Meaningful Morphological Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessin, Dan; Risi, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In the past, evolved virtual creatures (EVCs) have been developed with rigid, segmented bodies, and with soft bodies, but never before with a combination of the two. In nature, however, creatures combining a rigid skeleton and non-rigid muscles are some of the most complex and successful examples...... of life on earth. Now, for the first time, creatures with fully evolved rigid-body skeletons and soft-body muscles can be developed in the virtual world, as well. By exploiting and re-purposing the capabilities of existing soft-body simulation systems, we can evolve complex and effective simulated muscles...

  15. Multiple patterns of diblock copolymer confined in irregular geometries with soft surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Sun, Min-Na; Zhang, Jin-Jun; Pan, Jun-Xing; Guo, Yu-Qi; Wang, Bao-Feng; Wu, Hai-Shun

    2015-12-01

    The different confinement shapes can induce the formation of various interesting and novel morphologies, which might inspire potential applications of materials. In this paper, we study the directed self-assembly of diblock copolymer confined in irregular geometries with a soft surface by using self-consistent field theory. Two types of confinement geometries are considered, namely, one is the concave pore with one groove and the other is the concave pore with two grooves. We obtain more novel and different structures which could not be produced in other two-dimensional (2D) confinements. Comparing these new structures with those obtained in regular square confinement, we find that the range of ordered lamellae is enlarged and the range of disordered structure is narrowed down under the concave pore confinement. We also compare the different structures obtained under the two types of confinement geometries, the results show that the effect of confinement would increase, which might induce the diblock copolymer to form novel structures. We construct the phase diagram as a function of the fraction of B block and the ratio of h/L of the groove. The simulation reveals that the wetting effect of brushes and the shape of confinement geometries play important roles in determining the morphologies of the system. Our results improve the applications in the directed self-assembly of diblock copolymer for fabricating the irregular structures. Project supported by the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20121404110004), the Research Foundation for Excellent Talents of Shanxi Provincial Department of Human Resources and Social Security, China, and the Scientific and Technological Innovation Programs of Higher Education Institutions in Shanxi Province, China.

  16. Crystallization in nano-confinement seeded by a nanocrystal—A molecular dynamics study

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Heng; Grigoropoulos, Costas

    2014-01-01

    Seeded crystallization and solidification in nanoscale confinement volumes have become an important and complex topic. Due to the complexity and limitations in observing nanoscale crystallization, computer simulation can provide valuable details for supporting and interpreting experimental observations. In this article, seeded crystallization from nano-confined liquid, as represented by the crystallization of a suspended gold nano-droplet seeded by a pre-existing gold nanocrystal seed, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in canonical (NVT) ensemble. We found that the crystallization temperature depends on nano-confinement volume, crystal orientation, and seed size as explained by classical two-sphere model and Gibbs-Thomson effect. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  17. Crystallization in nano-confinement seeded by a nanocrystal—A molecular dynamics study

    KAUST Repository

    Pan, Heng

    2014-03-14

    Seeded crystallization and solidification in nanoscale confinement volumes have become an important and complex topic. Due to the complexity and limitations in observing nanoscale crystallization, computer simulation can provide valuable details for supporting and interpreting experimental observations. In this article, seeded crystallization from nano-confined liquid, as represented by the crystallization of a suspended gold nano-droplet seeded by a pre-existing gold nanocrystal seed, was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations in canonical (NVT) ensemble. We found that the crystallization temperature depends on nano-confinement volume, crystal orientation, and seed size as explained by classical two-sphere model and Gibbs-Thomson effect. © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  18. Confinement dynamics in the reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    The study of basic transport and confinement dynamics is central to the development of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a confinement concept. Thus, the goal of RFP research is to understand the connection between processes that sustain the RFP configuration and related transport/confinement properties. Recently, new insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation of RFP electron and ion physics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and strongly coupled role in RFP sustainment and confinement dynamics. In this paper, we summarize the results of these studies on the ZT-40M experiment. 8 refs

  19. Global confinement characteristics of Jet limiter plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.J.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.; Thomas, P.R.; Thomsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    Data from a wide variety of plasma pulses on JET (aux. heating, current, field, minority species, plasma shape, etc) are analysed in order to assess the characteristics of global confinement. The scaling of confinement in ohmically and auxiliary heated discharges is examined. The ohmic confinement in the present new JET configuration (Belt Limiter) is essentially the same as previously. Confinement in auxiliary heated discharges shows presently a slight improvement since 1986. Both ohmic and non-ohmic data is used in a set of confinement time regression analyses and certain constraints derived from theory are imposed

  20. Usefulness of electrocardiography-gated dual-source computed tomography for evaluating morphological features of the ventricles in children with complex congenital heart defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Motoo; Hara, Masaki; Sakurai, Keita; Asano, Miki; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ohashi, Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    Improved time resolution using dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) enabled adaptation of electrocardiography (ECG)-gated cardiac CT for children with a high heart rate. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ECG-gated DSCT (ECG-DSCT) to depict the morphological ventricular features in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Between August 2006 and March 2010, a total of 66 patients with CHD (aged 1 day to 9 years, median 11 months) were analyzed using ECG-DSCT. The type of anomaly was ventricular septal defect (VSD) in 32 (malaligned type in 20, perimembranous type in 7, supracristal type in 3, muscular type in 2), single ventricle (SV) in 11, and corrected transposition of the great arteries (cTGA) in 3. All patients underwent ECG-DSCT and ultrasonography (US). We evaluated the accuracy of diagnosing the type of VSD. For the cases with SV and cTGA, we evaluated the ability to depict anatomical ventricular features. In all 32 cases of VSD, DSCT could confirm the VSD defects, and the findings were identical to those obtained by US. Anatomical configurations of the SV and cTGA were correctly diagnosed, similar to that on US. Our study suggests that ECG-DSCT can clearly depict the configuration of ventricles. (author)

  1. Morphological families in the mental lexicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Nivja Helena de

    2002-01-01

    Words can occur as constituents of other words. Some words have a high morphological productivity, in that they occur in many complex words, whereas others are morphological islands. Previous studies have found that the size of a word's morphological family can co-determine response latencies in

  2. Inertial confinement fusion at NRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodner, S.E.; Boris, J.P.; Cooperstein, G.

    1979-01-01

    The NRL Inertial Confinement Fusion Program's emphasis has moved toward pellet concepts which use longer (approximately 10ns) lower intensity driver pulses than previously assumed. For laser drivers, this change was motivated by recent experiments at NRL with enhanced stimulated Brillouin backscatter. For ion drivers, the motivation is the possibility that substantial energy at 10-ns pulse lengths may soon be available. To accept these 10-ns pulses, it may be necessary to consider pellets of larger radius and thinner shell. The computational studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at NRL indicate the possibility of a dynamic stabilization of these thinner shells. (author)

  3. Confinement through tensor gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.; Strathdee, J.

    1977-12-01

    Using the 0(3,2)-symmetric de Sitter solution of Einstein's equation describing a strongly interacting tensor field it is shown that hadronic bags confining quarks can be represented as de Sitter ''micro-universes'' with radii given 1/R 2 =lambdak 2 /6. Here k 2 and lambda are the strong coupling and the ''cosmological'' constant which apear in the Einstein equation used. Surprisingly the energy spectrum for the two-body hadronic states is the same as that for a harmonic oscillator potential, though the wave functions are completely different. The Einstein equation can be extended to include colour for the tensor fields

  4. Compact inertial confinement multireactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) commercial-applications plant-optimum driver pulse repetition rates may exceed reactor pulse-repetition-rate capabilities. Thus, more than one reactor may be required for low-cost production of electric power, process heat, fissionable fuels, etc., in ICF plants. Substantial savings in expensive reactor containment cells and blankets can be realized by placing more than one reactor in a cell and by surrounding more than one reactor cavity with a single blanket system. There are also some potential disadvantages associated with close coupling in compact multicavity blankets and multireactor cells. Tradeoffs associated with several scenarios have been studied

  5. Polyphyly of the spring-parsleys (Cymopterus): molecular and morphological evidence suggests complex relationships among the perennial endemic genera of western North American Apiaceae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downie, S.R.; Hartman, R.L.; Sun, F.-J.; Katz-Downie, D.S.

    2002-01-01

    Cladistic analyses of DNA sequences from the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer region and cpDNA rps16 intron and, for a subset of taxa, the cpDNA trnF-trnL-trnT locus were carried out to evaluate the monophyly of Cymopterus and to ascertain its phylogenetic placement among the other perennial genera of Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) subfamily Apioideae endemic to western North America. To elucidate patterns in the evolution of specific fruit characters and to evaluate their utility in circumscribing genera unambiguously, additional evidence was procured from cross-sections of mature fruits and the results of cladistic analysis of 25 morphological characters. Analyses of the partitioned data sets resulted in weakly supported and largely unresolved phylogenetic hypotheses, possibly due to the rapid radiation of the group, whereas the combined analysis of all molecular evidence resulted in a well-resolved phylogeny with higher bootstrap support. The traditionally used fruit characters of wing shape and composition and orientation of mericarp compression are highly variable. The results of these analyses reveal that Cymopterus and Lomatium, the two largest genera of western North American Apiaceae, are polyphyletic, and that their species are inextricably linked with those of other endemic perennial genera of the region (such as, Aletes, Musineon, Oreoxis, Pseudocymopterus, Pteryxia, and Tauschia), many of which are also not monophyletic. Prior emphasis on characters of the fruit in all systems of classification of the group has led to highly artificial assemblages of species. A complete reassessment of generic limits of all western endemic Apiaceae is required, as is further systematic study of this intractable group. (author)

  6. Surface-Activated Coupling Reactions Confined on a Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-10-20

    Chemical reactions may take place in a pure phase of gas or liquid or at the interface of two phases (gas-solid or liquid-solid). Recently, the emerging field of "surface-confined coupling reactions" has attracted intensive attention. In this process, reactants, intermediates, and products of a coupling reaction are adsorbed on a solid-vacuum or a solid-liquid interface. The solid surface restricts all reaction steps on the interface, in other words, the reaction takes place within a lower-dimensional, for example, two-dimensional, space. Surface atoms that are fixed in the surface and adatoms that move on the surface often activate the surface-confined coupling reactions. The synergy of surface morphology and activity allow some reactions that are inefficient or prohibited in the gas or liquid phase to proceed efficiently when the reactions are confined on a surface. Over the past decade, dozens of well-known "textbook" coupling reactions have been shown to proceed as surface-confined coupling reactions. In most cases, the surface-confined coupling reactions were discovered by trial and error, and the reaction pathways are largely unknown. It is thus highly desirable to unravel the mechanisms, mechanisms of surface activation in particular, of the surface-confined coupling reactions. Because the reactions take place on surfaces, advanced surface science techniques can be applied to study the surface-confined coupling reactions. Among them, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are the two most extensively used experimental tools. The former resolves submolecular structures of individual reactants, intermediates, and products in real space, while the latter monitors the chemical states during the reactions in real time. Combination of the two methods provides unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the reaction pathways. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical modeling. In particular, density

  7. Holographic collisions in confining theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Emparan, Roberto; Mateos, David; Pani, Paolo; Rocha, Jorge V.

    2014-01-01

    We study the gravitational dual of a high-energy collision in a confining gauge theory. We consider a linearized approach in which two point particles traveling in an AdS-soliton background suddenly collide to form an object at rest (presumably a black hole for large enough center-of-mass energies). The resulting radiation exhibits the features expected in a theory with a mass gap: late-time power law tails of the form t −3/2 , the failure of Huygens’ principle and distortion of the wave pattern as it propagates. The energy spectrum is exponentially suppressed for frequencies smaller than the gauge theory mass gap. Consequently, we observe no memory effect in the gravitational waveforms. At larger frequencies the spectrum has an upward-stairway structure, which corresponds to the excitation of the tower of massive states in the confining gauge theory. We discuss the importance of phenomenological cutoffs to regularize the divergent spectrum, and the aspects of the full non-linear collision that are expected to be captured by our approach

  8. Magnetic confinement fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grad, H.

    1977-03-01

    Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion offers probably the only relatively clean energy solution with completely inexhaustible fuel and unlimited power capacity. The scientific and technological problem consists in magnetically confining a hot, dense plasma (pressure several to hundreds of atmospheres, temperature 10 8 degrees or more) for an appreciable fraction of a second. The scientific and mathematical problem is to describe the behavior, such as confinement, stability, flow, compression, heating, energy transfer and diffusion of this medium in the presence of electromagnetic fields just as we now can for air or steam. Some of the extant theory consists of applications, routine or ingenious, of known mathematical structures in the theory of differential equations and in traditional analysis. Other applications of known mathematical structures offer surprises and new insights: the coordination between sub-supersonic and elliptic-hyperbolic is fractured; supersonic propagation goes upstream; etc. Other completely nonstandard mathematical structures with significant theory are being rapidly uncovered (and somewhat less rapidly understood) such as non-elliptic variational equations and new types of weak solutions. It is these new mathematical structures which one should expect to supply the foundation for the next generation's pure mathematics, if history is a guide. Despite the substantial effort over a period of some twenty years, there are still basic and important scintific and mathematical discoveries to be made, lying just beneath the surface

  9. Quark cluster model and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Yuji; Yazaki, Koichi

    2000-01-01

    How confinement of quarks is implemented for multi-hadron systems in the quark cluster model is reviewed. In order to learn the nature of the confining interaction for fermions we first study 1+1 dimensional QED and QCD, in which the gauge field can be eliminated exactly and generates linear interaction of fermions. Then, we compare the two-body potential model, the flip-flop model and the Born-Oppenheimer approach in the strong coupling lattice QCD for the meson-meson system. Having shown how the long-range attraction between hadrons, van der Waals interaction, shows up in the two-body potential model, we discuss two distinct attempts beyond the two-body potential model: one is a many-body potential model, the flip-flop model, and the other is the Born-Oppenheimer approach in the strong coupling lattice QCD. We explain how the emergence of the long-range attraction is avoided in these attempts. Finally, we present the results of the application of the flip-flop model to the baryon-baryon scattering in the quark cluster model. (author)

  10. Multiple-mirror plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberg, A.J.; Lieberman, M.A.; Logan, B.G.

    1975-01-01

    A large enhancement of the confinement time can be achieved in a straight system of multiple mirrors over an equal length uniform magnetic field. The scaling is diffusive rather than that of flow, thereby scaling the square of the system length rather than linear with system length. Probably the most economic mode of operation for a reactor occurs when lambda/M is approximately l/sub c/, where lambda is the mean free path, M the mirror ratio, and l/sub c/ the length between mirrors; but where the scale length of the mirror field l/sub m/ is much less than lambda. The axial confinement time has been calculated theoretically and numerically for all important parameter regimes, and confirmed experimentally. A typical reactor calculation gives Q/sub E/ = 2 for a 400 meter system with 3000 MW(e) output. The main concern of a multiple-mirror system is stability. Linked quadrupoles can achieve average minimum-B stabilization of flute modes, and experiments have demonstrated this stabilization. Localized instabilities at finite β and enhanced diffusion resulting from the distorted flux surfaces and possibly from turbulent higher order modes still remain to be investigated

  11. Elmo bumpy square plasma confinement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, L.W.

    1985-01-01

    The invention is an Elmo bumpy type plasma confinement device having a polygonal configuration of closed magnet field lines for improved plasma confinement. In the preferred embodiment, the device is of a square configuration which is referred to as an Elmo bumpy square (EBS). The EBS is formed by four linear magnetic mirror sections each comprising a plurality of axisymmetric assemblies connected in series and linked by 90/sup 0/ sections of a high magnetic field toroidal solenoid type field generating coils. These coils provide corner confinement with a minimum of radial dispersion of the confined plasma to minimize the detrimental effects of the toroidal curvature of the magnetic field. Each corner is formed by a plurality of circular or elliptical coils aligned about the corner radius to provide maximum continuity in the closing of the magnetic field lines about the square configuration confining the plasma within a vacuum vessel located within the various coils forming the square configuration confinement geometry.

  12. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-01-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model's phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density

  13. Combined confinement system applied to tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1986-01-01

    From particle orbit point of view, a tokamak is a combined confinement configuration where a closed toroidal volume is surrounded by an open confinement system like a magnetic mirror. By eliminating a cold halo plasma, the energy loss from the plasma becomes convective. The H-mode in diverted tokamaks is an example. Because of the favorable scaling of the energy confinement time with temperature, the performance of the tokamak may be significantly improved by taking advantage of this effect. (author)

  14. Molecular phylogeny and species separation of five morphologically similar Holosticha-complex ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora) using ARDRA riboprinting and multigene sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Yi, Zhenzhen; Gong, Jun; Al-Rasheid Khaled, A. S.; Song, Weibo

    2010-05-01

    To separate and redefine the ambiguous Holosticha-complex, a confusing group of hypotrichous ciliates, six strains belonging to five morphospecies of three genera, Holosticha heterofoissneri, Anteholosticha sp. pop1, Anteholosticha sp. pop2, A. manca, A. gracilis and Nothoholosticha fasciola, were analyzed using 12 restriction enzymes on the basis of amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis. Nine of the 12 enzymes could digest the DNA products, four ( Hinf I, Hind III, Msp I, Taq I) yielded species-specific restriction patterns, and Hind III and Taq I produced different patterns for two Anteholosticha sp. populations. Distinctly different restriction digestion haplotypes and similarity indices can be used to separate the species. The secondary structures of the five species were predicted based on the ITS2 transcripts and there were several minor differences among species, while two Anteholosticha sp. populations were identical. In addition, phylogenies based on the SSrRNA gene sequences were reconstructed using multiple algorithms, which grouped them generally into four clades, and exhibited that the genus Anteholosticha should be a convergent assemblage. The fact that Holosticha species clustered with the oligotrichs and choreotrichs, though with very low support values, indicated that the topology may be very divergent and unreliable when the number of sequence data used in the analyses is too low.

  15. Dynamics and reactivity of confined water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musat, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the context of new sustainable energy sources quest, the nuclear energy remains a key solution. However, with the development of nuclear technology, problems relating to nuclear waste disposal arise; thus, the radiolysis of water in confined media is extremely important with respect to matters related to long time storage of nuclear waste. Studies in model porous media would allow the projection of a confined water radiolysis simulator. A first step in this direction was made by studying the radiolysis of water confined in Vycor and CPG glasses; this study continues the trend set and investigates the effects of confinement in metal materials upon the water radiolysis allowing the understanding of metal - water radiation induced corrosion. A further/complete understanding of the radiolytic process under confinement requires knowledge of the effect of confinement upon the dynamics of confined molecules and on the evolution of the species produced upon ionizing radiation. In this respect, we have used the OH vibrator as a probe of the hydrogen bond network properties and thus investigated the dynamics of confined water using IR time resolved spectroscopy. The evolution of the hydrated electron under confinement was studied on a nano and picosecond time scale using UV pump - visible probe technique and single shot spectroscopy. (author) [fr

  16. Summary on inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J.

    1995-01-01

    Highlights on inertial confinement during the fifteenth international conference on plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion are briefly summarized. Specifically the following topics are discussed: the US National Ignition Facility presently planned by the US Department of Energy; demonstration of diagnostics for hot spot formation; declassification of Hohlraum target design; fusion targets, in particular, the Hohlraum target design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Hohlraum experiments, direct drive implosions, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, laser imprinting (of perturbations by the laser on the laser target surface), hot spot formation and mixing, hot spot implosion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, USA, time resolving hot spot dynamics at the Institute of Laser Engineering (ILE), Osaka, Japan, laser-plasma interaction

  17. Confined subdiffusion in three dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Shan-Lin; He Yong

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) Fick's diffusion equation and fractional diffusion equation are solved for different reflecting boundaries. We use the continuous time random walk model (CTRW) to investigate the time-averaged mean square displacement (MSD) of a 3D single particle trajectory. Theoretical results show that the ensemble average of the time-averaged MSD can be expressed analytically by a Mittag—Leffler function. Our new expression is in agreement with previous formulas in two limiting cases: <δ 2 -bar> ∼ Δ in short lag time and <δ 2 -bar> ∼ Δ 1-α in long lag time. We also simulate the experimental data of mRNA diffusion in living E. coli using a 3D CTRW model under confined and crowded conditions. The simulation results are well consistent with experimental results. The calculations of power spectral density (PSD) further indicate the subdiffsive behavior of an individual trajectory. (general)

  18. Colour screening and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1978-03-01

    It is proposed that in Quantum Chromodynamics the colour charge of gluons and of anything with zero triality is screened by a dynamical Higgs mechanism with Higgs scalars made out of gluons. The center Z 3 of the gauge group SU(3) is left unbroken in this way, and single quarks, which have nonzero triality, cannot be screened. Long range forces between them persist therefore. Given that the Higgs mechanism produces a mass gap, the most favorable configuration of field lines between e.g. quark and antiquark will be in strings analogous to magnetic field lines in a superconductor. The strings confine the quarks. The screening mechanism, on the other hand, produces not only the mass gap (which leads to string formation) but is also responsible for saturation of forces, i.e. absence of bound states of six quarks etc. (orig.) [de

  19. Colour screening and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1978-01-01

    It is proposed that in quantum chromodynamics the colour charge of gluons and of anything with zero triality is screened by a dynamic Higgs mechanism with Higgs scalars made out of gluons, but the center Z 3 of the gauge group SU(3) is left unbroken, and single quarks, which have nonzero triality, are not screened. Long range forces between them persist therefore. Given that the Higgs mechanism produces a mass gap, the most favourable configuration of field lines between e.g., quark and antiquark will be in strings analogous to magnetic field lines in a superconductor. The string confine the quarks. The screening mechanism, on the other hand, produces not only the mass gap (which leads to string formation) but is also responsible for saturation of forces, i.e. absence of bound states of six quarks, etc. (Auth.)

  20. Tormac confinement, theory, and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, H.L.; Brown, I.G.; Feinberg, B.

    1978-01-01

    Tormac is a stuffed toroidal line cusp: the magnetic field is divided into two distinct regions, i.e., an outside ''sheath'' layer where the plasma is mirror-confined on open field lines and an internal high-β region of closed nested flux surfaces. The sheath is arranged with the appropriate curvature to ensure absolute MHD stability everywhere. The bulk of the plasma is maintained on closed flux surfaces as in a typical toroidal configuration, but with enhanced MHD stability due to the external field shaping. Experimental results on a toroidal ''bicusp'' (Tormac IV) will be reported. This device has a boro-silicate glass chamber and holds a plasma with an aspect ratio of 4 and a major diameter of 35 cm

  1. Planning for greater confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, T.L.; Luner, C.; Meshkov, N.K.; Trevorrow, L.E.; Yu, C.

    1985-01-01

    A report that provides guidance for planning for greater-confinement disposal (GCD) of low-level radioactive waste is being prepared. The report addresses procedures for selecting a GCD technology and provides information for implementing these procedures. The focus is on GCD; planning aspects common to GCD and shallow-land burial are covered by reference. Planning procedure topics covered include regulatory requirements, waste characterization, benefit-cost-risk assessment and pathway analysis methodologies, determination of need, waste-acceptance criteria, performance objectives, and comparative assessment of attributes that support these objectives. The major technologies covered include augered shafts, deep trenches, engineered structures, hydrofracture, improved waste forms, and high-integrity containers. Descriptive information is provided, and attributes that are relevant for risk assessment and operational requirements are given. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  2. 2XIIB plasma confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coensgen, F.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports results of 2XIIB neutral-beam injection experiments with plasma-stream stabilization. The plasma stream is provided either by a pulsed plasma generator located on the field lines outside the plasma region or by ionization of neutral gas introduced at the mirror throat. In the latter case, the gas is ionized by the normal particle flux through the magnetic mirror. A method of plasma startup and sustenance in a steady-state magnetic field is reported in which the plasma stream from the pulsed plasma generator serves as the initial target for the neutral beams. After an energetic plasma of sufficient density is established, the plasma generator stream is replaced by the gas-fed stream. Lifetimes of the stabilized plasma increase with plasma temperature in agreement with the plasma stabilization of the drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode. The following plasma parameters are attained using the pulsed plasma generator for stabilization: n approximately 5 x 10 13 cm -3 , anti W/sub i/ approximately 13 keV, T/sub e/ = 140 eV, and ntau/sub p/ approximately 7 x 10 10 cm -3 .s. With the gas feed, the mean deuterium ion energy is 9 keV and the peak density n approximately 10 14 cm -3 . In the latter case, the energy confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub E/ = 7 x 10 10 cm -3 .s, and the particle confinement parameter reaches ntau/sub p/ = 1 x 10 11 cm -3 .s

  3. Local structural ordering in surface-confined liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwa, I.; Jeżewski, W.; Zakharov, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    The effect of the interplay between attractive nonlocal surface interactions and attractive pair long-range intermolecular couplings on molecular structures of liquid crystals confined in thin cells with flat solid surfaces has been studied. Extending the McMillan mean field theory to include finite systems, it has been shown that confining surfaces can induce complex orientational and translational ordering of molecules. Typically, local smectic A, nematic, and isotropic phases have been shown to coexist in certain temperature ranges, provided that confining cells are sufficiently thick, albeit finite. Due to the nonlocality of surface interactions, the spatial arrangement of these local phases can display, in general, an unexpected complexity along the surface normal direction. In particular, molecules located in the vicinity of surfaces can still be organized in smectic layers, even though nematic and/or isotropic order can simultaneously appear in the interior of cells. The resulting surface freezing of smectic layers has been confirmed to occur even for rather weak surface interactions. The surface interactions cannot, however, prevent smectic layers from melting relatively close to system boundaries, even when molecules are still arranged in layers within the central region of the system. The internal interfaces, separating individual liquid-crystal phases, are demonstrated here to form fronts of local finite-size transitions that move across cells under temperature changes. Although the complex molecular ordering in surface confined liquid-crystal systems can essentially be controlled by temperature variations, specific thermal properties of these systems, especially the nature of the local transitions, are argued to be strongly conditioned to the degree of molecular packing.

  4. The growth of the mean average crossing number of equilateral polygons in confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsuaga, J; Borgo, B; Scharein, R; Diao, Y

    2009-01-01

    The physical and biological properties of collapsed long polymer chains as well as of highly condensed biopolymers (such as DNA in all organisms) are known to be determined, at least in part, by their topological and geometrical properties. With this purpose of characterizing the topological properties of such condensed systems equilateral random polygons restricted to confined volumes are often used. However, very few analytical results are known. In this paper, we investigate the effect of volume confinement on the mean average crossing number (ACN) of equilateral random polygons. The mean ACN of knots and links under confinement provides a simple alternative measurement for the topological complexity of knots and links in the statistical sense. For an equilateral random polygon of n segments without any volume confinement constrain, it is known that its mean ACN (ACN) is of the order 3/16 n log n + O(n). Here we model the confining volume as a simple sphere of radius R. We provide an analytical argument which shows that (ACN) of an equilateral random polygon of n segments under extreme confinement (meaning R 2 ). We propose to model the growth of (ACN) as a(R)n 2 + b(R)nln(n) under a less-extreme confinement condition, where a(R) and b(R) are functions of R with R being the radius of the confining sphere. Computer simulations performed show a fairly good fit using this model.

  5. Generating equilateral random polygons in confinement III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Y; Ernst, C; Montemayor, A; Ziegler, U

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we continue our earlier studies (Diao et al 2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 405202, Diao et al J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 275203) on the generation methods of random equilateral polygons confined in a sphere. The first half of this paper is concerned with the generation of confined equilateral random walks. We show that if the selection of a vertex is uniform subject to the position of its previous vertex and the confining condition, then the distributions of the vertices are not uniform, although there exists a distribution such that if the initial vertex is selected following this distribution, then all vertices of the random walk follow this same distribution. Thus in order to generate a confined equilateral random walk, the selection of a vertex cannot be uniform subject to the position of its previous vertex and the confining condition. We provide a simple algorithm capable of generating confined equilateral random walks whose vertex distribution is almost uniform in the confinement sphere. In the second half of this paper we show that any process generating confined equilateral random walks can be turned into a process generating confined equilateral random polygons with the property that the vertex distribution of the polygons approaches the vertex distribution of the walks as the polygons get longer and longer. In our earlier studies, the starting point of the confined polygon is fixed at the center of the sphere. The new approach here allows us to move the starting point of the confined polygon off the center of the sphere. (paper)

  6. ABC Triblock Copolymer Vesicles with Mesh-like Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Russell, Thomas; Grason, Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Polymer vesicles can be made from poly(isoprene-b-styrene-b-2-vinylpyridene) (PI-b-PS-b-P2VP) triblock copolymer under the confinement of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. It was found that these vesicles have well-defined, nanoscopic size and a microphase-separated hydrophobic core, comprised of PS and PI blocks. Vesicle formation was tracked using both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. A mesh-like morphology formed in the core at a well-defined composition of three blocks. Confinement played an important role in generating these vesicles with such an unusual morphology.

  7. Auroral morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deehr, C.S.; Romick, G.J.; Sivjee, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The aurora is a radiant manifestation of solar particle emissions and their control by intervening electromagnetic fields. The analogy with a television system was first made, we believe, by Elvey, (1958). The latest concepts of solar-terrestrial control are included in description by Akasofu (1979) showing the phosphor screen as the upper atmosphere with an auroral image produced by particles from a source on the sun, modulated by electric and magnetic fields with the magnetohydrodynamic (MDH) generator formed by electrons and protons from the solar wind across the geomagnetic tail as the power supply. Thus, the size and shape of the aurora must reflect all the forces acting in the auroral particles on their way from the sun to the earth. Auroral morphology, therefore, is the study of the occurence of aurora in space and time for the purpose of describing the origin of solar particels and the forces acting upon them between the time of their production on the sun and their loss in the atmosphere. The advantage of using the aurora as a television monitor of this process over any conceivable system of in situ measurements is obvious when one considers the large number of space vehicles which would be necessary to record the information concentrated in the auroral oval which differs in scale with the magnetosphere by perhaps 10 6 . (orig.)

  8. Climate conditions in bedded confinement buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confinement buildings are utilized for finishing cattle to allow more efficient collection of animal waste and to buffer animals against adverse climatic conditions. Environmental data were obtained from a 29 m wide x 318 m long bedded confinement building with the long axis oriented east to west. T...

  9. An introduction to the confinement problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greensite, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    This book addresses the confinement problem, which quite generally deals with the behavior of non-abelian gauge theories, and the force which is mediated by gauge fields, at large distances.The word ''confinement'' in the context of hadronic physics originally referred to the fact that quarks and gluons appear to be trapped inside mesons and baryons, from which they cannot escape. There are other, and possibly deeper meanings that can be attached to the term, and these will be explored in this book. Although the confinement problem is far from solved, much is now known about the general features of the confining force, and there are a number of very well motivated theories of confinement which are under active investigation. This volume gives a both pedagogical and concise introduction and overview of the main ideas in this field, their attractive features, and, as appropriate, their shortcomings. (orig.)

  10. Global energy confinement in TORE SUPRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, G.T.; Bizarro, J.P.; Genile, B. de; Hutter, Th.; Laurent, L.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D.; Peysson, Y.; Tonon, G.; Houtte, D. van

    1992-01-01

    The global energy confinement behaviour of mixed Ohmic/Lower Hybrid driven Tore Supra plasmas has been analysed at various densities. In contradiction with L-mode ITER scaling law, this analysis indicates that the global energy confinement time depends strongly on the plasma density and the isotopic dependence seems not to be observed. The thermal electron energy content of steady-state discharges is in good agreement with the offset linear Rebut-Lallia scaling law. During current ramp experiments, the global energy confinement time was found to depend on the internal self-inductance (li). Improved confinement has been obtained for a steady-state 0.8 MA plasma where the plasma current profile is peaked by LH waves (li ∼1.8). In this case, the global confinement time is found to be about 40% higher than the value predicted by the Rebut-Lallia scaling law. (author) 3 refs., 6 figs

  11. Confinement-induced resonances in anharmonic waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Shiguo [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia); Hu Hui; Liu Xiaji; Drummond, Peter D. [Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne 3122 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    We develop the theory of anharmonic confinement-induced resonances (ACIRs). These are caused by anharmonic excitation of the transverse motion of the center of mass (c.m.) of two bound atoms in a waveguide. As the transverse confinement becomes anisotropic, we find that the c.m. resonant solutions split for a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) system, in agreement with recent experiments. This is not found in harmonic confinement theories. A new resonance appears for repulsive couplings (a{sub 3D}>0) for a quasi-two-dimensional (2D) system, which is also not seen with harmonic confinement. After inclusion of anharmonic energy corrections within perturbation theory, we find that these ACIRs agree extremely well with anomalous 1D and 2D confinement-induced resonance positions observed in recent experiments. Multiple even- and odd-order transverse ACIRs are identified in experimental data, including up to N=4 transverse c.m. quantum numbers.

  12. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D.

    2001-01-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  13. Local linear viscoelasticity of confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J S; Daivis, P J; Todd, B D

    2007-04-14

    In this paper the authors propose a novel method to study the local linear viscoelasticity of fluids confined between two walls. The method is based on the linear constitutive equation and provides details about the real and imaginary parts of the local complex viscosity. They apply the method to a simple atomic fluid undergoing zero mean oscillatory flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The method shows that the viscoelastic properties of the fluid exhibit dramatic spatial changes near the wall-fluid boundary due to the high density in this region. It is also shown that the real part of the viscosity converges to the frequency dependent local shear viscosity sufficiently far away from the wall. This also provides valuable information about the transport properties in the fluid, in general. The viscosity is compared with predictions from the local average density model. The two methods disagree in that the local average density model predicts larger viscosity variations near the wall-fluid boundary than what is observed through the method presented here.

  14. Dynamic behaviour of the high confinement mode of fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zohm, H.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the dynamic behaviour of the High Confinement mode (H-mode) of fusion plasmas, which is one of the most promising regimes of enhanced energy confinement in magnetic fusion research. The physics of the H-mode is not yet fully understood, and the detailed behaviour is complex. However, we establish a simple physics picture of the phenomenon. Although a first principles theory of the anomalous transport processes in a fusion plasma has not yet been given, we show that within the picture developed here, it is possible to describe the dynamic behaviour of the H-mode, namely the dynamics of the L-H transition and the occurrence of edge localized modes (ELMs). (orig.)

  15. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  16. Confinement in single walled carbon nanotubes investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battie, Y.; Jamon, D.; Lauret, J.S.; Gu, Q.; Gicquel-Guézo, M.; En Naciri, A.; Loiseau, A.

    2014-01-01

    Thick films of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different diameter and chirality distributions are characterized by combining transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dependence of the dielectric function with the increase of the SWCNT diameter occurs with a drastic redshift of the S 11 , S 22 and M 11 transition energies. The transfer integral parameter γ 0 of SWCNT is also evaluated and analyzed. We demonstrate that parts of the optical properties of SWCNTs are attributed to a one dimensional confinement effect. - Highlights: • Ellipsometric measurements are performed on carbon nanotube thick films. • The complex dielectric functions of conventional carbon nanotubes are given. • Confinement effects explain the variations of dielectric function of nanotubes

  17. Coastal Modelling Environment version 1.0: a framework for integrating landform-specific component models in order to simulate decadal to centennial morphological changes on complex coasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Payo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to model morphological changes on complex, multi-landform coasts over decadal to centennial timescales is essential for sustainable coastal management worldwide. One approach involves coupling of landform-specific simulation models (e.g. cliffs, beaches, dunes and estuaries that have been independently developed. An alternative, novel approach explored in this paper is to capture the essential characteristics of the landform-specific models using a common spatial representation within an appropriate software framework. This avoid the problems that result from the model-coupling approach due to between-model differences in the conceptualizations of geometries, volumes and locations of sediment. In the proposed framework, the Coastal Modelling Environment (CoastalME, change in coastal morphology is represented by means of dynamically linked raster and geometrical objects. A grid of raster cells provides the data structure for representing quasi-3-D spatial heterogeneity and sediment conservation. Other geometrical objects (lines, areas and volumes that are consistent with, and derived from, the raster structure represent a library of coastal elements (e.g. shoreline, beach profiles and estuary volumes as required by different landform-specific models. As a proof-of-concept, we illustrate the capabilities of an initial version of CoastalME by integrating a cliff–beach model and two wave propagation approaches. We verify that CoastalME can reproduce behaviours of the component landform-specific models. Additionally, the integration of these component models within the CoastalME framework reveals behaviours that emerge from the interaction of landforms, which have not previously been captured, such as the influence of the regional bathymetry on the local alongshore sediment-transport gradient and the effect on coastal change on an undefended coastal segment and on sediment bypassing of coastal structures.

  18. Morphology, structure, composition and build-up processes of the active channel-mouth lobe complex of the Congo deep-sea fan with inputs from remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) multibeam and video surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennielou, Bernard; Droz, Laurence; Babonneau, Nathalie; Jacq, Céline; Bonnel, Cédric; Picot, Marie; Le Saout, Morgane; Saout, Yohan; Bez, Martine; Savoye, Bruno; Olu, Karine; Rabouille, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    The detailed structure and composition of turbiditic channel-mouth lobes is still largely unknown because they commonly lie at abyssal water depths, are very thin and are therefore beyond the resolution of hull-mound acoustic tools. The morphology, structure and composition of the Congo turbiditic channel-mouth lobe complex (90×40 km; 2525 km2) were investigated with hull-mounted swath bathymetry, air gun seismics, 3.5 kHz sub-bottom profiler, sediment piston cores and also with high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and video acquired with a Remote Operating Vehicle (ROV). The lobe complex lies 760 km off the Congo River mouth in the Angola abyssal plain between 4740 and 5030 m deep. It is active and is fed by turbidity currents that deposit several centimetres of sediment per century. The lobe complex is subdivided into five lobes that have prograded. The lobes are dominantly muddy. Sand represents ca. 13% of the deposits and is restricted to the feeding channel and distributaries. The overall lobe body is composed of thin muddy to silty turbidites. The whole lobe complex is characterized by in situ mass wasting (slumps, debrites). The 1-m-resolution bathymetry shows pervasive slidings and block avalanches on the edges of the feeding channel and the channel mouth indicating that sliding occurs early and continuously in the lobe build-up. Mass wasting is interpreted as a consequence of very-high accumulation rates, over-steepening and erosion along the channels and is therefore an intrinsic process of lobe building. The bifurcation of feeding channels is probably triggered when the gradient in the distributaries at the top of a lobe becomes flat and when turbidity currents find their way on the higher gradient on the lobe side. It may also be triggered by mass wasting on the lobe side. When a new lobe develops, the abandoned lobes continue to collect significant turbiditic deposits from the feeding channel spillover, so that the whole lobe complex remains active. A

  19. The nature of confined states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, C.H.

    1979-01-01

    We show that in spite of charge confinement in the Schwinger model and its nonconfinement in (QED) 4 , the charged states in the two theories have many features in common. A convenient infrared regularization procedure is introduced to facilitate the study of large-distance behaviors in the Schwinger model, particularly those properties that are relevant ot the question of when a charged state is physical. One difference that emerges between the two theories is that when a charged state in the Schwinger model is made physical while its energy is kept bounded, the charge goes off to infinity. Thr end-product could be considered neutral if the charge is defined as the limit of local measurements. On the other hadn, if one attempts to change a local charged state in the Schwinger model into a physical state by transportin the localization region to asymptotic distances, the state may end up in either a THETA-sector or the corresponding (THETA + π)-sector, depending on the direction of transport. A possible generalization of this THETA-mixing property to quark-like states in QCD is commented upon. (orig.)

  20. Complex Nanostructures by Pulsed Droplet Epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboyuki Koguchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available What makes three dimensional semiconductor quantum nanostructures so attractive is the possibility to tune their electronic properties by careful design of their size and composition. These parameters set the confinement potential of electrons and holes, thus determining the electronic and optical properties of the nanostructure. An often overlooked parameter, which has an even more relevant effect on the electronic properties of the nanostructure, is shape. Gaining a strong control over the electronic properties via shape tuning is the key to access subtle electronic design possibilities. The Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy is an innovative growth method for the fabrication of quantum nanostructures with highly designable shapes and complex morphologies. With Pulsed Dropled Epitaxy it is possible to combine different nanostructures, namely quantum dots, quantum rings and quantum disks, with tunable sizes and densities, into a single multi-function nanostructure, thus allowing an unprecedented control over electronic properties.

  1. Generating equilateral random polygons in confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Y; Ernst, C; Montemayor, A; Ziegler, U

    2011-01-01

    One challenging problem in biology is to understand the mechanism of DNA packing in a confined volume such as a cell. It is known that confined circular DNA is often knotted and hence the topology of the extracted (and relaxed) circular DNA can be used as a probe of the DNA packing mechanism. However, in order to properly estimate the topological properties of the confined circular DNA structures using mathematical models, it is necessary to generate large ensembles of simulated closed chains (i.e. polygons) of equal edge lengths that are confined in a volume such as a sphere of certain fixed radius. Finding efficient algorithms that properly sample the space of such confined equilateral random polygons is a difficult problem. In this paper, we propose a method that generates confined equilateral random polygons based on their probability distribution. This method requires the creation of a large database initially. However, once the database has been created, a confined equilateral random polygon of length n can be generated in linear time in terms of n. The errors introduced by the method can be controlled and reduced by the refinement of the database. Furthermore, our numerical simulations indicate that these errors are unbiased and tend to cancel each other in a long polygon. (paper)

  2. Mechanical collapse of confined fluid membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Jee E; Purohit, Prashant K; Klug, William S

    2014-11-01

    Compact cylindrical and spherical invaginations are common structural motifs found in cellular and developmental biology. To understand the basic physical mechanisms that produce and maintain such structures, we present here a simple model of vesicles in confinement, in which mechanical equilibrium configurations are computed by energy minimization, balancing the effects of curvature elasticity, contact of the membrane with itself and the confining geometry, and adhesion. For cylindrical confinement, the shape equations are solved both analytically and numerically by finite element analysis. For spherical confinement, axisymmetric configurations are obtained numerically. We find that the geometry of invaginations is controlled by a dimensionless ratio of the adhesion strength to the bending energy of an equal area spherical vesicle. Larger adhesion produces more concentrated curvatures, which are mainly localized to the "neck" region where the invagination breaks away from its confining container. Under spherical confinement, axisymmetric invaginations are approximately spherical. For extreme confinement, multiple invaginations may form, bifurcating along multiple equilibrium branches. The results of the model are useful for understanding the physical mechanisms controlling the structure of lipid membranes of cells and their organelles, and developing tissue membranes.

  3. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image

  4. Review of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, M. G.

    The physics of inertial confinement fusion is reviewed. The trend to short-wavelength lasers is argued, and the distinction between direct and indirect (soft X-ray) drive is made. Key present issues include the non-linear growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities, the seeding of this instability by the initial laser imprint, the relevance of self-generated magnetic fields, and the importance of parametric instabilities (stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering) in gas-filled hohlraums. Experiments are reviewed which explore the R-T instability in both planar and converging geometry. The employment of various optical smoothing techniques is contrasted with the overcoating of the capsule by gold coated plastic foams to reduce considerably the imprint problem. The role of spontaneously generated magnetic fields in non-symmetric plasmas is discussed. Recent hohlraum compression results are presented together with gas bag targets which replicate the long-scale-length low density plasmas expected in NIF gas filled hohlraums. The onset of first Brillouin and then Raman scattering is observed. The fast ignitor scheme is a proposal to use an intense short pulse laser to drill a hole through the coronal plasma and then, with laser excited fast electrons, create a propagating thermonuclear spark in a dense, relatively cold laser-compressed target. Some preliminary results of laser hole drilling and 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations of this and the > 10^8 Gauss self-generated magnetic fields are presented. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described.

  5. Percolating cluster of center vortices and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliozzi, Ferdinando; Panero, Marco; Provero, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    We study the role of percolating clusters of center vortices in configurations of an Ising gauge theory in 3D. It is known that low energy features of gauge theories can be described in terms of an 'effective string picture', and that confinement properties are associated with topologically non-trivial configurations. We focus our attention upon percolating clusters of center vortices, and present numerical evidence for the fact that these objects play a preminent role in confinement phenomenon, since their removal sweeps off confinement altogether. Moreover, numerical simulations show that the string fluctuations, and in particular the Mischer term, are completely encoded in the percolating cluster

  6. FRP confined smart concrete/mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Y.; Zhu, P. S.; Choi, K. G.; Wu, Y. T.; Huang, Z. Y.; Shan, B.

    2006-03-01

    In this study, fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) confined smart concrete/mortar sensors were invented and validated for significantly improved measurement range. Several trial mixes were made using cement mortar and micron-phase graphite powders at different mix proportions. Compressive loading tests were conducted on smart mortar cylinder specimens with or without FRP confinement. Two-probe method was used to detect the electrical resistance of the smart cement mortar specimens. Strong correlation was recognized between the stress and electric resistance of the smart mortar. The test results indicated that the FRP wrapping could significantly enlarge the range of such self-sensing property as a consequence of confinement.

  7. Confinement and quark structure of light hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    We present a quark confinement model (QCM) for the description of the low-energy physics of light hadrons (mesons and baryons). The model is based on two hypotheses. First, the quark confinement is realized as averaging over vacuum gluon fields which are believed to provide the confinement of any colour objects. Second, hadrons are treated as collective colourless excitations of quark-gluon interactions. The description of strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions of mesons and baryons at the low energy is given from a unique point of view

  8. Plasma confinement in the TMX tandem mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement in the Tandem Mirror Experiment (TMX) is described. Axially confining potentials are shown to exist throughout the central 20-cm core of TMX. Axial electron-confinement time is up to 100 times that of single-cell mirror machines. Radial transport of ions is smaller than axial transport near the axis. It has two parts at large radii: nonambipolar, in rough agreement with predictions from resonant-neoclassical transport theory, and ambipolar, observed near the plasma edge under certain conditions, accompanied by a low-frequency, m = 1 instability or strong turbulence

  9. Plasma confinement in a magnetic dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.; Bromberg, L.; Garnier, D.; Mauel, M.

    1999-01-01

    A dipole fusion confinement device is stable to MHD interchange and ballooning modes when the pressure profile is sufficiently gentle. The plasma can be confined at high beta, is steady state and disruption free. Theory indicates that when the pressure gradient is sufficiently gentle to satisfy MHD requirements drift waves will also be stable. The dipole approach is particularly applicable for advanced fuels. A new experimental facility is presently being built to test the stability and transport properties of a dipole-confined plasma. (author)

  10. Plasma confinement in a magnetic dipole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.; Bromberg, L.; Garnier, D.; Mauel, M.

    2001-01-01

    A dipole fusion confinement device is stable to MHD interchange and ballooning modes when the pressure profile is sufficiently gentle. The plasma can be confined at high beta, is steady state and disruption free. Theory indicates that when the pressure gradient is sufficiently gentle to satisfy MHD requirements drift waves will also be stable. The dipole approach is particularly applicable for advanced fuels. A new experimental facility is presently being built to test the stability and transport properties of a dipole-confined plasma. (author)

  11. Energy Confinement of both Ohmic and LHW Plasma on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yao; Gao Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Study on the characters of energy confinement in both Ohmic and lower hybrid wave (LHW) discharges on EAST is conducted and the linear Ohmic confinement (LOC), saturated ohmic confinement (SOC) and improved Ohmic confinement (IOC) regimes are investigated in this paper. It is observed that an improved confinement mode characterized by both a drop of D α line intensity and an increase in line average density can be triggered by a gas puffing pulse. (magnetically confined plasma)

  12. Capillary condensation and orientational ordering of confined polar fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramzow, Matthias; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2007-01-01

    The phase behavior and the orientational structure of polar model fluids confined to slit pores is investigated by means of density functional theory in a modified mean-field approximation. We focus on fluid states and further assume a uniform number density throughout the pore. Our results for spherical dipolar particles with additional van der Waals-like interactions (Stockmayer fluids) reveal complex fluid-fluid phase behavior involving condensation and first- and second-order isotropic-to-ferroelectric phase transitions, where the ferroelectric ordering occurs parallel to the confining walls. The relative importance of these phase transitions depends on two "tuning" parameters, that is the strength of the dipolar interactions (relative to the isotropic attractive ones) between fluid particles, and on the pore width. In particular, in narrow pores the condensation transition seen in bulk Stockmayer fluids is entirely suppressed. For dipolar hard spheres, on the other hand, the impact of confinement consists in a decrease of the isotropic-to-ferroelectric transition temperatures. We also demonstrate that the local orientational structure is inhomogeneous and anisotropic even in globally isotropic systems, in agreement with computer simulation results.

  13. A Study of Confined Helium Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Wenfang

    2007-01-01

    The helium atom confined by a spherical parabolic potential well is studied employing the adiabatic hyperspherical approach method. Total energies of the ground and three low-excited states are obtained as a function of the confined potential radii. We find that the energies of a spherical parabolic potential well are in good agreement with those of an impenetrable spherical box for the larger confined potential radius. We find also that the confinement may cause accidental degeneracies between levels with different low-excited states and the inversion of the energy values. The results for the three-dimensional spherical potential well and the two-dimensional disc-like potential well are compared with each other. We find that the energy difference between states in a two-dimensional parabolic potential is also obviously larger than the corresponding levels for a spherical parabolic potential.

  14. The Physics Basis of ITER Confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, F.

    2009-01-01

    ITER will be the first fusion reactor and the 50 year old dream of fusion scientists will become reality. The quality of magnetic confinement will decide about the success of ITER, directly in the form of the confinement time and indirectly because it decides about the plasma parameters and the fluxes, which cross the separatrix and have to be handled externally by technical means. This lecture portrays some of the basic principles which govern plasma confinement, uses dimensionless scaling to set the limits for the predictions for ITER, an approach which also shows the limitations of the predictions, and describes briefly the major characteristics and physics behind the H-mode--the preferred confinement regime of ITER.

  15. Nucleon in confining models with glueballs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broniowski, W.

    1987-07-01

    Solutions to non-chiral and chiral color dielectric models are discussed. The coupling of glueballs produces absolute quark confinement and generates selfconsistently a bag. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  16. Random walks and polygons in tight confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Y; Ernst, C; Ziegler, U

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the effect of confinement on the topology and geometry of tightly confined random walks and polygons. Here the walks and polygons are confined in a sphere of radius R ≥ 1/2 and the polygons are equilateral with n edges of unit length. We illustrate numerically that for a fixed length of random polygons the knotting probability increases to one as the radius decreases to 1/2. We also demonstrate that for random polygons (walks) the curvature increases to πn (π(n – 1)) as the radius approaches 1/2 and that the torsion decreases to ≈ πn/3 (≈ π(n – 1)/3). In addition we show the effect of length and confinement on the average crossing number of a random polygon

  17. Plasma confinement system and methods for use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarboe, Thomas R.; Sutherland, Derek

    2017-09-05

    A plasma confinement system is provided that includes a confinement chamber that includes one or more enclosures of respective helicity injectors. The one or more enclosures are coupled to ports at an outer radius of the confinement chamber. The system further includes one or more conductive coils aligned substantially parallel to the one or more enclosures and a further set of one or more conductive coils respectively surrounding portions of the one or more enclosures. Currents may be provided to the sets of conductive coils to energize a gas within the confinement chamber into a plasma. Further, a heat-exchange system is provided that includes an inner wall, an intermediate wall, an outer wall, and pipe sections configured to carry coolant through cavities formed by the walls.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of confined polymer systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Johannes Henricus van

    1991-01-01

    This thesis considers confined polymer systems. These systems are of considerable interest, e.g., thin polymer films, chromotography of polymer solutions, drag reduction, enhanced oil recovery, stabilization of colloidal dispersions, lubrication and biolubrication. The method used to study these

  19. Rock Fragmentation Characteristics by TBM Cutting and Efficiency under Bi-Lateral Confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Chen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the mechanisms of rock breakage are assessed using tunnel boring machine (TBM disc cutters under bi-axial pressure. Sequential indentation tests were conducted on granite specimens using a tri-axial testing platform. The morphology and volume of the fractured surface were measured and analyzed using a three-dimensional surface profilometer. An analysis of rock breaking growth and efficiency was performed as well. When the minor confining pressure (σ1 is constant, the results show that a larger difference in confining pressure leads to a larger volume of fractured surface, thereafter improving the rock-breaking efficiency even though the penetration energy is enlarged. On the other hand, when the major confining pressure (σ2 is constant, the penetration energy increases proportionally with the σ1; however, the volume of fractured surface is decreased, and the breaking efficiency is attenuated as well.

  20. Predictions of a theory of quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1980-03-01

    We propose a theory of quark confinement which uses only the simplest of approximations. It explains persistence of quark confinement in Yang Mills theories with gauge group SU(2) or SU(3) as a consequence of asymptotic freedom in perturbation theory and of the known phase structure of Z(2) resp. Z(3) lattice gauge theory. Predictions are derived which can in principle be tested by computer simulation. Some are already tested by results of Creutz. They are in good agreement. (orig.)

  1. Confined catalysis under two-dimensional materials

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haobo; Xiao, Jianping; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    Small spaces in nanoreactors may have big implications in chemistry, because the chemical nature of molecules and reactions within the nanospaces can be changed significantly due to the nanoconfinement effect. Two-dimensional (2D) nanoreactor formed under 2D materials can provide a well-defined model system to explore the confined catalysis. We demonstrate a general tendency for weakened surface adsorption under the confinement of graphene overlayer, illustrating the feasible modulation of su...

  2. Magnetic confinement in plasmas in nuclear devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tull, C.G.

    1979-01-01

    The main emphasis of the magnetic fusion energy research program today lies in the development of two types of confinement schemes: magnetic mirrors and tokamaks. Experimental programs for both of these confinement schemes have shown steady progress toward achieving fusion power breakeven. The scaling of the current machines to a reactor operating regime and newly developed methods for plasma heating will very likely produce power breakeven within the next decade. Predictions are that the efficiency in a fusion power plant should exceed 32%

  3. Predictions of a theory of quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of quark confinement is proposed which uses only the simplest of approximations. It explains persistence of quark confinement in Yang-Mills theories with gauge group SU(2) or SU(3) as a consequence of asymptotic freedom in perturbation theory and of the known phase structure of Z(2) and Z(3) lattice gauge theory. Predictions are derived which can in principle be tested by computer simulation. Some are are already tested by results of Creutz. They are in good agreement

  4. Isotope effect on confinement in DT plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.; Yagi, M.; Azumi, M.

    1994-03-01

    Isotope effect on the energy confinement time is discussed for the DT plasma. The transport theory which is based on the ballooning mode turbulence is applied. When the DT plasma is produced under the condition of β p >1, the energy confinement time of DT plasma (50% mixture) is expected to be about 1.2 times better than the D plasma with the same operation condition. (author)

  5. Fluorescence Microscopy of Nanochannel-Confined DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Fredrik; Persson, Fredrik; Fritzsche, Joachim; Beech, Jason P; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O

    2018-01-01

    Stretching of DNA in nanoscale confinement allows for several important studies. The genetic contents of the DNA can be visualized on the single DNA molecule level and both the polymer physics of confined DNA and also DNA/protein and other DNA/DNA-binding molecule interactions can be explored. This chapter describes the basic steps to fabricate the nanostructures, perform the experiments and analyze the data.

  6. Extended BRS algebra and color confinement criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Meiun.

    1983-09-01

    We examine the color-confinement criteria proposed by Kugo and Ojima. With the use of the extended BRS symmetry and the Nakanishi's theorem, we look for the representations of the BRS algebra compatible with the first condition of their criteria (the K-O condition) and then ask whether or not they are physically acceptable. As a result, the quartet mechanism does not work, and the K-O condition is not regarded as a confinement condition. (author)

  7. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  8. Bifurcated equilibria in centrifugally confined plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, I.; Teodorescu, C.; Guzdar, P. N.; Hassam, A. B.; Clary, R.; Ellis, R.; Lunsford, R.

    2008-01-01

    A bifurcation theory and associated computational model are developed to account for abrupt transitions observed recently on the Maryland Centrifugal eXperiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al. Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)], a supersonically rotating magnetized plasma that relies on centrifugal forces to prevent thermal expansion of plasma along the magnetic field. The observed transitions are from a well-confined, high-rotation state (HR-mode) to a lower-rotation, lesser-confined state (O-mode). A two-dimensional time-dependent magnetohydrodynamics code is used to simulate the dynamical equilibrium states of the MCX configuration. In addition to the expected viscous drag on the core plasma rotation, a momentum loss term is added that models the friction of plasma on the enhanced level of neutrals expected in the vicinity of the insulators at the throats of the magnetic mirror geometry. At small values of the external rotation drive, the plasma is not well-centrifugally confined and hence experiences the drag from near the insulators. Beyond a critical value of the external drive, the system makes an abrupt transition to a well-centrifugally confined state in which the plasma has pulled away from the end insulator plates; more effective centrifugal confinement lowers the plasma mass near the insulators allowing runaway increases in the rotation speed. The well-confined steady state is reached when the external drive is balanced by only the viscosity of the core plasma. A clear hysteresis phenomenon is shown.

  9. Exceptional confinement in G(2) gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, K.; Minkowski, P.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2003-01-01

    We study theories with the exceptional gauge group G(2). The 14 adjoint 'gluons' of a G(2) gauge theory transform as {3}, {3-bar} and {8} under the subgroup SU(3), and hence have the color quantum numbers of ordinary quarks, anti-quarks and gluons in QCD. Since G(2) has a trivial center, a 'quark' in the {7} representation of G(2) can be screened by 'gluons'. As a result, in G(2) Yang-Mills theory the string between a pair of static 'quarks' can break. In G(2) QCD there is a hybrid consisting of one 'quark' and three 'gluons'. In supersymmetric G(2) Yang-Mills theory with a {14} Majorana 'gluino' the chiral symmetry is Z(4) χ . Chiral symmetry breaking gives rise to distinct confined phases separated by confined-confined domain walls. A scalar Higgs field in the {7} representation breaks G(2) to SU(3) and allows us to interpolate between theories with exceptional and ordinary confinement. We also present strong coupling lattice calculations that reveal basic features of G(2) confinement. Just as in QCD, where dynamical quarks break the Z(3) symmetry explicitly, G(2) gauge theories confine even without a center. However, there is not necessarily a deconfinement phase transition at finite temperature

  10. Confined Space Evaluation Student Manual, #19613

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, David Ezekiel [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-08-29

    Many workplaces contain spaces that are considered to be “confined” because their configuration hinders the activities of employees who must enter into, work in, and exit from them. In general, the permit-required confined spaces (PRCSs) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard requires that Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) evaluate the workplace to determine if any spaces are PRCSs. The standard specifies strict procedures for the evaluation and atmospheric testing of a space before and during an entry by workers. The OSHA PRCS standard provides for alternative (less stringent than full-permit) entry procedures in cases where the only hazard in a space is atmospheric and the hazard can be controlled by forced air. At LANL, all confined spaces or potential confined spaces on LANL-owned or -operated property must be identified and evaluated by a confined space evaluator accompanied by a knowledgeable person. This course provides the information needed by confined space evaluators to make judgements about whether a space is a confined space, and if so, whether the space will require a permit for entry.

  11. A new and effective method for thermostatting confined fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Luca, Sergio; Billy, Todd; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2014-01-01

    not interact with wall atoms or each other, thus behaving as virtual particles. Their displacements violate the Lindemann criterion for melting, in such a way that the net effect would not amount to an additional confining surface. One advantage over standard techniques is the reduced computational cost......, particularly for large walls, since they can be kept rigid. Another advantage over accepted strategies is the opportunity to freeze complex charged walls such as β-cristobalite. The method furthermore overcomes the problem with polar fluids such as water, as thermalized charged surfaces require higher spring...

  12. Morphological features in children with autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özgen, Mihriban Heval

    2008-01-01

    The central research aim in the present thesis was to extend the insight in several aspects of the role of the morphological features in autism. Clinical morphology might be used as a biomarker for ASD to reveal insight into the complexity of the disorder. In Chapter 1 current terminology and

  13. Conference summary: Experiments in confinement and plasma-wall interaction and innovative confinement concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninomiya, H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results presented at the 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference 2004 in the sessions of confinement, plasma-wall interaction and innovative confinement concept. The highlights of the presentations are as follows. Long pulse operation with high beta and high bootstrap fraction much longer than the current diffusion time has been achieved. The discharge scenario optimization and its extrapolation towards ITER have progressed remarkably. Significant progress has been made in understanding of global confinement and transport physics. (author)

  14. Pattern Transitions in Bacterial Oscillating System under Nanofluidic Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie-Pan; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Successful binary fission in E. coli relies on remarkable oscillatory behavior of the MinCDE protein system to determine the exact division site. The most favorable models to explain this fascinating spatiotemporal regulation on dynamic MinDE pattern formation in cells are based on reaction-diffusion scenario. Although not fully understood, geometric factors caused by bacterial morphology play a crucial role in MinDE dynamics. In the present study, bacteria were cultured, confined and reshaped in various micro/nanofluidic devices, to mimic either curvature changes of cell peripherals. Fluorescence imaging was utilized to detail the mode transitions in multiple MinDE patterns. The understanding of the physics in multiple pattern formations is further complemented via in silico modeling. The study synergizes the join merits of in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches, to grasp the insight of stochastic dynamics inherited from the noisy mesoscopic biophysics. We acknowledge support from the Foresight Project, Academia Sinica.

  15. Ductility of reinforced concrete columns confined with stapled strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.F.; Khan, Q.U.Z.; Shabbir, F.; Sharif, M.B.; Ijaz, N.

    2015-01-01

    Response of three 150x150x450mm short reinforced concrete (RC) columns confined with different types of confining steel was investigated. Standard stirrups, strips and stapled strips, each having same cross-sectional area, were employed as confining steel around four comer column bars. Experimental work was aimed at probing into the affect of stapled strip confinement on post elastic behavior and ductility level under cyclic axial load. Ductility ratios, strength enhancement factor and core concrete strengths were compared to study the affect of confinement. Results indicate that strength enhancement in RC columns due to strip and stapled strip confinement was not remarkable as compared to stirrup confined column. It was found that as compared to stirrup confined column, stapled strip confinement enhanced the ductility of RC column by 183% and observed axial capacity of stapled strip confined columns was 41 % higher than the strip confined columns. (author)

  16. Controllable Fabrication of Au Nanocups by Confined-Space Thermal Dewetting for OCT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Aiqin; Xu, Wenjing; Ponce de León, Yenisey; Bai, Yaocai; Gong, Mingfu; Xie, Kongliang; Park, Boris Hyle; Yin, Yadong

    2017-07-01

    Here, this study reports a novel confined-space thermal dewetting strategy for the fabrication of Au nanocups with tunable diameter, height, and size of cup opening. The nanocup morphology is defined by the cup-shaped void space created by a yolk-shell silica template that spontaneously takes an eccentric configuration during annealing. Thermal dewetting of Au, which is sandwiched between the yolk and shell, leads to the desired nanocup morphology. With strong scattering in near infrared, the Au nanocups exhibit superior efficiency as contrast agents for spectral-domain optical coherence tomography imaging. This confined-space thermal dewetting strategy is scalable and general, and can be potentially extended to the synthesis of novel anisotropic nanostructures of various compositions that are difficult to produce by conventional wet chemical or physical methods, thus opening up opportunities for many new applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Nogo-receptor 1 antagonization in combination with neurotrophin-4/5 is not superior to single factor treatment in promoting survival and morphological complexity of cultured dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Stefanie; Di Santo, Stefano; Sahli, Sebastian; Andereggen, Lukas; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Cell transplantation using ventral mesencephalic tissue is an experimental approach to treat Parkinson's disease. This approach is limited by poor survival of the transplants and the high number of dopaminergic neurons needed for grafting. Increasing the yield of dopaminergic neurons in donor tissue is of great importance. We have previously shown that antagonization of the Nogo-receptor 1 by NEP1-40 promoted survival of cultured dopaminergic neurons and exposure to neurotrophin-4/5 increased dopaminergic cell densities in organotypic midbrain cultures. We investigated whether a combination of both treatments offers a novel tool to further improve dopaminergic neuron survival. Rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neurons grown as organotypic free-floating roller tube or primary dissociated cultures were exposed to neurotrophin-4/5 and NEP1-40. The combined and single factor treatment resulted in significantly higher numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons compared to controls. Significantly stronger tyrosine hydroxylase signal intensity was detected by Western blotting in the combination-treated cultures compared to controls but not compared to single factor treatments. Neurotrophin-4/5 and the combined treatment showed significantly higher signals for the neuronal marker microtubule-associated protein 2 in Western blots compared to control while no effects were observed for the astroglial marker glial fibrillary acidic protein between groups, suggesting that neurotrophin-4/5 targets mainly neuronal cells. Finally, NEP1-40 and the combined treatment significantly augmented tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurite length. Summarizing, our findings substantiate that antagonization of the Nogo-receptor 1 promotes dopaminergic neurons but does not further increase the yield of dopaminergic neurons and their morphological complexity when combined with neurotrophin-4/5 hinting to the idea that these treatments might exert their effects by activating common

  18. Evaluation of the confinement option for LMRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himes, D.A.; Stepnewski, D.D.; Franz, G.R.

    1985-12-01

    The coolant in liquid metal cooled reactors operates at low pressures and therefore contains relatively little stored energy compared to LWR systems. This presents the possibility of using a more conventional building for containment coupled with a confinement system which vents the internal volume of the building through a filter/scrubber. The confinement system would be designed to keep the internal pressure in the containment near atmospheric thereby minimizing unfiltered leakage. The principal benefits of such an arrangement would be lower capital cost and less stringent leaktightness requirements permitting simpler and less disruptive testing. In conclusion, the confinement system assumed here would reduce consequences to the public of an LMR HCDA to acceptable levels. However control room doses are unacceptable due to the noble gas concentration inside the control room. A confinement system is therefore a viable design option for LMR's provided means are included for keeping noble gases out of the control room. Such means are readily available including, for example, selectable remote air intakes, an exhaust stack, or a noble gas filter. Probably the most satisfactory alternative would be a large cryogenic filter on the confinement system exhaust

  19. Vortex Ring Dynamics in Radially Confined Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kelley; Niebel, Casandra; Jung, Sunghwan; Vlachos, Pavlos

    2010-11-01

    Vortex ring dynamics have been studied extensively in semi-infinite quiescent volumes. However, very little is known about vortex-ring formation in wall-bounded domains where vortex wall interaction will affect both the vortex ring pinch-off and propagation velocity. This study addresses this limitation and studies vortex formation in radially confined domains to analyze the affect of vortex-ring wall interaction on the formation and propagation of the vortex ring. Vortex rings were produced using a pneumatically driven piston cylinder arrangement and were ejected into a long cylindrical tube which defined the confined downstream domain. A range of confinement domains were studied with varying confinement diameters Velocity field measurements were performed using planar Time Resolved Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (TRDPIV) and were processed using an in-house developed cross-correlation PIV algorithm. The experimental analysis was used to facilitate the development of a theoretical model to predict the variations in vortex ring circulation over time within confined domains.

  20. Reinforced confinement in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nuclear reactor containing a reactor core, a swimming pool space that is filled and pressurized with a neutron-absorbing solution, a reactor tank, at least one heat exchanger, at least one inlet line, at least one return line and at least one circulation pump, where the said reactor tank is confined in the said swimming pool space and designed to be cooled with the aid of relatively pure water, which is fed by means of the said at least one circulating pump to the said reactor tank from the said heat exchanger via the said at least one inlet line and is returned to the heat exchanger via the said at least one return line. The problem that is to be solved by the invention is to design a reactor of the above type in such a way that a complete confinement of the primary circuit of the reactor is achieved at relatively low extra cost. This problem is solved by providing the reactor with a special confinement space that confines the heat exchanger, but not the reactor tank, with the confinement space and the swimming pool space being fashioned in the same concrete body

  1. Generating equilateral random polygons in confinement II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, Y; Ernst, C; Montemayor, A; Ziegler, U

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we continue an earlier study (Diao et al 2011 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 44 405202) on the generation algorithms of random equilateral polygons confined in a sphere. Here, the equilateral random polygons are rooted at the center of the confining sphere and the confining sphere behaves like an absorbing boundary. One way to generate such a random polygon is the accept/reject method in which an unconditioned equilateral random polygon rooted at origin is generated. The polygon is accepted if it is within the confining sphere, otherwise it is rejected and the process is repeated. The algorithm proposed in this paper offers an alternative to the accept/reject method, yielding a faster generation process when the confining sphere is small. In order to use this algorithm effectively, a large, reusable data set needs to be pre-computed only once. We derive the theoretical distribution of the given random polygon model and demonstrate, with strong numerical evidence, that our implementation of the algorithm follows this distribution. A run time analysis and a numerical error estimate are given at the end of the paper. (paper)

  2. Packing frustration in dense confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Kjellander, Roland

    2014-09-07

    Packing frustration for confined fluids, i.e., the incompatibility between the preferred packing of the fluid particles and the packing constraints imposed by the confining surfaces, is studied for a dense hard-sphere fluid confined between planar hard surfaces at short separations. The detailed mechanism for the frustration is investigated via an analysis of the anisotropic pair distributions of the confined fluid, as obtained from integral equation theory for inhomogeneous fluids at pair correlation level within the anisotropic Percus-Yevick approximation. By examining the mean forces that arise from interparticle collisions around the periphery of each particle in the slit, we calculate the principal components of the mean force for the density profile--each component being the sum of collisional forces on a particle's hemisphere facing either surface. The variations of these components with the slit width give rise to rather intricate changes in the layer structure between the surfaces, but, as shown in this paper, the basis of these variations can be easily understood qualitatively and often also semi-quantitatively. It is found that the ordering of the fluid is in essence governed locally by the packing constraints at each single solid-fluid interface. A simple superposition of forces due to the presence of each surface gives surprisingly good estimates of the density profiles, but there remain nontrivial confinement effects that cannot be explained by superposition, most notably the magnitude of the excess adsorption of particles in the slit relative to bulk.

  3. Fast algorithm for Morphological Filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Shan; Jiang Xiangqian; Scott, Paul J

    2011-01-01

    In surface metrology, morphological filters, which evolved from the envelope filtering system (E-system) work well for functional prediction of surface finish in the analysis of surfaces in contact. The naive algorithms are time consuming, especially for areal data, and not generally adopted in real practice. A fast algorithm is proposed based on the alpha shape. The hull obtained by rolling the alpha ball is equivalent to the morphological opening/closing in theory. The algorithm depends on Delaunay triangulation with time complexity O(nlogn). In comparison to the naive algorithms it generates the opening and closing envelope without combining dilation and erosion. Edge distortion is corrected by reflective padding for open profiles/surfaces. Spikes in the sample data are detected and points interpolated to prevent singularities. The proposed algorithm works well both for morphological profile and area filters. Examples are presented to demonstrate the validity and superiority on efficiency of this algorithm over the naive algorithm.

  4. Vesicle dynamics in a confined Poiseuille flow: from steady state to chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouane, Othmane; Thiébaud, Marine; Benyoussef, Abdelilah; Wagner, Christian; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2014-09-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are the major component of blood, and the flow of blood is dictated by that of RBCs. We employ vesicles, which consist of closed bilayer membranes enclosing a fluid, as a model system to study the behavior of RBCs under a confined Poiseuille flow. We extensively explore two main parameters: (i) the degree of confinement of vesicles within the channel and (ii) the flow strength. Rich and complex dynamics for vesicles are revealed, ranging from steady-state shapes (in the form of parachute and slipper shapes) to chaotic dynamics of shape. Chaos occurs through a cascade of multiple periodic oscillations of the vesicle shape. We summarize our results in a phase diagram in the parameter plane (degree of confinement and flow strength). This finding highlights the level of complexity of a flowing vesicle in the small Reynolds number where the flow is laminar in the absence of vesicles and can be rendered turbulent due to elasticity of vesicles.

  5. Kinetic Transition of Crystal Morphology from Nanoparticles to Dendrites during Electron Beam Induced Deposition of Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeung Hun; Schneider, Nicholas; Bau, Haim; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances

    2015-03-01

    We studied the kinetic transition from compact nanoparticle to dendritic morphology during electron beam-induced Au deposition using in situ liquid cell-based transmission electron microcopy. Radiolysis of water by electrons generates radicals and molecular species. Hydrated electrons and hydrogen and hydroxide radicals can act as reducing agents and initiate the reduction of the water-soluble precursor, HAuCl4, resulting in the precipitation of Au as nanostructures. We tracked nucleation, growth, and morphological transition of Au from movies recorded in situ, as a function of irradiated dose and liquid thickness. We identified several distinct regimes that depend on the irradiation time: (1) nucleation; (2) linear volumetric growth; (3) formation of dendritic structures; (4) coalescence and dissolution. A diffusion and reaction model for the radiolytic species and metal ions in the confined geometry of the irradiated volume is used to understand the nucleation sites and morphological transitions. We finally describe how nanoparticles can be made to grow in a stepwise manner by switching the supply of Au ions on and off electrochemically, and discuss possibilities for creating more complex nanostructures. This research was partially funded by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1310639, CMMI-1129722, and CBET-1066573).

  6. Total curvature and total torsion of knotted random polygons in confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Yuanan; Ernst, Claus; Rawdon, Eric J.; Ziegler, Uta

    2018-04-01

    Knots in nature are typically confined spatially. The confinement affects the possible configurations, which in turn affects the spectrum of possible knot types as well as the geometry of the configurations within each knot type. The goal of this paper is to determine how confinement, length, and knotting affect the total curvature and total torsion of random polygons. Previously published papers have investigated these effects in the unconstrained case. In particular, we analyze how the total curvature and total torsion are affected by (1) varying the length of polygons within a fixed confinement radius and (2) varying the confinement radius of polygons with a fixed length. We also compare the total curvature and total torsion of groups of knots with similar complexity (measured as crossing number). While some of our results fall in line with what has been observed in the studies of the unconfined random polygons, a few surprising results emerge from our study, showing some properties that are unique due to the effect of knotting in confinement.

  7. Thermonuclear plasma physic: inertial confinement fusion; Physique des plasmas thermonucleaires: la fusion par confinement inertiel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Ch.; Juraszek, D

    2001-07-01

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion in which the fuel contained in a spherical capsule is strongly compressed and heated to achieve ignition and burn. The released thermonuclear energy can be much higher than the driver energy, making energetic applications attractive. Many complex physical phenomena are involved by the compression process, but it is possible to use simple analytical models to analyze the main critical points. We first determine the conditions to obtain fuel ignition. High thermonuclear gains are achieved if only a small fraction of the fuel called hot spot is used to trigger burn in the main fuel compressed on a low isentrope. A simple hot spot model will be described. The high pressure needed to drive the capsule compression are obtained by the ablation process. A simple Rocket model describe the main features of the implosion phase. Several parameters have to be controlled during the compression: irradiation symmetry, hydrodynamical stability and when the driver is a laser, the problems arising from interaction of the EM wave with the plasma. Two different schemes are examined: Indirect Drive which uses X-ray generated in a cavity to drive the implosion and the Fast Ignitor concept using a ultra intense laser beam to create the hot spot. At the end we present the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) project. LMJ is scaled to a thermonuclear gain of the order of ten. (authors)

  8. Cylindrical fabric-confined soil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Richard A.

    A cylindrical fabric-soil structural concept for implementation on the moon and Mars which provides many advantages is proposed. The most efficient use of fabric is to fashion it into cylindrical tubes, creating cylindrical fabric-confined soil structures. The length, diameter, and curvature of the tubes will depend on the intended application. The cylindrical hoop forces provide radial confinement while end caps provide axial confinement. One of the ends is designed to allow passage of the soil into the fabric tube before sealing. Transportation requirements are reduced due to the low mass and volume of the fabric. Construction requirements are reduced due to the self-erection capability via the pneumatic exoskeleton. Maintenance requirements are reduced due to the passive nature of the concept. The structure's natural ductility is well suited for any seismic activity.

  9. Confinement and related transport in Extrap geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tendler, M.

    1983-01-01

    The properties of the plasma dynamic equilibrium are investigated for the Extrap magnetic confinement geometry. The temperatures achieved so far in the high-#betta# pinches are much lower than the predicted values. Here, it is shown that the particle containment in Extrap may be improved as compared to the other pinches due to the electrostatic confinement. An analytic solution for the profiles of the plasma parameters are found under the assumption that the energy is lost primarily in the radial direction by heat conduction and convection. An estimate of the radial particle confinement time is given, showing favourable scaling with plasma density and temperature. The conventional assumption of a uniform current density is shown to be unjustified in the case of an inhomogeneous electron temperature. An analytical expression is found for the pinch radius at different mechanisms of the heat transport. (orig.)

  10. INERT Atmosphere confinement operability test procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISENMAY, H.R.

    1999-01-01

    This Operability Test Procedure (OTP) provides instructions for testing operability of the Inert Atmosphere Confinement (IAC). The Inert Atmosphere Confinement was designed and built for opening cans of metal items that might have hydrided surfaces. Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) PFP-97-005 addresses the discovery of suspected plutonium hydride forming on plutonium metal currently stored in the Plutonium Finishing Plant vaults. Plutonium hydride reacts quickly with air, liberating energy. The Inert Atmosphere Confinement was designed to prevent this sudden liberation of energy by opening the material in an inert argon atmosphere instead of the normal glovebox atmosphere. The IAC is located in glovebox HC-21A, room 230B of the 234-5Z Building at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in the 200-West Area of the Hanford Site

  11. Critical quench dynamics in confined systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collura, Mario; Karevski, Dragi

    2010-05-21

    We analyze the coherent quantum evolution of a many-particle system after slowly sweeping a power-law confining potential. The amplitude of the confining potential is varied in time along a power-law ramp such that the many-particle system finally reaches or crosses a critical point. Under this protocol we derive general scaling laws for the density of excitations created during the nonadiabatic sweep of the confining potential. It is found that the mean excitation density follows an algebraic law as a function of the sweeping rate with an exponent that depends on the space-time properties of the potential. We confirm our scaling laws by first order adiabatic calculation and exact results on the Ising quantum chain with a varying transverse field.

  12. Electrostatically confined quantum rings in bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarenia, M; Pereira, J M; Peeters, F M; Farias, G A

    2009-12-01

    We propose a new system where electron and hole states are electrostatically confined into a quantum ring in bilayer graphene. These structures can be created by tuning the gap of the graphene bilayer using nanostructured gates or by position-dependent doping. The energy levels have a magnetic field (B(0)) dependence that is strikingly distinct from that of usual semiconductor quantum rings. In particular, the eigenvalues are not invariant under a B(0) --> -B(0) transformation and, for a fixed total angular momentum index m, their field dependence is not parabolic, but displays two minima separated by a saddle point. The spectra also display several anticrossings, which arise due to the overlap of gate-confined and magnetically confined states.

  13. Holographic repulsion and confinement in gauge theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Viqar; Kothawala, Dawood

    2013-02-01

    We show that for asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) backgrounds with negative energy, such as the AdS soliton and regulated negative-mass AdS-Schwarzshild metrics, the Wilson loop expectation value in the AdS/CFT conjecture exhibits a Coulomb to confinement transition. We also show that the quark-antiquark (q \\bar{q}) potential can be interpreted as affine time along null geodesics on the minimal string worldsheet and that its intrinsic curvature provides a signature of transition to confinement phase. Our results suggest a generic (holographic) relationship between confinement in gauge theory and repulsive gravity, which in turn is connected with singularity avoidance in quantum gravity. Communicated by P R L V Moniz

  14. Neutron Assay System for Confinement Vessel Disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frame, Katherine C.; Bourne, Mark M.; Crooks, William J.; Evans, Louise; Mayo, Douglas R.; Miko, David K.; Salazar, William R.; Stange, Sy; Valdez, Jose I.; Vigil, Georgiana M.

    2012-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has a number of spherical confinement vessels (CVs) remaining from tests involving nuclear materials. These vessels have an inner diameter of 6 feet with 1-inch thick steel walls. The goal of the Confinement Vessel Disposition (CVD) project is to remove debris and reduce contamination inside the CVs. The Confinement Vessel Assay System (CVAS) was developed to measure the amount of special nuclear material (SNM) in CVs before and after cleanout. Prior to cleanout, the system will be used to perform a verification measurement of each vessel. After cleanout, the system will be used to perform safeguards-quality assays of (le)100-g 239 Pu equivalent in a vessel for safeguards termination. The CVAS has been tested and calibrated in preparation for verification and safeguards measurements.

  15. Progress in toroidal confinement and fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1987-10-01

    During the past 30 years, the characteristic T/sub i/n tau/sub E/-value of toroidal-confinement experiments has advanced by more than seven orders of magnitude. Part of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of this advance has been due to an increase of gross machine parameters. Most of the advance is associated with improvements in the ''quality of plasma confinement.'' The combined evidence of spherator and tokamak research clarifies the role of magnetic-field geometry in determining confinement and points to the importance of shielding out plasma edge effects. A true physical understanding of anomalous transport remains to be achieved. 39 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  16. Computer modeling and simulation in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrory, R.L.; Verdon, C.P.

    1989-03-01

    The complex hydrodynamic and transport processes associated with the implosion of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellet place considerable demands on numerical simulation programs. Processes associated with implosion can usually be described using relatively simple models, but their complex interplay requires that programs model most of the relevant physical phenomena accurately. Most hydrodynamic codes used in ICF incorporate a one-fluid, two-temperature model. Electrons and ions are assumed to flow as one fluid (no charge separation). Due to the relatively weak coupling between the ions and electrons, each species is treated separately in terms of its temperature. In this paper we describe some of the major components associated with an ICF hydrodynamics simulation code. To serve as an example we draw heavily on a two-dimensional Lagrangian hydrodynamic code (ORCHID) written at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. 46 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab

  17. Higher representations: Confinement and large N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannino, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the confining phase transition as a function of temperature for theories with dynamical fermions in the two index symmetric and antisymmetric representation of the gauge group. By studying the properties of the center of the gauge group we predict for an even number of colors a confining phase transition, if second order, to be in the universality class of Ising in three dimensions. This is due to the fact that the center group symmetry does not break completely for an even number of colors. For an odd number of colors the center group symmetry breaks completely. This pattern remains unaltered at a large number of colors. The confining/deconfining phase transition in these theories at large and finite N is not mapped in the one of super Yang-Mills theory. We extend the Polyakov loop effective theory to describe the confining phase transition of the theories studied here for a generic number of colors. Our results are not modified when adding matter in the same higher dimensional representations of the gauge group. We comment on the interplay between confinement and chiral symmetry in these theories and suggest that they are ideal laboratories to shed light on this issue also for ordinary QCD. We compare the free energy as a function of temperature for different theories. We find that the conjectured thermal inequality between the infrared and ultraviolet degrees of freedom computed using the free energy does not lead to new constraints on asymptotically free theories with fermions in higher dimensional representations of the gauge group. Since the center of the gauge group is an important quantity for the confinement properties at zero temperature our results are relevant here as well

  18. Crystal habit dependent quantum confined photoluminescence of zinc oxide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, Ian Harvey J.; Payawan, Leon Jr. M.; Sarmago, Roland V.

    2008-01-01

    Diverse zinc oxide crystal habits namely wire, rods, tubes, whiskers and tetrapods were synthesized via hydrothermal and carbothermal reduction routes. A vapor current induced regionalization in the carbothermal synthesis lead to the isolation of these crystal habits for characterization. The surface morphology of the nanostructures was analyzed via field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The morphology and crystallinity of the as-synthesized nanostructure architectural motifs were related to their photoluminescence (PL). The photoluminescence at 157 nm was taken using F2 excimer laser and a crystal habit dependent response was observed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were conducted to deduce the degree of crystallinity showing results consistent with the excitonic emission at the band edge and visible emission at the electron-hole recombination sites. The presence of minimal crystal defects which gave the green emission was supported by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) data. Transmission spectroscopy for the tetrapods exhibited an interesting PL reduction associated with high-energy deep traps in the nanostructures. Furthermore, some intensity dependent characteristics were deduced indicating quantum confined properties of these nano structures. (author)

  19. Mott glass from localization and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yang-Zhi; Nandkishore, Rahul M.; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2018-05-01

    We study a system of fermions in one spatial dimension with linearly confining interactions and short-range disorder. We focus on the zero-temperature properties of this system, which we characterize using bosonization and the Gaussian variational method. We compute the static compressibility and ac conductivity, and thereby demonstrate that the system is incompressible, but exhibits gapless optical conductivity. This corresponds to a "Mott glass" state, distinct from an Anderson and a fully gapped Mott insulator, arising due to the interplay of disorder and charge confinement. We argue that this Mott glass phenomenology should persist to nonzero temperatures.

  20. Alternative lines with magnetic plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma confinement with the aid of a magnetic field is the most common and also the most frequently investigated principle on the way to controlled nuclear fusion. Apart from the Tokamak principle, which is the most advanced principle as far as fusion-relevant plasma parameters are concerned, also other approaches are being investigated, e.g. the mirror device, the bumpy tons, and the stellarator. In principle, all three concepts permit 'stationary' plasma confinement in a stationary fusion reactor. Compared with the pulsed Tokamak reactor, this is a considerable advantage. (orig./GG) [de

  1. Recent results on confinement in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The JET device is the world's largest tokamak and has been utilized in plasma heating experiments at total powers of up to 35MW using both neutral beam injection (NBI) and ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH). At the highest performance, JET plasmas have achieved conditions equivalent to energy ''breakeven''. A principal aim of the JET experiment is the investigation of plasma heating and confinement in plasma regimes relevant to thermonuclear ignition. The central issues in confinement physics involved in these advances are briefly reviewed and the most recent investigations of transport in high performance plasmas are summarized. (Author)

  2. Magnetic properties of confined electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felicio, J.R.D. de.

    1977-04-01

    The effects of confinement by a two or three-dimensional harmonic potential on the magnetic properties of a free electron gas are investigated using the grand-canonical ensemble framework. At high temperatures an extension of Darwin's, Felderhof and Raval's works is made taking into account spin effects at low temperature. A comprehensive description of the magnetic properties of a free electron gas is given. The system is regarded as finite, but the boundary condition psi=0 is not introduced. The limits of weak and strong confinement are also analysed [pt

  3. The bound state problem and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Demichev, A.P.; Nelipa, N.F.

    1980-01-01

    A quantum field-theoretic model in which quark is confined is considered. System of equations for the Green functions of colour singlet and octet bound states is obtained. The method is based on the nonperturbative Schwinger-Dyson equations with the use of Slavnov-Taylor identities. It is shown that in the framework of the model if there exist singlet, then also exist octet bound states of the quark-antiquark system. Thus in general, confinement of free quarks does not mean absence of their coloured bound states. (author)

  4. Synonymization of key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): taxonomic changes based on a review of 20 years of integrative morphological, molecular, cytogenetic, behavioral, and c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White are four horticultural pest tephritid fruit fly species that are highly morphologically and genetically similar to the destructive pest, th...

  5. Engineering design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial-confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, W.W.; Godwin, R.O.; Hurley, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    The design of the Nova Laser Facility for inertial confinement fusion experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is presented from an engineering perspective. Emphasis is placed upon design-to-performance requirements as they impact the various subsystems that comprise this complex experimental facility

  6. CCSD(T) calculations of stabilities and properties of confined systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holka, F.; Urban, M. [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava, Institute of Materials Science, Bottova 25, SK-917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Melicherčík, M.; Neogrády, P. [Department of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Paldus, J. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, N2L 3G1, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-01-22

    We analyze energies, electron affinities and polarizabilities of small anions exposed to an external confinement. The second electron in free O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions is unbound. We investigate the stabilizing effect of the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω. on these anions employing the Hartree-Fock stability analysis as introduced by Čížek and Paldus. With increasing strength of the external harmonic-oscillator confinement potential ω the broken symmetry (BS) solutions are systematically eliminated. For ω larger than 0.1 all BS solutions for O{sup 2−} disappear. For ω larger than 0.13 the CCSD(T) energy of O{sup 2−} becomes more negative than the energy of the singly charged O{sup −} anion. We relate the harmonic-oscillator confining potential to a crystalline environment in which the O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions are stable. We also present a model allowing calculations of the in-crystal polarizabilities of anions. The model is based on CCSD(T) calculations of static polarizabilities of selected anions exposed to the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω This artificial confinement potential ω is then related to the ionic radii of the cation in representative crystal lattices. We investigate the polarizability of O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions in MgO, MgS, CaO, CaS, SrO, SrS, BaO and BaS crystals. We compare our results with alternative models for in-crystal polarizabilities. External confinement also stabilizes the uracil anion U{sup −}, as is shown by calculations with a stepwise micro-hydration of U{sup −}. Upon hydration is the CCSD(T) adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of uracil enhanced by about 250 up to 570 meV in comparison with AEA of the isolated molecule, depending on the geometry of the hydrated uracil anion complex. We tried to find an analogy of the stabilization effect of the external confinement on the otherwise unstable anions. In uracil and its anion is the external

  7. Morphological and functional development of the interbranchial lymphoid tissue (ILT) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalum, Alf Seljenes; Griffiths, David James; Valen, Elin Christine; Amthor, Karoline Skaar; Austbø, Lars; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Press, Charles McLean; Kvellestad, Agnar

    2016-11-01

    The interbranchial lymphoid tissue (ILT) of Atlantic salmon originates from an embryological location that in higher vertebrates gives rise to both primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. Still much is unknown about the morphological and functional development of the ILT. In the present work a standardized method of organ volume determination was established to study its development in relation to its containing gill and the thymus. Based on morphological findings and gene transcription data, the ILT shows no signs of primary lymphoid function. In contrast to the thymus, an ILT-complex first became discernible after the yolk-sac period. After its appearance, the ILT-complex constitutes 3-7% of the total volume of the gill (excluding the gill arch) with the newly described distal ILT constituting a major part, and in adult fish it is approximately 13 times larger than the thymus. Confined regions of T-cell proliferation are present within the ILT. Communication with systemic circulation through the distal ILT is also highly plausible thus offering both internal and external recruitment of immune cells in the growing ILT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Symmetries in confined classical Coulomb systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of charged particles confined in a harmonic oscillator potential have become of increased interest lately in view of the development of techniques in ion traps and storage rings. The symmetries in such systems intrigued the imagination of Ted Hecht in connection with the storage ring at Heidelberg, and so perhaps it is an appropriate subject for this symposium

  9. Inertial Confinement Fusion at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Inertial Confinement Fusion: ICF contributions to science and technology; target fabrication; laser-target interaction; KrF laser development; advanced KrF lasers; KrF laser technology; and plasma physics for light-ion program

  10. Modification of the perturbative QCD towards confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arodz, H.

    1981-01-01

    Modification of the low momentum behaviour of the perturbative SU(2) gauge theory is proposed. The modification is closely related (although not equivalent) to a nonstandard choice of boundary condition for the Euclidean 2-point gluonic Green function. In the resulting theory already single graphs lead to the confining potential between heavy, static quarks, V(r) = ar 2 for r → infinity. (author)

  11. Mixed colour states in QCD confining vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Buividovich, P. V.; Kuvshinov, V. I.

    2005-01-01

    We show that confinement of spinless heavy quarks in fundamental representation of $SU(N_{c})$ gauge group can be treated as decoherence of pure colour state into a white mixture of states. Decoherence rate is found to be proportional to the tension of QCD string and the distance between colour charges. The purity of colour states is calculated.

  12. Confining strings revisited - a short comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botelho, Luiz C.L.

    2000-03-01

    We show that Polyakov's confining string Nucl. Phys. B486, (1997) 23, is the author's previously proposed self-avoiding extrinsic strings (Luiz C.L. Botelho), Rev. Bras. Fis. 16, 279, (1986); CALTECH-preprint 68, 1444, (1987); J. Math. Phys. 30 (9), (1989), 2160). (author)

  13. Monopole current dynamics and color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichie, H.; Suganuma, H.; Tanaka, A.

    1998-01-01

    Color confinement can be understood by the dual Higgs theory, where monopole condensation leads to the exclusion of the electric flux from the QCD vacuum. We study the role of the monopole for color confinement by investigating the monopole current system. When the self-energy of the monopole current is small enough, long and complicated monopole world-lines appear, which is a signal of monopole condensation. In the dense monopole system, the Wilson loop obeys the area-law, and the string tension and the monopole density have similar behavior as the function of the self-energy, which seems that monopole condensation leads to color confinement. On the long-distance physics, the monopole current system almost reproduces essential features of confinement properties in lattice QCD. In the short-distance physics, however, the monopole-current theory would become nonlocal and complicated due to the monopole size effect. This monopole size would provide a critical scale of QCD in terms of the dual Higgs mechanism. (orig.)

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, D.C.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the following topics on inertial confinement fusion: distribution of electron-beam energy in KrF laser media; electron collision processes in KrF laser media; Krf laser kinetics; and properties of the KrF laser medium

  15. Somersault of Paramecium in extremely confined environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Saikat; Eddins, Aja; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-08-01

    We investigate various swimming modes of Paramecium in geometric confinements and a non-swimming self-bending behavior like a somersault, which is quite different from the previously reported behaviors. We observe that Paramecia execute directional sinusoidal trajectories in thick fluid films, whereas Paramecia meander around a localized region and execute frequent turns due to collisions with adjacent walls in thin fluid films. When Paramecia are further constrained in rectangular channels narrower than the length of the cell body, a fraction of meandering Paramecia buckle their body by pushing on the channel walls. The bucking (self-bending) of the cell body allows the Paramecium to reorient its anterior end and explore a completely new direction in extremely confined spaces. Using force deflection method, we quantify the Young’s modulus of the cell and estimate the swimming and bending powers exerted by Paramecium. The analysis shows that Paramecia can utilize a fraction of its swimming power to execute the self-bending maneuver within the confined channel and no extra power may be required for this new kind of self-bending behavior. This investigation sheds light on how micro-organisms can use the flexibility of the body to actively navigate within confined spaces.

  16. Dynamics of water confined in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Caer, S.; Pommeret, S.; Renault, J.Ph.; Lima, M.; Righini, R.; Gosset, D.; Simeone, D.; Bergaya, F.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the O-D stretching mode of dilute HOD in H 2 O probes the local environment and the hydrogen bond network of confined water. The dynamics of water molecules confined in the interlayer space of montmorillonites (Mt) and in interaction with two types of cations (Li + and Ca 2+ ) but also with the negatively charged siloxane surface are studied. The results evidence that the OD vibrational dynamics is significantly slowed down in confined media: it goes from 1.7 ps in neat water to 2.6 Ps in the case of Li + cations with two water pseudo-layers (2.2-2.3 ps in the case of Ca 2+ cations) and to 4.7 ps in the case of Li + cations with one water pseudo-layer. No significant difference between the two cations is noticed. In this 2D confined geometry (the interlayer space being about 0.6 nm for two water pseudo-layers), the relaxation time constants obtained are comparable to the ones measured in analogous concentrated salt solutions. Nevertheless, and in strong opposition to the observations performed in the liquid phase, anisotropy experiments evidence the absence of rotational motions on a 5 ps time scale, proving that the hydrogen bond network in the interlayer space of the clay mineral is locked at this time scale. (authors)

  17. Extended BRS algebra and color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Meiun.

    1984-02-01

    We examine the color confinement scheme and its realizations proposed by Kugo and Ojima. Using the Nakanishi's theorem, we obtain a representation of the extended BRS algebra compatible with the so-called K-O condition of their confinement criteria. However, it turns out that the representation is not physically acceptable, and thus their scheme lacks self-consistency at the level of realizations. We also clarify what kind of ghost structures are suggested by the well-definedness or ill-definedness of the charge operator Nsup(a) constituting a part of the global color charge operator. It is shown that there are four possible cancellation mechanisms of ghosts. In particular, it turns out that the octet of ghosts suggested by Nishijima in his confinement theory arises from the well-definedness of the Nsup(a) charge, whereas the elementary quartet arises from the ill-definedness of the Nsup(a). Moreover, from the octet structures, we deduce the confinement condition which replaces the K-O condition. (author)

  18. Neutrino confinement in collapsing stellar cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    Neutrino confinement is expected to occur in the core of highly evolved stars, leading to the formation of a degenerate neutrino gas. The main neutrino sources are briefly reviewed and the neutrino processes relevant to the neutrino opacity in the stellar matter are discussed. Implications for the equation of state of neutrino-trapped matter are examined. (author) [pt

  19. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used

  20. Perspectives on confinement in helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae

    1989-01-01

    A review on recent experimental results and theoretical models on anomalous transport and density limit in toroidal helical devices is presented. Importance of transport problems is discussed. Experiments on Heliotron-E, Wendelstein-VIIA and new devices, i.e., ATF, Wendelstein-VIIAS and CHS, are reviewed and an overview on confinement property is given. From recent experimental results one sees that there are anomalous transport, which increases with temperature, and density limit, and that they limit the energy confinement time as well as the attainable beta value. The confinement characteristics of the scrape off layer plasma and loss cone loss are discussed, and perspectives on the high temperature plasma are given. These anomalous transport and density limit will be difficult obstacles in realizing a reactor grade plasma in helical systems. It is an urgent task to draw a realistic picture of the confinement based on the present data base. The relevant knowledge now would be critically essential for the successful development of the research in 1990's. (author) 102 refs

  1. Energy confinement of high-density tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüller, F.C.; Schram, D.C.; Coppi, B.; Sadowski, W.

    1977-01-01

    Neoclassical ion heat conduction is the major energy loss mechanism in the center of an ohmically heated high-d. tokamak discharge (n>3 * 1020 m-3). This fixes the mutual dependence of plasma quantities on the axis and leads to scaling laws for the poloidal b and energy confinement time, given the

  2. Confinement mechanisms in the radiatively improved mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tokar, M. Z.; R. Jaspers,; Koslowski, H. R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Messiaen, A. M.; Ongena, J.; Rogister, A. A.; Unterberg, B.; Weynants, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    The characteristics of the toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability, considered as the main source of anomalous transport in the low (L) confinement mode of tokamaks, are analysed for the conditions of the radiatively improved (RI) mode triggered by seeding of impurities. Based on

  3. Probing the properties of confined liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi Jacoba Adrianus

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we describe Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) measurements and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation of the static and dynamic properties of layered liquids confined between two solid surfaces. Liquid molecules in the proximity of a solid surface assemble into layers. When a fluid is

  4. Confinement, hidden color and multibaryon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolescu, B.

    1979-01-01

    Ideas and theoretical results on multiquark states are reviewed. The measuring of concepts such as 'quarks', 'color' and 'confinement' is analysed first then the possible existence of multiquark states is discussed. the example of dibaryons is used to study their properties in the bag model and in the Dual Topological Unitarization theory [fr

  5. Dynamics of Colloids Confined in Microcylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Wijnperle, Daniël; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Duits, Michael H.G.

    2016-01-01

    We studied both global and local effects of cylindrical confinement on the diffusive behavior of hard sphere (HS) colloids. Using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) and particle tracking, we measured the mean squared displacement (MSD) of 1 micron sized silica particles in water–glycerol.

  6. Subwavelength light confinement with surface plasmon polaritons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, E.

    2009-01-01

    In free space, the diffraction limit sets a lower bound to the size to which light can be confined. Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), which are electromagnetic waves bound to the interface between a metal and a dielectric, allow the control of light on subwavelength length scales. This opens up a

  7. Color confinement and a superconvergence relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, Kazuhiko

    1987-01-01

    The spectral function of the transverse gluon propagator satisfies a superconvergence relation when the number of generations does not exceed four. This relation is shown to be connected with various interpretations of color confinement, such as metric cancellation, the bag model and the area law in lattice QCD. (author)

  8. Gross morphology betrays phylogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alström, Per; Fjeldså, Jon; Fregin, Silke

    2011-01-01

    .). Superficial morphological similarity to cisticolid warblers has previously clouded the species true relationship. Detailed morphology, such as facial bristles and claw and footpad structure, also supports a closer relationship to Cettiidae and some other non-cisticolid warblers....

  9. Monopoles and confinement in lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, V.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism by which quarks, believed to be the fundamental constituents of matter, are prevented from existing in the free state is fundamental problems in physics. One of the most viable candidates for a hypothesis of confinement is the dual superconductor mechanism that likens quark confinement to the Meissner effect in superconductors. The peculiarities of quark interactions make a numerical approach to the subject a necessity, and therefore, much of the work in this area has been done through the methods of lattice gauge theory, with the simplicities afforded by putting spacetime on a four-dimensional grid. Over the years a large amount of indirect evidence has accumulated that the dual superconductor hypothesis does indeed lead to quark confinement but unambiguous evidence has eluded research efforts until recently. This work presents the first direct proof of a Meissner-like effect that leads to confinement, using the numerical techniques of lattice gauge theory. It is shown that for a U(1) lattice gauge theory, that serves as a toy model of the real world of quarks, a dual London relation and an electric fluxoid qauntization condition is satisfied, allowing the author to conclude that the vacuum in this case acts like an extreme type-II superconductor, and that quarks are confined. The author also shows that SU(2) lattice gauge theory, which is qualitatively different and another step closer to reality, shows a Meissner-like effect. In contrast to the U(1) case, the author's results are found consistent with a dual version of the Ginsburg-Landau theory of superconductor on the borderline between type-I and type-II. This approach paves the wave for a study of the more complicated theory, quantum chromodynamics, that is believed to describe quarks

  10. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, R.E.

    2001-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results show /that relaxation timescales of medium sized systems are accessible. Following this, simulations are performed of relaxation in hybrid aligned nematic systems, where each surface induces a different alignment. Flow patterns associated with director reorientation are observed. The damped oscillatory nature of the relaxation process suggests that the behaviour of these systems is dominated by orientational elastic forces and that the observed director motion and flow do not correspond to the macroscopic processes of backflow and kickback. Chevron structures can occur in confined smectic cells which develop two domains of equal and opposite layer tilt on cooling. Layer lilting is thought to be caused by a need to reconcile a mismatch between bulk and surface smectic layer spacing. Here, simulations are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. (author)

  11. Computer simulation of confined liquid crystal dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, R.E

    2001-11-01

    Results are presented from a series of simulations undertaken to determine whether dynamic processes observed in device-scale liquid crystal cells confined between aligning substrates can be simulated in a molecular system using parallel molecular dynamics of the Gay-Berne model. In a nematic cell, on removal of an aligning field, initial near-surface director relaxation can induce flow, termed 'backflow' in the liquid. This, in turn, can cause director rotation, termed 'orientational kickback', in the centre of the cell. Simulations are performed of the relaxation in nematic systems confined between substrates with a common alignment on removal of an aligning field. Results show /that relaxation timescales of medium sized systems are accessible. Following this, simulations are performed of relaxation in hybrid aligned nematic systems, where each surface induces a different alignment. Flow patterns associated with director reorientation are observed. The damped oscillatory nature of the relaxation process suggests that the behaviour of these systems is dominated by orientational elastic forces and that the observed director motion and flow do not correspond to the macroscopic processes of backflow and kickback. Chevron structures can occur in confined smectic cells which develop two domains of equal and opposite layer tilt on cooling. Layer lilting is thought to be caused by a need to reconcile a mismatch between bulk and surface smectic layer spacing. Here, simulations are performed of the formation of structures in confined smectic systems where layer tilt is induced by an imposed surface pretilt. Results show that bookshelf, chevron and tilled layer structures are observable in a confined Gay-Berne system. The formation and stability of the chevron structure are shown to be influenced by surface slip. (author)

  12. [Neotropical plant morphology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-García, Blanca; Mendoza, Aniceto

    2002-01-01

    An analysis on plant morphology and the sources that are important to the morphologic interpretations is done. An additional analysis is presented on all published papers in this subject by the Revista de Biología Tropical since its foundation, as well as its contribution to the plant morphology development in the neotropics.

  13. On the Numerical Modeling of Confined Masonry Structures for In-plane Earthquake Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea Barnaure

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The seismic design of confined masonry structures involves the use of numerical models. As there are many parameters that influence the structural behavior, these models can be very complex and unsuitable for the current design purposes of practicing engineers. Simplified models could lead to reasonably accurate results, but caution should be given to the simplification assumptions. An analysis of various parameters considered in the numerical modeling of confined masonry structural walls is made. Conclusions regarding the influence of simplified procedures on the results are drawn.

  14. A Programmable DNA Origami Platform for Organizing Intrinsically Disordered Nucleoporins within Nanopore Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Patrick D Ellis; Shen, Qi; Akpinar, Bernice; Davis, Luke K; Chung, Kenny Kwok Hin; Baddeley, David; Šarić, Anđela; Melia, Thomas J; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Lin, Chenxiang; Lusk, C Patrick

    2018-02-27

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) form gateways that control molecular exchange between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. They impose a diffusion barrier to macromolecules and enable the selective transport of nuclear transport receptors with bound cargo. The underlying mechanisms that establish these permeability properties remain to be fully elucidated but require unstructured nuclear pore proteins rich in Phe-Gly (FG)-repeat domains of different types, such as FxFG and GLFG. While physical modeling and in vitro approaches have provided a framework for explaining how the FG network contributes to the barrier and transport properties of the NPC, it remains unknown whether the number and/or the spatial positioning of different FG-domains along a cylindrical, ∼40 nm diameter transport channel contributes to their collective properties and function. To begin to answer these questions, we have used DNA origami to build a cylinder that mimics the dimensions of the central transport channel and can house a specified number of FG-domains at specific positions with easily tunable design parameters, such as grafting density and topology. We find the overall morphology of the FG-domain assemblies to be dependent on their chemical composition, determined by the type and density of FG-repeat, and on their architectural confinement provided by the DNA cylinder, largely consistent with here presented molecular dynamics simulations based on a coarse-grained polymer model. In addition, high-speed atomic force microscopy reveals local and reversible FG-domain condensation that transiently occludes the lumen of the DNA central channel mimics, suggestive of how the NPC might establish its permeability properties.

  15. Technically feasibility solution for WWER-440/B230. Confinement upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balabanov, E.; Sartmandgiev, A.

    2000-01-01

    A concept for modernization of the units 1 to 4 of Kozloduy NPP ( WWER-440/V230) localization system to cope with a large spectrum of accidents, including 2x100% LOCA is proposed. This concept in foreseeing the installation of several systems, which altogether would form a complex of beyond original design basis accidents mitigation systems. These systems are: Pressure Suppression System (PSS) - with implementation of VNIIAES vortex condenser - supposed to cope with the first pressure peak and to protect the confinement integrity, hydrogen control system-with implementation of Passive Autocatalic Recombiners (PAR) - supposed to cope with hydrogen and to mitigate the possible uncontrolled release of radiation products, active Filter Venting System (FVS) - to maintain underpressure in the confinement and to retain radioactive products, as well as to control radioactive releases during a long period of time. This concept is ensuring: integrity of the localization system for the full spectrum of primary LOCA, non violation of the dose limits, defined by BNSA, for a large spectrum of accidents including severe accidents, fulfillment of IAEA recommendation (INSAG - 3) - decrease the probability for large radioactive release by a factor of 10 outside of NPP side

  16. Photoluminescence and Confinement of Excitons in Disordered Porous Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondar, N. V., E-mail: jbond@iop.kiev.ua; Brodin, M. S. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine); Brodin, A. M. [National Technical University of Ukraine “KPI” (Ukraine); Matveevskaya, N. A. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Single Crystals (Ukraine)

    2016-03-15

    The exciton confinement effect in quantum dots at the surface of SiO{sub 2} spheres and the percolation phase transition in films based on a mixture of pure SiO{sub 2} spheres and spheres covered by CdS quantum dots (SiO{sub 2}/CdS nanoparticles) are studied. It is found that, due to the high surface energy of spheres, the quantum dots deposited onto their surface are distorted, which modifies the exciton confinement effect: the effect is retained only in one direction, the direction normal to the surface of the spheres. As a result, the energy of the exciton ground state exhibits a complex dependence on both the quantum-dot radius and sphere size. In the optical spectra of films based on this mixture, the clustering of small-sized nanoparticles and then, at a critical concentration of nanoparticles of ~60%, the formation of a percolation cluster are detected for the first time. The critical concentration is twice higher than the corresponding quantity given by the model of geometrical “colored percolation”, which is a consequence of interaction between submicrometer nanoparticles. The relation between the basic parameters of the percolation transition, such as the film porosity, coordination number, and the quantity defining the number of particles in the percolation cluster, is obtained and analyzed.

  17. Magnetic force micropiston: An integrated force/microfluidic device for the application of compressive forces in a confined environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J. K.; Kleckner, N.

    2014-02-01

    Cellular biology takes place inside confining spaces. For example, bacteria grow in crevices, red blood cells squeeze through capillaries, and chromosomes replicate inside the nucleus. Frequently, the extent of this confinement varies. Bacteria grow longer and divide, red blood cells move through smaller and smaller passages as they travel to capillary beds, and replication doubles the amount of DNA inside the nucleus. This increase in confinement, either due to a decrease in the available space or an increase in the amount of material contained in a constant volume, has the potential to squeeze and stress objects in ways that may lead to changes in morphology, dynamics, and ultimately biological function. Here, we describe a device developed to probe the interplay between confinement and the mechanical properties of cells and cellular structures, and forces that arise due to changes in a structure's state. In this system, the manipulation of a magnetic bead exerts a compressive force upon a target contained in the confining space of a microfluidic channel. This magnetic force microfluidic piston is constructed in such a way that we can measure (a) target compliance and changes in compliance as induced by changes in buffer, extract, or biochemical composition, (b) target expansion force generated by changes in the same parameters, and (c) the effects of compression stress on a target's structure and function. Beyond these issues, our system has general applicability to a variety of questions requiring the combination of mechanical forces, confinement, and optical imaging.

  18. Structural behavior of supercritical fluids under confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kanka; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2018-01-01

    The existence of the Frenkel line in the supercritical regime of a Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid shown through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations initially and later corroborated by experiments on argon opens up possibilities of understanding the structure and dynamics of supercritical fluids in general and of the Frenkel line in particular. The location of the Frenkel line, which demarcates two distinct physical states, liquidlike and gaslike within the supercritical regime, has been established through MD simulations of the velocity autocorrelation (VACF) and radial distribution function (RDF). We, in this article, explore the changes in the structural features of supercritical LJ fluid under partial confinement using atomistic walls. The study is carried out across the Frenkel line through a series of MD simulations considering a set of thermodynamics states in the supercritical regime (P =5000 bar, 240 K ≤T ≤1500 K ) of argon well above the critical point. Confinement is partial, with atomistic walls located normal to z and extending to "infinity" along the x and y directions. In the "liquidlike" regime of the supercritical phase, particles are found to be distributed in distinct layers along the z axis with layer spacing less than one atomic diameter and the lateral RDF showing amorphous-like structure for specific spacings (packing frustration) and non-amorphous-like structure for other spacings. Increasing the rigidity of the atomistic walls is found to lead to stronger layering and increased structural order. For confinement with reflective walls, layers are found to form with one atomic diameter spacing and the lateral RDF showing close-packed structure for the smaller confinements. Translational order parameter and excess entropy assessment confirms the ordering taking place for atomistic wall and reflective wall confinements. In the "gaslike" regime of the supercritical phase, particle distribution along the spacing and the lateral RDF exhibit features

  19. The development of a laterally confined laboratory fan delta under sediment supply reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Siqiang; Wu, Xi; Xu, Shun; Li, Zhangyong

    2016-03-01

    In previous fan delta experiments, the effect of lateral confinement was generally ignored as these fans were usually unconfined with semiconical geometries. However, in gorge areas, fan development is usually laterally confined by valley walls. This study investigates autogenic processes of fan deltas in a laterally confined experimental tank. The experiment is divided into three phases. The sediment supply is held constant within each phase, so the autogenic processes of the fan are separated from the allogenic forcings. Results indicate that laterally confined fan deltas have higher progradation and aggradation potential, more regular channel braiding, and more even transverse sedimentation than unconfined fans. Besides, responses of fan deltas to sediment supply reduction are investigated in this research. At the initiation of the second and third phases, sediment feed rates are instantaneously reduced so that the allogenic forcings are predominant. Observations show that under sediment supply reduction, channelization on fan deltas are more pronounced and durations of the fluvial cycles are longer. The adjustment of fan morphology becomes slower as the self-regulation capacity of the fan decreases with reduced sediment supply.

  20. Communication: Slow relaxation, spatial mobility gradients, and vitrification in confined films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Schweizer, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Two decades of experimental research indicate that spatial confinement of glass-forming molecular and polymeric liquids results in major changes of their slow dynamics beginning at large confinement distances. A fundamental understanding remains elusive given the generic complexity of activated relaxation in supercooled liquids and the major complications of geometric confinement, interfacial effects, and spatial inhomogeneity. We construct a predictive, quantitative, force-level theory of relaxation in free-standing films for the central question of the nature of the spatial mobility gradient. The key new idea is that vapor interfaces speed up barrier hopping in two distinct, but coupled, ways by reducing near surface local caging constraints and spatially long range collective elastic distortion. Effective vitrification temperatures, dynamic length scales, and mobile layer thicknesses naturally follow. Our results provide a unified basis for central observations of dynamic and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements

  1. Communication: Slow relaxation, spatial mobility gradients, and vitrification in confined films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirigian, Stephen [Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Schweizer, Kenneth S., E-mail: kschweiz@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    Two decades of experimental research indicate that spatial confinement of glass-forming molecular and polymeric liquids results in major changes of their slow dynamics beginning at large confinement distances. A fundamental understanding remains elusive given the generic complexity of activated relaxation in supercooled liquids and the major complications of geometric confinement, interfacial effects, and spatial inhomogeneity. We construct a predictive, quantitative, force-level theory of relaxation in free-standing films for the central question of the nature of the spatial mobility gradient. The key new idea is that vapor interfaces speed up barrier hopping in two distinct, but coupled, ways by reducing near surface local caging constraints and spatially long range collective elastic distortion. Effective vitrification temperatures, dynamic length scales, and mobile layer thicknesses naturally follow. Our results provide a unified basis for central observations of dynamic and pseudo-thermodynamic measurements.

  2. Confined-but-Connected Quantum Solids via Controlled Ligand Displacement

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.; Whitham, Kevin; Hanrath, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Confined-but-connected quantum dot solids (QDS) combine the advantages of tunable, quantum-confined energy levels with efficient charge transport through enhanced electronic interdot coupling. We report the fabrication of QDS by treating self

  3. Investigation of stress–strain models for confined high strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High strength concrete; confined concrete; stress–strain models; ... One of its advantages is the lessening column cross-sectional areas. It was ..... Ahmad S H, Shah S P 1982 Stress–strain curves of concrete confined by spiral reinforcement.

  4. System Description for the Double Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ROSSI, H.

    2000-01-01

    This document provides a description of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Confinement System. This description will provide a basis for developing functional, performance and test requirements (i.e., subsystem specification), as necessary, for the DST Confinement System

  5. System and method of operating toroidal magnetic confinement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Stix, T.H.; Grimm, R.C.; Manickam, J.; Okabayashi, M.

    1984-08-30

    This invention pertains to methods and arrangements for attaining high beta values in plasma confinement devices. More specifically, this invention pertains to methods for accessing the second stability region of operation in toroidal magnetic confinement devices.

  6. Confinement of antihydrogen for 1000 seconds

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kemp, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2011-01-01

    Atoms made of a particle and an antiparticle are unstable, usually surviving less than a microsecond. Antihydrogen, made entirely of antiparticles, is believed to be stable, and it is this longevity that holds the promise of precision studies of matter-antimatter symmetry. We have recently demonstrated trapping of antihydrogen atoms by releasing them after a confinement time of 172 ms. A critical question for future studies is: how long can anti-atoms be trapped? Here we report the observation of anti-atom confinement for 1000 s, extending our earlier results by nearly four orders of magnitude. Our calculations indicate that most of the trapped anti-atoms reach the ground state. Further, we report the first measurement of the energy distribution of trapped antihydrogen which, coupled with detailed comparisons with simulations, provides a key tool for the systematic investigation of trapping dynamics. These advances open up a range of experimental possibilities, including precision studies of CPT symmetry and ...

  7. Hydrodynamics of compressible superfluids in confined geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmi-Kakkada, Abdul N; Valls, Oriol T; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the hydrodynamics of compressible superfluids in confined geometries. We use a perturbative procedure in terms of the dimensionless expansion parameter (v/v s ) 2 where v is the typical speed of the flow and v s is the speed of sound. A zero value of this parameter corresponds to the incompressible limit. We apply the procedure to two specific problems: the case of a trapped superfluid with a Gaussian profile of the local density, and that of a superfluid confined in a rotating obstructed cylinder. We find that the corrections due to finite compressibility which are, as expected, negligible for liquid He, are important but amenable to the perturbative treatment for typical ultracold atomic systems. (paper)

  8. Inertial confinement: concept and early history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhart, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of inertial confinement is linked to the general theme of energy compression and staging. It is shown how it arose from the ideas and experiments on dynamic pinches towards the end of the fifties and how the important key concept of a linear was further developed during the sixties. THe various attempts at driving linears to speeds in excess of 1 cm/μs are reviewed in chronological order, mentioning the important impetus given to this field by the consideration of laser as a driver. It is concluded that the field of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is becoming ever richer in possibilities, and the understanding of the physics of high-energy density has reached now a satisfactory level

  9. Confinement and stability in JET: recent results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The versatility of the JET device allows a wide range of tokamak operating regimes to be explored and plasmas bounded both by material limiters and by a magnetic separatrix have been investigated extensively. This has permitted the confinement and mhd stability properties of plasmas heated to temperatures above 10keV by neutral beam injection or ion cyclotron resonance heating to be studied in detail. The results of recent analyses of transport and confinement in the L- and H-mode regimes in JET are discussed and the properties of H-mode plasmas produced by both major forms of heating are compared. Several aspects of the mhd stability of such plasmas, particularly at high toroidal beta, β θ , and at the density limit, are reviewed. (author)

  10. NEW APPROACHES TO CONFINED ALPHA DIAGNOSTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISHER,R.K

    2004-04-01

    Three new approaches to obtain information on the confined fast alphas in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are proposed. The first technique measures the energetic charge exchange (CX) neutrals that result from the alpha collision-induced knock-on fuel ion tails undergoing electron capture on the MeV D neutral beams planned for heating and current drive. The second technique measures the energetic knock-on neutron tail due to alphas using the lengths of the proton recoil tracks produced by neutron collisions in nuclear emulsions. The range of the 14 to 20 MeV recoil protons increases by {approx}140 microns per MeV. The third approach would measure the CX helium neutrals resulting from confined alphas capturing two electrons in the ablation cloud surrounding a dense gas jet that has been proposed for disruption mitigation in ITER.

  11. Quantum liquids in confinement the microscopic view

    CERN Document Server

    Krotscheck, Eckhard S; Rimnac, A; Zillich, R

    2003-01-01

    We discuss, on a microscopic level, the effects of confinement on structural as well as dynamic properties of quantum liquids. The most evident structural consequences of confinement are layer structures found in liquid films, and free surfaces appearing in liquid drops and slabs. These structural properties have immediate consequences: new types of excitation such as surface phonons, layer phonons, layer rotons, and standing waves can appear and are potentially observable in neutron scattering spectra as well as in thermodynamic properties. Atom scattering experiments provide further insights into structural properties. Methods have been developed to describe elastic and inelastic atom scattering as well as transport currents. The theory has been applied to examine scattering processes of sup 4 He and sup 3 He atoms impinging on sup 4 He clusters, as well as sup 4 He scattering off sup 4 He films and slabs.

  12. Magnetic confinement fusion plasma theory, Task 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    1991-07-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has concentrated on a few key tokamak plasma confinement and heating theory issues: extensive development of a new Chapman-Enskog-like fluid/kinetic hybrid approach to deriving rigorously valid fluid moment equations; applications (neoclassical viscous force, instabilities in the banana-plateau collisionality regime, nonlinear gyroviscous force, unified plasma microinstability equations and their implications, semi-collisional presheath modeling, etc.) of this new formalism; interactions of fluctuating bootstrap-current-driven magnetic islands; determination of net transport processes and equations for a tokamak; and some other topics (extracting more information from heat-pulse-propagation data, modeling of BES fluctuation data, exploring sawtooth effects on energy confinement in DIII-D, divertor X-point modeling). Recent progress and publications in these areas, and in the management of the local NERSC node and fusion theory DECstation 5000 at UW-Madison are summarized briefly in this report

  13. NEW APPROACHES TO CONFINED ALPHA DIAGNOSTICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISHER, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Three new approaches to obtain information on the confined fast alphas in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are proposed. The first technique measures the energetic charge exchange (CX) neutrals that result from the alpha collision-induced knock-on fuel ion tails undergoing electron capture on the MeV D neutral beams planned for heating and current drive. The second technique measures the energetic knock-on neutron tail due to alphas using the lengths of the proton recoil tracks produced by neutron collisions in nuclear emulsions. The range of the 14 to 20 MeV recoil protons increases by ∼140 microns per MeV. The third approach would measure the CX helium neutrals resulting from confined alphas capturing two electrons in the ablation cloud surrounding a dense gas jet that has been proposed for disruption mitigation in ITER

  14. The history and hopes of inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhart, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the concept of inertial confinement is followed through its several incarnations starting from hammer and anvil, tamping of chemical explosives to Veksler's idea of collective and impact acceleration. The application of inertial confinement to the controlled nuclear fusion appears as a natural extension of these previous applications. The early association with the research on macroparticle-acceleration is also mentioned. Follows a brief description of the development of ideas on liner-acceleration, including those linked with a rocket-propulsion, or as it is known today-ablation. The recent trends in liner-acceleration, energy-compression and energy-staging are mentioned, as well as the hopes and fears connected with reactor projects

  15. Anomalous structural transition of confined hard squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurin, Péter; Varga, Szabolcs; Odriozola, Gerardo

    2016-11-01

    Structural transitions are examined in quasi-one-dimensional systems of freely rotating hard squares, which are confined between two parallel walls. We find two competing phases: one is a fluid where the squares have two sides parallel to the walls, while the second one is a solidlike structure with a zigzag arrangement of the squares. Using transfer matrix method we show that the configuration space consists of subspaces of fluidlike and solidlike phases, which are connected with low probability microstates of mixed structures. The existence of these connecting states makes the thermodynamic quantities continuous and precludes the possibility of a true phase transition. However, thermodynamic functions indicate strong tendency for the phase transition and our replica exchange Monte Carlo simulation study detects several important markers of the first order phase transition. The distinction of a phase transition from a structural change is practically impossible with simulations and experiments in such systems like the confined hard squares.

  16. Institutional games played by confined juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartollas, C; Sieverdes, C M

    1983-01-01

    This study examined the games played by 561 juvenile offenders confined in six coeducational correctional facilities in one state. The types of games these residents used against staff and peers within the confines of the institution varied considerably. The study documented nineteen games used by males and females, twelve to deal with staff and seven to deal with peers. The games were defined as therapeutic games, material games, psychological games, and physical games. Peer-oriented games included attention-seeking activities and a variety of dominance games. Additionally, these games were described and tabulated according to the sex and race of the residents. The conclusion was that game-playing behavior was no less frequent in coeducational institutions than it was in single-sex institutions.

  17. IL 14: Radiolysis of water confined in nano-porous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renault, J.P.; Pommeret, S.; Musat, R.; Le Caer, S.; Alam, M.; Mialocq, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Radiolysis of water in nano-porous media has raised a lot of interest and involved research in the recent years, with respect to concerns arising from the storage of nuclear waste. In the civil nuclear industry, storing for a long time nuclear wastes requires safety evaluations in order to test the durability of the materials involved. Among these materials, concrete and clays are a complex heterogeneous material that traps important quantities of interstitial water. Irradiation that arises from the nuclear wastes stored in these materials may lead to the radiolysis of the interstitial water, and the formation of radiolytic products, such as H 2 , O 2 or H 2 O 2 that may cause the breaking or the corrosion of the confining matrix. This communication will describe the possible impacts of confinement on the radiolysis of water. We will especially discuss the current knowledge about the evolution of radiolytic yields of primary species (hydroxyl radical, dihydrogen, aqueous electron) as a function of the degree of confinement and of the nature of the confining material. SEM picture of a nano-porous gold sample used to study the radiolysis of confined water The yield enhancement observed in many cases revealed original energy and charge transfer phenomena that we tried to decipher. (authors)

  18. Long-range correlations from colour confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, J.; Zenczykowski, P.

    1979-01-01

    A class of independent parton emission models is generalized by the introduction of the colour degrees of freedom. In the proposed models colour confinement extorts strong long-range forward-backward correlations, the rise of one-particle inclusive distribution and the KNO scaling. It leads to the analytically calculable definite asymptotic predictions for the D/ ratio which depends only on the choice of the colour group. Multiplicity distribution develops a remarkably long tail. (author)

  19. Designing the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The primary goal in designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactors is to produce electrical power as inexpensively as possible, with minimum activation and without compromising safety. This paper discusses a method for designing the Cascade rotating ceramic-granule-blanket reactor (Pitts, 1985) and its associated power plant (Pitts and Maya, 1985). Although focus is on the cascade reactor, the design method and issues presented are applicable to most other ICF reactors

  20. Studies into laser ignition of confined pyrotechnics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, S.R.; Russell, D.A. [Centre for Applied Laser Spectroscopy, DASSR, Defence Academy, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, Swindon (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Ignition tests were carried out on three different pyrotechnics using laser energy from the multimode output from an Ar-Ion laser (av) at 500 nm and a near-IR diode laser pigtailed to a fibre optic cable and operating at 808 nm. The pyrotechnics investigated were: G20 black powder, SR44 and SR371C. The confined ignition tests were conducted in a specially designed ignition chamber. Pyrotechnics were ignited by a free space beam entering the chamber through an industrial sapphire window in the case of the Ar-ion laser. For the NIR diode laser, fibre was ducted through a block into direct contact with the pyrotechnic. The Ar-Ion laser was chosen as this was found to ignite all three pyrotechnics in the unconfined condition. It also allowed for a direct comparison of confined/unconfined results to be made. The threshold laser flux densities to initiate reproducible ignitions at this wavelength were found to be between {proportional_to}12.7 and {proportional_to}0.16 kW cm{sup -2}. Plotted on the ignition maps are the laser flux densities versus the start of ignition times for the three confined pyrotechnics. It was found from these maps that the times for confined ignition were substantially lower than those obtained for unconfined ignition under similar experimental conditions. For the NIR diode laser flux densities varied between {proportional_to}6.8 and {proportional_to}0.2 kW cm{sup -2}. The minimum ignition times for the NIR diode laser for SR371C ({proportional_to}11.2 ms) and G20 ({proportional_to}17.1 ms) were faster than those achieved by the use of the Ar-ion laser. However, the minimum ignition time was shorter ({proportional_to}11.7 ms) with the Ar-ion laser for SR44. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Cluster expansion for vacuum confining fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonov, Yu.A.

    1987-01-01

    Colored particle Green functions in vacuum background random fields are written as path integrals. Averaging over random fields is done using the cluster (cumulant) expansion. The existence of a finite correlation length for vacuum background fields is shown to produce the linear confinement, in agreement with the results, obtained with the help of averaged Hamiltonians. A modified form of cluster expansion for nonabelian fields is introduced using the path-ordered cumulants

  2. A transport model with color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, S.

    1997-01-01

    First the mostly important properties of QCD are dealt with. It is made plausible, how the QCD vacuum generates a screening of color charges and is by this responsible for the quark confinement in color singlets. in the following the behaviour of classical color charges and color fields is studied and it is concluded that by this approximation, the neglection of quantum-mechanical fluctuation, the quark confinement cannot be explained, because the mean-field approximation leads to a screening of the color charges. Motivated by this result the Friedberg-Lee soliton model is presented, in which the the color confinement and all further nonperturbative QCD effects are phenomenologically modelled by means of a scalar field. Thereafter a derivation of the transport equations for quarks in the framework of the Wigner-function is presented. An extension of the equation to the Friedberg-Lee model is explained. As results the ground-state properties of the model are studied. Mesonic and baryonic ground-state solutions (soliton solutions) of the equations are constructed, whereby the constituents are both light quarks and heavy quarks. Furthermore the color coupling constant of QCD is fixed by means of the string tension by dynamical separation of the quarks of the meson. The flux tubes formed dynamically in this way are applied, in order to study the interaction of two strings and to calculate a string-string potential. Excited states of the meson (isovectorial modes) are presented as well as the influence of the color confinement on the quark motion. Finally the dynamical formation and the break-up of a string by the production of light and heavy quark pairs is described

  3. Twenty years of ''Nuclear Fusion''. Inertial confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.

    1980-01-01

    Inertial confinement (ICF) fusion research is directed towards demonstrating the feasibility of very rapidly heating and compressing small pellets of suitable fuel until conditions exist where thermonuclear fusion can occur and useful amounts of power can be produced. Major problems which have to be solved are the following: 1) pellet design based on driver-plasma coupling; 2) the technology of energy drivers; 3) feasibility of ICF reactor systems

  4. Confinement scaling and ignition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.; Sun, Y.C.

    1985-10-01

    A drift wave turbulence model is used to compute the scaling and magnitude of central electron temperature and confinement time of tokamak plasmas. The results are in accord with experiment. Application to ignition experiments shows that high density (1 to 2) . 10 15 cm -3 , high field, B/sub T/ > 10 T, but low temperature T approx. 6 keV constitute the optimum path to ignition

  5. A dynamical model for plasma confinement transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, Paweł; García, Luis; Carreras, Benjamin A; Llerena, Irene

    2012-01-01

    A three-equation model describing the evolution of the turbulence level, averaged shear flow and sheared zonal flow is analyzed using topological properties of the asymptotic solutions. An exploration in parameter space is done, identifying the attractor sets, which are fixed points and limit cycles. Then a more detailed analysis of all Morse sets is conducted using topological-combinatorial computations. This model allows the description of different types of transitions to improved plasma confinement regimes. (paper)

  6. Target support for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1995-08-01

    General Atomics (GA) plays an important industrial support role for the US Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program in the area of target technology. This includes three major activities: target fabrication support, target handling systems development, and target chamber design. The work includes target fabrication for existing ICF experiments, target and target system development for future experiments, and target research and target chamber design for experiments on future machines, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

  7. Charm production and the confining force field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, B.; Bengtsson, H.-U.; Gustafson, G.

    1983-03-01

    We show that charm production at SPS energies can be understood simply from O(α 2 sub (s)) QCD processes when combined with fragmentation of the colour fields stretched by the final state partons. The tension of the confining force field responsible for particle production is found to pull the charmed particles away from the reaction centre, giving rise to a harder x sub (F)-spectrum than would be expected from the bare QCD matrix elements. (Authors)

  8. Entanglement as a probe of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klebanov, Igor R.; Kutasov, David; Murugan, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement entropy in gravity duals of confining large N c gauge theories using the proposal of [S. Ryu, T. Takayanagi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 181602, (hep-th/0603001); S. Ryu, T. Takayanagi, JHEP 0608 (2006) 045, (hep-th/0605073)]. Dividing one of the directions of space into a line segment of length l and its complement, the entanglement entropy between the two subspaces is given by the classical action of the minimal bulk hypersurface which approaches the endpoints of the line segment at the boundary. We find that in confining backgrounds there are generally two such surfaces. One consists of two disconnected components localized at the endpoints of the line segment. The other contains a tube connecting the two components. The disconnected surface dominates the entropy for l above a certain critical value l crit while the connected one dominates below that value. The change of behavior at l=l crit is reminiscent of the finite temperature deconfinement transition: for l crit the entropy scales as N c 2 , while for l>l crit as N c 0 . We argue that a similar transition should occur in any field theory with a Hagedorn spectrum of non-interacting bound states. The requirement that the entanglement entropy has a phase transition may be useful in constraining gravity duals of confining theories

  9. Fuel and helium confinement in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    An expanded macroscopic model for particle confinement is used to investigate both fuel and helium confinement in reactor plasmas. The authors illustrate the relative effects of external sources of fuel, divertor pumping, and wall and divertory recycle on core, edge and scrape-off layer densities by using separate particle confinement times for open-quote core close-quote fueling (deep pellet or beam penetration, τ c ), open-quote shallow close-quote fueling (shallow pellet penetration or neutral atoms that penetrate the scrape-off layer, τ s ) and fueling in the scrape-off layer (τ sol ). Because τ s is determined by the parallel flow velocity and characteristic distance to the divertor plate, it can be orders of magnitude lower than either τ c or τ sol . A dense scrape-off region, desirable for reduced divertor erosion, leads to a high fraction of the recycled neutrals being ionized in the scrape-off region and poor core fueling efficiency. The overall fueling efficiency can then be dramatically improved with either shallow or deep auxillary fueling. Helium recycle is nearly always coupled to the scrape-off region and does not lead to strong core accumulation unless the helium pumping efficiency is much less than the fuel pumping efficiency, or the plasma preferentially retains helium over hydrogenic ions. Differences between the results of this model, single-τ p macroscopic models, and 1-D and 2-D models are discussed in terms of assumptions and boundary conditions

  10. Initial assessment of MHTGR confinement releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maneke, J.L.; Lanning, D.D.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Initial investigation of Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) designs suggest that source terms during postulated accidents will be considerably lower than Light Water Reactor (LWR) source term estimates. These lower postulated accident releases are not only a safety incentive, but also an economic incentive for the development of this reactor type. For example, it is hoped that a filtered confinement building, rather than a more expensive LWR-like containment building, would adequately protect the public from radiological releases. The ability of a confinement building to satisfy safety requirements for the MHTGR depends on several reactor parameters, such as fuel quality, reactor design, and the design of the reactor building. SCIMCA, a Simple Code for Initial MHTGR Confinement Assessment has been developed for preliminary MHTGR building requirement calculations. The code is capable of modeling a decay chain with a maximum of five regions. Phenomena such as fission product decay and buildup, natural deposition, building filtration, and intercompartmental transport are incorporated. SCIMCA models reduction mechanisms, such as dispersion and decay, occurring as radioactivity is transported through the environment. A subroutine for calculating doses at specified distances has also been included

  11. Pathways to dewetting in hydrophobic confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remsing, Richard C; Xi, Erte; Vembanur, Srivathsan; Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Garde, Shekhar; Patel, Amish J

    2015-07-07

    Liquid water can become metastable with respect to its vapor in hydrophobic confinement. The resulting dewetting transitions are often impeded by large kinetic barriers. According to macroscopic theory, such barriers arise from the free energy required to nucleate a critical vapor tube that spans the region between two hydrophobic surfaces--tubes with smaller radii collapse, whereas larger ones grow to dry the entire confined region. Using extensive molecular simulations of water between two nanoscopic hydrophobic surfaces, in conjunction with advanced sampling techniques, here we show that for intersurface separations that thermodynamically favor dewetting, the barrier to dewetting does not correspond to the formation of a (classical) critical vapor tube. Instead, it corresponds to an abrupt transition from an isolated cavity adjacent to one of the confining surfaces to a gap-spanning vapor tube that is already larger than the critical vapor tube anticipated by macroscopic theory. Correspondingly, the barrier to dewetting is also smaller than the classical expectation. We show that the peculiar nature of water density fluctuations adjacent to extended hydrophobic surfaces--namely, the enhanced likelihood of observing low-density fluctuations relative to Gaussian statistics--facilitates this nonclassical behavior. By stabilizing isolated cavities relative to vapor tubes, enhanced water density fluctuations thus stabilize novel pathways, which circumvent the classical barriers and offer diminished resistance to dewetting. Our results thus suggest a key role for fluctuations in speeding up the kinetics of numerous phenomena ranging from Cassie-Wenzel transitions on superhydrophobic surfaces, to hydrophobically driven biomolecular folding and assembly.

  12. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Hogan, J.T.; Porkolab, M.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995

  13. Confined Tube Crimp Using Portable Hand Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Joseph James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pereyra, R. A. [LANL Retired; Archuleta, Jeffrey Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Isaac P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, A. M. [MST-16 Summer Student (2007); Allen, Ronald Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Page, R. L. [LANL Retired; Freer, Jerry Eugene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dozhier, Nathan Gus [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-04-04

    The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory developed handheld tools that crimp a 1/16 inch OD tube, forming a leak tight seal1 (see Figure 1). The leak tight seal forms by confining the 1/16 inch OD tubing inside a die while applying crimp pressure. Under confined pressure, the tube walls weld at the crimp. The purpose of this study was to determine conditions for fabricating a leak tight tube weld. The equipment was used on a trial-and-error basis, changing the conditions after each attempt until successful welds were fabricated. To better confine the tube, the die faces were polished. Polishing removed a few thousandths of an inch from the die face, resulting in a tighter grip on the tubing wall. Using detergent in an ultrasonic bath, the tubing was cleaned. Also, the time under crimp pressure was increased to 30 seconds. With these modifications, acceptable cold welds were fabricated. After setting the conditions for an acceptable cold weld, the tube was TIG welded across the crimped face.

  14. Status of global energy confinement studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.; Bell, M.G.; DeBoo, J.C.; Waltz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Sigmar, D.

    1990-02-01

    Empirical scaling expressions, reflecting the parametric dependence of the L-mode energy confinement time, have been used not only as benchmarks for tokamak operation and theories of energy transport, but for predicting the performance of proposed tokamak devices. Several scaling expressions based on data from small-and medium-sized devices have done well in predicting performance in larger devices, although great uncertainty exists in extrapolating yet farther, into the ignition regime. Several approaches exist for developing higher confidence scaling expressions. These include reducing the statistical uncertainty by identifying and filling in gaps in the present database, making use of more sophisticated statistical techniques, and developing scalings for confinement regimes within which future devices will operate. Confidence in the scaling expressions will be increased still if the expressions can be more directly tied to transport physics theory. This can be done through the use of dimensionless parameters, better describing the edge and core confinement regimes separately, and by incorporating transport models directly into the scaling expressions. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Positron confinement in embedded lithium nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kuriplach, J.

    2002-02-01

    Quantum confinement of positrons in nanoclusters offers the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the electronic structure of nanoclusters by application of positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques. In this work, positron confinement is investigated in lithium nanoclusters embedded in monocrystalline MgO. These nanoclusters were created by means of ion implantation and subsequent annealing. It was found from the results of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis that approximately 92% of the implanted positrons annihilate in lithium nanoclusters rather than in the embedding MgO, while the local fraction of lithium at the implantation depth is only 1.3 at. %. The results of two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation confirm the presence of crystalline bulk lithium. The confinement of positrons is ascribed to the difference in positron affinity between lithium and MgO. The nanocluster acts as a potential well for positrons, where the depth of the potential well is equal to the difference in the positron affinities of lithium and MgO. These affinities were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method. This yields a positronic potential step at the MgO||Li interface of 1.8 eV using the generalized gradient approximation and 2.8 eV using the insulator model.

  16. Evaporation rate of water in hydrophobic confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2012-03-20

    The drying of hydrophobic cavities is believed to play an important role in biophysical phenomena such as the folding of globular proteins, the opening and closing of ligand-gated ion channels, and ligand binding to hydrophobic pockets. We use forward flux sampling, a molecular simulation technique, to compute the rate of capillary evaporation of water confined between two hydrophobic surfaces separated by nanoscopic gaps, as a function of gap, surface size, and temperature. Over the range of conditions investigated (gaps between 9 and 14 Å and surface areas between 1 and 9 nm(2)), the free energy barrier to evaporation scales linearly with the gap between hydrophobic surfaces, suggesting that line tension makes the predominant contribution to the free energy barrier. The exponential dependence of the evaporation rate on the gap between confining surfaces causes a 10 order-of-magnitude decrease in the rate when the gap increases from 9 to 14 Å. The computed free energy barriers are of the order of 50 kT and are predominantly enthalpic. Evaporation rates per unit area are found to be two orders of magnitude faster in confinement by the larger (9 nm(2)) than by the smaller (1 nm(2)) surfaces considered here, at otherwise identical conditions. We show that this rate enhancement is a consequence of the dependence of hydrophobic hydration on the size of solvated objects. For sufficiently large surfaces, the critical nucleus for the evaporation process is a gap-spanning vapor tube.

  17. Operational technology for greater confinement disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, P.T.; Vollmer, A.T.; Hunter, P.H.

    1984-12-01

    Procedures and methods for the design and operation of a greater confinement disposal facility using large-diameter boreholes are discussed. It is assumed that the facility would be located at an operating low-level waste disposal site and that only a small portion of the wastes received at the site would require greater confinement disposal. The document is organized into sections addressing: facility planning process; facility construction; waste loading and handling; radiological safety planning; operations procedures; and engineering cost studies. While primarily written for low-level waste management site operators and managers, a detailed economic assessment section is included that should assist planners in performing cost analyses. Economic assessments for both commercial and US government greater confinement disposal facilities are included. The estimated disposal costs range from $27 to $104 per cubic foot for a commercial facility and from $17 to $60 per cubic foot for a government facility. These costs are based on average site preparation, construction, and waste loading costs for both contact- and remote-handled wastes. 14 figures, 22 tables

  18. CATTLE PRODUCTIVE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION CONFINED SUBMITTED IMMUNOCASTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Maluf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the performance and carcass characteristics of cattle cross breeds ½ Aberdeen Angus x ½Nelore and Nelore confined submitted to immunocastration 218 male animals were used, feedlot, averaging 342 kg, divided into three experimental groups, T1: 117 steers ½ Angus x ½ Nelore no castrated (ANC, T2: 51 Nelore steers uncastrated (NNC and T3: 50 Nellore steers immunocastrated (NIC. The experiment lasted 144 days of confinement. The selection of animals for group formation was according to the individual weight, breed, sex condition and age. For immunocastration it wasused Bopriva® vaccine. The rating was finished according to the parameter used by the meatpacking industry ranging from 1 to 5. The experimental design was completely randomized in three groups. For the analyzes the variables studied statistics were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey test both at the 5% level of significance. The results showed differences (p <0.01 at various features of productive performance and carcass between treatments. For slaughter weight, the ANC animals were higher (with 582.1 kg to Nelore, regardless of sexual condition, and the NNC were in turn heavier than the NIC, 527.4 and 503.7 respectively. Finally, it observed that the use of immunocastration in Nellore animals provided a decrease in productive performance of confined animals, but provided better finish carcass similar to crossbred (ANC.

  19. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Shailendra K., E-mail: phd1211512@iiti.ac.in; Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh [Material Research Laboratory, Discipline of Physics & MSEG, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Madhya Pradesh-452017 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  20. Multi-scale experimental and numerical study of the structure and the dynamics of water confined in clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaud, Emmanuel Bertrand

    2017-01-01

    Clay are complex minerals with a multi-scale porosity and a remarkable ability to swell under humid atmosphere. These materials have many applications in catalysis, waste management, construction industry... However, the properties of confined water are still not fully understood, due in particular to the complexity of water itself. The aim of this work is, using mainly molecular simulations and vibrational spectroscopy, to understand the structure and the dynamics of water confined in clay minerals. To evaluate the accuracy of numerical models to describe water confined in clay minerals, and to understand the origin of its structural and dynamical properties, a large part of the work was devoted to the building blocks of clays: pure bulk water, water at the surface of a solid, and salt water. To this extent, the viscoelastic properties of water from the deeply supercooled regime to the boiling temperature were investigated using classical molecular dynamics. The evolution of the friction properties of water on a prototypical solid surface was also analyzed, and the accuracy of ab initio approaches and empirical salt models was studied. In a second part, those results were confronted to the properties of water confined in clay minerals at low and room temperature, studied both experimentally and numerically. Experimental work consisted mostly in extensive far- and -mid infrared absorption spectrometry measurements, whereas numerical work mainly consisted in empirical molecular dynamics simulations. Especially, the existence of confinement- or temperature-induced phase transitions of confined water was investigated. (author)

  1. Functional modulation of cardiac form through regionally confined cell shape changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi J Auman

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Developing organs acquire a specific three-dimensional form that ensures their normal function. Cardiac function, for example, depends upon properly shaped chambers that emerge from a primitive heart tube. The cellular mechanisms that control chamber shape are not yet understood. Here, we demonstrate that chamber morphology develops via changes in cell morphology, and we determine key regulatory influences on this process. Focusing on the development of the ventricular chamber in zebrafish, we show that cardiomyocyte cell shape changes underlie the formation of characteristic chamber curvatures. In particular, cardiomyocyte elongation occurs within a confined area that forms the ventricular outer curvature. Because cardiac contractility and blood flow begin before chambers emerge, cardiac function has the potential to influence chamber curvature formation. Employing zebrafish mutants with functional deficiencies, we find that blood flow and contractility independently regulate cell shape changes in the emerging ventricle. Reduction of circulation limits the extent of cardiomyocyte elongation; in contrast, disruption of sarcomere formation releases limitations on cardiomyocyte dimensions. Thus, the acquisition of normal cardiomyocyte morphology requires a balance between extrinsic and intrinsic physical forces. Together, these data establish regionally confined cell shape change as a cellular mechanism for chamber emergence and as a link in the relationship between form and function during organ morphogenesis.

  2. Energy confinement scaling from the international stellarator database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroth, U [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Murakami, M; Dory, R A; Yamada, H; Okamura, S; Sano, F; Obiki, T

    1995-09-01

    An international stellarator database on global energy confinement is presented comprising data from the ATF, CHS and Heliotron E heliotron/torsatrons and the W7-A and W7-AS shearless stellarators. Regression expressions for the energy confinement time are given for the individual devices and the combined dataset. A comparison with tokamak L mode confinement is discussed on the basis of various scaling expressions. In order to make this database available to interested colleagues, the structure of the database and the parameter list are explained in detail. More recent confinement results incorporating data from enhanced confinement regimes such as H mode are reported elsewhere. (author).

  3. Dimensional crossover in fluids under nanometer-scale confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J

    2012-05-01

    Several earlier studies have shown signatures of crossover in various static and dynamics properties of a confined fluid when the confining dimension decreases to about a nanometer. The density fluctuations govern the majority of such properties of a fluid. Here, we illustrate the crossover in density fluctuation in a confined fluid, to provide a generic understanding of confinement-induced crossover of fluid properties, using computer simulations. The crossover can be understood as a manifestation of changes in the long-wavelength behavior of fluctuation in density due to geometrical constraints. We further show that the confining potential significantly affects the crossover behavior.

  4. Morphology and composition of pyrotechnic residues formed at different levels of confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, E.; Duvalois, W.; Webb, R.; Koeberg, M.

    2009-01-01

    Post explosion residues (PER) are residues from pyrotechnic compositions or explosives that are generated during an explosion. In the recent past SEM/EDX was used several times to analyze PER from pyrotechnic compositions. The results from these studies suggest that there might be a difference in

  5. Influence of error fields on the plasma confining field and the plasma confinement in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Shinzaburo

    1977-05-01

    Influence of error fields on the plasma confining field and the plasma confinement is treated in the standpoint of design. In the initial breakdown phase before formation of the closed magnetic surfaces, the vertical field properly applied is the most important. Once the magnetic surfaces are formed, the non-axisymmetric error field is important. Effect of the shell gap associated with iron core and with pulsed vertical coils is thus studied. The formation of magnetic islands due to the external non-axisymmetric error field is studied with a simple model. A method of suppressing the islands by choosing the minor periodicity is proposed. (auth.)

  6. Plasma Confinement in the UCLA Electric Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert J.

    2001-10-01

    The main goal of the newly constructed large Electric Tokamak (R = 5 m, a = 1 m, BT 8 x 10^12 cm-3 when there is no MHD activity. The electron temperature, derived from the plasma conductivity is > 250 eV with a central electron energy confinement time > 350 msec in ohmic conditions. The sawteeth period is 50 msec. Edge plasma rotation is induced by plasma biasing via electron injection in an analogous manner to that seen in CCT(R.J. Taylor, M.L. Brown, B.D. Fried, H. Grote, J.R. Liberati, G.J. Morales, P. Pribyl, D. Darrow, and M. Ono. Phys. Rev Lett. 63 2365 1989.) and the neoclassical bifurcation is close to that described by Shaing et al(K.C. Shaing and E.C. Crume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63 2369 (1989).). In the ohmic phase the confinement tends to be MHD limited. The ICRF heating eliminates the MHD disturbances. Under second harmonic heating conditions, we observe an internal confinement peaking characterized by doubling of the core density and a corresponding increase in the central electron temperature. Charge exchange data, Doppler data in visible H-alpha light, and EC radiation all indicate that ICRF heating works much better than expected. The major effort is focused on increasing the power input and controlling the resulting equilibrium. This task appears to be easy since our current pulses are approaching the 3 second mark without RF heating or current drive. Our initial experience with current profile control, needed for high beta plasma equilibrium, will be also discussed.

  7. Generalized Morphology using Sponges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Gronde, Jasper J.; Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical morphology has traditionally been grounded in lattice theory. For non-scalar data lattices often prove too restrictive, however. In this paper we present a more general alternative, sponges, that still allows useful definitions of various properties and concepts from morphological

  8. Covariant, chirally symmetric, confining model of mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.; Milana, J.

    1991-01-01

    We introduce a new model of mesons as quark-antiquark bound states. The model is covariant, confining, and chirally symmetric. Our equations give an analytic solution for a zero-mass pseudoscalar bound state in the case of exact chiral symmetry, and also reduce to the familiar, highly successful nonrelativistic linear potential models in the limit of heavy-quark mass and lightly bound systems. In this fashion we are constructing a unified description of all the mesons from the π through the Υ. Numerical solutions for other cases are also presented

  9. Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    The focus of these (two) lectures is on buoyancy-driven instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type, which are commonly regarded as the most important kind of hydrodynamic instability in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions. The paper is intended to be pedagogical rather than research-oriented, and so is by no means a comprehensive review of work in this field. Rather, it is hoped that the student will find here a foundation on which to build an understanding of current research, and the experienced researcher will find a compilation of useful results. (author)

  10. Effective diffusion of confined active Brownian swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Mario; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    We find theoretically the effect of confinement and thermal fluctuations, on the diffusivity of a spherical active swimmer moving inside a two-dimensional narrow cavity of general shape. The explicit formulas for the effective diffusion coefficient of a swimmer moving inside two particular cavities are presented. We also compare our analytical results with Brownian Dynamics simulations and we obtain excellent agreement. L.D. thanks Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia (CONACyT) Mexico, for partial support by Grant No. 176452. M. S. thanks CONACyT and Programa de Mejoramiento de Profesorado (PROMEP) for partially funding this work under Grant No. 103.5/13/6732.

  11. Commercial applications of inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.; Frank, T.G.

    1977-05-01

    This report describes the fundamentals of inertial-confinement fusion, some laser-fusion reactor (LFR) concepts, and attendant means of utilizing the thermonuclear energy for commercial electric power generation. In addition, other commercial energy-related applications, such as the production of fissionable fuels, of synthetic hydrocarbon-based fuels, and of process heat for a variety of uses, as well as the environmental and safety aspects of fusion energy, are discussed. Finally, the requirements for commercialization of laser fusion technologies are described

  12. Invariant structures in gauge theories and confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokhorov, L.V.; Shabanov, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of finding all gauge invariants is considered in connection with the problem of confinement. Polylocal gauge tensors are introduced and studied. It is shown (both in physical and pure geometrical approaches) that the path-ordered exponent is the only fundamental bilocal gauge tensor, which means that any irreducible polylocal gauge tensor is built of P-exponents and local tensors (matter fields). The simplest invariant structures in electrodynamics, chromodynamics and a theory with the gauge group SU(2) are considered separately. 23 refs.; 2 figs

  13. The Gribov theory of quark confinement

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    V N Gribov, one of the founders of modern particle physics, shaped our understanding of QCD as the microscopic dynamics of hadrons. This volume collects his papers on quark confinement, showing the road he followed to arrive at the theory and formulating the theory itself. It begins with papers providing a beautiful physical explanation of asymptotic freedom based on the phenomenon of antiscreening and demonstrating the inconsistency of the standard perturbative treatment of the gluon fields (Gribov copies, Gribov horizon). It continues with papers presenting the Gribov theory according to whi

  14. Micromachining of inertial confinement fusion targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobby, P.L.; Salzer, L.J.; Day, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Many experiments conducted on today's largest inertial confinement fusion drive lasers require target components with sub-millimeter dimensions, precisions of a micron or less and surface finishes measured in nanometers. For metal and plastic, techniques using direct machining with diamond tools have been developed that yield the desired parts. New techniques that will be discussed include the quick-flip locator, a magnetically held kinematic mount that has allowed the direct machining of millimeter-sized beryllium hemishells whose inside and outside surface are concentric to within 0.25 micron, and an electronic version of a tracer lathe which has produced precise azimuthal variations of less than a micron

  15. Isolation and confinement - Considerations for colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses three types of isolation (sensory/perceptual, temporal, and social) that could adversely affect mankind in space. The literature dealing with laboratory and field experiments relevant to these areas is summarized and suggestions are given for dealing with these problems within the space colony community. Also, consideration is given to the potential effects of physical confinement and the need for usable space. Finally, a modification of Maslow's hierarchy of needs is proposed as a theoretical framework to understand and investigate mankind's psychological needs in space.

  16. Inertia-confining thermonuclear molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Yamanaka, Chiyoe; Nakai, Sadao; Imon, Shunji; Nakajima, Hidenori; Nakamura, Norio; Kato, Yoshio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the heat generating efficiency while improving the reactor safety and thereby maintaining the energy balance throughout the reactor. Constitution: In an inertia-confining type D-T thermonuclear reactor, the blanket is made of lithium-containing fluoride molten salts (LiF.BeF 2 , LiF.NaF.KF, LiF.KF, etc) which are cascaded downwardly in a large thickness (50 - 100 cm) along the inner wall of the thermonuclear reaction vessel, and neutrons generated by explosive compression are absorbed to lithium in the molten salts to produce tritium, Heat transportation is carried out by the molten salts. (Ikeda, J.)

  17. Central cell confinement in MFTF-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The point code TANDEM has been used to survey the range of plasma parameters which can be attained in MFTF-B. The code solves for the electron and ion densities and temperatures in the central cell, yin-yang, barrier, and A-cell regions as well as the plasma potential in each region. In these studies, the A-cell sloshing ion beams were fixed while the neutral beams in the yin-yang and central cell, the gas feed in the central cell, and the applied ECRH power β, central cell ion density and temperature, and the confining potential are discussed

  18. Magnetic properties of confined holographic QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Oren; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the Sakai-Sugimoto model at nonzero baryon chemical potential in a background magnetic field in the confined phase where chiral symmetry is broken. The D8-brane Chern-Simons term holographically encodes the axial anomaly and generates a gradient of the η' meson, which carries a non-vanishing baryon charge. Above a critical value of the chemical potential, there is a second-order phase transition to a mixed phase which includes also ordinary baryonic matter. However, at fixed baryon charge density, the matter is purely η'-gradient above a critical magnetic field.

  19. Sure confinement of spent sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.

    2013-10-01

    The industrial and technological development of the last decades produced and increment in the radiations application in different human activities. One of the main effects has been the production of radioactive wastes of all the levels. In Mexico, several stages of the waste management of low and intermediate level have not been completely resolved, as the case of the treatment and the final storage. In this work the confinement of spent sealed sources is described, maintaining as main objective the security of these sources and the protection to the workers and the people. (author)

  20. Status of 2XIIB plasma confinement experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coensgen, F.J.; Clauser, J.F.; Correll, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes the status of 2XIIB neutral beam injection experiments with stabilizing plasma. The stream suppresses ion-cyclotron fluctuations and permits density to 5 x 10 13 cm -3 . The ion energy is 13 keV, and electron temperature reaches 140 eV. Plasma confinement increases with ion energy and n tau reaches 7 x 10 10 cm -3 .s at 13 keV. The n tau energy scaling is consistent with electron drag and ion-ion scattering losses. Buildup on a streaming plasma in a steady-state magnetic field is described

  1. Extrinsic morphology of graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Teng

    2011-01-01

    Graphene is intrinsically non-flat and corrugates randomly. Since the corrugating physics of atomically thin graphene is strongly tied to its electronics properties, randomly corrugating morphology of graphene poses a significant challenge to its application in nanoelectronic devices for which precise (digital) control is the key. Recent studies revealed that the morphology of substrate-supported graphene is regulated by the graphene–substrate interaction, thus is distinct from the random intrinsic morphology of freestanding graphene. The regulated extrinsic morphology of graphene sheds light on new pathways to fine tune the properties of graphene. To guide further research to explore these fertile opportunities, this paper reviews recent progress on modeling and experimental studies of the extrinsic morphology of graphene under a wide range of external regulation, including two-dimensional and one-dimensional substrate surface features and one-dimensional and zero-dimensional nanoscale scaffolds (e.g. nanowires and nanoparticles)

  2. Collective Behavior of Quorum-Sensing Run-and-Tumble Particles under Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Markus; Heinß, Nike; Schmid, Friederike; Speck, Thomas

    2016-02-05

    We study a generic model for quorum-sensing bacteria in circular confinement. Every bacterium produces signaling molecules, the local concentration of which triggers a response when a certain threshold is reached. If this response lowers the motility, then an aggregation of bacteria occurs which differs fundamentally from standard motility-induced phase separation due to the long-ranged nature of the concentration of signal molecules. We analyze this phenomenon analytically and by numerical simulations employing two different protocols leading to stationary cluster and ring morphologies, respectively.

  3. Confinement of Reinforced-Concrete Columns with Non-Code Compliant Confining Reinforcement plus Supplemental Pen-Binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anang Kristianto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the important requirements for earthquake resistant building related to confinement is the use of seismic hooks in the hoop or confining reinforcement of reinforced-concrete column elements. However, installation of a confining reinforcement with a 135-degree hook is not easy. Therefore, in practice, many construction workers apply a confining reinforcement with a 90-degreehook (non-code compliant. Based on research and records of recent earthquakes in Indonesia, the use of a non-code compliant confining reinforcement for concrete columns produces structures with poor seismic performance. This paper presents a study that introduces an additional element that is expected to improve the effectiveness of concrete columns confined with a non-code compliant confining reinforcement. The additional element, named a pen-binder, is used to keep the non-code compliant confining reinforcement in place. The effectiveness of this element under pure axial concentric loading was investigatedcomprehensively.The specimens tested in this study were 18 concrete columns,with a cross-section of 170 mm x 170 mm and a height of 480 mm. The main test variables were the material type of the pen-binder, the angle of the hook, and the confining reinforcement configuration.The test results indicate that adding pen-binders can effectively improve the strength and ductility of the column specimens confined with a non-code compliant confining reinforcement

  4. Aspects of confinement in QCD from lattice simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, Daniel

    2011-01-12

    We study confinement in quantum chromodynamics via numerical simulations in the framework of lattice gauge theory. In Landau gauge, the mechanism of confinement is related to the infrared behavior of the ghost and gluon propagators via the Gribov-Zwanziger and Kugo- Ojima scenarios. These scenarios entail a scaling behavior. Functional methods in the continuum allow both for this behavior and for decoupling solutions, while lattice simulations in three and four dimensions yield only the latter. A possible explanation for this mismatch is based on limitations of standard lattice gauge fixing methods. Hence, we investigate a number of alternative gauge fixing algorithms in pure SU(2) gauge theory in two, three and four dimensions. We find that stochastic quantization yields an infrared behavior of the propagators in agreement with the results of standard procedures, even though the Faddeev-Popov operator spectrum indicates some different properties. In the strong-coupling limit, our results challenge the standard picture. In particular, we find in a non-perturbative completion of Landau gauge an enormous effect of the Gribov ambiguity. It entails that no subset of infrared solutions can be excluded yet. Moreover, we study the gluon propagator with free boundary conditions. On large lattices, the results mostly show the standard behavior. We also examine non-periodic gauge transformations. Furthermore, we analyze two topics related to the phase diagram of QCD. First, we explore the sign problem for fermions on the lattice by simulating the three-dimensional Thirring model with a complex Langevin equation. The algorithm succeeds in yielding a 'Silver Blaze' behavior of observables, but it does not reliably describe the onset to a phase with non-zero density. Second, we determine properties of the deconfinement phase transition of pure SU(2) gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, like the critical temperature, by means of the gluon propagator in Landau gauge. (orig.)

  5. Aspects of confinement in QCD from lattice simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielmann, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We study confinement in quantum chromodynamics via numerical simulations in the framework of lattice gauge theory. In Landau gauge, the mechanism of confinement is related to the infrared behavior of the ghost and gluon propagators via the Gribov-Zwanziger and Kugo- Ojima scenarios. These scenarios entail a scaling behavior. Functional methods in the continuum allow both for this behavior and for decoupling solutions, while lattice simulations in three and four dimensions yield only the latter. A possible explanation for this mismatch is based on limitations of standard lattice gauge fixing methods. Hence, we investigate a number of alternative gauge fixing algorithms in pure SU(2) gauge theory in two, three and four dimensions. We find that stochastic quantization yields an infrared behavior of the propagators in agreement with the results of standard procedures, even though the Faddeev-Popov operator spectrum indicates some different properties. In the strong-coupling limit, our results challenge the standard picture. In particular, we find in a non-perturbative completion of Landau gauge an enormous effect of the Gribov ambiguity. It entails that no subset of infrared solutions can be excluded yet. Moreover, we study the gluon propagator with free boundary conditions. On large lattices, the results mostly show the standard behavior. We also examine non-periodic gauge transformations. Furthermore, we analyze two topics related to the phase diagram of QCD. First, we explore the sign problem for fermions on the lattice by simulating the three-dimensional Thirring model with a complex Langevin equation. The algorithm succeeds in yielding a 'Silver Blaze' behavior of observables, but it does not reliably describe the onset to a phase with non-zero density. Second, we determine properties of the deconfinement phase transition of pure SU(2) gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, like the critical temperature, by means of the gluon propagator in Landau gauge. (orig.)

  6. Velocity Dependence of Friction of Confined Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the f......We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence...... of the frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (∼3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature...... in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower. In all...

  7. Achieving improved ohmic confinement via impurity injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Soeldner, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    Improved Ohmic Confinement (IOC) was obtained in ASDEX after a modification of the divertors that allowed a larger (deuterium and impurity) backflow from the divertor chamber. The quality of IOC depended crucially on the wall conditions, i.e. IOC was best for uncovered stainless steels walls and vanished with boronization. Furthermore, IOC was found only in deuterium discharges. These circumstances led to the idea that IOC correlates with the content of light impurities in the plasma. To substantiate this working hypothesis, we present observations in deuterium discharges with boronized wall conditions into which various impurities have been injected with the aim to induce IOC conditions. Firstly, the plasma behaviour in typical IOC discharges is characterized. Secondly, injection experiments with the low-Z impurities nitrogen and neon as well as with the high-Z impurities argon and krypton are discussed. Then, we concentrate on optimized neon puffing that yields the best confinement results which are similar to IOC conditions. Finally, these results are compared with eperiments in other tokamaks and some conclusions are drawn about the effects of the impurity puffing on both, the central and the edge plasma behaviour. (orig.)

  8. Mechanism for confinement in massive quark QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    The first part of this talk reviews the mean field approach to quark statics and the leading log model for bag formation was given in a recent paper. The second part treats two new topics. First, a flux function reformulation of the leading log model which leads to a stable iterative numerical method is given. Second, it is shown that when the running coupling constant is defined so that the β-function terminates at 1- or 2-loop order, QCD has two perturbative regions: the standard asymptotically free region F 2 much greater than kappa 2 (with kappa/sup 1/2/ the scale mass), and a second asymptotically free region where vertical bar F 2 vertical bar much less than kappa 2 . The existence of this second region gives a perturbative QCD justification for the weak-field behavior of the leading log model which is responsible for confinement. A possible starting point is suggested for an attempt at a general confinement proof

  9. Self-consistent model of confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the large-spatial-distance, zero--three-momentum, limit of QCD is developed from the hypothesis that there is an infrared singularity. Single quarks and gluons do not propagate because they have infinite energy after renormalization. The Hamiltonian formulation of the path integral is used to quantize QCD with physical, nonpropagating fields. Perturbation theory in the infrared limit is simplified by the absence of self-energy insertions and by the suppression of large classes of diagrams due to vanishing propagators. Remaining terms in the perturbation series are resummed to produce a set of nonlinear, renormalizable integral equations which fix both the confining interaction and the physical propagators. Solutions demonstrate the self-consistency of the concepts of an infrared singularity and nonpropagating fields. The Wilson loop is calculated to provide a general proof of confinement. Bethe-Salpeter equations for quark-antiquark pairs and for two gluons have finite-energy solutions in the color-singlet channel. The choice of gauge is addressed in detail. Large classes of corrections to the model are discussed and shown to support self-consistency

  10. Congestion and communication in confined ant traffic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravish, Nick; Gold, Gregory; Zangwill, Andrew; Goodisman, Michael A. D.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-03-01

    Many social animals move and communicate within confined spaces. In subterranean fire ants Solenopsis invicta, mobility within crowded nest tunnels is important for resource and information transport. Within confined tunnels, communication and traffic flow are at odds: trafficking ants communicate through tactile interactions while stopped, yet ants that stop to communicate impose physical obstacles on the traffic. We monitor the bi-directional flow of fire ant workers in laboratory tunnels of varied diameter D. The persistence time of communicating ant aggregations, τ, increases approximately linearly with the number of participating ants, n. The sensitivity of traffic flow increases as D decreases and diverges at a minimum diameter, Dc. A cellular automata model incorporating minimal traffic features--excluded volume and communication duration--reproduces features of the experiment. From the model we identify a competition between information transfer and the need to maintain jam-free traffic flow. We show that by balancing information transfer and traffic flow demands, an optimum group strategy exists which maximizes information throughput. We acknowledge funding from NSF PoLS #0957659 and #PHY-1205878.

  11. Condensate bright solitons under transverse confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salasnich, L.; Reatto, L.; Parola, A.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensate bright solitons made of alkali-metal atoms with negative scattering length and under harmonic confinement in the transverse direction. Contrary to the one-dimensional (1D) case, the 3D bright soliton exists only below a critical attractive interaction that depends on the extent of confinement. Such a behavior is also found in multisoliton condensates with box boundary conditions. We obtain numerical and analytical estimates of the critical strength beyond which the solitons do not exist. By using an effective 1D nonpolynomial nonlinear Schroedinger equation, which accurately takes into account the transverse dynamics of cigarlike condensates, we numerically simulate the dynamics of the 'soliton train' reported in a recent experiment [Nature (London) 417, 150 (2002)]. Then, analyzing the macroscopic quantum tunneling of the bright soliton on a Gaussian barrier, we find that its interference in the tunneling region is strongly suppressed with respect to nonsolitonic case; moreover, the tunneling through a barrier breaks the shape invariance of the matter wave. Finally, we show that the collapse of the soliton is induced by the scattering on the barrier or by the collision with another matter wave when the density reaches a critical value, for which we derive an accurate analytical formula

  12. Dual Higgs theory for color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichie, H.; Suganuma, H.

    1999-01-01

    We study theoretical bases of the dual Higgs theory for confinement physics in QCD in terms of monopoles and the gluon configuration in the maximally abelian (MA) gauge. Abelian dominance for the confinement force can be analytically proved by regarding the off-diagonal angle variable as a random variable in the lattice formalism. In the long-distance scale, the contribution of off-diagonal gluons to the Wilson loop cancels each other and exhibits a perimeter law behavior, which leads to exact abelian dominance on the string tension if the finite size effect of the Wilson loop is removed. We investigate the appearance of the monopole in the QCD vacuum, considering the role of off-diagonal gluons. The monopole carries a large fluctuation of the gluon field and provides a large abelian action in abelian projected QCD. Due to the partial cancellation between the abelian part and the off-diagonal part of the QCD action, the monopole can appear in QCD without large cost of the QCD action. The off-diagonal gluon is necessary for existence of the monopole at the short-distance scale. We study monopole condensation, which is the requirement of the dual Higgs theory, by comparing the QCD vacuum with the monopole-current system. We find that 'entropy' of monopole-current dominates than its 'energy', and the monopole seems to be condensed at the infrared scale in the QCD vacuum. Copyright (1999) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd

  13. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallamace, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mallamace@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienza della Terra Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Corsaro, Carmelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienza della Terra Università di Messina and CNISM, I-98168 Messina (Italy); Mallamace, Domenico [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Università di Messina, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino [IPCF-CNR, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Stanley, H. Eugene [Center for Polymer Studies and Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ≃ 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ∼ 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient α{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  14. Laser doppler velocimetry and confined flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Jelena T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding the mode, in which two component laser Doppler velocimetry can be applied to flows confined in cylindrical tubes or vessels, was the aim of this study. We have identified principle issues that influence the propagation of laser beams in laser Doppler velocimetry system, applied to flow confined in cylindrical tube. Among them, the most important are influences of fluid and wall refractive indices, wall thickness and internal radius ratio and beam intersection angle. In analysis of the degrees of these influences, we have applied mathematical model, based on geometrical optics. The separation of measurement volumes, that measure different velocity components, has been recognized as the main drawback. To overcome this, we propose a lens with dual focal length – primary focal length for the measurement of one velocity component and secondary focal length for the measurement of the other velocity component. We present here the procedure for calculating the optimal value of secondary focal length, depending on experimental set-up parameters. The mathematical simulation of the application of the dual focal length lens, for chosen cases presented here, confirmed the accuracy of the proposed procedure.

  15. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  16. Quantum chromodynamics near the confinement limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    1985-09-01

    These nine lectures deal at an elementary level with the strong interaction between quarks and its implications for the structure of hadrons. Quarkonium systems are studied as a means for measuring the interquark interaction. This is presumably (part of) the answer a solution to QCD must yield, if it is indeed the correct theory of the strong interactions. Some elements of QCD are reviewed, and metaphors for QCD as a confining theory are introduced. The 1/N expansion is summarized as a way of guessing the consequences of QCD for hadron physics. Lattice gauge theory is developed as a means for going beyond perturbation theory in the solution of QCD. The correspondence between statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and field theory is made, and simple spin systems are formulated on the lattice. The lattice analog of local gauge invariance is developed, and analytic methods for solving lattice gauge theory are considered. The strong-coupling expansion indicates the existence of a confining phase, and the renormalization group provides a means for recovering the consequences of continuum field theory. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of lattice theories give evidence for the phase structure of gauge theories, yield an estimate for the string tension characterizing the interquark force, and provide an approximate description of the quarkonium potential in encouraging good agreement with what is known from experiment

  17. Confinement effects and mechanistic aspects for montmorillonite nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiong; Zhu, Chang; Jia, Zengqiang; Yang, Gang

    2018-08-01

    Owing to the ubiquity, critical importance and special properties, confined microenvironments have recently triggered overwhelming interest. In this work, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to address the confinement effects and ion-specific effects for electrolyte solutions within montmorillonite nanopores, where the pore widths vary with a wide range. The adsorption number, structure, dynamics and stability of inner- and outer-sphere metal ions are affected by the change of pore widths (confinement effects), while the extents are significantly dependent on the type of adsorbed species. The type of adsorbed species is, however, not altered by the magnitude of confinement effects, and confinement effects are similar for different electrolyte concentrations. Ion-specific effects are pronounced for all magnitudes of confinement effects (from non- to strong confined conditions), and Hofmeister sequences of outer-sphere species are closely associated with the magnitude of confinement effects while those of inner-sphere species remain consistent. In addition, mechanistic aspects of confinement have been posed using the electrical double layer theories, and the results can be generalized to other confined systems that are ubiquitous in biology, chemistry, geology and nanotechnology. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comments on experimental results of energy confinement of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.

    1989-04-01

    The results of energy-confinement experiments on steady-state tokamak plasmas are examined. For plasmas with auxiliary heating, an analysis based on the heat diffusion equation is used to define heat confinement time (the incremental energy confinement time). For ohmically sustained plasmas, experiments show that the onset of the saturation regime of energy confinement, marfeing, detachment, and disruption are marked by distinct values of the parameter /bar n//sub e///bar j/. The confinement results of the two types of experiments can be described by a single surface in 3-dimensional space spanned by the plasma energy, the heating power, and the plasma density: the incremental energy confinement time /tau//sub inc/ = ΔW/ΔP is the correct concept for describing results of heat confinement in a heating experiment; the commonly used energy confinement time defined by /tau//sub E/ = W/P is not. A further examination shows that the change of edge parameters, as characterized by the change of the effective collision frequency ν/sub e/*, governs the change of confinement properties. The totality of the results of tokamak experiments on energy confinement appears to support a hypothesis that energy transport is determined by the preservation of the pressure gradient scale length. 70 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  19. First prediction of the direct effect of a confined atom on photoionization of the confining fullerene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCune, Matthew A; De, Ruma; Chakraborty, Himadri S; Madjet, Mohamed E

    2010-01-01

    We predict that the confined atom can qualitatively modify the energetic photoionization of some cage levels, even though these levels are of very dominant fullerene character. The effect imposes strong new oscillations in the cross sections which are forbidden to the ionization of empty fullerenes. Results are presented for the AratC 60 endofullerene compound. (fast track communication)

  20. First prediction of the direct effect of a confined atom on photoionization of the confining fullerene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, Matthew A; De, Ruma; Chakraborty, Himadri S [Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO 64468 (United States); Madjet, Mohamed E, E-mail: himadri@nwmissouri.ed [Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Fabeckstrasse 36a, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-09-28

    We predict that the confined atom can qualitatively modify the energetic photoionization of some cage levels, even though these levels are of very dominant fullerene character. The effect imposes strong new oscillations in the cross sections which are forbidden to the ionization of empty fullerenes. Results are presented for the AratC{sub 60} endofullerene compound. (fast track communication)

  1. From Pauli's birthday to 'Confinement Resonances' – a potted history of Quantum Confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connerade, J P

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Confinement is in some sense a new subject. International meetings dedicated to Quantum Confinement have occurred only recently in Mexico City (the first in 2010 and the second, in September 2011). However, at least in principle, the subject has existed since a very long time. Surprisingly perhaps, it lay dormant for many years, for want of suitable experimental examples. However, when one looks carefully at its origin, it turns out to have a long and distinguished history. In fact, the problem of quantum confinement raises a number of very interesting issues concerning boundary conditions in elementary quantum mechanics and how they should be applied to real problems. Some of these issues were missed in the earliest papers, but are implicit in the structure of quantum mechanics, and lead to the notion of Confinement Resonances, the existence of which was predicted theoretically more than ten years ago. Although, for several reasons, these resonances remained elusive for a very long time, they have now been observed experimentally, which puts the whole subject in much better shape and, together with the advent of metallofullerenes, has contributed to its revival.

  2. Computational Nonlinear Morphology with Emphasis on Semitic Languages. Studies in Natural Language Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraz, George Anton

    This book presents a tractable computational model that can cope with complex morphological operations, especially in Semitic languages, and less complex morphological systems present in Western languages. It outlines a new generalized regular rewrite rule system that uses multiple finite-state automata to cater to root-and-pattern morphology,…

  3. Impurity confinement and transport in high confinement regimes without edge localized modes on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grierson, B. A., E-mail: bgriers@pppl.gov; Nazikian, R. M.; Solomon, W. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Garofalo, A. M.; Belli, E. A.; Staebler, G. M.; Evans, T. E.; Smith, S. P.; Chrobak, C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); McKee, G. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53796 (United States); Orlov, D. M. [Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States); Chrystal, C. [University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0417 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Impurity transport in the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] is investigated in stationary high confinement (H-mode) regimes without edge localized modes (ELMs). In plasmas maintained by resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP), ELM-suppression, and QH-mode, the confinement time of fluorine (Z = 9) is equivalent to that in ELMing discharges with 40 Hz ELMs. For selected discharges with impurity injection, the impurity particle confinement time compared to the energy confinement time is in the range of τ{sub p}/τ{sub e}≈2−3. In QH-mode operation, the impurity confinement time is shown to be smaller for intense, coherent magnetic, and density fluctuations of the edge harmonic oscillation than weaker fluctuations. Transport coefficients are derived from the time evolution of the impurity density profile and compared to neoclassical and turbulent transport models NEO and TGLF. Neoclassical transport of fluorine is found to be small compared to the experimental values. In the ELMing and RMP ELM-suppressed plasma, the impurity transport is affected by the presence of tearing modes. For radii larger than the mode radius, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is smaller than the experimental value by a factor of 2–3, while the convective velocity is within error estimates. Low levels of diffusion are observed for radii smaller than the tearing mode radius. In the QH-mode plasma investigated, the TGLF diffusion coefficient is higher inside of ρ=0.4 and lower outside of 0.4 than the experiment, and the TGLF convective velocity is more negative by a factor of approximately 1.7.

  4. Controlled synthesis of quantum confined CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocrystals under ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huimei; Tang, Bing; Ma, Ying

    2018-02-01

    Room temperature recrystallization is a simple and convenient method for synthesis of all-inorganic perovskite nanomaterials with excellent luminescent properties. However, the fast crystallization usually brings the colloidal stability and uncontrollable synthesis issues in the formation of all-inorganic perovskite. In the present study, we present a new strategy to prepare the quantum confined CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with controlled morphology under ambient condition. With the assist of fatty acid-capped precursor, the crystallization and the following growth rate can be retarded. Thanks to the retarded reaction, the morphology can be varied from nanowires to nanoplates and the thickness can be controlled from 5-7 monolayers by simply adjusting the amount of octylammonium cations and oleic acid. The nanoplates exhibit a higher photoluminescence quantum yield than the nanowires possibly due to fewer defects in the nanoplates.

  5. Controlled Synthesis of Quantum Confined CsPbBr3 perovskite Nanocrystals under Ambient Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huimei; Tang, Bing; Ma, Ying

    2017-11-21

    Room temperature recrystallization is a simple and convenient method for synthesis of all-inorganic perovskite nanomaterials with excellent luminescent properties. However, the fast crystallization usually brings the colloidal stability and uncontrollable synthesis issues in the formation of all-inorganic perovskite. In the present study, we present a new strategy to prepare the quantum confined CsPbBr3 nanocrystals with controlled morphology under ambient condition. With the assist of fatty acid-capped precursor, the crystallization and the following growth rate can be retarded. Thanks to the retarded reaction, the morphology can be varied from nanowires to nanoplates and the thickness can be controlled from 5 to 7 monolayers by simply adjusting the amount of octylammonium cations and oleic acid. The nanoplates exhibit a higher photoluminescence quantum yield than the nanowires possibly due to fewer defects in the nanoplates. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  6. External morphology of the cycliophoran dwarf male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves, Ricardo Cardoso; da Cunha, Maria Ribeiro; Funch, Peter

    2010-01-01

    the phylum was first described, the dwarf male has a remarkably complex bodyplan albeit its very small size (approx. 30–40 lm in length). Aiming to increase the knowledge on the gross morphology of the cycliophoran dwarf male, specimens from S. pandora and S. americanus were analyzed by scanning electron...

  7. A framework for bootstrapping morphological decomposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joubert, LJ

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The need for a bootstrapping approach to the morphological decomposition of words in agglutinative languages such as isiZulu is motivated, and the complexities of such an approach are described. The authors then introduce a generic framework which...

  8. Chiral symmetry breaking and confinement - solutions of relativistic wave equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murugesan, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis, an attempt is made to explore the question whether confinement automatically leads to chiral symmetry breaking. While it should be accepted that chiral symmetry breaking manifests in nature in the absence of scalar partners of pseudoscalar mesons, it does not necessarily follow that confinement should lead to chiral symmetry breaking. If chiral conserving forces give rise to observed spectrum of hadrons, then the conjuncture that confinement is responsible for chiral symmetry breaking is not valid. The method employed to answer the question whether confinement leads to chiral symmetry breaking or not is to solve relativistic wave equations by introducing chiral conserving as well as chiral breaking confining potentials and compare the results with experimental observations. It is concluded that even though chiral symmetry is broken in nature, confinement of quarks need not be the cause of it

  9. High temperature L- and H-mode confinement in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balet, B.; Boyd, D.A.; Campbell, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The energy confinement properties of low density, high ion temperature L- and H-mode plasmas are investigated. For L-mode plasmas it is shown that, although the global confinement is independent of density, the energy confinement in the central region is significantly better at low densities than at higher densities. The improved confinement appears to be associated with the steepness of the density gradient. For the H-mode phase, although the confinement at the edge is dramatically improved, which is once again associated with the steep density gradient in the edge region, the central confinement properties are essentially the same as for the standard L-mode. The results are compared in a qualitative manner with the predictions of the ion temperature gradient instability theory and appear to be in disagreement with some aspects of this theory. (author). 13 refs, 15 figs

  10. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  11. FABRICATION, MORPHOLOGICAL AND OPTOELECTRONIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-31

    Dec 31, 2014 ... porous silicon has better optoelectronic properties than bulk .... Measurement: The morphological properties of PS layer such as nanocrystalline size, the .... excess carrier removal by internal recombination and diffusion.

  12. Soft matter in hard confinement: phase transition thermodynamics, structure, texture, diffusion and flow in nanoporous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Spatial confinement in nanoporous media affects the structure, thermodynamics and mobility of molecular soft matter often markedly. This article reviews thermodynamic equilibrium phenomena, such as physisorption, capillary condensation, crystallisation, self-diffusion, and structural phase transitions as well as selected aspects of the emerging field of spatially confined, non-equilibrium physics, i.e. the rheology of liquids, capillarity-driven flow phenomena, and imbibition front broadening in nanoporous materials. The observations in the nanoscale systems are related to the corresponding bulk phenomenologies. The complexity of the confined molecular species is varied from simple building blocks, like noble gas atoms, normal alkanes and alcohols to liquid crystals, polymers, ionic liquids, proteins and water. Mostly, experiments with mesoporous solids of alumina, gold, carbon, silica, and silicon with pore diameters ranging from a few up to 50 nm are presented. The observed peculiarities of nanopore-confined condensed matter are also discussed with regard to applications. A particular emphasis is put on texture formation upon crystallisation in nanoporous media, a topic both of high fundamental interest and of increasing nanotechnological importance, e.g. for the synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid materials by melt infiltration, the usage of nanoporous solids in crystal nucleation or in template-assisted electrochemical deposition of nano structures.

  13. Thermodynamics of partially confined Fermi gases at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toms, David J

    2004-01-01

    We examine the behaviour of non-interacting Fermi gases at low temperature. If there is a confining potential present the thermodynamic behaviour is altered from the familiar results for the unconfined gas. The role of de Haas-van Alphen type oscillations that are a consequence of the confining potential is considered. Attention is concentrated on the behaviour of the chemical potential and the specific heat. Results are compared and contrasted with those for an unconfined and a totally confined gas

  14. The cruel and unusual phenomenology of solitary confinement

    OpenAIRE

    Shaun eGallagher; Shaun eGallagher; Shaun eGallagher

    2014-01-01

    What happens when subjects are deprived of intersubjective contact? This paper looks closely at the phenomenology and psychology of one example of that deprivation: solitary confinement. It also puts the phenomenology and psychology of solitary confinement to use in the legal context. Not only is there no consensus on whether solitary confinement is a cruel and unusual punishment, there is no consensus on the definition of the term ‘cruel’ in the use of that legal phrase. I argue that we ...

  15. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Heung, L.K.

    1997-10-20

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented.

  16. Behaviour of FRP confined concrete in square columns

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Villalón, Ana de; Arteaga Iriarte, Ángel; Fernandez Gomez, Jaime Antonio; Perera Velamazán, Ricardo; Cisneros, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of research has been conducted on FRP-confined circular columns, but much less is known about rectangular/square columns in which the effectiveness of confinement is much reduced. This paper presents the results of experimental investigations on low strength square concrete columns confined with FRP. Axial compression tests were performed on ten intermediate size columns. The tests results indicate that FRP composites can significantly improve the bearing capacity and duc...

  17. Confinement of a neutral plasma using nested electric potential wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    A self-consistent, two-dimensional analysis is presented on confining a region of neutral plasma with a Penning/Malmberg type plasma trap using a nested well configuration. It is found that a neutral plasma region having disparate electron and ion temperatures or having high charge state ions can be confined with static fields. For confining a neutral region comprised of electrons and equal temperature low charge state ions, a quasistatic approach appears promising. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. Possible retardation effects of quark confinement on the meson spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, C.; Huang, H.; Chao, K.

    1996-01-01

    The reduced Bethe-Salpeter equation with scalar confinement and vector gluon exchange is applied to quark-antiquark bound states. The so-called intrinsic flaw of the Salpeter equation with static scalar confinement is investigated. The notorious problem of narrow level spacings is found to be remedied by taking into consideration the retardation effect of scalar confinement. A good fit for the mass spectrum of both heavy and light quarkonium states is then obtained. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  19. Confinement and Tritium Stripping Systems for APT Tritium Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, R.H.; Heung, L.K.

    1997-01-01

    This report identifies functions and requirements for the tritium process confinement and clean-up system (PCCS) and provides supporting technical information for the selection and design of tritium confinement, clean-up (stripping) and recovery technologies for new tritium processing facilities in the Accelerator for the Production of Tritium (APT). The results of a survey of tritium confinement and clean-up systems for large-scale tritium handling facilities and recommendations for the APT are also presented

  20. Study of confinement and sliding friction of fluids using sum frequency generation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjundiah, Kumar

    2007-12-01

    Friction and wear are important technologically. Tires on wet roads, windshield wipers and human joints are examples where nanometer-thick liquids are confined between flexible-rigid contact interfaces. Fundamental understanding of the structure of these liquids can assist in the design of products such as artificial joints and lubricants for Micro-electromechanical systems [MEMS]. Prior force measurements have suggested an increase in apparent viscosity of confined liquid and sometimes solid-like responses. But, these have not given the state of molecules under confinement. In the present study, we have used a surface sensitive, non-linear optical technique (infrared-visible sum frequency generation spectroscopy [SFG]) to investigate molecular structure at hidden interfaces. SFG can identify chemical groups, concentration and orientation of molecules at an interface. A friction cell was developed to study sliding of a smooth elastomeric lens against a sapphire surface. Experiments were done with dry sliding as well as lubricated sliding in the presence of linear alkane liquids. SFG spectra at the alkane/sapphire interface revealed ordering of the confined alkane molecules. These were more ordered than alkane liquid, but less ordered than alkane crystal. Cooling of the confined alkane below its melting temperature [TM] led to molecular orientation that was different from that of bulk crystal next to a sapphire surface. Molecules were oriented with their symmetry axis parallel to the surface normal. In addition, the melting temperature [Tconf] under confinement for a series of linear alkanes (n =15--27) showed a surprising trend. Intermediate molecular weights showed melting point depression. The T conf values suggested that melting started at the alkane/sapphire interface. In another investigation, confinement of water between an elastomeric PDMS lens and sapphire was studied. SFG spectra at the sapphire/water/PDMS interface revealed a heterogeneous morphology. The