WorldWideScience

Sample records for conduction band model

  1. The two bands model for the high temperature conductivity of the binary rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgiel, W.

    1983-09-01

    The formula for the high temperature spin disorder resistivity for the concentrated Asub(1-x)Bsub(x)C alloys where A,B is an element of Rare Earth (RE) is determined on the basis of two bands model and the coherent potential approximation (CPA). The conductivity given by the 5d bands coming from the RE compounds has been taken into account

  2. Calculation of the band structure of 2d conducting polymers using the network model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabra, M. K.; Suman, H.

    2007-01-01

    the network model has been used to calculate the band structure the gap energy and Fermi level of conducting polymers in two dimensions. For this purpose, a geometrical classification of possible polymer chains configurations in two dimensions has been introduced leading to a classification of the unit cells based on the number of bonds in them. The model has been applied to graphite in 2D, represented by a three bonds unit cell, and, as a new case, the anti-parallel Polyacetylene chains (PA) in two dimensions, represented by a unit cell with four bons. The results are in good agreement with the first principles calculations. (author)

  3. A simple model for conduction band states of nitride-based double heteroestructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaggero-Sager, L M; Mora-Ramos, M E, E-mail: lgaggero@uaem.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    In this work we propose an analytical expression for the approximate modeling of the potential energy function describing conduction band bending in III-V nitride quantum wells. It is an alternative approach to the self-consistent Poisson-Schoedinger calculation. The model considers the influence of the many electron system and the built-in electric field inside the well. Hartree and exchange contributions are included along the lines of a local-density Thomas-Fermi-based theory. The effects due to the modulated doping in the barriers is also considered. We report the calculation of the energy spectrum as a function of several input parameters: alloy composition in the barriers, barrier doping concentration, and quantum well width. Our results could be of usefulness in the study of optoelectronic properties in this kind of systems.

  4. Amplification of transcutaneous and percutaneous bone-conduction devices with a test-band in an induced model of conductive hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Marn Joon; Lee, Jae Ryung; Yang, Chan Joo; Yoo, Myung Hoon; Jin, In Suk; Choi, Chi Ho; Park, Hong Ju

    2016-11-01

    Transcutaneous devices have a disadvantage, the dampening effect by soft tissue between the bone and devices. We investigated hearing outcomes with percutaneous and transcutaneous devices using test-bands in an induced unilateral conductive hearing loss. Comparison of hearing outcomes of two devices in the same individuals. The right ear was plugged in 30 subjects and a test-band with devices (Cochlear™ Baha® BP110 Power and Sophono® Alpha-2 MPO™) was applied on the right mastoid tip with the left ear masked. Sound-field thresholds, speech recognition thresholds (SRTs), and word recognition scores (WRSs) were compared. Aided thresholds of Sophono were significantly better than those of Baha at most frequencies. Sophono WRSs (86 ± 12%) at 40 dB SPL and SRTs (14 ± 5 dB HL) were significantly better than those (73 ± 24% and 23 ± 8 dB HL) of Baha. However, Sophono WRSs (98 ± 3%) at 60 dB SPL did not differ from Baha WRSs (95 ± 12%). Amplifications of the current transcutaneous device were not inferior to those of percutaneous devices with a test-band in subjects with normal bone-conduction thresholds. Since the percutaneous devices can increase the gain when fixed to the skull by eliminating the dampening effect, both devices are expected to provide sufficient hearing amplification.

  5. Energies of conduction bands in dielectric liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holroyd, R.

    1975-01-01

    The properties of excess electrons in non-polar liquids depend on the relative energies of the trapped and conducting states. We have measured the energies of the conducting states, denoted V 0 , for about twenty non-polar liquids. Two methods were used: In one the work functions of metals immersed in the liquid were measured. In the other, solutes (TMPD) were photoionized in the liquid and V 0 calculated from the wavelength at which ionization onsets occur. A wide variation in conduction state energies is observed from a high of +0.21 eV for tetradecane to a low of --0.60 eV for tetramethylsilane. In general V 0 shifts to more negative values with increasing molecular symmetry, and correlates well with electron mobility. The photoionization results indicate that V 0 decreases with increasing temperature. In mixtures V 0 is linearly dependent on mole fraction. It was found empirically for n-hexane-neopentane mixtures that μ = 0.34 exp [--15.2(V 0 )]. This equation relating V 0 to the electron mobility also applies approximately to pure hydrocarbons. Thus the role of the conduction state energy in influencing electron mobilities and photoionization onsets is established and recent evidence indicates V 0 also influences the rates of electron reactions in these liquids

  6. Conduction bands and invariant energy gaps in alkali bromides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, P.K. de; Groot, R.A. de

    1998-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations of the alkali bromides LiBr, NaBr, KBr, RbBr and CsBr are reported. It is shown that the conduction band has primarily bromine character. The size of the band gaps of bromides and alkali halides in general is reinterpreted.

  7. Change in optimum genetic algorithm solution with changing band discontinuities and band widths of electrically conducting copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Avneet; Bakhshi, A. K.

    2010-04-01

    The interest in copolymers stems from the fact that they present interesting electronic and optical properties leading to a variety of technological applications. In order to get a suitable copolymer for a specific application, genetic algorithm (GA) along with negative factor counting (NFC) method has recently been used. In this paper, we study the effect of change in the ratio of conduction band discontinuity to valence band discontinuity (Δ Ec/Δ Ev) on the optimum solution obtained from GA for model binary copolymers. The effect of varying bandwidths on the optimum GA solution is also investigated. The obtained results show that the optimum solution changes with varying parameters like band discontinuity and band width of constituent homopolymers. As the ratio Δ Ec/Δ Ev increases, band gap of optimum solution decreases. With increasing band widths of constituent homopolymers, the optimum solution tends to be dependent on the component with higher band gap.

  8. Effect of conduction band nonparabolicity on the optical properties in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the bulk conduction band edge, the correction due to nonparabolicity can be important. [9,10]. In a narrow QW under a strong magnetic field, the optical absorption coefficients calculated with the nonparabolicity correction shows remarkable deviation from results obtained using parabolic energy approximation [11].

  9. SINGLE-BAND, TRIPLE-BAND, OR MULTIPLE-BAND HUBBARD MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1991-01-01

    The relevance of different models, such as the one-band t-J model and the three-band Emery model, as a realistic description of the electronic structure of high-T(c) materials is discussed. Starting from a multiband approach using cluster calculations and an impurity approach, the following

  10. Analysis of optical band-gap shift in impurity doped ZnO thin films by using nonparabolic conduction band parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Mok; Kim, Jin Soo; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Jun; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Polycrystalline ZnO thin films both undoped and doped with various types of impurities, which covered the wide carrier concentration range of 10 16 –10 21 cm −3 , were prepared by magnetron sputtering, and their optical-band gaps were investigated. The experimentally measured optical band-gap shifts were analyzed by taking into account the carrier density dependent effective mass determined by the first-order nonparabolicity approximation. It was shown that the measured shifts in optical band-gaps in ZnO films doped with cationic dopants, which mainly perturb the conduction band, could be well represented by theoretical estimation in which the band-gap widening due to the band-filling effect and the band-gap renormalization due to the many-body effect derived for a weakly interacting electron-gas model were combined and the carrier density dependent effective mass was incorporated. - Highlights: ► Optical band-gaps of polycrystalline ZnO thin films were analyzed. ► Experimental carrier concentration range covered from 10 16 to 10 21 cm −3 . ► Nonparabolic conduction band parameters were used in theoretical analysis. ► The band-filling and the band-gap renormalization effects were considered. ► The measured optical band-gap shifts corresponded well with the calculated ones

  11. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2003-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  12. Multi-band Modelling of Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    the appearance of both derived feature bands and an intensity band. As a special case of feature-band augmented appearance modelling we propose a dedicated representation with applications to face segmentation. The representation addresses a major problem within face recognition by lowering the sensitivity...

  13. Conduction band edge effective mass of La-doped BaSnO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Allen, S., E-mail: allen@itst.ucsb.edu; Law, Ka-Ming [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5100 (United States); Raghavan, Santosh; Schumann, Timo; Stemmer, Susanne [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    BaSnO{sub 3} has attracted attention as a promising material for applications requiring wide band gap, high electron mobility semiconductors, and moreover possesses the same perovskite crystal structure as many functional oxides. A key parameter for these applications and for the interpretation of its properties is the conduction band effective mass. We measure the plasma frequency of La-doped BaSnO{sub 3} thin films by glancing incidence, parallel-polarized resonant reflectivity. Using the known optical dielectric constant and measured electron density, the resonant frequency determines the band edge electron mass to be 0.19 ± 0.01. The results allow for testing band structure calculations and transport models.

  14. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    shifts in the rutile Ti d-band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., ... requires excitation with UV light due to its wide band ... RIXS maps were compared to the theoretical results .... optical methods are insufficient, such as dark samples.

  15. Post-precipitation bias in band-tailed pigeon surveys conducted at mineral sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, C.T.; Schmitz, R.A.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    Many animal surveys to estimate populations or index trends include protocol prohibiting counts during rain but fail to address effects of rainfall preceding the count. Prior research on Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeons (Patagioenas fasciata monilis) documented declines in use of mineral sites during rainfall. We hypothesized that prior precipitation was associated with a short-term increase in use of mineral sites following rain. We conducted weekly counts of band-tailed pigeons at 19 Pacific Northwest mineral sites in 2001 and 20 sites in 2002. Results from regression analysis indicated higher counts ???2 days after rain (11.31??5.00% [x????SE]) compared to ???3 days. Individual index counts conducted ???2 days after rain were biased high, resulting in reduced ability to accurately estimate population trends. Models of band-tailed pigeon visitation rates throughout the summer showed increased mineral-site counts during both June and August migration periods, relative to the July breeding period. Our research supported previous studies recommending that mineral-site counts used to index the band-tailed pigeon population be conducted during July. We further recommend conducting counts >3 days after rain to avoid weather-related bias in index estimation. The design of other population sampling strategies that rely on annual counts should consider the influence of aberrant weather not only coincident with but also preceding surveys if weather patterns are thought to influence behavior or detection probability of target species.

  16. The determination of the conduction mechanism and optical band gap of fluorescein sodium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakuphanoglu, Fahrettin; Sekerci, Memet; Evin, Ertan

    2006-01-01

    The electrical conductivity and optical properties of fluorescein sodium salt in the temperature range of 295-370 K have been investigated. Various conduction models described in the literature were used to elucidate the charge transport mechanism of the compound. It is found that the charge transfer mechanism of the compound is understood in terms of grain boundary scattering. It can be evaluated that the obtained electronic parameters such as mobility, conductivity at room temperature, activation energy and optical band gap suggest that the compound is an organic semiconductor

  17. Characterising and modelling extended conducted electromagnetic emission

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, Inus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available , such as common mode and differential mode separation, calibrated with an EMC ETS-Lindgren current probe. Good and workable model accuracies were achieved with the basic Step-Up and Step-Down circuits over the conducted emission frequency band and beyond...

  18. Conduction mechanism in Polyaniline-flyash composite material for shielding against electromagnetic radiation in X-band & Ku band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanish Pratap Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available β–Naphthalene sulphonic acid (β–NSA doped polyaniline (PANI–flyash (FA composites have been prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization route whose conductivity lies in the range 2.37–21.49 S/cm. The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity has also been recorded which shows that composites follow Mott's 3D–VRH model. SEM images demonstrate that β–NSA leads to the formation of the tubular structure with incorporated flyash phase. TGA studies show the improvement in thermal stability of composites with increase in loading level of flyash. Complex parameters i.e. permittivity (ɛ* = ɛ′- iɛ″ and permeability (μ*=μ′- iμ″ of PANI-FA composites have been calculated from experimental scattering parameters (S11 & S21 using theoretical calculations given in Nicholson–Ross and Weir algorithms. The microwave absorption properties of the composites have been studied in X-band (8.2 – 12.4 GHz & Ku–Band (12.4 – 18 GHz frequency range. The maximum shielding effectiveness observed was 32dB, which strongly depends on dielectric loss and volume fraction of flyash in PANI matrix.

  19. Absorption band Q model for the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.L.; Given, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. With a simple absorption band model it is possible to satisfy the shear sensitive data over a broad frequency range. The quality factor Q/sub s/(ω) is proportional to ω/sup α/ in the band and to ω and ω -1 at higher and lower frequencies, respectively, as appropriate for a relaxation mechanism with a spectrum of relaxation time. The parameters of the band are Q(min) = 80, α = 0.15, and width, 5 decades. The center of the band varies from 10 1 seconds in the upper mantle, to 1.6 x 10 3 seconds in the lower mantle. The shift of the band with depth is consistent with the expected effects of temperature, pressure and stress. High Q, regions of the mantle are attributed to a shift of the absorption band to longer periods. To satisfy the gravest fundamental spheroidal modes and the ScS data, the absorption band must shift back into the short-period seismic band at the base of the mantle. This may be due to a high temperature gradient or high shear stresses. A preliminary attempt is also made to specify bulk dissipation in the mantle and core. Specific features of the absorption band model are low Q in the body wave band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q 2 that increases with period, and low Q/sub p//Q/sub s/ at short periods in the middle mantel. The short-period Q/sub s/ increases rapidly at 400 km and is relatively constant from this depth to 2400 km. The deformational Q of the earth at a period of 14 months is predicted to be 463

  20. Confidence bands for inverse regression models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birke, Melanie; Bissantz, Nicolai; Holzmann, Hajo

    2010-01-01

    We construct uniform confidence bands for the regression function in inverse, homoscedastic regression models with convolution-type operators. Here, the convolution is between two non-periodic functions on the whole real line rather than between two periodic functions on a compact interval, since the former situation arguably arises more often in applications. First, following Bickel and Rosenblatt (1973 Ann. Stat. 1 1071–95) we construct asymptotic confidence bands which are based on strong approximations and on a limit theorem for the supremum of a stationary Gaussian process. Further, we propose bootstrap confidence bands based on the residual bootstrap and prove consistency of the bootstrap procedure. A simulation study shows that the bootstrap confidence bands perform reasonably well for moderate sample sizes. Finally, we apply our method to data from a gel electrophoresis experiment with genetically engineered neuronal receptor subunits incubated with rat brain extract

  1. Electrochromic properties of a novel low band gap conductive copolymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigitsoy, Basak; Varis, Serhat; Tanyeli, Cihangir; Akhmedov, Idris M.; Toppare, Levent [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-07-10

    A copolymer of 2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1-p-tolyl-1H-pyrrole (DTTP) with 3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene (EDOT) was electrochemically synthesized. The resultant copolymer P(DTTP-co-EDOT) was characterized via cyclic voltammetry, FTIR, SEM, conductivity measurements and spectroelectrochemistry. Copolymer film has distinct electrochromic properties. It has four different colors (chestnut, khaki, camouflage green, and blue). At the neutral state {lambda}{sub max} due to the {pi}-{pi}{sup *} transition was found to be 487 nm and E{sub g} was calculated as 1.65 eV. Double potential step chronoamperometry experiment shows that copolymer film has good stability, fast switching time (less than 1 s) and good optical contrast (20%). An electrochromic device based on P(DTTP-co-EDOT) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was constructed and characterized. The device showed reddish brown color at -0.6 V when the P(DTTP-co-EDOT) layer was in its reduced state; whereas blue color at 2.0 V when PEDOT was in its reduced state and P(DTTP-co-EDOT) layer was in its oxidized state. At 0.2 V intermediate green state was observed. Maximum contrast (%{delta}T) and switching time of the device were measured as 18% and 1 s at 615 nm. ECD has good environmental and redox stability. (author)

  2. Optical conductivity of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente Alvarez, J.J.; Balseiro, C.A.; Ceccatto, H.A.

    1996-07-01

    We study the response to a static electric field (charge stiffness) and the frequency-dependent conductivity of the Hubbard model in a resonant-valence-bond-type paramagnetic phase. This phase is described by means of a charge and spin rotational-invariant approach, based on a mixed fermion-boson representation of the original strongly correlated electrons. We found that the Mott transition at half filling is well described by the charge stiffness behaviour, and that the values for this quantity off half filling agree reasonably well with numerical results. Furthermore, for the frequency-dependent conductivity we trace back the origin of the band which appears inside the Hubbard gap to magnetic pair breaking. This points to a magnetic origin of midinfrared band in high-T c compounds, with no relation to superconductivity. (author). 12 refs, 2 tabs

  3. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-01

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the "CVBs interaction" that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  4. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-01-01

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices

  5. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A. [Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zürich, Gloriastrasse 35, 8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  6. Effects of Conducting Instruction on the Musical Performance of Beginning Band Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the effects of conducting instruction on beginning band students' individual rhythmic performance, group rhythmic performance, group performance of legato and staccato, and group performance of phrasing and dynamics. The students represented diverse ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Concludes the conducting instruction is a useful tool…

  7. Tunable Band Gap and Conductivity Type of ZnSe/Si Core-Shell Nanowire Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijie Zeng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of zincblende ZnSe/Si core-shell nanowires (NWs with a diameter of 1.1–2.8 nm are calculated by means of the first principle calculation. Band gaps of both ZnSe-core/Si-shell and Si-core/ZnSe-shell NWs are much smaller than those of pure ZnSe or Si NWs. Band alignment analysis reveals that the small band gaps of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs are caused by the interface state. Fixing the ZnSe core size and enlarging the Si shell would turn the NWs from intrinsic to p-type, then to metallic. However, Fixing the Si core and enlarging the ZnSe shell would not change the band gap significantly. The partial charge distribution diagram shows that the conduction band maximum (CBM is confined in Si, while the valence band maximum (VBM is mainly distributed around the interface. Our findings also show that the band gap and conductivity type of ZnSe/Si core-shell NWs can be tuned by the concentration and diameter of the core-shell material, respectively.

  8. Quantum conductance of 4,4-bipyridine molecular junctions: Role of electrode work function and local d band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauba, J.M.C.; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    conductance than the Pt-BPD junction due to the smaller work function of Au as compared to Pt. On the other hand, coupling to the local d band is stronger in the case of Pt and this broadens the LUMO resonance. We find that these effects largely outbalance each other leading to conductances of 0.01G(0) and 0......-principles results within a simple single-level model....

  9. Simultaneous Conduction and Valence Band Quantization in Ultrashallow High-Density Doping Profiles in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, F.; Wells, J. W.; Pakpour-Tabrizi, A. C.; Jackman, R. B.; Thiagarajan, B.; Hofmann, Ph.; Miwa, J. A.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous quantization of conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB) states in silicon using ultrashallow, high-density, phosphorus doping profiles (so-called Si:P δ layers). We show that, in addition to the well-known quantization of CB states within the dopant plane, the confinement of VB-derived states between the subsurface P dopant layer and the Si surface gives rise to a simultaneous quantization of VB states in this narrow region. We also show that the VB quantization can be explained using a simple particle-in-a-box model, and that the number and energy separation of the quantized VB states depend on the depth of the P dopant layer beneath the Si surface. Since the quantized CB states do not show a strong dependence on the dopant depth (but rather on the dopant density), it is straightforward to exhibit control over the properties of the quantized CB and VB states independently of each other by choosing the dopant density and depth accordingly, thus offering new possibilities for engineering quantum matter.

  10. Two band model for the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiu; White, Steven

    2009-03-01

    We use a numerical canonical transformation approach to derive an effective two-band model for the hole-doped cuprates, which keeps both oxygen and copper orbitals but removes double occupancy from each. A similar model was considered previously by Frenkel, Gooding, Shraiman, and Siggia (PRB 41, number 1, page 350). We compare the numerically derived model with previously obtained analytical results. In addition to the usual hopping terms between oxygens tpp and Cu-Cu exchange terms Jdd, the model also includes a strong copper-oxygen exchange interaction Jpd and a Kondo-like spin-flip oxygen-oxygen hopping term Kpdp. We use the density matrix renormalization group to study the charge, spin, and pairing properties of the derived model on ladder systems.

  11. Transparent Conducting Oxides for Photovoltaics: Manipulation of Fermi Level, Work Function and Energy Band Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana E. Proffit

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Doping limits, band gaps, work functions and energy band alignments of undoped and donor-doped transparent conducting oxides Zn0, In2O3, and SnO2 as accessed by X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS/UPS are summarized and compared. The presented collection provides an extensive data set of technologically relevant electronic properties of photovoltaic transparent electrode materials and illustrates how these relate to the underlying defect chemistry, the dependence of surface dipoles on crystallographic orientation and/or surface termination, and Fermi level pinning.

  12. Experimental determination of conduction and valence bands of semiconductor nanoparticles using Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wen; Chen Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The ability to determine a semiconductor’s band edge positions is important for the design of new photocatalyst materials. In this paper, we introduced an experimental method based on Kelvin probe force microscopy to determine the conduction and valence band edge energies of semiconductor nanomaterials, which has rarely been demonstrated. We tested the method on six semiconductor nanoparticles (α-Fe 2 O 3 , CeO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , CuO, TiO 2 , and ZnO) with known electronic structures. The experimentally determined band edge positions for α-Fe 2 O 3 , Al 2 O 3 , and CuO well matched the literature values with no statistical difference. Except CeO 2 , all other metal oxides had a consistent upward bias in the experimental measurements of band edge positions because of the shielding effect of the adsorbed surface water layer. This experimental approach may outstand as a unique alternative way of probing the band edge energy positions of semiconductor materials to complement the current computational methods, which often find limitations in new synthetic or complex materials. Ultimately, this work provides scientific foundation for developing experimental tools to probe nanoscale electronic properties of photocatalytic materials, which will drive breakthroughs in the design of novel photocatalytic systems and advance the fundamental understanding of material properties.

  13. Calculations of Energy Shift of the Conduction Band-Edge in Doped and Compensated GaP

    OpenAIRE

    Endo, Tamio; Itoh, Nobuhiko; Okino, Yasushi; 遠藤, 民生; 伊藤, 伸彦; 沖野, 祥[他

    1989-01-01

    The energy shifts of the parabolic conduction band-edge at 77 and 300K with doping the Te-donor in GaP were calculated in the nondegenerate system for the two cases ; unintentional and intentional compensations, using the two models proposed by Hwang abd by Mahan. The total parabolic shift △EM(△EH), and the contributions of the exchangeinteraction △μex(△Ee) and of the Coulomb interaction △μed(△Ec) calculated by the Mahan's model (Hwang's model), increase with increasing donor concentration in...

  14. On averaging the Kubo-Hall conductivity of magnetic Bloch bands leading to Chern numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riess, J.

    1997-01-01

    The authors re-examine the topological approach to the integer quantum Hall effect in its original form where an average of the Kubo-Hall conductivity of a magnetic Bloch band has been considered. For the precise definition of this average it is crucial to make a sharp distinction between the discrete Bloch wave numbers k 1 , k 2 and the two continuous integration parameters α 1 , α 2 . The average over the parameter domain 0 ≤ α j 1 , k 2 . They show how this can be transformed into a single integral over the continuous magnetic Brillouin zone 0 ≤ α j j , j = 1, 2, n j = number of unit cells in j-direction, keeping k 1 , k 2 fixed. This average prescription for the Hall conductivity of a magnetic Bloch band is exactly the same as the one used for a many-body system in the presence of disorder

  15. Conduction band offset at the InN/GaN heterojunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kejia; Lian Chuanxin; Su Ning; Jena, Debdeep; Timler, John

    2007-01-01

    The conduction-band offset between GaN and InN is experimentally determined. InN/n-type GaN isotype heterojunctions grown by molecular beam epitaxy are observed to exhibit Schottky-junction like behavior based on rectifying vertical current flow. From capacitance-voltage measurements on the heterojunction, the Schottky barrier height is found to be ∼0.94 eV. The photocurrent spectroscopy measurement by backside illumination reveals an energy barrier height of 0.95 eV across the heterojunction, consistent with the capacitance measurement. By combining electrical transport, capacitance-voltage, and photocurrent spectroscopy measurement results, the conduction band offset between InN and GaN is estimated to be ΔE C =1.68±0.1 eV

  16. Electron correlations in narrow energy bands: modified polar model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Didukh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron correlations in narrow energy bands are examined within the framework of the modified form of polar model. This model permits to analyze the effect of strong Coulomb correlation, inter-atomic exchange and correlated hopping of electrons and explain some peculiarities of the properties of narrow-band materials, namely the metal-insulator transition with an increase of temperature, nonlinear concentration dependence of Curie temperature and peculiarities of transport properties of electronic subsystem. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation, the single-electron Green's function and quasi-particle energy spectrum of the model are calculated. Metal-insulator transition with the change of temperature is investigated in a system with correlated hopping. Processes of ferromagnetic ordering stabilization in the system with various forms of electronic DOS are studied. The static conductivity and effective spin-dependent masses of current carriers are calculated as a function of electron concentration at various DOS forms. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport and ferromagnetic properties of narrow band materials.

  17. Modelling band-to-band tunneling current in InP-based heterostructure photonic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, J.P.; Shen, L.; van der Tol, J.J.G.M.; Smit, M.K.; Kockaert, P.; Emplit, P.; Gorza, S.-P.; Massar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Some semiconductor photonic devices show large discontinuities in the band structure. Short tunnel paths caused by this band structure may lead to an excessive tunneling current, especially in highly doped layers. Modelling of this tunnelling current is therefore important when designing photonic

  18. Conduction-band valley spin splitting in single-layer H-T l2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yandong; Kou, Liangzhi; Du, Aijun; Huang, Baibiao; Dai, Ying; Heine, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Despite numerous studies, coupled spin and valley physics is currently limited to two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). Here, we predict an exceptional 2D valleytronic material associated with the spin-valley coupling phenomena beyond 2D TMDCs—single-layer (SL) H-T l2O . It displays large valley spin splitting (VSS), significantly larger than that of 2D TMDCs, and a finite band gap, which are both critically attractive for the integration of valleytronics and spintronics. More importantly, in sharp contrast to all the experimentally confirmed 2D valleytronic materials, where the strong valence-band VSS (0.15-0.46 eV) supports the spin-valley coupling, the VSS in SL H-T l2O is pronounced in its conduction band (0.61 eV), but negligibly small in its valence band (21 meV), thus opening a way for manipulating the coupled spin and valley physics. Moreover, SL H-T l2O possesses extremely high carrier mobility, as large as 9.8 ×103c m2V-1s-1 .

  19. Comparison of band-to-band tunneling models in Si and Si—Ge junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Yipeng; Wang Taihuan; Wei Kangliang; Du Gang; Liu Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    We compared several different band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models with both Sentaurus and the two-dimensional full-band Monte Carlo simulator in Si homo-junctions and Si—Ge hetero-junctions. It was shown that in Si homo-junctions, different models could achieve similar results. However, in the Si—Ge hetero-junctions, there were significant differences among these models at high reverse biases (over 2 V). Compared to the nonlocal model, the local models in Sentaurus underrated the BTBT rate distinctly, and the Monte Carlo method was shown to give a better approximation. Additionally, it was found that in the Si region near the interface of the Si—Ge hetero-junctions, the direct tunneling rates increased largely due to the interaction of the band structures of Si and Ge. (semiconductor physics)

  20. Controlling the conduction band offset for highly efficient ZnO nanorods based perovskite solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Juan; Shi, Jiangjian; Li, Dongmei; Luo, Yanhong; Meng, Qingbo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of charge recombination at the interface of n-type electron transport layer (n-ETL) and perovskite absorber on the carrier properties in the perovskite solar cell is theoretically studied. By solving the one dimensional diffusion equation with different boundary conditions, it reveals that the interface charge recombination in the perovskite solar cell can be suppressed by adjusting the conduction band offset (ΔE C ) at ZnO ETL/perovskite absorber interface, thus leading to improvements in cell performance. Furthermore, Mg doped ZnO nanorods ETL has been designed to control the energy band levels. By optimizing the doping amount of Mg, the conduction band minimum of the Mg doped ZnO ETL has been raised up by 0.29 eV and a positive ΔE C of about 0.1 eV is obtained. The photovoltage of the cell is thus significantly increased due to the relatively low charge recombination

  1. Conduction band structure and electron mobility in uniaxially strained Si via externally applied strain in nanomembranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Feng [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Euaruksakul, Chanan; Himpsel, F J; Lagally, Max G [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Liu Zheng; Liu Feng, E-mail: lagally@engr.wisc.edu [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-08-17

    Strain changes the band structure of semiconductors. We use x-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the change in the density of conduction band (CB) states when silicon is uniaxially strained along the [1 0 0] and [1 1 0] directions. High stress can be applied to silicon nanomembranes, because their thinness allows high levels of strain without fracture. Strain-induced changes in both the sixfold degenerate {Delta} valleys and the eightfold degenerate L valleys are determined quantitatively. The uniaxial deformation potentials of both {Delta} and L valleys are directly extracted using a strain tensor appropriate to the boundary conditions, i.e., confinement in the plane in the direction orthogonal to the straining direction, which correspond to those of strained CMOS in commercial applications. The experimentally determined deformation potentials match the theoretical predictions well. We predict electron mobility enhancement created by strain-induced CB modifications.

  2. A Shear Banding Model for Penetration Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    mechanism of strength reduction to zero within a shear band in three different steels, includ- ing AISI 4340 with RHC 44, which is reasonably similar to RHA...TECH LIB CHINA LAKE CA 93555-6001 CDR NAVAL SUR WAR CTR C S COFFEY PPARK FZERILLI CODE 4140 R K GARRET JR JMCKIRGAN TECH LIB 101 STRAUSS AVE

  3. Homogenized thermal conduction model for particulate foods

    OpenAIRE

    Chinesta , Francisco; Torres , Rafael; Ramón , Antonio; Rodrigo , Mari Carmen; Rodrigo , Miguel

    2002-01-01

    International audience; This paper deals with the definition of an equivalent thermal conductivity for particulate foods. An homogenized thermal model is used to asses the effect of particulate spatial distribution and differences in thermal conductivities. We prove that the spatial average of the conductivity can be used in an homogenized heat transfer model if the conductivity differences among the food components are not very large, usually the highest conductivity ratio between the foods ...

  4. Valence and conduction band offsets of β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiding; Torres Castanedo, C. G.; Liu, Kaikai; Li, Kuang-Hui; Guo, Wenzhe; Lin, Ronghui; Liu, Xinwei; Li, Jingtao; Li, Xiaohang

    2017-10-01

    Both β-Ga2O3 and wurtzite AlN have wide bandgaps of 4.5-4.9 and 6.1 eV, respectively. We calculated the in-plane lattice mismatch between the (-201) plane of β-Ga2O3 and the (0002) plane of AlN, which was found to be 2.4%. This is the smallest mismatch between β-Ga2O3 and binary III-nitrides which is beneficial for the formation of a high quality β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction. However, the valence and conduction band offsets (VBO and CBO) at the β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction have not yet been identified. In this study, a very thin (less than 2 nm) β-Ga2O3 layer was deposited on an AlN/sapphire template to form the heterojunction by pulsed laser deposition. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the core-level (CL) binding energies of Ga 3d and Al 2p with respect to the valence band maximum in individual β-Ga2O3 and AlN layers, respectively. The separation between Ga 3d and Al 2p CLs at the β-Ga2O3/AlN interface was also measured. Eventually, the VBO was found to be -0.55 ± 0.05 eV. Consequently, a staggered-gap (type II) heterojunction with a CBO of -1.75 ± 0.05 eV was determined. The identification of the band alignment of the β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction could facilitate the design of optical and electronic devices based on these and related alloys.

  5. Valence and conduction band offsets of β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Haiding

    2017-10-16

    Both β-Ga2O3 and wurtzite AlN have wide bandgaps of 4.5–4.9 and 6.1 eV, respectively. We calculated the in-plane lattice mismatch between the (−201) plane of β-Ga2O3 and the (0002) plane of AlN, which was found to be 2.4%. This is the smallest mismatch between β-Ga2O3 and binary III-nitrides which is beneficial for the formation of a high quality β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction. However, the valence and conduction band offsets (VBO and CBO) at the β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction have not yet been identified. In this study, a very thin (less than 2 nm) β-Ga2O3 layer was deposited on an AlN/sapphire template to form the heterojunction by pulsed laser deposition. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the core-level (CL) binding energies of Ga 3d and Al 2p with respect to the valence band maximum in individual β-Ga2O3 and AlN layers, respectively. The separation between Ga 3d and Al 2p CLs at the β-Ga2O3/AlN interface was also measured. Eventually, the VBO was found to be −0.55 ± 0.05 eV. Consequently, a staggered-gap (type II) heterojunction with a CBO of −1.75 ± 0.05 eV was determined. The identification of the band alignment of the β-Ga2O3/AlN heterojunction could facilitate the design of optical and electronic devices based on these and related alloys.

  6. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-01-01

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements

  7. Model Development for MODIS Thermal Band Electronic Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghonh; Brinkman, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 bands. Among them, 16 thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 m. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands developed substantial issues that cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on band 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 m and band 29 at 8.5 m increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk effect is evident in the near-monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. The development of an alternative approach is very helpful for independent verification.In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS band 29 empirically to correct the Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detectors nonlinear response is considered. The impact of the electronic crosstalk is assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detectors nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending bands. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector non-linearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving bands. The correction of the electronic cross talk can be implemented empirically from the processed bias at different brightness temperature. The implementation

  8. H-tailored surface conductivity in narrow band gap In(AsN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velichko, A. V., E-mail: amalia.patane@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: anton.velychko@nottingham.ac.uk; Patanè, A., E-mail: amalia.patane@nottingham.ac.uk, E-mail: anton.velychko@nottingham.ac.uk; Makarovsky, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Capizzi, M.; Polimeni, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Sandall, I. C.; Tan, C. H. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Giubertoni, D. [Center for Materials and Microsystems—Fondazione Bruno Kessler, via Sommarive 18, 38123 Povo, Trento (Italy); Krier, A.; Zhuang, Q. [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-12

    We show that the n-type conductivity of the narrow band gap In(AsN) alloy can be increased within a thin (∼100 nm) channel below the surface by the controlled incorporation of H-atoms. This channel has a large electron sheet density of ∼10{sup 18 }m{sup −2} and a high electron mobility (μ > 0.1 m{sup 2}V{sup −1}s{sup −1} at low and room temperature). For a fixed dose of impinging H-atoms, its width decreases with the increase in concentration of N-atoms that act as H-traps thus forming N-H donor complexes near the surface.

  9. Interplay of Coulomb interactions and disorder in three-dimensional quadratic band crossings without time-reversal symmetry and with unequal masses for conduction and valence bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Ipsita; Nandkishore, Rahul M.

    2018-03-01

    Coulomb interactions famously drive three-dimensional quadratic band crossing semimetals into a non-Fermi liquid phase of matter. In a previous work [Nandkishore and Parameswaran, Phys. Rev. B 95, 205106 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevB.95.205106], the effect of disorder on this non-Fermi liquid phase was investigated, assuming that the band structure was isotropic, assuming that the conduction and valence bands had the same band mass, and assuming that the disorder preserved exact time-reversal symmetry and statistical isotropy. It was shown that the non-Fermi liquid fixed point is unstable to disorder and that a runaway flow to strong disorder occurs. In this paper, we extend that analysis by relaxing the assumption of time-reversal symmetry and allowing the electron and hole masses to differ (but continuing to assume isotropy of the low energy band structure). We first incorporate time-reversal symmetry breaking disorder and demonstrate that there do not appear any new fixed points. Moreover, while the system continues to flow to strong disorder, time-reversal-symmetry-breaking disorder grows asymptotically more slowly than time-reversal-symmetry-preserving disorder, which we therefore expect should dominate the strong-coupling phase. We then allow for unequal electron and hole masses. We show that whereas asymmetry in the two masses is irrelevant in the clean system, it is relevant in the presence of disorder, such that the `effective masses' of the conduction and valence bands should become sharply distinct in the low-energy limit. We calculate the RG flow equations for the disordered interacting system with unequal band masses and demonstrate that the problem exhibits a runaway flow to strong disorder. Along the runaway flow, time-reversal-symmetry-preserving disorder grows asymptotically more rapidly than both time-reversal-symmetry-breaking disorder and the Coulomb interaction.

  10. Kalman filter-based gap conductance modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tylee, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Geometric and thermal property uncertainties contribute greatly to the problem of determining conductance within the fuel-clad gas gap of a nuclear fuel pin. Accurate conductance values are needed for power plant licensing transient analysis and for test analyses at research facilities. Recent work by Meek, Doerner, and Adams has shown that use of Kalman filters to estimate gap conductance is a promising approach. A Kalman filter is simply a mathematical algorithm that employs available system measurements and assumed dynamic models to generate optimal system state vector estimates. This summary addresses another Kalman filter approach to gap conductance estimation and subsequent identification of an empirical conductance model

  11. Cranking model interpretation of weakly coupled bands in Hg isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttormsen, M.; Huebel, H.

    1982-01-01

    The positive-parity yrast states of the transitional sup(189-198)Hg isotopes are interpreted within the Bengtsson and Frauendorf version of the cranking model. The very sharp backbendings can be explained by small interaction matrix elements between the ground and s-bands. The experimentally observed large aligned angular momenta and the low band-crossing frequencies are well reproduced in the calculations. (orig.)

  12. Toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in Escherichia coli correlates with conduction band and hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Ivask, Angela; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Low-Kam, Cecile; Fischer, Heidi; Ji, Zhaoxia; Pokhrel, Suman; Cohen, Yoram; Telesca, Donatello; Zink, Jeffrey; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Nel, Andre; Godwin, Hilary

    2015-01-20

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx NPs) are used for a host of applications, such as electronics, cosmetics, construction, and medicine, and as a result, the safety of these materials to humans and the environment is of considerable interest. A prior study of 24 MOx NPs in mammalian cells revealed that some of these materials show hazard potential. Here, we report the growth inhibitory effects of the same series of MOx NPs in the bacterium Escherichia coli and show that toxicity trends observed in E. coli parallel those seen previously in mammalian cells. Of the 24 materials studied, only ZnO, CuO, CoO, Mn2O3, Co3O4, Ni2O3, and Cr2O3 were found to exert significant growth inhibitory effects; these effects were found to relate to membrane damage and oxidative stress responses in minimal trophic media. A correlation of the toxicological data with physicochemical parameters of MOx NPs revealed that the probability of a MOx NP being toxic increases as the hydration enthalpy becomes less negative and as the conduction band energy approaches those of biological molecules. These observations are consistent with prior results observed in mammalian cells, revealing that mechanisms of toxicity of MOx NPs are consistent across two very different taxa. These results suggest that studying nanotoxicity in E. coli may help to predict toxicity patterns in higher organisms.

  13. Optical model with multiple band couplings using soft rotator structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Dmitry; Soukhovitskii, Efrem; Capote, Roberto; Quesada, Jose Manuel; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    A new dispersive coupled-channel optical model (DCCOM) is derived that describes nucleon scattering on 238U and 232Th targets using a soft-rotator-model (SRM) description of the collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM Hamiltonian parameters are adjusted to the observed collective levels of the target nucleus. SRM nuclear wave functions (mixed in K quantum number) have been used to calculate coupling matrix elements of the generalized optical model. Five rotational bands are coupled: the ground-state band, β-, γ-, non-axial- bands, and a negative parity band. Such coupling scheme includes almost all levels below 1.2 MeV of excitation energy of targets. The "effective" deformations that define inter-band couplings are derived from SRM Hamiltonian parameters. Conservation of nuclear volume is enforced by introducing a monopolar deformed potential leading to additional couplings between rotational bands. The present DCCOM describes the total cross section differences between 238U and 232Th targets within experimental uncertainty from 50 keV up to 200 MeV of neutron incident energy. SRM couplings and volume conservation allow a precise calculation of the compound-nucleus (CN) formation cross sections, which is significantly different from the one calculated with rigid-rotor potentials with any number of coupled levels.

  14. Electron conductivity model for dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.T.; More, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    An electron conductivity model for dense plasmas is described which gives a consistent and complete set of transport coefficients including not only electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity, but also thermoelectric power, and Hall, Nernst, Ettinghausen, and Leduc--Righi coefficients. The model is useful for simulating plasma experiments with strong magnetic fields. The coefficients apply over a wide range of plasma temperature and density and are expressed in a computationally simple form. Different formulas are used for the electron relaxation time in plasma, liquid, and solid phases. Comparisons with recent calculations and available experimental measurement show the model gives results which are sufficiently accurate for many practical applications

  15. Hopping models for ion conduction in noncrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, Jeppe; Schrøder, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    semiconductors). These universalities are subject of much current interest, for instance interpreted in the context of simple hopping models. In the present paper we first discuss the temperature dependence of the dc conductivity in hopping models and the importance of the percolation phenomenon. Next......, the experimental (quasi)universality of the ac conductivity is discussed. It is shown that hopping models are able to reproduce the experimental finding that the response obeys time-temperature superposition, while at the same time a broad range of activation energies is involved in the conduction process. Again...

  16. Collapse and revival in inter-band oscillations of a two-band Bose-Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploetz, Patrick; Wimberger, Sandro [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 19, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Madronero, Javier, E-mail: ploetz@thphys.uni-heidelberg.d [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-04-28

    We study the effect of a many-body interaction on inter-band oscillations in a two-band Bose-Hubbard model with an external Stark force. Weak and strong inter-band oscillations are observed, where the latter arise from a resonant coupling of the bands. These oscillations collapse and revive due to a weak two-body interaction between the atoms. Effective models for oscillations in and out of resonance are introduced that provide predictions for the system's behaviour, particularly for the time scales for the collapse and revival of the resonant inter-band oscillations. (fast track communication)

  17. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinpeng; Huang, Congliang; Liu, Qingkun; Smalyukh, Ivan I.; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-02-01

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  18. Thermal conductivity model for nanofiber networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xinpeng [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Huang, Congliang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; School of Electrical and Power Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China; Liu, Qingkun [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Smalyukh, Ivan I. [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Yang, Ronggui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309, USA; Buildings and Thermal Systems Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA

    2018-02-28

    Understanding thermal transport in nanofiber networks is essential for their applications in thermal management, which are used extensively as mechanically sturdy thermal insulation or high thermal conductivity materials. In this study, using the statistical theory and Fourier's law of heat conduction while accounting for both the inter-fiber contact thermal resistance and the intrinsic thermal resistance of nanofibers, an analytical model is developed to predict the thermal conductivity of nanofiber networks as a function of their geometric and thermal properties. A scaling relation between the thermal conductivity and the geometric properties including volume fraction and nanofiber length of the network is revealed. This model agrees well with both numerical simulations and experimental measurements found in the literature. This model may prove useful in analyzing the experimental results and designing nanofiber networks for both high and low thermal conductivity applications.

  19. Modeling liver electrical conductivity during hypertonic injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellví, Quim; Sánchez-Velázquez, Patricia; Moll, Xavier; Berjano, Enrique; Andaluz, Anna; Burdío, Fernando; Bijnens, Bart; Ivorra, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    Metastases in the liver frequently grow as scattered tumor nodules that neither can be removed by surgical resection nor focally ablated. Previously, we have proposed a novel technique based on irreversible electroporation that may be able to simultaneously treat all nodules in the liver while sparing healthy tissue. The proposed technique requires increasing the electrical conductivity of healthy liver by injecting a hypersaline solution through the portal vein. Aiming to assess the capability of increasing the global conductivity of the liver by means of hypersaline fluids, here, it is presented a mathematical model that estimates the NaCl distribution within the liver and the resulting conductivity change. The model fuses well-established compartmental pharmacokinetic models of the organ with saline injection models used for resuscitation treatments, and it considers changes in sinusoidal blood viscosity because of the hypertonicity of the solution. Here, it is also described a pilot experimental study in pigs in which different volumes of NaCl 20% (from 100 to 200 mL) were injected through the portal vein at different flow rates (from 53 to 171 mL/minute). The in vivo conductivity results fit those obtained by the model, both quantitatively and qualitatively, being able to predict the maximum conductivity with a 14.6% average relative error. The maximum conductivity value was 0.44 second/m, which corresponds to increasing 4 times the mean basal conductivity (0.11 second/m). The results suggest that the presented model is well suited for predicting on liver conductivity changes during hypertonic saline injection. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Modeling of Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductor Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambrecht, W

    1998-01-01

    .... The band structure and the total energy properties of LiGaO2 were studied in relation to its possible role as a substrate for GaN growth and as a model system for cation ordering on wurtzite based lattices...

  1. Thermal conductivity model for nanoporous thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Congliang; Zhao, Xinpeng; Regner, Keith; Yang, Ronggui

    2018-03-01

    Nanoporous thin films have attracted great interest because of their extremely low thermal conductivity and potential applications in thin thermal insulators and thermoelectrics. Although there are some numerical and experimental studies about the thermal conductivity of nanoporous thin films, a simplified model is still needed to provide a straightforward prediction. In this paper, by including the phonon scattering lifetimes due to film thickness boundary scattering, nanopore scattering and the frequency-dependent intrinsic phonon-phonon scattering, a fitting-parameter-free model based on the kinetic theory of phonon transport is developed to predict both the in-plane and the cross-plane thermal conductivities of nanoporous thin films. With input parameters such as the lattice constants, thermal conductivity, and the group velocity of acoustic phonons of bulk silicon, our model shows a good agreement with available experimental and numerical results of nanoporous silicon thin films. It illustrates that the size effect of film thickness boundary scattering not only depends on the film thickness but also on the size of nanopores, and a larger nanopore leads to a stronger size effect of the film thickness. Our model also reveals that there are different optimal structures for getting the lowest in-plane and cross-plane thermal conductivities.

  2. A Combined Theoretical and Experimental View on Valence and Conduction Band Densities of States of Lead Halide Perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronik, Leeor; Endres, James; Egger, David A.; Kulbak, Michael; Kerner, Ross A.; Zhao, Lianfeng; Silver, Scott H.; Hodes, Gary; Rand, Barry P.; Cahen, David; Kahn, Antoine

    We present results for the valence and conduction band density of states (DOS), measured via ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies for three lead halide perovskites. Specifically, the DOS of MAPbI3, MAPbBr3, and CsPbBr3, grown on different substrates, are compared. Theoretical DOS, calculated via hybrid density functional theory and including spin-orbit coupling, are compared to experimental data. The agreement between experiment and theory, obtained after correcting the latter for quantitative discrepancies, leads to the identification of valence and conduction band spectral features. In particular, this comparison allows for precise determination of the energy position of the band edges, namely ionization energies and electron affinities of these materials. We find an unusually low DOS at the valence band maximum (VBM) of these systems, which confirms and generalizes previous findings of strong band dispersion and low DOS at the VBM of MAPbI3. This calls for special attention when using electron spectroscopy to determine the frontier electronic states of lead halide perovskites.

  3. Conductance of Conjugated Molecular Wires: Length Dependence, Anchoring Groups, and Band Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Guowen; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2009-01-01

    , is not solely determined by the intrinsic band gap of the molecular wire but also depends on the anchoring group. This is because the alignment of the metal Fermi level with respect to the molecular levels is controlled by charge transfer and interface dipoles which in turn are determined by the local chemistry...

  4. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs heterostructures: Conduction-band offsets, transport mechanisms, and band-structure effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OShea, J.J.; Brazel, E.G.; Rubin, M.E.; Bhargava, S.; Chin, M.A.; Narayanamurti, V.

    1997-01-01

    We report an extensive investigation of semiconductor band-structure effects in single-barrier Al x Ga 1-x As/GaAs heterostructures using ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES). The transport mechanisms in these single-barrier structures were studied systematically as a function of temperature and Al composition over the full compositional range (0≤x≤1). The initial (Γ) BEES thresholds for Al x Ga 1-x As single barriers with 0≤x≤0.42 were extracted using a model which includes the complete transmission probability of the metal-semiconductor interface and the semiconductor heterostructure. Band offsets measured by BEES are in good agreement with previous measurements by other techniques which demonstrates the accuracy of this technique. BEES measurements at 77 K give the same band-offset values as at room temperature. When a reverse bias is applied to the heterostructures, the BEES thresholds shift to lower voltages in good agreement with the expected bias-induced band-bending. In the indirect band-gap regime (x>0.45), spectra show a weak ballistic-electron-emission microscopy current contribution due to intervalley scattering through Al x Ga 1-x As X valley states. Low-temperature spectra show a marked reduction in this intervalley current component, indicating that intervalley phonon scattering at the GaAs/Al x Ga 1-x As interface produces a significant fraction of thisX valley current. A comparison of the BEES thresholds with the expected composition dependence of the Al x Ga 1-x As Γ, L, and X points yields good agreement over the entire composition range. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  6. Radiation enhanced conduction in insulators: computer modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, A.J.

    1986-10-01

    The report describes the implementation of the Klaffky-Rose-Goland-Dienes [Phys. Rev. B.21 3610,1980] model of radiation-enhanced conduction and describes the codes used. The approach is demonstrated for the data for alumina of Pells, Buckley, Hill and Murphy [AERE R.11715, 1985]. (author)

  7. Model calculation of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhail, I.F.I., E-mail: ifi_mikhail@hotmail.com; Ismail, I.M.M.; Ameen, M.

    2015-11-01

    A theoretical study is given of thermal conductivity in antiferromagnetic materials. The study has the advantage that the three-phonon interactions as well as the magnon phonon interactions have been represented by model operators that preserve the important properties of the exact collision operators. A new expression for thermal conductivity has been derived that involves the same terms obtained in our previous work in addition to two new terms. These two terms represent the conservation and quasi-conservation of wavevector that occur in the three-phonon Normal and Umklapp processes respectively. They gave appreciable contributions to the thermal conductivity and have led to an excellent quantitative agreement with the experimental measurements of the antiferromagnet FeCl{sub 2}. - Highlights: • The Boltzmann equations of phonons and magnons in antiferromagnets have been studied. • Model operators have been used to represent the magnon–phonon and three-phonon interactions. • The models possess the same important properties as the exact operators. • A new expression for the thermal conductivity has been derived. • The results showed a good quantitative agreement with the experimental data of FeCl{sub 2}.

  8. A new thermal conductivity model for nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Junemoo; Kleinstreuer, Clement [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (United States)], E-mail: ck@eos.ncsu.edu

    2004-12-15

    In a quiescent suspension, nanoparticles move randomly and thereby carry relatively large volumes of surrounding liquid with them. This micro-scale interaction may occur between hot and cold regions, resulting in a lower local temperature gradient for a given heat flux compared with the pure liquid case. Thus, as a result of Brownian motion, the effective thermal conductivity, k{sub eff}, which is composed of the particles' conventional static part and the Brownian motion part, increases to result in a lower temperature gradient for a given heat flux. To capture these transport phenomena, a new thermal conductivity model for nanofluids has been developed, which takes the effects of particle size, particle volume fraction and temperature dependence as well as properties of base liquid and particle phase into consideration by considering surrounding liquid traveling with randomly moving nanoparticles.The strong dependence of the effective thermal conductivity on temperature and material properties of both particle and carrier fluid was attributed to the long impact range of the interparticle potential, which influences the particle motion. In the new model, the impact of Brownian motion is more effective at higher temperatures, as also observed experimentally. Specifically, the new model was tested with simple thermal conduction cases, and demonstrated that for a given heat flux, the temperature gradient changes significantly due to a variable thermal conductivity which mainly depends on particle volume fraction, particle size, particle material and temperature. To improve the accuracy and versatility of the k{sub eff}model, more experimental data sets are needed.

  9. Band model for d- and f-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelling, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The application of band theory to metallic systems with d- and f-orbitals in the valence and conduction bands is discussed. Because such an application pushes theory and technique to their limits, several important features are briefly recapitulated. Within the transition metal systems, the elemental systems are used to discuss the fundamental formalism being applied and the newer directions into more complex systems are mentioned. Here we focus more on anisotropic properties and Fermi surface properties. Within the f-orbital systems, the focus is more on Ce and its compounds because of current interest with a relatively brief discussion of the actinides. the point of view advanced, however, has its origins in actinide research

  10. Physical properties and analytical models of band-to-band tunneling in low-bandgap semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Chun-Hsing; Dang Chien, Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Low-bandgap semiconductors, such as InAs and InSb, are widely considered to be ideal for use in tunnel field-effect transistors to ensure sufficient on-current boosting at low voltages. This work elucidates the physical and mathematical considerations of applying conventional band-to-band tunneling models in low-bandgap semiconductors, and presents a new analytical alternative for practical use. The high-bandgap tunneling generates most at maximum field region with shortest tunnel path, whereas the low-bandgap generations occur dispersedly because of narrow tunnel barrier. The local electrical field associated with tunneling-electron numbers dominates in low-bandgap materials. This work proposes decoupled electric-field terms in the pre-exponential factor and exponential function of generation-rate expressions. Without fitting, the analytical results and approximated forms exhibit great agreements with the sophisticated forms both in high- and low-bandgap semiconductors. Neither nonlocal nor local field is appropriate to be used in numerical simulations for predicting the tunneling generations in a variety of low- and high-bandgap semiconductors

  11. Characterization of the Valence and Conduction Band Levels of n = 1 2D Perovskites: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Investigation

    KAUST Repository

    Silver, Scott

    2018-02-13

    This study presents a combined experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of two 2D metal halide perovskite films. Ultraviolet and inverse photoemission spectroscopies are performed on solution-processed thin films of the n = 1 layered perovskite butylammonium lead iodide and bromide, BA2PbI4 and BA2PbBr4, characterized by optical absorption and X-ray diffraction, to determine their valence and conduction band densities of states, transport gaps, and exciton binding energies. The electron spectroscopy results are compared with the densities of states determined by density functional theory calculations. The remarkable agreement between experiment and calculation enables a detailed identification and analysis of the organic and inorganic contributions to the valence and conduction bands of these two hybrid perovskites. The electron affinity and ionization energies are found to be 3.1 and 5.8 eV for BA2PbI4, and 3.1 and 6.5 eV for BA2PbBr4. The exciton binding energies are estimated to be 260 and 300 meV for the two materials, respectively. The 2D lead iodide and bromide perovskites exhibit significantly less band dispersion and a larger density of states at the band edges than the 3D analogs. The effects of using various organic ligands are also discussed.

  12. Hydrostatic pressure and conduction band non-parabolicity effects on the impurity binding energy in a spherical quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakami, A.; Mahendran, M.

    2010-01-01

    The binding energy of a shallow hydrogenic impurity in a spherical quantum dot under hydrostatic pressure with square well potential is calculated using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The effect of conduction band non-parabolicity on these energies is also estimated. The binding energy is computed for GaAs spherical quantum dot as a function of dot size, hydrostatic pressure both in the presence and absence of the band non-parabolicity effect. Our results show that (i) the hydrostatic pressure increases the impurity binding energy when dot radius increases for a given pressure, (ii) the hydrostatic pressure with the band non-parabolicity effect effectively increases the binding energy such that the variation is large for smaller dots and (iii) the maximum contribution by the non-parabolicity effect is about 15% for narrow dots. Our results are in good agreement with Perez-Merchancano et al. [J. Phys. Condens. Matter 19 (2007) 026225] who have not considered the conduction band non-parabolicity effect.

  13. Role of electrostatic fluctuations in doped semiconductors upon the transition from band to hopping conduction (by the example of p-Ge:Ga)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poklonski, N. A., E-mail: poklonski@bsu.by; Vyrko, S. A.; Poklonskaya, O. N. [Belarusian State University (Belarus); Zabrodskii, A. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The electrostatic model of ionization equilibrium between hydrogen-like acceptors and v-band holes in crystalline covalent p-type semiconductors is developed. The range of applicability of the model is the entire insulator side of the insulator–metal (Mott) phase transition. The density of the spatial distribution of acceptor- and donor-impurity atoms and holes over a crystal was assumed to be Poissonian and the fluctuations of their electrostatic potential energy, to be Gaussian. The model takes into account the effect of a decrease in the energy of affinity of an ionized acceptor to a v-band hole due to Debye–Hückel ion screening by both free v-band holes and localized holes hopping over charge states (0) and (–1) of acceptors in the acceptor band. All donors are in charge state (+1) and are not directly involved in the screening, but ensure the total electroneutrality of a sample. In the quasiclassical approximation, analytical expressions for the root-mean-square fluctuation of the v-band hole energy W{sub p} and effective acceptor bandwidth W{sub a} are obtained. In calculating W{sub a}, only fluctuations caused by the Coulomb interaction between two nearest point charges (impurity ions and holes) are taken into account. It is shown that W{sub p} is lower than W{sub a}, since electrostatic fluctuations do not manifest themselves on scales smaller than the average de Broglie wavelength of a free hole. The delocalization threshold for v-band holes is determined as the sum of the diffusive-percolation threshold and exchange energy of holes. The concentration of free v-band holes is calculated at the temperature T{sub j} of the transition from dc band conductivity to conductivity implemented via hopping over acceptor states, which is determined from the virial theorem. The dependence of the differential energy of the thermal ionization of acceptors at the temperature 3T{sub j}/2 on their concentration N and degree of compensation K (the ratio between the

  14. A tight binding model study of tunneling conductance spectra of spin and orbitally ordered CMR manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Saswati; Sahoo, D. D.; Rout, G. C.

    2018-04-01

    We report here a tight binding model for colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites to study the pseudo gap (PG) behavior near Fermi level. In the Kubo-Ohata type DE model, we consider first and second nearest neighbor interactions for transverse spin fluctuations in core band and hopping integrals in conduction band, in the presence of static band Jahn-Teller distortion. The model Hamiltonian is solved using Zubarev's Green's function technique. The electron density of states (DOS) is found out from the Green's functions. We observe clear PG near Fermi level in the electron DOS.

  15. Conduction band mass determinations for n-type InGaAs/InAlAs single quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, E.D.; Reno, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kotera, Nobuo [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan); Wang, Y. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Lab.

    1998-05-01

    The authors report the measurement of the conduction band mass in n-type single 27-ML-wide InGaAs/InAlAs quantum well lattice matched to InP using two methods: (1) Magnetoluminescence spectroscopy and (2) far-infrared cyclotron resonance. The magnetoluminescence method utilizes Landau level transitions between 0 and 14 T at 1.4 K. The far infrared cyclotron resonance measurements were made at 4.2 K and to fields as large up to 18 T. The 2D-carrier density N{sub 2D} = 3 {times} 10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}2} at low temperatures. The magnetoluminescence technique yielded an effective conduction-band mass of m{sub c} = 0.062m{sub 0} while the far infrared cyclotron resonance measurements gave m{sub c} = 0.056m{sub 0}, where m{sub 0} is the free electron mass. Both measurements show no evidence for any significant conduction-band nonparabolicity.

  16. Enhanced modeling of band nonparabolicity with application to a mid-IR quantum cascade laser structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukovic, N; Radovanovic, J; Milanovic, V

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the influence of conduction-band nonparabolicity on bound electronic states in the active region of a quantum cascade laser (QCL). Our model assumes expansion of the conduction-band dispersion relation up to a fourth order in wavevector and use of a suitable second boundary condition at the interface of two III-V semiconductor layers. Numerical results, obtained by the transfer matrix method, are presented for two mid-infrared GaAs/Al 0.33 Ga 0.67 As QCL active regions, and they are in very good agreement with experimental data found in the literature. Comparison with a different nonparabolicity model is presented for the example of a GaAs/Al 0.38 Ga 0.62 As-based mid-IR QCL. Calculations have also been carried out for one THz QCL structure to illustrate the possible application of the model in the terahertz part of the spectrum. (paper)

  17. Magnetization and spin-polarized conductance of asymmetrically hydrogenated graphene nanoribbons: significance of sigma bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Syuta; Inuzuka, Kouhei; Inoshita, Takeshi; Ota, Norio; Sano, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The magnetization and spin transport of asymmetric zigzag-edge graphene nanoribbons, terminated by hydrogen on one edge while unterminated on the other edge, were investigated by a combination of first-principles calculations and a tight-binding approach. At the unterminated edge, a spin-polarized σ edge state of minority spin appears near the Fermi level and contributes to spin transport. This state enters the band gap for ribbon widths of less than 15 chains, dominating the spin-polarized current. This indicates the importance of the σ edge states in the design of spintronic devices using graphene nanoribbons. We also examined the case where the ‘unterminated’ edge is partially terminated by hydrogen. (paper)

  18. Conduction band-edge d-states in high-k dielectrics due to Jahn-Teller term splittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucovsky, G.; Fulton, C.C.; Zhang, Y.; Luning, J.; Edge, L.; Whitten, J.L.; Nemanich, R.J.; Schlom, D.G.; Afanase'v, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to study conduction band edge electronic structure of high-k transition metal (TM) and trivalent lanthanide series rare earth (RE) oxide dielectrics. Empty TM/RE d-states are studied by intra-atomic transitions originating in core level spin-orbit split p-states, and conduction band states are studied in inter-atomic transitions which originate in the oxygen atom 1s core level state. In non-crystalline Zr and Hf silicate alloys, the local bonding symmetry, or crystal field splits these d-states into doubly and triply degenerate features. In nano-crystalline oxides, there are additional d-state splittings due to contributions of more distant neighbors that completely remove d-state degeneracies via the Jahn-Teller effect mechanism. This gives rise to highly localized band edge states that are electronically active in photoconductivity, internal photoemission, and act as bulk traps in metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) devices

  19. Human vision model in relation to characteristics of shapes for the Mach band effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo-Wen; Fang, Yi-Chin

    2015-10-01

    For human vision to recognize the contours of objects means that, as the contrast variation at the object's edges increases, so will the Mach band effect of human vision. This paper more deeply investigates the relationship between changes in the contours of an object and the Mach band effect of human vision. Based on lateral inhibition and the Mach band effect, we studied subjects' eyes as they watched images of different shapes under a fixed brightness at 34  cd/m2, with changes of contrast and spatial frequency. Three types of display were used: a television, a computer monitor, and a projector. For each display used, we conducted a separate experiment for each shape. Although the maximum values for the contrast sensitivity function curves of the displays were different, their variations were minimal. As the spatial frequency changed, the diminishing effect of the different lines also was minimal. However, as the shapes at the contour intersections were modified by the Mach band effect, a greater degree of variation occurred. In addition, as the spatial frequency at a contour intersection increased, the Mach band effect became lower, along with changes in the corresponding contrast sensitivity function curve. Our experimental results on the characteristics of human vision have led to what we believe is a new vision model based on tests with different shapes. This new model may be used for future development and implementation of an artificial vision system.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of UHTC: Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murry, Daw; Squire, Thomas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  1. The Connoisseurship of Conducting: A Qualitative Study of Exemplary Wind Band Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Nancy; Henry, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to gain an in-depth perspective through examining how the conducting pedagogy of three selected exemplary high school and college instrumental music conductors function within the context of an actual rehearsal. A typical rehearsal was video recorded, followed by a "think-aloud" session in which the conductor viewed the…

  2. Study of band structure in 78,80Sr using Triaxial Projected Shell Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behera, N.; Naik, Z.; Bhat, G.H.; Sheikh, J.A.; Palit, R.; Sun, Y.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of present work is to carry out a systematic study of the yrast-band and gamma-band structure for the even-even 78-80 Sr nuclei using Triaxial Projected Shell Model (TPSM) approach. These nuclei were chosen because 78 Sr has well developed side band(unassigned configuration) and 80 Sr has well developed band observed experimentally

  3. Modeling of heat conduction via fractional derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, Mauro; Giorgi, Claudio; Morro, Angelo

    2017-09-01

    The modeling of heat conduction is considered by letting the time derivative, in the Cattaneo-Maxwell equation, be replaced by a derivative of fractional order. The purpose of this new approach is to overcome some drawbacks of the Cattaneo-Maxwell equation, for instance possible fluctuations which violate the non-negativity of the absolute temperature. Consistency with thermodynamics is shown to hold for a suitable free energy potential, that is in fact a functional of the summed history of the heat flux, subject to a suitable restriction on the set of admissible histories. Compatibility with wave propagation at a finite speed is investigated in connection with temperature-rate waves. It follows that though, as expected, this is the case for the Cattaneo-Maxwell equation, the model involving the fractional derivative does not allow the propagation at a finite speed. Nevertheless, this new model provides a good description of wave-like profiles in thermal propagation phenomena, whereas Fourier's law does not.

  4. Ultrafast conductivity in a low-band-gap polyphenylene and fullerene blend studied by terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Hynek; Nienhuys, H.-K.; Perzon, E.; Zhang, F.; Inganäs, O.; Kužel, Petr; Sundström, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 24 (2009), 245326/1-245326/7 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P099; GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/06/0286 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy * ultrafast conductivity * polymer * solar-cell material Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.475, year: 2009

  5. Model of coupled bands in even-even nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadzhakov, E G; Nozharov, R M; Myankova, G Z; Antonova, V A [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika

    1979-01-01

    The model is derived in a natural way from the theory of coupled modes. It is based on an expansion of the Hamiltonian in terms of elementary transition operators, including direct rotation-vibration coupling with phonons. The treatment is limited to three types of phonons: ( I = K = 0), S (I = K = 1) and (I = K = 2). The basis of the operators, acting on the ground state is truncated by an inclusion of a reasonable number of phonon states. In the framework of this approximation one may evaluate the matrix elements of the model Hamiltonian and diagonalize it by standard numerical methods to fit the experimental spectrum. The well known picture of band hybridization is obtained as a special case of the model under consideration.

  6. Model of thermal conductivity of anisotropic nanodiamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, S.F.; Kalinichenko, A.I.; Strel'nitskij, V.E.

    2014-01-01

    Dependence of thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline diamond on grain size and shape is theoretically investigated. Nanodiamond is considered as two-phase material composed of diamond grains characterizing by three main dimensions and segregated by thin graphite layers with electron, phonon or hybrid thermal conductivity. Influence of type of thermal conductance and thickness of boundary layer on thermal conductivity of nanodiamond is analyzed. Derived dependences of thermal conductivity on grain dimensions are compared with experimental data

  7. Photoelectric emission from negative-electron-affinity diamond (111) surfaces: Exciton breakup versus conduction-band emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandis, C.; Pate, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    We have recently reported that bound electron-hole pairs (Mott-Wannier excitons) are the dominant source of photoelectron emission from specially prepared [''as-polished'' C(111)-(1x1):H] negative-electron-affinity diamond surfaces for near-band-gap excitation up to 0.5 eV above threshold [C. Bandis and B. B. Pate, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 777 (1995)]. It was found that photoexcited excitons transport to the surface, break up, and emit their electron. In this paper, we extend the study of exciton-derived emission to include partial yield (constant final-state) analysis as well as angular distribution measurements of the photoelectric emission. In addition, we find that exciton-derived emission does not always dominate. Photoelectric emission properties of the in situ ''rehydrogenated'' (111)-(1x1):H diamond surface are characteristically different than emission observed from the as-polished (111)-(1x1):H surface. The rehydrogenated surface has additional downward band bending as compared to the as-polished surface. In confirmation of the assignment of photoelectric yield to exciton breakup emission, we find a significant enhancement of the total electron yield when the downward band bending of the hydrogenated surface is increased. The functional form of the observed total electron yield demonstrates that, in contrast to the as-polished surface, conduction-band electrons are a significant component of the observed photoelectric yield from the in situ hydrogenated (111)-(1x1):H surface. Furthermore, electron emission characteristics of the rehydrogenated surface confirms our assignment of a Fan phonon-cascade mechanism for thermalization of excitons

  8. Theoretical evaluation of maximum electric field approximation of direct band-to-band tunneling Kane model for low bandgap semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang Chien, Nguyen; Shih, Chun-Hsing; Hoa, Phu Chi; Minh, Nguyen Hong; Thi Thanh Hien, Duong; Nhung, Le Hong

    2016-06-01

    The two-band Kane model has been popularly used to calculate the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) current in tunnel field-effect transistor (TFET) which is currently considered as a promising candidate for low power applications. This study theoretically clarifies the maximum electric field approximation (MEFA) of direct BTBT Kane model and evaluates its appropriateness for low bandgap semiconductors. By analysing the physical origin of each electric field term in the Kane model, it has been elucidated in the MEFA that the local electric field term must be remained while the nonlocal electric field terms are assigned by the maximum value of electric field at the tunnel junction. Mathematical investigations have showed that the MEFA is more appropriate for low bandgap semiconductors compared to high bandgap materials because of enhanced tunneling probability in low field regions. The appropriateness of the MEFA is very useful for practical uses in quickly estimating the direct BTBT current in low bandgap TFET devices.

  9. Connectivity ranking of heterogeneous random conductivity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, C. B.; de Barros, F.

    2017-12-01

    To overcome the challenges associated with hydrogeological data scarcity, the hydraulic conductivity (K) field is often represented by a spatial random process. The state-of-the-art provides several methods to generate 2D or 3D random K-fields, such as the classic multi-Gaussian fields or non-Gaussian fields, training image-based fields and object-based fields. We provide a systematic comparison of these models based on their connectivity. We use the minimum hydraulic resistance as a connectivity measure, which it has been found to be strictly correlated with early time arrival of dissolved contaminants. A computationally efficient graph-based algorithm is employed, allowing a stochastic treatment of the minimum hydraulic resistance through a Monte-Carlo approach and therefore enabling the computation of its uncertainty. The results show the impact of geostatistical parameters on the connectivity for each group of random fields, being able to rank the fields according to their minimum hydraulic resistance.

  10. Modeling and design of an X-band rf photoinjector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Marsh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A design for an X-band rf photoinjector that was developed jointly by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL is presented. The photoinjector is based around a 5.59 cell rf gun that has state-of-the-art features including: elliptical contoured irises; improved mode separation; an optimized initial half cell length; a racetrack input coupler; and coupling that balances pulsed heating with cavity fill time. Radio-frequency and beam dynamics modeling have been done using a combination of codes including PARMELA, HFSS, IMPACT-T, ASTRA, and the ACE3P suite of codes developed at SLAC. The impact of lower gradient operation, magnet misalignment, solenoid multipole errors, beam offset, mode beating, wakefields, and beam line symmetry have been analyzed and are described. Fabrication and testing plans at both LLNL and SLAC are discussed.

  11. Modeling of Photonic Band Gap Crystals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kady, Ihab Fathy [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    In this work, the authors have undertaken a theoretical approach to the complex problem of modeling the flow of electromagnetic waves in photonic crystals. The focus is to address the feasibility of using the exciting phenomena of photonic gaps (PBG) in actual applications. The authors start by providing analytical derivations of the computational electromagnetic methods used in their work. They also present a detailed explanation of the physics underlying each approach, as well as a comparative study of the strengths and weaknesses of each method. The Plane Wave expansion, Transfer Matrix, and Finite Difference time Domain Methods are addressed. They also introduce a new theoretical approach, the Modal Expansion Method. They then shift the attention to actual applications. They begin with a discussion of 2D photonic crystal wave guides. The structure addressed consists of a 2D hexagonal structure of air cylinders in a layered dielectric background. Comparison with the performance of a conventional guide is made, as well as suggestions for enhancing it. The studies provide an upper theoretical limit on the performance of such guides, as they assumed no crystal imperfections and non-absorbing media. Next, they study 3D metallic PBG materials at near infrared and optical wavelengths. The main objective is to study the importance of absorption in the metal and the suitability of observing photonic band gaps in such structures. They study simple cubic structures where the metallic scatters are either cubes or interconnected metallic rods. Several metals are studied (aluminum, gold, copper, and silver). The effect of topology is addressed and isolated metallic cubes are found to be less lossy than the connected rod structures. The results reveal that the best performance is obtained by choosing metals with a large negative real part of the dielectric function, together with a relatively small imaginary part. Finally, they point out a new direction in photonic crystal

  12. k-dependent spectrum and optical conductivity near metal-insulator transition in multi-orbital hubbard bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Oki; Fujiwara, Takeo

    2006-01-01

    We apply the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) combined with the iterative perturbation theory (IPT) to the doubly degenerate e g and the triply degenerate f 2g bands on a simple cubic lattice and a body-centered cubic lattice and calculate the spectrum and optical conductivity in arbitrary electron occupation. The spectrum simultaneously shows the effects of multiplet structure together with the electron ionization and affinity levels of different electron occupations, coherent peaks at the Fermi energy in the metallic phase and an energy gap at an integer filling of electrons for sufficiently large Coulomb U. We also discuss the critical value of the Coulomb U for degenerate orbitals on a simple cubic lattice and a body-centered cubic lattice. (author)

  13. Broad-band conductivity and dielectric spectroscopy of composites of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(ethylene terephthalate) around their low percolation threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhnyy, D.; Savinov, M.; Bovtun, V.; Kempa, M.; Petzelt, J.; Mayoral, B.; McNally, T.

    2013-02-01

    Composites of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET-MWCNT) with up to 3 vol% MWCNTs were prepared and characterized by broad-band AC conductivity and dielectric spectroscopy up to the infrared range using several techniques. A very low electrical percolation threshold of 0.07 vol% MWCNTs was revealed from the low-frequency conductivity plateau as well as from DC conductivity, whose values show the same critical power dependence on MWCNT concentration with the exponent t = 4.3. Above the plateau, the AC conductivity increases with frequency up to the THz range, where it becomes overlapped with the absorption of vibrational modes. The temperature dependence down to ˜5 K has shown semiconductor behaviour with a concentration-independent but weakly temperature-dependent small activation energy of ˜3 meV. The behaviour is compatible with the previously suggested fluctuation-induced tunnelling conductivity model through a thin (˜1 nm) polymer contact layer among the adjacent MWCNTs within percolated clusters. At higher frequencies, deviations from the simple universal conductivity behaviour are observed, indicating some distribution of energy barriers for an electron hopping mechanism.

  14. Anomalies in the 1D Anderson model: Beyond the band-centre and band-edge cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessieri, L.; Izrailev, F. M.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the one-dimensional Anderson model with weak disorder. Using the Hamiltonian map approach, we analyse the validity of the random-phase approximation for resonant values of the energy, E = 2 cos(πr) , with r a rational number. We expand the invariant measure of the phase variable in powers of the disorder strength and we show that, contrary to what happens at the centre and at the edges of the band, for all other resonant energies the leading term of the invariant measure is uniform. When higher-order terms are taken into account, a modulation of the invariant measure appears for all resonant values of the energy. This implies that, when the localisation length is computed within the second-order approximation in the disorder strength, the Thouless formula is valid everywhere except at the band centre and at the band edges.

  15. Bidirectional reflectance distribution function modeling of one-dimensional rough surface in the microwave band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Li-Xin; Gou Xue-Yin; Zhang Lian-Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a one-dimensional conducting rough surface and a dielectric rough surface are calculated with different frequencies and roughness values in the microwave band by using the method of moments, and the relationship between the bistatic scattering coefficient and the BRDF of a rough surface is expressed. From the theory of the parameters of the rough surface BRDF, the parameters of the BRDF are obtained using a genetic algorithm. The BRDF of a rough surface is calculated using the obtained parameter values. Further, the fitting values and theoretical calculations of the BRDF are compared, and the optimization results are in agreement with the theoretical calculation results. Finally, a reference for BRDF modeling of a Gaussian rough surface in the microwave band is provided by the proposed method. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Evaluation of Model Microphysics Within Precipitation Bands of Extratropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colle, Brian A.; Molthan, Andrew; Yu, Ruyi; Stark, David; Yuter, Sandra; Nesbitt, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies evaluating the bulk microphysical schemes (BMPs) within cloud resolving models (CRMs) have indicated large uncertainties and errors in the amount and size distributions of snow and cloud ice aloft. The snow prediction is sensitive to the snow densities, habits, and degree of riming within the BMPs. Improving these BMPs is a crucial step toward improving both weather forecasting and climate predictions. Several microphysical schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model down to 1.33-km grid spacing are evaluated using aircraft, radar, and ground in situ data from the Global Precipitation Mission Coldseason Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) experiment, as well as a few years (15 winter storms) of surface measurements of riming, crystal habit, snow density, and radar measurements at Stony Brook, NY (SBNY on north shore of Long Island) during the 2009-2012 winter seasons. Surface microphysical measurements at SBNY were taken every 15 to 30 minutes using a stereo microscope and camera, and snow depth and snow density were also recorded. During these storms, a vertically-pointing Ku-band radar was used to observe the vertical evolution of reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocities. A Particle Size and Velocity (PARSIVEL) disdrometer was also used to measure the surface size distribution and fall speeds of snow at SBNY. For the 15 cases at SBNY, the WSM6, Morrison (MORR), Thompson (THOM2), and Stony Brook (SBU-YLIN) BMPs were validated. A non-spherical snow assumption (THOM2 and SBU-YLIN) simulated a more realistic distribution of reflectivity than spherical snow assumptions in the WSM6 and MORR schemes. The MORR, WSM6, and SBU-YLIN schemes are comparable to the observed velocity distribution in light and moderate riming periods. The THOM2 is 0.25 meters per second too slow with its velocity distribution in these periods. In heavier riming, the vertical Doppler velocities in the WSM6, THOM2, and MORR schemes were 0.25 meters per second too

  17. Infrared and dc conductivity in metals with strong scattering: Nonclassical behavior from a generalized Boltzmann equation containing band-mixing effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, P.B.; Chakraborty, B.

    1981-01-01

    Metals with high resistivity (approx.100 μΩ cm) seem to show weaker variation of resistivity (as a function of temperature and perhaps also static disorder) than predicted by semiclassical (Bloch-Boltzmann) theory (SBT). We argue that the effect is not closely related to Anderson localization, and therefore does not necessarily signify a failure of the independent collision approximation. Instead we propose a failure of the semiclassical acceleration and conduction approximations. A generalization of Boltzmann theory is made which includes quantum (interband) acceleration and conduction, as well as a complete treatment of interband-collision effects (within the independent-collision approximation). The interband terms enhance short-time response to E fields (because the theory satisfies the exact f-sum rule instead of the semiclassical approximation to it). This suggests that the additional conductivity, as expressed phenomenologically by the shunt resistor model, is explained by interband effects. The scattering operator is complex, its imaginary parts being related to energy-band renormalization caused by the disorder. Charge conservation is respected and thermal equilibrium is restored by the collision operator. The theory is formally solved for the leading corrections to SBT, which have the form of a shunt resistor model. At infrared frequencies, the conductivity mostly obeys the Drude law sigma(ω)approx.sigma(0)(1-iωtau) -1 , except for one term which goes as (1-iωtau) -2

  18. Evaluation of Empirical Ray-Tracing Model for an Urban Outdoor Scenario at 73 GHz E-Band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Huan Cong; R. MacCartney Jr., George; Thomas, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2013, a wideband propagation measurement campaign using rotating directional antennas at 73 GHz was conducted at the New York University (NYU) campus, in order to collect extensive field measurements for use in a millimeter wave (mmWave) E-band statistical channel model. While...

  19. Band structure and orbital character of monolayer MoS2 with eleven-band tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Majid; Ghalambor Dezfuli, Abdolmohammad; Sabaeian, Mohammad

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, based on a tight-binding (TB) model, first we present the calculations of eigenvalues as band structure and then present the eigenvectors as probability amplitude for finding electron in atomic orbitals for monolayer MoS2 in the first Brillouin zone. In these calculations we are considering hopping processes between the nearest-neighbor Mo-S, the next nearest-neighbor in-plan Mo-Mo, and the next nearest-neighbor in-plan and out-of-plan S-S atoms in a three-atom based unit cell of two-dimensional rhombic MoS2. The hopping integrals have been solved in terms of Slater-Koster and crystal field parameters. These parameters are calculated by comparing TB model with the density function theory (DFT) in the high-symmetry k-points (i.e. the K- and Γ-points). In our TB model all the 4d Mo orbitals and the 3p S orbitals are considered and detailed analysis of the orbital character of each energy level at the main high-symmetry points of the Brillouin zone is described. In comparison with DFT calculations, our results of TB model show a very good agreement for bands near the Fermi level. However for other bands which are far from the Fermi level, some discrepancies between our TB model and DFT calculations are observed. Upon the accuracy of Slater-Koster and crystal field parameters, on the contrary of DFT, our model provide enough accuracy to calculate all allowed transitions between energy bands that are very crucial for investigating the linear and nonlinear optical properties of monolayer MoS2.

  20. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photonic crystal; complete photonic band gap; plane-wave expansion method. ... lies in the possibility of the substantial control of the radiation field by means of ... research. To prevent the propagation of the waves, whatever its direction is, the.

  1. Microscale Heat Conduction Models and Doppler Feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project is to establish an approach for providing the fundamental input that is needed to estimate the magnitude and time-dependence of the Doppler feedback mechanism in Very High Temperature reactors. This mechanism is the foremost contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature reactors that use fuel based on Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) coated particles. Therefore, its correct prediction is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. Since the effect is directly dependent on the actual temperature reached by the fuel during transients, the underlying phenomena of heat deposition, heat transfer and temperature rise must be correctly predicted. To achieve the above objective, this project will explore an approach that accounts for lattice effects as well as local temperature variations and the correct definition of temperature and related local effects.

  2. Modeling charged defects inside density functional theory band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, Peter A.; Edwards, Arthur H.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) has emerged as an important tool to probe microscopic behavior in materials. The fundamental band gap defines the energy scale for charge transition energy levels of point defects in ionic and covalent materials. The eigenvalue gap between occupied and unoccupied states in conventional DFT, the Kohn–Sham gap, is often half or less of the experimental band gap, seemingly precluding quantitative studies of charged defects. Applying explicit and rigorous control of charge boundary conditions in supercells, we find that calculations of defect energy levels derived from total energy differences give accurate predictions of charge transition energy levels in Si and GaAs, unhampered by a band gap problem. The GaAs system provides a good theoretical laboratory for investigating band gap effects in defect level calculations: depending on the functional and pseudopotential, the Kohn–Sham gap can be as large as 1.1 eV or as small as 0.1 eV. We find that the effective defect band gap, the computed range in defect levels, is mostly insensitive to the Kohn–Sham gap, demonstrating it is often possible to use conventional DFT for quantitative studies of defect chemistry governing interesting materials behavior in semiconductors and oxides despite a band gap problem

  3. Geophysical exploration to estimate the surface conductivity of residual argillaceous bands in the groundwater repositories of coastal sediments of EOLGA, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.J. George

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical geophysical applications exploit a petrophysical relationship governing the electrical properties of rocks/sediments when field data are coupled with laboratory data. Given the robust analytical techniques of electrical method and the interrelationship with laboratory measurements, it seems natural to classify, and hence simplify, the spatially aggregated conductivity information on the basis of rock/sediment lithology. This provides a unique link between lithological sediment/rock parameters and the physical parameters controlling bulk conductivity. In this work vertical electrical sounding (VES technique employing Schlumberger configuration integrated with sediment and water analysis have been used to determine the conductivity of argillaceous bands of aquifer sands (fine- coarse sands in Eastern Obolo Local Government Area (EOLGA. The analysis of the data shows that the aquifer systems composing of fine sands, siltstones and coarse sand have bulk and pore-water resistivities ranging from 40.1–2049.4 Ω m (average = 995.18 Ω m to 2.7–256.9 Ω m (average = 91.2 Ω m respectively. These ranges respectively correspond to porosity and formation factor of (19.5–40.6%; average = 29.2% and (7.1–19.7%; average = 12.95%. Within the limit of experimental errors clearly specified in the work, the intrinsic (clay-free formation factor (Fi was estimated to be 16.34 while the intrinsic porosity and the conductivity of the pore-scale clay (σA were respectively estimated to be 20.4% and 3.2679 mS/m. Accounting for this conductivity magnitude of argillaceous bands from bulk conductivity (σb of aquifer sands makes the aquifer systems in the area to be consistent with Archie’s law that is valid only in clay-free sandy formation. The graphical deductions and contour distribution of parameters realised from data processing could be used to derive input parameters for contaminant migration modelling and to improve the

  4. Quantification and impact of nonparabolicity of the conduction band of indium tin oxide on its plasmonic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiaoge; Park, Junghyun; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Yuan, Hongtao; Cui, Yi; Hwang, Harold Y.; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Doped indium tin oxide (ITO) behaves as a Drude metal with a plasma frequency that is controlled by its free carrier density. In this work, we systematically tune this frequency across the mid-infrared range by annealing treatments in a reducing environment that produce high electron concentrations (∼10 21  cm −3 ). The changes in ITO's optical properties that result from the changes in carrier density are measured by attenuated total reflection measurements. These optical frequency measurements are complemented by Hall measurements to obtain a comprehensive picture of the Drude response of the ITO films. It was found that a complete description of the optical properties at very high carrier densities needs to account for the nonparabolicity of the conduction band of ITO and a reduced carrier mobility. More specifically, an increase in carrier concentration from 6.2 × 10 19  cm −3 to 1.4 × 10 21  cm −3 comes with a change of the effective electron mass from 0.35 m 0 to 0.53 m 0 and a decrease in the optical frequency mobility from about 20 cm 2  V −1  s −1 to 9 cm 2  V −1  s −1

  5. Stability of the split-band solution and energy gap in the narrow-band region of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.; Cohen, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    By inserting quasielectron energies ω calculated from the fully renormalized Green's function of the Hubbard model obtained in the preceding paper into the exact expression of Galitskii and Migdal, the ground-state energy, the chemical potential, and the dynamic- and thermodynamic-stability conditions are calculated in the narrow-band region. The results show that as long as the interaction energy I is finite, electrons in the narrow-band region do not obey the Landau theory of Fermi liquids, and a gap appears between the lowest quasielectron energy ω and the chemical potential μ for any occupation n, regardless of whether the lower band is exactly filled or not. This unusual behavior is possible because, when an electron is added to the system of N electrons, the whole system relaxes due to the strong interaction, introducing a relaxation energy difference between the two quantities. We also show that all previous solutions which exhibit the split-band structure, including Hubbard's work, yield the same conclusion that electrons do not behave like Landau quasiparticles. However, the energy gap is calculated to be negative at least for some occupations n, demonstrating the dynamic instability of those solutions. They also exhibit thermodynamic instability for certain occupations, while the fully renormalized solution, having sufficient electron correlations built in, satisfies the dynamic and thermodynamic stability conditions for all occupations. When the lower band is nearly filled, the nature of the solution is shown to change, making the coherent motion of electrons with fixed k values more difficult. In the pathological limit where I=infinity, however, the gap vanishes, yielding a metallic state

  6. A New Model of Multiphonon Excitation Trap-Assisted Band-to-Band Tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Racko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new approach to calculating the currents in a pn-diode based on the extension of the Shockley-Read-Hall recombination-generation model. The presented theory is an alternative to Schenk’s model of trap-assisted tunneling. The new approach takes into account generation and recombination as well as tunneling processes in pn-junctions. Using this model, the real “soft” I-V curve usually observed in the case of switching diodes and transistors was modeled as a result of the high concentration of traps that assist in the process of tunneling.

  7. Comparison and fit of the two and six band k.p models for the band edge structure of Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, Y.

    1975-10-01

    The band edge structure of Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te is derived in detail using a two band ellipsoidal model and compared with a more rigorous calculation based on six bands. A quantitative comparison is made for two values of the energy gap, corresponding to the cases where x=0 and x=0.17. It was found that, for the occupied states in nondegenerate materials, both models are practically equivalent. Discrepancies may occur only in high degeneracies or deep inversion layers. The agreement between both models was significantly improved by introducing an effective energy gap in the two band model. It is suggested that the use of the effective energy gap may improve the agreement between the two band model and experiment whenever the details of the band edge structure enter the interpretation of the experimental results. (author)

  8. Modelling and design of complete photonic band gaps in two ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we investigate the existence and variation of complete photonic band gap size with the introduction of asymmetry in the constituent dielectric rods with honeycomb lattices in two-dimensional photonic crystals (PhC) using the plane-wave expansion (PWE) method. Two examples, one consisting of elliptical rods ...

  9. Features of the band structure and conduction mechanisms of n-HfNiSn heavily doped with Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaka, V. A., E-mail: vromaka@polynet.lviv.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Pidstryhach Institute for Applied Problems of Mechanics and Mathematics (Ukraine); Rogl, P. [Universitet Wien, Institut für Physikalische Chemie (Austria); Romaka, V. V. [National University “Lvivska Politechnika” (Ukraine); Kaczorowski, D. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research (Poland); Krayovskyy, V. Ya. [National University “Lvivska Politechnika” (Ukraine); Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Horyn, A. M. [Ivan Franko Lviv National University (Ukraine)

    2017-02-15

    The crystalline and electronic structures, energy, kinetic, and magnetic characteristics of n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with Y acceptor impurity are studied in the ranges: T = 80–400 K, N{sub A}{sup Y} ≈ 1.9 × 10{sup 20}–5.7 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –3} (x = 0.01–0.30), and H ≤ 10 kG. The nature of the mechanism of structural defect generation is determined, which leads to a change in the band gap and the degree of semiconductor compensation, the essence of which is the simultaneous reduction and elimination of structural donor-type defects as a result of the displacement of ~1% of Ni atoms from the Hf (4a) site, and the generation of structural acceptor-type defects by substituting Hf atoms with Y atoms at the 4a site. The results of calculations of the electronic structure of Hf{sub 1–x}Y{sub x}NiSn are in agreement with the experimental data. The discussion is performed within the Shklovskii–Efros model of a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  10. Explaining electric conductivity using the particle-in-a-box model: quantum superposition is the key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanesan, Umaseh; Tsang, Kin; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2017-12-01

    Most of the textbooks explaining electric conductivity in the context of quantum mechanics provide either incomplete or semi-classical explanations that are not connected with the elementary concepts of quantum mechanics. We illustrate the conduction phenomena using the simplest model system in quantum dynamics, a particle in a box (PIB). To induce the particle dynamics, a linear potential tilting the bottom of the box is introduced, which is equivalent to imposing a constant electric field for a charged particle. Although the PIB model represents a closed system that cannot have a flow of electrons through the system, we consider the oscillatory dynamics of the particle probability density as the analogue of the electric current. Relating the amplitude and other parameters of the particle oscillatory dynamics with the gap between the ground and excited states of the PIB model allows us to demonstrate one of the most basic dependencies of electric conductivity on the valence-conduction band gap of the material.

  11. Superconducting correlations in the one- and two-band Hubbard models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, K.P.; Ramakumar, R.; Chancey, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    An approximate expression is derived for the generalized energy gap function Δ kμ for a system of interacting electrons in a narrow s-band. This function has the virtue that it interpolates between the weak interaction limit (BCS) and the intermediate coupling regime. Starting from the Cooper pairing state, the authors investigate the build-up of pairing correlations and study the properties of the generalized gap in these two regimes as a function of the band filling. The coupled equations for the gap and the band filling define the self-consistency conditions. A recent extension of this analysis to the two-band model is also discussed

  12. Extended two-temperature model for ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon impulsive optical excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Taeho [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Teitelbaum, Samuel W.; Wolfson, Johanna; Nelson, Keith A., E-mail: kanelson@mit.edu [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Kandyla, Maria [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens 116-35 (Greece)

    2015-11-21

    Thermal modeling and numerical simulations have been performed to describe the ultrafast thermal response of band gap materials upon optical excitation. A model was established by extending the conventional two-temperature model that is adequate for metals, but not for semiconductors. It considers the time- and space-dependent density of electrons photoexcited to the conduction band and accordingly allows a more accurate description of the transient thermal equilibration between the hot electrons and lattice. Ultrafast thermal behaviors of bismuth, as a model system, were demonstrated using the extended two-temperature model with a view to elucidating the thermal effects of excitation laser pulse fluence, electron diffusivity, electron-hole recombination kinetics, and electron-phonon interactions, focusing on high-density excitation.

  13. Configurational Model for Conductivity of Stabilized Fluorite Structure Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Finn Willy

    1981-01-01

    The formalism developed here furnishes means by which ionic configurations, solid solution limits, and conductivity mechanisms in doped fluorite structures can be described. The present model differs markedly from previous models but reproduces qualitatively reality. The analysis reported...

  14. Soil hydraulic properties near saturation, an improved conductivity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye; Hansen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    of commonly used hydraulic conductivity models and give suggestions for improved models. Water retention and near saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured for a variety of 81 top and subsoils. The hydraulic conductivity models by van Genuchten [van Genuchten, 1980. A closed-form equation...... for predicting the hydraulic conductivity of unsaturated soils. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 44, 892–898.] (vGM) and Brooks and Corey, modified by Jarvis [Jarvis, 1991. MACRO—A Model of Water Movement and Solute Transport in Macroporous Soils. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences. Department of Soil Sciences....... Optimising a matching factor (k0) improved the fit considerably whereas optimising the l-parameter in the vGM model improved the fit only slightly. The vGM was improved with an empirical scaling function to account for the rapid increase in conductivity near saturation. Using the improved models...

  15. Electron spin polarization induced by spin Hall effect in semiconductors with a linear in the momentum spin-orbit splitting of conduction band

    OpenAIRE

    Korenev, V. L.

    2005-01-01

    It is shown that spin Hall effect creates uniform spin polarization of electrons in semiconductor with a linear in the momentum spin splitting of conduction band. In turn, the profile of the non-uniform spin polarization accumulated at the edge of the sample oscillates in space even in the absence of an external magnetic field.

  16. The modified turning bands (MTB) model for space-time rainfall. I. Model definition and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, Dale

    1996-02-01

    A new stochastic model of space-time rainfall, the Modified Turning Bands (MTB) model, is proposed which reproduces, in particular, the movements and developments of rainbands, cluster potential regions and raincells, as well as their respective interactions. The ensemble correlation structure is unsuitable for practical estimation of the model parameters because the model is not ergodic in this statistic, and hence it cannot easily be measured from a single real storm. Thus, some general theory on the internal covariance structure of a class of stochastic models is presented, of which the MTB model is an example. It is noted that, for the MTB model, the internal covariance structure may be measured from a single storm, and can thus be used for model identification.

  17. Geometric model for softwood transverse thermal conductivity. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-mei Gu; Audrey Zink-Sharp

    2005-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is a very important parameter in determining heat transfer rate and is required for developing of drying models and in industrial operations such as adhesive cure rate. Geometric models for predicting softwood thermal conductivity in the radial and tangential directions were generated in this study based on obervation and measurements of wood...

  18. Modelling electrolyte conductivity in a water electrolyzer cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspersen, Michael; Kirkegaard, Julius Bier

    2012-01-01

    An analytical model describing the hydrogen gas evolution under natural convection in an electrolyzer cell is developed. Main purpose of the model is to investigate the electrolyte conductivity through the cell under various conditions. Cell conductivity is calculated from a parallel resistor...

  19. Development of irradiated UO2 thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Bang Je-Geon; Kim Dae Ho; Jung Youn Ho

    2001-01-01

    Thermal conductivity model of the irradiated UO 2 pellet was developed, based upon the thermal diffusivity data of the irradiated UO 2 pellet measured during thermal cycling. The model predicts the thermal conductivity by multiplying such separate correction factors as solid fission products, gaseous fission products, radiation damage and porosity. The developed model was validated by comparison with the variation of the measured thermal diffusivity data during thermal cycling and prediction of other UO 2 thermal conductivity models. Since the developed model considers the effect of gaseous fission products as a separate factor, it can predict variation of thermal conductivity in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 pellet where the fission gases in the matrix are precipitated into bubbles, indicating that decrease of thermal conductivity by bubble precipitation in rim region would be significantly compensated by the enhancing effect of fission gas depletion in the UO 2 matrix. (author)

  20. Electrons in feldspar II: A consideration of the influence of conduction band-tail states on luminescence processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, H.R.J.; Ozanyan, K.B.; Wallinga, J.

    2002-01-01

    consider what influence the band tails have on the luminescence properties of feldspar, where electrons travel through the sample prior to recombination. The work highlights the dominant role that 0.04-0.05-eV phonons play in both the luminescence excitation and emission processes of these materials...

  1. Discovery of high-performance low-cost n-type Mg3Sb2-based thermoelectric materials with multi-valley conduction bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiawei; Song, Lirong; Pedersen, Steffen Hindborg

    2017-01-01

    Widespread application of thermoelectric devices for waste heat recovery requires low-cost high-performance materials. The currently available n-type thermoelectric materials are limited either by their low efficiencies or by being based on expensive, scarce or toxic elements. Here we report a low-cost...... because of the multi-valley band behaviour dominated by a unique near-edge conduction band with a sixfold valley degeneracy. This makes Te-doped Mg3Sb1.5Bi0.5 a promising candidate for the low- and intermediate-temperature thermoelectric applications....

  2. Seven-parameter statistical model for BRDF in the UV band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lu; Wu, Zhensen; Zou, Xiren; Cao, Yunhua

    2012-05-21

    A new semi-empirical seven-parameter BRDF model is developed in the UV band using experimentally measured data. The model is based on the five-parameter model of Wu and the fourteen-parameter model of Renhorn and Boreman. Surface scatter, bulk scatter and retro-reflection scatter are considered. An optimizing modeling method, the artificial immune network genetic algorithm, is used to fit the BRDF measurement data over a wide range of incident angles. The calculation time and accuracy of the five- and seven-parameter models are compared. After fixing the seven parameters, the model can well describe scattering data in the UV band.

  3. Electrical conductivity modeling in fractal non-saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W.; Cai, J.; Hu, X.; Han, Q.

    2016-12-01

    The variety of electrical conductivity in non-saturated conditions is important to study electric conduction in natural sedimentary rocks. The electrical conductivity in completely saturated porous media is a porosity-function representing the complex connected behavior of single conducting phases (pore fluid). For partially saturated conditions, the electrical conductivity becomes even more complicated since the connectedness of pore. Archie's second law is an empirical electrical conductivity-porosity and -saturation model that has been used to predict the formation factor of non-saturated porous rock. However, the physical interpretation of its parameters, e.g., the cementation exponent m and the saturation exponent n, remains questionable. On basis of our previous work, we combine the pore-solid fractal (PSF) model to build an electrical conductivity model in non-saturated porous media. Our theoretical porosity- and saturation-dependent models contain endmember properties, such as fluid electrical conductivities, pore fractal dimension and tortuosity fractal dimension (representing the complex degree of electrical flowing path). We find the presented model with non-saturation-dependent electrical conductivity datasets indicate excellent match between theory and experiments. This means the value of pore fractal dimension and tortuosity fractal dimension change from medium to medium and depends not only on geometrical properties of pore structure but also characteristics of electrical current flowing in the non-saturated porous media.

  4. On the electrical conductivity for the mixed-valence model with d-f correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgiel, W.; Matlak, M.

    1984-08-01

    The static electrical conductivity of mixed-valence systems is calculated in the model of Matlak and Nolting [Solid State Commun., 47, 11 (1983); Z. Phys., B55, 103 (1984)]. The method takes into account the atomic properties more exactly than those connected with bands, and hence emphasizes the ionic aspect of the problem in some way; indeed, the calculations overestimate the atomic properties. Some results are presented in a graph. It is found that the electrical conductivity depends strongly on temperature and the electron-hole attraction constant

  5. Stability and special solutions to the conducting dusty gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calmelet, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    Models of the flow of a dusty, conducting and non-conducting gas are examined. Exact solutions for a conducting dusty gas model in the presence of a magnetic field are developed for two different flow domains. The exact solutions are calculated in the cases of negligible and non-negligible induced magnetic field. Stability theorems are developed which depend on the flow parameters of the dusty gas and the magnetic field. In particular, a universal stability theorem is obtained when the dusty gas flow is electrically conducting in the presence of an applied magnetic field, and the dust particles are non-uniformly distributed

  6. Contributions of conduction band offset to the enhanced separation efficiency of photoinduced charges for SrTiO3/Bi2O3 heterojunction semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhenlong; Zhu, Jichun; Li, Shengjun; Mao, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 heterojunction semiconductor was prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV–vis absorption spectrum, and scanning electron microscope, surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The surface photovoltage spectra indicate that the separation efficiency of photoinduced charges for SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 was enhanced compared with that of SrTiO 3 or Bi 2 O 3 . The energy band diagram of SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 heterojunction was directly determined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the conduction band offset between SrTiO 3 and Bi 2 O 3 was quantified to be 0.28±0.03 eV. The photoluminescence spectra display that the recombination rate of photoinduced carriers for SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 decreases compared with that of SrTiO 3 or Bi 2 O 3 , which is mainly due to the energy levels matching between them. Therefore the enhanced separation efficiency of photoinduced charges is resulting from the energy difference between the conduction band edges of SrTiO 3 and Bi 2 O 3 . -- Graphical abstract: Enhanced separation efficiency for SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 is resulting from the energy difference between the conduction band edges. Highlights: ●Heterojunction semiconductor of SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 was prepared. ●SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 presents enhanced separation efficiency. ●Conduction band offset between SrTiO 3 and Bi 2 O 3 is quantified. ●Recombination rate of SrTiO 3 /Bi 2 O 3 decreases compared with single phases

  7. Monte Carlo study of superconductivity in the three-band Emery model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, M.; Pattnaik, P.C.; Morgenstern, I.; Newns, D.M.; von der Linden, W.

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the three-band Hubbard model for the copper oxide planes in high-temperature superconductors using the projector quantum Monte Carlo method. We find no evidence for s-wave superconductivity

  8. Spin alignment and collective moment of inertia of the basic rotational band in the cranking model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihide

    1982-01-01

    By making an attempt to separate the intrinsic particle and collective rotational motions in the cranking model, the spin alignment and the collective moment of inertia characterizing the basic rotational bands are defined, and are investigated by using a simple i sub(13/2) shell model. The result of the calculation indicates that the collective moment of inertia decreases under the presence of the quasiparticles which are responsible for the increase of the spin alignment of the band. (author)

  9. Energy shift and conduction-to-valence band transition mediated by a time-dependent potential barrier in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Andrey; da Costa, D. R.; de Sousa, G. O.; Pereira, J. M.; Farias, G. A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the scattering of a wave packet describing low-energy electrons in graphene by a time-dependent finite-step potential barrier. Our results demonstrate that, after Klein tunneling through the barrier, the electron acquires an extra energy which depends on the rate of change of the barrier height with time. If this rate is negative, the electron loses energy and ends up as a valence band state after leaving the barrier, which effectively behaves as a positively charged quasiparticle.

  10. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Electrical Contact Conductance of Rough Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Murashov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 20th century to the present time, efforts have been made to develop a model of the electrical contact conductance. The development of micro- and nanotechnologies make contact conductance problem more essential. To conduct borrowing from a welldeveloped thermal contact conductance models on the basis of thermal and electrical conductivity analogy is often not possible due to a number of fundamental differences. While some 3Dmodels of rough bodies deformation have been developed in one way or another, a 3D-model of the electrical conductance through rough bodies contact is still not. A spatial model of electrical contact of rough bodies is proposed, allows one to calculate the electrical contact conductance as a function of the contact pressure. Representative elements of the bodies are parallelepipeds with deterministic roughness on the contacting surfaces. First the non-linear elastic-plastic deformation of rough surface under external pressure is solved using the finite element software ANSYS. Then the solution of electrostatic problem goes on the same finite element mesh. Aluminum AD1 is used as the material of the contacting bodies with properties that account for cold work hardening of the surface. The numerical model is built within the continuum mechanics and nanoscale effects are not taken into account. The electrical contact conductance was calculated on the basis of the concept of electrical resistance of the model as the sum of the electrical resistances of the contacting bodies and the contact itself. It was assumed that there is no air in the gap between the bodies. The dependence of the electrical contact conductance on the contact pressure is calculated as well as voltage and current density distributions in the contact bodies. It is determined that the multi-asperity contact mode, adequate to real roughness, is achieved at pressures higher than 3MPa, while results within the single contact spot are

  12. Microscopic nuclear structure models and methods: chiral symmetry, wobbling motion and γ –bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, Javid A; Bhat, Gowhar H; Dar, Waheed A; Jehangir, Sheikh; Ganai, Prince A

    2016-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the nuclear observables related to the triaxial degree of freedom is presented using the multi-quasiparticle triaxial projected shell model (TPSM) approach. These properties correspond to the observation of γ -bands, chiral doublet bands and the wobbling mode. In the TPSM approach, γ -bands are built on each quasiparticle configuration and it is demonstrated that some observations in high-spin spectroscopy that have remained unresolved for quite some time could be explained by considering γ -bands based on two-quasiparticle configurations. It is shown in some Ce-, Nd- and Ge-isotopes that the two observed aligned or s-bands originate from the same intrinsic configuration with one of them as the γ -band based on a two-quasiparticle configuration. In the present work, we have also performed a detailed study of γ -bands observed up to the highest spin in dysposium, hafnium, mercury and uranium isotopes. Furthermore, several measurements related to chiral symmetry breaking and wobbling motion have been reported recently. These phenomena, which are possible only for triaxial nuclei, have been investigated using the TPSM approach. It is shown that doublet bands observed in lighter odd–odd Cs-isotopes can be considered as candidates for chiral symmetry breaking. Transverse wobbling motion recently observed in 135 Pr has also been investigated and it is shown that TPSM approach provides a reasonable description of the measured properties. (invited comment)

  13. Modelling the effect of hydration on skin conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, L; Chappell, P; Melvin, T

    2017-08-01

    Electrical signals are recorded from and sent into the body via the skin in a number of applications. In practice, skin is often hydrated with liquids having different conductivities so a model was produced in order to determine the relationship between skin impedance and conductivity. A model representing the skin was subjected to a variety of electrical signals. The parts of the model representing the stratum corneum were given different conductivities to represent different levels of hydration. The overall impedance and conductivity of the cells did not vary at frequencies below 40 kHz. Above 40 kHz, levels of increased conductivity caused the overall impedance to decrease. The variation in impedance with conductivity between 5 and 50 mSm -1 can be modelled quadratically while variation in impedance with conductivity between 5 and 5000 mSm -1 can be modelled with a double exponential decay. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Finite element model for heat conduction in jointed rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartling, D.K.; Thomas, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    A computatonal procedure for simulating heat conduction in a fractured rock mass is proposed and illustrated in the present paper. The method makes use of a simple local model for conduction in the vicinity of a single open fracture. The distributions of fractures and fracture properties within the finite element model are based on a statistical representation of geologic field data. Fracture behavior is included in the finite element computation by locating local, discrete fractures at the element integration points

  15. Current amplification models of sensorineurall and conductive hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Ostojić, Sanja; Mikić, Branka; Mirić, Danica

    2012-01-01

    The main function of a hearing aid is to improve auditory and language abilities of hearing impaired users. The amplification model has to be adapted according to age, degree and type of hearing loss. The goal of this paper is to analyze the current amplification models of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss which can provide a high quality of speech perception and sounds at any degree of hearing loss. The BAHA is a surgically implantable system for treatment of conductive hearing loss ...

  16. Madelung and Hubbard interactions in polaron band model of doped organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Rui-Qi; Ang, Mervin C.Y.; Teo, Meng-How; Choo, Kim-Kian; Tang, Cindy Guanyu; Belaineh, Dagmawi; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The standard polaron band model of doped organic semiconductors predicts that density-of-states shift into the π–π* gap to give a partially filled polaron band that pins the Fermi level. This picture neglects both Madelung and Hubbard interactions. Here we show using ultrahigh workfunction hole-doped model triarylamine–fluorene copolymers that Hubbard interaction strongly splits the singly-occupied molecular orbital from its empty counterpart, while Madelung (Coulomb) interactions with counter-anions and other carriers markedly shift energies of the frontier orbitals. These interactions lower the singly-occupied molecular orbital band below the valence band edge and give rise to an empty low-lying counterpart band. The Fermi level, and hence workfunction, is determined by conjunction of the bottom edge of this empty band and the top edge of the valence band. Calculations are consistent with the observed Fermi-level downshift with counter-anion size and the observed dependence of workfunction on doping level in the strongly doped regime. PMID:27582355

  17. Electrical equivalent model of intermediate band solar cell using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    presents a structure of IBSC based on ZnTe:O. The proposed model uses irradiance and temperature as ... of solar cells. They are based on different processes and properties such as photon recycling, ... The MATLAB interface was used .... ioral model of an arbitrary solar cell to amend the PSPICE simulation performance.

  18. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Žecová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are described. Individual methods have been implemented in MATLAB and the examples of simulations are listed. The proposal and experimental verification of the methods for determining thermal diffusivity using half-order derivative of temperature by time are listed at the conclusion of the paper.

  19. Intensity profiles of superdeformed bands in Pb isotopes in a two-level mixing model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, A. N.; Szigeti, S. S.; Rogers, J. I.; Davidson, P. M.; Cardamone, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    A recently developed two-level mixing model of the decay out of superdeformed bands is applied to examine the loss of flux from the yrast superdeformed bands in 192 Pb, 194 Pb, and 196 Pb. Probability distributions for decay to states at normal deformations are calculated at each level. The sensitivity of the results to parameters describing the levels at normal deformation and their coupling to levels in the superdeformed well is explored. It is found that except for narrow ranges of the interaction strength coupling the states, the amount of intensity lost is primarily determined by the ratio of γ decay widths in the normal and superdeformed wells. It is also found that while the model can accommodate the observed fractional intensity loss profiles for decay from bands at relatively high excitation, it cannot accommodate the similarly abrupt decay from bands at lower energies if standard estimates of the properties of the states in the first minimum are employed

  20. Lithium-modulated conduction band edge shifts and charge-transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized solar cells based on a dicyanamide ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Min; Wang, Peng

    2011-04-19

    Lithium ions are known for their potent function in modulating the energy alignment at the oxide semiconductor/dye/electrolyte interface in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), offering the opportunity to control the associated multichannel charge-transfer dynamics. Herein, by optimizing the lithium iodide content in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide-based ionic liquid electrolytes, we present a solvent-free DSC displaying an impressive 8.4% efficiency at 100 mW cm(-2) AM1.5G conditions. We further scrutinize the origins of evident impacts of lithium ions upon current density-voltage characteristics as well as photocurrent action spectra of DSCs based thereon. It is found that, along with a gradual increase of the lithium content in ionic liquid electrolytes, a consecutive diminishment of the open-circuit photovoltage arises, primarily owing to a noticeable downward movement of the titania conduction band edge. The conduction band edge displacement away from vacuum also assists the formation of a more favorable energy offset at the titania/dye interface, and thereby leads to a faster electron injection rate and a higher exciton dissociation yield as implied by transient emission measurements. We also notice that the adverse influence of the titania conduction band edge downward shift arising from lithium addition upon photovoltage is partly compensated by a concomitant suppression of the triiodide involving interfacial charge recombination. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Pseudo SU(3) shell model: Normal parity bands in odd-mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, C.E.; Hirsch, J.G.; Draayer, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    A pseudo shell SU(3) model description of normal parity bands in 159 Tb is presented. The Hamiltonian includes spherical Nilsson single-particle energies, the quadrupole-quadrupole and pairing interactions, as well as three rotor terms. A systematic parametrization is introduced, accompanied by a detailed discussion of the effect each term in the Hamiltonian has on the energy spectrum. Yrast and excited band wavefunctions are analyzed together with their B(E2) values

  2. The use of conduction model in laser weld profile computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabas, Bogusław

    2007-02-01

    Profiles of joints resulting from deep penetration laser beam welding of a flat workpiece of carbon steel were computed. A semi-analytical conduction model solved with Green's function method was used in computations. In the model, the moving heat source was attenuated exponentially in accordance with Beer-Lambert law. Computational results were compared with those in the experiment.

  3. Modeling electrical conductivities of nanocomposites with aligned carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, W S; Meguid, S A; Zhu, Z H; Meguid, M J

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an improved three-dimensional (3D) percolation model to investigate the effect of the alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites. In this model, both intrinsic and contact resistances are considered, and a new method of resistor network recognition that employs periodically connective paths is developed. This method leads to a reduction in the size effect of the representative cuboid in our Monte Carlo simulations. With this new technique, we were able to effectively analyze the effects of the CNT alignment upon the electrical conductivity of nanocomposites. Our model predicted that the peak value of the conductivity occurs for partially aligned rather than perfectly aligned CNTs. It has also identified the value of the peak and the corresponding alignment for different volume fractions of CNTs. Our model works well for both multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs) and single-wall CNTs (SWCNTs), and the numerical results show a quantitative agreement with existing experimental observations.

  4. Model validity and frequency band selection in operational modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Siu-Kui

    2016-12-01

    Experimental modal analysis aims at identifying the modal properties (e.g., natural frequencies, damping ratios, mode shapes) of a structure using vibration measurements. Two basic questions are encountered when operating in the frequency domain: Is there a mode near a particular frequency? If so, how much spectral data near the frequency can be included for modal identification without incurring significant modeling error? For data with high signal-to-noise (s/n) ratios these questions can be addressed using empirical tools such as singular value spectrum. Otherwise they are generally open and can be challenging, e.g., for modes with low s/n ratios or close modes. In this work these questions are addressed using a Bayesian approach. The focus is on operational modal analysis, i.e., with 'output-only' ambient data, where identification uncertainty and modeling error can be significant and their control is most demanding. The approach leads to 'evidence ratios' quantifying the relative plausibility of competing sets of modeling assumptions. The latter involves modeling the 'what-if-not' situation, which is non-trivial but is resolved by systematic consideration of alternative models and using maximum entropy principle. Synthetic and field data are considered to investigate the behavior of evidence ratios and how they should be interpreted in practical applications.

  5. Periodic Anderson model with correlated conduction electrons: Variational and exact diagonalization study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, I.; Itai, K.; Sólyom, J.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate an extended version of the periodic Anderson model (the so-called periodic Anderson-Hubbard model) with the aim to understand the role of interaction between conduction electrons in the formation of the heavy-fermion and mixed-valence states. Two methods are used: (i) variational calculation with the Gutzwiller wave function optimizing numerically the ground-state energy and (ii) exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian for short chains. The f-level occupancy and the renormalization factor of the quasiparticles are calculated as a function of the energy of the f orbital for a wide range of the interaction parameters. The results obtained by the two methods are in reasonably good agreement for the periodic Anderson model. The agreement is maintained even when the interaction between band electrons, Ud, is taken into account, except for the half-filled case. This discrepancy can be explained by the difference between the physics of the one- and higher-dimensional models. We find that this interaction shifts and widens the energy range of the bare f level, where heavy-fermion behavior can be observed. For large-enough Ud this range may lie even above the bare conduction band. The Gutzwiller method indicates a robust transition from Kondo insulator to Mott insulator in the half-filled model, while Ud enhances the quasiparticle mass when the filling is close to half filling.

  6. Modeling and analysis of renewable energy obligations and technology bandings in the UK electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürkan, Gül; Langestraat, Romeo

    2014-01-01

    In the UK electricity market, generators are obliged to produce part of their electricity with renewable energy resources in accordance with the Renewable Obligation Order. Since 2009 technology banding has been added, meaning that different technologies are rewarded with a different number of certificates. We analyze these two different renewable obligation policies in a mathematical representation of an electricity market with random availabilities of renewable generation outputs and random electricity demand. We also present another, alternative, banding policy. We provide revenue adequate pricing schemes for the three obligation policies. We carry out a simulation study via sampling. A key finding is that the UK banding policy cannot guarantee that the original obligation target is met, hence potentially resulting in more pollution. Our alternative provides a way to make sure that the target is met while supporting less established technologies, but it comes with a significantly higher consumer price. Furthermore, as an undesirable side effect, we observe that a cost reduction in a technology with a high banding (namely offshore wind) leads to more CO 2 emissions under the UK banding policy and to higher consumer prices under the alternative banding policy. - Highlights: • We model and analyze three renewable obligation policies in a mathematical framework. • We provide revenue adequate pricing schemes for the three policies. • We carry out a simulation study via sampling. • The UK policy cannot guarantee that the original obligation target is met. • Cost reductions can lead to more pollution or higher prices under banding policies

  7. Design of an L-band normally conducting RF gun cavity for high peak and average RF power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, V., E-mail: paramono@inr.ru [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Philipp, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Rybakov, I.; Skassyrskaya, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research of Russian Academy of Sciences, 60-th October Anniversary prospect 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Stephan, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)

    2017-05-11

    To provide high quality electron bunches for linear accelerators used in free electron lasers and particle colliders, RF gun cavities operate with extreme electric fields, resulting in a high pulsed RF power. The main L-band superconducting linacs of such facilities also require a long RF pulse length, resulting in a high average dissipated RF power in the gun cavity. The newly developed cavity based on the proven advantages of the existing DESY RF gun cavities, underwent significant changes. The shape of the cells is optimized to reduce the maximal surface electric field and RF loss power. Furthermore, the cavity is equipped with an RF probe to measure the field amplitude and phase. The elaborated cooling circuit design results in a lower temperature rise on the cavity RF surface and permits higher dissipated RF power. The paper presents the main solutions and results of the cavity design.

  8. A multi-band, multi-level, multi-electron model for efficient FDTD simulations of electromagnetic interactions with semiconductor quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Koustuban; Wang, Qian; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2015-08-01

    We report a new computational model for simulations of electromagnetic interactions with semiconductor quantum well(s) (SQW) in complex electromagnetic geometries using the finite-difference time-domain method. The presented model is based on an approach of spanning a large number of electron transverse momentum states in each SQW sub-band (multi-band) with a small number of discrete multi-electron states (multi-level, multi-electron). This enables accurate and efficient two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) simulations of nanophotonic devices with SQW active media. The model includes the following features: (1) Optically induced interband transitions between various SQW conduction and heavy-hole or light-hole sub-bands are considered. (2) Novel intra sub-band and inter sub-band transition terms are derived to thermalize the electron and hole occupational distributions to the correct Fermi-Dirac distributions. (3) The terms in (2) result in an explicit update scheme which circumvents numerically cumbersome iterative procedures. This significantly augments computational efficiency. (4) Explicit update terms to account for carrier leakage to unconfined states are derived, which thermalize the bulk and SQW populations to a common quasi-equilibrium Fermi-Dirac distribution. (5) Auger recombination and intervalence band absorption are included. The model is validated by comparisons to analytic band-filling calculations, simulations of SQW optical gain spectra, and photonic crystal lasers.

  9. Random resistor network model of minimal conductivity in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheianov, Vadim V; Fal'ko, Vladimir I; Altshuler, Boris L; Aleiner, Igor L

    2007-10-26

    Transport in undoped graphene is related to percolating current patterns in the networks of n- and p-type regions reflecting the strong bipolar charge density fluctuations. Finite transparency of the p-n junctions is vital in establishing the macroscopic conductivity. We propose a random resistor network model to analyze scaling dependencies of the conductance on the doping and disorder, the quantum magnetoresistance and the corresponding dephasing rate.

  10. Arbitrary Chern number generation in the three-band model from momentum space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo-Yong; Go, Gyungchoon; Han, Jung Hoon; Park, Jin-Hong

    2015-01-01

    A simple, general rule for generating a three-band model with arbitrary Chern numbers is given. The rule is based on the idea of monopole charge-changing unitary operations and can be realized by two types of simple unitary operations on the original Hamiltonian. A pair of monopole charges are required to produce desired topological numbers in the three-band model. The set of rules presented here offers a way to produce lattice models of any desired Chern numbers for three-sublattice situations. (author)

  11. Schwinger effect and negative differential conductivity in holographic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankhadeep Chakrabortty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of the Schwinger effect for conductivity are computed for strong coupling systems using holography. The one-loop diagram on the flavor brane introduces an O(λNc imaginary part in the effective action for a Maxwell flavor gauge field. This in turn introduces a real conductivity in an otherwise insulating phase of the boundary theory. Moreover, in certain regions of parameter space the differential conductivity is negative. This is computed in the context of the Sakai–Sugimoto model.

  12. Thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliero, Guillaume; Boned, Christian

    2009-12-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to estimate, analyze, and correlate the thermal conductivity of a fluid composed of short Lennard-Jones chains (up to 16 segments) over a large range of thermodynamic conditions. It is shown that the dilute gas contribution to the thermal conductivity decreases when the chain length increases for a given temperature. In dense states, simulation results indicate that the residual thermal conductivity of the monomer increases strongly with density, but is weakly dependent on the temperature. Compared to the monomer value, it has been noted that the residual thermal conductivity of the chain was slightly decreasing with its length. Using these results, an empirical relation, including a contribution due to the critical enhancement, is proposed to provide an accurate estimation of the thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model (up to 16 segments) over the domain 0.8values of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model merge on the same "universal" curve when plotted as a function of the excess entropy. Furthermore, it is shown that the reduced configurational thermal conductivity of the Lennard-Jones chain fluid model is approximately proportional to the reduced excess entropy for all fluid states and all chain lengths.

  13. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  14. Dual Band Magnonic Crystals: Model System and Basic Spin Wave Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Montoncello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a special design of two-dimensional magnonic crystal, consisting of two superimposed lattices with different lattice constants, such that spin waves (SWs can propagate either in one or the other sublattice, depending on which of the two frequency bands they belong to. The SW bands are separated by a very large bandgap (in our model system, 6 GHz, easily tunable by changing the direction of an applied magnetic field, and the overlap of their spatial distribution, for any frequency of their bands, is always negligible. These properties make the designed system an ideal test system for a magnonic dual band waveguide, where the simultaneous excitation and subsequent propagation of two independent SW signals are allowed, with no mutual interference.

  15. Projected Shell Model Description of Positive Parity Band of 130Pr Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Suram; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Dhanvir; Sharma, Chetan; Bharti, Arun; Bhat, G. H.; Sheikh, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    Theoretical investigation of positive parity yrast band of odd-odd 130Pr nucleus is performed by applying the projected shell model. The present study is undertaken to investigate and verify the very recently observed side band in 130Pr theoretically in terms of quasi-particle (qp) configuration. From the analysis of band diagram, the yrast as well as side band are found to arise from two-qp configuration πh 11/2 ⊗ νh 11/2. The present calculations are viewed to have qualitatively reproduced the known experimental data for yrast states, transition energies, and B( M1) / B( E2) ratios of this nucleus. The recently observed positive parity side band is also reproduced by the present calculations. The energy states of the side band are predicted up to spin 25+, which is far above the known experimental spin of 18+ and this could serve as a motivational factor for future experiments. In addition, the reduced transition probability B( E2) for interband transitions has also been calculated for the first time in projected shell model, which would serve as an encouragement for other research groups in the future.

  16. Band Jahn-Teller effect on the density of states of the magnetic high-Tc superconductors: A model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, B.; Mohanta, K.L.; Rout, G.C.

    2012-01-01

    We report here a mean-field study of competing antiferromagnetism, superconductivity and lattice strain phases and their effect on the local density of states of the cuprate system. Our model Hamiltonian incorporating these interactions is reported earlier [G.C. Rout et al., Physica C, 2007]. The analytic expression for superconducting, antiferromagnetism and lattice strain order parameters are calculated and solved self-consistently. The interplay of these order parameters is investigated considering the calculated density of states (DOSs) of the conduction electrons. The DOS displays multiple gap structures with multiple peaks. It is suggested that the tunneling conductance data obtained from the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements could be interpreted by using the quasi-particle bands calculated from our model Hamiltonian. We have discussed the mechanism to calculate the order parameters from the conductance data.

  17. URGAP: A gap conductance model for transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.; Pazdera, F.

    1983-01-01

    A gap conductance model, URGAP, has been developed with contributions from solid, fluid and radiation heat transfer components. Model parameters are easily available, independent of different combinations of material surfaces. The model parameters were fitted to 388 data points under reactor conditions. For model verification, another 274 data points of steel-steel and aluminium-aluminium interfaces, respectively, were used. For minor surface roughnesses normally prevailing in reactor fuel elements the model asymptotically yields Ross' and Stoute's model for the open gap, which is thus confirmed. Materials data were carefully checked over a wide range of temperatures. Special attention was paid to the contact term for high temperatures. Thus, the model can be applied to transients. The URGAP model is being used successfully in several codes (e.g. URANUS, SSYST). (author)

  18. A model for calculating expected performance of the Apollo unified S-band (USB) communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, N. W.

    1971-01-01

    A model for calculating the expected performance of the Apollo unified S-band (USB) communication system is presented. The general organization of the Apollo USB is described. The mathematical model is reviewed and the computer program for implementation of the calculations is included.

  19. Bondwire array modeling for the design of hybrid high power amplifiers above C-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernández, Carlos Cilla; Jónasson, Sævar Þór; Hanberg, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a bondwire array model obtained using a software based on the finite elements method and validated up to 15 GHz by measurements over a purpose-build array structure. This work addresses the limits of the inductor-based bondwire model when used at frequencies above C-band to si...

  20. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies – oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Funk

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999. Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD. This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements. Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative processes; instruments and techniques

  1. Photon path length distributions for cloudy skies – oxygen A-Band measurements and model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Funk

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the statistics underlying cloudy sky radiative transfer (RT by inspection of the distribution of the path lengths of solar photons. Recent studies indicate that this approach is promising, since it might reveal characteristics about the diffusion process underlying atmospheric radiative transfer (Pfeilsticker, 1999. Moreover, it uses an observable that is directly related to the atmospheric absorption and, therefore, of climatic relevance. However, these studies are based largely on the accuracy of the measurement of the photon path length distribution (PPD. This paper presents a refined analysis method based on high resolution spectroscopy of the oxygen A-band. The method is validated by Monte Carlo simulation atmospheric spectra. Additionally, a new method to measure the effective optical thickness of cloud layers, based on fitting the measured differential transmissions with a 1-dimensional (discrete ordinate RT model, is presented. These methods are applied to measurements conducted during the cloud radar inter-comparison campaign CLARE’98, which supplied detailed cloud structure information, required for the further analysis. For some exemplary cases, measured path length distributions and optical thicknesses are presented and backed by detailed RT model calculations. For all cases, reasonable PPDs can be retrieved and the effects of the vertical cloud structure are found. The inferred cloud optical thicknesses are in agreement with liquid water path measurements.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (radiative processes; instruments and techniques

  2. Measurements and Modeling of Conducted EMI in a Buck Chopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakhfakh, L.; Abid, S.; Ammous, A.

    2011-01-01

    The high increase of power electronic devices use (speed control, lighting, heating, automotive, etc...) requires the electrical, thermal and electromagnetic behavior studies. In this paper we developed a model to predict the conducted EMI level in a DC/DC converter. Measurement methodology was done using a network analyzer in order to evaluate the equivalent impedance model of each converter element. The full circuit model is then implemented in the Saber-trademark simulation tool using time domain simulation followed by fast Fourier transformation (FFT) in the frequency range 150 KHz -100 MHz. A comparison between simulation results and those obtained by measurements is used to validate the developed model. (author)

  3. Modeling cell elongation during germ band retraction: cell autonomy versus applied anisotropic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Holley E; Shane Hutson, M; Veldhuis, Jim; Wayne Brodland, G

    2014-01-01

    The morphogenetic process of germ band retraction in Drosophila embryos involves coordinated movements of two epithelial tissues—germ band and amnioserosa. The germ band shortens along its rostral–caudal or head-to-tail axis, widens along its perpendicular dorsal-ventral axis, and uncurls from an initial ‘U’ shape. The amnioserosa mechanically assists this process by pulling on the crook of the U-shaped germ band. The amnioserosa may also provide biochemical signals that drive germ band cells to change shape in a mechanically autonomous fashion. Here, we use a finite-element model to investigate how these two contributions reshape the germ band. We do so by modeling the response to laser-induced wounds in each of the germ band’s spatially distinct segments (T1–T3, A1–A9) during the middle of retraction when segments T1–A3 form the ventral arm of the ‘U’, A4–A7 form its crook, and A8–A9 complete the dorsal arm. We explore these responses under a range of externally applied stresses and internal anisotropy of cell edge tensions—akin to a planar cell polarity that can drive elongation of cells in a direction parallel to the minimum edge tension—and identify regions of parameter space (edge-tension anisotropy versus stress anisotropy) that best match previous experiments for each germ band segment. All but three germ band segments are best fit when the applied stress anisotropy and the edge-tension anisotropy work against one another—i.e., when the isolated effects would elongate cells in perpendicular directions. Segments in the crook of the germ band (A4–A7) have cells that elongate in the direction of maximum external stress, i.e., external stress anisotropy is dominant. In most other segments, the dominant factor is internal edge-tension anisotropy. These results are consistent with models in which the amnioserosa pulls on the crook of the germ band to mechanically assist retraction. In addition, they suggest a mechanical cue for

  4. Modeling of the effective thermal conductivity of sintered porous pastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez-Miranda, J.; Hermens, M.; Nikitin, I.; Kouznetsova, V.G.; Volz, S.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of sintered porous pastes of metals is modelled, based on an analytical and a numerical approach. The first method arises from the differential effective medium theory and considers the air voids as ellipsoidal pores of different sizes, while second one is based on the

  5. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  6. An examination of the developmental propensity model of conduct problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Soo Hyun; Friedman, Naomi P; Corley, Robin P; Hewitt, John K; Hink, Laura K; Johnson, Daniel P; Smith Watts, Ashley K; Young, Susan E; Robinson, JoAnn; Waldman, Irwin D; Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn

    2016-05-01

    The present study tested specific hypotheses advanced by the developmental propensity model of the etiology of conduct problems in the Colorado Longitudinal Twin Study, a prospective, longitudinal, genetically informative sample. High negative emotionality, low behavioral inhibition, low concern and high disregard for others, and low cognitive ability assessed during toddlerhood (age 14 to 36 months) were examined as predictors of conduct problems in later childhood and adolescence (age 4 to 17 years). Each hypothesized antisocial propensity dimension predicted conduct problems, but some predictions may be context specific or due to method covariance. The most robust predictors were observed disregard for others (i.e., responding to others' distress with active, negative responses such as anger and hostility), general cognitive ability, and language ability, which were associated with conduct problems reported by parents, teachers, and adolescents, and change in observed negative emotionality (i.e., frustration tolerance), which was associated with conduct problems reported by teachers and adolescents. Furthermore, associations between the most robust early predictors and later conduct problems were influenced by the shared environment rather than genes. We conclude that shared environmental influences that promote disregard for others and detract from cognitive and language development during toddlerhood also predispose individuals to conduct problems in later childhood and adolescence. The identification of those shared environmental influences common to early antisocial propensity and later conduct problems is an important future direction, and additional developmental behavior genetic studies examining the interaction between children's characteristics and socializing influences on conduct problems are needed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the {gamma}-X conduction band mixing and the binding energy of a donor impurity in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, C.A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Lopez, S.Y. [Facultad de Educacion, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62210, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    2007-06-15

    Mixing between {gamma} and X valleys of the conduction band in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells is investigated taken into account the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure. This effect is introduced via the pressure-dependent values of the corresponding energy gaps and the main band parameters. The mixing is considered along the lines of a phenomenological model. Variation of the confined ground state in the well as a function of the pressure is reported. The dependencies of the variationally calculated binding energy of a donor impurity with the hydrostatic pressure and well width are also presented. It is shown that the inclusion of the {gamma}-X mixing explains the non-linear behavior in the photoluminescence peak of confined exciton states that has been observed for pressures above 20 kbar. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Two-dimensional modeling of conduction-mode laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    WELD2D is a two-dimensional finite difference computer program suitable for modeling the conduction-mode welding process when the molten weld pool motion can be neglected. The code is currently structured to treat butt-welded geometries in a plane normal to the beam motion so that dissimilar materials may be considered. The surface heat transfer models used in the code include a Gaussian beam or uniform laser source, and a free electron theory reflectance calculation. Temperature-dependent material parameters are used in the reflectance calculation. Measured cold reflection data are used to include surface roughness or oxide effects until melt occurs, after which the surface is assumed to be smooth and clean. Blackbody reradiation and a simple natural convection model are also included in the upper surface boundary condition. Either an implicit or explicit finite-difference representation of the heat conduction equation in an enthalpy form is solved at each time step. This enables phase transition energies to be easily and accurately incorporated into the formulation. Temperature-dependent 9second-order polynominal dependence) thermal conductivities are used in the conduction calculations. Constant values of specific heat are used for each material phase. At present, material properties for six metals are included in the code. These are: aluminium, nickel, steel, molybdenum, copper and silicon

  9. Accurate Energy Consumption Modeling of IEEE 802.15.4e TSCH Using Dual-BandOpenMote Hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneels, Glenn; Municio, Esteban; Van de Velde, Bruno; Ergeerts, Glenn; Weyn, Maarten; Latré, Steven; Famaey, Jeroen

    2018-02-02

    The Time-Slotted Channel Hopping (TSCH) mode of the IEEE 802.15.4e amendment aims to improve reliability and energy efficiency in industrial and other challenging Internet-of-Things (IoT) environments. This paper presents an accurate and up-to-date energy consumption model for devices using this IEEE 802.15.4e TSCH mode. The model identifies all network-related CPU and radio state changes, thus providing a precise representation of the device behavior and an accurate prediction of its energy consumption. Moreover, energy measurements were performed with a dual-band OpenMote device, running the OpenWSN firmware. This allows the model to be used for devices using 2.4 GHz, as well as 868 MHz. Using these measurements, several network simulations were conducted to observe the TSCH energy consumption effects in end-to-end communication for both frequency bands. Experimental verification of the model shows that it accurately models the consumption for all possible packet sizes and that the calculated consumption on average differs less than 3% from the measured consumption. This deviation includes measurement inaccuracies and the variations of the guard time. As such, the proposed model is very suitable for accurate energy consumption modeling of TSCH networks.

  10. A thermal conductivity model for U-­Si compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    U3Si2 is a candidate for accident tolerant nuclear fuel being developed as an alternative to UO2 in commercial light water reactors (LWRs). One of its main benefits compared to UO2 is higher thermal conductivity that increases with temperature. This increase is contrary to UO2, for which the thermal conductivity decreases with temperature. The reason for the difference is the electronic origin of thermal conductivity in U3Si2, as compared to the phonon mechanism responsible for thermal transport in UO2. The phonon thermal conductivity in UO2 is unusually low for a fluorite oxide due to the strong interaction with the spins in the paramagnetic phase. The thermal conductivity of U3Si2 as well as other U-­Si compounds has been measured experimentally [1-­4]. However, for fuel performance simulations it is also critical to model the degradation of the thermal conductivity due to damage and microstructure evolution caused by the reactor environment (irradiation and high temperature). For UO2 this reduction is substantial and it has been the topic of extensive NEAMS research resulting in several publications [5, 6]. There are no data or models for the evolution of the U3Si2 thermal conductivity under irradiation. We know that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of UO2 (semi-conductor) and U3Si2 (metal) are very different, and we do not necessarily expect the dependence on damage to be the same either, which could present another advantage for the silicide fuel. In this report we summarize the first step in developing a model for the thermal conductivity of U-­Si compounds with the goal of capturing the effect of damage in U3Si2. Next year, we will focus on lattice damage. We will also attempt to assess the impact of fission gas bubbles.

  11. Modeling conductive cooling for thermally stressed dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremedhin, Kifle G; Wu, Binxin; Perano, K

    2016-02-01

    Conductive cooling, which is based on direct contact between a cow lying down and a cooled surface (water mattress, or any other heat exchanger embedded under the bedding), allows heat transfer from the cow to the cooled surface, and thus alleviate heat stress of the cow. Conductive cooling is a novel technology that has the potential to reduce the consumption of energy and water in cooling dairy cows compared to some current practices. A three-dimensional conduction model that simulates cooling thermally-stressed dairy cows was developed. The model used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method to characterize the air-flow field surrounding the animal model. The flow field was obtained by solving the continuity and the momentum equations. The heat exchange between the animal and the cooled water mattress as well as between the animal and ambient air was determined by solving the energy equation. The relative humidity was characterized using the species transport equation. The conduction 3-D model was validated against experimental temperature data and the agreement was very good (average error is 4.4% and the range is 1.9-8.3%) for a mesh size of 1117202. Sensitivity analyses were conducted between heat losses (sensible and latent) with respect to air temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, and level of wetness of skin surface to determine which of the parameters affect heat flux more than others. Heat flux was more sensitive to air temperature and level of wetness of the skin surface and less sensitive to relative humidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermal conductivity model of vibro-packed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon Soo, Kim

    2001-01-01

    In an effort to dispose of excess weapons grade plutonium accumulated in the cold war era in the United States and the Russian Federation, one method currently under investigation is the conversion of the plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) reactor fuel for LWRs and fast reactors in the Russian Federation. A fuel option already partly developed at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Dimitrovgrad is that of vibro-packed MOX. Fuel rod fabrication using powder vibro-packing is attractive because it includes neither a process too complex to operate in glove boxes (or remotely), nor a waste-producing step necessary for the conventional pellet rod fabrication. However, because of its loose bonding between fuel particles at the beginning of life, vibro-packed MOX fuel has a somewhat less effective thermal conductivity than fully sintered pellet fuel, and undergoes more restructuring. Helium would also likely be pressurized in vibro-packed MOX fuel rods for LWRs to enhance initial fuel thermal conductivity. The combination of these two factors complicates development of an accurate thermal conductivity model. But clearly in order to predict fuel thermomechanical responses during irradiation of vibro-packed MOX fuel, fuel thermal conductivity must be known. The Vibropac fuel of interest in this study refers the fuel that is compacted with irregular fragments of mixed oxide fuel. In this paper, the thermal-conductivity models in the literature that dealt with relatively similar situations to the present case are examined. Then, the best model is selected based on accuracy of prediction and applicability. Then, the selected model is expanded to fit the various situations of interest. (author)

  13. Band nesting, massive Dirac fermions, and valley Landé and Zeeman effects in transition metal dichalcogenides: A tight-binding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, Maciej; Korkusiński, Marek; Szulakowska, Ludmiła; Potasz, Paweł; Ozfidan, Isil; Hawrylak, Paweł

    2018-02-01

    We present here the minimal tight-binding model for a single layer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) MX 2(M , metal; X , chalcogen) which illuminates the physics and captures band nesting, massive Dirac fermions, and valley Landé and Zeeman magnetic field effects. TMDCs share the hexagonal lattice with graphene but their electronic bands require much more complex atomic orbitals. Using symmetry arguments, a minimal basis consisting of three metal d orbitals and three chalcogen dimer p orbitals is constructed. The tunneling matrix elements between nearest-neighbor metal and chalcogen orbitals are explicitly derived at K ,-K , and Γ points of the Brillouin zone. The nearest-neighbor tunneling matrix elements connect specific metal and sulfur orbitals yielding an effective 6 ×6 Hamiltonian giving correct composition of metal and chalcogen orbitals but not the direct gap at K points. The direct gap at K , correct masses, and conduction band minima at Q points responsible for band nesting are obtained by inclusion of next-neighbor Mo-Mo tunneling. The parameters of the next-nearest-neighbor model are successfully fitted to MX 2(M =Mo ; X =S ) density functional ab initio calculations of the highest valence and lowest conduction band dispersion along K -Γ line in the Brillouin zone. The effective two-band massive Dirac Hamiltonian for MoS2, Landé g factors, and valley Zeeman splitting are obtained.

  14. A model study of tunneling conductance spectra of ferromagnetically ordered manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Saswati; Kar, J. K.; Rout, G. C.

    2018-02-01

    We report here the interplay of ferromagnetism (FM) and charge density wave (CDW) in manganese oxide systems through the study of tunneling conductance spectra. The model Hamiltonian consists of strong Heisenberg coupling in core t2g band electrons within mean-field approximation giving rise to ferromagnetism. Ferromagnetism is induced in the itinerant eg electrons due to Kubo-Ohata type double exchange (DE) interaction among the t2g and eg electrons. The charge ordering (CO) present in the eg band giving rise to CDW interaction is considered as the extra-mechanism to explain the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) property of manganites. The magnetic and CDW order parameters are calculated using Zubarev's Green's function technique and solved self-consistently and numerically. The eg electron density of states (DOS) calculated from the imaginary part of the Green's function explains the experimentally observed tunneling conductance spectra. The DOS graph exhibits a parabolic gap near the Fermi energy as observed in tunneling conductance spectra experiments.

  15. Atomistic Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.; Sundararaghavan, Veera

    2016-05-01

    The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for epoxy/single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) nanocomposites. An epoxy network of DGEBA-DDS was built using the `dendrimer' growth approach, and conductivity was computed by taking into account long-range Coulombic forces via a k-space approach. Thermal conductivity was calculated in the direction perpendicular to, and along the SWNT axis for functionalized and pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. The thermal conductivity of the long, pristine SWNT/epoxy system is equivalent to that of an isolated SWNT along its axis, but there was a 27% reduction perpendicular to the nanotube axis. The functionalized, long SWNT/epoxy system had a very large increase in thermal conductivity along the nanotube axis (~700%), as well as the directions perpendicular to the nanotube (64%). The discontinuous nanotubes displayed an increased thermal conductivity along the SWNT axis compared to neat epoxy (103-115% for the pristine SWNT/epoxy, and 91-103% for functionalized SWNT/epoxy system). The functionalized system also showed a 42% improvement perpendicular to the nanotube, while the pristine SWNT/epoxy system had no improvement over epoxy. The thermal conductivity tensor is averaged over all possible orientations to see the effects of randomly orientated nanotubes, and allow for experimental comparison. Excellent agreement is seen for the discontinuous, pristine SWNT/epoxy nanocomposite. These simulations demonstrate there exists a threshold of the SWNT length where the best improvement for a composite system with randomly oriented nanotubes would transition from pristine SWNTs to functionalized SWNTs.

  16. Simple Predictive Models for Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Technosands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of technosands (gravel-free, coarse sands with negligible organic matter content) is important for irrigation and drainage management of athletic fields and golf courses. In this study, we developed two simple models for predicting Ks......-Rammler particle size distribution (PSD) function. The Ks and PSD data of 14 golf course sands from literature as well as newly measured data for a size fraction of Lunar Regolith Simulant, packed at three different dry bulk densities, were used for model evaluation. The pore network tortuosity......-connectivity parameter (m) obtained for pure coarse sand after fitting to measured Ks data was 1.68 for both models and in good agreement with m values obtained from recent solute and gas diffusion studies. Both the modified K-C and R-C models are easy to use and require limited parameter input, and both models gave...

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Dielectric Characteristics of the Metallic Band Inclusion Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the desirable properties of functional materials used in various electrical and radio physical equipment and devices, dielectric characteristics, including relative permittivity (hereinafter, permittivity are of importance. The permittivity requirements can be met when a composite with a particular combination of its matrix characteristics and inclusions [1, 2, 3] is used as a functional material. The use of metallic inclusions extends a variation range of dielectric characteristics of the composite, and thereby enhances its application. The composite structure, form of inclusions, and their volume concentration has a significant impact on the permittivity.One of the composite structure embodiments is a dispersion system when in the dispersion medium (in this case | in the composite matrix a dispersed phase (inclusions with highly extended interface between them [4] is distributed. There can be various forms of dispersed inclusions. Band is one of the possible forms of inclusion when its dimensions in three orthogonal directions are significantly different among themselves. For such inclusion, a tri-axial ellipsoid can be taken as an acceptable geometric model to describe its form. This model can be used, in particular, to describe the form of nanostructured elements, which recently are considered as inclusions for advanced composites for various purposes [5].With raising volume concentration of metal inclusions in the dielectric matrix composite there is an increasing probability of direct contact between the inclusions resulting in continuous conductive cluster [3, 6]. In this paper, it is assumed that metal band inclusions are covered with a sufficiently thin layer of the electrically insulating material, eliminating the possibility of direct contact and precluding consideration of the so-called percolation effect [2, 7] in the entire interval of the expectedly changing volume concentration of electrically ellipsoidal inclusions. The

  18. A model for the direct-to-indirect band-gap transition in monolayer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A monolayer of MoSe2 is found to be a direct band-gap semiconductor. We show, ... In order to determine appropriate basis for the tight-binding model, the Mo and Se ..... RD thanks the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research.

  19. Predicting superdeformed rotational band-head spin in A ∼ 190 mass region using variable moment of inertia model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uma, V.S.; Goel, Alpana; Yadav, Archana; Jain, A.K.

    2016-01-01

    The band-head spin (I 0 ) of superdeformed (SD) rotational bands in A ∼ 190 mass region is predicted using the variable moment of inertia (VMI) model for 66 SD rotational bands. The superdeformed rotational bands exhibited considerably good rotational property and rigid behaviour. The transition energies were dependent on the prescribed band-head spins. The ratio of transition energies over spin Eγ/ 2 I (RTEOS) vs. angular momentum (I) have confirmed the rigid behaviour, provided the band-head spin value is assigned correctly. There is a good agreement between the calculated and the observed transition energies. This method gives a very comprehensive interpretation for spin assignment of SD rotational bands which could help in designing future experiments for SD bands. (author)

  20. Excitation model of pacemaker cardiomyocytes of cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2015-11-01

    Myocardium includes typical and atypical cardiomyocytes - pacemakers, which form the cardiac conduction system. Excitation from the atrioventricular node in normal conditions is possible only in one direction. Retrograde direction of pulses is impossible. The most important prerequisite for the work of cardiomyocytes is the anatomical integrity of the conduction system. Changes in contractile force of the cardiomyocytes, which appear periodically, are due to two mechanisms of self-regulation - heterometric and homeometric. Graphic course of the excitation pulse propagation along the heart muscle more accurately reveals the understanding of the arrhythmia mechanism. These models have the ability to visualize the essence of excitation dynamics. However, they do not have the proper forecasting function for result estimation. Integrative mathematical model enables further investigation of general laws of the myocardium active behavior, allows for determination of the violation mechanism of electrical and contractile function of cardiomyocytes. Currently, there is no full understanding of the topography of pacemakers and ionic mechanisms. There is a need for the development of direction of mathematical modeling and comparative studies of the electrophysiological arrangement of cells of atrioventricular connection and ventricular conduction system.

  1. Modeling and Simulating Asymmetrical Conductance Changes in Gramicidin Pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Shixin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gramicidin A is a small and well characterized peptide that forms an ion channel in lipid membranes. An important feature of gramicidin A (gA pore is that its conductance is affected by the electric charges near the its entrance. This property has led to the application of gramicidin A as a biochemical sensor for monitoring and quantifying a number of chemical and enzymatic reactions. Here, a mathematical model of conductance changes of gramicidin A pores in response to the presence of electrical charges near its entrance, either on membrane surface or attached to gramicidin A itself, is presented. In this numerical simulation, a two dimensional computational domain is set to mimic the structure of a gramicidin A channel in the bilayer surrounded by electrolyte. The transport of ions through the channel is modeled by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP equations that are solved by Finite Element Method (FEM. Preliminary numerical simulations of this mathematical model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results in the literature. In addition to the model and simulations, we also present the analysis of the stability of the solution to the boundary conditions and the convergence of FEM method for the two dimensional PNP equations in our model.

  2. The effect of band Jahn-Teller distortion on the magnetoresistivity of manganites: a model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rout, G C; Panda, Saswati; Behera, S N

    2011-01-01

    We present a model study of magnetoresistance through the interplay of magnetisation, structural distortion and external magnetic field for the manganite systems. The manganite system is described by the Hamiltonian which consists of the s-d type double exchange interaction, Heisenberg spin-spin interaction among the core electrons, and the static and dynamic band Jahn-Teller (JT) interaction in the e g band. The relaxation time of the e g electron is found from the imaginary part of the Green's function using the total Hamiltonian consisting of the interactions due to the electron and phonon. The calculated resistivity exhibits a peak in the pure JT distorted insulating phase separating the low temperature metallic ferromagnetic phase and the high temperature paramagnetic phase. The resistivity is suppressed with the increase of the external magnetic field. The e g electron band splitting and its effect on magnetoresistivity is reported here. (paper)

  3. The effect of band Jahn-Teller distortion on the magnetoresistivity of manganites: a model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, G C [Condensed Matter Physics Group, P G Department of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F M University, Balasore 756 019 (India); Panda, Saswati [Trident Academy of Technology, F2/A, Chandaka Industrial Estate, Bhubaneswar 751 024 (India); Behera, S N, E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in, E-mail: saswatip7@gmail.com [National Institute of Science and Technology, Palur Hills, Berhampur 761 008 (India)

    2011-10-05

    We present a model study of magnetoresistance through the interplay of magnetisation, structural distortion and external magnetic field for the manganite systems. The manganite system is described by the Hamiltonian which consists of the s-d type double exchange interaction, Heisenberg spin-spin interaction among the core electrons, and the static and dynamic band Jahn-Teller (JT) interaction in the e{sub g} band. The relaxation time of the e{sub g} electron is found from the imaginary part of the Green's function using the total Hamiltonian consisting of the interactions due to the electron and phonon. The calculated resistivity exhibits a peak in the pure JT distorted insulating phase separating the low temperature metallic ferromagnetic phase and the high temperature paramagnetic phase. The resistivity is suppressed with the increase of the external magnetic field. The e{sub g} electron band splitting and its effect on magnetoresistivity is reported here. (paper)

  4. Topological model of composite fermions in the cyclotron band generator picture: New insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staśkiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    A combinatorial group theory in the braid groups is correlated with the unusual "anyon" statistic of particles in 2D Hall system in the fractional quantum regime well. On this background has been derived cyclotron band generator as a modification and generalization band generator, first established to solve the word and conjugacy problems in the braid group terms. Topological commensurability condition has been embraced by canonical factors - like, based on the concept of parallel descending cycles. Owing to this we can mathematically capture the general hierarchy of correlated states in the lowest Landau level, describing the fractional quantum Hall effect hierarchy, in terms of cyclotron band generators, especially for those being beyond conventional composite fermions model. It has been also shown that cyclotron braid subgroups, developed for interpretation of Laughlin correlations, are a special case of the right-angled Artin groups.

  5. Two-band model with off-diagonal occupation dependent hopping rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawadowski, A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper two-band hopping model is treated on a two-dimensional square lattice. The atoms are located at the corners and the middles of the edges of the squares. In addition to the strongly overlapping orbitals of the atoms, there are extra orbitals at the corners, which are weakly hybridized. The assumption is made that the Fermi level is inside the broad band and is every near to the narrow band formed by the extra orbitals. The hamiltonian is Hubbard type, but the off-diagonal part of the two-site interaction t is kept also where one creation or annihilation operator acts on the extra orbital and the others on one of its neighbors. The weak coupling t is enhanced by the on-site Coulomb repulsion at the corners, which enhancement is a power function of the ratio of the broad band width and the narrow bank position measured from the Fermi level. That enhancement is obtained by summation of logarithmic Kondo-type corrections of orbital origin, which reflects the formation of a ground state of new type with strong orbital and spin correlations. Interaction between the particles of the broad band is generated by processes with one heavy and one light particle in the intermediate state

  6. Optimizing a gap conductance model applicable to VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahgoshay, M.; Hashemi-Tilehnoee, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two known conductance models for application in VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic code are examined. ► An optimized gap conductance model is developed which can predict the gap conductance in good agreement with FSAR data. ► The licensed thermal–hydraulic code is coupled with the gap conductance model predictor externally. -- Abstract: The modeling of gap conductance for application in VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic codes is addressed. Two known models, namely CALZA-BINI and RELAP5 gap conductance models, are examined. By externally linking of gap conductance models and COBRA-EN thermal hydraulic code, the acceptable range of each model is specified. The result of each gap conductance model versus linear heat rate has been compared with FSAR data. A linear heat rate of about 9 kW/m is the boundary for optimization process. Since each gap conductance model has its advantages and limitation, the optimized gap conductance model can predict the gap conductance better than each of the two other models individually.

  7. Modeling and experimental studies of a side band power re-injection locked magnetron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi; Yuan, Ping; Zhu, Hua-Cheng; Huang, Ka-Ma; Yang, Yang

    2016-12-01

    A side band power re-injection locked (SBPRIL) magnetron is presented in this paper. A tuning stub is placed between the external injection locked (EIL) magnetron and the circulator. Side band power of the EIL magnetron is reflected back to the magnetron. The reflected side band power is reused and pulled back to the central frequency. A phase-locking model is developed from circuit theory to explain the process of reuse of side band power in SBPRIL magnetron. Theoretical analysis proves that the side band power is pulled back to the central frequency of the SBPRIL magnetron, then the amplitude of the RF voltage increases and the phase noise performance is improved. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of a 10-vane continuous wave (CW) magnetron model is presented. Computer simulation predicts that the frequency spectrum’s peak of the SBPRIL magnetron has an increase of 3.25 dB compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise performance at the side band offset reduces 12.05 dB for the SBPRIL magnetron. Besides, the SBPRIL magnetron experiment is presented. Experimental results show that the spectrum peak rises by 14.29% for SBPRIL magnetron compared with the free running magnetron. The phase noise reduces more than 25 dB at 45-kHz offset compared with the free running magnetron. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB328902) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61501311).

  8. Conductive solar wind models in rapidly diverging flow geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, T.E.; Leer, E.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed parameter study of conductive models of the solar wind has been carried out, extending the previous similar studies of Durney (1972) and Durney and Hundhausen (1974) by considering collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction, rapidly diverging flow geometries, and the structure of solutions for the entire n 0 -T 0 plane (n 0 and T 0 are the coronal base density and temperature). Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the complex effects of the physical processes operative in conductive solar wind models. There are five points of particular interest that have arisen from the study: (1) neither collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction nor rapidly diverging flow geometries can significantly increase the solar wind speed at 1 AU; (2) there exists a firm upper limit on the coronal base temperature consistent with observed values of the coronal base pressure and solar wind mass flux density; (3) the principal effect of rapidly diverging flow geometries is a decrease in the solar wind mass flux density at 1 AU and an increase in the mass flux density at the coronal base; (4) collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction can lead to a solar wind flow speed that either increases or decreases with increasing coronal base density (n 0 ) and temperature (T 0 , depending on the region of the n 0 -T 0 plane considered; (5) there is a region of the n 0 -T/sub o/ plane at high coronal base densities where low-speed, high-mass-flux, transonic solar wind flows exist: a region not previously considered

  9. Valence Band Structure of InAs1-xBix and InSb1-xBix Alloy Semiconductors Calculated Using Valence Band Anticrossing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Samajdar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The valence band anticrossing model has been used to calculate the heavy/light hole and spin-orbit split-off energies in InAs1-xBix and InSb1-xBix alloy systems. It is found that both the heavy/light hole, and spin-orbit split E+ levels move upwards in energy with an increase in Bi content in the alloy, whereas the split E− energy for the holes shows a reverse trend. The model is also used to calculate the reduction of band gap energy with an increase in Bi mole fraction. The calculated values of band gap variation agree well with the available experimental data.

  10. A mathematical model for the deformation of the eyeball by an elastic band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Stephen L; Propst, Georg; Stadler, Georg; Wackernagel, Werner

    2009-06-01

    In a certain kind of eye surgery, the human eyeball is deformed sustainably by the application of an elastic band. This article presents a mathematical model for the mechanics of the combined eye/band structure along with an algorithm to compute the model solutions. These predict the immediate and the lasting indentation of the eyeball. The model is derived from basic physical principles by minimizing a potential energy subject to a volume constraint. Assuming spherical symmetry, this leads to a two-point boundary-value problem for a non-linear second-order ordinary differential equation that describes the minimizing static equilibrium. By comparison with laboratory data, a preliminary validation of the model is given.

  11. Anomaly in the band centre of the one-dimensional Anderson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, M.; Wegner, F.

    1981-03-01

    We calculate the density of states and various characteristic lengths of the one-dimensional Anderson model in the limit of weak disorder. All these quantities show anomalous fluctuations near the band centre. This has already been observed for the density of states in a different model by Gorkov and Dorokhov, and is in close agreement with a Monte-Carlo calculation for the localization length by Czycholl, Kramer and Mac-Kinnon.

  12. High-Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating Shear Banding and Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-22

    High Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating Shear Banding and Fracture The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12. DISTRIBUTION AVAILIBILITY STATEMENT 6. AUTHORS...Report as of 05-Dec-2017 Agreement Number: W911NF-13-1-0238 Organization: Columbia University Title: High Strain Rate Failure Modeling Incorporating

  13. A model for gap conductance in nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyalka, S.K.

    1982-01-01

    Computation of nuclear reactor fuel behavior under normal and off-normal conditions is influenced by gap conductance models. These models should provide accurate results for heat transfer for arbitrary gap widths and gas mixtures and should be based on considerations of the kinetic theory of gases. There has been considerable progress in the study of heat transfer in a simple gas for arbitrary Knudsen numbers (Kn = l/similar to d, where l is a meanfree-path and similar d is the gap width) in recent years. Using these recent results, a simple expression for heat transfer in a gas mixture (enclosed between parallel plates) for an arbitrary Knudsen number has been constructed, and a new model for gap conductance has been proposed. The latter reproduces the free molecular (small gap, Kn >> 1) and the jump limits (large gaps, Kn << 1) correctly, and it provides fairly accurate results for arbitrary gap widths. The new model is suitable for use in large fuel behavior computer programs

  14. Current amplification models of sensorineurall and conductive hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostojić Sanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main function of a hearing aid is to improve auditory and language abilities of hearing impaired users. The amplification model has to be adapted according to age, degree and type of hearing loss. The goal of this paper is to analyze the current amplification models of sensorineural and conductive hearing loss which can provide a high quality of speech perception and sounds at any degree of hearing loss. The BAHA is a surgically implantable system for treatment of conductive hearing loss that works through direct bone conduction. BAHA is used to help people with chronic ear infections, congenital external auditory canal atresia and single sided deafness who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. The last generation of hearing aid for sensorineural hearing loss is cochlear implant. Bimodal amplification improves binaural hearing. Hearing aids alone do not make listening easier in all situations. The things that can interfere with listening are background noises, distance from a sound and reverberation or echo. The device used most often today is the Frequency Modulated (FM system.

  15. Overview of thermal conductivity models of anisotropic thermal insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurikhin, A. V.; Kostanovsky, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, the most of existing materials and substances under elaboration are anisotropic. It makes certain difficulties in the study of heat transfer process. Thermal conductivity of the materials can be characterized by tensor of the second order. Also, the parallelism between the temperature gradient vector and the density of heat flow vector is violated in anisotropic thermal insulation materials (TIM). One of the most famous TIM is a family of integrated thermal insulation refractory material («ITIRM»). The main component ensuring its properties is the «inflated» vermiculite. Natural mineral vermiculite is ground into powder state, fired by gas burner for dehydration, and its precipitate is then compressed. The key feature of thus treated batch of vermiculite is a package structure. The properties of the material lead to a slow heating of manufactured products due to low absorption and high radiation reflection. The maximum of reflection function is referred to infrared spectral region. A review of current models of heat propagation in anisotropic thermal insulation materials is carried out, as well as analysis of their thermal and optical properties. A theoretical model, which allows to determine the heat conductivity «ITIRM», can be useful in the study of thermal characteristics such as specific heat capacity, temperature conductivity, and others. Materials as «ITIRM» can be used in the metallurgy industry, thermal energy and nuclear power-engineering.

  16. X-band COSMO-SkyMed wind field retrieval, with application to coastal circulation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Montuori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, X-band COSMO-SkyMed© synthetic aperture radar (SAR wind field retrieval is investigated, and the obtained data are used to force a coastal ocean circulation model. The SAR data set consists of 60 X-band Level 1B Multi-Look Ground Detected ScanSAR Huge Region COSMO-SkyMed© SAR data, gathered in the southern Tyrrhenian Sea during the summer and winter seasons of 2010. The SAR-based wind vector field estimation is accomplished by resolving both the SAR-based wind speed and wind direction retrieval problems independently. The sea surface wind speed is retrieved by means of a SAR wind speed algorithm based on the azimuth cut-off procedure, while the sea surface wind direction is provided by means of a SAR wind direction algorithm based on the discrete wavelet transform multi-resolution analysis. The obtained wind fields are compared with ground truth data provided by both ASCAT scatterometer and ECMWF model wind fields. SAR-derived wind vector fields and ECMWF model wind data are used to construct a blended wind product regularly sampled in both space and time, which is then used to force a coastal circulation model of a southern Tyrrhenian coastal area to simulate wind-driven circulation processes. The modeling results show that X-band COSMO-SkyMed© SAR data can be valuable in providing effective wind fields for coastal circulation modeling.

  17. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  18. 8-band and 14-band kp modeling of electronic band structure and material gain in Ga(In)AsBi quantum wells grown on GaAs and InP substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Wartak, M. S. [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland); Department of Physics and Computer Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3C5 (Canada); Kudrawiec, R. [Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology, Wybrzeze Wyspianskiego 27, 50-370 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2015-08-07

    The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for GaAsBi/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) with various bismuth concentrations (Bi ≤ 15%) within the 8-band and 14-band kp models. The 14-band kp model was obtained by extending the standard 8-band kp Hamiltonian by the valence band anticrossing (VBAC) Hamiltonian, which is widely used to describe Bi-related changes in the electronic band structure of dilute bismides. It has been shown that in the range of low carrier concentrations n < 5 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}, material gain spectra calculated within 8- and 14-band kp Hamiltonians are similar. It means that the 8-band kp model can be used to calculate material gain in dilute bismides QWs. Therefore, it can be applied to analyze QWs containing new dilute bismides for which the VBAC parameters are unknown. Thus, the energy gap and electron effective mass for Bi-containing materials are used instead of VBAC parameters. The electronic band structure and material gain have been calculated for 8 nm wide GaInAsBi QWs on GaAs and InP substrates with various compositions. In these QWs, Bi concentration was varied from 0% to 5% and indium concentration was tuned in order to keep the same compressive strain (ε = 2%) in QW region. For GaInAsBi/GaAs QW with 5% Bi, gain peak was determined to be at about 1.5 μm. It means that it can be possible to achieve emission at telecommunication windows (i.e., 1.3 μm and 1.55 μm) for GaAs-based lasers containing GaInAsBi/GaAs QWs. For GaInAsBi/Ga{sub 0.47}In{sub 0.53}As/InP QWs with 5% Bi, gain peak is predicted to be at about 4.0 μm, i.e., at the wavelengths that are not available in current InP-based lasers.

  19. TiO 2 Conduction Band Modulation with In 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers in Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-11-21

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to grow subnanometer indium oxide recombination barriers in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on the spiro-OMeTAD hole-transport material (HTM) and the WN1 donor-π-acceptor organic dye. While optimal device performance was achieved after 3-10 ALD cycles, 15 ALD cycles (∼2 Å of In2O 3) was observed to be optimal for increasing open-circuit voltage (VOC) with an average improvement of over 100 mV, including one device with an extremely high VOC of 1.00 V. An unexpected phenomenon was observed after 15 ALD cycles: the increasing VOC trend reversed, and after 30 ALD cycles VOC dropped by over 100 mV relative to control devices without any In2O3. To explore possible causes of the nonmonotonic behavior resulting from In2O3 barrier layers, we conducted several device measurements, including transient photovoltage experiments and capacitance measurements, as well as density functional theory (DFT) studies. Our results suggest that the VOC gains observed in the first 20 ALD cycles are due to both a surface dipole that pulls up the TiO2 conduction band and recombination suppression. After 30 ALD cycles, however, both effects are reversed: the surface dipole of the In2O3 layer reverses direction, lowering the TiO 2 conduction band, and mid-bandgap states introduced by In 2O3 accelerate recombination, leading to a reduced V OC. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, J.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock

  1. Channel Model on Various Frequency Bands for Wearable Body Area Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Norihiko; Takizawa, Kenichi; Aoyagi, Takahiro; Takada, Jun-Ichi; Li, Huan-Bang; Kohno, Ryuji

    Body Area Network (BAN) is considered as a promising technology in supporting medical and healthcare services by combining with various biological sensors. In this paper, we look at wearable BAN, which provides communication links among sensors on body surface. In order to design a BAN that manages biological information with high efficiency and high reliability, the propagation characteristics of BAN must be thoroughly investigated. As a preliminary effort, we measured the propagation characteristics of BAN at frequency bands of 400MHz, 600MHz, 900MHz and 2400MHz respectively. Channel models for wearable BAN based on the measurement were derived. Our results show that the channel model can be described by using a path loss model for all frequency bands investigated.

  2. Copper nano composites functionalized by bis-benzimidazole diamide ligand: Effect of size, co-anion dependent conductivity and band gap studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singla, Manisha; Mohapatra, Subash Chandra; Ahmad, Sharif

    2012-01-01

    Copper (I) and copper (II) nano composites capped with a bis-benzimidazole diamide ligand were prepared by reverse micelle method and characterized using CHNS, FTIR, 1 H NMR, TEM and DLS studies. All particles were spherical ranging between 10 and 70 nm. They displayed a quasi reversible redox wave due to the Cu (II)/Cu (I) reduction process. The E g1 ′ values shift anodically as NO 3 − − − . Electrochemical HOMO and LUMO band gap (E g1 ′ ) for the nano composites were +1.80 (NO 3 − ), +2.80 (Cl − ) and +4.10 (SCN − ) eV, respectively. However, the optical band gap (E g1 ) for the nano composites was calculated from their absorption edges and lie between 1.77 and 4.13 eV. Fluorescence studies reveal that nano composites in themselves behave as an enhancer and quencher in respect to ligand, Quantum yield (φ) is varying from 0.008 to 0.02 photon. The activation energies range from 34 to 54 kJ mol −1 and are quite low in comparison to that of the free bis-benzimidazole diamide ligand (137 kJ mol −1 ). The lower activation energies further re-emphasize the nano size of these composites. At room temperature, the dc conductivity lies between 1 × 10 −4 –9.33 × 10 −4 S cm −1 [NO 3 − > SCN − > Cl − ] indicating them to be on the semiconductor insulator interface. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and the ac conductivity were measured for all nano at room temperature and below the room temperature for the nano composite containing nitrate as co-anion. The conductivity was found to follow the correlated barrier hopping (CBH) mechanism; the exponent factor (s) varies from 0.5 to 1. -- Highlights: ► Nano composites of copper, capped by bis benzimidazole diamide ligand. ► Such copper nano composites have not been used in conductivity studies before. ► Conductance studies for these thus make this work unique. ► The dc conductivity of these composites is much higher than normal.

  3. LBM estimation of thermal conductivity in meso-scale modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grucelski, A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there is a growing engineering interest in more rigorous prediction of effective transport coefficients for multicomponent, geometrically complex materials. We present main assumptions and constituents of the meso-scale model for the simulation of the coal or biomass devolatilisation with the Lattice Boltzmann method. For the results, the estimated values of the thermal conductivity coefficient of coal (solids), pyrolytic gases and air matrix are presented for a non-steady state with account for chemical reactions in fluid flow and heat transfer. (paper)

  4. Modeling and conduct of turbine missile concrete impact experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodfin, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The overall objective of the subject experiments was to provide full scale data on the response of reinforced concrete containment walls to impact and penetration by postulated turbine-produced missiles. These data can be used to validate analytical or scale modeling methods and to assess the applicability of current design formulas to penetration by large, irregularly shaped missiles. These data and results will be used in providing more realistic estimates of turbine missile damage probability in nuclear power plants with a non-peninsula arrangement. This paper describes the derivation of the test matrix and the method of conducting the experiments. (orig./HP)

  5. Universality for 1d Random Band Matrices: Sigma-Model Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, Mariya; Shcherbina, Tatyana

    2018-02-01

    The paper continues the development of the rigorous supersymmetric transfer matrix approach to the random band matrices started in (J Stat Phys 164:1233-1260, 2016; Commun Math Phys 351:1009-1044, 2017). We consider random Hermitian block band matrices consisting of W× W random Gaussian blocks (parametrized by j,k \\in Λ =[1,n]^d\\cap Z^d ) with a fixed entry's variance J_{jk}=δ _{j,k}W^{-1}+β Δ _{j,k}W^{-2} , β >0 in each block. Taking the limit W→ ∞ with fixed n and β , we derive the sigma-model approximation of the second correlation function similar to Efetov's one. Then, considering the limit β , n→ ∞, we prove that in the dimension d=1 the behaviour of the sigma-model approximation in the bulk of the spectrum, as β ≫ n , is determined by the classical Wigner-Dyson statistics.

  6. Adjustment of Conduction Band Edge of Compact TiO2 Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells Through TiCl4 Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takurou N; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Funaki, Takashi; Cojocaru, Ludmila; Kazaoui, Said; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Segawa, Hiroshi

    2017-10-25

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) without a mesoporous TiO 2 layer, that is, planar-type PSCs exhibit poorer cell performance as compared to PSCs with a porous TiO 2 layer, owing to inefficient electron transfer from the perovskite layer to the compact TiO 2 layer in the former case. The matching of the conduction band levels of perovskite and the compact TiO 2 layer is thus essential for enhancing PSC performance. In this study, we demonstrate the shifting of the conduction band edge (CBE) of the compact TiO 2 layer through a TiCl 4 treatment, with the aim of improving PSC performance. The CBE of the compact TiO 2 layer was shifted to a higher level through the TiCl 4 treatment and then shifted in the opposite direction, that is, to a lower level, through a subsequent heat treatment. These shifts in the CBE were reflected in the PSC performance. The TiCl 4 -treated PSC showed an increase in the open-circuit voltage of more than 150 mV, as well as a decrease of 100 mV after being heated at 450 °C. On the other hand, the short-circuit current decreased after the treatment but increased after heating at temperatures higher than 300 °C. The treated PSC subjected to subsequent heating at 300 °C exhibited the best performance, with the power conversion efficiency of the PSC being 17% under optimized conditions.

  7. Relaxation model of radiation-induced conductivity in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhutayeva, Yu. R.; Khatipov, S. A.

    1999-05-01

    The paper suggests a relaxation model of radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) in polymers. According to the model, the transfer of charges generated in the polymer volume by ionizing radiation takes place with the participation of molecular relaxation processes. The mechanism of electron transport consists in the transfer of the charge directly between traps when they draw close to one another due to the rotation of macromolecule segments. The numerical solutions of the corresponding kinetic equations for different distribution functions Q( τ) of the times of molecular relaxation and for different functions of the probability P( τ, τ') of charge transfer in the `overlapping' regions of the diffusion spheres of the segments are analyzed. The relaxation model provides an explanation of the non-Arrhenius behavior of the RIC temperature dependence, the power dependence of RIC on the dose rate with a power index in the interval 0.5-1.0, the appearance of maxima in the curves of the RIC temporal dependence and their irreversible character in the region of large dose rates (more than 1 Gy/s). The model can be used for interpreting polymer RIC in conditions of kinetic mobility of macromolecules.

  8. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, J; Decker, V; Hendrickson, L; Markiewicz, T W; Partridge, R; Seryi, Andrei

    2004-01-01

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system.

  9. Vibration Stabilization of a Mechanical Model of a X-Band Linear Collider Final Focus Magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, Josef; Chang, Allison; Decker, Valentin; Doyle, Eric; Eriksson, Leif; Hendrickson, Linda; Himel, Thomas; Markiewicz, Thomas; Partridge, Richard; Seryi, Andrei; SLAC

    2006-01-01

    The small beam sizes at the interaction point of a X-band linear collider require mechanical stabilization of the final focus magnets at the nanometer level. While passive systems provide adequate performance at many potential sites, active mechanical stabilization is useful if the natural or cultural ground vibration is higher than expected. A mechanical model of a room temperature linear collider final focus magnet has been constructed and actively stabilized with an accelerometer based system

  10. Totally Asymmetric Limit for Models of Heat Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Leonardo; Gabrielli, Davide

    2017-08-01

    We consider one dimensional weakly asymmetric boundary driven models of heat conduction. In the cases of a constant diffusion coefficient and of a quadratic mobility we compute the quasi-potential that is a non local functional obtained by the solution of a variational problem. This is done using the dynamic variational approach of the macroscopic fluctuation theory (Bertini et al. in Rev Mod Phys 87:593, 2015). The case of a concave mobility corresponds essentially to the exclusion model that has been discussed in Bertini et al. (J Stat Mech L11001, 2010; Pure Appl Math 64(5):649-696, 2011; Commun Math Phys 289(1):311-334, 2009) and Enaud and Derrida (J Stat Phys 114:537-562, 2004). We consider here the convex case that includes for example the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) model and its dual (KMPd) (Kipnis et al. in J Stat Phys 27:6574, 1982). This extends to the weakly asymmetric regime the computations in Bertini et al. (J Stat Phys 121(5/6):843-885, 2005). We consider then, both microscopically and macroscopically, the limit of large externalfields. Microscopically we discuss some possible totally asymmetric limits of the KMP model. In one case the totally asymmetric dynamics has a product invariant measure. Another possible limit dynamics has instead a non trivial invariant measure for which we give a duality representation. Macroscopically we show that the quasi-potentials of KMP and KMPd, which are non local for any value of the external field, become local in the limit. Moreover the dependence on one of the external reservoirs disappears. For models having strictly positive quadratic mobilities we obtain instead in the limit a non local functional having a structure similar to the one of the boundary driven asymmetric exclusion process.

  11. Wave propagation model of heat conduction and group speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long; Zhang, Xiaomin; Peng, Song

    2018-03-01

    In view of the finite relaxation model of non-Fourier's law, the Cattaneo and Vernotte (CV) model and Fourier's law are presented in this work for comparing wave propagation modes. Independent variable translation is applied to solve the partial differential equation. Results show that the general form of the time spatial distribution of temperature for the three media comprises two solutions: those corresponding to the positive and negative logarithmic heating rates. The former shows that a group of heat waves whose spatial distribution follows the exponential function law propagates at a group speed; the speed of propagation is related to the logarithmic heating rate. The total speed of all the possible heat waves can be combined to form the group speed of the wave propagation. The latter indicates that the spatial distribution of temperature, which follows the exponential function law, decays with time. These features show that propagation accelerates when heated and decelerates when cooled. For the model media that follow Fourier's law and correspond to the positive heat rate of heat conduction, the propagation mode is also considered the propagation of a group of heat waves because the group speed has no upper bound. For the finite relaxation model with non-Fourier media, the interval of group speed is bounded and the maximum speed can be obtained when the logarithmic heating rate is exactly the reciprocal of relaxation time. And for the CV model with a non-Fourier medium, the interval of group speed is also bounded and the maximum value can be obtained when the logarithmic heating rate is infinite.

  12. About the free electron model in electric conduction of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, C.

    1991-01-01

    In the model proposed by Drude to describe, among others, the electric conduction in metals, it is supposed that electrons move freely in the material with a time interval between encounters T and a probability distribution g(t). The name, 'electron pause time', will be assigned to the time T with that probability distribution. The calculations made by Drude turned out to be erroneous. The error can be corrected observing that the random variable 'pause time' appearing in this intuitive idea is not the previously defined random variable T, 'electron pause time', but another random variable S, which will be called 'observed pause time' whose probability density is Csg(s), where C is a normalization constant. With this distribution, the characteristics of the distribution, q(u), of the wait time can be obtained. (Author) [es

  13. Cross-band noise model refinement for transform domain Wyner–Ziv video coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2012-01-01

    TDWZ video coding trails that of conventional video coding solutions, mainly due to the quality of side information, inaccurate noise modeling and loss in the final coding step. The major goal of this paper is to enhance the accuracy of the noise modeling, which is one of the most important aspects...... influencing the coding performance of DVC. A TDWZ video decoder with a novel cross-band based adaptive noise model is proposed, and a noise residue refinement scheme is introduced to successively update the estimated noise residue for noise modeling after each bit-plane. Experimental results show...... that the proposed noise model and noise residue refinement scheme can improve the rate-distortion (RD) performance of TDWZ video coding significantly. The quality of the side information modeling is also evaluated by a measure of the ideal code length....

  14. An integrated approach to model strain localization bands in magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxevanakis, K. P.; Mo, C.; Cabal, M.; Kontsos, A.

    2018-02-01

    Strain localization bands (SLBs) that appear at early stages of deformation of magnesium alloys have been recently associated with heterogeneous activation of deformation twinning. Experimental evidence has demonstrated that such "Lüders-type" band formations dominate the overall mechanical behavior of these alloys resulting in sigmoidal type stress-strain curves with a distinct plateau followed by pronounced anisotropic hardening. To evaluate the role of SLB formation on the local and global mechanical behavior of magnesium alloys, an integrated experimental/computational approach is presented. The computational part is developed based on custom subroutines implemented in a finite element method that combine a plasticity model with a stiffness degradation approach. Specific inputs from the characterization and testing measurements to the computational approach are discussed while the numerical results are validated against such available experimental information, confirming the existence of load drops and the intensification of strain accumulation at the time of SLB initiation.

  15. Magnetic Chern bands and triplon Hall effect in an extended Shastry-Sutherland model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, M.; Schmidt, K. P.

    2017-05-01

    We study topological properties of one-triplon bands in an extended Shastry-Sutherland model relevant for the frustrated quantum magnet SrCu2(BO3)2 . To this end perturbative continuous unitary transformations are applied about the isolated dimer limit allowing us to calculate the one-triplon dispersion up to high order in various couplings including intra- and interdimer Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions and a general uniform magnetic field. We determine the Berry curvature and the Chern number of the different one-triplon bands. We demonstrate the occurrence of Chern numbers ±1 and ±2 for the case that two components of the magnetic field are finite. Finally, we also calculate the triplon Hall effect arising at finite temperatures.

  16. Fermi surface changes in dilute magnesium alloys: a pseudopotential band structure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been used to study the Fermi surface of pure magnesium and its dilute alloys containing lithium and indium. The quantum oscillations in magnetization were detected by means of a torque magnetometer in magnetic field up to 36 kilogauss and temperature range of 4.2 0 to 1.7 0 K. The results provide information on the effects of lithium and indium solutes on the Fermi surface of magnesium in changes of extremal cross sections and effective masses as well as the relaxation times associated with the orbits. The nonlocal pseudopotential model proposed by Kimball, Stark and Mueller has been fitted to the Fermi surface of magnesium and extended to include the dilute alloys, fitting all the observed de Haas-van Alphen frequencies with an accuracy of better than 1 percent. A modified rigid band interpretation including both Fermi energy and local band edge changes computed from the model, gives an overall satisfactory description of the observed frequency shifts. With the pseudo-wavefunctions provided by the nonlocal model, the relaxation times in terms of Dingle temperatures for several orbits have been predicted using Sorbello's multiple-plane-wave phase shift model. The calculation with phase shifts obtained from a model potential yields a greater anisotropy than has been observed experimentally, while a two-parameter phase shift model provides a good fit to the experimental results

  17. Some Effective Tight-Binding Models for Electrons in DNA Conduction: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, H.; Iguchi, K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum transport for DNA conduction has been widely studied with interest in application as a candidate in making nanowires as well as interest in the scientific mechanism. In this paper, we review recent works concerning the electronic states and the conduction/transfer in DNA polymers. We have mainly investigated the energy-band structure and the correlation effects of localization property in the two- and three-chain systems (ladder model) with long-range correlation as a simple model for electronic property in a double strand of DNA by using the tight-bindingmodel. In addition, we investigated the localization properties of electronic states in several actual DNA sequences such as bacteriophages of Escherichia coli, human-chromosome 22, compared with those of the artificial disordered sequences with correlation. The charge-transfer properties for poly(dA)-poly(dT) and poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA polymers are also presented in terms of localization lengths within the frameworks of the polaron models due to the coupling between the charge carriers and the lattice vibrations of the double strand of DNA

  18. Soil Moisture Estimate under Forest using a Semi-empirical Model at P-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, M.; Saatchi, S.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper we show the potential of a semi-empirical algorithm to retrieve soil moisture under forests using P-band polarimetric SAR data. In past decades, several remote sensing techniques have been developed to estimate the surface soil moisture. In most studies associated with radar sensing of soil moisture, the proposed algorithms are focused on bare or sparsely vegetated surfaces where the effect of vegetation can be ignored. At long wavelengths such as L-band, empirical or physical models such as the Small Perturbation Model (SPM) provide reasonable estimates of surface soil moisture at depths of 0-5cm. However for densely covered vegetated surfaces such as forests, the problem becomes more challenging because the vegetation canopy is a complex scattering environment. For this reason there have been only few studies focusing on retrieving soil moisture under vegetation canopy in the literature. Moghaddam et al. developed an algorithm to estimate soil moisture under a boreal forest using L- and P-band SAR data. For their studied area, double-bounce between trunks and ground appear to be the most important scattering mechanism. Thereby, they implemented parametric models of radar backscatter for double-bounce using simulations of a numerical forest scattering model. Hajnsek et al. showed the potential of estimating the soil moisture under agricultural vegetation using L-band polarimetric SAR data and using polarimetric-decomposition techniques to remove the vegetation layer. Here we use an approach based on physical formulation of dominant scattering mechanisms and three parameters that integrates the vegetation and soil effects at long wavelengths. The algorithm is a simplification of a 3-D coherent model of forest canopy based on the Distorted Born Approximation (DBA). The simplified model has three equations and three unknowns, preserving the three dominant scattering mechanisms of volume, double-bounce and surface for three polarized backscattering

  19. Thin inclusion approach for modelling of heterogeneous conducting materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Nikolay; Smirnova, Alevtina; Gorgun, Haluk; Sammes, Nigel

    Experimental data show that heterogeneous nanostructure of solid oxide and polymer electrolyte fuel cells could be approximated as an infinite set of fiber-like or penny-shaped inclusions in a continuous medium. Inclusions can be arranged in a cluster mode and regular or random order. In the newly proposed theoretical model of nanostructured material, the most attention is paid to the small aspect ratio of structural elements as well as to some model problems of electrostatics. The proposed integral equation for electric potential caused by the charge distributed over the single circular or elliptic cylindrical conductor of finite length, as a single unit of a nanostructured material, has been asymptotically simplified for the small aspect ratio and solved numerically. The result demonstrates that surface density changes slightly in the middle part of the thin domain and has boundary layers localized near the edges. It is anticipated, that contribution of boundary layer solution to the surface density is significant and cannot be governed by classic equation for smooth linear charge. The role of the cross-section shape is also investigated. Proposed approach is sufficiently simple, robust and allows extension to either regular or irregular system of various inclusions. This approach can be used for the development of the system of conducting inclusions, which are commonly present in nanostructured materials used for solid oxide and polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC) materials.

  20. Numerical modeling of thermal conductive heating in fractured bedrock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Daniel P; Falta, Ronald W; Kueper, Bernard H

    2010-01-01

    Numerical modeling was employed to study the performance of thermal conductive heating (TCH) in fractured shale under a variety of hydrogeological conditions. Model results show that groundwater flow in fractures does not significantly affect the minimum treatment zone temperature, except near the beginning of heating or when groundwater influx is high. However, fracture and rock matrix properties can significantly influence the time necessary to remove all liquid water (i.e., reach superheated steam conditions) in the treatment area. Low matrix permeability, high matrix porosity, and wide fracture spacing can contribute to boiling point elevation in the rock matrix. Consequently, knowledge of these properties is important for the estimation of treatment times. Because of the variability in boiling point throughout a fractured rock treatment zone and the absence of a well-defined constant temperature boiling plateau in the rock matrix, it may be difficult to monitor the progress of thermal treatment using temperature measurements alone. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  1. Rain effect on Aquarius L-band Emissivity and Backscatter Model Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Fore, A.; Neumann, G.; Hayashi, A.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing of sea surface salinity (SSS) is being performed by Aquarius and SMOS missions, which are using L-band radiometry to sense the microwave emissions from sea surfaces. To enable accurate SSS retrieval, it is essential to correct the impact of sea surface roughness on L-band brightness temperatures. In addition, the impact of rain has to be carefully assessed and accounted for. Although the atmospheric attenuation caused by raindrops are likely negligible at 1.4GHz, other factors must be considered because they may have indirect but important contribution to the surface roughness and consequently L-band brightness temperatures. For example, the wind speed dependent roughness correction will be corrupted when rain striking the water, creating rings, stalks, and crowns from which the signal scatters. It is also unknown how long the freshwater stays at surface while through the oceanic mixing process at various regions over global oceans. We collocated the Aquarius L-band data with various wind products, including SSM/I, NCEP, ASCAT and WindSAT, as well as the SSM/I and WindSAT rain products. During the first four months of Aquarius mission, near 1.9 million pixels are identified under rain conditions by either SSM/I or WindSAT. We derived the L-band emissivity and backscatter geophysical model functions (GMF), parameterized by SSM/I and NCEP winds for rain-free conditions. However, the residual ocean surface emissivity (the Aquarius measured minus the rain-free model predictions) reveals profound resemblance with global precipitation pattern. In region dominated by rain, e.g. ITCZ, northern hemisphere storm track, and Indian Ocean partially under the influence of summer monsoon, the GMF built using rain free data underestimates excess emissivity about 0.5 to 1 K. The dependence of residual of emissivity and backscatter is shown as a function of wind speed and rain rate. A modified GMF is developed including rain rate as one of the parameters. Due to

  2. Oxygen reduction kinetics on mixed conducting SOFC model cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, F.S.

    2006-07-01

    The kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction at the surface of mixed conducting solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes is one of the main limiting factors to the performance of these promising systems. For ''realistic'' porous electrodes, however, it is usually very difficult to separate the influence of different resistive processes. Therefore, a suitable, geometrically well-defined model system was used in this work to enable an unambiguous distinction of individual electrochemical processes by means of impedance spectroscopy. The electrochemical measurements were performed on dense thin film microelectrodes, prepared by PLD and photolithography, of mixed conducting perovskite-type materials. The first part of the thesis consists of an extensive impedance spectroscopic investigation of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.8Fe0.2O3 (LSCF) microelectrodes. An equivalent circuit was identified that describes the electrochemical properties of the model electrodes appropriately and enables an unambiguous interpretation of the measured impedance spectra. Hence, the dependencies of individual electrochemical processes such as the surface exchange reaction on a wide range of experimental parameters including temperature, dc bias and oxygen partial pressure could be studied. As a result, a comprehensive set of experimental data has been obtained, which was previously not available for a mixed conducting model system. In the course of the experiments on the dc bias dependence of the electrochemical processes a new and surprising effect was discovered: It could be shown that a short but strong dc polarisation of a LSCF microelectrode at high temperature improves its electrochemical performance with respect to the oxygen reduction reaction drastically. The electrochemical resistance associated with the oxygen surface exchange reaction, initially the dominant contribution to the total electrode resistance, can be reduced by two orders of magnitude. This &apos

  3. Modeling of a Robust Confidence Band for the Power Curve of a Wind Turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Wilmar; Méndez, Alfredo; Maldonado-Correa, Jorge L; Balleteros, Francisco

    2016-12-07

    Having an accurate model of the power curve of a wind turbine allows us to better monitor its operation and planning of storage capacity. Since wind speed and direction is of a highly stochastic nature, the forecasting of the power generated by the wind turbine is of the same nature as well. In this paper, a method for obtaining a robust confidence band containing the power curve of a wind turbine under test conditions is presented. Here, the confidence band is bound by two curves which are estimated using parametric statistical inference techniques. However, the observations that are used for carrying out the statistical analysis are obtained by using the binning method, and in each bin, the outliers are eliminated by using a censorship process based on robust statistical techniques. Then, the observations that are not outliers are divided into observation sets. Finally, both the power curve of the wind turbine and the two curves that define the robust confidence band are estimated using each of the previously mentioned observation sets.

  4. Bayesian Model Averaging of Artificial Intelligence Models for Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiri, A.; Chitsazan, N.; Tsai, F. T.; Asghari Moghaddam, A.

    2012-12-01

    This research presents a Bayesian artificial intelligence model averaging (BAIMA) method that incorporates multiple artificial intelligence (AI) models to estimate hydraulic conductivity and evaluate estimation uncertainties. Uncertainty in the AI model outputs stems from error in model input as well as non-uniqueness in selecting different AI methods. Using one single AI model tends to bias the estimation and underestimate uncertainty. BAIMA employs Bayesian model averaging (BMA) technique to address the issue of using one single AI model for estimation. BAIMA estimates hydraulic conductivity by averaging the outputs of AI models according to their model weights. In this study, the model weights were determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) that follows the parsimony principle. BAIMA calculates the within-model variances to account for uncertainty propagation from input data to AI model output. Between-model variances are evaluated to account for uncertainty due to model non-uniqueness. We employed Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic (TS-FL), artificial neural network (ANN) and neurofuzzy (NF) to estimate hydraulic conductivity for the Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran. BAIMA combined three AI models and produced better fitting than individual models. While NF was expected to be the best AI model owing to its utilization of both TS-FL and ANN models, the NF model is nearly discarded by the parsimony principle. The TS-FL model and the ANN model showed equal importance although their hydraulic conductivity estimates were quite different. This resulted in significant between-model variances that are normally ignored by using one AI model.

  5. Fast integration-based prediction bands for ordinary differential equation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Helge; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; Kaschek, Daniel

    2016-04-15

    To gain a deeper understanding of biological processes and their relevance in disease, mathematical models are built upon experimental data. Uncertainty in the data leads to uncertainties of the model's parameters and in turn to uncertainties of predictions. Mechanistic dynamic models of biochemical networks are frequently based on nonlinear differential equation systems and feature a large number of parameters, sparse observations of the model components and lack of information in the available data. Due to the curse of dimensionality, classical and sampling approaches propagating parameter uncertainties to predictions are hardly feasible and insufficient. However, for experimental design and to discriminate between competing models, prediction and confidence bands are essential. To circumvent the hurdles of the former methods, an approach to calculate a profile likelihood on arbitrary observations for a specific time point has been introduced, which provides accurate confidence and prediction intervals for nonlinear models and is computationally feasible for high-dimensional models. In this article, reliable and smooth point-wise prediction and confidence bands to assess the model's uncertainty on the whole time-course are achieved via explicit integration with elaborate correction mechanisms. The corresponding system of ordinary differential equations is derived and tested on three established models for cellular signalling. An efficiency analysis is performed to illustrate the computational benefit compared with repeated profile likelihood calculations at multiple time points. The integration framework and the examples used in this article are provided with the software package Data2Dynamics, which is based on MATLAB and freely available at http://www.data2dynamics.org helge.hass@fdm.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  6. Transmission line model and fields analysis of metamaterial absorber in the terahertz band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qi-Ye; Xie, Yun-Song; Zhang, Huai-Wu; Yang, Qing-Hui; Li, Yuan-Xun; Liu, Ying-Li

    2009-10-26

    Metamaterial (MM) absorber is a novel device to provide near-unity absorption to electromagnetic wave, which is especially important in the terahertz (THz) band. However, the principal physics of MM absorber is still far from being understood. In this work, a transmission line (TL) model for MM absorber was proposed, and with this model the S-parameters, energy consumption, and the power loss density of the absorber were calculated. By this TL model, the asymmetric phenomenon of THz absorption in MM absorber is unambiguously demonstrated, and it clarifies that strong absorption of this absorber under studied is mainly related to the LC resonance of the split-ring-resonator structure. The distribution of power loss density in the absorber indicates that the electromagnetic wave is firstly concentrated into some specific locations of the absorber and then be strongly consumed. This feature as electromagnetic wave trapper renders MM absorber a potential energy converter. Based on TL model, some design strategies to widen the absorption band were also proposed for the purposes to extend its application areas.

  7. Pattern solutions of the Klausmeier Model for banded vegetation in semi-arid environments I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    In many semi-arid environments, vegetation cover is sparse, and is self-organized into large-scale spatial patterns. In particular, banded vegetation is typical on hillsides. Mathematical modelling is widely used to study these banded patterns, and many models are effectively extensions of a coupled reaction–diffusion–advection system proposed by Klausmeier (1999 Science 284 1826–8). However, there is currently very little mathematical theory on pattern solutions of these equations. This paper is the first in a series whose aim is a comprehensive understanding of these solutions, which can act as a springboard both for future simulation-based studies of the Klausmeier model, and for analysis of model extensions. The author focusses on a particular part of parameter space, and derives expressions for the boundaries of the parameter region in which patterns occur. The calculations are valid to leading order at large values of the 'slope parameter', which reflects a comparison of the rate of water flow downhill with the rate of vegetation dispersal. The form of the corresponding patterns is also studied, and the author shows that the leading order equations change close to one boundary of the parameter region in which there are patterns, leading to a homoclinic solution. Conclusions are drawn on the way in which changes in mean annual rainfall affect pattern properties, including overall biomass productivity

  8. Finite-range Coulomb gas models of banded random matrices and quantum kicked rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Akhilesh; Kumar, Avanish; Puri, Sanjay

    2017-11-01

    Dyson demonstrated an equivalence between infinite-range Coulomb gas models and classical random matrix ensembles for the study of eigenvalue statistics. We introduce finite-range Coulomb gas (FRCG) models via a Brownian matrix process, and study them analytically and by Monte Carlo simulations. These models yield new universality classes, and provide a theoretical framework for the study of banded random matrices (BRMs) and quantum kicked rotors (QKRs). We demonstrate that, for a BRM of bandwidth b and a QKR of chaos parameter α, the appropriate FRCG model has the effective range d=b^{2}/N=α^{2}/N, for large N matrix dimensionality. As d increases, there is a transition from Poisson to classical random matrix statistics.

  9. Coexistence of spherical states with deformed and superdeformed bands in doubly magic 40Ca; A shell model challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2007-02-01

    Large scale shell model calculations, with dimensions reaching 10 9 , are carried out to describe the recently observed deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) bands based on the first and second excited 0 + states of 40 Ca at 3.35 MeV and 5.21 MeV respectively. A valence space comprising two major oscillator shells, sd and pf, can accommodate most of the relevant degrees of freedom of this problem. The ND band is dominated by configurations with four particles promoted to the pf-shell (4p-4h in short). The SD band by 8p-8h configurations. The ground state of 40 Ca is strongly correlated, but the closed shell still amounts to 65%. The energies of the bands are very well reproduced by the calculations. The out-band transitions connecting the SD band with other states are very small and depend on the details of the mixing among the different np-nh configurations, in spite of that, the calculation describes them reasonably. For the in-band transition probabilities along the SD band, we predict a fairly constant transition quadrupole moment Q 0 (t) ∼ 70 e fm 2 up to J=10, that decreases toward the higher spins. We submit also that the J=8 states of the deformed and superdeformed band are maximally mixed. (authors)

  10. Coexistence of spherical states with deformed and superdeformed bands in doubly magic 40Ca: A shell-model challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale shell-model calculations, with dimensions reaching 10 9 , are carried out to describe the recently observed deformed (ND) and superdeformed (SD) bands based on the first and second excited 0 + states of 40 Ca at 3.35 and 5.21 MeV, respectively. A valence space comprising two major oscillator shells, sd and pf, can accommodate most of the relevant degrees of freedom of this problem. The ND band is dominated by configurations with four particles promoted to the pf shell (4p-4h in short). The SD band by 8p-8h configurations. The ground state of 40 Ca is strongly correlated, but the closed shell still amounts to 65%. The energies of the bands are very well reproduced by the calculations. The out-band transitions connecting the SD band with other states are very small and depend on the details of the mixing among the different np-nh configurations; in spite of that, the calculation describes them reasonably. For the in-band transition probabilities along the SD band, we predict a fairly constant transition quadrupole moment Q 0 (t)∼170 e fm 2 up to J=10 that decreases toward the higher spins. We submit also that the J=8 states of the deformed and superdeformed bands are maximally mixed

  11. Evaluation of SAR in a human body model due to wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tsuchida, Shogo; Hirata, Akimasa; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    This study discusses a computational method for calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) due to a wireless power transmission system in the 10 MHz frequency band. A two-step quasi-static method comprised of the method of moments and the scalar potential finite-difference method are proposed. The applicability of the quasi-static approximation for localized exposure in this frequency band is discussed by comparing the SAR in a lossy dielectric cylinder computed with a full-wave electromagnetic analysis and the quasi-static approximation. From the computational results, the input impedance of the resonant coils was affected by the existence of the cylinder. On the other hand, the magnetic field distribution in free space and considering the cylinder and an impedance matching circuit were in good agreement; the maximum difference in the amplitude of the magnetic field was 4.8%. For a cylinder–coil distance of 10 mm, the difference between the peak 10 g averaged SAR in the cylinder computed with the full-wave electromagnetic method and our quasi-static method was 7.8%. These results suggest that the quasi-static approach is applicable for conducting the dosimetry of wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band. With our two-step quasi-static method, the SAR in the anatomically based model was computed for different exposure scenarios. From those computations, the allowable input power satisfying the limit of a peak 10 g averaged SAR of 2.0 W kg −1 was 830 W in the worst case exposure scenario with a coil positioned at a distance of 30 mm from the chest. (paper)

  12. Evaluation of SAR in a human body model due to wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tsuchida, Shogo; Hirata, Akimasa; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    2012-08-07

    This study discusses a computational method for calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) due to a wireless power transmission system in the 10 MHz frequency band. A two-step quasi-static method comprised of the method of moments and the scalar potential finite-difference method are proposed. The applicability of the quasi-static approximation for localized exposure in this frequency band is discussed by comparing the SAR in a lossy dielectric cylinder computed with a full-wave electromagnetic analysis and the quasi-static approximation. From the computational results, the input impedance of the resonant coils was affected by the existence of the cylinder. On the other hand, the magnetic field distribution in free space and considering the cylinder and an impedance matching circuit were in good agreement; the maximum difference in the amplitude of the magnetic field was 4.8%. For a cylinder-coil distance of 10 mm, the difference between the peak 10 g averaged SAR in the cylinder computed with the full-wave electromagnetic method and our quasi-static method was 7.8%. These results suggest that the quasi-static approach is applicable for conducting the dosimetry of wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band. With our two-step quasi-static method, the SAR in the anatomically based model was computed for different exposure scenarios. From those computations, the allowable input power satisfying the limit of a peak 10 g averaged SAR of 2.0 W kg(-1) was 830 W in the worst case exposure scenario with a coil positioned at a distance of 30 mm from the chest.

  13. A linear two-layer model for flat-band shift in irradiated MOS devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchill, J N; Holstrom, F E; Collins, T W [International Business Machines Corp., San Jose, Calif. (USA)

    1976-04-01

    A closed-form mathematical expression is derived for the flat-band shift as a function of gate bias during electron irradiation. The model assumes that the charge in the oxide consists of charged layers of variable thickness at each of the two interfaces, depending on voltage polarity and magnitude. The region of extreme linearity which has been observed by numerous investigators and which normally occurs for the relatively small values of gate bias voltages fits this closed-form solution. Analytical results compare favourably with data obtained from 500 to 700 A thick oxides and with other previously published data.

  14. Numerical modelling of high efficiency InAs/GaAs intermediate band solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Ali; Jiang, Jianliang; Eric, Debora; Yousaf, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) intermediate band solar cells (IBSC) are the most attractive candidates for the next generation of photovoltaic applications. In this paper, theoretical model of InAs/GaAs device has been proposed, where we have calculated the effect of variation in the thickness of intrinsic and IB layer on the efficiency of the solar cell using detailed balance theory. IB energies has been optimized for different IB layers thickness. Maximum efficiency 46.6% is calculated for IB material under maximum optical concentration.

  15. Enhanced persistent red luminescence in Mn2+-doped (Mg,Zn)GeO3 by electron trap and conduction band engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yumiko; Kayumi, Tomohiro; Ueda, Jumpei; Tanabe, Setsuhisa

    2018-05-01

    The effect of Zn substitution on the persistent luminescence properties of MgGeO3:Mn2+-Ln3+ (Ln = Eu and Yb) red phosphors was investigated. The intensity of the persistent luminescence of the Eu3+ co-doped phosphors increased with increasing Zn content, whereas that of the Yb3+ co-doped samples decreased. For both series of lanthanide co-doped samples, the thermoluminescence (TL) glow peak shifted to the lower temperature side with increasing Zn content. These persistent luminescence properties were well explained in terms of lowering of the bottom of the conduction band relative to the ground state of the divalent lanthanide ions. Especially, in Eu3+ co-doped system, TL peak shifted from 520 K to 318 K by 50% Zn substitution. The persistent radiance of the (Mg0.5 Zn0.5)GeO3: Mn2+-Eu3+ sample at 1 h after ceasing UV light was 46 times stronger than that of MgGeO3:Mn2+-Eu3+, and 11 times stronger than that of ZnGa2O4: Cr3+ standard deep red persistent phosphor.

  16. Band-structure-based collisional model for electronic excitations in ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M.N.; Gravielle, M.S.; Alducin, M.; Silkin, V.M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2005-01-01

    Energy loss per unit path in grazing collisions with metal surfaces is studied by using the collisional and dielectric formalisms. Within both theories we make use of the band-structure-based (BSB) model to represent the surface interaction. The BSB approach is based on a model potential and provides a precise description of the one-electron states and the surface-induced potential. The method is applied to evaluate the energy lost by 100 keV protons impinging on aluminum surfaces at glancing angles. We found that when the realistic BSB description of the surface is used, the energy loss obtained from the collisional formalism agrees with the dielectric one, which includes not only binary but also plasmon excitations. The distance-dependent stopping power derived from the BSB model is in good agreement with available experimental data. We have also investigated the influence of the surface band structure in collisions with the Al(100) surface. Surface-state contributions to the energy loss and electron emission probability are analyzed

  17. Specific heat of MgB2 in a one- and a two-band model from first-principles calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubov, A.A.; Dolgov, O.V.; Jepsen, O.; Kong, Y.; Andersen, O.K.; Gibson, B.J.; Ahn, K.; Kremer, R.K.; Kortus, J.

    2002-01-01

    The heat capacity anomaly at the transition to superconductivity of the layered superconductor MgB 2 is compared to first-principles calculations with the Coulomb repulsion, μ*, as the only parameter which is fixed to give the measured T c . We solve the Eliashberg equations for both an isotropic one-band model and a two-band model with different superconducting gaps on the π-band anσd-band Fermi surfaces. The agreement with experiments is considerably better for the two-band model than for the one-band model. (author)

  18. Modeling of thermal conductivity of nanofluids by modifying Maxwell’s equation using cell model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Siddharth; Chauhan, K. Prashanth; Kanagaraj, S.

    2011-01-01

    Nanofluid is an innovative heat transfer fluid with superior potential for enhancing the heat transfer performance of conventional fluids. Though many attempts have been made to investigate the abnormal high thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the existing models cannot precisely predict the same. An attempt has been made to develop a model for predicting the thermal conductivity of different types of nanofluids. The model presented here is derived based on the fact that thermal conductivity of nanofluids depends on thermal conductivity of particle and fluid as well as micro-convective heat transfer due to Brownian motion of nanoparticles. Novelty of the article lies in giving a unique equation which predicts thermal conductivity of nanofluids for different concentrations and particle sizes which also correctly predicts the trends observed in experimental data over a wide range of particle sizes, temperatures, and particle concentrations.

  19. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-BAND DETECTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES WITH MARKOVIAN MODELING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollmer, B.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M.; Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch.; Van Driel, W.; Sabatini, S.; MacArthur, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings—typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg 2 in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered ∼20% more mock LSB galaxies and ∼40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of 90% is

  20. Generalized One-Band Model Based on Zhang-Rice Singlets for Tetragonal CuO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, I. J.; Manuel, L. O.; Aligia, A. A.

    2018-04-01

    Tetragonal CuO (T-CuO) has attracted attention because of its structure similar to that of the cuprates. It has been recently proposed as a compound whose study can give an end to the long debate about the proper microscopic modeling for cuprates. In this work, we rigorously derive an effective one-band generalized t -J model for T-CuO, based on orthogonalized Zhang-Rice singlets, and make an estimative calculation of its parameters, based on previous ab initio calculations. By means of the self-consistent Born approximation, we then evaluate the spectral function and the quasiparticle dispersion for a single hole doped in antiferromagnetically ordered half filled T-CuO. Our predictions show very good agreement with angle-resolved photoemission spectra and with theoretical multiband results. We conclude that a generalized t -J model remains the minimal Hamiltonian for a correct description of single-hole dynamics in cuprates.

  1. On a business cycle model with fractional derivative under narrow-band random excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zifei; Li, Jiaorui; Li, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes the dynamics of a business cycle model with fractional derivative of order  α (0 < α < 1) subject to narrow-band random excitation, in which fractional derivative describes the memory property of the economic variables. Stochastic dynamical system concepts are integrated into the business cycle model for understanding the economic fluctuation. Firstly, the method of multiple scales is applied to derive the model to obtain the approximate analytical solution. Secondly, the effect of economic policy with fractional derivative on the amplitude of the economic fluctuation and the effect on stationary probability density are studied. The results show macroeconomic regulation and control can lower the stable amplitude of economic fluctuation. While in the process of equilibrium state, the amplitude is magnified. Also, the macroeconomic regulation and control improves the stability of the equilibrium state. Thirdly, how externally stochastic perturbation affects the dynamics of the economy system is investigated.

  2. Characterizing the dependence of vegetation model parameters on crop structure, incidence angle, and polarization at L-band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneron, J-P.; Pardé, M.; Waldteufel, P.

    2004-01-01

    To retrieve soil moisture over vegetation-covered areas from microwave radiometry, it is necessary to account for vegetation effects. At L-band, many retrieval approaches are based on a simple model that relies on two vegetation parameters: the optical depth (tau) and the single-scattering albedo......, wheat, grass, and alfalfa) based on L-band experimental datasets. The results should be useful for developing more accurate forward modeling and retrieval methods over mixed pixels including a variety of vegetation types....

  3. Pushing the pseudo-SU(3) model towards its limits: Excited bands in even-even Dy isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Hirsch, Jorge G.

    2004-01-01

    The energetics of states belonging to normal parity bands in even-even dysprosium isotopes, and their B(E2) transition strengths, are studied using an extended pseudo-SU(3) shell model. States with pseudospin 1 are added to the standard pseudospin 0 space, allowing for a proper description of known excited normal parity bands. A realistic Hamiltonian is employed. Both the success of model and its limitations are discussed

  4. Application of the Tor Vergata Scattering Model to L Band Backscatter During the Corn Growth Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; ONeill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Gish, T.

    2010-01-01

    At the USDA's Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE3) experimental site in Beltsville, Maryland, USA) a field campaign took place throughout the 2002 corn growth cycle from May 10th (emergence of corn crops) to October 2nd (harvest). One of the microwave instruments deployed was the multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) quad-polarized (HH, HV, VV, VH) NASA GSFC/George Washington University (GWU) truck mounted radar. During the field campaign, this radar system provided once a week fully polarized C- and L-band (4.75 and 1.6 GHz) backscatter measurements from incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees. In support of microwave observations, an extensive ground characterization took place, which included measurements of surface roughness, soil moisture, vegetation biomass and morphology. The field conditions during the campaign are characterized by several dry downs with a period of drought in the month of August. Peak biomass the corn canopies was reached on July 24th with a total biomass of approximately 6.5 kg/sq m. This dynamic range in both soil moisture and vegetation conditions within the data set is ideal for the validation of discrete medium vegetation scattering models. In this study, we compare the L band backscatter measurements with simulations by the Tor Vergata model (ferrazzoli and Guerriero 1996). The measured soil moisture, vegetation biomass and most reliably measured vegetation morphological parameters (e.g. number of leaves, number of stems and stem height) were used as input for the Tor Vergata model. The more uncertain model parameters (e.g. surface roughness, leaf thickness) and the stem diameter were optimized using a parameter estimation routine based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. As cost function for this optimization, the HH and VV polarized backscatter measured and stimulated by the TOR Vergata model for incidence angle of 15, 35, and 55 degrees were used (6 measurements in total). The calibrated

  5. Study of gap conductance model for thermo mechanical fully coupled finite element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Cha; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2012-01-01

    A light water reactor (LWR) fuel rod consists of zirconium alloy cladding and uranium dioxide pellets, with a slight gap between them. Therefore, the mechanical integrity of zirconium alloy cladding is the most critical issue, as it is an important barrier for fission products released into the environment. To evaluate the stress and strain of the cladding during operation, fuel performance codes with a one-dimensional (1D) approach have been reported since the 1970s. However, it is difficult for a 1D model to simulate the stress and strain of the cladding accurately owing to a lack of degree of freedom. A LWR fuel performance code should include thermo-mechanical coupled model owing to the existence of the fuel-cladding gap. Generally, the gap that is filled with helium gas results in temperature drop along radius direction. The gap conductance that determines temperature gradient within the gap is very sensitive to gap thickness. For instance, once the gap size increases up to several microns in certain region, difference of surface temperatures increases up to 100 Kelvin. Therefore, iterative thermo-mechanical coupled analysis is required to solve temperature distribution throughout pellet and cladding. Consequently, the Finite Element (FE) module, which can simulate a higher degree of freedom numerically, is an indispensable requirement to understand the thermomechanical behavior of cladding. FRAPCON-3, which is reliable performance code, has iterative loop for thermo-mechanical coupled calculation to solve 1D gap conductance model. In FEMAXI-III, 1D thermal analysis module and FE module for stress-strain analysis were separated. 1D thermal module includes iterative analysis between them. DIONISIO code focused on thermal contact model as function of surface roughness and contact pressure when the gap is closed. In previous works, gap conductance model has been developed only for 1D model or hybrid model (1D and FE). To simulate temperature, stress and strain

  6. Band alignment in organic devices: Photoemission studies of model oligomers on In2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, R. I. R.; Duschek, R.; Koller, G.; Netzer, F. P.; Ramsey, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The interfaces of In 2 O 3 , a model for indium - tin - oxide (ITO), with benzene, thiophene, and benzaldehyde, models for technologically important organic molecules, are studied using angle resolved ultraviolet photoemission and work function measurements. Band alignment diagrams for hypothetical Al/organic/ITO devices have been drawn, using values determined from this work and previously published studies of these molecules on Al(111). The similarity between the bonding of benzene and thiophene on Al(111) and In 2 O 3 , i.e., largely electrostatic, leads to near identical alignment at both metal and oxide interfaces. This indicates that clean Al and ITO will make a very poor electron/hole injecting pair. We suggest that the apparent efficiency of Al as an electron injecting contact in real devices is due to the presence of oxygen at the Al/organic interface. For benzaldehyde the interaction with In 2 O 3 is largely electrostatic, in contrast to the covalent bonds formed on Al(111). This leads to very different alignment at the Al and oxide interfaces, showing the importance of the particular organic - inorganic interaction in determining band alignment. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  7. Conductivity modeling of gas sensors based on copper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this work is to study the electronic conductivity of copper ... applications, such as gas sensors [11 - 13], catalysts [14], solar cells [15], .... solid systems and adopted to examine the mechanism of the adsorption process [38].

  8. Fractional model for heat conduction in polar bear hairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qing-Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-fractional differential equations can accurately describe heat conduction in fractal media, such as wool fibers, goose down and polar bear hair. The fractional complex transform is used to convert time-fractional heat conduction equations with the modified Riemann-Liouville derivative into ordinary differential equations, and exact solutions can be easily obtained. The solution process is straightforward and concise.

  9. Anisotropic modelling of the electrical conductivity of fractured bedrock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flykt, M.J.; Sihvola, A.H.; Eloranta, E.H.

    1995-01-01

    The electromagnetic characterization of fractured bedrock is of importance when studying the final disposal of nuclear waste. The different types of discontinuities at all scales in rocks can be viewed as an inhomogeneity. In some cases there are reasons to assume the influence of the discontinuities on electrical conductivity is anisotropic in character. The effort has been made to use electromagnetic mixing rules in the definition of an equivalent homogeneous anisotropic conductivity tensor for such fractured rock mass. (author) (16 refs., 6 figs.)

  10. Challenges with space-time rainfall in urban hydrology highlighted with a semi-distributed model using C-band and X-band radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Rocha Paz, Igor; Ichiba, Abdellah; Skouri-Plakali, Ilektra; Lee, Jisun; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Climate change and global warming are expected to make precipitation events more frequent, more severe and more local. This may have serious consequences for human health, the environment, cultural heritage, economic activities, utilities and public service providers. Then precipitation risk and water management is a key challenge for densely populated urban areas. Applications derived from high (time and space) resolution observation of precipitations are to make our cities more weather-ready. Finer resolution data available from X-band dual radar measurements enhance engineering tools as used for urban planning policies as well as protection (mitigation/adaptation) strategies to tackle climate-change related weather events. For decades engineering tools have been developed to work conveniently either with very local rain gauge networks, or with mainly C-band weather radars that have gradually been set up for space-time remote sensing of precipitation. Most of the time, the C-band weather radars continue to be calibrated by the existing rain gauge networks. Inhomogeneous distributions of rain gauging networks lead to only a partial information on the rainfall fields. In fact, the statistics of measured rainfall is strongly biased by the fractality of the measuring networks. This fractality needs to be properly taken in to account to retrieve the original properties of the rainfall fields, in spite of the radar data calibration. In this presentation, with the help of multifractal analysis, we first demonstrate that the semi-distributed hydrological models statistically reduce the rainfall fields into rainfall measured by a much scarcer network of virtual rain gauges. For this purpose, we use C-band and X-band radar data. The first has a resolution of 1 km in space and 5 min in time and is in fact a product provided by RHEA SAS after treating the Météo-France C-band radar data. The latter is measured by the radar operated at Ecole des Ponts and has a resolution of

  11. Conducting field studies for testing pesticide leaching models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles N.; Parrish, Rudolph S.; Brown, David S.

    1990-01-01

    A variety of predictive models are being applied to evaluate the transport and transformation of pesticides in the environment. These include well known models such as the Pesticide Root Zone Model (PRZM), the Risk of Unsaturated-Saturated Transport and Transformation Interactions for Chemical Concentrations Model (RUSTIC) and the Groundwater Loading Effects of Agricultural Management Systems Model (GLEAMS). The potentially large impacts of using these models as tools for developing pesticide management strategies and regulatory decisions necessitates development of sound model validation protocols. This paper offers guidance on many of the theoretical and practical problems encountered in the design and implementation of field-scale model validation studies. Recommendations are provided for site selection and characterization, test compound selection, data needs, measurement techniques, statistical design considerations and sampling techniques. A strategy is provided for quantitatively testing models using field measurements.

  12. The modelling and measurement of super-conducting rock joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, N.; Makurat, A.; Vik, G.; Loset, F.

    1985-01-01

    Rock joints exhibiting exceptionally high conductivity have been responsible for severe inflows (10-50 m 3 /min.) and flooding in recent Norwegian tunneling projects. These events may be explained by channeling of flow in partially outwashed mineral fillings, associated with deep weathering in ancient basement rocks. There is also evidence to suggest extensional strain with consistent relationships to regional faulting patterns (Selmer-Olsen 1981). Hydraulic fractures making connection with joint systems that are sheared as a result of increased fluid pressure, has been deduced as the mechanism explaining unusually large fluid losses in the geothermal project in Cornwall, England (Pine and Batchelor, 1984). Such mechanisms also introduce uncertainty into water flood and MHF stimulation treatment of fractured oil and gas reservoirs, particularly when principal stress and joint orientations are poorly understood due to coring and stress measurement problems in weak, overstressed reservoir rocks. The possibility of permanent disposal of nuclear waste in crystalline rock, has also focussed attention on highly conductive (''super-conducting'') joints in nuclear waste programmes in Canada, the USA and in Europe. The bi-modal distributions of joint spacing, continuity, apertures and conductivities resulting from the discovery of super-conducting joints has important implications for the location of planned repositories, due to their dramatic impact on potential transport times. In the laboratory a class of super-conducting joints can be created by shear displacement that causes dilation when shearing non-planar features. Recent biaxial shear testing of rock joints recovered in jointed core has identified a strong coupling of conductivity and shear displacement. The theoretical predictions of constitutive relationships for coupled flow in rock joints (Barton et al. 1985) have been broadly verified

  13. Nanoclay gelation approach toward improved dye-sensitized solar cell efficiencies: an investigation of charge transport and shift in the TiO2 conduction band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu; Kulkarni, Sneha A; Ito, Bruno Ieiri; Batabyal, Sudip K; Nonomura, Kazuteru; Wong, Chee Cheong; Grätzel, Michael; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G; Uchida, Satoshi

    2013-01-23

    Nanoclay minerals play a promising role as additives in the liquid electrolyte to form a gel electrolyte for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells, because of the high chemical stability, unique swelling capability, ion exchange capacity, and rheological properties of nanoclays. Here, we report the improved performance of a quasi-solid-state gel electrolyte that is made from a liquid electrolyte and synthetic nitrate-hydrotalcite nanoclay. Charge transport mechanisms in the gel electrolyte and nanoclay interactions with TiO(2)/electrolyte interface are discussed in detail. The electrochemical analysis reveals that the charge transport is solely based on physical diffusion at the ratio of [PMII]:[I(2)] = 10:1 (where PMII is 1-propyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide). The calculated physical diffusion coefficient shows that the diffusion of redox ions is not affected much by the viscosity of nanoclay gel. The addition of nitrate-hydrotalcite clay in the electrolyte has the effect of buffering the protonation process at the TiO(2)/electrolyte interface, resulting in an upward shift in the conduction band and a boost in open-circuit voltage (V(OC)). Higher V(OC) values with undiminished photocurrent is achieved with nitrate-hydrotalcite nanoclay gel electrolyte for organic as well as for inorganic dye (D35 and N719) systems. The efficiency for hydrotalcite clay gel electrolyte solar cells is increased by 10%, compared to that of the liquid electrolyte. The power conversion efficiency can reach 10.1% under 0.25 sun and 9.6% under full sun. This study demonstrates that nitrate-hydrotalcite nanoclay in the electrolyte not only solidifies the liquid electrolyte to prevent solvent leakage, but also facilitates the improvement in cell efficiency.

  14. Quantum critical behavior in three-dimensional one-band Hubbard model at half-filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karchev, Naoum

    2013-01-01

    A one-band Hubbard model with hopping parameter t and Coulomb repulsion U is considered at half-filling. By means of the Schwinger bosons and slave fermions representation of the electron operators and integrating out the spin–singlet Fermi fields an effective Heisenberg model with antiferromagnetic exchange constant is obtained for vectors which identifies the local orientation of the spin of the itinerant electrons. The amplitude of the spin vectors is an effective spin of the itinerant electrons accounting for the fact that some sites, in the ground state, are doubly occupied or empty. Accounting adequately for the magnon–magnon interaction the Néel temperature is calculated. When the ratio t/U is small enough (t/U ≤0.09) the effective model describes a system of localized electrons. Increasing the ratio increases the density of doubly occupied states which in turn decreases the effective spin and Néel temperature. The phase diagram in the plane of temperature (T N )/U and parameter t/U is presented. The quantum critical point (T N =0) is reached at t/U =0.9. The magnons in the paramagnetic phase are studied and the contribution of the magnons’ fluctuations to the heat capacity is calculated. At the Néel temperature the heat capacity has a peak which is suppressed when the system approaches a quantum critical point. It is important to stress that, at half-filling, the ground state, determined by fermions, is antiferromagnetic. The magnon fluctuations drive the system to quantum criticality and when the effective spin is critically small these fluctuations suppress the magnetic order. -- Highlights: •Technique of calculation is introduced which permits us to study the magnons’ fluctuations. •Quantum critical point is obtained in the one-band 3D Hubbard model at half-filling. •The present analytical results supplement the numerical ones (see Fig. 7)

  15. A narrow-band k-distribution model with single mixture gas assumption for radiative flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Sung Min; Kim, Jae Won; Kwon, Oh Joon

    2018-06-01

    In the present study, the narrow-band k-distribution (NBK) model parameters for mixtures of H2O, CO2, and CO are proposed by utilizing the line-by-line (LBL) calculations with a single mixture gas assumption. For the application of the NBK model to radiative flows, a radiative transfer equation (RTE) solver based on a finite-volume method on unstructured meshes was developed. The NBK model and the RTE solver were verified by solving two benchmark problems including the spectral radiance distribution emitted from one-dimensional slabs and the radiative heat transfer in a truncated conical enclosure. It was shown that the results are accurate and physically reliable by comparing with available data. To examine the applicability of the methods to realistic multi-dimensional problems in non-isothermal and non-homogeneous conditions, radiation in an axisymmetric combustion chamber was analyzed, and then the infrared signature emitted from an aircraft exhaust plume was predicted. For modeling the plume flow involving radiative cooling, a flow-radiation coupled procedure was devised in a loosely coupled manner by adopting a Navier-Stokes flow solver based on unstructured meshes. It was shown that the predicted radiative cooling for the combustion chamber is physically more accurate than other predictions, and is as accurate as that by the LBL calculations. It was found that the infrared signature of aircraft exhaust plume can also be obtained accurately, equivalent to the LBL calculations, by using the present narrow-band approach with a much improved numerical efficiency.

  16. Conducting to non-conducting transition in dual transmission lines using a ternary model with long-range correlated disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazo, E.; Diez, E.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we study the behavior of the allowed and forbidden frequencies in disordered classical dual transmission lines when the values of capacitances {C j } are distributed according to a ternary model with long-range correlated disorder. We introduce the disorder from a random sequence with a power spectrum S(k)∝k -(2α-1) , where α≥0.5 is the correlation exponent. From this sequence we generate an asymmetric ternary map using two map parameters b 1 and b 2 , which adjust the occupancy probability of each possible value of the capacitances C j ={C A, C B, C C, }. If the sequence of capacitance values is totally at random α=0.5 (white noise), the electrical transmission line is in the non-conducting state for every frequency ω. When we introduce long-range correlations in the distribution of capacitances, the electrical transmission lines can change their conducting properties and we can find a transition from the non-conducting to conducting state for a fixed system size. This implies the existence of critical values of the map parameters for each correlation exponent α. By performing finite-size scaling we obtain the asymptotic value of the map parameters in the thermodynamic limit for any α. With these data we obtain a phase diagram for the symmetric ternary model, which separates the non-conducting state from the conducting one. This is the fundamental result of this Letter. In addition, introducing one or more impurities in random places of the long-range correlated distribution of capacitances, we observe a dramatic change in the conducting properties of the electrical transmission lines, in such a way that the system jumps from conducting to non-conducting states. We think that this behavior can be considered as a possible mechanism to secure communication.

  17. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  18. Constitutive Modelling and Deformation Band Angle Predictions for High Porosity Sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, M. C.; Issen, K. A.; Ingraham, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The development of a field-scale deformation model requires a constitutive framework that is capable of representing known material behavior and able to be calibrated using available mechanical response data. This work employs the principle of hyperplasticity (e.g., Houlsby and Puzrin, 2006) to develop such a constitutive framework for high porosity sandstone. Adapting the works of Zimmerman et al. (1986) and Collins and Houlsby (1997), the mechanical data set of Ingraham et al. (2013 a, b) was used to develop a specific constitutive framework for Castlegate sandstone, a high porosity fluvial-deposited reservoir analog rock. Using the mechanical data set of Ingraham et al. (2013 a, b), explicit expressions and material parameters of the elastic moduli and strain tensors were obtained. With these expressions, analytical and numerical techniques were then employed to partition the total mechanical strain into elastic, coupled, and plastic strain components. With the partitioned strain data, yield surfaces in true-stress space, coefficients of internal friction, dilatancy factors, along with the theorectical predictions of the deformation band angles were obtained. These results were also evaluated against band angle values obtained from a) measurements on specimen jackets (Ingraham et al., 2013a), b) plane fits through located acoustic emissions (AE) events (Ingraham et al. 2013b), and c) X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) calculations.

  19. Modelling the metal–semiconductor band structure in implanted ohmic contacts to GaN and SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Tomás, A; Fontserè, A; Placidi, M; Jennings, M R; Gammon, P M

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a method to model the metal–semiconductor (M–S) band structure to an implanted ohmic contact to a wide band gap semiconductor (WBG) such as GaN and SiC. The performance and understanding of the M–S contact to a WBG semiconductor is of great importance as it influences the overall performance of a semiconductor device. In this work we explore in a numerical fashion the ohmic contact properties to a WBG semiconductor taking into account the partial ionization of impurities and analysing its dependence on the temperature, the barrier height, the impurity level band energy and carrier concentration. The effect of the M–S Schottky barrier lowering and the Schottky barrier inhomogeneities are discussed. The model is applied to a fabricated ohmic contact to GaN where the M–S band structure can be completely determined. (paper)

  20. A micro-convection model for thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Increase in the specific surface area as well as Brownian motion are supposed to be the most significant reasons for the anomalous enhancement in thermal conductivity of nanofluids. This work presents a semi-empirical approach for the same by emphasizing the above two effects through micro-convection. A new way of ...

  1. Assimilation of ambient seismic noise in hydrological models allows estimation of hydraulic conductivity in unsaturated media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fores, B.; Champollion, C.; Mainsant, G.; Fort, A.; Albaric, J.

    2016-12-01

    Karstic hydrosystems represent one of the main water resources in the Mediterranean area but are challenging for geophysical methods. The GEK (Geodesy in Karstic Environment) observatory has been setup in 2011 to study the unsaturated zone of a karstic system in the south of France. The unsaturated zone (the epikarst) is thick and up to 100m on the site. Since 2011, gravity, rainfall and evapotranspiration are monitored. Together, they allow precise estimation of the global water storage changes but lack depth resolution. Surface waves velocity variations, obtained from ambient seismic noise monitoring are used here to overcome this lack. Indeed, velocities depend on saturation and the depths where changes occur can be defined as surface waves are dispersive. From October 2014 to November 2015, two seismometers have been recording noise. Velocity changes at a narrow frequency band (6-8 Hz) have shown a clear annual cycle. Minimum velocity is several months late on precipitations, which is coherent with a slow infiltration and a maximum sensitivity at -40m for these frequencies and this site. Models have been made with the Hydrus-1D software which allows modeling 1D-flow in variably saturated media. With a stochastic sampling, we have researched the underground parameters that reproduce the most the different observations (gravity, evapotranspiration and rainfall, and velocity changes). We show that velocity changes clearly constrain the hydraulic conductivity of the medium. Ambient seismic noise is therefore a promising method to study unsaturated zone which are too deep or too heterogeneous for classic methods.

  2. Measurement and Modelling of MIC Components Using Conductive Lithographic Films

    OpenAIRE

    Shepherd, P. R.; Taylor, C.; Evans l, P. S. A.; Harrison, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Conductive Lithographic Films (CLFs) have previously demonstrated useful properties in printed mi-crowave circuits, combining low cost with high speed of manufacture. In this paper we examine the formation of various passive components via the CLF process, which enables further integration of printed microwave integrated circuits. The printed components include vias, resistors and overlay capacitors, and offer viable alternatives to traditional manufacturing processes for Microwave Inte-grate...

  3. Hierarchical relaxation dynamics in a tilted two-band Bose-Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Jayson G.

    2018-04-01

    We numerically examine slow and hierarchical relaxation dynamics of interacting bosons described by a tilted two-band Bose-Hubbard model. The system is found to exhibit signatures of quantum chaos within the spectrum and the validity of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis for relevant physical observables is demonstrated for certain parameter regimes. Using the truncated Wigner representation in the semiclassical limit of the system, dynamics of relevant observables reveal hierarchical relaxation and the appearance of prethermalized states is studied from the perspective of statistics of the underlying mean-field trajectories. The observed prethermalization scenario can be attributed to different stages of glassy dynamics in the mode-time configuration space due to dynamical phase transition between ergodic and nonergodic trajectories.

  4. Magnetotelluric Forward Modeling and Inversion In 3 -d Conductivity Model of The Vesuvio Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spichak, V.; Patella, D.

    Three-dimensional forward modeling of MT fields in the simplified conductivity model of the Vesuvio volcano (T=0.1, 1, 10, 100 and 1000s) indicates that the best image of the magma chamber could be obtained basing on the pseudo-section of the determinant apparent resitivity phase as well as on the real and imaginary components of the electric field. Another important result of the studies conducted is that it was demonstrated the principal opportunity of detection and contouring the magma chamber by 2-D pseudo-sections constructed basing on the data transforms mentioned above. Bayesian three-dimensional inversion of synthetic MT data in the volcano model indicates that it is possible to determine the depth and vertical size of the magma chamber, however, simultaneous detection of the conductivity distribution inside the domain of search is of pure quality. However, if the geometrical parameters of the magma chamber are determined in advance, it becomes quite realistic to find out the conductivity distribution inside. The accuracy of such estimation strongly depends on the uncertainty in its prior value: the more narrow is the prior conductivity palette the closer could be the posterior conductivity distribution to the true one.

  5. CONDUCT RESEARCH STOCK MARKET BASED ON MODELS OF ARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Burtnyak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to study the dynamics of the volatility of some indicators of financial market of Ukraine using the methods ARCH modeling. As indicators of the financial market we take the most aggregated variables describing profitability or market price of the portfolio, but not individual assets constituting the portfolio. An indicator of the stock market index stands First Stock Trading System (PFTS. The conditional variance of financial indicators reflecting the level of systemic risk, measures the uncertainty associated with forecasting market dynamics. Key words. Autoregression models, econometric models, stock market, financial instruments, the PFTS index, volatility time series. JEL: C 50

  6. Improved gap conductance model for the TRAC code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, S.W.; Mandell, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the present work, as indicated earlier, is to improve the present constant fuel clad spacing in TRAC-P1A without significantly increasing the computer costs. It is realized that the simple model proposed may not be accurate enough for some cases, but for the initial calculations made the DELTAR model improves the predictions over the constant Δr results of TRAC-P1A and the additional computing costs are negligible

  7. Analysis and comparison model for measuring tropospheric scintillation intensity for Ku-band frequency in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep JS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has been based on understanding local propagation signal data distribution characteristics and identifying and predicting the overall impact of significant attenuating factors regarding the propagation path such as impaired propagation for a signal being transmitted. Predicting propagation impairment is important for accurate link budgeting, thereby leading to better communication network system designation. This study has thus used sample data for one year concerning beacon satellite operation in Malaysia from April 2008 to April 2009. Data concerning 12GHz frequency (Ku-band and 40° elevation angle was collected and analysed, obtaining average signal amplitude value, ÷ and also standard deviation ó which is normally measured in dB to obtain long-term scintillation intensity distribution. This analysis showed that scintillation intensity distribution followed Gaussian distribution for long-term data distribution. A prediction model was then selected based on the above; Karasawa,
    ITU-R, Van de Kamp and Otung models were compared to obtain the best prediction model performance for selected data regarding specific meteorological conditions. This study showed that the Karasawa model had the best performance for predicting scintillation intensity for the selected da ta.

  8. Magnetic field dependence of conductivity and effective mass of carriers in a model of Mott-Hubbard material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.Didukh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of external magnetic field h on a static conductivity of Mott-Hubbard material which is described by the model with correlated hopping of electrons has been investigated. By means of canonical transformation, the effective Hamiltonian is obtained which takes into account strong intra-site Coulomb repulsion and correlated hopping. Using a variant of generalized Hartree-Fock approximation the single-electron Green function and quasiparticle energy spectrum of the model have been calculated. The static conductivity σ has been calculated as a function of h, electron concentration n and temperature T. The correlated hopping is shown to cause the electron-hole asymmetry of transport properties of narrow band materials.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-BAND DETECTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES WITH MARKOVIAN MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollmer, B.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M. [CDS, Observatoire Astronomique, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch. [LSIIT, Universite de Strasbourg, 7, Rue Rene Descartes, F-67084 Strasbourg (France); Van Driel, W. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Sabatini, S. [INAF/IASF-Roma, via Fosso de Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); MacArthur, L. A., E-mail: Bernd.Vollmer@astro.unistra.fr [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-02-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings-typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg{sup 2} in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered {approx}20% more mock LSB galaxies and {approx}40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of

  10. Structural conceptual models of water-conducting features at Aespoe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossart, P.; Mazurek, M.; Hermansson, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of the Fracture Classification and Characterization Project (FCC), water conducting features (WCF) in the Aespoe tunnel system and on the surface of Aespoe Island are being characterized over a range of scales. The larger-scale hierarchies of WCF are mostly constituted of fault arrays, i.e. brittle structures that accommodated episodes of shear strain. The smaller-scale WCF (contained within blocks 1 m. Structural evidence indicates that the fractures within the TRUE-1 block constitute an interconnected system with a pronounced anisotropy

  11. In-Sample Confidence Bands and Out-of-Sample Forecast Bands for Time-Varying Parameters in Observation Driven Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasques, F.; Koopman, S.J.; Lasak, K.A.; Lucas, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the performances of alternative methods for calculating in-sample confidence and out-of-sample forecast bands for time-varying parameters. The in-sample bands reflect parameter uncertainty, while the out-of-sample bands reflect not only parameter uncertainty, but also innovation

  12. An Econometric Diffusion Model of Exchange Rate Movements within a Band - Implications for Interest Rate Differential and Credibility of Exchange Rate Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, Olavi

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a model ofexchange rate movements within a specified exchange rate band enforced by central bank interventions. The model is based on the empirical observation that the exchange rate has usually been strictly inside the band, at least in Finland. In this model the distribution of the exchange rate is truncated lognormal from the edges towards the center of the band and hence quite different from the bimodal distribution of the standard target zone model. The model is estima...

  13. Band Jahn-Teller effect on the density of states of the magnetic high-T{sub c} superconductors: A model study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, B. [Department of Physics, Govt. Science College, Malkangiri 764 048 (India); Mohanta, K.L. [Department of Physics, ITER, Siksha ' O' Anusandhan University, Bhubaneswar 751 030 (India); Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in [Condensed Matter Physics Group, Dept. of Applied Physics and Ballistics, F.M. University, Balasore 756 019 (India)

    2012-05-15

    We report here a mean-field study of competing antiferromagnetism, superconductivity and lattice strain phases and their effect on the local density of states of the cuprate system. Our model Hamiltonian incorporating these interactions is reported earlier [G.C. Rout et al., Physica C, 2007]. The analytic expression for superconducting, antiferromagnetism and lattice strain order parameters are calculated and solved self-consistently. The interplay of these order parameters is investigated considering the calculated density of states (DOSs) of the conduction electrons. The DOS displays multiple gap structures with multiple peaks. It is suggested that the tunneling conductance data obtained from the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements could be interpreted by using the quasi-particle bands calculated from our model Hamiltonian. We have discussed the mechanism to calculate the order parameters from the conductance data.

  14. Theories of conduct disorder: a causal modelling analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krol, N.P.C.M.; Morton, J.; Bruyn, E.E.J. De

    2004-01-01

    Background: If a clinician has to make decisions on diagnosis and treatment, he or she is confronted with a variety of causal theories. In order to compare these theories a neutral terminology and notational system is needed. The Causal Modelling framework involving three levels of description –

  15. On the Kubo-Greenwood model for electron conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James; Wrighton, Jeffrey; Luo, Kai; Trickey, S. B.

    2018-02-01

    Currently, the most common method to calculate transport properties for materials under extreme conditions is based on the phenomenological Kubo-Greenwood method. The results of an inquiry into the justification and context of that model are summarized here. Specifically, the basis for its connection to equilibrium DFT and the assumption of static ions are discussed briefly.

  16. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  17. Dispersive Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model: Band structure and quantum chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei

    2017-11-01

    The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev (SYK) model is a concrete model for a non-Fermi liquid with maximally chaotic behavior in (0 +1 ) dimensions. In order to gain some insights into real materials in higher dimensions where fermions could hop between different sites, here we consider coupling a SYK lattice by constant hopping. We call this the dispersive SYK model. Focusing on (1 +1 ) -dimensional homogeneous hopping, by either tuning the temperature or the relative strength of the random interaction (hopping) and constant hopping, we find a crossover between a dispersive metal to an incoherent metal, where the dynamic exponent z changes from 1 to ∞ . We study the crossover by calculating the spectral function, charge density correlator, and the Lyapunov exponent. We further find the Lyapunov exponent becomes larger when the chemical potential is tuned to approach a van Hove singularity because of the large density of states near the Fermi surface. The effect of the topological nontrivial bands is also discussed.

  18. Arctic sea ice signatures: L-band brightness temperature sensitivity comparison using two radiation transfer models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Richter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice is a crucial component for short-, medium- and long-term numerical weather predictions. Most importantly, changes of sea ice coverage and areas covered by thin sea ice have a large impact on heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere. L-band brightness temperatures from ESA's Earth Explorer SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity have been proven to be a valuable tool to derive thin sea ice thickness. These retrieved estimates were already successfully assimilated in forecasting models to constrain the ice analysis, leading to more accurate initial conditions and subsequently more accurate forecasts. However, the brightness temperature measurements can potentially be assimilated directly in forecasting systems, reducing the data latency and providing a more consistent first guess. As a first step towards such a data assimilation system we studied the forward operator that translates geophysical parameters provided by a model into brightness temperatures. We use two different radiative transfer models to generate top of atmosphere brightness temperatures based on ORAP5 model output for the 2012/2013 winter season. The simulations are then compared against actual SMOS measurements. The results indicate that both models are able to capture the general variability of measured brightness temperatures over sea ice. The simulated brightness temperatures are dominated by sea ice coverage and thickness changes are most pronounced in the marginal ice zone where new sea ice is formed. There we observe the largest differences of more than 20 K over sea ice between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. We conclude that the assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures yields high potential for forecasting models to correct for uncertainties in thin sea ice areas and suggest that information on sea ice fractional coverage from higher-frequency brightness temperatures should be used simultaneously.

  19. Arctic sea ice signatures: L-band brightness temperature sensitivity comparison using two radiation transfer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Friedrich; Drusch, Matthias; Kaleschke, Lars; Maaß, Nina; Tian-Kunze, Xiangshan; Mecklenburg, Susanne

    2018-03-01

    Sea ice is a crucial component for short-, medium- and long-term numerical weather predictions. Most importantly, changes of sea ice coverage and areas covered by thin sea ice have a large impact on heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere. L-band brightness temperatures from ESA's Earth Explorer SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) have been proven to be a valuable tool to derive thin sea ice thickness. These retrieved estimates were already successfully assimilated in forecasting models to constrain the ice analysis, leading to more accurate initial conditions and subsequently more accurate forecasts. However, the brightness temperature measurements can potentially be assimilated directly in forecasting systems, reducing the data latency and providing a more consistent first guess. As a first step towards such a data assimilation system we studied the forward operator that translates geophysical parameters provided by a model into brightness temperatures. We use two different radiative transfer models to generate top of atmosphere brightness temperatures based on ORAP5 model output for the 2012/2013 winter season. The simulations are then compared against actual SMOS measurements. The results indicate that both models are able to capture the general variability of measured brightness temperatures over sea ice. The simulated brightness temperatures are dominated by sea ice coverage and thickness changes are most pronounced in the marginal ice zone where new sea ice is formed. There we observe the largest differences of more than 20 K over sea ice between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. We conclude that the assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures yields high potential for forecasting models to correct for uncertainties in thin sea ice areas and suggest that information on sea ice fractional coverage from higher-frequency brightness temperatures should be used simultaneously.

  20. Heat conduction in caricature models of the Lorentz gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramli, A.; Simanyi, N.; Szasz, D.

    1987-01-01

    Heat transport coefficients are calculated for various random walks with internal states (the Markov partition of the Sinai billiard connects these walks with the Lorentz gas among a periodic configuration of scatterers). Models with reflecting or absorbing barriers and also those without or with local thermal equilibrium are investigated. The method is unified and is based on the Keldysh expansion of the resolvent of a matrix polynomial

  1. Dynamical mechanisms of conducted vasoreactivity: minimalistic modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryshova, Ekaterina A.; Rogatina, Kristina V.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2018-04-01

    Endothelial cells are cells lining the inner surface of the blood and lymphatic vessels, they separate the bloodstream from the deeper layers of the vascular wall. Earlier endothelium was considered only as a passive barrier between blood and tissues. However, it has now become apparent that endothelial cells, specifically reacting to different molecular signals generated locally and remotely, perform a variety of functions. Simulation of large vascular networks requires the development of specialized models of autoregulation of vascular tone. On the one hand, such models should have a strong support for cellular dynamics, on the other - be as computationally efficient as possible. A model of a two-dimensional cylindrical array of endothelial cells is proposed on the basis of the integral description by means of the whole-cell CVC. The process of propagation of hyperpolarizing and depolarizing pulses is investigated depending on the statistics of cell distribution between the two main types. Endothelial cells are considered as a dynamic system possessing bistability. Based on the articles, the results of the distribution of the resting-potential values were repeated, the propagation of the hyperpolarizing pulse was observed, the endothelial cell chain supported the propagation of the wave switching to a hyperpolarized state, and then the return wave returned to its original state.

  2. Multiband model of the valence-band electronic structure in cylindrical GaAs nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čukarić Nemanja A.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We compute the hole states in the GaAs free-standing nanowires, and in the GaAs/(Al,GaAs core-shell nanowires of type I-s, which are grown along the [100] direction. The hole states are extracted from the 4-band Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian, which explicitly takes into account mixing between the light and heavy holes. The axial aproximation is adopted, which allowed classification of states according to the total angular monentum (fz when expressed in units of the Planck constant. The envelope functions are expanded in Bessel functions of the first kind. The dispersion relations of the subbands E(kz obtained by the devised method do not resemble parabolas, which is otherwise a feature of the dispersion relations of the conduction subbands. Furthermore, the energy levels of holes whose total orbital momentum is fz=1/2 are shown to cross for a free-standing wire. The low energy fz=1/2 states are found to anticross, but these anticrossings turn into crossings when the ratio of the inner and outer radius of the core-shell wire takes a certain value. The influence of the geometric parameters on the dispersion relations is considered for both free standing and core-shell nanowires.

  3. A numerical model for adiabatic shear bands with application to a thick-walled cylinder in 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mingtao; Li, Yongchi; Hu, Xiuzhang; Hu, Haibo

    2014-01-01

    The formation of an adiabatic shear band (ASB) experiences three stages: stable plastic flow, nucleation and a fluid-like stage. For different stages, the microstructures of the material undergo great changes. The mechanical behavior of the material in each stage has its own unique characteristics. To describe these characteristics, a multi-stage model for the shear band is proposed. For the stable plastic flow stage, a modified adiabatic J–C constitutive relationship is used. For the nucleation stage, the effects of work hardening and temperature softening are described by a power function of plastic strain. A Newtonian fluid model is used for the fluid-like stage. The formation of a shear band is an instability process. Various defects in the material are perturbation sources, which change the local yield stress. To describe the disturbances, a probability factor is introduced into the macroscopic constitutive relationship. The yield stress in the material is assumed to obey a Gaussian distribution. The multi-stage model combined with a probability factor is applied to simulate the rupture of thick-walled cylinder in 304 Stainless Steel (304SS). A close agreement is found between the simulation and experimental results, such as the failure mechanism, shear band spacing and propagating velocity of the shear band. By combining the experimental results with the simulation results, the importance of the nucleation stage is emphasized. (paper)

  4. Future changes in the East Asian rain band projected by global atmospheric models with 20-km and 60-km grid size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, Shoji; Mizuta, Ryo [Meteorological Research Institute, Climate Research Department, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Matsueda, Mio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Global warming projection experiments were conducted using a 20-km mesh global atmospheric model, focusing on the change in the rain band of East Asian summer monsoon. To assess the uncertainty of climate change projections, we performed ensemble simulations with the 60-km resolution model combining four different SSTs and three atmospheric initial conditions. In the present-day climate simulations, the 20-km model reproduces the rain band of East Asian summer monsoon better than lower resolution models in terms of geographical distribution and seasonal march. In the future climate simulation by the 20-km model, precipitation increases over the Yangtze River valley in May through July, Korean peninsula in May, and Japan in July. The termination of rainy season over Japan tends to be delayed until August. Ensemble simulations by the 60-km model show that precipitation in the future climate for July increases over the Yangtze River valley, the East China Sea and Japan. These changes in precipitation are partly consistent with those projected by the 20-km model. Simulations by the 20-km and 60-km models consistently show that in the future climate the termination of rainy season over Japan tends to be delayed until August. The changes in the vertically integrated water vapor flux show the intensification of clockwise moisture transport over the western Pacific subtropical high. Most precipitation changes over the East Asia can be interpreted as the moisture convergence resulting from change in the horizontal transport of water vapor. (orig.)

  5. A Mathematical Study of the One-Dimensional Keller and Rubinov Model for Liesegang Bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, D.; van der Hout, R.; Mimura, M.; Ohnishi, I.

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose is to start understanding from a mathematical viewpoint experiments in which regularized structures with spatially distinct bands or rings of precipitated material are exhibited, with clearly visible scaling properties. Such patterns are known as Liesegang bands or rings. In this paper,

  6. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations.

  7. Electron and hole states in quantum dot quantum wells within a spherical eight-band model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pokatilov, E.P.; Fonoberov, V.A.; Fomin, V.; Devreese, J.T.

    2001-01-01

    In order to study heterostructures composed both of materials with strongly different parameters and of materials with narrow band gaps, we have developed an approach [E. P. Pokatilov [etal], Phys. Rev. B 64, 245328 (2001), (preceding paper)], which combines the spherical eight-band effective-mass

  8. Transient heat conduction in a pebble fuel applying fractional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez A, R.; Espinosa P, G.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we presents the equation of thermal diffusion of temporary-fractional order in the one-dimensional space in spherical coordinates, with the objective to analyze the heat transference between the fuel and coolant in a fuel element of a Pebble Bed Modular Reactor. The pebble fuel is the heterogeneous system made by microsphere constitutes by U O, pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide mixed with graphite. To describe the heat transfer phenomena in the pebble fuel we applied a constitutive law fractional (Non-Fourier) in order to analyze the behaviour transient of the temperature distribution in the pebble fuel with anomalous thermal diffusion effects a numerical model is developed. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Tumors Electrical Conductivity Anisotropy Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Numerical Modeling on Electroporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazikhanlou-sani K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is many ways to assessing the electrical conductivity anisotropy of a tumor. Applying the values of tissue electrical conductivity anisotropy is crucial in numerical modeling of the electric and thermal field distribution in electroporation treatments. This study aims to calculate the tissues electrical conductivity anisotropy in patients with sarcoma tumors using diffusion tensor imaging technique. Materials and Method: A total of 3 subjects were involved in this study. All of patients had clinically apparent sarcoma tumors at the extremities. The T1, T2 and DTI images were performed using a 3-Tesla multi-coil, multi-channel MRI system. The fractional anisotropy (FA maps were performed using the FSL (FMRI software library software regarding the DTI images. The 3D matrix of the FA maps of each area (tumor, normal soft tissue and bone/s was reconstructed and the anisotropy matrix was calculated regarding to the FA values. Result: The mean FA values in direction of main axis in sarcoma tumors were ranged between 0.475–0.690. With assumption of isotropy of the electrical conductivity, the FA value of electrical conductivity at each X, Y and Z coordinate axes would be equal to 0.577. The gathered results showed that there is a mean error band of 20% in electrical conductivity, if the electrical conductivity anisotropy not concluded at the calculations. The comparison of FA values showed that there is a significant statistical difference between the mean FA value of tumor and normal soft tissues (P<0.05. Conclusion: DTI is a feasible technique for the assessment of electrical conductivity anisotropy of tissues. It is crucial to quantify the electrical conductivity anisotropy data of tissues for numerical modeling of electroporation treatments.

  10. Band co-registration modeling of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager based on satellite attitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, P. R.; Syafrudin, A. H.; Utama, S.; Jayani, A. P. S.

    2018-05-01

    One of significant geometric distortion on images of LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral imager is co-registration error between each color channel detector. Band co-registration distortion usually can be corrected by using several approaches, which are manual method, image matching algorithm, or sensor modeling and calibration approach. This paper develops another approach to minimize band co-registration distortion on LAPAN-A3/IPB multispectral image by using supervised modeling of image matching with respect to satellite attitude. Modeling results show that band co-registration error in across-track axis is strongly influenced by yaw angle, while error in along-track axis is fairly influenced by both pitch and roll angle. Accuracy of the models obtained is pretty good, which lies between 1-3 pixels error for each axis of each pair of band co-registration. This mean that the model can be used to correct the distorted images without the need of slower image matching algorithm, nor the laborious effort needed in manual approach and sensor calibration. Since the calculation can be executed in order of seconds, this approach can be used in real time quick-look image processing in ground station or even in satellite on-board image processing.

  11. Theoretical Modeling and Analysis of L- and P-band Radar Backscatter Sensitivity to Soil Active Layer Dielectric Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyang Du

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT and moisture dynamics within the soil active layer are critical elements of boreal, arctic and alpine ecosystems, and environmental change assessments. We evaluated the potential for detecting dielectric changes within different soil layers using combined L- and P-band radar remote sensing as a prerequisite for detecting FT and moisture profile changes within the soil active layer. A two-layer scattering model was developed and validated for simulating radar responses from vertically inhomogeneous soil. The model simulations indicated that inhomogeneity in the soil dielectric profile contributes to both L- and P-band backscatter, but with greater P-band sensitivity at depth. The difference in L- and P-band responses to soil dielectric profile inhomogeneity appears suitable for detecting associated changes in soil active layer conditions. Additional evaluation using collocated airborne radar (AIRSAR observations and in situ soil moisture measurements over alpine tundra indicates that combined L- and P-band SAR observations are sensitive to soil dielectric profile heterogeneity associated with variations in soil moisture and FT conditions.

  12. Modeling the overall heat conductive and convective properties of open-cell graphite foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tee, C C; Yu, N; Li, H

    2008-01-01

    This work develops analytic models on the overall thermal conductivity, pressure drop and overall convective heat transfer coefficient of graphite foam. The models study the relationship between the overall heat conductive and convective properties, and foam microstructure, temperature, foam surface friction characteristics and cooling fluid properties. The predicted thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop agree well with experimental data

  13. Modelling of stomatal conductance and ozone deposition flux of Norway Spruce using deposition model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, M.; Chroust, P.; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Mikuška, Pavel; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar; Pokorný, Radek; Czerný, Radek; Janouš, Dalibor; Taufarová, Klára

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 12, 2-3 (2009), s. 75-81 ISSN 1335-339X R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1B7/189/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : ozone concentration * ozone deposition * stomatal conductance * deposition velocity * resistance model * tropo-spheric ozone Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  14. Hundness versus Mottness in a three-band Hund model with relevance for iron-pnictides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, Katharina M.; Delft, Jan von; Weichselbaum, Andreas [Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Yin, Zhiping; Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers University, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The recently discovered iron pnictide superconductors (as well as chalcogenides, ruthenates, and other 4d transition metal oxides) show puzzling anomalous properties, like a coherence-incoherence crossover, also in the normal state. While there is consensus about strong correlation effects playing a key role in these materials, their precise origin (Coulomb repulsion or Hund's rule coupling between electrons of different orbitals) has been under debate as one of the major open questions in the field many years. In a recent detailed study of the Hund metal problem the coherence-incoherence crossover was shown to be connected to spin-orbital separation and to be clearly driven by Hund's rule coupling. In order to better understand the differences between Mott insulators and Hund metals we explore the phase diagram for a three-band model with Coulomb repulsion and Hund's rule coupling on a Bethe lattice at 1/3 filling using the numerical renormalization group to obtain a numerically exact dynamical mean-field theory solution.

  15. Two healing lengths in a two-band GL-model with quadratic terms: Numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias-Medri, A. E.; Rodríguez-Núñez, J. J.

    2018-05-01

    A two-band and quartic interaction order Ginzburg-Landau model in the presence of a single vortex is studied in this work. Interactions of second (quadratic, with coupling parameter γ) and fourth (quartic, with coupling parameter γ˜) order between the two superconducting order parameters (fi with i = 1,2) are incorporated in a functional. Terms beyond quadratic gradient contributions are neglected in the corresponding minimized free energy. The solution of the system of coupled equations is solved by numerical methods to obtain the fi-profiles, where our starting point was the calculation of the superconducting critical temperature Tc. With this at hand, we evaluate fi and the magnetic field along the z-axis, B0, as function of γ, γ˜, the radial distance r/λ1(0) and the temperature T, for T ≈ Tc. The self-consistent equations allow us to compute λ (penetration depth) and the healing lengths of fi (Lhi with i = 1,2) as functions of T, γ and γ˜. At the end, relevant discussions about type-1.5 superconductivity in the compounds we have studied are presented.

  16. Valence and conduction band offsets at low-k a-SiO{sub x}C{sub y}:H/a-SiC{sub x}N{sub y}:H interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Brockman, Justin; French, Marc; Jaehnig, Milt; Kuhn, Markus [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); French, Benjamin [Ocotillo Materials Laboratory, Intel Corporation, Chandler, Arizona 85248 (United States)

    2014-09-21

    In order to understand the fundamental electrical leakage and reliability failure mechanisms in nano-electronic low-k dielectric/metal interconnect structures, we have utilized x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy to determine the valence and conduction band offsets present at interfaces between non-porous and porous low-k a-SiO{sub x}C{sub y}:H interlayer dielectrics and a-SiC{sub x}N{sub y}:H metal capping layers. The valence band offset for such interfaces was determined to be 2.7±0.2 eV and weakly dependent on the a-SiOC:H porosity. The corresponding conduction band offset was determined to be 2.1±0.2 eV. The large band offsets indicate that intra metal layer leakage is likely dominated by defects and trap states in the a-SiOC:H and a-SiCN:H dielectrics.

  17. Uncertainty quantification of GEOS-5 L-band radiative transfer model parameters using Bayesian inference and SMOS observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lannoy, G.J.M.; Reichle, R.H.; Vrugt, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Uncertainties in L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave radiative transfer modeling (RTM) affect the simulation of brightness temperatures (Tb) over land and the inversion of satellite-observed Tb into soil moisture retrievals. In particular, accurate estimates of the microwave soil roughness, vegetation

  18. Itinerant ferromagnetism in the As 4p conduction band of Ba_{0.6}K_{0.4}Mn_{2}As_{2} identified by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueland, B G; Pandey, Abhishek; Lee, Y; Sapkota, A; Choi, Y; Haskel, D; Rosenberg, R A; Lang, J C; Harmon, B N; Johnston, D C; Kreyssig, A; Goldman, A I

    2015-05-29

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements on single-crystal and powder samples of Ba_{0.6}K_{0.4}Mn_{2}As_{2} show that the ferromagnetism below T_{C}≈100  K arises in the As 4p conduction band. No XMCD signal is observed at the Mn x-ray absorption edges. Below T_{C}, however, a clear XMCD signal is found at the As K edge which increases with decreasing temperature. The XMCD signal is absent in data taken with the beam directed parallel to the crystallographic c axis indicating that the orbital magnetic moment lies in the basal plane of the tetragonal lattice. These results show that the previously reported itinerant ferromagnetism is associated with the As 4p conduction band and that distinct local-moment antiferromagnetism and itinerant ferromagnetism with perpendicular easy axes coexist in this compound at low temperature.

  19. QUANTUM-MECHANICAL MODELING OF SPATIAL AND BAND STRUCTURE OF Y3AL5O12 SCINTILLATION CRYSTAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vrubel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and electronic structures of a unit cell of yttrium-aluminum garnet have been studied. Quantum-mechanical model have been presented. Semi-empirical methods PM6 and PM7 have been used for geometry optimization of the crystal unit cell. Band structure has been calculated within density functional theory with the use of PBE exchange-correlation functional. Histograms of metal-oxygen distances for equilibrium geometry have been constructed. Comparison of the used methods has been carried out and recommendation about their applicability for such problems was given. The single-particle wave functions and energies have been calculated. The bandgap was estimated. The band structure was plotted. It was shown that the method gives reliable results for spatial and band structure of Y3Al5O12 scintillation crystal. The results of this work can be used for improvement of characteristics of garnet scintillation crystals.

  20. An Empirical Outdoor-to-Indoor Path Loss Model from below 6 GHz to cm-Wave Frequency Bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Larrad, Ignacio; Nguyen, Huan Cong; Kovács, István Z.

    2017-01-01

    This letter presents an empirical multi-frequency outdoor-to-indoor path loss model. The model is based on measurements performed on the exact same set of scenarios for different frequency bands ranging from traditional cellular allocations below 6 GHz (0.8, 2, 3.5 and 5.2 GHz), up to cm-wave fre......This letter presents an empirical multi-frequency outdoor-to-indoor path loss model. The model is based on measurements performed on the exact same set of scenarios for different frequency bands ranging from traditional cellular allocations below 6 GHz (0.8, 2, 3.5 and 5.2 GHz), up to cm...

  1. Combinatory Models for Predicting the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frozen and Unfrozen Food Materials

    OpenAIRE

    K. S. Reddy; P Karthikeyan

    2010-01-01

    A model to predict the effective thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials is proposed based on unit cell approach. The model is combined with four fundamental effective thermal conductivity models (Parallel, Series, Maxwell-Eucken-I, and Maxwell-Eucken-II) to evolve a unifying equation for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of porous and nonporous food materials. The effect of volume fraction (ν) on the structure composition factor (ψ) of the food materials is studied. Th...

  2. Model surface conductivity effect for the electromagnetic heat shield in re-entry flight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Otsu, Hirotaka; Kawamura, Masaaki; Konigorski, Detlev; Takizawa, Yuji; Abe, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Effects of model surface conductivity on shock layer enhancement by an applied magnetic field in weakly ionized supersonic plasma flow with a large Hall parameter (β∼300) was investigated experimentally. The shock layer structures of test models of two kinds were measured using laser absorption spectroscopy, in the large Hall parameter situation. One was an insulated model; the other was a conductive spherical blunt model. The shock layer enhancement phenomenon by the applied magnetic field was more pronounced for the insulated model than for the conductive model. This tendency agrees with the computational fluid dynamics result, at least qualitatively

  3. A Network Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jochen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is described for computing the effective thermal conductivity of a rigid fibrous refractory insulation. The insulation is modeled as a 3-dimensional Cartesian network of thermal conductance. The values and volume distributions of the conductance are assigned to reflect the physical properties of the insulation, its constituent fibers, and any permeating gas. The effective thermal conductivity is computed by considering the simultaneous energy transport by solid conduction, gas conduction and radiation through a cubic volume of model insulation; thus the coupling between heat transfer modes is retained (within the simplifications inherent to the model), rather than suppressed by treating these heat transfer modes as independent. The model takes into account insulation composition, density and fiber anisotropy, as well as the geometric and material properties of the constituent fibers. A relatively good agreement, between calculated and experimentally derived thermal conductivity values, is obtained for a variety of rigid fibrous insulations.

  4. Phonon dispersion and thermal conductivity of nanocrystal superlattices using three-dimensional atomistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanjani, Mehdi B.; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    A computational study of thermal conductivity and phonon dispersion of gold nanocrystal superlattices is presented. Phonon dispersion curves, reported here for the first time from combined molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics calculations, show multiple phononic band gaps and consist of many more dispersion branches than simple atomic crystals. Fully atomistic three dimensional molecular dynamics calculations of thermal conductivity using the Green Kubo method are also performed for the first time on these materials. Thermal conductivity is observed to increase for increasing nanocrystal core size and decrease for increasing surface ligand density. Our calculations predict values in the range 0.1–1 W/m K that are consistent with reported experimental results

  5. Ethane in Planetary and Cometary Atmospheres: Transmittance and Fluorescence Models of the nu7 Band at 3.3 Micrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ethane and other hydrocarbon gases have strong rovibrational transitions in the 3.3 micron spectral region owing to C-H, CH2, and CH3 vibrational modes, making this spectral region prime for searching possible biomarker gases in extraterrestrial atmospheres (e.g., Mars, exoplanets) and organic molecules in comets. However, removing ethane spectral signatures from high-resolution terrestrial transmittance spectra has been imperfect because existing quantum mechanical models have been unable to reproduce the observed spectra with sufficient accuracy. To redress this problem, we constructed a line-by-line model for the n7 band of ethane (C2H6) and applied it to compute telluric transmittances and cometary fluorescence efficiencies. Our model considers accurate spectral parameters, vibration-rotation interactions, and a functional characterization of the torsional hot band. We integrated the new band model into an advanced radiative transfer code for synthesizing the terrestrial atmosphere (LBLRTM), achieving excellent agreement with transmittance data recorded against Mars using three different instruments located in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. The retrieved ethane abundances demonstrate the strong hemispheric asymmetry noted in prior surveys of volatile hydrocarbons. We also retrieved sensitive limits for the abundance of ethane on Mars. The most critical validation of the model was obtained by comparing simulations of C2H6 fluorescent emission with spectra of three hydrocarbon-rich comets: C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), 8P/Tuttle, and C/2007 W1 (Boattini). The new model accurately describes the complex emission morphology of the nu7 band at low rotational temperatures and greatly increases the confidence of the retrieved production rates (and rotational temperatures) with respect to previously available fluorescence models.

  6. A New Blind Pointing Model Improves Large Reflector Antennas Precision Pointing at Ka-Band (32 GHz)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.

    2009-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)-Deep Space Network (DSN) subnet of 34-m Beam Waveguide (BWG) Antennas was recently upgraded with Ka-Band (32-GHz) frequency feeds for space research and communication. For normal telemetry tracking a Ka-Band monopulse system is used, which typically yields 1.6-mdeg mean radial error (MRE) pointing accuracy on the 34-m diameter antennas. However, for the monopulse to be able to acquire and lock, for special radio science applications where monopulse cannot be used, or as a back-up for the monopulse, high-precision open-loop blind pointing is required. This paper describes a new 4th order pointing model and calibration technique, which was developed and applied to the DSN 34-m BWG antennas yielding 1.8 to 3.0-mdeg MRE pointing accuracy and amplitude stability of 0.2 dB, at Ka-Band, and successfully used for the CASSINI spacecraft occultation experiment at Saturn and Titan. In addition, the new 4th order pointing model was used during a telemetry experiment at Ka-Band (32 GHz) utilizing the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft while at a distance of 0.225 astronomical units (AU) from Earth and communicating with a DSN 34-m BWG antenna at a record high rate of 6-megabits per second (Mb/s).

  7. Simulation of biatrial conduction via different pathways during sinus rhythm with a detailed human atrial model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-dong DENG; Ying-lan GONG; Guo-fa SHOU; Pei-feng JIAO; Heng-gui ZHANG; Xue-song YE; Ling XIA

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand biatrial conduction,investigate various conduction pathways,and compare the differences between isotropic and anisotropic conductions in human atria,we present a simulation study of biatrial conduction with known/assumed conduction pathways using a recently developed human atrial model.In addition to known pathways:(1) Bachmann's bundle (BB),(2) limbus of fossa ovalis (LFO),and (3) coronary sinus (CS),we also hypothesize that there exist two fast conduction bundles that connect the crista terminalis (CT),LFO,and CS.Our simulation demonstrates that use of these fast conduction bundles results in a conduction pattern consistent with experimental data.The comparison of isotropic and anisotropoic conductions in the BB case showed that the atrial working muscles had small effect on conduction time and conduction speed,although the conductivities assigned in anisotropic conduction were two to four times higher than the isotropic conduction.In conclusion,we suggest that the hypothesized intercaval bundles play a significant role in the biatrial conduction and that myofiber orientation has larger effects on the conduction system than the atrial working muscles.This study presents readers with new insights into human atrial conduction.

  8. Comparison of Model Prediction with Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.; Wilson, Willam J.; Skou, Niels; Sobjaerg, S.

    2004-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.413 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of surface parameters such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity that are needed to understand the hydrological cycle and ocean circulation. Radiation from celestial (mostly galactic) sources is strong in this window and an accurate accounting for this background radiation is often needed for calibration. Modem radio astronomy measurements in this spectral window have been converted into a brightness temperature map of the celestial sky at L-band suitable for use in correcting passive measurements. This paper presents a comparison of the background radiation predicted by this map with measurements made with several modem L-band remote sensing radiometers. The agreement validates the map and the procedure for locating the source of down-welling radiation.

  9. An effective 2-band eg model of sulfur hydride H3S for high-Tc superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Kazutaka; Teranishi, Shingo; Miyao, Satoaki; Matsushita, Goh; Kusakabe, Koichi

    To understand high transition temperature (Tc) superconductivity in sulfur hydride H3S, we propose an effective 2-band model having the eg symmetry as the minimal model for H3S. Two eg orbitals centered on a sulfur S atom are chosen for the smallest representation of relevant bands with the van-Hove singularity around the Fermi levels except for the Γ-centered small hole pockets by the sulfur 3 p orbitals. By using the maximally localized Wannier functions, we derive the minimal effective model preserving the body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal symmetry of the H3S phase having the highest Tc ( 203 K under pressures) among the other polymorphs of H3S.

  10. Combinatory Models for Predicting the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frozen and Unfrozen Food Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A model to predict the effective thermal conductivity of heterogeneous materials is proposed based on unit cell approach. The model is combined with four fundamental effective thermal conductivity models (Parallel, Series, Maxwell-Eucken-I, and Maxwell-Eucken-II to evolve a unifying equation for the estimation of effective thermal conductivity of porous and nonporous food materials. The effect of volume fraction (ν on the structure composition factor (ψ of the food materials is studied. The models are compared with the experimental data of various foods at the initial freezing temperature. The effective thermal conductivity estimated by the Maxwell-Eucken-I + Present model shows good agreement with the experimental data with a minimum average deviation of ±8.66% and maximum deviation of ±42.76% of Series + Present Model. The combined models have advantages over other empirical and semiempirical models.

  11. Gap Conductance model Validation in the TASS/SMR-S code using MARS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sang Jun; Yang, Soo Hyung; Chung, Young Jong; Lee, Won Jae

    2010-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing the TASS/SMR-S (Transient and Setpoint Simulation/Small and Medium Reactor) code, which is a thermal hydraulic code for the safety analysis of the advanced integral reactor. An appropriate work to validate the applicability of the thermal hydraulic models within the code should be demanded. Among the models, the gap conductance model which is describes the thermal gap conductivity between fuel and cladding was validated through the comparison with MARS code. The validation of the gap conductance model was performed by evaluating the variation of the gap temperature and gap width as the changed with the power fraction. In this paper, a brief description of the gap conductance model in the TASS/SMR-S code is presented. In addition, calculated results to validate the gap conductance model are demonstrated by comparing with the results of the MARS code with the test case

  12. Statistics of modelled conductive fractures based on Laxemar and Forsmark. Site descriptive model data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stigsson, Martin

    2009-12-15

    The objectives of this report is to investigate the frequency of fractures assumed to be water conductive, i.e. open or partly open and directly or indirectly connected to a source. Also the distribution of total transmissivity in 100 m and 20 m horizontal sections and 8 m vertical sections is calculated. The report is only intended to serve as input to the SER, Site Engineering Report, at Laxemar and Forsmark. The input data for the analyses is taken, as is, from the Discrete Fracture Network sections in published reports. No evaluation that the model parameters are appropriate for the task or sensitivity analysis is performed. The tunnels and deposition holes are modelled as scanlines which is a very coarse approximation, but it may give some rough estimation of the frequency of the water bearing features, especially for the larger ones, and the total transmissivity in a section

  13. Statistics of modelled conductive fractures based on Laxemar and Forsmark. Site descriptive model data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stigsson, Martin

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this report is to investigate the frequency of fractures assumed to be water conductive, i.e. open or partly open and directly or indirectly connected to a source. Also the distribution of total transmissivity in 100 m and 20 m horizontal sections and 8 m vertical sections is calculated. The report is only intended to serve as input to the SER, Site Engineering Report, at Laxemar and Forsmark. The input data for the analyses is taken, as is, from the Discrete Fracture Network sections in published reports. No evaluation that the model parameters are appropriate for the task or sensitivity analysis is performed. The tunnels and deposition holes are modelled as scanlines which is a very coarse approximation, but it may give some rough estimation of the frequency of the water bearing features, especially for the larger ones, and the total transmissivity in a section

  14. Description of multi-quasiparticle bands by the tilted axis cranking model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauendorf, S.

    2000-01-01

    The selfconsistent cranking approach is extended to the case of rotation about an axis which is tilted with respect to the principal axes of the deformed potential (Tilted Axis Cranking). Expressions for the energies and the intra bands electro-magnetic transition probabilities are given. The mean field solutions are interpreted in terms of quantal rotational states. The construction of the quasiparticle configurations and the elimination of spurious states is discussed. The application of the theory to high spin data is demonstrated by analyzing the multi-quasiparticle bands in the nuclides with N=102,103 and Z=71,72,73

  15. Theoretical modelling of intermediate band solar cell materials based on metal-doped chalcopyrite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, P.; Sanchez, K.; Conesa, J.C.; Fernandez, J.J.; Wahnon, P.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations are carried out for CuGaS 2 partially substituted with Ti, V, Cr or Mn to ascertain if some of these systems could provide an intermediate band material able to give a high efficiency photovoltaic cell. Trends in electronic level positions are analyzed and more accurate advanced theory levels (exact exchange or Hubbard-type methods) are used in some cases. The Ti-substituted system seems more likely to yield an intermediate band material with the desired properties, and furthermore seems realizable from the thermodynamic point of view, while those with Cr and Mn might give half-metal structures with applications in spintronics

  16. Theoretical modelling of intermediate band solar cell materials based on metal-doped chalcopyrite compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, P [Instituto de Energia Solar and Dpt. de Tecnologias Especiales, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez, K [Instituto de Energia Solar and Dpt. de Tecnologias Especiales, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Conesa, J C [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, J J [Dpt. de Fisica Fundamental, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, 28080, Madrid (Spain); Wahnon, P [Instituto de Energia Solar and Dpt. de Tecnologias Especiales, ETSI de Telecomunicacion, UPM, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-05-31

    Electronic structure calculations are carried out for CuGaS{sub 2} partially substituted with Ti, V, Cr or Mn to ascertain if some of these systems could provide an intermediate band material able to give a high efficiency photovoltaic cell. Trends in electronic level positions are analyzed and more accurate advanced theory levels (exact exchange or Hubbard-type methods) are used in some cases. The Ti-substituted system seems more likely to yield an intermediate band material with the desired properties, and furthermore seems realizable from the thermodynamic point of view, while those with Cr and Mn might give half-metal structures with applications in spintronics.

  17. The electrical conductivity and energy band gap of ‘bunga belimbing buluh’/tio2 nanocrystals as hybrid solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarulzaman, N. H.; Salleh, H.; Ghazali, M. S. M.; Ghazali, S. M.; Ahmad, Z.

    2018-05-01

    This research intends to explore the effect of thickness of inorganic titania nanocrystals (TiO2 NCs) materials and Averrhoe bilimbi’s flower towards the electrical conductivity. Averrhoe bilimbi’s flower or also known as ‘bunga belimbing buluh’ was used for the first time as a natural dye in hybrid solar cells. The performance of electrical conductivity can be improved in bilayer heterojunction hybrid solar cell (HCS). The TiO2 NCs was deposited on the ITO substrate using Electrochemistry method at room temperature. The dye extracted from Averrhoe bilimbi’s flower was deposited on the top of TiO2 NCs layered using the same method. The electrical conductivity can be recorded using Four Point Probe (FPP) under dark and light radiation (range of 0 Wm-2 to 200Wm-2). From the results, electrical conductivity was increased by the increment light intensity and suitable for further solar cell fabrications.

  18. Point kinetics model with one-dimensional (radial) heat conduction formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, V.K.

    1989-01-01

    A point-kinetics model with one-dimensional (radial) heat conduction formalism has been developed. The heat conduction formalism is based on corner-mesh finite difference method. To get average temperatures in various conducting regions, a novel weighting scheme has been devised. The heat conduction model has been incorporated in the point-kinetics code MRTF-FUEL. The point-kinetics equations are solved using the method of real integrating factors. It has been shown by analysing the simulation of hypothetical loss of regulation accident in NAPP reactor that the model is superior to the conventional one in accuracy and speed of computation. (author). 3 refs., 3 tabs

  19. DART model for thermal conductivity of U3Si2 Aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the primary physical models that form the basis of the DART model for calculating irradiation-induced changes in the thermal conductivity of aluminum dispersion fuel. DART calculations of fuel swelling, pore closure, and thermal conductivity are compared with measured values. (author)

  20. DART model for thermal conductivity of U3Si2 aluminum dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rest, J.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the primary physical models that form the basis of the DART model for calculating irradiation-induced changes in the thermal conductivity of aluminium dispersion fuel. DART calculations of fuel swelling, pore closure, and thermal conductivity are compared with measured values

  1. Near omni-conductors and insulators: Alternant hydrocarbons in the SSP model of ballistic conduction

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler, P.W.; Sciriha, I.; Borg, M.; Seville, V.E.; Pickup, B.T.

    2017-01-01

    Within the source-and-sink-potential model, a complete characterisation is obtained for the conduction behaviour of alternant π-conjugated hydrocarbons (conjugated hydrocarbons without odd cycles). In this model, an omni-conductor has a molecular graph that conducts at the Fermi level irrespective of the choice of connection vertices. Likewise, an omni-insulator is a molecular graph that fails to conduct for any choice of connections. We give a comprehensive classification of possible combina...

  2. Medium usage model for the design of dynamic spectrum management in ISM bands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witvliet, B.A.; Bentum, M.J.; Schiphorst, R.; Slump, C.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for dynamic spectrum management for heterogeneous wireless devices. Local congestion degrades the reliability of wireless applications in the License Exempt bands. This leads to the research questions: (1) how to realize equal spectrum sharing between dissimilar

  3. Comparison of Model Prediction With Measurements of Galactic Background Noise at L-Band

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Vine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.

    2005-01-01

    The spectral window at L-band (1.413 GHz) is important for passive remote sensing of surface parameters such as soil moisture and sea surface salinity that are needed to understand the hydrological cycle and ocean circulation. Radiation from celestial sources (mostly galactic) is strong in this w...

  4. Stoffenmanager : a web-based control banding tool using an exposure process model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquart, H.; Heussen, H.; Feber, M. Le; Noy, D.; Tielemans, E.; Schinkel, J.; West, J.; Schaaf, D. van der

    2008-01-01

    In the scope of a Dutch programme to reinforce the working conditions policy on hazardous substances, an internet-based tool was developed to help small- and medium-sized companies to handle hazardous substances with more care. The heart of this tool, called the Stoffenmanager, is a risk banding

  5. Modeling and analysis of renewable energy obligations and technology bandings in the UK electricity market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurkan, G.; Langestraat, R.

    In the UK electricity market, generators are obliged to produce part of their electricity with renewable energy resources in accordance with the Renewable Obligation Order. Since 2009 technology banding has been added, meaning that different technologies are rewarded with a different number of

  6. A thermal conductivity model for nanofluids including effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitprasert, Chatcharin; Dechaumphai, Pramote; Juntasaro, Varangrat

    2009-01-01

    The interfacial layer of nanoparticles has been recently shown to have an effect on the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. There is, however, still no thermal conductivity model that includes the effects of temperature and nanoparticle size variations on the thickness and consequently on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer. In the present work, the stationary model developed by Leong et al. (J Nanopart Res 8:245-254, 2006) is initially modified to include the thermal dispersion effect due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles. This model is called the 'Leong et al.'s dynamic model'. However, the Leong et al.'s dynamic model over-predicts the thermal conductivity of nanofluids in the case of the flowing fluid. This suggests that the enhancement in the thermal conductivity of the flowing nanofluids due to the increase in temperature does not come from the thermal dispersion effect. It is more likely that the enhancement in heat transfer of the flowing nanofluids comes from the temperature-dependent interfacial layer effect. Therefore, the Leong et al.'s stationary model is again modified to include the effect of temperature variation on the thermal conductivity of the interfacial layer for different sizes of nanoparticles. This present model is then evaluated and compared with the other thermal conductivity models for the turbulent convective heat transfer in nanofluids along a uniformly heated tube. The results show that the present model is more general than the other models in the sense that it can predict both the temperature and the volume fraction dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids for both non-flowing and flowing fluids. Also, it is found to be more accurate than the other models due to the inclusion of the effect of the temperature-dependent interfacial layer. In conclusion, the present model can accurately predict the changes in thermal conductivity of nanofluids due to the changes in volume fraction and temperature for

  7. Valence band structure and density of states effective mass model of biaxial tensile strained silicon based on k · p theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Qian-Wei; Liu Hong-Xia; Wang Shu-Long; Qin Shan-Shan; Wang Zhi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    After constructing a stress and strain model, the valence bands of in-plane biaxial tensile strained Si is calculated by k · p method. In the paper we calculate the accurate anisotropy valance bands and the splitting energy between light and heavy hole bands. The results show that the valance bands are highly distorted, and the anisotropy is more obvious. To obtain the density of states (DOS) effective mass, which is a very important parameter for device modeling, a DOS effective mass model of biaxial tensile strained Si is constructed based on the valance band calculation. This model can be directly used in the device model of metal—oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). It also a provides valuable reference for biaxial tensile strained silicon MOSFET design. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Unified one-band Hubbard model for magnetic and electronic spectra of the parent compounds of cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Piazza, B.; Mourigal, M.; Guarise, M.; Berger, H.; Schmitt, T.; Zhou, K. J.; Grioni, M.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    Using low-energy projection of the one-band t-t'-t'' Hubbard model we derive an effective spin Hamiltonian and its spin-wave expansion to order 1/S. We fit the spin-wave dispersion of several parent compounds to the high-temperature superconducting cuprates La2CuO4, Sr2CuO2Cl2, and Bi2Sr2YCu2O8. Our accurate quantitative determination of the one-band Hubbard model parameters allows prediction and comparison to experimental results. Among those we discuss the two-magnon Raman peak line shape, the K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering 500-meV peak, and the high-energy kink in the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy quasiparticle dispersion, also known as the waterfall feature.

  9. In vitro burn model illustrating heat conduction patterns using compressed thermal papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Yong; Jung, Sung-No; Kwon, Ho

    2015-01-01

    To date, heat conduction from heat sources to tissue has been estimated by complex mathematical modeling. In the present study, we developed an intuitive in vitro skin burn model that illustrates heat conduction patterns inside the skin. This was composed of tightly compressed thermal papers with compression frames. Heat flow through the model left a trace by changing the color of thermal papers. These were digitized and three-dimensionally reconstituted to reproduce the heat conduction patterns in the skin. For standardization, we validated K91HG-CE thermal paper using a printout test and bivariate correlation analysis. We measured the papers' physical properties and calculated the estimated depth of heat conduction using Fourier's equation. Through contact burns of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 seconds on porcine skin and our burn model using a heated brass comb, and comparing the burn wound and heat conduction trace, we validated our model. The heat conduction pattern correlation analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.846, p < 0.001) and the heat conduction depth correlation analysis (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.93, p < 0.001) showed statistically significant high correlations between the porcine burn wound and our model. Our model showed good correlation with porcine skin burn injury and replicated its heat conduction patterns. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  10. Fractional single-phase-lagging heat conduction model for describing anomalous diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.N. Mishra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fractional single-phase-lagging (FSPL heat conduction model is obtained by combining scalar time fractional conservation equation to the single-phase-lagging (SPL heat conduction model. Based on the FSPL heat conduction model, anomalous diffusion within a finite thin film is investigated. The effect of different parameters on solution has been observed and studied the asymptotic behavior of the FSPL model. The analytical solution is obtained using Laplace transform method. The whole analysis is presented in dimensionless form. Numerical examples of particular interest have been studied and discussed in details.

  11. Impedance and a.c. conductivity studies on Ba(Nd0⋅2Ti0⋅6Nb0⋅2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ceramic prepared through conventional and microwave sintering route .... disorder due to the random distribution of B-site cations. (Nd+3, Ti+4, ... due to rapid cooling rates less time is available for reoxi- ... mental data for CS sample indicating the contribution from ... may be related to the change in conductivity mechanism.

  12. Predicting photosynthesis and transpiration responses to ozone: decoupling modeled photosynthesis and stomatal conductance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lombardozzi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants exchange greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and water with the atmosphere through the processes of photosynthesis and transpiration, making them essential in climate regulation. Carbon dioxide and water exchange are typically coupled through the control of stomatal conductance, and the parameterization in many models often predict conductance based on photosynthesis values. Some environmental conditions, like exposure to high ozone (O3 concentrations, alter photosynthesis independent of stomatal conductance, so models that couple these processes cannot accurately predict both. The goals of this study were to test direct and indirect photosynthesis and stomatal conductance modifications based on O3 damage to tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera in a coupled Farquhar/Ball-Berry model. The same modifications were then tested in the Community Land Model (CLM to determine the impacts on gross primary productivity (GPP and transpiration at a constant O3 concentration of 100 parts per billion (ppb. Modifying the Vcmax parameter and directly modifying stomatal conductance best predicts photosynthesis and stomatal conductance responses to chronic O3 over a range of environmental conditions. On a global scale, directly modifying conductance reduces the effect of O3 on both transpiration and GPP compared to indirectly modifying conductance, particularly in the tropics. The results of this study suggest that independently modifying stomatal conductance can improve the ability of models to predict hydrologic cycling, and therefore improve future climate predictions.

  13. Semi-Empirical Calibration of the Integral Equation Model for Co-Polarized L-Band Backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Baghdadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to extend the semi-empirical calibration of the backscattering Integral Equation Model (IEM initially proposed for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data at C- and X-bands to SAR data at L-band. A large dataset of radar signal and in situ measurements (soil moisture and surface roughness over bare soil surfaces were used. This dataset was collected over numerous agricultural study sites in France, Luxembourg, Belgium, Germany and Italy using various SAR sensors (AIRSAR, SIR-C, JERS-1, PALSAR-1, ESAR. Results showed slightly better simulations with exponential autocorrelation function than with Gaussian function and with HH than with VV. Using the exponential autocorrelation function, the mean difference between experimental data and Integral Equation Model (IEM simulations is +0.4 dB in HH and −1.2 dB in VV with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE about 3.5 dB. In order to improve the modeling results of the IEM for a better use in the inversion of SAR data, a semi-empirical calibration of the IEM was performed at L-band in replacing the correlation length derived from field experiments by a fitting parameter. Better agreement was observed between the backscattering coefficient provided by the SAR and that simulated by the calibrated version of the IEM (RMSE about 2.2 dB.

  14. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils: 1. Theory for Unconsolidated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of heat conduction for mono-sized spherical particulate media under stagnant gases based on the kinetic theory of gases, numerical modeling of Fourier s law of heat conduction, theoretical constraints on the gas thermal conductivity at various Knudsen regimes, and laboratory measurements. Incorporating the effect of the temperature allows for the derivation of the pore-filling gas conductivity and bulk thermal conductivity of samples using additional parameters (pressure, gas composition, grain size, and porosity). The radiative and solid-to-solid conductivities are also accounted for. Our thermal model reproduces the well-established bulk thermal conductivity dependency of a sample with the grain size and pressure and also confirms laboratory measurements finding that higher porosities generally lead to lower conductivities. It predicts the existence of the plateau conductivity at high pressure, where the bulk conductivity does not depend on the grain size. The good agreement between the model predictions and published laboratory measurements under a variety of pressures, temperatures, gas compositions, and grain sizes provides additional confidence in our results. On Venus, Earth, and Titan, the pressure and temperature combinations are too high to observe a soil thermal conductivity dependency on the grain size, but each planet has a unique thermal inertia due to their different surface temperatures. On Mars, the temperature and pressure combination is ideal to observe the soil thermal conductivity dependency on the average grain size. Thermal conductivity models that do not take the temperature and the pore-filling gas composition into account may yield significant errors.

  15. Role of band states and trap states in the electrical properties of organic semiconductors: Hopping versus mobility edge model

    KAUST Repository

    Mehraeen, Shafigh; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bré das, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    We compare the merits of a hopping model and a mobility edge model in the description of the effect of charge-carrier concentration on the electrical conductivity, carrier mobility, and Fermi energy of organic semiconductors. We consider the case

  16. Statistically motivated model of mechanisms controlling evolution of deformation band substructure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kratochvíl, J.; Kružík, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2016), s. 196-208 ISSN 0749-6419 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/12/0121 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Crystal plastic ity * Microstructures * Deformation bands Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 5.702, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/MTR/kruzik-0457407.pdf

  17. Broad-band conductivity and dielectric spectroscopy of composites of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and poly(ethylene terephthalate) around their low percolation threshold

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nuzhnyy, Dmitry; Savinov, Maxim; Bovtun, Viktor; Kempa, Martin; Petzelt, Jan; Mayoral, B.; McNally, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2013), "055707-1"-"055707-9" ISSN 0957-4484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/12/0232; GA MŠk LD12025 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : THz and dielectric spectroscopy * multiwalled carbon nanotubes * electrical percolation threshold * fluctuation-induced tunneling conductivity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.672, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/0957-4484/24/5/055707/

  18. Multiscale development of a fission gas thermal conductivity model: Coupling atomic, meso and continuum level simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, Michael R.; Millett, Paul C.; Nerikar, Pankaj; Du, Shiyu; Andersson, David; Stanek, Christopher R.; Gaston, Derek; Andrs, David; Williamson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Fission gas production and evolution significantly impact the fuel performance, causing swelling, a reduction in the thermal conductivity and fission gas release. However, typical empirical models of fuel properties treat each of these effects separately and uncoupled. Here, we couple a fission gas release model to a model of the impact of fission gas on the fuel thermal conductivity. To quantify the specific impact of grain boundary (GB) bubbles on the thermal conductivity, we use atomistic and mesoscale simulations. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations were employed to determine the GB thermal resistance. These values were then used in mesoscale heat conduction simulations to develop a mechanistic expression for the effective GB thermal resistance of a GB containing gas bubbles, as a function of the percentage of the GB covered by fission gas. The coupled fission gas release and thermal conductivity model was implemented in Idaho National Laboratory’s BISON fuel performance code to model the behavior of a 10-pellet LWR fuel rodlet, showing how the fission gas impacts the UO 2 thermal conductivity. Furthermore, additional BISON simulations were conducted to demonstrate the impact of average grain size on both the fuel thermal conductivity and the fission gas release

  19. The sensitivity of the electron transport within bulk zinc-blende gallium nitride to variations in the crystal temperature, the doping concentration, and the non-parabolicity coefficient associated with the lowest energy conduction band valley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqua, Poppy; O' Leary, Stephen K., E-mail: stephen.oleary@ubc.ca [School of Engineering, The University of British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Within the framework of a semi-classical three-valley Monte Carlo simulation approach, we analyze the steady-state and transient electron transport that occurs within bulk zinc-blende gallium nitride. In particular, we examine how the steady-state and transient electron transport that occurs within this material changes in response to variations in the crystal temperature, the doping concentration, and the non-parabolicity coefficient associated with the lowest energy conduction band valley. These results are then contrasted with those corresponding to a number of other compound semiconductors of interest.

  20. Donor impurity-related optical absorption spectra in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells: hydrostatic pressure and {gamma}-X conduction band mixing effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, C.P. 62209, Cuernavaca, MOR (Mexico); Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, S.Y. [Fac. de Educacion, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Duque, C.A. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellin (Colombia); Velasco, V.R. [Inst. de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Using a variational procedure within the effective mass approximation, the mixing between the {gamma} and X conduction band valleys in GaAs-Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As quantum wells is investigated by taking into account the effect of applied hydrostatic pressure. Some optical properties such as donor and/or acceptor binding energy and impurity-related transition energies are calculated and comparisons with available experimental data are presented. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. GPI Spectra of HR8799 C, D, and E in H-K Bands with KLIP Forward Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Alexandra Z.; Pueyo, Laurent; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Wang, Jason J.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Aguilar, Jonathan; Rameau, Julien; Barman, Travis; Marois, Christian; Marley, Mark S.; hide

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate KLIP forward modeling spectral extraction on Gemini Planet Imager coronagraphic data of HR8799, using PyKLIP. We report new and re-reduced spectrophotometry of HR8799 c, d, and e from H-K bands. We discuss a strategy for choosing optimal KLIP PSF subtraction parameters by injecting fake sources and recovering them over a range of parameters. The K1/K2 spectra for planets c and d are similar to previously published results from the same dataset. We also present a K band spectrum of HR8799e for the first time and show that our H-band spectra agree well with previously published spectra from the VLT/SPHERE instrument. We compare planets c, d, and e with M, L, and T-type field objects. All objects are consistent with low gravity mid-to-late L dwarfs, however, a lack of standard spectra for low gravity late L-type objects lead to poor fit for gravity. We place our results in context of atmospheric models presented in previous publications and discuss differences in the spectra of the three planets.

  2. Analysis of the electrical conduction in CdHgTe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziuba, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical conduction versus magnetic field in p-like CdHgTe samples at 77 K is investigated by analysing the conductivity tensor components. The electrical conduction is mainly due to electrons in the conduction band and low-mobility carriers in an impurity band. In the investigated samples Cd/sub x/Hg/sub 1-x/Te with the composition x approximately 0.17 the concentration of electrons in the conduction band is higher than the intrinsic one and in samples with the composition close to HgTe the concentration of electrons in the conduction band is equal to or lower than the intrinsic one. The model of a half-filled impurity band situated close to the bottom of the conduction band is proposed to account for the concentration of electrons in the conduction band. (author)

  3. Influence of linear-energy-dependent density of states on two-band superconductors: Three-square-well model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbuu, O.A.; Abah, O.C.; Asomba, G.C.; Okoye, C.M.I.

    2011-01-01

    We derived the transition temperature and the isotope exponent of two-band superconductor. We employed Bogoliubov-Valatin formalism assuming a three-square-well potential. The effect of linear-energy-dependent electronic DOS in superconductors is considered. The relevance of the studies to MgB 2 is analyzed. We have derived the expressions for the transition temperature and the isotope effect exponent within the framework of Bogoliubov-Valatin two-band formalism using a linear-energy-dependent electronic density of states assuming a three-square-well potentials model. Our results show that the approach could be used to account for a wide range of values of the transition temperature and isotope effect exponent. The relevance of the present calculations to MgB 2 is analyzed.

  4. Tracking- and Scintillation-Aware Channel Model for GEO Satellite to Land Mobile Terminals at Ku-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Al-Saegh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in satellite to land mobile terminal services and technologies, which utilize high frequencies with directional antennas, have made the design of an appropriate model for land mobile satellite (LMS channels a necessity. This paper presents LMS channel model at Ku-band with features that enhance accuracy, comprehensiveness, and reliability. The effect of satellite tracking loss at different mobile terminal speeds is considered for directional mobile antenna systems, a reliable tropospheric scintillation model for an LMS scenario at tropical and temperate regions is presented, and finally a new quality indicator module for different modulation and coding schemes is included. The proposed extended LMS channel (ELMSC model is designed based on actual experimental measurements and can be applied to narrow- and wide-band signals at different regions and at different speeds and multichannel states. The proposed model exhibits lower root mean square error (RMSE and significant performance observation compared with the conventional model in terms of the signal fluctuations, fade depth, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, and quality indicators accompanied for several transmission schemes.

  5. Using Rouse-Fowler model to describe radiation-induced electrical conductivity of nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyuryagina, N. S.; Yalovets, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Using the Rouse-Fowler (RF) model this work studies the radiation-induced electrical conductivity of a polymer nanocomposite material with spherical nanoparticles against the intensity and exposure time of gamma-ray, concentration and size of nanoparticles. The research has found the energy distribution of localized statesinduced by nanoparticles. The studies were conducted on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with CdS nanoparticles.

  6. Valence Band Structure of InAs1−xBix and InSb1−xBix Alloy Semiconductors Calculated Using Valence Band Anticrossing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samajdar, D. P.; Dhar, S.

    2014-01-01

    The valence band anticrossing model has been used to calculate the heavy/light hole and spin-orbit split-off energies in InAs1−xBix and InSb1−xBix alloy systems. It is found that both the heavy/light hole, and spin-orbit split E + levels move upwards in energy with an increase in Bi content in the alloy, whereas the split E − energy for the holes shows a reverse trend. The model is also used to calculate the reduction of band gap energy with an increase in Bi mole fraction. The calculated values of band gap variation agree well with the available experimental data. PMID:24592181

  7. Valence band structure of InAs(1-x)Bi(x) and InSb(1-x)Bi(x) alloy semiconductors calculated using valence band anticrossing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samajdar, D P; Dhar, S

    2014-01-01

    The valence band anticrossing model has been used to calculate the heavy/light hole and spin-orbit split-off energies in InAs(1-x)Bi(x) and InSb(1-x)Bi(x) alloy systems. It is found that both the heavy/light hole, and spin-orbit split E + levels move upwards in energy with an increase in Bi content in the alloy, whereas the split E - energy for the holes shows a reverse trend. The model is also used to calculate the reduction of band gap energy with an increase in Bi mole fraction. The calculated values of band gap variation agree well with the available experimental data.

  8. Equilibrium and transient conductivity for gadolium-doped ceria under large perturbations: II. Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Huayang; Ricote, Sandrine; Coors, W. Grover

    2014-01-01

    the computational implementation of a Nernst–Planck–Poisson (NPP) model to represent and interpret conductivity-relaxation measurements. Defect surface chemistry is represented with both equilibrium and finite-rate kinetic models. The experiments and the models are capable of representing relaxations from strongly......A model-based approach is used to interpret equilibrium and transient conductivity measurements for 10% gadolinium-doped ceria: Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 − δ (GDC10). The measurements were carried out by AC impedance spectroscopy on slender extruded GDC10 rods. Although equilibrium conductivity measurements...... provide sufficient information from which to derive material properties, it is found that uniquely establishing properties is difficult. Augmenting equilibrium measurements with conductivity relaxation significantly improves the evaluation of needed physical properties. This paper develops and applies...

  9. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  10. The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure: A predictive model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiangmeng; Wei, Kai; He, Rujie; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A predictive model of the equivalent thermal conductivity was established. • Both the heat conduction and radiation were considered. • The predictive results were in good agreement with experiment and FEM. • Some methods for improving the thermal protection performance were proposed. - Abstract: The equivalent thermal conductivity of lattice core sandwich structure was predicted using a novel model. The predictive results were in good agreement with experimental and Finite Element Method results. The thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure was attributed to both core conduction and radiation. The core conduction caused thermal conductivity only relied on the relative density of the structure. And the radiation caused thermal conductivity increased linearly with the thickness of the core. It was found that the equivalent thermal conductivity of the lattice core sandwich structure showed a highly dependent relationship on temperature. At low temperatures, the structure exhibited a nearly thermal insulated behavior. With the temperature increasing, the thermal conductivity of the structure increased owing to radiation. Therefore, some attempts, such as reducing the emissivity of the core or designing multilayered structure, are believe to be of benefit for improving the thermal protection performance of the structure at high temperatures.

  11. An improved UO2 thermal conductivity model in the ELESTRES computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassie, G.G.; Tochaie, M.; Xu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the improved UO 2 thermal conductivity model for use in the ELESTRES (ELEment Simulation and sTRESses) computer code. The ELESTRES computer code models the thermal, mechanical and microstructural behaviour of a CANDU® fuel element under normal operating conditions. The main purpose of the code is to calculate fuel temperatures, fission gas release, internal gas pressure, fuel pellet deformation, and fuel sheath strains for fuel element design and assessment. It is also used to provide initial conditions for evaluating fuel behaviour during high temperature transients. The thermal conductivity of UO 2 fuel is one of the key parameters that affect ELESTRES calculations. The existing ELESTRES thermal conductivity model has been assessed and improved based on a large amount of thermal conductivity data from measurements of irradiated and un-irradiated UO 2 fuel with different densities. The UO 2 thermal conductivity data cover 90% to 99% theoretical density of UO 2 , temperature up to 3027 K, and burnup up to 1224 MW·h/kg U. The improved thermal conductivity model, which is recommended for a full implementation in the ELESTRES computer code, has reduced the ELESTRES code prediction biases of temperature, fission gas release, and fuel sheath strains when compared with the available experimental data. This improved thermal conductivity model has also been checked with a test version of ELESTRES over the full ranges of fuel temperature, fuel burnup, and fuel density expected in CANDU fuel. (author)

  12. An empirical model of L-band scintillation S4 index constructed by using FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Ping; Bilitza, Dieter; Liu, Jann-Yenq; Caton, Ronald; Chang, Loren C.; Yeh, Wen-Hao

    2017-09-01

    Modern society relies heavily on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology for applications such as satellite communication, navigation, and positioning on the ground and/or aviation in the troposphere/stratosphere. However, ionospheric scintillations can severely impact GNSS systems and their related applications. In this study, a global empirical ionospheric scintillation model is constructed with S4-index data obtained by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) satellites during 2007-2014 (hereafter referred to as the F3CGS4 model). This model describes the S4-index as a function of local time, day of year, dip-latitude, and solar activity using the index PF10.7. The model reproduces the F3/C S4-index observations well, and yields good agreement with ground-based reception of satellite signals. This confirms that the constructed model can be used to forecast global L-band scintillations on the ground and in the near surface atmosphere.

  13. Study on models for gap conductance between fuel and sheath for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.M.; Ohn, M.Y.; Lim, H.S.; Choi, J.H.; Hwang, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    The gap conductance between the fuel and the sheath depends strongly on the gap width and has a significant influence on the amount of initial stored energy. The modified Ross and Stoute gap conductance model in ELESTRES is based on a simplified thermal deformation model for steady-state fuel temperature calculations. A review on a series of experiments reveals that fuel pellets crack, relocate, and are eccentrically positioned within the sheath rather than solid concentric cylinders. In this paper, the two recently-proposed gap conductance models (offset gap model and relocated gap model) are described and are applied to calculate the fuel-sheath gap conductances under experimental conditions and normal operating conditions in CANDU reactors. The good agreement between the experimentally-inferred and calculated gap conductance values demonstrates that the modified Ross and Stoute model was implemented correctly in ELESTRES. The predictions of the modified Ross and Stoute model provide conservative values for gap heat transfer and fuel surface temperature compared to the offset gap and relocated gap models for a limiting power envelope. (author)

  14. Thermal conductivity of Al–Cu–Mg–Si alloys: Experimental measurement and CALPHAD modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Cong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German cooperation group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Du, Yong, E-mail: yong-du@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German cooperation group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Yuling [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sino-German cooperation group “Microstructure in Al alloys”, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Sundman, Bo. [INSTN, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2016-07-10

    Highlights: • The thermal conductivities of Al–x wt% Cu (x = 1, 3, 5, 15 and 30) and Al–y wt% Si (y = 2, 12.5 and 20) alloys were determined. • The reported thermal conductivities of Al–Cu–Mg–Si system were critically reviewed. • The CALPHAD approach was applied for the modeling of thermal conductivity. • The applicability of CALPHAD technique in the modeling of thermal conductivity was discussed. - Abstract: In the present work, the thermal conductivities and microstructure of Al–x wt% Cu (x = 1, 3, 5, 15 and 30) and Al–y wt% Si (y = 2, 12.5 and 20) alloys were investigated by using laser-flash method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides, a CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagram) approach to evaluate the thermal conductivity of Al–Cu–Mg–Si system was performed. The numerical models for the thermal conductivity of pure elements and stoichiometric phases were described as polynomials, and the coefficients were optimized via PARROT module of Thermal-Calc software applied to the experimental data. The thermal conductivity of (Al)-based solid solutions was described by using Redlich–Kister interaction parameters. For alloys in two-phase region, the interface scattering parameter was proposed in the modeling to describe the impediment of interfaces on the heat transfer. Finally, a set of self-consistent parameters for the description of thermal conductivity in Al–Cu–Mg–Si system was obtained, and comprehensive comparisons between the calculated and measured thermal conductivities show that the experimental information is satisfactorily accounted for by the present modeling.

  15. The ALI-ARMS Code for Modeling Atmospheric non-LTE Molecular Band Emissions: Current Status and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutepov, A. A.; Feofilov, A. G.; Manuilova, R. O.; Yankovsky, V. A.; Rezac, L.; Pesnell, W. D.; Goldberg, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The Accelerated Lambda Iteration (ALI) technique was developed in stellar astrophysics at the beginning of 1990s for solving the non-LTE radiative transfer problem in atomic lines and multiplets in stellar atmospheres. It was later successfully applied to modeling the non-LTE emissions and radiative cooling/heating in the vibrational-rotational bands of molecules in planetary atmospheres. Similar to the standard lambda iterations ALI operates with the matrices of minimal dimension. However, it provides higher convergence rate and stability due to removing from the iterating process the photons trapped in the optically thick line cores. In the current ALI-ARMS (ALI for Atmospheric Radiation and Molecular Spectra) code version additional acceleration of calculations is provided by utilizing the opacity distribution function (ODF) approach and "decoupling". The former allows replacing the band branches by single lines of special shape, whereas the latter treats non-linearity caused by strong near-resonant vibration-vibrational level coupling without additional linearizing the statistical equilibrium equations. Latest code application for the non-LTE diagnostics of the molecular band emissions of Earth's and Martian atmospheres as well as for the non-LTE IR cooling/heating calculations are discussed.

  16. Role of band 3 in the erythrocyte membrane structural changes under thermal fluctuations -multi scale modeling considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajic-Lijakovic, Ivana

    2015-12-01

    An attempt was made to discuss and connect various modeling approaches on various time and space scales which have been proposed in the literature in order to shed further light on the erythrocyte membrane rearrangement caused by the cortex-lipid bilayer coupling under thermal fluctuations. Roles of the main membrane constituents: (1) the actin-spectrin cortex, (2) the lipid bilayer, and (3) the trans membrane protein band 3 and their course-consequence relations were considered in the context of the cortex non linear stiffening and corresponding anomalous nature of energy dissipation. The fluctuations induce alternating expansion and compression of the membrane parts in order to ensure surface and volume conservation. The membrane structural changes were considered within two time regimes. The results indicate that the cortex non linear stiffening and corresponding anomalous nature of energy dissipation are related to the spectrin flexibility distribution and the rate of its changes. The spectrin flexibility varies from purely flexible to semi flexible. It is influenced by: (1) the number of band 3 molecules attached to single spectrin filaments, and (2) phosphorylation of the actin-junctions. The rate of spectrin flexibility changes depends on the band 3 molecules rearrangement.

  17. Use of IRI to Model the Effect of Ionosphere Emission on Earth Remote Sensing at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Saji; LeVine, David M.

    2004-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing in the window at 1.413 GHz (L-band) set aside for passive use only is important for monitoring sea surface salinity and soil moisture. These parameters are important for understanding ocean dynamics and energy exchange between the surface and atmosphere, and both NASA and ESA plan to launch satellite sensors to monitor these parameters at L-band (Aquarius, Hydros and SMOS). The ionosphere is an important source of error for passive remote sensing at this frequency. In addition to Faraday rotation, emission from the ionosphere is also a potential source of error at L-band. As an aid for correcting for emission, a regression model is presented that relates ionosphere emission to the integrated electron density (TEC). The goal is to use TEC from sources such as TOPEX, JASON or GPS to obtain estimates of emission over the oceans where the electron density profiles needed to compute emission are not available. In addition, data will also be presented to evaluate the use of the IRI for computing emission over the ocean.

  18. A self-similar model for conduction in the plasma erosion opening switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosher, D.; Grossmann, J.M.; Ottinger, P.F.; Colombant, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The conduction phase of the plasma erosion opening switch (PEOS) is characterized by combining a 1-D fluid model for plasma hydrodynamics, Maxwell's equations, and a 2-D electron-orbit analysis. A self-similar approximation for the plasma and field variables permits analytic expressions for their space and time variations to be derived. It is shown that a combination of axial MHD compression and magnetic insulation of high-energy electrons emitted from the switch cathode can control the character of switch conduction. The analysis highlights the need to include additional phenomena for accurate fluid modeling of PEOS conduction

  19. A two-parameter nondiffusive heat conduction model for data analysis in pump-probe experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanbao

    2014-12-01

    Nondiffusive heat transfer has attracted intensive research interests in last 50 years because of its importance in fundamental physics and engineering applications. It has unique features that cannot be described by the Fourier law. However, current studies of nondiffusive heat transfer still focus on studying the effective thermal conductivity within the framework of the Fourier law due to a lack of a well-accepted replacement. Here, we show that nondiffusive heat conduction can be characterized by two inherent material properties: a diffusive thermal conductivity and a ballistic transport length. We also present a two-parameter heat conduction model and demonstrate its validity in different pump-probe experiments. This model not only offers new insights of nondiffusive heat conduction but also opens up new avenues for the studies of nondiffusive heat transfer outside the framework of the Fourier law.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis and electrical conductivity model for the zinc oxide-insulated oil nanofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, L.P.; Wang, H.; Dong, M.; Ma, Z.C.; Wang, H.B.

    2012-01-01

    A new kind of nanofluid, ZnO-insulated oil nanofluid was prepared from ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by solvothermal method. Electrical property measurement shows that the electrical conductivity increases by 973 times after adding 0.75% volumetric fraction of ZnO nanoparticles into the insulated oil. A linear dependence of the electrical conductivity on the volumetric fraction has been observed, while the temperature dependence of the electrical conductivity reveals a nonlinear relationship. An electrical conductivity model is established for the nanofluid by considering both the Brownian motion and electrophoresis of the ZnO nanoparticles. -- Highlights: ► Stable ZnO-insulated oil nanofluid was successfully prepared. ► The electrical conductivity of the ZnO nanofluid is investigated. ► A new model is established to explain the electrical properties of the nanofluid.

  1. Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of CVI-Densified Composites at Fiber and Bundle Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Kang; Wu, Jianqing; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the thermal conductivities of the unidirectional, 2D woven and 3D braided composites during the CVI (chemical vapor infiltration) process have been numerically studied by the finite element method. The results show that the dual-scale pores play an important role in the thermal conduction of the CVI-densified composites. According to our results, two thermal conductivity models applicable for CVI process have been developed. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the parameter with the most influence on the CVI-densified composites’ thermal conductivity is matrix cracking’s density, followed by volume fraction of the bundle and thermal conductance of the matrix cracks, finally by micro-porosity inside the bundles and macro-porosity between the bundles. The obtained results are well consistent with the reported data, thus our models could be useful for designing the processing and performance of the CVI-densified composites. PMID:28774130

  2. Near omni-conductors and insulators: Alternant hydrocarbons in the SSP model of ballistic conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Patrick W.; Sciriha, Irene; Borg, Martha; Seville, Victoria E.; Pickup, Barry T.

    2017-10-01

    Within the source-and-sink-potential model, a complete characterisation is obtained for the conduction behaviour of alternant π-conjugated hydrocarbons (conjugated hydrocarbons without odd cycles). In this model, an omni-conductor has a molecular graph that conducts at the Fermi level irrespective of the choice of connection vertices. Likewise, an omni-insulator is a molecular graph that fails to conduct for any choice of connections. We give a comprehensive classification of possible combinations of omni-conducting and omni-insulating behaviour for molecular graphs, ranked by nullity (number of non-bonding orbitals). Alternant hydrocarbons are those that have bipartite molecular graphs; they cannot be full omni-conductors or full omni-insulators but may conduct or insulate within well-defined subsets of vertices (unsaturated carbon centres). This leads to the definition of "near omni-conductors" and "near omni-insulators." Of 81 conceivable classes of conduction behaviour for alternants, only 14 are realisable. Of these, nine are realised by more than one chemical graph. For example, conduction of all Kekulean benzenoids (nanographenes) is described by just two classes. In particular, the catafused benzenoids (benzenoids in which no carbon atom belongs to three hexagons) conduct when connected to leads via one starred and one unstarred atom, and otherwise insulate, corresponding to conduction type CII in the near-omni classification scheme.

  3. Simulation of Relationship between ENSO and winter precipitation over Western Himalayas: Application of Regional climate model (RegT-Band)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, P. R.; Mohanty, U. C.; Dey, S.; Acharaya, N.; Sinha, P.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation over the Western Himalayas region during winter is mainly associated with the passage of midlatitude synoptic systems known as western disturbances (WDs). Recently, many observational and modeling studies reported that the relationship of the Indian southwest monsoon rainfall with El Niño- Southern Oscillation (ENSO) has weakened since around 1980. But, in contrast, only very few observational studies are reported so far to examine the relationship between ENSO and the winter precipitation over the Western Himalayas region from December to February (DJF). But there is a huge gap of modeling this phenomenon. So keeping in view of the absence of modeling studies, an attempt is made to simulate the relationship between wintertime precipitations associated with large scale global forcing of ENSO over the Western Himalayas. In the present study, RegT-Band, a tropical band version of the regional climate model RegCM4 is integrated for a set of 5 El Niño (1986-87, 1991-92, 1997-98, 2002-03, 2009-10) and 4 La Niña (1984-85, 1988-89, 1999-2000, 2007-08) years with the observed sea-surface temperature and lateral boundary condition. The domain extends from 50° S to 50° N and covers the entire tropics at a grid spacing of about 45 km, i.e. it includes lateral boundary forcing only at the southern and northern boundaries. The performance evaluation of the model in capturing the large scale fields followed by ENSO response with wintertime precipitation over the Western Himalayas region has been carried out by using National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-Department of Energy (DOE) reanalysis 2 (NNRP2) data (2.5° x 2.5°) and Aphrodite precipitation data (0.25° x 0.25°). The model is able to delineate the mean circulation associated with ENSO over the region during DJF reasonably well and shows strong southwesterly to northwesterly wind flow, which is there in verification analysis also. The vertical structure of the low as well as upper level

  4. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Ziye; Chen, Jiajie; Xu, Tao; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  5. Six Conductivity Values to Use in the Bidomain Model of Cardiac Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work is to produce a consistent set of six conductivity values for use in the bidomain model of cardiac tissue. Studies in 2007 by Hooks et al. and in 2009 by Caldwell et al. have found that, in the directions longitudinal:transverse:normal (l:t:n) to the cardiac fibers, ratios of bulk conductivities and conduction velocities are each approximately in the ratio 4:2:1. These results are used here as the basis for a method that can find sets of six normalized bidomain conductivity values. It is found that the ratios involving transverse and normal conductivities are quite consistent, allowing new light to be shed on conductivity in the normal direction. For example, it is found that the ratio of transverse to normal conductivity is much greater in the intracellular (i) than the extracellular (e) domain. Using parameter values from experimental studies leads to the proposal of a new nominal six conductivity dataset: gil=2.4, gel=2.4, git=0.35, get=2.0, gin=0.08, and gen=1.1 (all in mS/cm). When it is used to model partial thickness ischaemia, this dataset produces epicardial potential distributions in accord with experimental studies in an animal model. It is, therefore, suggested that the dataset is suitable for use in numerical simulations. Since the bidomain approach is the most commonly used method for modeling cardiac electrophysiological phenomena, new information about conductivity in the normal direction, as well as a consistent set of six conductivity values, is valuable for researchers who perform simulation studies.

  6. Exploring L1 model space in search of conductivity bounds for the MT problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, B. D.; Parker, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Geophysical inverse problems of the type encountered in electromagnetic techniques are highly non-unique. As a result, any single inverted model, though feasible, is at best inconclusive and at worst misleading. In this paper, we use modified inversion methods to establish bounds on electrical conductivity within a model of the earth. Our method consists of two steps, each making use of the 1-norm in model regularization. Both 1-norm minimization problems are framed without approximation as non-negative least-squares (NNLS) problems. First, we must identify a parsimonious set of regions within the model for which upper and lower bounds on average conductivity will be sought. This is accomplished by minimizing the 1-norm of spatial variation, which produces a model with a limited number of homogeneous regions; in fact, the number of homogeneous regions will never be greater than the number of data, regardless of the number of free parameters supplied. The second step establishes bounds for each of these regions with pairs of inversions. The new suite of inversions also uses a 1-norm penalty, but applied to the conductivity values themselves, rather than the spatial variation thereof. In the bounding step we use the 1-norm of our model parameters because it is proportional to average conductivity. For a lower bound on average conductivity, the 1-norm within a bounding region is minimized. For an upper bound on average conductivity, the 1-norm everywhere outside a bounding region is minimized. The latter minimization has the effect of concentrating conductance into the bounding region. Taken together, these bounds are a measure of the uncertainty in the associated region of our model. Starting with a blocky inverse solution is key in the selection of the bounding regions. Of course, there is a tradeoff between resolution and uncertainty: an increase in resolution (smaller bounding regions), results in greater uncertainty (wider bounds). Minimization of the 1-norm of

  7. Development of Multidimensional Gap Conductance model using Virtual Link Gap Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The gap conductance that determines temperature gradient between pellet and cladding can be quite sensitive to gap thickness. For instance, once the gap size increases up to several micrometers in certain region, difference of pellet surface temperatures increases up to 100 Kelvin. Therefore, iterative thermo-mechanical coupled analysis is required to solve temperature distribution throughout pellet and cladding. Recently, multidimensional fuel performance codes have been being developed in the advanced countries to evaluate thermal behavior of fuel for off normal conditions and DBA(design based accident) conditions using the Finite Element Method (FEM). FRAPCON-FRAPTRAN code system, which is well known as the verified and reliable code, incorporates 1D thermal module and multidimensional mechanical module. In this code, multidimensional gap conductance model is not applied. ALCYONE developed by CEA introduces equivalent heat convection coefficient that represents multidimensional gap conductance as a function of gap thickness. BISON, which is multidimensional fuel performance code developed by INL, owns multidimensional gap conductance model using projected thermal contact. In general, thermal contact algorithm is nonlinear calculation which is expensive approach numerically. The gap conductance model for multi-dimension is difficult issue in terms of convergence and nonlinearity because gap conductance is function of gap thickness which depends on mechanical analysis at each iteration step. In this paper, virtual link gap (VLG) element has been proposed to resolve convergence issue and nonlinear characteristic of multidimensional gap conductance. In terms of calculation accuracy and convergence efficiency, the proposed VLG model was evaluated. LWR fuel performance codes should incorporate thermo-mechanical loop to solve gap conductance problem, iteratively. However, gap conductance in multidimensional model is difficult issue owing to its nonlinearity and

  8. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C; Cantarero, A; Lopeandia, A F; Alvarez, F X

    2014-09-08

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon-phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range.

  9. Thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors from a kinetic-collective model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tomas, C.; Cantarero, A.; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X.

    2014-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of group-IV semiconductors (silicon, germanium, diamond and grey tin) with several isotopic compositions has been calculated from a kinetic-collective model. From this approach, significantly different to Callaway-like models in its physical interpretation, the thermal conductivity expression accounts for a transition from a kinetic (individual phonon transport) to a collective (hydrodynamic phonon transport) behaviour of the phonon field. Within the model, we confirm the theoretical proportionality between the phonon–phonon relaxation times of the group-IV semiconductors. This proportionality depends on some materials properties and it allows us to predict the thermal conductivity of the whole group of materials without the need to fit each material individually. The predictions on thermal conductivities are in good agreement with experimental data over a wide temperature range. PMID:25197256

  10. Thermal Conductivity in Soil: Theoretical Approach by 3D Infinite Resistance Grid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changjan, A.; Intaravicha, N.

    2018-05-01

    Thermal conductivity in soil was elementary characteristic of soil that conduct heat, measured in terms of Fourier’s Law for heat conduction and useful application in many fields: such as Utilizing underground cable for transmission and distribution systems, the rate of cooling of the cable depends on the thermal properties of the soil surrounding the cable. In this paper, we investigated thermal conductivity in soil by infinite three dimensions (3D) electrical resistance circuit concept. Infinite resistance grid 3D was the grid of resistors that extends to infinity in all directions. Model of thermal conductivity in soil of this research was generated from this concept: comparison between electrical resistance and thermal resistance in soil. Finally, we investigated the analytical form of thermal conductivity in soil which helpful for engineering and science students that could exhibit education with a principle of physics that applied to real situations.

  11. Water vapor transmittance models for narrow bands in the 13 to 19 μm spectral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichel, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the development of water vapor transmittance models for narrow bands (satellite sensor channels) in the 13 to 19 μm spectral region. The models are the result of research efforts of the author in 1971-1972 while on active duty with the US Air Force at the Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC). The models were developed for application in studies involving a temperature profiling sensor system carried aboard the satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), formerly DAPP. Recently, (Lovill et al., 1978; Luther et al., 1981) the models were implemented for studies concerned with methodologies to retrieve total atmospheric column ozone from measurements of newer DMSP Block 5D series satellite sensors with similar channels (see Nichols, 1975)

  12. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions thermal conductivity. A significant conductivity increase (factor 3-8) is observed for bond fractions of 0.01 to 1% in volume. In the 1 to 15% bond fraction domain, the conductivity increases continuously but less intensely (25-100% conductivity increase compared to a 1% bond system). Beyond 15% of cements, the conductivity increases vigorously and the bulk conductivity rapidly approaches that of bedrock. The composition of the cements (i.e. conductivity) has little influence on the bulk thermal inertia of the soil, especially if the volume of bond thermal inertia (200-600 J s(0.5)/sq m/K) has long been hypothesized to be associated with a duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  13. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folsom, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50-30 W m -1 K -1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  14. Modelling of root ABA synthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration and potato production under water saving irrigation regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Finn; Abrahamsen, Per; Gjettermann, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    . Experimental data was compared to simulated results from the new enhanced Daisy model which include modelling 2D soil water flow, abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and its effect on stomatal conductance and hence on transpiration and assimilation, and finally crop yield. The results demonstrated that the enhanced...

  15. A numerical model of ionospheric convection derived from field-aligned current and the corresponding conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, L.G.; Marklund, G.T.

    1988-03-01

    A numerical model for the calculation of ionospheric convection patterns from given distributions of field-aligned current and ionospheric conductivity is described. The model includes a coupling between the conductivity and the field-aligned current, so that the conductivity peaks in regions of upward current, as usually observed by measurements. The model is very flexible in that the input distributions, the field-aligned current and the conductivity, have been parameterized in a convenient way. From the primary model output, namely the ionospheric electrostatic potential (or convection) in the corotating frame, a number of other quantities can be computed. These include: the potential in a Sun-fixed frame, the distribution of ionospheric (horizontal) current, and the Joule heating in the ionosphere. This model has been used together with input data inferred from satellite measurements to calculate the high-latitude potential distribution prevailing during a particular event. The model potential variation along the satellite orbit was found to be in excellent agreement with the measured electric field. The model has also been used to study some fundamental properties of the electrodynamics of the high-latitude ionosphere. The results of these different applications of the model have been published separately. (With 23 refs.) (authors)

  16. Addressing Conduct Disorder in Elementary School Children: An Application of the ASCA National Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demanchick, Stephen P.; Rangan, Malathi; Douthit, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    The range of management strategies for school counselors dealing with conduct disorder in elementary school children can be expanded through an integration of several of the principles of the ASCA National Model[R]. This paper discusses ways the counselor can use the model to assist struggling children, teachers, administrators, and families as…

  17. Structure, Raman spectra and defect chemistry modelling of conductive pyrochlore oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, F.W.; Glerup, M.; Holtappels, P.

    2000-01-01

    -O(x) and V-O on the O site, interstitial oxygens O-i", and delocalised electrons and electron holes. Four mass action law expressions govern such a model. The defect model can rationalise why home-valent doping, i.e. substitution of Zr(4+) by Ce(4+), can lead to an increase in ionic conductivity...

  18. Metal-insulator transition and Frohlich conductivity in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielsen, K.F L; de Raedt, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    A quantum molecular dynamics technique is used to study the single-particle density of states, Drude weight, optical conductivity and flux quantization in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. Our simulation data show that the SSH model has a metal-insulator transition away from half-filling. In the

  19. Conductance Thin Film Model of Flexible Organic Thin Film Device using COMSOL Multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carradero-Santiago, Carolyn; Vedrine-Pauléus, Josee

    We developed a virtual model to analyze the electrical conductivity of multilayered thin films placed above a graphene conducting and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The organic layers of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) as a hole conducting layer, poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT), as a p-type, phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and as n-type, with aluminum as a top conductor. COMSOL Multiphysics was the software we used to develop the virtual model to analyze potential variations and conductivity through the thin-film layers. COMSOL Multiphysics software allows simulation and modeling of physical phenomena represented by differential equations such as heat transfer, fluid flow, electromagnetism, and structural mechanics. In this work, using the AC/DC, electric currents module we defined the geometry of the model and properties for each of the six layers: PET/graphene/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT/PCBM/aluminum. We analyzed the model with varying thicknesses of graphene and active layers (P3HT/PCBM). This simulation allowed us to analyze the electrical conductivity, and visualize the model with varying voltage potential, or bias across the plates, useful for applications in solar cell devices.

  20. Comparison among Models to Estimate the Shielding Effectiveness Applied to Conductive Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a comparison among two models and its measurement to calculate the shielding effectiveness of electromagnetic barriers, applying it to conductive textiles. Each one, models a conductive textile as either a (1 wire mesh screen or (2 compact material. Therefore, the objective is to perform an analysis of the models in order to determine which one is a better approximation for electromagnetic shielding fabrics. In order to provide results for the comparison, the shielding effectiveness of the sample has been measured by means of the standard ASTM D4935-99.

  1. Absence of local thermal equilibrium in two models of heat conduction

    OpenAIRE

    Dhar, Abhishek; Dhar, Deepak

    1998-01-01

    A crucial assumption in the conventional description of thermal conduction is the existence of local thermal equilibrium. We test this assumption in two simple models of heat conduction. Our first model is a linear chain of planar spins with nearest neighbour couplings, and the second model is that of a Lorentz gas. We look at the steady state of the system when the two ends are connected to heat baths at temperatures T1 and T2. If T1=T2, the system reaches thermal equilibrium. If T1 is not e...

  2. Coupling X-band dual-polarized mini-radars and hydro-meteorological forecast models: the HYDRORAD project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Picciotti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydro-meteorological hazards like convective outbreaks leading to torrential rain and floods are among the most critical environmental issues world-wide. In that context weather radar observations have proven to be very useful in providing information on the spatial distribution of rainfall that can support early warning of floods. However, quantitative precipitation estimation by radar is subjected to many limitations and uncertainties. The use of dual-polarization at high frequency (i.e. X-band has proven particularly useful for mitigating some of the limitation of operational systems, by exploiting the benefit of easiness to transport and deploy and the high spatial and temporal resolution achievable at small antenna sizes. New developments on X-band dual-polarization technology in recent years have received the interest of scientific and operational communities in these systems. New enterprises are focusing on the advancement of cost-efficient mini-radar network technology, based on high-frequency (mainly X-band and low-power weather radar systems for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological forecasting. Within the above context, the main objective of the HYDRORAD project was the development of an innovative mbox{integrated} decision support tool for weather monitoring and hydro-meteorological applications. The integrated system tool is based on a polarimetric X-band mini-radar network which is the core of the decision support tool, a novel radar products generator and a hydro-meteorological forecast modelling system that ingests mini-radar rainfall products to forecast precipitation and floods. The radar products generator includes algorithms for attenuation correction, hydrometeor classification, a vertical profile reflectivity correction, a new polarimetric rainfall estimators developed for mini-radar observations, and short-term nowcasting of convective cells. The hydro-meteorological modelling system includes the Mesoscale Model 5

  3. Laser ablation under different electron heat conduction models in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuanggui; Ren, Guoli; Huo, Wen Yi

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of three different electron heat conduction models on the laser ablation of gold plane target. Different from previous studies, we concentrate on the plasma conditions, the conversion efficiency from laser into soft x rays and the scaling relation of mass ablation, which are relevant to hohlraum physics study in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. We find that the simulated electron temperature in corona region is sensitive to the electron heat conduction models. For different electron heat conduction models, there are obvious differences in magnitude and spatial profile of electron temperature. For the flux limit model, the calculated conversion efficiency is sensitive to flux limiters. In the laser ablation of gold, most of the laser energies are converted into x rays. So the scaling relation of mass ablation rate is quite different from that of low Z materials.

  4. Modeling the influence of interaction layer formation on thermal conductivity of U–Mo dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hsu equation provides best thermal conductivity estimate of U–Mo dispersion fuel. • Simple model considering interaction layer formation was coupled with Hsu equation. • Interaction layer thermal conductivity is not the most important attribute. • Effective thermal conductivity is mostly influenced by interaction layer formation. • Fuel particle distribution also influences the effective thermal conductivity. - Abstract: The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new test reactor fuels to achieve the maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium–molybdenum (U–Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates or rods, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation, dispersed particle size, and volume fraction of dispersed phase in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be as important in determining the effective conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the dispersed particle distribution by minimizing interaction

  5. Modeling C-band single scattering properties of hydrometeors using discrete-dipole approximation and T-matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyynelae, Jani; Nousiainen, Timo; Goeke, Sabine; Muinonen, Karri

    2009-01-01

    We study the applicability of the discrete-dipole approximation by modeling centimeter (C-band) radar echoes for hydrometeors, and compare the results to exact theories. We use ice and water particles of various shapes with varying water-content to investigate how the backscattering, extinction, and absorption cross sections change as a function of particle radius. We also compute radar parameters, such as the differential reflectivity, the linear depolarization ratio, and the copolarized correlation coefficient. We find that using discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) to model pure ice and pure water particles at the C-band, is a lot more accurate than particles containing both ice and water. For coated particles, a large grid-size is recommended so that the coating is modeled adequately. We also find that the absorption cross section is significantly less accurate than the scattering and backscattering cross sections. The accuracy of DDA can be increased by increasing the number of dipoles, but also by using the filtered coupled dipole-option for the polarizability. This halved the relative errors in cross sections.

  6. Electronic band structure of lithium, sodium and potassium fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouanin, C.; Albert, J.P.; Gout, C.

    1975-01-01

    A mixed tight-binding, pseudopotential method is proposed to calculate the energy band structure of large-gap crystals and is tested here on LiF, NaF and KF. Three-centre terms are included in the determination of the valence bands by the tight-binding method and for the conduction bands we use a pseudopotential model proposed by Bassani and Giuliano, modified for the positive ions. By taking into account the polarization corrections, transitions calculated from the energy band structures are compared with experimental data and the agreement is generally good

  7. Bi-national cross-validation of an evidence-based conduct problem prevention model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Carolyn M; Bloomquist, Michael L; Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Vega, Leticia; Balch, Rosita; Yu, Xiaohui; Cooper, Daniel K

    2018-04-01

    To (a) explore the preferences of Mexican parents and Spanish-speaking professionals working with migrant Latino families in Minnesota regarding the Mexican-adapted brief model versus the original conduct problems intervention and (b) identifying the potential challenges, and preferred solutions, to implementation of a conduct problems preventive intervention. The core practice elements of a conduct problems prevention program originating in the United States were adapted for prevention efforts in Mexico. Three focus groups were conducted in the United States, with Latino parents (n = 24; 2 focus groups) and professionals serving Latino families (n = 9; 1 focus group), to compare and discuss the Mexican-adapted model and the original conduct problems prevention program. Thematic analysis was conducted on the verbatim focus group transcripts in the original language spoken. Participants preferred the Mexican-adapted model. The following key areas were identified for cultural adaptation when delivering a conduct problems prevention program with Latino families: recruitment/enrollment strategies, program delivery format, and program content (i.e., child skills training, parent skills training, child-parent activities, and child-parent support). For both models, strengths, concerns, barriers, and strategies for overcoming concerns and barriers were identified. We summarize recommendations offered by participants to strengthen the effective implementation of a conduct problems prevention model with Latino families in the United States. This project demonstrates the strength in binational collaboration to critically examine cultural adaptations of evidence-based prevention programs that could be useful to diverse communities, families, and youth in other settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Multi-sphere unit cell model to calculate the effective thermal conductivity in pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Antwerpen, W.; Rousseau, P.G.; Du Toit, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    A proper understanding of the mechanisms of heat transfer, fluid flow and pressure drop through a packed bed of spheres is of utmost importance in the design of a high temperature Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). While the gas flows predominantly in the axial direction through the bed, the total effective thermal conductivity is a lumped parameter that characterises the total heat transfer in the radial direction through the packed bed. The study of the effective thermal conductivity is important because it forms an intricate part of the self-acting decay heat removal chain, which is directly related to the PBR safety case. The effective thermal conductivity is the summation of various heat transport phenomena. These are the enhanced thermal conductivity due to turbulent mixing as the fluid passes through the voids between pebbles, heat transfer due to the movement of the solid spheres and thermal conduction and thermal radiation between the spheres in a stagnant fluid environment. In this study, the conduction and radiation between the spheres are investigated. Firstly, existing correlations for the effective thermal conductivity are investigated, with particular attention given to its applicability in the near-wall region. Several phenomena in particular are examined namely: conduction through the spheres, conduction through the contact area between the spheres, conduction through the gas phase and radiation between solid surfaces. A new approach to simulate the effective thermal conductivity for randomly packed beds is then presented, namely the so-called Multi-sphere Unit Cell Model. The model is validated by comparing the results with that obtained in experiments. (authors)

  9. Experimental Determination and Thermodynamic Modeling of Electrical Conductivity of SRS Waste Tank Supernate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Reboul, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-06-01

    SRS High Level Waste Tank Farm personnel rely on conductivity probes for detection of incipient overflow conditions in waste tanks. Minimal information is available concerning the sensitivity that must be achieved such that that liquid detection is assured. Overly sensitive electronics results in numerous nuisance alarms for these safety-related instruments. In order to determine the minimum sensitivity required of the probe, Tank Farm Engineering personnel need adequate conductivity data to improve the existing designs. Little or no measurements of liquid waste conductivity exist; however, the liquid phase of the waste consists of inorganic electrolytes for which the conductivity may be calculated. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Tank Farm Facility Engineering requested SRNL to determine the conductivity of the supernate resident in SRS waste Tank 40 experimentally as well as computationally. In addition, SRNL was requested to develop a correlation, if possible, that would be generally applicable to liquid waste resident in SRS waste tanks. A waste sample from Tank 40 was analyzed for composition and electrical conductivity as shown in Table 4-6, Table 4-7, and Table 4-9. The conductivity for undiluted Tank 40 sample was 0.087 S/cm. The accuracy of OLI Analyzer™ was determined using available literature data. Overall, 95% of computed estimates of electrical conductivity are within ±15% of literature values for component concentrations from 0 to 15 M and temperatures from 0 to 125 °C. Though the computational results are generally in good agreement with the measured data, a small portion of literature data deviates as much as ±76%. A simplified model was created that can be used readily to estimate electrical conductivity of waste solution in computer spreadsheets. The variability of this simplified approach deviates up to 140% from measured values. Generally, this model can be applied to estimate the conductivity within a factor of two. The comparison of the

  10. Thermal conductivity model for powdered materials under vacuum based on experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sakatani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of powdered media is characteristically very low in vacuum, and is effectively dependent on many parameters of their constituent particles and packing structure. Understanding of the heat transfer mechanism within powder layers in vacuum and theoretical modeling of their thermal conductivity are of great importance for several scientific and engineering problems. In this paper, we report the results of systematic thermal conductivity measurements of powdered media of varied particle size, porosity, and temperature under vacuum using glass beads as a model material. Based on the obtained experimental data, we investigated the heat transfer mechanism in powdered media in detail, and constructed a new theoretical thermal conductivity model for the vacuum condition. This model enables an absolute thermal conductivity to be calculated for a powder with the input of a set of powder parameters including particle size, porosity, temperature, and compressional stress or gravity, and vice versa. Our model is expected to be a competent tool for several scientific and engineering fields of study related to powders, such as the thermal infrared observation of air-less planetary bodies, thermal evolution of planetesimals, and performance of thermal insulators and heat storage powders.

  11. Summary report on UO2 thermal conductivity model refinement and assessment studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cooper, Michael William Donald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lashley, Jason Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Byler, Darrin David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bell, B. D.C. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Grimes, R. W. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-03

    Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the most commonly used fuel in light water nuclear reactors and thermal conductivity controls the removal of heat produced by fission, therefore, governing fuel temperature during normal and accident conditions. The use of fuel performance codes by the industry to predict operational behavior is widespread. A primary source of uncertainty in these codes is thermal conductivity, and optimized fuel utilization may be possible if existing empirical models were replaced with models that incorporate explicit thermal conductivity degradation mechanisms during fuel burn-up. This approach is able to represent the degradation of thermal conductivity due to each individual defect type, rather than the overall burn-up measure typically used which is not an accurate representation of the chemical or microstructure state of the fuel that actually governs thermal conductivity and other properties. To generate a mechanistic thermal conductivity model, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of UO2 thermal conductivity including representative uranium and oxygen defects and fission products are carried out. These calculations employ a standard Buckingham type interatomic potential and a potential that combines the many-body embedded atom method potential with Morse-Buckingham pair potentials. Potential parameters for UO2+x and ZrO2 are developed for the latter potential. Physical insights from the resonant phonon-spin scattering mechanism due to spins on the magnetic uranium ions have been introduced into the treatment of the MD results, with the corresponding relaxation time derived from existing experimental data. High defect scattering is predicted for Xe atoms compared to that of La and Zr ions. Uranium defects reduce the thermal conductivity more than oxygen defects. For each defect and fission product, scattering parameters are derived for application in both a Callaway model and the corresponding high

  12. Entropic Constitutive Relation and Modeling for Fourier and Hyperbolic Heat Conductions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Nan Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most existing phenomenological heat conduction models are expressed by temperature and heat flux distributions, whose definitions might be debatable in heat conductions with strong non-equilibrium. The constitutive relations of Fourier and hyperbolic heat conductions are here rewritten by the entropy and entropy flux distributions in the frameworks of classical irreversible thermodynamics (CIT and extended irreversible thermodynamics (EIT. The entropic constitutive relations are then generalized by Boltzmann–Gibbs–Shannon (BGS statistical mechanics, which can avoid the debatable definitions of thermodynamic quantities relying on local equilibrium. It shows a possibility of modeling heat conduction through entropic constitutive relations. The applicability of the generalizations by BGS statistical mechanics is also discussed based on the relaxation time approximation, and it is found that the generalizations require a sufficiently small entropy production rate.

  13. Comparison study of different head model structures with homogeneous/inhomogeneous conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, P.; Li, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Most of the human head models used in dipole localisation research, which have been reported in the literature to date, assume a simplified cranial structure wherein the head is modelled as a set of distinct homogenous tissue compartments. The inherent inhomogeneity of the tissues has so far been ignored in these models due to the difficulties involved in obtaining the conductivity characteristics with sufficiently high enough spatial resolution throughout the head. A technique for developing an inhomogeneous head model based on the generation of pseudo-conductivity values from the existing but sparse conductivity values is proposed in this paper. Comparative studies are conducted on different model structures and different mechanisms for generating the pseudo conductivities. An evaluation of the results of these studies as reported in this paper, shows that contrary to current simplifying assumptions, tissue inhomogeneity has a major influence on the computation of electrical potential distributions in the head. Brain electrical activity is spatially distributed in three dimensions in the head and evolves with time. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a widely used noninvasive technique which measures the potential distribution on the scalp caused by the brain electrical activity. A number of interesting correlations between features of the recorded EEG waveforms and various aspects of attention memory and linguistic tAS/Ks have been discovered. These correlations are estimated by comparing, for a given brain function, the recorded EEGs against the scalp potentials obtained from the computation of an electric field model of the head. The accuracy of these estimates depends not only on such factors as EEG measured errors but also, more importantly, on how closely the head model approximates the physiological head. This has spurred interest in the use of a more realistic head geometry with more accurate conductivity values which would use the detailed anatomical

  14. Low frequency complex dielectric (conductivity) response of dilute clay suspensions: Modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Chang-Yu; Feng, Ling; Seleznev, Nikita; Freed, Denise E

    2018-04-11

    In this work, we establish an effective medium model to describe the low-frequency complex dielectric (conductivity) dispersion of dilute clay suspensions. We use previously obtained low-frequency polarization coefficients for a charged oblate spheroidal particle immersed in an electrolyte as the building block for the Maxwell Garnett mixing formula to model the dilute clay suspension. The complex conductivity phase dispersion exhibits a near-resonance peak when the clay grains have a narrow size distribution. The peak frequency is associated with the size distribution as well as the shape of clay grains and is often referred to as the characteristic frequency. In contrast, if the size of the clay grains has a broad distribution, the phase peak is broadened and can disappear into the background of the canonical phase response of the brine. To benchmark our model, the low-frequency dispersion of the complex conductivity of dilute clay suspensions is measured using a four-point impedance measurement, which can be reliably calibrated in the frequency range between 0.1 Hz and 10 kHz. By using a minimal number of fitting parameters when reliable information is available as input for the model and carefully examining the issue of potential over-fitting, we found that our model can be used to fit the measured dispersion of the complex conductivity with reasonable parameters. The good match between the modeled and experimental complex conductivity dispersion allows us to argue that our simplified model captures the essential physics for describing the low-frequency dispersion of the complex conductivity of dilute clay suspensions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Regression and Neuro_Fuzzy Models in Estimating Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Behmanesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study of soil hydraulic properties such as saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is required in the environmental investigations. Despite numerous research, measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity using by direct methods are still costly, time consuming and professional. Therefore estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity using rapid and low cost methods such as pedo-transfer functions with acceptable accuracy was developed. The purpose of this research was to compare and evaluate 11 pedo-transfer functions and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil. In this direct, saturated hydraulic conductivity and physical properties in 40 points of Urmia were calculated. The soil excavated was used in the lab to determine its easily accessible parameters. The results showed that among existing models, Aimrun et al model had the best estimation for soil saturated hydraulic conductivity. For mentioned model, the Root Mean Square Error and Mean Absolute Error parameters were 0.174 and 0.028 m/day respectively. The results of the present research, emphasises the importance of effective porosity application as an important accessible parameter in accuracy of pedo-transfer functions. sand and silt percent, bulk density and soil particle density were selected to apply in 561 ANFIS models. In training phase of best ANFIS model, the R2 and RMSE were calculated 1 and 1.2×10-7 respectively. These amounts in the test phase were 0.98 and 0.0006 respectively. Comparison of regression and ANFIS models showed that the ANFIS model had better results than regression functions. Also Nuro-Fuzzy Inference System had capability to estimatae with high accuracy in various soil textures.

  16. Compressive failure model for fiber composites by kink band initiation from obliquely aligned, shear-dislocated fiber breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, J.; Phoenix, S.L. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

    2005-04-01

    Predicting compressive failure of a unidirectional fibrous composite is a longstanding and challenging problem that we study from a new perspective. Motivated by previous modelling of tensile failure as well as experimental observations on compressive failures in single carbon fibers, we develop a new micromechanical model for the compressive failure process in unidirectional, planar composites. As the compressive load is increased, random fiber failures are assumed to occur due to statistically distributed flaws, analogous to what occurs in tension. These breaks are often shear-mode failures with slanted surfaces that induce shear dislocations, especially when they occur in small groups aligned obliquely. Our model includes interactions of dislocated and neighboring intact fibers through a system of fourth-order, differential equations governing transverse deformation, and also allows for local matrix plastic yielding and debonding from the fiber near and within the dislocation arrays. Using the Discrete Fourier Transform method, we find a 'building-block' analytical solution form, which naturally embodies local length scales of fiber microbuckling and instability. Based on the influence function, superposition approach, a computationally efficient scheme is developed to model the evolution of fiber and matrix stresses. Under increasing compressive strain the simulations show that matrix yielding and debonding crucially lead to large increases in bending strains in fibers next to small groups of obliquely aligned, dislocated breaks. From the paired locations of maximum fiber bending in flanking fibers, the triggering of an unstable kink band becomes realistic. The geometric features of the kink band, such as the fragment lengths and orientation angles, will depend on the fiber and matrix mechanical and geometric properties. In carbon fiber-polymer matrix systems our model predicts a much lower compressive failure stress than obtained from Rosen

  17. Bentonite electrical conductivity: a model based on series–parallel transport

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, Ana T.

    2010-01-30

    Bentonite has significant applications nowadays, among them as landfill liners, in concrete industry as a repairing material, and as drilling mud in oil well construction. The application of an electric field to such perimeters is under wide discussion, and subject of many studies. However, to understand the behaviour of such an expansive and plastic material under the influence of an electric field, the perception of its electrical properties is essential. This work serves to compare existing data of such electrical behaviour with new laboratorial results. Electrical conductivity is a pertinent parameter since it indicates how much a material is prone to conduct electricity. In the current study, total conductivity of a compacted porous medium was established to be dependent upon density of the bentonite plug. Therefore, surface conductivity was addressed and a series-parallel transport model used to quantify/predict the total conductivity of the system. © The Author(s) 2010.

  18. 3D printing of CNT- and graphene-based conductive polymer nanocomposites by fused deposition modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanasekaran, K.; Heijmans, T.; van Bennekom, S.; Woldhuis, H.; Wijnia, S.; de With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2017-01-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM) is limited by the availability of application specific functional materials. Here we illustrate printing of non-conventional polymer nanocomposites (CNT- and graphene-based polybutylene terephthalate (PBT)) on a commercially available desktop 3D printer leading toward printing of electrically conductive structures. The printability, electrical conductivity and mechanical stability of the polymer nanocomposites before and after 3D printing was evaluated. The res...

  19. Applicability of common stomatal conductance models in maize under varying soil moisture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuling; He, Qijin; Zhou, Guangsheng

    2018-07-01

    In the context of climate warming, the varying soil moisture caused by precipitation pattern change will affect the applicability of stomatal conductance models, thereby affecting the simulation accuracy of carbon-nitrogen-water cycles in ecosystems. We studied the applicability of four common stomatal conductance models including Jarvis, Ball-Woodrow-Berry (BWB), Ball-Berry-Leuning (BBL) and unified stomatal optimization (USO) models based on summer maize leaf gas exchange data from a soil moisture consecutive decrease manipulation experiment. The results showed that the USO model performed best, followed by the BBL model, BWB model, and the Jarvis model performed worst under varying soil moisture conditions. The effects of soil moisture made a difference in the relative performance among the models. By introducing a water response function, the performance of the Jarvis, BWB, and USO models improved, which decreased the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) by 15.7%, 16.6% and 3.9%, respectively; however, the performance of the BBL model was negative, which increased the NRMSE by 5.3%. It was observed that the models of Jarvis, BWB, BBL and USO were applicable within different ranges of soil relative water content (i.e., 55%-65%, 56%-67%, 37%-79% and 37%-95%, respectively) based on the 95% confidence limits. Moreover, introducing a water response function, the applicability of the Jarvis and BWB models improved. The USO model performed best with or without introducing the water response function and was applicable under varying soil moisture conditions. Our results provide a basis for selecting appropriate stomatal conductance models under drought conditions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  1. A model of thermal conductivity for planetary soils: 2. Theory for cemented soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-09-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than ˜1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface.

  2. A review of anisotropic conductivity models of brain white matter based on diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanxiong; Liu, Yang; Hong, Ming; Yu, Xiaohui

    2018-06-01

    The conductivity of brain tissues is not only essential for electromagnetic source estimation (ESI), but also a key reflector of the brain functional changes. Different from the other brain tissues, the conductivity of whiter matter (WM) is highly anisotropic and a tensor is needed to describe it. The traditional electrical property imaging methods, such as electrical impedance tomography (EIT) and magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT), usually fail to image the anisotropic conductivity tensor of WM with high spatial resolution. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a newly developed technique that can fulfill this purpose. This paper reviews the existing anisotropic conductivity models of WM based on the DTI and discusses their advantages and disadvantages, as well as identifies opportunities for future research on this subject. It is crucial to obtain the linear conversion coefficient between the eigenvalues of anisotropic conductivity tensor and diffusion tensor, since they share the same eigenvectors. We conclude that the electrochemical model is suitable for ESI analysis because the conversion coefficient can be directly obtained from the concentration of ions in extracellular liquid and that the volume fraction model is appropriate to study the influence of WM structural changes on electrical conductivity. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  3. A regularized, model-based approach to phase-based conductivity mapping using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropella, Kathleen M; Noll, Douglas C

    2017-11-01

    To develop a novel regularized, model-based approach to phase-based conductivity mapping that uses structural information to improve the accuracy of conductivity maps. The inverse of the three-dimensional Laplacian operator is used to model the relationship between measured phase maps and the object conductivity in a penalized weighted least-squares optimization problem. Spatial masks based on structural information are incorporated into the problem to preserve data near boundaries. The proposed Inverse Laplacian method was compared against a restricted Gaussian filter in simulation, phantom, and human experiments. The Inverse Laplacian method resulted in lower reconstruction bias and error due to noise in simulations than the Gaussian filter. The Inverse Laplacian method also produced conductivity maps closer to the measured values in a phantom and with reduced noise in the human brain, as compared to the Gaussian filter. The Inverse Laplacian method calculates conductivity maps with less noise and more accurate values near boundaries. Improving the accuracy of conductivity maps is integral for advancing the applications of conductivity mapping. Magn Reson Med 78:2011-2021, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. A generative modeling approach to connectivity-Electrical conduction in vascular networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav

    2016-01-01

    The physiology of biological structures is inherently dynamic and emerges from the interaction and assembly of large collections of small entities. The extent of coupled entities complicates modeling and increases computational load. Here, microvascular networks are used to present a novel...... to synchronize vessel tone across the vast distances within a network. We hypothesize that electrical conduction capacity is delimited by the size of vascular structures and connectivity of the network. Generation and simulation of series of dynamical models of electrical spread within vascular networks...... of different size and composition showed that (1) Conduction is enhanced in models harboring long and thin endothelial cells that couple preferentially along the longitudinal axis. (2) Conduction across a branch point depends on endothelial connectivity between branches. (3) Low connectivity sub...

  5. Multi-channel conduction in redox-based resistive switch modelled using quantum point contact theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, E., E-mail: enrique.miranda@uab.cat; Suñé, J. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallés, Barcelona (Spain); Mehonic, A.; Kenyon, A. J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-25

    A simple analytic model for the electron transport through filamentary-type structures in Si-rich silica (SiO{sub x})-based resistive switches is proposed. The model is based on a mesoscopic description and is able to account for the linear and nonlinear components of conductance that arise from both fully and partially formed conductive channels spanning the dielectric film. Channels are represented by arrays of identical scatterers whose number and quantum transmission properties determine the current magnitude in the low and high resistance states. We show that the proposed model not only reproduces the experimental current-voltage (I-V) characteristics but also the normalized differential conductance (dln(I)/dln(V)-V) curves of devices under test.

  6. Conductance Effects on Inner Magnetospheric Plasma Morphology: Model Comparisons with IMAGE EUV, MENA, and HENA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, M.; Ridley, A. J.; Kozyra, J. U.; Gallagher, D. L.; Brandt, P. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Denton, M. H.; Jahn, J. M.; Roelof, E. C.; DeMajistre, R. M.

    2004-01-01

    Modeling results of the inner magnetosphere showing the influence of the ionospheric conductance on the inner magnetospheric electric fields during the April 17, 2002 magnetic storm are presented. Kinetic plasma transport code results are analyzed in combination with observations of the inner magnetospheric plasma populations, in particular those from the IMAGE satellite. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons are made with the observations from EW, MENA, and HENA, covering the entire energy range simulated by the model (0 to 300 keV). The electric field description, and in particular the ionospheric conductance, is the only variable between the simulations. Results from the data-model comparisons are discussed, detailing the strengths and weaknesses of each conductance choice for each energy channel.

  7. Models of thermal transfer by radiation and by conduction, in any geometry, in multiphase multicomponent medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanne, T.

    1990-03-01

    A conduction model and a radiation model are proposed for the calculation of heat transfer. A multiphase multicomponent medium is considered. The conduction model allows the calculation of heat exchanges between two configurations. The heat flow from each component can be obtained. This model is well adapted to the calculation of thermal shocks in an ensemble of materials. The radiation model shows how the radiative transfers can be calculated in a cylinder composed of two opaque surfaces, with the same axis of rotation, and separated by a transparent medium. The form factors are obtained from Herman and Nusselt methods. The parts of the face-to-face surfaces which are seen and not seen are evaluated [fr

  8. Wind Speed Retrieval by Means of X-Band Cosmo-Skymed SAR Data with Application to Coastel Circulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montuori, Antonio; de Ruggiero, Paola; Migliaccio, Maurizio; Pierini, Stefano

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the capabilities of X-band COSMOSkyMed SAR data are investigated for both wind speed estimation purposes and for the improvement of coastal circulation modeling. The data set consists of 60 X-band Level 1B Multi-Look Ground Detected ScanSAR HugeRegion COSMO-SkyMed SAR data, gathered in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea during the summer and winter seasons of 2010. Wind speed is estimated by means of a SAR wind speed retrieval based on the azimuth cut-off procedure. Wind direction is provided by means of a SAR retrieval approach based on Discrete Wavelet Transform. After comparison with the provided ground truth data, SAR-derived wind fields and ECMWF data are used to construct a blended wind product regularly sampled in both space and time. The resulting wind field will be used to force the Princeton Ocean Model, which has been implemented in a Southern Tyrrhenian Sea coastal area to simulate wind-driven costal circulation processes.

  9. A numerical model of ionospheric convection derived from field-aligned currents and the corresponding conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomberg, L.G.; Marklund, G.T.

    1991-08-01

    A numerical model for the calculation of ionospheric convection patterns from given distributions of field-aligned current and ionospheric conductivity is described. The model includes a coupling between the conductivity and the field-aligned current, so that the conductivity peaks in regions of upward current, as is usually observed by measurements. The model is very flexible in that the input distributions, the field-aligned current and the conductivity, have been parametrized in a convenient way. From the primary model output, namely the ionospheric electrostatic potential (or convection) in the corotating frame, a number of other quantities can be computed. These include; the potential in the inertial frame (the transformation takes into account the non-alignment of the Earths magnetic and geographic axes), the potential in the magnetospheric equatorial plane (projected using either a dipole magnetic field model or the Tsyganenko-Usmanov model, and the assumption of either vanishing parallel electric field or a proportionality between parallel potential and upward field-aligned current), the distribution of ionospheric (horizontal) current, and the Joule heating in the ionosphere. This model has been used together with a new snapshot technique to calculate the high-latitude potential distribution prevailing during a particular event by combining information from global auroral images and local measurements of fields and particles. The model potential variation along the satellite orbit was found to be in excellent agreement with that calculated from the measured electric field. The model has also been used to study some fundamental properties of the electrodynamics of the high-latitude ionosphere. The results of these different applications of the model have been published separately. (au) (39 refs.)

  10. Phase-change memory: A continuous multilevel compact model of subthreshold conduction and threshold switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Corentin; Gilibert, Fabien; Reyboz, Marina; Bocquet, Marc; Zuliani, Paola; Portal, Jean-Michel

    2018-04-01

    Phase-change memory (PCM) compact modeling of the threshold switching based on a thermal runaway in Poole–Frenkel conduction is proposed. Although this approach is often used in physical models, this is the first time it is implemented in a compact model. The model accuracy is validated by a good correlation between simulations and experimental data collected on a PCM cell embedded in a 90 nm technology. A wide range of intermediate states is measured and accurately modeled with a single set of parameters, allowing multilevel programing. A good convergence is exhibited even in snapback simulation owing to this fully continuous approach. Moreover, threshold properties extraction indicates a thermally enhanced switching, which validates the basic hypothesis of the model. Finally, it is shown that this model is compliant with a new drift-resilient cell-state metric. Once enriched with a phase transition module, this compact model is ready to be implemented in circuit simulators.

  11. The PP ampersand L Nuclear Department model for conducting self-assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murthy, M.L.R.; Vernick, H.R.; Male, A.M.; Burchill, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear department of Pennsylvania Power ampersand Light Company (PP ampersand L) has initiated an aggressive, methodical, self-assessment program. Self-assessments are conducted to prevent problems, improve performance, and monitor results. The assessment activities are conducted by, or for, an individual having responsibility for performing the work being assessed. This individual, or customer, accepts ownership of the assessment effort and commits to implementing the recommendations agreed on during the assessment. This paper discusses the main elements of the assessment model developed by PP ampersand L and the results the model has achieved to date

  12. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy of a quantum particle cannot be determined exactly unless there is an infinite amount of time to perform the measurement. This paper considers the possibility that , the uncertainty in the energy, may be complex. To understand the effect of a particle having a complex energy, the behaviour of a classical ...

  13. Conduction bands in classical periodic potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is an infinite amount of time to perform the measurement. This paper ... the observation that when the energy is real, the classical trajectories in the com- plex plane are .... Figure 4 shows that the particle can travel smoothly from one well to the ...

  14. Thermal conductivity of granular porous media: A pore scale modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Askari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pore scale modeling method has been widely used in the petrophysical studies to estimate macroscopic properties (e.g. porosity, permeability, and electrical resistivity of porous media with respect to their micro structures. Although there is a sumptuous literature about the application of the method to study flow in porous media, there are fewer studies regarding its application to thermal conduction characterization, and the estimation of effective thermal conductivity, which is a salient parameter in many engineering surveys (e.g. geothermal resources and heavy oil recovery. By considering thermal contact resistance, we demonstrate the robustness of the method for predicting the effective thermal conductivity. According to our results obtained from Utah oil sand samples simulations, the simulation of thermal contact resistance is pivotal to grant reliable estimates of effective thermal conductivity. Our estimated effective thermal conductivities exhibit a better compatibility with the experimental data in companion with some famous experimental and analytical equations for the calculation of the effective thermal conductivity. In addition, we reconstruct a porous medium for an Alberta oil sand sample. By increasing roughness, we observe the effect of thermal contact resistance in the decrease of the effective thermal conductivity. However, the roughness effect becomes more noticeable when there is a higher thermal conductivity of solid to fluid ratio. Moreover, by considering the thermal resistance in porous media with different grains sizes, we find that the effective thermal conductivity augments with increased grain size. Our observation is in a reasonable accordance with experimental results. This demonstrates the usefulness of our modeling approach for further computational studies of heat transfer in porous media.

  15. An Improved Semi-Empirical Model for Radar Backscattering from Rough Sea Surfaces at X-Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taekyeong Jin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose an improved semi-empirical scattering model for X-band radar backscattering from rough sea surfaces. This new model has a wider validity range of wind speeds than does the existing semi-empirical sea spectrum (SESS model. First, we retrieved the small-roughness parameters from the sea surfaces, which were numerically generated using the Pierson-Moskowitz spectrum and measurement datasets for various wind speeds. Then, we computed the backscattering coefficients of the small-roughness surfaces for various wind speeds using the integral equation method model. Finally, the large-roughness characteristics were taken into account by integrating the small-roughness backscattering coefficients multiplying them with the surface slope probability density function for all possible surface slopes. The new model includes a wind speed range below 3.46 m/s, which was not covered by the existing SESS model. The accuracy of the new model was verified with two measurement datasets for various wind speeds from 0.5 m/s to 14 m/s.

  16. Rigorous derivation of the mean-field green functions of the two-band Hubbard model of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Adam, S.

    2007-01-01

    The Green function (GF) equation of motion technique for solving the effective two-band Hubbard model of high-T c superconductivity in cuprates rests on the Hubbard operator (HO) algebra. We show that, if we take into account the invariance to translations and spin reversal, the HO algebra results in invariance properties of several specific correlation functions. The use of these properties allows rigorous derivation and simplification of the expressions of the frequency matrix (FM) and of the generalized mean-field approximation (GMFA) Green functions (GFs) of the model. For the normal singlet hopping and anomalous exchange pairing correlation functions which enter the FM and GMFA-GFs, the use of spectral representations allows the identification and elimination of exponentially small quantities. This procedure secures the reduction of the correlation order to the GMFA-GF expressions

  17. Effects of adsorbed pyridine derivatives and ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited alumina coatings on the conduction band-edge energy of TiO2 and on redox-shuttle-derived dark currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Michael J; Vermeer, Michael J D; Farha, Omar K; Pellin, Michael J; Hupp, Joseph T

    2013-01-15

    Both the adsorption of t-butylpyridine and the atomic-layer deposition of ultrathin conformal coatings of insulators (such as alumina) are known to boost open-circuit photovoltages substantially for dye-sensitized solar cells. One attractive interpretation is that these modifiers significantly shift the conduction-edge energy of the electrode, thereby shifting the onset potential for dark current arising from the interception of injected electrons by solution-phase redox shuttle components such as Co(phenanthroline)(3)(3+) and triiodide. For standard, high-area, nanoporous photoelectrodes, band-edge energies are difficult to measure directly. In contrast, for flat electrodes they are readily accessible from Mott-Schottky analyses of impedance data. Using such electrodes (specifically TiO(2)), we find that neither organic nor inorganic electrode-surface modifiers shift the conduction-band-edge energy sufficiently to account fully for the beneficial effects on electrode behavior (i.e., the suppression of dark current). Additional experiments reveal that the efficacy of ultrathin coatings of Al(2)O(3) arises chiefly from the passivation of redox-catalytic surface states. In contrast, adsorbed t-butylpyridine appears to suppress dark currents mainly by physically blocking access of shuttle molecules to the electrode surface. Studies with other derivatives of pyridine, including sterically and/or electronically diverse derivatives, show that heterocycle adsorption and the concomitant suppression of dark current does not require the coordination of surface Ti(IV) or Al(III) atoms. Notably, the favorable (i.e., negative) shifts in onset potential for the flow of dark current engendered by organic and inorganic surface modifiers are additive. Furthermore, they appear to be largely insensitive to the identity of shuttle molecules.

  18. A novel linear physical model for remote sensing of snow wetness and snow density using the visible and infrared bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varade, D. M.; Dikshit, O.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling and forecasting of snowmelt runoff are significant for understanding the hydrological processes in the cryosphere which requires timely information regarding snow physical properties such as liquid water content and density of snow in the topmost layer of the snowpack. Both the seasonal runoffs and avalanche forecasting are vastly dependent on the inherent physical characteristics of the snowpack which are conventionally measured by field surveys in difficult terrains at larger impending costs and manpower. With advances in remote sensing technology and the increase in the availability of satellite data, the frequency and extent of these surveys could see a declining trend in future. In this study, we present a novel approach for estimating snow wetness and snow density using visible and infrared bands that are available with most multi-spectral sensors. We define a trapezoidal feature space based on the spectral reflectance in the near infrared band and the Normalized Differenced Snow Index (NDSI), referred to as NIR-NDSI space, where dry snow and wet snow are observed in the left diagonal upper and lower right corners, respectively. The corresponding pixels are extracted by approximating the dry and wet edges which are used to develop a linear physical model to estimate snow wetness. Snow density is then estimated using the modeled snow wetness. Although the proposed approach has used Sentinel-2 data, it can be extended to incorporate data from other multi-spectral sensors. The estimated values for snow wetness and snow density show a high correlation with respect to in-situ measurements. The proposed model opens a new avenue for remote sensing of snow physical properties using multi-spectral data, which were limited in the literature.

  19. A reconstruction of Maxwell model for effective thermal conductivity of composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.Z.; Gao, B.Z.; Kang, F.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Deficiencies were found in classical Maxwell model for effective thermal conductivity. • Maxwell model was reconstructed based on potential mean-field theory. • Reconstructed Maxwell model was extended with particle–particle contact resistance. • Predictions by reconstructed Maxwell model agree excellently with experimental data. - Abstract: Composite materials consisting of high thermal conductive fillers and polymer matrix are often used as thermal interface materials to dissipate heat generated from mechanical and electronic devices. The prediction of effective thermal conductivity of composites remains as a critical issue due to its dependence on considerably factors. Most models for prediction are based on the analog between electric potential and temperature that satisfy the Laplace equation under steady condition. Maxwell was the first to derive the effective electric resistivity of composites by examining the far-field spherical harmonic solution of Laplace equation perturbed by a sphere of different resistivity, and his model was considered as classical. However, a close review of Maxwell’s derivation reveals that there exist several controversial issues (deficiencies) inherent in his model. In this study, we reconstruct the Maxwell model based on a potential mean-field theory to resolve these issues. For composites made of continuum matrix and particle fillers, the contact resistance among particles was introduced in the reconstruction of Maxwell model. The newly reconstructed Maxwell model with contact resistivity as a fitting parameter is shown to fit excellently to experimental data over wide ranges of particle concentration and mean particle diameter. The scope of applicability of the reconstructed Maxwell model is also discussed using the contact resistivity as a parameter.

  20. Effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube-polymer composites: a simplified model and its validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Sung-Hwan; Yin, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    A simplified model is presented to predict the effective electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube(CNT)-polymer composite with different material proportions, which is validated by the experiments of multi-walled CNT/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) composites. CNTs are well dispersed in a PDMS matrix, and the mixture is then cured and cast into thin films for electrical characterization. The CNTs are assumed to be statistically uniformly distributed in the PDMS matrix with the three-dimensional (3D) waviness. As the proportion of CNTs increases to a certain level, namely the percolation threshold, the discrete CNTs start to connect with each other, forming a 3D network which exhibits a significant increase of effective electrical conductivity. The eight-chain model has been used to predict the effective electrical conductivity of the composite, in which the contact resistance between CNTs has been considered through the Simmons’ equation. The eight-chain network features can be significantly changed with the modification to mixing process, CNT length and diameter, and CNT clustering and curling. A Gaussian statistics-based formulation is used to calculate the effective length of a single CNT well dispersed in the matrix. The modeling results of effective electrical conductivity agree with the experiments very well, which are highly dependent on a contact resistance between CNTs and the waviness of the CNTs. The effect of inner-nanotube distance and diameter of CNTs on the effective electrical conductivity of the CNT/PDMS composite is also discussed. (paper)

  1. Thermal conductivity degradation analyses of LWR MOX fuel by the quasi-two phase material model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaka, Yuji; Kurematsu, Shigeru; Kitagawa, Takaaki; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The temperature measurements of mixed oxide (MOX) and UO 2 fuels during irradiation suggested that the thermal conductivity degradation rate of the MOX fuel with burnup should be slower than that of the UO 2 fuel. In order to explain the difference of the degradation rates, the quasi-two phase material model is proposed to assess the thermal conductivity degradation of the MIMAS MOX fuel, which takes into account the Pu agglomerate distributions in the MOX fuel matrix as fabricated. As a result, the quasi-two phase model calculation shows the gradual increase of the difference with burnup and may expect more than 10% higher thermal conductivity values around 75 GWd/t. While these results are not fully suitable for thermal conductivity degradation models implemented by some industrial fuel manufacturers, they are consistent with the results from the irradiation tests and indicate that the inhomogeneity of Pu content in the MOX fuel can be one of the major reasons for the moderation of the thermal conductivity degradation of the MOX fuel. (author)

  2. Conducting requirements analyses for research using routinely collected health data: a model driven approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Cashman, Josephine; Poh, Norman; Michalakidis, Georgios; Mason, Aaron; Desombre, Terry; Krause, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Medical research increasingly requires the linkage of data from different sources. Conducting a requirements analysis for a new application is an established part of software engineering, but rarely reported in the biomedical literature; and no generic approaches have been published as to how to link heterogeneous health data. Literature review, followed by a consensus process to define how requirements for research, using, multiple data sources might be modeled. We have developed a requirements analysis: i-ScheDULEs - The first components of the modeling process are indexing and create a rich picture of the research study. Secondly, we developed a series of reference models of progressive complexity: Data flow diagrams (DFD) to define data requirements; unified modeling language (UML) use case diagrams to capture study specific and governance requirements; and finally, business process models, using business process modeling notation (BPMN). These requirements and their associated models should become part of research study protocols.

  3. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions conductivity. A significant conductivity increase (factor 3-8) is observed for bond fractions of 0.01 to 1% in volume. In the 1 to 15% bond fraction domain, the conductivity increases continuously but less intensely (25-100% conductivity increase compared to a 1% bond system). Beyond 15% of cements, the conductivity increases vigorously and the bulk conductivity rapidly approaches that of bedrock. The composition of the cements (i.e. conductivity) has little influence on the bulk thermal inertia of the soil, especially if the volume of bond <10%. These results indicate that temperature measurements are sufficient to detect cemented soils and quantify the amount of cementing phase, but the mineralogical nature of the bonds and the typical grain size are unlikely to be determined from orbit. On Mars, a widespread surface unit characterized by a medium albedo (0.19-0.26) and medium/high thermal inertia (200-600 J s(0.5)/sq m/K) has long been hypothesized to be associated with a duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  4. Modeling auditory processing of amplitude modulation I. Detection and masking with narrow-band carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dau, T.; Kollmeier, B.; Kohlrausch, A.G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative model for describing data from modulation-detection and modulation-masking experiments, which extends the model of the "effective" signal processing of the auditory system described in Dau et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99, 3615–3622 (1996)]. The new element in the

  5. A Functional Model of the Digital Extensor Mechanism: Demonstrating Biomechanics with Hair Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, Beth A.; Youdas, James W.; Hellyer, Nathan J.; Krause, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The action of muscles about joints can be explained through analysis of their spatial relationship. A functional model of these relationships can be valuable in learning and understanding the muscular action about a joint. A model can be particularly helpful when examining complex actions across multiple joints such as in the digital extensor…

  6. Spontaneous temporal changes and variability of peripheral nerve conduction analyzed using a random effects model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøigård, Thomas; Gaist, David; Otto, Marit

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY: The reproducibility of variables commonly included in studies of peripheral nerve conduction in healthy individuals has not previously been analyzed using a random effects regression model. We examined the temporal changes and variability of standard nerve conduction measures in the leg...... reexamined after 2 and 26 weeks. There was no change in the variables except for a minor decrease in sural nerve sensory action potential amplitude and a minor increase in tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Reproducibility was best for peroneal nerve distal motor latency and motor conduction velocity......, sural nerve sensory conduction velocity, and tibial nerve minimal F-wave latency. Between-subject variability was greater than within-subject variability. Sample sizes ranging from 21 to 128 would be required to show changes twice the magnitude of the spontaneous changes observed in this study. Nerve...

  7. Cracked pellet gap conductance model: comparison of FRAP-S calculations with measured fuel centerline temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1975-03-01

    Fuel pellets crack extensively upon irradiation due both to thermal stresses induced by power changes and at high burnup, to accumulation of gaseous fission products at grain boundaries. Therefore, the distance between the fuel and cladding will be circumferentially nonuniform; varying between that calculated for intact operating fuel pellets and essentially zero (fuel segments in contact with the cladding wall). A model for calculation of temperatures in cracked pellets is proposed wherein the effective fuel to cladding gap conductance is calculated by taking a zero pressure contact conductance in series with an annular gap conductance. Comparisons of predicted and measured fuel centerline temperatures at beginning of life and at extended burnup are presented in support of the model. 13 references

  8. Band parameters of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene. (paper)

  9. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  10. Idealised modelling of ocean circulation driven by conductive and hydrothermal fluxes at the seabed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jowan M.; Morales Maqueda, Miguel A.; Polton, Jeff A.; Megann, Alex P.

    2018-02-01

    Geothermal heating is increasingly recognised as an important factor affecting ocean circulation, with modelling studies suggesting that this heat source could lead to first-order changes in the formation rate of Antarctic Bottom Water, as well as a significant warming effect in the abyssal ocean. Where it has been represented in numerical models, however, the geothermal heat flux into the ocean is generally treated as an entirely conductive flux, despite an estimated one third of the global geothermal flux being introduced to the ocean via hydrothermal sources. A modelling study is presented which investigates the sensitivity of the geothermally forced circulation to the way heat is supplied to the abyssal ocean. An analytical two-dimensional model of the circulation is described, which demonstrates the effects of a volume flux through the ocean bed. A simulation using the NEMO numerical general circulation model in an idealised domain is then used to partition a heat flux between conductive and hydrothermal sources and explicitly test the sensitivity of the circulation to the formulation of the abyssal heat flux. Our simulations suggest that representing the hydrothermal flux as a mass exchange indeed changes the heat distribution in the abyssal ocean, increasing the advective heat transport from the abyss by up to 35% compared to conductive heat sources. Consequently, we suggest that the inclusion of hydrothermal fluxes can be an important addition to course-resolution ocean models.

  11. Effective Thermal Conductivity For Drift-Scale Models Used In TSPA-SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.D. Francis

    2001-01-25

    The objective of this calculation is to develop a time dependent in-drift effective thermal conductivity parameter that will approximate heat conduction, thermal radiation, and natural convection heat transfer using a single mode of heat transfer (heat conduction). In order to reduce the physical and numerical complexity of the heat transfer processes that occur (and must be modeled) as a result of the emplacement of heat generating wastes, a single parameter will be developed that approximates all forms of heat transfer from the waste package surface to the drift wall (or from one surface exchanging heat with another). Subsequently, with this single parameter, one heat transfer mechanism (e.g., conduction heat transfer) can be used in the models. The resulting parameter is to be used as input in the drift-scale process-level models applied in total system performance assessments for the site recommendation (TSPA-SR). The format of this parameter will be a time-dependent table for direct input into the thermal-hydrologic (TH) and the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) models.

  12. Cell percolation model for electrical conduction of granular superconducting composites. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, G.; Bankuti, J.

    1990-01-01

    The percolation of the electrical conductivity of the uniform cells is studied in an in-situ elongated granular superconducting composite on the basis of the uniform cell model improved previously. The critical temperatures are determined in the macroscopic superconducting state of the two- and the three-dimensional composites. (author)

  13. Effective Thermal Conductivity For Drift-Scale Models Used In TSPA-SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N.D. Francis

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this calculation is to develop a time dependent in-drift effective thermal conductivity parameter that will approximate heat conduction, thermal radiation, and natural convection heat transfer using a single mode of heat transfer (heat conduction). In order to reduce the physical and numerical complexity of the heat transfer processes that occur (and must be modeled) as a result of the emplacement of heat generating wastes, a single parameter will be developed that approximates all forms of heat transfer from the waste package surface to the drift wall (or from one surface exchanging heat with another). Subsequently, with this single parameter, one heat transfer mechanism (e.g., conduction heat transfer) can be used in the models. The resulting parameter is to be used as input in the drift-scale process-level models applied in total system performance assessments for the site recommendation (TSPA-SR). The format of this parameter will be a time-dependent table for direct input into the thermal-hydrologic (TH) and the thermal-hydrologic-chemical (THC) models

  14. Molecular modeling of the conductivity changes of the emeraldine base polyaniline due to protonic acid doping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Yuan, C.A.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Zhang, G.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a molecular modeling strategy, which is capable of predicting the conductivity change of emeraldine base polyaniline polymer due to different degree of protonic acid doping. The method is comprised of two key steps: (1) generating the amorphous unit cells with given number of polymer

  15. Modeling and Simulation of PMSG Wind Turbine with Boost Converter Working under Discontinuous Conduction Mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Nan; Xu, Zhao

    2008-01-01

    in the discontinuous conducting mode (DCM). The new wind turbine model with the variable speed control of the PMSG based on duty cycle control of the boost converter has been developed in Matlab Simulink. Simulation studies show that DCM working mode of the boost converter provides more flexibility in controlling...

  16. Quantum Hall conductivity in a Landau type model with a realistic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandelier, F.; Georgelin, Y.; Masson, T.; Wallet, J.-C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit some quantum mechanical aspects related to the quantum Hall effect. We consider a Landau type model, paying a special attention to the experimental and geometrical features of quantum Hall experiments. The resulting formalism is then used to compute explicitly the Hall conductivity from a Kubo formula

  17. Erythrocyte orientation and lung conductivity analysis with a high temporal resolution FEM model for bioimpedance measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulbrich, M.; Paluchowski, P.; Muehlsteff, J.; Leonhardt, S.

    2012-01-01

    Impedance cardiography (ICG) is a simple and cheap method to acquirehemodynamic parameters. In this work, the influence of three dynamic physiological sources has been analyzed using a model of the humanthorax with a high temporal resolution. Therefore, simulations havebeen conducted using the

  18. Development of a LSSVM-GC model for estimating the electrical conductivity of ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani-Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Sattari, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    In this communication, an extensive set of 1077 experimental electrical conductivity data for 54 ionic liquids (ILs) was collected from 21 different literature sources. Using this dataset, a reliable least square support vector machine-group contribution (LSSVM-GC) model has been developed, which...

  19. Model of electrical conductivity of skeletal muscle based on tissue structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, F.L.H.; Cruts, H.E.P.; Alberts, B.A.; Boon, K.L.; Wallinga, W.; Boom, H.B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Recent experiments carried out in our laboratory with the four-electrode method showed that the electrical conductivity of skeletal muscle tissue depends on the frequency of the injected current and the distance between the current electrodes. A model is proposed in order to study these effects. The

  20. Soil Systems for Upscaling Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity (Ksat) for Hydrological Modeling in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful hydrological model predictions depend on appropriate framing of scale and the spatial-temporal accuracy of input parameters describing soil hydraulic properties. Saturated soil hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is one of the most important properties influencing water movement through soil un...

  1. A comparison of two stomatal conductance models for ozone flux modelling using data from two Brassica species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Op de Beeck, M.; De Bock, M.; Vandermeiren, K.; Temmerman, L. de; Ceulemans, R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we tested and compared a multiplicative stomatal model and a coupled semi-empirical stomatal-photosynthesis model in their ability to predict stomatal conductance to ozone (g st ) using leaf-level data from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica Plenck). For oilseed rape, the multiplicative model and the coupled model were able to explain 72% and 73% of the observed g st variance, respectively. For broccoli, the models were able to explain 53% and 51% of the observed g st variance, respectively. These results support the coupled semi-empirical stomatal-photosynthesis model as a valid alternative to the multiplicative stomatal model for O 3 flux modelling, in terms of predictive performance. - A multiplicative stomatal model and a coupled semi-empirical stomatal-photosynthesis model performed equally well when tested against leaf-level data for oilseed rape and broccoli.

  2. Statistics of anomalously localized states at the center of band E = 0 in the one-dimensional Anderson localization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravtsov, V E; Yudson, V I

    2013-01-01

    We consider the distribution function P(|ψ| 2 ) of the eigenfunction amplitude at the center-of-band (E = 0) anomaly in the one-dimensional tight-binding chain with weak uncorrelated on-site disorder (the one-dimensional Anderson model). The special emphasis is on the probability of the anomalously localized states (ALS) with |ψ| 2 much larger than the inverse typical localization length ℓ 0 . Using the recently found solution for the generating function Φ an (u, ϕ) we obtain the ALS probability distribution P(|ψ| 2 ) at |ψ| 2 ℓ 0 ≫ 1. As an auxiliary preliminary step, we found the asymptotic form of the generating function Φ an (u, ϕ) at u ≫ 1 which can be used to compute other statistical properties at the center-of-band anomaly. We show that at moderately large values of |ψ| 2 ℓ 0 , the probability of ALS at E = 0 is smaller than at energies away from the anomaly. However, at very large values of |ψ| 2 ℓ 0 , the tendency is inverted: it is exponentially easier to create a very strongly localized state at E = 0 than at energies away from the anomaly. We also found the leading term in the behavior of P(|ψ| 2 ) at small |ψ| 2 ≪ ℓ −1 0 and show that it is consistent with the exponential localization corresponding to the Lyapunov exponent found earlier by Kappus and Wegner. (paper)

  3. Observations of leaf stomatal conductance at the canopy scale: an atmospheric modeling perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avissar, R.

    1993-01-01

    Plant stomata play a key role in the redistribution of energy received on vegetated land into sensible and latent heat. As a result, they have a considerable impact on the atmospheric planetary boundary layer, the hydrologic cycle, the climate, and the weather. Current parameterizations of the stomatal mechanism in state-of-the-art atmospheric models are based on empirical relations that are established at the leaf scale between stomatal conductance and environmental conditions. In order to evaluate these parameterizations, an experiment was carried out on a potato field in New Jersey during the summer of 1989. Stomatal conductances were measured within a small homogeneous area in the middle of the potato field and under a relatively broad range of atmospheric conditions. A large variability of stomatal conductances was observed. This variability, which was associated with the variability of micro-environmental and physiological conditions that is found even in a homogeneous canopy, cannot be simulated explicitly on the scale of a single agricultural field and,a fortiori, on the scale of atmospheric models. Furthermore, this variability could not be related to the environmental conditions measured at a height of 2 m above the plant canopy simultaneously with the conductances, reinforcing the concept of scale decoupling suggested by Jarvis and McNaughton (1986) and McNaughton and Jarvis (1991). Thus, for atmospheric modeling purposes, a parameterization of stomatal conductance at the canopy scale using external environmental forcing conditions seems more appropriate than a parameterization based on leaf-scale stomatal conductance, as currently adopted in state-of-the-art atmospheric models. The measured variability was characterized by a lognormal probability density function (pdf) that remained relatively stable during the entire measuring period. These observations support conclusions by McNaughton and Jarvis (1991) that, unlike current parameterizations, a

  4. Observations of leaf stomatal conductance at the canopy scale: an atmospheric modeling perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avissar, R.

    1993-01-01

    Plant stomata play a key role in the redistribution of energy received on vegetated land into sensible and latent heat. As a result, they have a considerable impact on the atmospheric planetary boundary layer, the hydrologic cycle, the climate, and the weather. Current parameterizations of the stomatal mechanism in state-of-the-art atmospheric models are based on empirical relations that are established at the leaf scale between stomatal conductance and environmental conditions. In order to evaluate these parameterizations, an experiment was carried out on a potato field in New Jersey during the summer of 1989. Stomatal conductances were measured within a small homogeneous area in the middle of the potato field and under a relatively broad range of atmospheric conditions. A large variability of stomatal conductances was observed. This variability, which was associated with the variability of micro-environmental and physiological conditions that is found even in a homogeneous canopy, cannot be simulated explicitly on the scale of a single agricultural field and, a fortiori, on the scale of atmospheric models. Furthermore, this variability could not be related to the environmental conditions measured at a height of 2 m above the plant canopy simultaneously with the conductances, reinforcing the concept of scale decoupling suggested by Jarvis and McNaughton (1986) and McNaughton and Jarvis (1991). Thus, for atmospheric modeling purposes, a parameterization of stomatal conductance at the canopy scale using external environmental forcing conditions seems more appropriate than a parameterization based on leaf-scale stomatal conductance, as currently adopted in state-of-the-art atmospheric models. The measured variability was characterized by a lognormal probability density function (pdf) that remained relatively stable during the entire measuring period. These observations support conclusions by McNaughton and Jarvis (1991) that, unlike current parameterizations, a

  5. External validation of multivariable prediction models: a systematic review of methodological conduct and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Before considering whether to use a multivariable (diagnostic or prognostic) prediction model, it is essential that its performance be evaluated in data that were not used to develop the model (referred to as external validation). We critically appraised the methodological conduct and reporting of external validation studies of multivariable prediction models. Methods We conducted a systematic review of articles describing some form of external validation of one or more multivariable prediction models indexed in PubMed core clinical journals published in 2010. Study data were extracted in duplicate on design, sample size, handling of missing data, reference to the original study developing the prediction models and predictive performance measures. Results 11,826 articles were identified and 78 were included for full review, which described the evaluation of 120 prediction models. in participant data that were not used to develop the model. Thirty-three articles described both the development of a prediction model and an evaluation of its performance on a separate dataset, and 45 articles described only the evaluation of an existing published prediction model on another dataset. Fifty-seven percent of the prediction models were presented and evaluated as simplified scoring systems. Sixteen percent of articles failed to report the number of outcome events in the validation datasets. Fifty-four percent of studies made no explicit mention of missing data. Sixty-seven percent did not report evaluating model calibration whilst most studies evaluated model discrimination. It was often unclear whether the reported performance measures were for the full regression model or for the simplified models. Conclusions The vast majority of studies describing some form of external validation of a multivariable prediction model were poorly reported with key details frequently not presented. The validation studies were characterised by poor design, inappropriate handling

  6. Spiral field inhibition of thermal conduction in two-fluid solar wind models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerney, S.; Barnes, A.

    1978-01-01

    The two-fluid solar wind equations, including inhibition of heat conduction by the spiral magnetic field, have been solved for steady radial flow, and the results are compared with those of our previous study of two-fluid models with straight interplanetary field lines. The main effects of the spiral field conduction cutoff are to bottle up electron heat inside 1 AU and to produce adiabatic electron (an proton) temperature profiles at large heliocentric distances. Otherwise, the spiral field models are nearly identical with straight field models with the same temperatures and velocity at 1 AU, except for models associated with very low coronal base densities (n 0 approx.10 6 cm -3 at 1R/sub s/). Low base density spiral models give a nearly isothermal electron temperature profile over 50--100 AU together with high velocities and temperatures at 1 AU. In general, high-velocity models do not agree well with observed high-velocity streams: lower-velocity states can be represented reasonably well at 1 AU, but only for very high proton temperatures (T/sub p/approx.2T/sub e/) at the coronal base. For spherically symmetric base conditions the straight field and spiral field models can be regarded, in lowest order, as approximations to the polar and equatorial three-dimensional flows, respectively. This viewpoint suggests a pole to equator electron temperature gradient in the region 1-10 AU, which would be associated with a meridional velocity of approx.0.5-1.0 km/s, diverging away from the equatorial plane. The formalism developed in this paper shows rather stringent limits to the mass loss rate for conductively driven winds and, in particular, illustrates that putative T Tauri outflows could not be conductively driven

  7. Modeling and inverse feedforward control for conducting polymer actuators with hysteresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiangjiang; Alici, Gursel; Tan, Xiaobo

    2014-01-01

    Conducting polymer actuators are biocompatible with a small footprint, and operate in air or liquid media under low actuation voltages. This makes them excellent actuators for macro- and micro-manipulation devices, however, their positioning ability or accuracy is adversely affected by their hysteresis non-linearity under open-loop control strategies. In this paper, we establish a hysteresis model for conducting polymer actuators, based on a rate-independent hysteresis model known as the Duhem model. The hysteresis model is experimentally identified and integrated with the linear dynamics of the actuator. This combined model is inverted to control the displacement of the tri-layer actuators considered in this study, without using any external feedback. The inversion requires an inverse hysteresis model which was experimentally identified using an inverse neural network model. Experimental results show that the position tracking errors are reduced by more than 50% when the hysteresis inverse model is incorporated into an inversion-based feedforward controller, indicating the potential of the proposed method in enabling wider use of such smart actuators. (paper)

  8. Two and Three-Phases Fractal Models Application in Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELNAZ Rezaei abajelu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil Hydraulic conductivity is considered as one of the most important hydraulic properties in water and solutionmovement in porous media. In recent years, variousmodels as pedo-transfer functions, fractal models and scaling technique are used to estimate the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks. Fractal models with two subset of two (solid and pore and three phases (solid, pore and soil fractal (PSF are used to estimate the fractal dimension of soil particles. The PSF represents a generalization of the solid and pore mass fractal models. The PSF characterizes both the solid and pore phases of the porous material. It also exhibits self-similarity to some degree, in the sense that where local structure seems to be similar to the whole structure.PSF models can estimate interface fractal dimension using soil pore size distribution data (PSD and soil moisture retention curve (SWRC. The main objective of this study was to evaluate different fractal models to estimate the Ksparameter. Materials and Methods: The Schaapetal data was used in this study. The complex consists of sixty soil samples. Soil texture, soil bulk density, soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil particle size distribution curve were measured by hydrometer method, undistributed soil sample, constant head method and wet sieve method, respectively for all soil samples.Soil water retention curve were determined by using pressure plates apparatus.The Ks parameter could be estimated by Ralws model as a function of fractal dimension by seven fractal models. Fractal models included Fuentes at al. (1996, Hunt and Gee (2002, Bird et al. (2000, Huang and Zhang (2005, Tyler and Wheatcraft (1990, Kutlu et al. (2008, Sepaskhah and Tafteh (2013.Therefore The Ks parameter can be estimated as a function of the DS (fractal dimension by seven fractal models (Table 2.Sensitivity analysis of Rawls model was assessed by making changes±10%, ±20% and±30%(in input parameters

  9. On The Construction of Models for Electrical Conduction in Biological Tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Aguilar, F.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Rosales-Garcia, J.; Guia-Calderon, M.

    2010-01-01

    Applying RC circuit theory, a theoretical representation for the electrical conduction in a biological multilayer system was developed. In particular an equivalent circuit for the epidermis, dermis and the subcutaneous tissue was constructed. This model includes an equivalent circuit, inside the dermis, in order to model a small formation like tumor. This work shows the feasibility to apply superficial electrodes to detect subcutaneous abnormalities. The behavior of the model is shown in the form of a frequency response chart. The Bode and Nyquist plots are also obtained. This theoretical frame is proposed to be a general treatment to describe the bioelectrical transport in a three layer bioelectrical system.

  10. Effect of recent popularity on heat-conduction based recommendation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Jun; Dong, Qiang; Shi, Yang-Bo; Fu, Yan; He, Jia-Lin

    2017-05-01

    Accuracy and diversity are two important measures in evaluating the performance of recommender systems. It has been demonstrated that the recommendation model inspired by the heat conduction process has high diversity yet low accuracy. Many variants have been introduced to improve the accuracy while keeping high diversity, most of which regard the current node-degree of an item as its popularity. However in this way, a few outdated items of large degree may be recommended to an enormous number of users. In this paper, we take the recent popularity (recently increased item degrees) into account in the heat-conduction based methods, and propose accordingly the improved recommendation models. Experimental results on two benchmark data sets show that the accuracy can be largely improved while keeping the high diversity compared with the original models.

  11. Model-Based Prediction of Pulsed Eddy Current Testing Signals from Stratified Conductive Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian Hai; Song, Sung Jin; Kim, Woong Ji; Kim, Hak Joon; Chung, Jong Duk

    2011-01-01

    Excitation and propagation of electromagnetic field of a cylindrical coil above an arbitrary number of conductive plates for pulsed eddy current testing(PECT) are very complex problems due to their complicated physical properties. In this paper, analytical modeling of PECT is established by Fourier series based on truncated region eigenfunction expansion(TREE) method for a single air-cored coil above stratified conductive structures(SCS) to investigate their integrity. From the presented expression of PECT, the coil impedance due to SCS is calculated based on analytical approach using the generalized reflection coefficient in series form. Then the multilayered structures manufactured by non-ferromagnetic (STS301L) and ferromagnetic materials (SS400) are investigated by the developed PECT model. Good prediction of analytical model of PECT not only contributes to the development of an efficient solver but also can be applied to optimize the conditions of experimental setup in PECT

  12. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  13. A nonlinear effective thermal conductivity model for carbon nanotube and nanofiber suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J; Kang, Y [Department of Mechanical Engineering Kyung Hee University, 1, Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kleinstreuer, C [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7910, 3211 Broughton Hall, Raleigh, NC 27695-7910 (United States)], E-mail: jmkoo@khu.ac.kr

    2008-09-17

    It has been experimentally demonstrated that suspensions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs) significantly increase the thermal conductivity of nanofluids; however, a physically sound theory of the underlying phenomenon is still missing. In this study, the nonlinear nature of the effective thermal conductivity enhancement with the particle concentration of CNT and CNF nanofluids is explained physically using the excluded volume concept. Specifically, the number of contacting CNTs and CNFs could be calculated by using the excluded volume concept, where the distance for heat to travel in a cylinder between the contacting cylinders in the thermal network of percolating CNTs and CNFs increased with the excluded volume. In contrast to the effective thermal conductivity model of Sastry et al (2008 Nanotechnology 19 055704) the present revised model could reproduce the nonlinear increase of the thermal conductivity with particle concentration, as well as the dependence on the diameter and aspect ratio of the CNTs and CNFs. It was found that the alignment of CNTs and CNFs due to the long range repulsion force decreases the excluded volume, leading to both the convex and concave nonlinear as well as linear increase of the thermal conductivity with particle concentration. The difference between various carrier fluids of the suspensions could be explained as the result of the change in the excluded volume in different base fluids.

  14. Multi-band effective mass approximations advanced mathematical models and numerical techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Koprucki, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This book addresses several mathematical models from the most relevant class of kp-Schrödinger systems. Both mathematical models and state-of-the-art numerical methods for adequately solving the arising systems of differential equations are presented. The operational principle of modern semiconductor nano structures, such as quantum wells, quantum wires or quantum dots, relies on quantum mechanical effects. The goal of numerical simulations using quantum mechanical models in the development of semiconductor nano structures is threefold: First they are needed for a deeper understanding of experimental data and of the operational principle. Secondly, they allow us to predict and optimize in advance the qualitative and quantitative properties of new devices in order to minimize the number of prototypes needed. Semiconductor nano structures are embedded as an active region in semiconductor devices. Thirdly and finally, the results of quantum mechanical simulations of semiconductor nano structures can be used wit...

  15. The spiral field inhibition of thermal conduction in two-fluid solar wind models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerney, S.; Barnes, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reports on two-field models which include the inhibition of thermal conduction by the spiraling interplanetary field to determine whether any of the major conclusions obtained by Nerney and Barnes (1977) needs to be modified. Comparisons with straight field line models reveal that for most base conditions, the primary effect of the inhibition of thermal conduction is the bottling-up of heat in the electrons as well as the quite different temperature profiles at a large heliocentric radius. The spiral field solutions show that coronal hole boundary conditions do not correspond to states of high-speed streams as observed at 1 AU. The two-fluid models suggest that the spiral field inhibition of thermal conduction in the equatorial plane will generate higher gas pressures in comparison with flows along the solar rotation axis (between 1 and 10 AU). In particular, massive outflows of stellar winds, such as outflow from T Tauri stars, cannot be driven by thermal conduction. The conclusions of Nerney and Barnes remain essentially unchanged.

  16. Modeling of cross-plane interface thermal conductance between graphene nano-ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Vikas; Lee, Jonghoon; Farmer, Barry L; Voevodin, Andrey A; Roy, Ajit K

    2014-01-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics for thermal energy transfer, we investigate the interfacial thermal conductance between non-covalently interacting graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs) of varying lengths and widths in a cross-contact (x-shaped) geometry. Our results show that the out-of-plane conductance between GNRs can vary significantly (up to a factor of 4) depending upon their geometric parameters. We observe that when plotted against aspect ratio, the predicted interface thermal conductance values fit excellently on a single master-plot with a logarithmic scaling, suggesting the importance of GNR aspect ratio towards thermal conductance. We propose a model based on incorporating different thermal conductance characteristics of edge and inner interacting regions which predicts the observed logarithmic dependence on aspect ratio. We also study the effect of graphene edge roughness, temperature, and strain on out-of-plane thermal conductance and discuss the observed results based on local vibrational characteristics of atoms within interacting region, number of interacting phonons, and the degree to which they interact across the interaction zone. (paper)

  17. Mathematical modelling of pasta dough dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Ionuţ SIMION

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to study the mathematical variation of three main thermodynamic properties (dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of pasta dough obtained by mixing wheat semolina and water with dough humidity and deformation speed (for dynamic viscosity, respectively with dough humidity and temperature (for thermal diffusivity and conductivity. The realized regression analysis of existing graphical data led to the development of mathematical models with a high degree of accuracy. The employed statistical tests (least squares, relative error and analysis of variance revealed that the obtained equations are able to describe and predict the tendency of the dough thermodynamic properties.

  18. High-conductance states in a mean-field cortical network model

    CERN Document Server

    Lerchner, A; Hertz, J

    2004-01-01

    Measured responses from visual cortical neurons show that spike times tend to be correlated rather than exactly Poisson distributed. Fano factors vary and are usually greater than 1 due to the tendency of spikes being clustered into bursts. We show that this behavior emerges naturally in a balanced cortical network model with random connectivity and conductance-based synapses. We employ mean field theory with correctly colored noise to describe temporal correlations in the neuronal activity. Our results illuminate the connection between two independent experimental findings: high conductance states of cortical neurons in their natural environment, and variable non-Poissonian spike statistics with Fano factors greater than 1.

  19. A simplistic analytical unit cell based model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X H; Kuang, J J; Lu, T J; Han, F S; Kim, T

    2013-01-01

    We present a simplistic yet accurate analytical model for the effective thermal conductivity of high porosity open-cell metal foams saturated in a low conducting fluid (air). The model is derived analytically based on a realistic representative unit cell (a tetrakaidecahedron) under the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along highly tortuous-conducting ligaments at high porosity ranges (ε ⩾ 0.9). Good agreement with existing experimental data suggests that heat conduction along highly conducting and tortuous ligaments predominantly defines the effective thermal conductivity of open-cell metal foams with negligible conduction in parallel through the fluid phase. (paper)

  20. Phase diagram of the Hubbard model with arbitrary band filling: renormalization group approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannas, Sergio A.; Cordoba Univ. Nacional; Tsallis, Constantino.

    1991-01-01

    The finite temperature phase diagram of the Hubbard model in d = 2 and d = 3 is calculated for arbitrary values of the parameter U/t and chemical potential μ using a quantum real space renormalization group. Evidence for a ferromagnetic phase at low temperatures is presented. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs

  1. Optimized Variational 1D Boussinesq Modelling for broad-band waves over flat bottom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakhturov, I.; Adytia, D.; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    The Variational Boussinesq Model (VBM) for waves above a layer of ideal fluid conserves mass, momentum, energy, and has decreased dimensionality compared to the full problem. It is derived from the Hamiltonian formulation via an approximation of the kinetic energy, and can provide approximate

  2. Estimating biozone hydraulic conductivity in wastewater soil-infiltration systems using inverse numerical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgarner, Johnathan R; McCray, John E

    2007-06-01

    During operation of an onsite wastewater treatment system, a low-permeability biozone develops at the infiltrative surface (IS) during application of wastewater to soil. Inverse numerical-model simulations were used to estimate the biozone saturated hydraulic conductivity (K(biozone)) under variably saturated conditions for 29 wastewater infiltration test cells installed in a sandy loam field soil. Test cells employed two loading rates (4 and 8cm/day) and 3 IS designs: open chamber, gravel, and synthetic bundles. The ratio of K(biozone) to the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the natural soil (K(s)) was used to quantify the reductions in the IS hydraulic conductivity. A smaller value of K(biozone)/K(s,) reflects a greater reduction in hydraulic conductivity. The IS hydraulic conductivity was reduced by 1-3 orders of magnitude. The reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity was primarily influenced by wastewater loading rate and IS type and not by the K(s) of the native soil. The higher loading rate yielded greater reductions in IS hydraulic conductivity than the lower loading rate for bundle and gravel cells, but the difference was not statistically significant for chamber cells. Bundle and gravel cells exhibited a greater reduction in IS hydraulic conductivity than chamber cells at the higher loading rates, while the difference between gravel and bundle systems was not statistically significant. At the lower rate, bundle cells exhibited generally lower K(biozone)/K(s) values, but not at a statistically significant level, while gravel and chamber cells were statistically similar. Gravel cells exhibited the greatest variability in measured values, which may complicate design efforts based on K(biozone) evaluations for these systems. These results suggest that chamber systems may provide for a more robust design, particularly for high or variable wastewater infiltration rates.

  3. Enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells performances by improving electron density in conduction band of nanostructure TiO2 electrode with using a metalloporphyrin as additional dye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojiri-Foroushani, M.; Dehghani, H.; Salehi-Vanani, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► N719 and ZnTCPP dyes were used in a sequential adsorption process. ► By using two dyes, improved the performance of the cell. ► Density of electrons in the conduction band of TiO 2 electrodes improved. -- Abstract: A zinc(II)-porphyrin dye with four carboxyphenyl moiety of ancillary (ZnTCPP) was studied as a sensitizer in combination with a ruthenium complex (N719) in co-sensitized solar cells. The high molar extinction coefficient (ε) of porphyrin dyes leads to high light absorption in the dye-sensitized TiO 2 electrode. In spite of the high ε of porphyrin dyes, they usually have a narrow absorption band and also to suffer from dye aggregation due to their planar structural nature. This causes lower efficiencies of the DSSCs for the porphyrins than the ruthenium complexes. Co-sensitization of two or more dyes with complementary absorption spectra on TiO 2 film is an important method to further enhance the IPCE response and energy conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells. Interestingly, when the ZnTCPP electrode was used to assemble a co-sensitized solar cell by additional adsorption of N719 dye, the efficiency improved to 6.35% (in comparison to N719 that the efficiency was 4.74%). The results indicated that the co-sensitized device shows enhancements of photovoltaic performance not only in short-circuit current density (J SC ) but also in open-circuit voltage (V OC ). In the present study we have been shown that co-sensitization of a zinc(II)-porphyrin with N719 dye changes the energy levels of the TiO 2 electrode and in result produces further improvement for its device performance

  4. Fidelity study of the superconducting phase diagram in the two-dimensional single-band Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C. J.; Moritz, B.; Chen, C.-C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Devereaux, T. P.

    2011-09-01

    Extensive numerical studies have demonstrated that the two-dimensional single-band Hubbard model contains much of the key physics in cuprate high-temperature superconductors. However, there is no definitive proof that the Hubbard model truly possesses a superconducting ground state or, if it does, of how it depends on model parameters. To answer these longstanding questions, we study an extension of the Hubbard model including an infinite-range d-wave pair field term, which precipitates a superconducting state in the d-wave channel. Using exact diagonalization on 16-site square clusters, we study the evolution of the ground state as a function of the strength of the pairing term. This is achieved by monitoring the fidelity metric of the ground state, as well as determining the ratio between the two largest eigenvalues of the d-wave pair/spin/charge-density matrices. The calculations show a d-wave superconducting ground state in doped clusters bracketed by a strong antiferromagnetic state at half filling controlled by the Coulomb repulsion U and a weak short-range checkerboard charge ordered state at larger hole doping controlled by the next-nearest-neighbor hopping t'. We also demonstrate that negative t' plays an important role in facilitating d-wave superconductivity.

  5. Site-scale groundwater flow modelling of Aberg and upscaling of conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Douglas; Gylling, Bjoern

    2002-04-01

    A recent performance assessment study of spent nuclear fuel disposal in Sweden, Safety Report 1997 (SR 97) included modelling of flow and transport in fractured host rocks. Hydraulic conductivity measurements in this system exhibit a strong scale dependence that needed to be addressed when determining the mean and variogram of the hydraulic conductivity for finite-difference blocks and when nesting site-scale models within regional scale models. This study applies four upscaling approaches to the groundwater flow models of Aberg, one of the hypothetical SR 97 repositories. The approaches are: 1) as in SR 97, empirically upscaling the mean conductivity via the observed scale dependence of measurements, and adjusting the covariance via numerical regularisation; 2) empirically upscaling as in SR 97, but considering fracture zones as two-dimensional features; 3) adapting the effective conductivity of stochastic continuum mechanics to upscale the mean, and geostatistical regularisation for variogram; and 4) the analytical approach of Indelman and Dagan. These four approaches are evaluated for their effects on simple measures of repository performance including the canister flux, the advective travel time from representative canister locations to the ground surface, and the F-quotient. A set of sensitivity analyses suggest that the results of the SR 97 Aberg Base Case are insensitive to minor computational changes and to the changes in the properties of minor fracture zones. The comparison of alternative approaches to upscaling indicates that, for the methods examined in this study, the greatest consistency of boundary flows between the regional and site-scale models was achieved when using the scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity observed at Aespoe for the rock domains, the hydraulic conductivities of the large-scale interference tests for the conductor domain, and a numerical regularisation based on Moye's formula for the variogram. The assumption that the

  6. A Two-Big-Leaf Model for Canopy Temperature, Photosynthesis, and Stomatal Conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yongjiu; Dickinson, Robert E.; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2004-06-01

    The energy exchange, evapotranspiration, and carbon exchange by plant canopies depend on leaf stomatal control. The treatment of this control has been required by land components of climate and carbon models. Physiological models can be used to simulate the responses of stomatal conductance to changes in atmospheric and soil environments. Big-leaf models that treat a canopy as a single leaf tend to overestimate fluxes of CO2 and water vapor. Models that differentiate between sunlit and shaded leaves largely overcome these problems.A one-layered, two-big-leaf submodel for photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, leaf temperature, and energy fluxes is presented in this paper. It includes 1) an improved two stream approximation model of radiation transfer of the canopy, with attention to singularities in its solution and with separate integrations of radiation absorption by sunlit and shaded fractions of canopy; 2) a photosynthesis stomatal conductance model for sunlit and shaded leaves separately, and for the simultaneous transfers of CO2 and water vapor into and out of the leaf—leaf physiological properties (i.e., leaf nitrogen concentration, maximum potential electron transport rate, and hence photosynthetic capacity) vary throughout the plant canopy in response to the radiation weight time-mean profile of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and the soil water limitation is applied to both maximum rates of leaf carbon uptake by Rubisco and electron transport, and the model scales up from leaf to canopy separately for all sunlit and shaded leaves; 3) a well-built quasi-Newton Raphson method for simultaneous solution of temperatures of the sunlit and shaded leaves.The model was incorporated into the Common Land Model (CLM) and is denoted CLM 2L. It was driven with observational atmospheric forcing from two forest sites [Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observation Study (ABRACOS) and Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS)] for 2 yr of simulation. The

  7. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor; Martin, Ian; Fielder, Richard; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS) to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  8. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Smaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  9. On the interaction between the ground- and s-bands in the CHFB model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haakansson, H.B.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction between the ground configuration and the first excited 2 qp (s-) configuration in the isub 13/2 CHFB model is eliminated in order to investigate how the interaction is built up by the different terms in the Hamiltonian. The changes of sign of the interaction can be understood from the particle number projected wave functions. Oscillations are still present after projection. (author)

  10. Optical conductivity calculation of a k.p model semiconductor GaAs incorporating first-order electron-hole vertex correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhuda, Maryam; Aziz Majidi, Muhammad

    2018-04-01

    The role of excitons in semiconducting materials carries potential applications. Experimental results show that excitonic signals also appear in optical absorption spectra of semiconductor system with narrow gap, such as Gallium Arsenide (GaAs). While on the theoretical side, calculation of optical spectra based purely on Density Functional Theory (DFT) without taking electron-hole (e-h) interactions into account does not lead to the appearance of any excitonic signal. Meanwhile, existing DFT-based algorithms that include a full vertex correction through Bethe-Salpeter equation may reveal an excitonic signal, but the algorithm has not provided a way to analyze the excitonic signal further. Motivated to provide a way to isolate the excitonic effect in the optical response theoretically, we develop a method of calculation for the optical conductivity of a narrow band-gap semiconductor GaAs within the 8-band k.p model that includes electron-hole interactions through first-order electron-hole vertex correction. Our calculation confirms that the first-order e-h vertex correction reveals excitonic signal around 1.5 eV (the band gap edge), consistent with the experimental data.

  11. Novel thermal efficiency-based model for determination of thermal conductivity of membrane distillation membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanneste, Johan; Bush, John A.; Hickenbottom, Kerri L.; Marks, Christopher A.; Jassby, David

    2017-01-01

    Development and selection of membranes for membrane distillation (MD) could be accelerated if all performance-determining characteristics of the membrane could be obtained during MD operation without the need to recur to specialized or cumbersome porosity or thermal conductivity measurement techniques. By redefining the thermal efficiency, the Schofield method could be adapted to describe the flux without prior knowledge of membrane porosity, thickness, or thermal conductivity. A total of 17 commercially available membranes were analyzed in terms of flux and thermal efficiency to assess their suitability for application in MD. The thermal-efficiency based model described the flux with an average %RMSE of 4.5%, which was in the same range as the standard deviation on the measured flux. The redefinition of the thermal efficiency also enabled MD to be used as a novel thermal conductivity measurement device for thin porous hydrophobic films that cannot be measured with the conventional laser flash diffusivity technique.

  12. Evaluation of the stomatal conductance formulation in the EMEP ozone deposition model for Picea abies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, G.; Emberson, L. D.

    It is widely acknowledged that the possible impacts of ozone on forest trees are more closely related to ozone flux through the stomata than to external ozone exposure. However, the application of the flux approach on a European scale requires the availability of appropriate models, such as the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) ozone deposition model, for estimating ozone flux and cumulative ozone uptake. Within this model stomatal conductance is the key variable, since it determines the amount of ozone absorbed by the leaves. This paper describes the suitability of the existing EMEP ozone deposition model parameterisation and formulation to represent stomatal behaviour determined from field measurements on adult Norway spruce ( Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees in the Central European Alps. Parameters affecting maximum stomatal conductance (e.g. seasonal phenology, needle position, needle age, nutrient deficiency and ozone itself) and stomatal response functions to temperature, irradiance, vapour pressure deficit, and soil water content are investigated. Finally, current limitations and possible alterations of the EMEP model will be discussed with respect to spatial scales of available input data for future flux modelling.

  13. A plug flow reactor model of a vanadium redox flow battery considering the conductive current collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, S.; Suriyah, M. R.; Leibfried, T.

    2017-08-01

    A lumped-parameter model for vanadium redox flow batteries, which use metallic current collectors, is extended into a one-dimensional model using the plug flow reactor principle. Thus, the commonly used simplification of a perfectly mixed cell is no longer required. The resistances of the cell components are derived in the in-plane and through-plane directions. The copper current collector is the only component with a significant in-plane conductance, which allows for a simplified electrical network. The division of a full-scale flow cell into 10 layers in the direction of fluid flow represents a reasonable compromise between computational effort and accuracy. Due to the variations in the state of charge and thus the open circuit voltage of the electrolyte, the currents in the individual layers vary considerably. Hence, there are situations, in which the first layer, directly at the electrolyte input, carries a multiple of the last layer's current. The conventional model overestimates the cell performance. In the worst-case scenario, the more accurate 20-layer model yields a discharge capacity 9.4% smaller than that computed with the conventional model. The conductive current collector effectively eliminates the high over-potentials in the last layers of the plug flow reactor models that have been reported previously.

  14. An alternative method for calibration of narrow band radiometer using a radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, J; Wolfram, E; D' Elia, R [Centro de Investigaciones en Laseres y Aplicaciones, CEILAP (CITEFA-CONICET), Juan B. de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO), Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zamorano, F; Casiccia, C [Laboratorio de Ozono y Radiacion UV, Universidad de Magallanes, Punta Arenas (Chile) (Chile); Rosales, A [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, UNPSJB, Facultad de Ingenieria, Trelew (Argentina) (Argentina); Quel, E, E-mail: jsalvador@citefa.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Unidad Academica Rio Gallegos Avda. Lisandro de la Torre 1070 ciudad de Rio Gallegos-Sta Cruz (Argentina) (Argentina)

    2011-01-01

    The continual monitoring of solar UV radiation is one of the major objectives proposed by many atmosphere research groups. The purpose of this task is to determine the status and degree of progress over time of the anthropogenic composition perturbation of the atmosphere. Such changes affect the intensity of the UV solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere that then interacts with living organisms and all materials, causing serious consequences in terms of human health and durability of materials that interact with this radiation. One of the many challenges that need to be faced to perform these measurements correctly is the maintenance of periodic calibrations of these instruments. Otherwise, damage caused by the UV radiation received will render any one calibration useless after the passage of some time. This requirement makes the usage of these instruments unattractive, and the lack of frequent calibration may lead to the loss of large amounts of acquired data. Motivated by this need to maintain calibration or, at least, know the degree of stability of instrumental behavior, we have developed a calibration methodology that uses the potential of radiative transfer models to model solar radiation with 5% accuracy or better relative to actual conditions. Voltage values in each radiometer channel involved in the calibration process are carefully selected from clear sky data. Thus, tables are constructed with voltage values corresponding to various atmospheric conditions for a given solar zenith angle. Then we model with a radiative transfer model using the same conditions as for the measurements to assemble sets of values for each zenith angle. The ratio of each group (measured and modeled) allows us to calculate the calibration coefficient value as a function of zenith angle as well as the cosine response presented by the radiometer. The calibration results obtained by this method were compared with those obtained with a Brewer MKIII SN 80 located in the

  15. Subtle paranodal injury slows impulse conduction in a mathematical model of myelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles F Babbs

    Full Text Available This study explores in detail the functional consequences of subtle retraction and detachment of myelin around the nodes of Ranvier following mild-to-moderate crush or stretch mediated injury. An equivalent electrical circuit model for a series of equally spaced nodes of Ranvier was created incorporating extracellular and axonal resistances, paranodal resistances, nodal capacitances, time varying sodium and potassium currents, and realistic resting and threshold membrane potentials in a myelinated axon segment of 21 successive nodes. Differential equations describing membrane potentials at each nodal region were solved numerically. Subtle injury was simulated by increasing the width of exposed nodal membrane in nodes 8 through 20 of the model. Such injury diminishes action potential amplitude and slows conduction velocity from 19.1 m/sec in the normal region to 7.8 m/sec in the crushed region. Detachment of paranodal myelin, exposing juxtaparanodal potassium channels, decreases conduction velocity further to 6.6 m/sec, an effect that is partially reversible with potassium ion channel blockade. Conduction velocity decreases as node width increases or as paranodal resistance falls. The calculated changes in conduction velocity with subtle paranodal injury agree with experimental observations. Nodes of Ranvier are highly effective but somewhat fragile devices for increasing nerve conduction velocity and decreasing reaction time in vertebrate animals. Their fundamental design limitation is that even small mechanical retractions of myelin from very narrow nodes or slight loosening of paranodal myelin, which are difficult to notice at the light microscopic level of observation, can cause large changes in myelinated nerve conduction velocity.

  16. Exploring the origin of broad-band emissions of Mrk 501 with a two-zone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Maichang; Yang, Chuyuan; Wang, Jiancheng; Yang, Xiaolin

    2018-04-01

    We propose a two-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, including an inner gamma-ray emitting region with spherical shape and a conical radio emitting region located at the extended jet, to alleviate the long-standing "bulk Lorentz factor crisis" in blazars. In this model, the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of blazars are produced by considering the gamma-ray emitting region inverse Compton scattering of both the synchrotron photons itself and the ambient photons from the radio emitting region. Applying the model to Mrk 501, we obtain that the radio emitting region has a comoving length of ˜0.15 pc and is located at sub-parsec scale from the central engine by modeling the radio data; the flux of the Compton scattering of the ambient photons is so low that it can be neglected safely. The characteristic hard gamma-ray spectrum can be explained by the superposition of two SSC processes, and the model can approximately explain the very high energy (VHE) data. The insights into the spectral shape and the inter-band correlations under the flaring state will provide us with a diagnostic for the bulk Lorentz factor of radio emitting region, where the low and upper limits of 8 and 15 are preferred, and for the two-zone SSC model itself. In addition, our two-zone SSC model shows that the gamma-ray emitting region creates flare on the timescale of merely a few hours, and the long time outbursts more likely originate from the extended radio emitting region.

  17. Investigation of the two-quasiparticle bands in the doubly-odd nucleus 166Ta using a particle-number conserving cranked shell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, ZhenHua

    2016-07-01

    The high-spin rotational properties of two-quasiparticle bands in the doubly-odd 166Ta are analyzed using the cranked shell model with pairing correlations treated by a particle-number conserving method, in which the blocking effects are taken into account exactly. The experimental moments of inertia and alignments and their variations with the rotational frequency hω are reproduced very well by the particle-number conserving calculations, which provides a reliable support to the configuration assignments in previous works for these bands. The backbendings in these two-quasiparticle bands are analyzed by the calculated occupation probabilities and the contributions of each orbital to the total angular momentum alignments. The moments of inertia and alignments for the Gallagher-Moszkowski partners of these observed two-quasiparticle rotational bands are also predicted.

  18. Methods for Automating Analysis of Glacier Morphology for Regional Modelling: Centerlines, Extensions, and Elevation Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger, R. J.; Van Beusekom, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of glaciers in modeling requires information about their shape and extent. This presentation discusses new methods and their application in a new glacier-capable variant of the USGS PRMS model, a physically-based, spatially distributed daily time-step model designed to simulate the runoff and evolution of glaciers through time. In addition to developing parameters describing PRMS land surfaces (hydrologic response units, HRUs), several of the analyses and products are likely of interest to cryospheric science community in general. The first method is a (fully automated) variation of logic previously presented in the literature for definition of the glacier centerline. Given that the surface of a glacier might be convex, using traditional topographic analyses based on a DEM to trace a path down the glacier is not reliable. Instead a path is derived based on a cost function. Although only a single path is presented in our results, the method can be easily modified to delineate a branched network of centerlines for each glacier. The second method extends the glacier terminus downslope by an arbitrary distance, according to local surface topography. This product is can be used to explore possible, if unlikely, scenarios under which glacier area grows. More usefully, this method can be used to approximate glacier extents from previous years without needing historical imagery. The final method presents an approach for segmenting the glacier into altitude-based HRUs. Successful integration of this information with traditional approaches for discretizing the non-glacierized portions of a basin requires several additional steps. These include synthesizing the glacier centerline network with one developed with a traditional DEM analysis, ensuring that flow can be routed under and beyond glaciers to a basin outlet. Results are presented based on analysis of the Copper River Basin, Alaska.

  19. Mathematical model for solar drying of potato cylinders with thermal conductivity radially modulated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo Arredondo, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    A mathematical model for drying potato cylinders using solar radiation is proposed and solved analytically. The model incorporates the energy balance for the heat capacity of the potato, the radiation heat transfer from the potato toward the drying chamber and the solar radiation absorbed by the potato during the drying process. Potato cylinders are assumed to exhibit a thermal conductivity which is radially modulated. The method of the Laplace transform, with integral Bromwich and residue theorem will be applied and the analytic solutions for the temperature profiles in the potato cylinder will be derived in the form of an infinite series of Bessel functions, when the thermal conductivity is constant; and in the form of an infinite series of Heun functions, when the thermal conductivity has a linear radial modulation. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is expected that the analytical results obtained will be useful in food engineering and industry. Our results suggest some lines for future investigations such as the adoption of more general forms of radial modulation for the thermal conductivity of potato cylinders; and possible applications of other computer algebra software such as Maxima and Mathematica.

  20. Non-Fourier Vernotte-Cattaneo numerical model for heat conduction in a BWR fuel rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa-Martinez, E.G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Varela-Ham, J.R.; Espinosa-Paredes, G., E-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    A fuel rod mathematical model based on transient heat conduction as constitutive Non-Fourier law for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) transient analysis is presented. The structure of the fuel pellet is affected due to high temperatures and irradiation, which eventually produce fracture or cracks. In principle the fractures are saturated of gas. Then, the Fourier law of the heat conduction is not strictly applicable to describe these phenomena, where the physical properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density correspond to a heterogeneous material due to gas, and therefore the thermal diffusion process due to molecular transport in the fuel pellet is affected. From the point of view of nuclear reactor safety analysis, the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant is crucial and superheating of the wall can cause the cladding failure. In the classical theory of diffusion, the Fourier law of heat conduction is used to describe the relation between the heat flux vector and the temperature gradient assuming that the heat propagation speeds are infinite. The Non-Fourier approach presented in this work eliminates the assumption of an infinite thermal wave speed, therefore time-dependent heat sources were considered in the fuel rod heat transfer model. The numerical experiments in a BWR, show that the Non-Fourier approach is crucial in the pressurization transients such as turbine trip and reactor isolation. (author)

  1. Non-Fourier Vernotte-Cattaneo numerical model for heat conduction in a BWR fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa-Martinez, E.G.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A.; Varela-Ham, J.R.; Espinosa-Paredes, G.

    2014-01-01

    A fuel rod mathematical model based on transient heat conduction as constitutive Non-Fourier law for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) transient analysis is presented. The structure of the fuel pellet is affected due to high temperatures and irradiation, which eventually produce fracture or cracks. In principle the fractures are saturated of gas. Then, the Fourier law of the heat conduction is not strictly applicable to describe these phenomena, where the physical properties such as thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density correspond to a heterogeneous material due to gas, and therefore the thermal diffusion process due to molecular transport in the fuel pellet is affected. From the point of view of nuclear reactor safety analysis, the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant is crucial and superheating of the wall can cause the cladding failure. In the classical theory of diffusion, the Fourier law of heat conduction is used to describe the relation between the heat flux vector and the temperature gradient assuming that the heat propagation speeds are infinite. The Non-Fourier approach presented in this work eliminates the assumption of an infinite thermal wave speed, therefore time-dependent heat sources were considered in the fuel rod heat transfer model. The numerical experiments in a BWR, show that the Non-Fourier approach is crucial in the pressurization transients such as turbine trip and reactor isolation. (author)

  2. Modelling and Characterization of Effective Thermal Conductivity of Single Hollow Glass Microsphere and Its Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Wang, Hui; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2018-01-14

    Tiny hollow glass microsphere (HGM) can be applied for designing new light-weighted and thermal-insulated composites as high strength core, owing to its hollow structure. However, little work has been found for studying its own overall thermal conductivity independent of any matrix, which generally cannot be measured or evaluated directly. In this study, the overall thermal conductivity of HGM is investigated experimentally and numerically. The experimental investigation of thermal conductivity of HGM powder is performed by the transient plane source (TPS) technique to provide a reference to numerical results, which are obtained by a developed three-dimensional two-step hierarchical computational method. In the present method, three heterogeneous HGM stacking elements representing different distributions of HGMs in the powder are assumed. Each stacking element and its equivalent homogeneous solid counterpart are, respectively, embedded into a fictitious matrix material as fillers to form two equivalent composite systems at different levels, and then the overall thermal conductivity of each stacking element can be numerically determined through the equivalence of the two systems. The comparison of experimental and computational results indicates the present computational modeling can be used for effectively predicting the overall thermal conductivity of single HGM and its powder in a flexible way. Besides, it is necessary to note that the influence of thermal interfacial resistance cannot be removed from the experimental results in the TPS measurement.

  3. Modeling conduction in host-graft interactions between stem cell grafts and cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Michael Q; Yu, Jin; Whittington, R Hollis; Wu, Joseph C; Kovacs, Gregory T A; Giovangrandi, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Cell therapy has recently made great strides towards aiding heart failure. However, while transplanted cells may electromechanically integrate into host tissue, there may not be a uniform propagation of a depolarization wave between the heterogeneous tissue boundaries. A model using microelectrode array technology that maps the electrical interactions between host and graft tissues in co-culture is presented and sheds light on the effects of having a mismatch of conduction properties at the boundary. Skeletal myoblasts co-cultured with cardiomyocytes demonstrated that conduction velocity significantly decreases at the boundary despite electromechanical coupling. In an attempt to improve the uniformity of conduction with host cells, differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESC) were used in co-culture. Over the course of four to seven days, synchronous electrical activity was observed at the hESC boundary, implying differentiation and integration. Activity did not extend far past the boundary, and conduction velocity was significantly greater than that of the host tissue, implying the need for other external measures to properly match the conduction properties between host and graft tissue.

  4. Particle acceleration model for the broad-band baseline spectrum of the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraschetti, F.; Pohl, M.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a simple one-zone model of the steady-state Crab nebula spectrum encompassing both the radio/soft X-ray and the GeV/multi-TeV observations. By solving the transport equation for GeV-TeV electrons injected at the wind termination shock as a log-parabola momentum distribution and evolved via energy losses, we determine analytically the resulting differential energy spectrum of photons. We find an impressive agreement with the observed spectrum of synchrotron emission, and the synchrotron self-Compton component reproduces the previously unexplained broad 200-GeV peak that matches the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) data beyond 1 GeV with the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) data. We determine the parameters of the single log-parabola electron injection distribution, in contrast with multiple broken power-law electron spectra proposed in the literature. The resulting photon differential spectrum provides a natural interpretation of the deviation from power law customarily fitted with empirical multiple broken power laws. Our model can be applied to the radio-to-multi-TeV spectrum of a variety of astrophysical outflows, including pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants, as well as to interplanetary shocks.

  5. Investigation of tDCS volume conduction effects in a highly realistic head model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S.; Rampersad, S. M.; Aydin, Ü.; Vorwerk, J.; Oostendorp, T. F.; Neuling, T.; Herrmann, C. S.; Stegeman, D. F.; Wolters, C. H.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. We investigate volume conduction effects in transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and present a guideline for efficient and yet accurate volume conductor modeling in tDCS using our newly-developed finite element (FE) approach. Approach. We developed a new, accurate and fast isoparametric FE approach for high-resolution geometry-adapted hexahedral meshes and tissue anisotropy. To attain a deeper insight into tDCS, we performed computer simulations, starting with a homogenized three-compartment head model and extending this step by step to a six-compartment anisotropic model. Main results. We are able to demonstrate important tDCS effects. First, we find channeling effects of the skin, the skull spongiosa and the cerebrospinal fluid compartments. Second, current vectors tend to be oriented towards the closest higher conducting region. Third, anisotropic WM conductivity causes current flow in directions more parallel to the WM fiber tracts. Fourth, the highest cortical current magnitudes are not only found close to the stimulation sites. Fifth, the median brain current density decreases with increasing distance from the electrodes. Significance. Our results allow us to formulate a guideline for volume conductor modeling in tDCS. We recommend to accurately model the major tissues between the stimulating electrodes and the target areas, while for efficient yet accurate modeling, an exact representation of other tissues is less important. Because for the low-frequency regime in electrophysiology the quasi-static approach is justified, our results should also be valid for at least low-frequency (e.g., below 100 Hz) transcranial alternating current stimulation.

  6. On parameterization of heat conduction in coupled soil water and heat flow modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Votrubová, J.; Dohnal, M.; Vogel, T.; Tesař, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2012), s. 125-137 ISSN 1801-5395 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1174 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : advective heat flux * dual-permeability model * soil heat transport * soil thermal conductivity * surface energy balance Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 0.333, year: 2012

  7. Process modeling of conductivity in nanocomposites based on reticulated polymers and carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgoshej, V.B.; Korskanov, V.V.; Karpova, I.L.; Bardash, L.V.

    2012-01-01

    The dependences of electric conductivities of thermosetting polymer nanocomposites based on epoxy polymer and polycyanurate filled by carbon nanotubes were investigated. Low values of percolation threshold at volume fraction of carbon nanotubes from 0.001 to 0.002 were observed for all samples.Absolute values of the percolation threshold are in good agreement with the results of mathematical modeling. It is established that electrical properties of thermosetting polymer nanocomposites can be characterized in the frame of the same theoretical model despite difference in polymers properties

  8. Riding Quality Model for Asphalt Pavement Monitoring Using Phase Array Type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiya Yoshikazu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available There are difficulties associated with near-real time or frequent pavement monitoring, because it is time consuming and costly. This study aimed to develop a binary logit model for the evaluation of highway riding quality, which could be used to monitor pavement conditions. The model was applied to investigate the influence of backscattering values of Phase Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR. Training data obtained during 3–7 May 2007 was used in the development process, together with actual international roughness index (IRI values collected along a highway in Ayutthaya province, Thailand. The analysis showed that an increase in the backscattering value in the HH or the VV polarization indicated the poor condition of the pavement surface and, of the two, the HH polarization is more suitable for developing riding quality evaluation. The model developed was applied to analyze highway number 3467, to demonstrate its capability. It was found that the assessment accuracy of the prediction of the highway level of service was 97.00%. This is a preliminary study of the proposed technique and more intensive investigation must be carried out using ALOS/PALSAR images in various seasons.

  9. Conducting model ecosystem studies in tropical climate zones: Lessons learned from Thailand and way forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daam, Michiel A., E-mail: mdaam@isa.utl.pt [Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Technical University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon (Portugal); Van den Brink, Paul J., E-mail: Paul.vandenbrink@wur.nl [Alterra, Wageningen University and Research centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Wageningen University, Department of Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management, Wageningen University and Research centre, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    Little research has been done so far into the environmental fate and side effects of pesticides in the tropics. In addition, those studies conducted in tropical regions have focused almost exclusively on single species laboratory tests. Hence, fate and effects of pesticides on higher-tier levels have barely been studied under tropical conditions. To address this lack of knowledge, four outdoor aquatic model ecosystem experiments using two different test systems were conducted in Thailand evaluating the insecticide chlorpyrifos, the herbicide linuron and the fungicide carbendazim. Results of these experiments and comparisons of recorded fate and effects with temperate studies have been published previously. The present paper discusses the pros and cons of the methodologies applied and provides indications for i) possible improvements; ii) important aspects that should be considered when performing model ecosystem experiments in the tropics; iii) future research. - Research highlights: > Methodologies used overall seemed adequate to evaluate pesticide stress. > Identification and sampling of tropical macroinvertebrates should be improved. > Additional studies needed for different compounds and greater geographical scale. > Different exposure regimes and ecosystem types should be simulated. > Trophic interrelationship and recovery potential need to be evaluated. - Methodologies for conducting model ecosystem studies in the tropics.

  10. A general one-dimensional model for conduction-controlled rewetting of a surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-oriented analytical method for predicting the rewetting rate of a hot dry wall is proposed. The wall, which is modeled as a thin flat plate with internal heat generation, receives a variable heat flux from one side while it is cooled from the other side. The model accounts for the large variations of the heat transfer coefficient near the wet front and for the temperature dependence of the thermal and physical properties of the wall. The one-dimensional heat-conduction equation is solved by dividing the quenching zone into small segments of arbitrary temperature increment and constant properties and heat transfer coefficient. A trial-and-error method is developed to predict the velocity of the wet front, the length of the quenching zone and the temperature profile. The one-dimensional models of other authors can be obtained as particular cases of the present model. (Auth.)

  11. A new model for heat conduction of nanofluids based on fractal distributions of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jie; Yu Boming; Zou Mingqing; Xu Peng

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report a new model for predicting the thermal conductivity of nanofluids by taking into account the fractal distribution of nanoparticle sizes and heat convection between nanoparticles and liquids due to the Brownian motion of nanoparticles in fluids. The proposed model is expressed as a function of the average size of nanoparticles, fractal dimension, concentration of nanoparticles, temperature and properties of fluids. The model shows the reasonable dependences of the thermal conductivity on the temperature of nanofluids, nanoparticle size and concentration. The parameter c introduced in thermal boundary layer depends on fluids, but is independent of nanoparticles added in the fluids. The model predictions are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The model also reveals that there is a critical concentration of 12.6% of nanoparticles at which the contribution from heat convection due to the Brownian movement of nanoparticles reaches the maximum value, below which the contribution from heat convection decreases with the decrease in concentration and above which the contribution from heat convection decreases with the increase in concentration

  12. A prediction model for the effective thermal conductivity of mono-sized pebble beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Hongli, E-mail: hlchen1@ustc.edu.cn

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • One new method to couple the contact area with bed strain is developed. • The constant coefficient to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined. • This model is valid for various cases, and its advantages are showed obviously. - Abstract: A model is presented here to predict the effective thermal conductivity of porous medium packed with mono-sized spherical pebbles, and it is valid when pebbles’ size is far less than the characteristic length of porous medium just like the fusion pebble beds. In this model, the influences of parameters such as properties of pebble and gas materials, bed porosity, pebble size, gas flow, contact area, thermal radiation, contact resistance, etc. are all taken into account, and one method to couple the contact areas with bed strains is also developed and implemented preliminarily. Compared with available theoretical models, CFD numerical simulations and experimental data, this model is verified to be successful to forecast the bed effective thermal conductivity in various cases and its advantages are also showed obviously. Especially, the convection in pebble beds is focused on and a constant coefficient C to correlate the effect of gas flow is determined for the fully developed region of beds by numerical simulation, which is close to some experimental data.

  13. Statistical inference and comparison of stochastic models for the hydraulic conductivity at the Finnsjoen-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, S.

    1992-04-01

    The origin of this study was to find a good, or even the best, stochastic model for the hydraulic conductivity field at the Finnsjoe site. The conductivity field in question are regularized, that is upscaled. The reason for performing regularization of measurement data is primarily the need for long correlation scales. This is needed in order to model reasonably large domains that can be used when describing regional groundwater flow accurately. A theory of regularization is discussed in this report. In order to find the best model, jacknifing is employed to compare different stochastic models. The theory for this method is described. In the act of doing so we also take a look at linear predictor theory, so called kriging, and include a general discussion of stochastic functions and intrinsic random functions. The statistical inference methods for finding the models are also described, in particular regression, iterative generalized regression (IGLSE) and non-parametric variogram estimators. A large amount of results is presented for a regularization scale of 36 metre. (30 refs.) (au)

  14. 1D-Var multilayer assimilation of X-band SAR data into a detailed snowpack model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, X. V.; Ferro-Famil, L.; Gay, M.; Durand, Y.; Dumont, M.; Morin, S.; Allain, S.; D'Urso, G.; Girard, A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure and physical properties of a snowpack and their temporal evolution may be simulated using meteorological data and a snow metamorphism model. Such an approach may meet limitations related to potential divergences and accumulated errors, to a limited spatial resolution, to wind or topography-induced local modulations of the physical properties of a snow cover, etc. Exogenous data are then required in order to constrain the simulator and improve its performance over time. Synthetic-aperture radars (SARs) and, in particular, recent sensors provide reflectivity maps of snow-covered environments with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The radiometric properties of a snowpack measured at sufficiently high carrier frequencies are known to be tightly related to some of its main physical parameters, like its depth, snow grain size and density. SAR acquisitions may then be used, together with an electromagnetic backscattering model (EBM) able to simulate the reflectivity of a snowpack from a set of physical descriptors, in order to constrain a physical snowpack model. In this study, we introduce a variational data assimilation scheme coupling TerraSAR-X radiometric data into the snowpack evolution model Crocus. The physical properties of a snowpack, such as snow density and optical diameter of each layer, are simulated by Crocus, fed by the local reanalysis of meteorological data (SAFRAN) at a French Alpine location. These snowpack properties are used as inputs of an EBM based on dense media radiative transfer (DMRT) theory, which simulates the total backscattering coefficient of a dry snow medium at X and higher frequency bands. After evaluating the sensitivity of the EBM to snowpack parameters, a 1D-Var data assimilation scheme is implemented in order to minimize the discrepancies between EBM simulations and observations obtained from TerraSAR-X acquisitions by modifying the physical parameters of the Crocus-simulated snowpack. The algorithm then re

  15. A pseudogap model beyond BCS for the cuprates: The effect of order parameter symmetry, Debye frequency and band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Nunez, J.J.; Schmidt, A.A.; Beck, H.; Valera, M.

    2005-08-01

    One of the most intriguing aspects of high temperature superconductors (HTSC) is the presence of the pseudogap in the normal and the superconducting phases of the cuprate compounds. Several pseudogap models have been proposed to explain the $abnormal$ properties of the cuprates. One of the recent models relies on the assumption that the self-energy is given by Σ PG (iω n )=- E g 2 (k)G 0 (k,-iω n ) where G 0 (k,iω n is the one- particle free Green function. Going beyond this mean field model for the pseudogap we now take into account fluctuations of the pseudogap as Σ PG (iω n )=- E g 2 (k)G PG (k,-iω n ) where G PG (k,iω n is the one-particle full Green function. We study the combined effect of the band structure and the Debye frequency, ω D , on the superconducting critical temperature, T c , as a function of the number of carriers per site, n. Our conclusions are: 1) increasing the value of V/t increases the value of T c /t; 2) increasing the value of E G /t decreases the value of T c /t. By the way, one needs some critical value of V/t to have finite values of T c /t. This is the reason we have taken high values of V/ to find superconductivity; 3) decreasing the value of ω D /t decreases the value of T c /t. This is reasonable since we have less available states around the Fermi; 4) the inclusion of α', which we call the effect of the band structure, is important because it moves the center of curve of T c /t x n. The center of this curve, with respect to half-filling (n=1), is displaced to the left if α'>0.0; 5) the chemical potential is defined in the region where T c /t ≠ 0. However, in this region, it is almost identical for different values of V/t. This is due to the fact that μ is a global property; 6) our model always produces d-wave superconductivity around the Fermi level, independent whether E G (K-bar)/t is s- or d-wave symmetry. (author)

  16. Discrete Element Modeling Results of Proppant Rearrangement in the Cooke Conductivity Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl Mattson; Hai Huang; Michael Conway; Lisa O' Connell

    2014-02-01

    The study of propped fracture conductivity began in earnest with the development of the Cooke cell which later became part of the initial API standard. Subsequent developments included a patented multicell design to conduct 4 tests in a press at the same time. Other modifications have been used by various investigators. Recent studies by the Stim-Lab proppant consortium have indicated that the flow field across a Cooke proppant conductivity testing cell may not be uniform as initially believed which resulted is significantly different conductivity results. Post test analysis of low temperature metal alloy injections at the termination of proppant testing prior to the release of the applied stress suggest that higher flow is to be expected along the sides and top of the proppant pack than compared to the middle of the pack. To evaluate these experimental findings, a physics-based two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element model (DEM) was developed and applied to simulate proppant rearrangement during stress loading in the Cooke conductivity cell and the resulting porosity field. Analysis of these simulations are critical to understanding the impact of modification to the testing cell as well as understanding key proppant conductivity issues such as how these effects are manifested in proppant concentration testing results. The 2-D DEM model was constructed to represent a realistic cross section of the Cooke cell with a distribution of four material properties, three that represented the Cooke cell (steel, sandstone,square rings), and one representing the proppant. In principle, Cooke cell materials can be approximated as assemblies of independent discrete elements (particles) of various sizes and material properties that interact via cohesive interactions, repulsive forces, and frictional forces. The macroscopic behavior can then be modeled as the collective behavior of many interacting discrete elements. This DEM model is particularly suitable for modeling proppant

  17. Optical Conductivity in a Two-Dimensional Extended Hubbard Model for an Organic Dirac Electron System α-(BEDT-TTF2I3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daigo Ohki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The optical conductivity in the charge order phase is calculated in the two-dimensional extended Hubbard model describing an organic Dirac electron system α -(BEDT-TTF 2 I 3 using the mean field theory and the Nakano-Kubo formula. Because the interband excitation is characteristic in a two-dimensional Dirac electron system, a peak structure is found above the charge order gap. It is shown that the peak structure originates from the Van Hove singularities of the conduction and valence bands, where those singularities are located at a saddle point between two Dirac cones in momentum space. The frequency of the peak structure exhibits drastic change in the vicinity of the charge order transition.

  18. Conductivity and superconductivity in heavily vacant diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Jafari

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available   Motivated by the idea of impurity band superconductivity in heavily Boron doped diamond, we investigate the doping of various elements into diamond to address the question, which impurity band can offer a better DOS at the Fermi level. Surprisingly, we find that the vacancy does the best job in producing the largest DOS at the Fermi surface. To investigate the effect of disorder in Anderson localization of the resulting impurity band, we use a simple tight-binding model. Our preliminary study based on the kernel polynomial method shows that the impurity band is already localized at the concentration of 10-3. Around the vacancy concentration of 0.006 the whole spectrum of diamond becomes localized and quantum percolation takes place. Therefore to achieve conducting bands at concentrations on the scale of 5-10 percent, one needs to introduce correlations such as hopping among the vacancies .

  19. Wireless Underground Sensor Networks: Channel Modeling and Operation Analysis in the Terahertz Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Alper Akkaş

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless underground sensor networks (WUSNs are networks of sensor nodes operating below the ground surface, which are envisioned to provide real-time monitoring capabilities in the complex underground environments consisting of soil, water, oil, and other components. In this paper, we investigate the possibilities and limitations of using WUSNs for increasing the efficiency of oil recovery processes. To realize this, millimeter scale sensor nodes with antennas at the same scale should be deployed in the confined oil reservoir fractures. This necessitates the sensor nodes to be operating in the terahertz (THz range and the main challenge is establishing reliable underground communication despite the hostile environment which does not allow the direct use of most existing wireless solutions. The major problems are extremely high path loss, small communication range, and high dynamics of the electromagnetic (EM waves when penetrating through soil, sand, and water and through the very specific crude oil medium. The objective of the paper is to address these issues in order to propose a novel communication channel model considering the propagation properties of terahertz EM waves in the complex underground environment of the oil reservoirs and to investigate the feasible transmission distances between nodes for different water-crude-oil-soil-CO2 compositions.

  20. Modelling of the toroidal asymmetry of poloidal halo currents in conducting structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomphrey, N.; Bialek, J.M.; Part, W.

    1998-01-01

    During plasma disruptions, substantial toroidal and poloidal eddy currents are generated in the vacuum vessel and other plasma facing conducting structures. Eddy currents that conduct charge through paths which close through the plasma periphery are called halo currents, and these can be of substantial magnitude. Of particular concern for tokamak design and operation is the observed toroidal asymmetry of the halo current distribution: such an asymmetric distribution leads to problematic non-uniform forces on the conducting structures. The premise is adopted that the source of toroidal asymmetry is the plasma deformation resulting from the non-linear external kink instability that develops during the current quench phase of a disruption. A simple model is presented of the kinked plasma that allows an analytic calculation of the dependence of the toroidal peaking factor (TPF) on the ratio of the halo current to the total toroidal plasma current, I h /I p . Expressions for the TPF as a function of I h /I p are derived for m/n=2/1 and m/n=1/1 helical instabilities. The expressions depend on a single parameter, which measures the amplitude of the saturated state of the kink instability. A comparison with disruption data from experiments shows good agreement. Numerical experiments that simulate non-linear external kinks provide guidance on the values expected for the saturated amplitude. It is proposed that a simple plasma halo model is adequate for assessing the engineering impact of asymmetric halo currents, since the force distribution on the conducting structures depends mainly on the 'resistive distribution' of the eddy currents. A brief description is given of an electromagnetics code that calculates the time development of eddy currents in conducting structures, and the code is applied to two halo current disruption scenarios. These are used to emphasize the importance of having an accurate eddy current calculation to correctly estimate the engineering impact of